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Sample records for deciphering formation processes

  1. Deciphering the influence of the thermal processes on the early passive margins formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, Romain; Nalpas, Thierry; Ballard, Jean-François; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Chelalou, Roman; Clerc, Camille

    2015-04-01

    Many large-scale dynamic processes, from continental rifting to plate subduction, are intimately linked to metamorphic reactions. This close relation between geodynamic processes and metamorphic reactions is, in spite of appearances, yet poorly understood. For example, during extension processes, rocks will be exposed to important temperature, pressures and stress changes. Meanwhile less attention has been paid to other important aspects of the metamorphic processes. When reacting rocks expand and contract, density and volume changes will set up in the surrounding material. While several tectonic models are proposed to explain the formation of extensive basins and passive margins ( simple shear detachment mantle exhumation .... ) a single thermal model (McKenzie , 1978), as a dogma, is used to understanding and modeling the formation and evolution of sedimentary basins . This model is based on the assumption that the extension is only by pure shear and it is instantaneous. Under this approach, the sedimentary deposits occur in two stages. i) A short step , 1 to 10 Ma , controlled by tectonics. ii) A longer step , at least 50 Ma as a result of the thermal evolution of the lithosphere.
However, most stratigraphic data indicate that less thermal model can account for documented vertical movements. The study of the thermal evolution , coupled with other tectonic models , and its consequences have never been studied in detail , although the differences may be significant and it is clear that the petrological changes associated with changes in temperature conditions , influence changes reliefs.
In addition, it seems that the relationship between basin formation and thermal evolution is not always the same:
- Sometimes the temperature rise above 50 to 100 Ma tectonic extension. In the Alps, a significant rise in geothermal gradient Permo -Triassic followed by a "cold" extension , leading to the opening of the Ligurian- Piedmont ocean, from the Middle Jurassic .

  2. Deciphering site formation processes through soil micromorphology at Contrebandiers Cave, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Aldeias, Vera; Goldberg, Paul; Dibble, Harold L; El-Hajraoui, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Contrebandiers Cave preserves a Late Pleistocene sequence containing Middle Stone Age (MSA) so-called Maghrebian Mousterian and Aterian occupations, spanning from ∼126 to 95 ka (thousands of years ago), followed by spatially restricted Iberomaurusian industries. Micromorphological analyses, complemented by instrumental mineralogical identification and fabric orientation, allowed for the reconstruction of the main site formation processes at the site. Initial deposition is characterized by local reworking of marine shelly sands dating to Marine Isotopic Stage 5e (MIS5e). The subsequent stratification reveals sedimentary dynamics predominantly associated with gravity-driven inputs and contributions from weathering of the encasing bedrock, at the same time that anthropogenic sediments were being accumulated. The allochthonous components reflect soil degradation and vegetation changes around the cave during the last interglacial. Human occupations seems to be somewhat ephemeral in nature, with some stratigraphic units apparently lacking archaeological components, while in others the human-associated deposits (e.g., burned bones, charcoal, and ashes) can be substantial. Ephemeral breaks in sedimentation and/or erosion followed by stabilization are mainly discernible microscopically by the presence of phosphatic-rich laminae interpreted as short-lived surfaces, peaks of increased humidity and colonization by plants. More substantial erosion affects the uppermost Aterian layers, presumably due to localized reconfigurations of the cave's roof. The subsequent Iberomaurusian deposits are not in their primary position and are associated with well-sorted silts of aeolian origin. While the effects of chemical diagenesis are limited throughout the whole stratigraphic sequence, physical bioturbation (e.g., by wasps, rodents, and earthworms) is more pervasive and leads to localized movement of the original sedimentary particles. PMID:24650737

  3. Space Weathering of Apollo 16 Sample 62255: Lunar Rocks as Witness Plates for Deciphering Regolith Formation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Keller, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Space weathering, or alteration that occurs at the surfaces of materials exposed directly to space, has been one of the primary areas of focus of lunar studies for the past several years. It is caused by processes such as micrometeorite impacts and solar wind bombardment, and effects can include microcraters, spall zones, and vapor deposits. Much of the recent work on space weathering has been concentrated on nanoscale features, especially the amorphous rims commonly found on individual lunar soil grains. The rims typically contain nanophase Fe metal globules, which, along with Fe metal globules in agglutinates, have a profound effect on optical properties of lunar soils. The nanophase metallic iron globules cause the characteristic optical changes (reddening and darkening) found in mature lunar soils.

  4. Deciphering Dynamical Patterns of Growth Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolakowska, A.

    2009-01-01

    Large systems of statistical physics often display properties that are independent of particulars that characterize their microscopic components. Universal dynamical patterns are manifested by the presence of scaling laws, which provides a common insight into governing physics of processes as vastly diverse as, e.g., growth of geological…

  5. Deciphering the pathogenesis of tendinopathy: a three-stages process

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of "tendinopathy" is based on fragmented evidences like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. We propose a "failed healing theory" to knit these fragments together, which can explain previous observations. We also propose that albeit "overuse injury" and other insidious "micro trauma" may well be primary triggers of the process, "tendinopathy" is not an "overuse injury" per se. The typical clinical, histological and biochemical presentation relates to a localized chronic pain condition which may lead to tendon rupture, the latter attributed to mechanical weakness. Characterization of pathological "tendinotic" tissues revealed coexistence of collagenolytic injuries and an active healing process, focal hypervascularity and tissue metaplasia. These observations suggest a failed healing process as response to a triggering injury. The pathogenesis of tendinopathy can be described as a three stage process: injury, failed healing and clinical presentation. It is likely that some of these "initial injuries" heal well and we speculate that predisposing intrinsic or extrinsic factors may be involved. The injury stage involves a progressive collagenolytic tendon injury. The failed healing stage mainly refers to prolonged activation and failed resolution of the normal healing process. Finally, the matrix disturbances, increased focal vascularity and abnormal cytokine profiles contribute to the clinical presentations of chronic tendon pain or rupture. With this integrative pathogenesis theory, we can relate the known manifestations of tendinopathy and point to the "missing links". This model may guide future research on tendinopathy, until we could ultimately decipher the complete pathogenesis process and provide better treatments. PMID:21144004

  6. Deciphering the Physical Basis of Biomineralization through Investigations of Nanoscale Growth Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; Davis, K. J.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Orme, C. A.

    2001-12-01

    Microbes and higher organisms direct the formation of complex structures in controlled biomineralization. Using biologically mediated crystallization strategies that have evolved over millenia, organisms have developed the ability to produce nanophase structures as single crystals and composite materials with remarkable properties that fulfill specific functional needs. Modern organisms, as well as those found in the sediment and rock records, chronicle Nature's ability to synthesize sophisticated nanostructures. Although biomineral compositions and their morphologies are windows to interpreting environments of prosperity and decline, most current interpretations lack an understanding of fundamental processes. Hence, the physical basis of biological mineralization continues as one of Nature's best kept secrets. Recently, the biomineralization processes of marine microorganisms have emerged as particularly important owing to the use of biomineral products as paleoclimate indicators. Besides providing critical information on crystal growth history, the minor and trace elements found in these materials also behave as impurities to regulate their properties and formation rates. Using integrated approaches, we are investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of calcite growth to decipher mechanisms of biomineral formation. Our focus is to link molecular interactions with surface processes and nanoscale controls on crystal morphology. The molecular-scale structure of the crystalline interface is a critical growth determinant, especially when considering nanocrystalline phases. By combining in situ AFM studies of growth that use carefully characterized solution chemistries with molecular modeling and surface spectroscopic investigations, we couple observations of nanoscale growth mechanisms with quantitative kinetic and thermodynamic information. This approach is showing how key inorganic growth impurities, Mg2+ and Sr2+, affect mineralization through complex ion

  7. Geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic Johnnie Formation and Stirling Quartzite, southern Nopah Range, California: Deciphering the roles of climate, tectonics, and sedimentary process in reconstructing the early evolution of a rifted continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenborn, William A.

    The Neoproterozoic Stirling Quartzite and Johnnie Formation in the southern Nopah Range, southeastern California, comprise a thick sequence of predominantly siliciclastic sediment that is exposed along the Cordilleran margin. Located above the syn-rift Kingston Peak Formation, they mark the early deposits of passive margin sedimentation during the breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent. Disagreement exists between field-based observations and subsidence modeling as to whether these units represent rift or passive margin deposition. In this study, major-, trace-, and rare earth--element (REE) geochemistry, and U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology are used to determine their provenance, paleoclimatic information, and, consequently their paleotectonic setting. Geochemical and petrologic evidence confirm that Johnnie Formation mudstones and sandstones were the initial siliciclastic deposits laid along the Cordilleran Laurentian margin following the Neoproterozoic break-up of Rodinia. Johnnie Formation sediment has corrected CIA values between 63 and 83, and likely higher, which suggests moderate to intense weathering of the source. Modeling suggests the unweathered source likely possessed a composition of a 90% granodiorite + 10% high-K granite. This mixture balances petrographic observations, major element geochemistry, and the REE: (La/Sm)N = 4.19 +/- 1.26, (Gd/Yb)N = 1.34 +/- 0.38, Eu/Eu* = 0.63 +/- 0.09 and (La/Yb)N = 9.55 +/- 2.27. The hypothesis of a primary tectonic control on sediment composition (i.e. rift-basin deposition) is rejected because Johnnie Formation sediments largely lack lithic fragments that are indicative of derivation from a source area with rugged topography. Feldspars are distributed unevenly in finer grained sediments. Observed fluctuations in feldspar content of sediments from the lower to upper Johnnie Formation are attributed to increased abrasion and hydrodynamic sorting, which differentially segregated feldspars into finer grained

  8. Deciphering How Pore Formation Causes Strain-Induced Membrane Lysis of Lipid Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Goh, Haw Zan; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Knoll, Wolfgang; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-02-01

    Pore formation by membrane-active antimicrobial peptides is a classic strategy of pathogen inactivation through disruption of membrane biochemical gradients. It remains unknown why some membrane-active peptides also inhibit enveloped viruses, which do not depend on biochemical gradients. Here, we employ a label-free biosensing approach based on simultaneous quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation and ellipsometry measurements in order to investigate how a pore-forming, virucidal peptide destabilizes lipid vesicles in a surface-based experimental configuration. A key advantage of the approach is that it enables direct kinetic measurement of the surface-bound peptide-to-lipid (P:L) ratio. Comprehensive experiments involving different bulk peptide concentrations and biologically relevant membrane compositions support a unified model that membrane lysis occurs at or above a critical P:L ratio, which is at least several-fold greater than the value corresponding to the onset of pore formation. That is consistent with peptide-induced pores causing additional membrane strain that leads to lysis of highly curved membranes. Collectively, the work presents a new model that describes how peptide-induced pores may destabilize lipid membranes through a membrane strain-related lytic process, and this knowledge has important implications for the design and application of membrane-active peptides.

  9. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Approaches for Deciphering the Signaling Pathway for Tension Wood Formation in Poplar.

    PubMed

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Claverol, Stéphane; Bartholomé, Jérôme; Negroni, Luc; Richet, Nicolas; Lalanne, Céline; Bonneu, Marc; Coutand, Catherine; Plomion, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Trees adjust their growth following forced changes in orientation to re-establish a vertical position. In angiosperms, this adjustment involves the differential regulation of vascular cambial activity between the lower (opposite wood) and upper (tension wood) sides of the leaning stem. We investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to the formation of differential wood types through a quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis on poplar subjected to a gravitropic stimulus. We identified and quantified 675 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 468 phosphoproteins, and 3 763 nonphosphorylated peptides, corresponding to 1 155 proteins, in the differentiating xylem of straight-growing trees (control) and trees subjected to a gravitational stimulus during 8 weeks. About 1% of the peptides were specific to a wood type (straight, opposite, or tension wood). Proteins quantified in more than one type of wood were more numerous: a mixed linear model showed 389 phosphopeptides and 556 proteins to differ in abundance between tension wood and opposite wood. Twenty-one percent of the phosphoproteins identified here were described in their phosphorylated form for the first time. Our analyses revealed remarkable developmental molecular plasticity, with wood type-specific phosphorylation events, and highlighted the involvement of different proteins in the biosynthesis of cell wall components during the formation of the three types of wood.

  10. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Approaches for Deciphering the Signaling Pathway for Tension Wood Formation in Poplar.

    PubMed

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Claverol, Stéphane; Bartholomé, Jérôme; Negroni, Luc; Richet, Nicolas; Lalanne, Céline; Bonneu, Marc; Coutand, Catherine; Plomion, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Trees adjust their growth following forced changes in orientation to re-establish a vertical position. In angiosperms, this adjustment involves the differential regulation of vascular cambial activity between the lower (opposite wood) and upper (tension wood) sides of the leaning stem. We investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to the formation of differential wood types through a quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis on poplar subjected to a gravitropic stimulus. We identified and quantified 675 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 468 phosphoproteins, and 3 763 nonphosphorylated peptides, corresponding to 1 155 proteins, in the differentiating xylem of straight-growing trees (control) and trees subjected to a gravitational stimulus during 8 weeks. About 1% of the peptides were specific to a wood type (straight, opposite, or tension wood). Proteins quantified in more than one type of wood were more numerous: a mixed linear model showed 389 phosphopeptides and 556 proteins to differ in abundance between tension wood and opposite wood. Twenty-one percent of the phosphoproteins identified here were described in their phosphorylated form for the first time. Our analyses revealed remarkable developmental molecular plasticity, with wood type-specific phosphorylation events, and highlighted the involvement of different proteins in the biosynthesis of cell wall components during the formation of the three types of wood. PMID:26112267

  11. An interdisciplinary approach to decipher different phases of soil formation using root abundances and geochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenberg, Guido; Gocke, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Pedogenic processes are commonly thought to be restricted mainly to the uppermost few dm of soils. However, often processes like water infiltration and - more obviously - rooting lead to much deeper penetration of soil, soil parent material and, if present, paleosols. The extent to which root penetration and subsequent organic matter incorporation, release of root exudates and microbial activity influence the general chemical and physical properties of deeper soil horizons remains largely unknown. We determined the lateral extent of root-derived overprint of the soil parent material as well as the overprint of the chemical properties in paleosols by combining root quantities obtained in the field with a large variety of inorganic and organic chemical as well as microbial properties in bulk soils and rhizosphere samples. Soils, soil parent material and paleosols were sampled along a transect from The Netherlands via Germany and Hungary towards Serbia, where soil and underlying loess, sand, and paleosol profiles were excavated in pits of 2 m to 13 m depth. Root counting on horizontal levels and profile walls during field campaigns, assisted by three-dimensional X-ray microtomographic scanning of undisturbed samples, enabled the quantitative assessment of recent and ancient root systems. Ages were determined by 14C dating for the latter, and by OSL dating for sediments, respectively. The bulk elemental composition of soils, sediments and paleosols and molecular structure of organic matter therein helped to quantitatively assess the root-related overprint in different depth intervals. The results point to the significance of deep roots as a soil forming factor extending into soil parent material, as well as the overprint of geochemical proxies in paleosols due to intense root penetration at various phases after burial. The shown examples highlight potential pitfalls in assessing rooted soil and paleosol profiles and their ages, and provide potential solutions for

  12. Capturing extracellular matrix properties in vitro: Microengineering materials to decipher cell and tissue level processes

    PubMed Central

    Abdeen, Amr A; Lee, Junmin

    2016-01-01

    Rapid advances in biology have led to the establishment of new fields with tremendous translational potential including regenerative medicine and immunoengineering. One commonality to these fields is the need to extract cells for manipulation in vitro; however, results obtained in laboratory cell culture will often differ widely from observations made in vivo. To more closely emulate native cell biology in the laboratory, designer engineered environments have proved a successful methodology to decipher the properties of the extracellular matrix that govern cellular decision making. Here, we present an overview of matrix properties that affect cell behavior, strategies for recapitulating important parameters in vitro, and examples of how these properties can affect cell and tissue level processes, with emphasis on leveraging these tools for immunoengineering. PMID:27075930

  13. Prominence Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, B. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    Martens and Zwaan (ApJ v. 558 872) have proposed a prominence/ filament formation model in which differential rotation drives reconnection between two initially unconnected active regions to form helical field lines that support mass and are held down by overlying field. Using an MHD solver with adaptive refinement we simulated this process by imposing a shear flow meant to mimic differential rotation on two bipolar flux distributions meant to mimic distinct active regions. In some runs the flux systems are initially potential while in others they have been twisted by footpoint rotation to inject helicity prior to imposing the shear flow. The resulting structures are studied to understand the role of helicity in the formation of prominence-like structures.

  14. Deciphering the Role of Surface and Subsurface Processes on Solute Dynamics at the Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, T. M.; Riscassi, A. L.; Ingram, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) leakage from forested watersheds due to disturbance is a well-documented but not well- understood process that can contribute to the degradation of receiving waters through eutrophication. Several studies have shown large-scale defoliation events in small forested watersheds in the Eastern U.S. cause immediate and dramatic increases in NO3- flux to steams with large differences in recovery time. Here, we analyze water-quality and discharge data collected from the time period 1992-2004 following a large-scale gypsy moth defoliation in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Following the defoliation, groundwater NO3- concentrations declined exponentially with a distinct seasonal pattern. Initial NO3- groundwater concentrations were related to the magnitude of defoliation within each watershed. Surprisingly, no long-term trend or seasonal pattern were found for soil water NO3- concentrations, as inferred from a mixing model applied to individual storm events. By comparing decay constants associated with groundwater discharge with constants for nitrate recovery to background concentrations, we find a hydrological imprint on the recovery time. This was confirmed by performing similar analysis on data from Hubbard Brook and Coweeta, where more rapid recovery times are attributed to the distinct biogeochemical processes associated with deforestation or crown damage. Synoptic measurements of NO3- concentrations collected on eight occasions within a stream network during the period of recovery are used to fit a model designed to capture the observed spatial variability. We find that upland terrestrial processes, rather than in-stream processes, account for the greatest proportion of this variability.

  15. Deciphering seismic signatures of physical processes in dynamic complex systems: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M. A.; Perton, M.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic evaluation of well-controlled experimental simulations of volumetric sources (e.g. explosions, cavitations, burst, pressure drops) is a powerful tool for better understanding of the seismic wave field of complex systems. In this work, we describe two distinct well-constrained physical models, which under controlled laboratory conditions enable the simulation of complex systems; volcanic explosions and fluid-filled wells. For volcanic explosion simulations, several experiments were performed to study seismic signals associated with fragmentation processes of volcanic rocks by rapid decompression. These experiments were performed in a shock-tube apparatus at room temperature and a pressure range of 4 to 20 MPa. Pumice samples from Popocatepetl volcano of different porosity were studied. To investigate the elastic wave propagation inside a fluid-filled well, we present a hollow cylinder model surrounded by water, excited by a ultrasonic laser beam emitting pulses between 5 and 8 ns in duration, causing micro-cavitations. Adequate instrumentation of these mechanical systems, using high-precision sensors, enabled us to capture and to analyze seismic wave fields, characterizing also their source mechanism. Although these laboratory analogues have simplified geometries and media properties, these experimental investigations are based upon the hypothesis that, in comparable systems, any physical process (e.g. pressure drops, fragmentation, vibration, elastic deformation, etc) conducts to equivalent system responses, causing the same distinctive effects, which are independent on the scale. These effects engender particular seismic signatures, reflecting the dynamics of the process, and are comparable with numerical simulations and seismic field observations. Therefore, laboratory models can validate the inverse problem solution, indicating that the source mechanism and the system nature can both be inferred from field-based seismograms.

  16. Deciphering the photochemical mechanisms describing the UV-induced processes occurring in solvated guanine monophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavilla, Salvatore; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Conti, Irene; Rivalta, Ivan; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of water-solvated guanine monophosphate (GMP) are here characterized by means of a multireference quantum-chemical/molecular mechanics theoretical approach (CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER) in order to elucidate the main photo-processes occurring upon UV-light irradiation. The effect of the solvent and of the phosphate group on the energetics and structural features of this system are evaluated for the first time employing high-level ab initio methods and thoroughly compared to those in vacuo previously reported in the literature and to the experimental evidence to assess to which extent they influence the photoinduced mechanisms. Solvated electronic excitation energies of solvated GMP at the Franck-Condon (FC) region show a red shift for the ππ* La and Lb states, whereas the energy of the oxygen lone-pair nπ* state is blue-shifted. The main photoinduced decay route is promoted through a ring-puckering motion along the bright lowest-lying La state towards a conical intersection (CI) with the ground state, involving a very shallow stationary point along the minimum energy pathway in contrast to the barrierless profile found in gas-phase, the point being placed at the end of the minimum energy path (MEP) thus endorsing its ultrafast deactivation in accordance with time-resolved transient and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The role of the nπ* state in the solvated system is severely diminished as the crossings with the initially populated La state and also with the Lb state are placed too high energetically to partake prominently in the deactivation photo-process. The proposed mechanism present in solvated and in vacuo DNA/RNA chromophores validates the intrinsic photostability mechanism through CI-mediated non-radiative processes accompanying the bright excited-state population towards the ground state and subsequent relaxation back to the FC region.

  17. Deciphering and modeling interconnections in ecohydrology: The role of scale, thresholds and stochastic storage processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, M. S.; McDonnell, J. J.; Porporato, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Several components of ecohydrological systems are characterized by an interplay of stochastic inputs, finite capacity storage, and nonlinear, threshold-like losses, resulting in a complex partitioning of the rainfall input between the different basin scales. With the goal of more accurate predictions of rainfall partitioning and threshold effects in ecohydrology, we examine ecohydrological processes at the various scales, including canopy interception, soil storage with runoff/percolation, hillslope filling-spilling mechanisms, and the related groundwater recharge and baseflow contribution to streamflow. We apply a probabilistic approach to a hierarchical arrangement of cascading reservoirs that are representative of the components of the basin system. The analytical results of this framework help single out the key parameters controlling the partitioning of rainfall within the storage compartments of river basins. This theoretical framework is a useful learning tool for exploring the physical meaning of known thresholds in ecohydrology.

  18. What Controls the Sizes and Shapes of Volcanic Ash? Integrating Morphological, Textural and Geochemical Ash Properties to Decipher Eruptive Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash particles encompass a diverse spectrum of shapes as a consequence of differences in the magma properties and the magma ascent and eruption conditions. We show how the quantitative analysis of ash particle shapes can be a valuable tool for deciphering magma fragmentation and transport processes. Importantly, integrating morphological data with ash texture (e.g. bubble and crystal sizes) and dissolved volatile data provides valuable insights into the physical and chemical controls on the resulting ash deposit. To explore the influence of magma-water interaction (MWI) on fine ash generation, we apply this multi-component characterisation to tephra from the 2500BC Hverfjall Fires, Iceland. Here, coeval fissure vents spanned sub-aerial to shallow lacustrine environments. Differences in the size and morphology of pyroclasts thus reflect fragmentation mechanisms under different near-surface conditions. Using shape parameters sensitive to both particle roughness and internal vesicularity, we quantify the relative proportions of dense fragments, bubble shards, and vesicular grains from 2-D SEM images. We show that componentry (and particle morphology) varies as a function of grain size, and that this variation can be related back to the bubble size distribution. Although both magmatic and hydromagmatic deposits exhibit similar component assemblages, they differ in how these assemblages change with grain size. These results highlight the benefits of characterising ash deposits over a wide range of grain sizes, and caution against inferring fragmentation mechanism from a narrow grain size range. Elevated matrix glass S concentrations in hydromagmatic ash (600-1500 ppm) compared to those in magmatic ash and scoria lapilli (200-500 ppm) indicate interrupted vesiculation. In contrast to the subaerial 'dry' deposits, fragmentation during MWI likely occurred over a greater range of depths with quench rates sufficient to prevent post-fragmentation degassing. High

  19. Deciphering Resting Microglial Morphology and Process Motility from a Synaptic Prospect

    PubMed Central

    Hristovska, Ines; Pascual, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), were traditionally believed to be set into action only in case of injury or disease. Accordingly, microglia were assumed to be inactive or resting in the healthy brain. However, recent studies revealed that microglia carry out active tissue sampling in the intact brain by extending and retracting their ramified processes while periodically contacting synapses. Microglial morphology and motility as well as the frequency and duration of physical contacts with synaptic elements were found to be modulated by neuronal activity, sensory experience and neurotransmission; however findings have not been straightforward. Microglial cells are the most morphologically plastic element of the CNS. This unique feature confers them the possibility to locally sense activity, and to respond adequately by establishing synaptic contacts to regulate synaptic inputs by the secretion of signaling molecules. Indeed, microglial cells can hold new roles as critical players in maintaining brain homeostasis and regulating synaptic number, maturation and plasticity. For this reason, a better characterization of microglial cells and cues mediating neuron-to-microglia communication under physiological conditions may help advance our understanding of the microglial behavior and its regulation in the healthy brain. This review highlights recent findings on the instructive role of neuronal activity on microglial motility and microglia-synapse interactions, focusing on the main transmitters involved in this communication and including newly described communication at the tripartite synapse. PMID:26834588

  20. Dissipative processes in galaxy formation.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, J

    1993-01-01

    A galaxy commences its life in a diffuse gas cloud that evolves into a predominantly stellar aggregation. Considerable dissipation of gravitational binding energy occurs during this transition. I review here the dissipative processes that determine the critical scales of luminous galaxies and the generation of their morphology. The universal scaling relations for spirals and ellipticals are shown to be sensitive to the history of star formation. Semiphenomenological expressions are given for star-formation rates in protogalaxies and in starbursts. Implications are described for elliptical galaxy formation and for the evolution of disk galaxies. PMID:11607396

  1. The Permian Whitehill Formation (Karoo Basin, South Africa): deciphering the complexity and potential of an unconventional gas resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Annette E.

    2014-05-01

    A key energy policy objective of the South African government is to diversify its energy mix from coal which constitutes 85% of the current mix. Gas will play a key role in the future South African economy with demand coming from electricity generation and gas-to-liquids projects. A study on world shale reserves conducted by the Energy Information Agency (EIA) in 2011 concluded that there could be as much as 485 Tcf recoverable reserves of shale gas in the South African Karoo Basin. However, the true extent and commercial viability is still unknown, due to the lack of exploration drilling and modern 3D seismic. The present study compiles existing data from literature review and new data from outcrop analogue studies on the Permian Whitehill Formation, the main target formation for future shale gas production, including thickness, depth, maturity, TOC, lithologies, sedimentary and organic facies, and dolerite occurrence to provide a first reference dataset for further investigations and resource estimates.

  2. Deciphering the genetic basis of Moraxella catarrhalis complement resistance: a critical role for the disulphide bond formation system.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Stefan P W; Rademakers, Rob J A; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E; Eleveld, Marc J; Hermans, Peter W M; Bootsma, Hester J

    2014-02-01

    The complement system is an important innate defence mechanism, and the ability to resist complement-mediated killing is considered a key virulence trait of the respiratory tract pathogen M. catarrhalis. We studied the molecular basis of complement resistance by transcriptional profiling and Tn-seq, a genome-wide negative-selection screenings technology. Exposure of M. catarrhalis to human serum resulted in increased expression of 84 genes and reduced expression of 134 genes, among which genes encoding ABC transporter systems and surface proteins UspA1 and McaP. By subjecting a ∼ 15 800 transposon mutant library to serum, mutants of 53 genes were negatively selected, including the key complement-resistance factor uspA2H. Validation with directed mutants confirmed Tn-seq phenotypes of uspA2H and 11 newly identified genes, with mutants of MCR_0424, olpA, MCR_1483, and dsbB most severely attenuated. Detailed analysis showed that both components of the disulphide bond formation (DSB) system, DsbB and DsbA, were required for complement-resistance in multiple isolates, and fulfil a critical role in evasion of IgG-dependent classical pathway-mediated killing. Lipooligosaccharide (LOS) structure and membrane stability were severely affected in ΔdsbA strains, suggesting a pivotal role for the DSB system in LOS structure safeguarding and membrane stability maintenance.

  3. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  4. New evaluation scheme for two-dimensional isotope analysis to decipher biodegradation processes: application to groundwater contamination by MTBE.

    PubMed

    Zwank, Luc; Berg, Michael; Elsner, Martin; Schmidt, Torsten C; Schwarzenbach, René P; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2005-02-15

    Compound-specific analysis of stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes was used to assess the fate of the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and its major degradation product tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in a groundwater plume at an industrial disposal site. We present a novel approach to evaluate two-dimensional compound-specific isotope data with the potential to identify reaction mechanisms and to quantify the extent of biodegradation at complex field sites. Due to the widespread contaminant plume, multiple MTBE sources, the presence of numerous other organic pollutants, and the complex biogeochemical and hydrological regime atthe site, a traditional mass balance approach was not applicable. The isotopic composition of MTBE steadily changed from the source regions along the major contaminant plume (-26.4% to +40.0% (carbon); -73.1% to +60.3% (hydrogen)) indicating substantial biodegradation. Constant carbon isotopic signatures of TBA suggest the absence of TBA degradation at the site. Published carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation data for biodegradation of MTBE under oxic and anoxic conditions, respectively, were examined and used to determine both the nature and the extent of in-situ biodegradation along the plume(s). The coupled evaluation of two-dimensional compound-specific isotope data explained both carbon and hydrogen fractionation data in a consistent way and indicate anaerobic biodegradation of MTBE along the entire plume. A novel scheme to reevaluate empiric isotopic enrichment factors (epsilon) in terms of theoretically based intrinsic carbon (12k/13k) and hydrogen (1k/2k) kinetic isotope effects (KIE) is presented. Carbon and hydrogen KIE values, calculated for different potential reaction mechanisms, imply that anaerobic biodegradation of MTBE follows a SN2-type reaction mechanism. Furthermore, our data suggest that additional removal process(es) such as evaporation contributed to the overall MTBE removal along the plume, a phenomenon

  5. Processes and problems in secondary star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I.; Whitaker, R.W.; Sandford M.T. II

    1984-03-01

    Recent developments relating the conditions in molecular clouds to star formation triggered by a prior stellar generation are reviewed. Primary processes are those that lead to the formation of a first stellar generation. The secondary processes that produce stars in response to effects caused by existing stars are compared and evaluated in terms of the observational data presently available. We discuss the role of turbulence to produce clumpy cloud structures and introduce new work on colliding inter-cloud gas flows leading to non-linear inhomogeneous cloud structures in an intially smooth cloud. This clumpy morphology has important consequences for secondary formation. The triggering processes of supernovae, stellar winds, and H II regions are discussed with emphasis on the consequences for radiation driven implosion as a promising secondary star formation mechanism. Detailed two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamic calculations of radiation driven implosion are discussed. This mechanism is shown to be highly efficient in synchronizing the formation of new stars in congruent to 1-3 x 10/sup 4/ years and could account for the recent evidence for new massive star formation in several UCHII regions. It is concluded that, while no single theory adequately explains the variety of star formation observed, a uniform description of star formation is likely to involve several secondary processes. Advances in the theory of star formation will require multiple dimensional calculations of coupled processes. The important non-linear interactions include hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and magnetic fields.

  6. Scale free processes in stellar cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Nate

    2015-08-01

    I will review what is known about stellar cluster formation, focussing on scale free processes, such as how lower mass open clusters related to their giant cousins, the young massive clusters, and potentially globular cluster as well.

  7. Instabilities and structure formation in laser processing

    SciTech Connect

    Baeuerle, D.; Arenholz, E.; Arnold, N.; Heitz, J.; Kargl, P.B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper gives an overview on different types of instabilities and structure formation in various fields of laser processing. Among the examples discussed in detail are non-coherent structures observed in laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD), in laser-induced surface modifications, and in laser ablation of polymers.

  8. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  9. Oligosaccharide formation during commercial pear juice processing.

    PubMed

    Willems, Jamie L; Low, Nicholas H

    2016-08-01

    The effect of enzyme treatment and processing on the oligosaccharide profile of commercial pear juice samples was examined by high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection and capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Industrial samples representing the major stages of processing produced with various commercial enzyme preparations were studied. Through the use of commercially available standards and laboratory scale enzymatic hydrolysis of pectin, starch and xyloglucan; galacturonic acid oligomers, glucose oligomers (e.g., maltose and cellotriose) and isoprimeverose were identified as being formed during pear juice production. It was found that the majority of polysaccharide hydrolysis and oligosaccharide formation occurred during enzymatic treatment at the pear mashing stage and that the remaining processing steps had minimal impact on the carbohydrate-based chromatographic profile of pear juice. Also, all commercial enzyme preparations and conditions (time and temperature) studied produced similar carbohydrate-based chromatographic profiles. PMID:26988479

  10. Mutagen formation during commercial processing of foods.

    PubMed Central

    Krone, C A; Yeh, S M; Iwaoka, W T

    1986-01-01

    Levels of bacterial mutagenicity 3-17 times above spontaneous are generated during commercial thermal processing (canning) of foods, particularly foods high in protein. The potential for other processing operations, including pasteurization, dehydration, and concentration, to produce substances active in the Ames Salmonella assay was also examined. Two heated fish model systems, canned salmon and fried sole, were established by extracting mutagen precursors from fish tissues with water. The model system studies suggest that the limiting reactants for mutagen formation differ from one food product to another, and that Maillard type browning reactions are involved in mutagen production. Bisulfite treatment was found to inhibit mutagen formation in modal systems and whole food products. Isolation and partial characterization of the mutagens in both fried and canned pink salmon showed that at least three distinct mutagens were present. These mutagens exhibited HPLC retention time patterns on C18, cyano, and amino columns different than the major mutagens present in other cooked and grilled meats and fish. PMID:3530739

  11. Site formation processes at Zhoukoudian, China.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, P; Weiner, S; Bar-Yosef, O; Xu, Q; Liu, J

    2001-11-01

    Zhoukoudian is often cited for its human remains and the early evidence of fire. Yet, since its first excavations over 70 years ago, detailed studies of processes responsible for the accumulation of anthropogenic and geogenic sediments in the site have been sparse. This paper provides some details of site formation processes mainly through field observations of the extant section at Locality 1, and the use of soil micromorphology and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) analyses of the sediments. Samples from Layers 10 through 3 show extensive water deposition of fine silt-sized material (reworked loess), including fine-grained organic matter. The dark organic-rich unit in Layer 10--often cited as one of the earliest evidence of fire--is a water-laid accumulation. Much of the fine-grained sediment was derived from outside Locality 1, implying that the site was open to varying extents throughout most of its depositional history. The 4-6 m accumulation of "ashes" in Layer 4 represents subaerial water-laid silt deposits derived from the loess-covered hillslopes surrounding the site. They presumably accumulated in an open depression that formed after the collapse of the brecciated roof deposits represented by Layer 6. Diagenesis is present in many of the Layers, and is exemplified by calcite precipitation and dissolution, and localized apatite (dahllite) replacement of calcite. In Layer 4 diagenesis is more advanced, including calcite/dahllite precipitation, subaerial weathering of the loess and associated precipitation of hematite, alteration of clay and the neoformation of quartz. Many of our conclusions concur with those of Teilhard de Chardin & Young published over 70 years ago.

  12. Situ microbial plugging process for subterranean formations

    DOEpatents

    McInerney, Michael J.; Jenneman, Gary E.; Knapp, Roy M.; Menzie, Donald E.

    1985-12-17

    Subterranean paths of water flow are impeded or changed by the facilitation of microbial growth therein. Either indigenous bacterial growth may be stimulated with nutrients or the formation may be first seeded with bacteria or their spores which inhibit fluid flow after proliferation. These methods and bacteria are usable to alter the flow of water in a waterflooded oil formation and to impede the outflow of contaminated water.

  13. Facilitating Collaboration in Rare Genetic Disorders Through Effective Matchmaking in DECIPHER

    PubMed Central

    Chatzimichali, Eleni A.; Brent, Simon; Hutton, Benjamin; Perrett, Daniel; Wright, Caroline F.; Bevan, Andrew P.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Firth, Helen V.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT DECIPHER (https://decipher.sanger.ac.uk) is a web‐based platform for secure deposition, analysis, and sharing of plausibly pathogenic genomic variants from well‐phenotyped patients suffering from genetic disorders. DECIPHER aids clinical interpretation of these rare sequence and copy‐number variants by providing tools for variant analysis and identification of other patients exhibiting similar genotype–phenotype characteristics. DECIPHER also provides mechanisms to encourage collaboration among a global community of clinical centers and researchers, as well as exchange of information between clinicians and researchers within a consortium, to accelerate discovery and diagnosis. DECIPHER has contributed to matchmaking efforts by enabling the global clinical genetics community to identify many previously undiagnosed syndromes and new disease genes, and has facilitated the publication of over 700 peer‐reviewed scientific publications since 2004. At the time of writing, DECIPHER contains anonymized data from ∼250 registered centers on more than 51,500 patients (∼18000 patients with consent for data sharing and ∼25000 anonymized records shared privately). In this paper, we describe salient features of the platform, with special emphasis on the tools and processes that aid interpretation, sharing, and effective matchmaking with other data held in the database and that make DECIPHER an invaluable clinical and research resource. PMID:26220709

  14. Mathematical modeling of biomass fuels formation process.

    PubMed

    Gaska, Krzysztof; Wandrasz, Andrzej J

    2008-01-01

    The increasing demand for thermal and electric energy in many branches of industry and municipal management accounts for a drastic diminishing of natural resources (fossil fuels). Meanwhile, in numerous technical processes, a huge mass of wastes is produced. A segregated and converted combustible fraction of the wastes, with relatively high calorific value, may be used as a component of formed fuels. The utilization of the formed fuel components from segregated groups of waste in associated processes of co-combustion with conventional fuels causes significant savings resulting from partial replacement of fossil fuels, and reduction of environmental pollution resulting directly from the limitation of waste migration to the environment (soil, atmospheric air, surface and underground water). The realization of technological processes with the utilization of formed fuel in associated thermal systems should be qualified by technical criteria, which means that elementary processes as well as factors of sustainable development, from a global viewpoint, must not be disturbed. The utilization of post-process waste should be preceded by detailed technical, ecological and economic analyses. In order to optimize the mixing process of fuel components, a mathematical model of the forming process was created. The model is defined as a group of data structures which uniquely identify a real process and conversion of this data in algorithms based on a problem of linear programming. The paper also presents the optimization of parameters in the process of forming fuels using a modified simplex algorithm with a polynomial worktime. This model is a datum-point in the numerical modeling of real processes, allowing a precise determination of the optimal elementary composition of formed fuels components, with assumed constraints and decision variables of the task.

  15. Deciphering the Encoded Debris of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Theory and observation strongly favor the notion that asymmetric explosions drive core-collapse supernovae. Where and how this asymmetry is introduced is uncertain, in part because of limited constraints on various dynamical processes that may take place deep inside the star prior to and during core collapse. Fortunately, the debris fields of supernovae encode valuable information about these processes in their three-dimensional kinematics and chemical abundances. Accessing that information accurately, however, is not straightforward since observed properties may have multiple origins; e.g., asymmetries in both the explosion mechanism and/or turbulent stellar interior, and nonuniform circumstellar environments. I argue that the key to deciphering supernova debris fields is via end-toend investigations that connect extragalactic events with young, nearby supernova remnants. This approach has the unique ability to trace the sources of mixing and clumping at large and small scales back to the time of explosion. I will emphasize how a holistic SN-SNR methodology is necessary for the next generation of three-dimensional core-collapse simulations seeking to robustly model and interpret the gravitational wave, neutrino, and EM signatures of supernovae.

  16. Particle contamination formation in magnetron sputtering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.; Sequeda, F.; Huang, C.

    1997-07-01

    Defects caused by particulate contamination are an important concern in the fabrication of thin film products. Often, magnetron sputtering processes are used for this purpose. Particle contamination generated during thin film processing can be detected using laser light scattering, a powerful diagnostic technique which provides real-time, {ital in situ} imaging of particles {gt}0.3 {mu}m on the target, substrate, or in the plasma. Using this technique, we demonstrate that the mechanisms for particle generation, transport, and trapping during magnetron sputter deposition are different from the mechanisms reported in previously studied plasma etch processes, due to the inherent spatial nonuniformity of magnetically enhanced plasmas. During magnetron sputter deposition, one source of particle contamination is linked to portions of the sputtering target surface exposed to weaker plasma density. There, film redeposition induces filament or nodule growth. Sputter removal of these features is inhibited by the dependence of sputter yield on angle of incidence. These features enhance trapping of plasma particles, which then increases filament growth. Eventually the growths effectively {open_quotes}short-circuit{close_quotes} the sheath, causing high currents to flow through these features. This, in turn, causes mechanical failure of the growth resulting in fracture and ejection of the target contaminants into the plasma and onto the substrate. Evidence of this effect has been observed in semiconductor fabrication and storage disk manufacturing. Discovery of this mechanism in both technologies suggests it may be universal to many sputter processes. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  17. Mechanism of the process formation; podocytes vs. neurons.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoto

    2002-05-15

    In this review article we discuss the common mechanism for cellular process formation. Besides the podocyte, the mechanism of process formation, including cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction, etc., has been studied using neurons and glias as model systems. There has been an accumulation of data showing common cell biological features of the podocyte and the neuron: 1) Both cells possess long and short cell processes equipped with highly organized cytoskeletal systems; 2) Both show cytoskeletal segregation; microtubules (MTs) and intermediate filaments (IFs) in podocyte primary processes and in neurites, while actin filaments (AFs) are abundant in podocyte foot processes in neuronal synaptic regions; 3) In both cells, process formation is mechanically dependent on MTs, whose assembly is regulated by various microtubule- associated proteins (MAPs); 4) In both cells, process formation is positively regulated by PP2A, a Ser/Thr protein phosphatase; 5) In both cells, process formation is accelerated by laminin, an extracellular matrix protein. In addition, recent data from our and other laboratories have shown that podocyte processes share many features with neuronal dendrites: 1) Podocyte processes and neuronal dendrites possess MTs with mixed polarity, namely, plus-end-distal and minus-end-distal MTs coexist in these processes; 2) To establish the mixed polarity of MTs, both express CHO1/MKLP1, a kinesin-related motor protein, and when its expression is inhibited formation of both podocyte processes and neuronal dendrites is abolished; 3) The elongation of both podocyte processes and neuronal dendrites is supported by rab8-regulated basolateral-type membrane transport; 4) Both podocyte processes and neuronal dendrites express synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein, in a development-dependent manner; interestingly, in both cells, synaptopodin is localized not in the main shaft of processes but in thin short projections from the main shaft. We propose

  18. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  19. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-11-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  20. Synthetic aperture radar processing with polar formatted subapertures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-10-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses the motion of a small real antenna to synthesize a larger aperture, and thereby achieve very fine azimuth resolution. Efficient SAR image formation requires modelling the radar echo and compensating (focusing) the delay and phase for various positions in the target scene. Polar-Format processing is one successful algorithm developed to process large scenes at fine resolutions, but is still limited, especially at resolutions near a wavelength. This paper shows how using tiers of subapertures can overcome the limitations of Polar-Format processing and increase the focused scene size substantially while using only efficient vector multiplies and Fast Fourier Transforms.

  1. The formation process of flight crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginnett, Robert C.

    1987-01-01

    A study which uses Hackman's Normative Model (1986) for group effectiveness to see if there are any differences between the behaviors of effective and less effective captains at building and maintaining their crews is presented. Captains were selected using crew evaluations, creating a final pool of six effective crew managers and four captains less proficient as crew leaders. Data collection began at crew briefings, and continued through two trips, with intense data gathering during critical incidents for both task and process events. It was found that a predetermined set of interactions that can occur between crew members exists for the forming crew. It is concluded that effective captains expand the set of interactions, decreasing the limitations on how the group will work together.

  2. Evaluation as a Process: The Formative-Summative Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudle, Sharon L.

    Rather than automatically presuming explicit conditions exist when designing an evaluation to fit the summative or formative mold, evaluators should think of an evaluation design as fitting between endpoints on an evaluation process continuum. Evaluators can blend techniques from both the formative and summative evaluation, matching actual program…

  3. A Process Model of Family Formation and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Diana R.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical models of family formation have assumed sexual coupling as the foundation of family life. This article proposes instead a model of family formation predicated on the processes of taking care of one another, eating together, and sharing life together. The interpersonal dynamics that distinguish a family from other close relationships…

  4. Processing treatments for mitigating acrylamide formation in sweetpotato French fries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acrylamide formation in sweetpotato French fries (SPFF) is likely a potential health concern as there is an increasing demand for good-quality fries from carotene-rich sweetpotatoes (SP). This is the first report on acrylamide formation in SPFF as affected by processing methods. Acrylamide levels in...

  5. EFFECT OF SEPARATION PROCESSES ON THE FORMATION OF BROMINATED THMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Separation treatment processes are being investigated as a way to control the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished waters. These processes remove natural organic matter before a disinfection is applied, thus limiting the amount of material available to form D...

  6. Synthesis of Individual Transition Plans: Format and Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Mar, Kathleen; Rosenberg, Bill

    This document presents a prototype Individual Transition Plan (ITP) process and format for students receiving special education services. Following an overview of the role of transition, a section on the ITP process discusses pre-meeting activities, conducting an ITP meeting, monitoring and evaluating the ITP meeting, and a rationale for the…

  7. Analysis of the Particle Formation Process of Structured Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Alberto; Boraey, Mohammed A; Nobes, David S; Vehring, Reinhard

    2015-08-01

    The particle formation process for microparticles of cellulose acetate butyrate dried from an acetone solution was investigated experimentally and theoretically. A monodisperse droplet chain was used to produce solution microdroplets in a size range of 55-70 μm with solution concentrations of 0.37 and 10 mg/mL. As the droplets dried in a laminar air flow with a temperature of 30, 40, or 55 °C, the particle formation process was recorded by two independent optical methods. Dried particles in a size range of 10-30 μm were collected for morphology analysis, showing hollow, elongated particles whose structure was dependent on the drying gas temperature and initial solution concentration. The setup allowed comprehensive measurements of the particle formation process to be made, including the period after initial shell formation. The early particle formation process for this system was controlled by the diffusion of cellulose acetate butyrate in the liquid phase, whereas later stages of the process were dominated by shell buckling and folding. PMID:25685865

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons' formation and occurrence in processed food.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lochan; Varshney, Jay G; Agarwal, Tripti

    2016-05-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emerged as an important contaminant group in a gamut of processed food groups like dairy, nuts, herbs, beverages, meat products etc. Different cooking processes and processing techniques like roasting, barbecuing, grilling, smoking, heating, drying, baking, ohmic-infrared cooking etc. contribute towards its formation. The level of PAHs depends on factors like distance from heat source, fuel used, level of processing, cooking durations and methods, whereas processes like reuse, conching, concentration, crushing and storage enhance the amount of PAHs in some food items. This review paper provides insight into the impact of dietary intake of PAHs, its levels and formation mechanism in processed food items and possible interventions for prevention and reduction of the PAHs contamination. The gaps and future prospects have also been assessed. PMID:26776034

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons' formation and occurrence in processed food.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lochan; Varshney, Jay G; Agarwal, Tripti

    2016-05-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emerged as an important contaminant group in a gamut of processed food groups like dairy, nuts, herbs, beverages, meat products etc. Different cooking processes and processing techniques like roasting, barbecuing, grilling, smoking, heating, drying, baking, ohmic-infrared cooking etc. contribute towards its formation. The level of PAHs depends on factors like distance from heat source, fuel used, level of processing, cooking durations and methods, whereas processes like reuse, conching, concentration, crushing and storage enhance the amount of PAHs in some food items. This review paper provides insight into the impact of dietary intake of PAHs, its levels and formation mechanism in processed food items and possible interventions for prevention and reduction of the PAHs contamination. The gaps and future prospects have also been assessed.

  10. Deciphering Multistage Crystal Histories in Arc Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, R.; Turner, S.; Berlo, K.; Pearson, N.

    2005-12-01

    Discrepancy between crystal ages derived by short-lived chronometers with vastly differing half-lives is one manifestation of the potential for complex, multistage evolution of phenocrysts in arc magmatic systems. Deciphering these processes is critical for estimating realistic crystal histories and, ultimately, the physical mechanisms of differentiation. Some of the biggest chronological discrepancies are evident in the andesitic compositional range, the most ubiquitous material erupted at arcs. In some systems, such as Sangeang Api in the Sunda arc, U-Th and Ra-Th systematics of bulk plagioclase separates are not in conflict and indicate that differentiation occurred over several 1000 years via crystallization due to cooling in the lower crust. Here, 210Pb data indicate significant degassing occurred in the decade prior to eruption but post-dated phenocryst growth and magma differentiation. Combined textural and U-Th-Ra isotope approaches often, however, provide compelling evidence that plagioclase phenocrysts contain old cores and thus are zoned in both age and composition. One of the best examples of apparently conflicting time-scale information comes from Soufriere volcano on St. Vincent in the Lesser Antilles. U-Th isotopes analyses of bulk plagioclase separates conflict with whole-rock and mineral Ra-Th disequilibria and attest to non-linear growth histories, and involvement of recycled cumulates upon which renewed crystal growth has taken place. We augment this well-constrained case study with new in situ Sr isotope analyses for one of the Soufriere lavas and a cumulate xenolith erupted in 1979. Significant isotope heterogeneity is observed, and complimentary isotope variations exist between cumulate xenolith and lava plagioclase phenocryst cores, lending further support to the model of heterogeneous core-rim evolution in the Soufriere system. We conclude that mineral time scales should always be cross-examined with other textural and/or isotope techniques

  11. On possibility of diamond formations in radiation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjonova, L. F.; Bolsheva, L. N.; Grachjova, T. V.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of diamond formation in radiation processes was checked by studying diamond contents in carburanium sample. The diamonds were not found and this result is discussed. At present one possible process of formation of nanometer-size diamond crystals in some meteorites and Earth's diamonds (carbonado), the radiation mechanism, is suggested: the formation of diamonds from carbonaceous matter in tracks of U fragment fissions and heavy fragmentation due to the action of energetic particles of cosmic rays. Bjakov et. al. have carried out the calculations and shown that the volume of formed diamonds in carbonaceous chondrites by radiation processes corresponds to discovery of diamond volume in chondrites. The discovery by Ozima et. al. of the unsupported fission of Xe and Kr in carbonado supports the supposition that carbonado could be formed by radiation processes. The possibility of diamond formation in radiation processes leads to the study of diamond contents in Earth's samples enriched by uranium and carbon. The attempt to release the diamonds from carburanium was undertaken.

  12. Gypsic pedofeatures and elementary pedogenetic processes of their formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamnova, I. A.; Pankova, E. I.

    2013-12-01

    Elementary pedogenetic processes forming gypsic pedofeatures in gypsiferous soils are discussed. Several groups of such processes are distinguished: (1) weathering of gypsum-bearing rocks; (2) gypsum formation associated with weathering of sulfuric (pyritic) rocks; (3) precipitation of gypsum owing to the inflow of soil solutions saturated with Ca and SO4 and their evaporative concentration; (4) gypsum formation owing to exchange reactions in soils between calcium in the exchange complex and sodium sulfate solutions; (5) gypsum formation upon interaction of calcium carbonates with sodium sulfate water resulting in the loss of CaCO3 and gypsum accumulation (decalcification process); (6) colluvial and alluvial redeposition of gypsum in the landscape with its accumulation in the subordinate positions, where gypsiferous soils are formed; and (7) eolian deposition of gypsum on the soil surface with the formation of gypsum-bearing horizons. The micromorphological specificity of the gypsic pedofeatures reflects the processes of their destruction and/or accumulation in the soil profiles. It is shown that gypsum accumulation in soils is a pedogeochemical process that manifests itself in different natural zones upon the presence of gypsum sources.

  13. Investigation of formation mechanisms of chips in orthogonal cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, W.

    2012-08-01

    This work investigates the formation mechanisms of chips in orthogonal cutting of mild steel and the transformation conditions between various morphology chips. It is supposed that the modeling material follows the Johnson-Cook constitutive model. In orthogonal cutting process, both the plastic flow and the instability behaviors of chip materials are caused by the plane strain loadings. Therefore, the general instability behaviors of materials in plane strain state are first analyzed with linear perturbation method and a universal instability criterion is established. Based on the analytical results, the formation mechanisms of chips and the transformation conditions between continuous and serrated chips are further studied by instability phase diagram method. The results show that the chip formation strongly depends on the intensity ratios between shear and normal stresses. The ratios of dissipative rates of plastic work done by compression and shear stresses govern the transformation from continuous to serrated chips. These results are verified by the numerical simulations on the orthogonal cutting process.

  14. Reducing the potential for processing contaminant formation in cereal products.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Tanya Y; Postles, Jennifer; Halford, Nigel G

    2014-05-01

    Processing contaminants may be defined as substances that are produced in a food when it is cooked or processed, are not present or are present at much lower concentrations in the raw, unprocessed food, and are undesirable either because they have an adverse effect on product quality or because they are potentially harmful. The presence of very low levels of processing contaminants in common foods is becoming an increasingly important issue for the food industry, as developments in analytical techniques and equipment bring foods under closer and closer scrutiny. This review considers the formation of lipid oxidation products, hydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to prevent lipid oxidation and the associated risk of trans fatty acid formation. The formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction is described, as well as the genetic and agronomic approaches being taken to reduce the acrylamide-forming potential of cereal grain. The multiple routes for the formation of furan and associated chemicals, including hydroxymethylfurfuryl, are also described. The evolving regulatory and public perception situations for these processing contaminants and their implications for the cereal supply chain are discussed, emphasising the need for cereal breeders to engage with the contaminants issue. PMID:24882936

  15. Reducing the potential for processing contaminant formation in cereal products

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Tanya Y.; Postles, Jennifer; Halford, Nigel G.

    2014-01-01

    Processing contaminants may be defined as substances that are produced in a food when it is cooked or processed, are not present or are present at much lower concentrations in the raw, unprocessed food, and are undesirable either because they have an adverse effect on product quality or because they are potentially harmful. The presence of very low levels of processing contaminants in common foods is becoming an increasingly important issue for the food industry, as developments in analytical techniques and equipment bring foods under closer and closer scrutiny. This review considers the formation of lipid oxidation products, hydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to prevent lipid oxidation and the associated risk of trans fatty acid formation. The formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction is described, as well as the genetic and agronomic approaches being taken to reduce the acrylamide-forming potential of cereal grain. The multiple routes for the formation of furan and associated chemicals, including hydroxymethylfurfuryl, are also described. The evolving regulatory and public perception situations for these processing contaminants and their implications for the cereal supply chain are discussed, emphasising the need for cereal breeders to engage with the contaminants issue. PMID:24882936

  16. Processing biological literature with customizable Web services supporting interoperable formats.

    PubMed

    Rak, Rafal; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Carter, Jacob; Rowley, Andrew; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Web services have become a popular means of interconnecting solutions for processing a body of scientific literature. This has fuelled research on high-level data exchange formats suitable for a given domain and ensuring the interoperability of Web services. In this article, we focus on the biological domain and consider four interoperability formats, BioC, BioNLP, XMI and RDF, that represent domain-specific and generic representations and include well-established as well as emerging specifications. We use the formats in the context of customizable Web services created in our Web-based, text-mining workbench Argo that features an ever-growing library of elementary analytics and capabilities to build and deploy Web services straight from a convenient graphical user interface. We demonstrate a 2-fold customization of Web services: by building task-specific processing pipelines from a repository of available analytics, and by configuring services to accept and produce a combination of input and output data interchange formats. We provide qualitative evaluation of the formats as well as quantitative evaluation of automatic analytics. The latter was carried out as part of our participation in the fourth edition of the BioCreative challenge. Our analytics built into Web services for recognizing biochemical concepts in BioC collections achieved the highest combined scores out of 10 participating teams. Database URL: http://argo.nactem.ac.uk.

  17. Kinetics of Elementary Processes Relevant to Incipient Soot Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M C; Heaven, M C

    2008-04-30

    Soot formation and abatement processes are some of the most important and challenging problems in hydrocarbon combustion. The key reactions involved in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), the precursors to soot, remain elusive. Small aromatic species such as C5H5, C6H6 and their derivatives are believed to play a pivotal role in incipient soot formation. The goal of this project is to establish a kinetic database for elementary reactions relevant to soot formation in its incipient stages. In the past year, we have completed by CRDS the kinetics for the formation and decomposition of C6H5C2H2O2 in the C6H5C2H2 +O2 reaction and the formation of C10H7O2 in the C10H7 + O2 reaction by directly monitoring C6H5C2H2O2 and C10H7O2 radicals in the visible region; their mechanisms have been elucidated computationally by quantum-chemical calculations. The O + C2H5OH reaction has been studied experimentally and computationally and the OH + HNCN reaction has been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital calculation. In addition, a new pulsed slit molecular beam system has been constructed and tested for spectroscopic studies of aromatic radicals and their derivatives by the cavity ringdown technique (CRDS).

  18. Modified Polar-Format Software for Processing SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis

    2003-01-01

    HMPF is a computer program that implements a modified polar-format algorithm for processing data from spaceborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) systems. Unlike prior polar-format processing algorithms, this algorithm is based on the assumption that the radar signal wavefronts are spherical rather than planar. The algorithm provides for resampling of SAR pulse data from slant range to radial distance from the center of a reference sphere that is nominally the local Earth surface. Then, invoking the projection-slice theorem, the resampled pulse data are Fourier-transformed over radial distance, arranged in the wavenumber domain according to the acquisition geometry, resampled to a Cartesian grid, and inverse-Fourier-transformed. The result of this process is the focused SAR image. HMPF, and perhaps other programs that implement variants of the algorithm, may give better accuracy than do prior algorithms for processing strip-map SAR data from high altitudes and may give better phase preservation relative to prior polar-format algorithms for processing spotlight-mode SAR data.

  19. The formation of blobs from a pure interchange process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, P.; Sovinec, C. R.; Hegna, C. C.

    2015-02-15

    In this work, we focus on examining a pure interchange process in a shear-less slab configuration as a prototype mechanism for blob formation. We employ full magnetohydrodynamic simulations to demonstrate that the blob-like structures can emerge through the nonlinear development of a pure interchange instability originating from a pedestal-like transition region. In the early nonlinear stage, filamentary structures develop and extend in the direction of the effective gravity. The blob-like structures appear when the radially extending filaments break off and disconnect from the core plasma. The morphology and the dynamics of these filaments and blobs vary dramatically with a sensitive dependence on the dissipation mechanisms in the system and the initial perturbation. Despite the complexity in morphology and dynamics, the nature of the entire blob formation process in the shear-less slab configuration remains strictly interchange without involving any change in magnetic topology.

  20. Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are a major feature of the Earth's dynamo. Questions remain regarding the dynamical processes that give rise to reversals and the properties of the geomagnetic field during a polarity transition. A large number of paleomagnetic reversal records have been acquired during the past 50 years in order to better constrain the structure and geometry of the transitional field. In addition, over the past two decades, numerical dynamo simulations have also provided insights into the reversal mechanism. Yet despite the large paleomagnetic database, controversial interpretations of records of the transitional field persist; they result from two characteristics inherent to all reversals, both of which are detrimental to an ambiguous analysis. On the one hand, the reversal process is rapid and requires adequate temporal resolution. On the other hand, weak field intensities during a reversal can affect the fidelity of magnetic recording in sedimentary records. This paper is aimed at reviewing critically the main reversal features derived from paleomagnetic records and at analyzing some of these features in light of numerical simulations. We discuss in detail the fidelity of the signal extracted from paleomagnetic records and pay special attention to their resolution with respect to the timing and mechanisms involved in the magnetization process. Records from marine sediments dominate the database. They give rise to transitional field models that often lead to overinterpret the data. Consequently, we attempt to separate robust results (and their subsequent interpretations) from those that do not stand on a strong observational footing. Finally, we discuss new avenues that should favor progress to better characterize and understand transitional field behavior.

  1. Collisional and dynamical processes in moon and planet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The collisional and dynamical processes in moon and planet formation are discussed. A hydrodynamic code of collision calculations, the orbital element changes due to gravitational scattering, a validation of the mass shifting algorithm, a theory of rotations, and the origin of asteroids are studied. A numerical model of planet growth is discussed and a methodology to evaluate the rate at which megaregolith increases its depth as a function of total accumulate number of impacts on an initially smooth, coherent surface is described.

  2. Segment formation in Annelids: patterns, processes and evolution.

    PubMed

    Balavoine, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the origin of segmentation is a central question in the study of body plan evolution in metazoans. Annelids are the most conspicuously metameric animals as most of the trunk is formed of identical anatomical units. In this paper, I summarize the various patterns of evolution of the metameric body plan in annelids, showing the remarkable evolvability of this trait, similar to what is also found in arthropods. I then review the different modes of segment formation in the annelid tree, taking into account the various processes taking place in the life histories of these animals, including embryogenesis, post-embryonic development, regeneration and asexual reproduction. As an example of the variations that occur at the cellular and genetic level in annelid segment formation, I discuss the processes of teloblastic growth or posterior addition in key groups in the annelid tree. I propose a comprehensive definition for the teloblasts, stem cells that are responsible for sequential segment addition. There are a diversity of different mechanisms used in annelids to produce segments depending on the species, the developmental time and also the life history processes of the worm. A major goal for the future will be to reconstitute an ancestral process (or several ancestral processes) in the ancestor of the whole clade. This in turn will provide key insights in the current debate on ancestral bilaterian segmentation.

  3. Segment formation in Annelids: patterns, processes and evolution.

    PubMed

    Balavoine, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the origin of segmentation is a central question in the study of body plan evolution in metazoans. Annelids are the most conspicuously metameric animals as most of the trunk is formed of identical anatomical units. In this paper, I summarize the various patterns of evolution of the metameric body plan in annelids, showing the remarkable evolvability of this trait, similar to what is also found in arthropods. I then review the different modes of segment formation in the annelid tree, taking into account the various processes taking place in the life histories of these animals, including embryogenesis, post-embryonic development, regeneration and asexual reproduction. As an example of the variations that occur at the cellular and genetic level in annelid segment formation, I discuss the processes of teloblastic growth or posterior addition in key groups in the annelid tree. I propose a comprehensive definition for the teloblasts, stem cells that are responsible for sequential segment addition. There are a diversity of different mechanisms used in annelids to produce segments depending on the species, the developmental time and also the life history processes of the worm. A major goal for the future will be to reconstitute an ancestral process (or several ancestral processes) in the ancestor of the whole clade. This in turn will provide key insights in the current debate on ancestral bilaterian segmentation. PMID:25690963

  4. Diagnostics of Nano-Particle Formation in Process Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, Holger

    2015-09-01

    The main sources of particle generation during plasma surface processing and the formation of nano-composite materials are (i) the formation of large molecules, mesoscopic clusters and particles in the plasma bulk by chemically reactive gases, and (ii) the formation and incorporation of particles at surfaces (target, substrate) by means of plasma-wall interaction. The plasma process promotes the particle formation by excitation, dissociation and reaction of the involved species in the gas phase. The different stages of the particle growth in the gas phase can be observed by various plasma diagnostics as mass spectrometry, laser induced evaporation, photo-detachment, IR absorption, microwave cavity measurements, Mie scattering and self-excited electron resonance spectroscopy (SEERS). Common diagnostics of particle formation also use the observation and analysis of harmonics and other discharge characteristics. Especially the early stages of the particle growth are not well investigated since they are experimentally inaccessible by standard methods as mentioned above. A novel collection method based on neutral drag was tested in order to get a better insight into the early stages of particle growth. The experiments were performed in an asymmetric, capacitively coupled rf-discharge, where multiple growth cycles can be obtained. Making use of the correlation between the particle growth cycles and the bias voltage as well as the phase angle between discharge current and voltage it was possible to monitor each growth process in-situ. This allowed to collect particles at any desired stage of the growth cycle via the neutral drag method. Size distributions of the nanoparticles at the different stages of the growth cycle were determined ex-situ by transmission electron microscopy. The observed correlations of particle size and bias voltage, which can be used for prediction of the particle growth, are qualitatively explained. Furthermore, the change of the electron density

  5. [Study on bromate formation of catalytic ozonation process].

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Yang, Hong-Wei; Yang, Shao-Xia; Lü, Miao; Cheng, Wen

    2011-08-01

    In a batch reactor, the BrO3(-) formation was investigated in the ozonation and catalytic ozonation of Br(-)-containing Yellow river water, using the different heterogeneous catalysts. The results showed that BrO3(-) minimization was achieved in the catalytic ozonation with NiO, CuO, Fe3O4 and Al2O3 as catalysts and the percent reductions of BrO3(-) were 34.0%, 32.8%, 29.2% and 20.8% respectively. In the reaction R(ct), the ratio of concentration of *OH to O3, decreased with the reaction time, and the range of R(ct) was from 10(-8) to 10(-6). In the ozonation process, one of the main reaction pathways of BrO3(-) formation was the combination oxidation of Br(-) by *OH and then O3, another was the combination oxidation of Br(-) by O3 and then *OH. In the catalytic ozonation with Fe3O4 catalyst, the main pathway was the combination oxidation by *OH and then O3. Moreover, about 60.7% removal for UV254 was obtained after 20 min in the catalytic ozonation reaction. In our study, it was found that the catalytic ozonation process can effectively minimize the formation of BrO3(-) and also oxidize organic compounds. PMID:22619950

  6. Processing treatments for mitigating acrylamide formation in sweetpotato French fries.

    PubMed

    Truong, Van-Den; Pascua, Yvette T; Reynolds, Rong; Thompson, Roger L; Palazoğlu, T Koray; Mogol, Burce Atac; Gökmen, Vural

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide formation in sweetpotato French fries (SPFF) is likely a potential health concern as there is an increasing demand for good-quality fries from carotene-rich sweetpotatoes (SP). This is the first report on acrylamide formation in SPFF as affected by processing methods. Acrylamide levels in SPFF from untreated SP strips fried at 165 °C for 2, 3, and 5 min were 124.9, 255.5, and 452.0 ng/g fresh weight, which were reduced by about 7 times to 16.3, 36.9, and 58.3 ng/g, respectively, when the strips were subjected to processing that included water blanching and soaking in 0.5% sodium acid pyrophosphate before frying. An additional step of strip soaking in 0.4% calcium chloride solution before par-frying increased the calcium content from 0.2 to 0.8 mg/g and decreased the acrylamide levels to 6.3, 17.6, and 35.4 ng/g, respectively. SPFF with acrylamide level of <100 ng/g or several times lower than that of white potato French fries can be obtained by integrating processing treatments commonly used in the food industry. PMID:24328312

  7. Processing treatments for mitigating acrylamide formation in sweetpotato French fries.

    PubMed

    Truong, Van-Den; Pascua, Yvette T; Reynolds, Rong; Thompson, Roger L; Palazoğlu, T Koray; Mogol, Burce Atac; Gökmen, Vural

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide formation in sweetpotato French fries (SPFF) is likely a potential health concern as there is an increasing demand for good-quality fries from carotene-rich sweetpotatoes (SP). This is the first report on acrylamide formation in SPFF as affected by processing methods. Acrylamide levels in SPFF from untreated SP strips fried at 165 °C for 2, 3, and 5 min were 124.9, 255.5, and 452.0 ng/g fresh weight, which were reduced by about 7 times to 16.3, 36.9, and 58.3 ng/g, respectively, when the strips were subjected to processing that included water blanching and soaking in 0.5% sodium acid pyrophosphate before frying. An additional step of strip soaking in 0.4% calcium chloride solution before par-frying increased the calcium content from 0.2 to 0.8 mg/g and decreased the acrylamide levels to 6.3, 17.6, and 35.4 ng/g, respectively. SPFF with acrylamide level of <100 ng/g or several times lower than that of white potato French fries can be obtained by integrating processing treatments commonly used in the food industry.

  8. Carbon formation and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; Wright, I.G.

    1997-02-01

    The product gases generated by coal gasification systems contain high concentrations of CO and, characteristically, have relatively high carbon activities. Accordingly, carbon deposition and metal dusting can potentially degrade the operation of such gasifier systems. Therefore, the product gas compositions of eight representative gasifier systems were examined with respect to the carbon activity of the gases at temperatures ranging from 480 to 1,090 C. Phase stability calculations indicated that Fe{sub 3}C is stable only under very limited thermodynamic conditions and with certain kinetic assumptions and that FeO and Fe{sub 0.877}S tend to form instead of the carbide. As formation of Fe{sub 3}C is a necessary step in the metal dusting of steels, there are numerous gasifier environments where this type of carbon-related degradation will not occur, particularly under conditions associated with higher oxygen and sulfur activities. These calculations also indicated that the removal of H{sub 2}S by a hot-gas cleanup system may have less effect on the formation of Fe{sub 3}C in air-blown gasifier environments, where the iron oxide phase can exist and is unaffected by the removal of sulfur, than in oxygen-blown systems, where iron sulfide provides the only potential barrier to Fe{sub 3}C formation. Use of carbon- and/or low-alloy steels dictates that the process gas composition be such that Fe{sub 3}C cannot form if the potential for metal dusting is to be eliminated. Alternatively, process modifications could include the reintroduction of hydrogen sulfide, cooling the gas to perhaps as low as 400 C and/or steam injection. If higher-alloy steels are used, a hydrogen sulfide-free gas may be processed without concern about carbon deposition and metal dusting.

  9. Process and apparatus for formation of photovoltaic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Robert B.; Rocheleau, Richard E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to a process and apparatus for formation and deposition of thin films on a substrate, in a vacuum, by evaporation of the elements to form a Zn.sub.x Cd.sub.1-x S compound having a preselected fixed ratio of cadmium to zinc, characterized by the evaporation of cadmium and zinc at a rate the ratio of which is proportional to the stoichiometric ratio of those elements in the intended compound and evaporation of sulfur at a rate at least twice the combined rates of cadmium and zinc, and at least twice that required by the stoichiometry of the intended compound.

  10. PSEUDOBULGE FORMATION AS A DYNAMICAL RATHER THAN A SECULAR PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, Javiera; Mayer, Lucio; Carollo, Marcella; Madau, Piero

    2013-07-20

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the pseudobulge in 'Eris', a high-resolution N-body + smoothed particle hydrodynamic cosmological simulation that successfully reproduces a Milky-Way-like massive late-type spiral in an cold dark matter universe. At the present epoch, Eris has a virial mass M{sub vir} {approx_equal} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, a photometric stellar mass M{sub *} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, a bulge-to-total ratio B/T = 0.26, and a weak nuclear bar. We find that the bulk of the pseudobulge forms quickly at high redshift via a combination of non-axisymmetric disk instabilities and tidal interactions or mergers, both occurring on dynamical timescales, not through slow secular processes at lower redshift. Its subsequent evolution is not strictly secular either, and is closely intertwined with the evolution of the stellar bar. In fact, the structure that we recognize as a pseudobulge today evolved from a stellar bar that formed at high redshift due to tidal interactions with satellites, was destroyed by minor mergers at z {approx} 3, re-formed shortly after, and weakened again following a steady gas inflow at z {approx}< 1. The gradual dissolution of the bar ensued at z {approx} 1 and continues until the present without increasing the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner regions. In this scenario, the pseudobulge is not a separate component from the inner disk in terms of formation path; rather, it is the first step in the inside-out formation of the baryonic disk, in agreement with the fact that pseudobulges of massive spiral galaxies typically have a dominant old stellar population. If our simulations do indeed reproduce the formation mechanisms of massive spirals, then the progenitors of late-type galaxies should have strong bars and small photometric pseudobulges at high redshift.

  11. Particle Formation by Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Expansion Process

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junbo; Li, Haiting; Quan, Can

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction and expansion (SFEE) patented technology combines the advantages of both supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and rapid expansion of supercritical solution (RESS) with on-line coupling, which makes the nanoparticle formation feasible directly from matrix such as Chinese herbal medicine. Supercritical fluid extraction is a green separation technology, which has been developed for decades and widely applied in traditional Chinese medicines or natural active components. In this paper, a SFEE patented instrument was firstly built up and controlled by LABVIEW work stations. Stearic acid was used to verify the SFEE process at optimized condition; via adjusting the preexpansion pressure and temperature one can get different sizes of particles. Furthermore, stearic acid was purified during the SFEE process with HPLC-ELSD detecting device; purity of stearic acid increased by 19%, and the device can purify stearic acid. PMID:24223031

  12. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes.

  13. Using Google Reverse Image Search to Decipher Biological Images.

    PubMed

    Mamrosh, Jennifer L; Moore, David D

    2015-07-01

    Despite the range of tasks performed by biological image-processing software, current versions cannot find matches for the image in question among the huge range of biological images that exist in the literature and elsewhere on the Internet. Google's Reverse Image Search is designed for this, and it is a simple, yet powerful tool that can be applied to decipher the contents of biological images. For images that contain unfamiliar or unknown elements, for example, Reverse Image Search can identify similar features in published images. Here we describe general guidelines for using this freely available tool to search published images in National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI's) image database. These guidelines can be applied to a variety of types of biological images, including immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, to facilitate straightforward and rapid searches using Google's Reverse Image Search.

  14. Twenty years of protein interaction studies for biological function deciphering.

    PubMed

    Legrain, Pierre; Rain, Jean-Christophe

    2014-07-31

    Intensive methodological developments and technology innovation have been devoted to protein-protein interaction studies over 20years. Genetic indirect assays and sophisticated large scale biochemical analyses have jointly contributed to the elucidation of protein-protein interactions, still with a lot of drawbacks despite heavy investment in human resources and technologies. With the most recent developments in mass spectrometry and computational tools for studying protein content of complex samples, the initial goal of deciphering molecular bases of biological functions is now within reach. Here, we described the various steps of this process and gave examples of key milestones in this scientific story line. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 20years of Proteomics in memory of Viatliano Pallini. Guest Editors: Luca Bini, Juan J. Calvete, Natacha Turck, Denis Hochstrasser and Jean-Charles Sanchez.

  15. The Stratigraphic Expression of Formative Processes in Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S. M.; Covault, J. A.; Fildani, A.; Romans, B.

    2014-12-01

    The stratigraphic record of sinuous fluvial and deep sea channel deposits contains a wealth of information about formative sedimentary processes. For fluvial systems, deposits are considered in the context of processes observed in rivers, with the point bar facies model, as an example, representing a well-established linkage between process and product. A direct link has not been achieved in the deep sea as direct monitoring of coarse-grained sediment transport is challenging, exacerbated by the sporadic and infrequent nature of flows. Until a method for direct observation is developed and widely applied, the stratigraphic record of sediment transfer in the deep sea provides a critical perspective and unique insight into processes that shape not only ancient basin margin slopes, but also the present day seascape. Despite the obvious similarity in sinuous planforms of open, single thread fluvial and deep sea channels, outcrop characteristics, validated in many instances by experimental and theoretical work, indicate different processes. Meandering fluvial systems are most commonly represented by deposits that reflect point bar migration, a process whereby bank erosion and bar growth are genetically linked. At the bed scale, cross-stratification reflects bedload sediment transport and deposition by traction sedimentation. Single thread deep sea channel-fill strata are commonly characterized by sandstone-filled channelform bodies, which reflect both traction and suspension sedimentation. Heterolithic thin beds and cross-stratification can be locally preserved above channel bases and against channel margins, but the majority of depositional thickness comprises tabular sandstone turbidites that bi-directionally lap onto channel edges. The stratal record indicates a distinction between phases of channel maintenance (e.g., erosion, sediment bypass) and phases of substantial infilling with coarse-grained sediment - they are not contemporaneous. This is a key departure from

  16. Are amphitheater headed canyons indicative of a particular formative process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, A. J.; Whipple, K. X.; Johnson, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Tributary canyons with amphitheater-shaped heads have previously been interpreted as evidence for groundwater seepage erosion, particularly in environments where fluvial processes are assumed to be negligible. However, some have questioned whether this canyon morphology is truly diagnostic of a particular formative process. We seek to determine the relative roles of fluvial and groundwater-related processes and the strength of stratigraphic control on the Colorado Plateau through a combination of fieldwork and GIS analysis. Amphitheater valleys may have overhanging or steep-sided headwalls with a semicircular plan-view pattern. It is reasonable to assume that this form is a result of focused erosion at the base of the headwall (i.e. sapping). Two frequently cited agents may lead to undermining: plunge-pool scour at the base of waterfalls and seepage induced weathering and erosion where the groundwater table intersects the land surface. Both processes are enhanced where weaker, less permeable layers underlie stronger cap rock. We conducted preliminary fieldwork in two locations on the Colorado Plateau, where there are many classic examples of amphitheater headed canyons. The Escalante River landscape is highly variable with a range of canyon and valley-head forms, many of which cut through the thick Navajo Sandstone into the underlying shale and sand of the Kayenta Formation. Northeast of Escalante National Monument, at the base of the Henry Mountains, is Tarantula Mesa. The canyons there are also considerably variable, with nearly all containing at least one abrupt amphitheater knickpoint at the valley head or farther downstream. Our observations are presented here with an analysis of the canyon profiles, surrounding topography, and potential structural controls. We have found that nearly all amphitheaters in both locales show signs of groundwater seepage weathering and plausibly seepage erosion. However, many also contain plunge pools and evidence of substantial

  17. POX 186: A Dwarf Galaxy in the Process of Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Michael R.; Vacca, William D.

    2002-12-01

    We present deep U-, V-, and I-band images of the ``ultracompact'' blue dwarf galaxy POX 186 obtained with the Planetary Camera 2 of the Hubble Space Telescope. We have also obtained a near-ultraviolet spectrum of the object with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and combine this with a new ground-based optical spectrum. The images confirm the galaxy to be extremely small, with a maximum extent of only 300 pc, a luminosity of ~10-4L*, and an estimated mass of ~107 Msolar. Its morphology is highly asymmetric, with a tail of material on its western side that may be tidal in origin. The U-band image shows this tail to be part of a stream of material in which stars have recently formed. Most of the star formation in the galaxy is, however, concentrated in a central, compact (d~10-15 pc) star cluster. We estimate this cluster to have a total mass of ~105 Msolar, to be forming stars at a rate of less than 0.05 yr-1, and to have a maximum age of a few million years. The outer regions of the galaxy are significantly redder than the cluster, with V-I colors consistent with a population dominated by K and M stars. From our analysis of the optical spectrum we find the galaxy to have a metallicity Z~=0.06 Zsolar and to contain a significant amount of internal dust [E(B-V)~=0.28] both values agree with previous estimates. While these results rule out earlier speculation that POX 186 is a protogalaxy, its morphology, mass, and active star formation suggest that it represents a recent (within ~108 yr) collision between two clumps of stars of subgalactic size (~100 pc). POX 186 may thus be a very small dwarf galaxy that, dynamically speaking, is still in the process of formation. This interpretation is supported by the fact that it resides in a void, so its morphology cannot be explained as the result of an encounter with a more massive galaxy. Clumps of stars this small may represent the building blocks required by hierarchical models of galaxy formation, and these results

  18. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  19. Deciphering Transcriptional Dynamics In Vivo by Counting Nascent RNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Choubey, Sandeep; Kondev, Jane; Sanchez, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Deciphering how the regulatory DNA sequence of a gene dictates its expression in response to intra and extracellular cues is one of the leading challenges in modern genomics. The development of novel single-cell sequencing and imaging techniques, as well as a better exploitation of currently available single-molecule imaging techniques, provides an avenue to interrogate the process of transcription and its dynamics in cells by quantifying the number of RNA polymerases engaged in the transcription of a gene (or equivalently the number of nascent RNAs) at a given moment in time. In this paper, we propose that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability in the number of nascent RNAs provide a mostly unexplored method for deciphering mechanisms of transcription initiation in cells. We propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which we calculate nascent RNA copy-number fluctuations. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we test our theory against published nascent RNA data for twelve constitutively expressed yeast genes. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate limiting step, as it had been previously proposed, our single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Surprisingly, half of the genes analyzed have nearly identical rates of transcription initiation, suggesting a common mechanism. Our analytical framework can be used to extract quantitative information about dynamics of transcription from single-cell sequencing data, as well as from single-molecule imaging and electron micrographs of fixed cells, and provides the mathematical means to exploit the quantitative power of these technologies. PMID:26544860

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation through cloud processing of aromatic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herckes, P.; Hutchings, J. W.; Ervens, B.

    2010-12-01

    Field observations have shown substantial concentrations (20-5,500 ng L-1) of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in cloud droplets. The potential generation of secondary organic aerosol mass through the processing of these anthropogenic VOCs was investigated through laboratory and modeling studies. Under simulated atmospheric laboratory conditions, in idealized solutions, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) degraded quickly in the aqueous phase. The degradation process yielded less volatile products which would contribute to new aerosol mass upon cloud evaporation. However, when realistic cloud solutions containing natural organic matter were used in the experiments, the reaction rates decreased with increasing organic carbon content. Kinetic data derived from these experiments were used as input to a multiphase box model in order to evaluate the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass formation potential of cloud processing of BTEX. Model results will be presented that quantify the SOA amounts from these aqueous phase pathways. The efficiency of this multiphase SOA source will be compared to SOA yields from the same aromatics as treated in traditional SOA models that are restricted to gas phase oxidation and subsequent condensation on particles.

  1. The mineralogy and formation processes of Mars soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, Amos

    1992-01-01

    The mineralogical nature of Mars soil is far from being understood, nor are the formation time and weathering processes known. Quantitatively, the two major mineral-forming elements in Mars soil are silicon and iron, constituting 44 and 19 percent of the soils as SiO4 and Fe2O3, respectively. The silicate phases have been studied only briefly, mostly because of their limited spectral fingerprinting in the VIS and NIR. Much attention was given to the iron minerals in the soil, due to their pronounced absorption in the VIS and NIR, making them easily detectable by telescopic observations. The available information on Mars soil mineralogy, mostly obtained by remote sensing, is reviewed, and it is hypothesized that it leads to the suggestion that nanophase short-range-order (amorphous) phases of the silicates and iron oxides abound in the soil.

  2. Detailed formation processes of stable dislocations in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gun-Do; Yoon, Euijoon; He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W.; Warner, Jamie H.

    2014-11-01

    atom loss). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HRTEM images of stable dislocation formation (Fig. S1). Suggested models for possible reconstruction processes from Fig. 1a-1h (Fig. S2). The formation energy of dislocation from DFT calculation (Fig. S3). Non-annotated HRTEM images of Fig. 4 (Fig. S4). Suggested models for possible reconstruction processes from Fig. 4a-4f (Fig. S5). Non-annotated HRTEM images of Fig. 5 (Fig. S6). See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04718d

  3. Photochemical formation of oligopepides in the space processes modeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontareva, N.; Kuzicheva, E.

    The origin of life may be considered as a sequence of events, each of which adds to the molecular complexity and order. Abundance of chemical building blocks synthesized previously is a prerequisite for the beginning of the next evolutionary step. That's why the availability of chemical building blocks for peptides and nucleic acids, their formation and resistance towards destructive impacts should not be underestimated. At the number of our previous publications it was reported about the oligopeptides and nucleotides formation promoted by cosmic energy sources at the terrestrial orbit. The next important question to solve was whether mineral beds could have protected these biological important substances from the destructive action of space radiation. Minerals of extraterrestrial origin, such as lunar soil, Allende and Murchison meteorites, were tested with respect of their protective properties. UV radiation of short wavelength (the most abundant and powerful source of energy during the period of early chemical evolution) was taken as the energy supplier triggering the solid phase synthesis process. Solid films consisting out of two aminoacids (Gly + Phe) were irradiated by UV 254 in course of the experiment - free or associat ed with minerals. As the result of exposure process, both dipeptides and tripeptides of certain aminoacids were identified. Presence of inorganic beds during irradiation increased the yield of oligopeptides. For lunar soil, the yield increased by 3.8 times, while in case of meteorite beds the rate between free and associated with clay samples was 1.4. These data correlate with our previous results on VUV 145 irradiation of the same mixture (Gly + Phe), irradiation dose 2.12*106 J m-2. The same set of products was traced in both experimental cases, while the quantitative yield of products was one order of magnitude less for the case of UV254 and the relevant irradiation dosage much higher - 2.64*107 J m -2. It should be considered, that at

  4. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  5. The phenomenon of formation of prebiological compounds in volcanic processes.

    PubMed

    Markhinin, E K; Podkletnov, N E

    1977-10-01

    Organic matter has been found in the juvenile ash of seven volcanoes in Kamchatka, the Kurile Islands and Indonesia. Its amount in one eruption is of the order of 1 00 000 tons. This matter constitutes a multicomponent mixture (more than 150 components) of, mainly, high boiling (b.p. over 250 degrees C) organic compounds of a complex structure. These are represented by hydrocarbons of saturated and aromatic nature, and, among them, polycyclic hydrocarbons, amino acids, amino sugars and other heteroatomic molecules, also containing N, O, S and C1. The formation of the above mentioned organic compounds is associated with volcanic processes--with abiogenous synthesis taking place in ash-gas clouds and, possibly, in the entrails of the Earth (hydrocarbons and their heteroatomic derivatives have also been found in volcanic bombs). On the strength of these facts, volcanic phenomena are regarded as the process which serves as the starting point of the chemical evolution from the inanimate to the animate matter.

  6. DMP1 processing is essential to dentin and jaw formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Lu, Y; Chen, L; Gao, T; D'Souza, R; Feng, J Q; Qin, C

    2011-05-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), an acidic protein that is essential to the mineralization of bone and dentin, exists as proteolytically processed fragments in the mineralized tissues. In this study, we characterized the tooth and jaw phenotypes in transgenic mice containing no wild-type DMP1, but expressing a mutant DMP1 in which Asp(213), a residue at one cleavage site, was replaced by Ala(213) (named "Dmp1-KO/D213A-Tg" mice). The teeth and mandible of Dmp1-KO/D213A-Tg mice were compared with those of wild-type, Dmp1-knockout (Dmp1-KO), and Dmp1-KO mice expressing the normal Dmp1 transgene. The results showed that D213A-DMP1 was not cleaved in dentin, and the expression of D213A-DMP1 failed to rescue the defects in the dentin, cementum, and alveolar bones in the Dmp1-KO mice. These findings indicate that the proteolytic processing of DMP1 is essential to the formation and mineralization of dentin, cementum, and jaw bones.

  7. Scale-Free Processes in Galaxy Formation at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, Avishai

    2015-08-01

    Key processes of galaxy formation in the Einstein-de Sitter cosmological phase are scale free. For example, 1. The specific accretion rate into dark-matter halos, and that of baryons into the central galaxies, is mass independent and scales as a generic power-law (1+z)^{5/2}. 2. The main-sequence of star-forming galaxies is evolving self-similarly accordingly. Its confinement is determined by generic evolution of galaxies through a sequence of compaction and quenching events. 3. The evolution of the overall gas and stellar content of galaxies can be addressed via a very simple and useful bathtub toy model, which converges to a self-similar quasi-steady-state solution. 4. The spin parameter of the halos, and of the baryons in the galaxy, as built up by streams from the cosmic web, is independent of mass and cosmic time. 5. Counter-rotating streams, self-similar on all scales, may play a major role in generating compaction events and stimulating disk instability. 6. The violent disk instability in the gas-rich high-z galaxies is manifested in a scale-free mass function of clumps. 7. This instability is nonlinear, stimulated by the intense gas inflow into the galaxies, and it may involve scale-free compressive modes of turbulence. These processes are studied using toy models and cosmological simulations.

  8. Deciphering DOC export dynamics in a small catchment using high frequency monitoring and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Frei, Sven; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Peiffer, Stefan; Matzner, Egbert; Strohmeier, Stefan; Partington, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in stream water have been increasing across Northern Europe and in other parts of the world posing problems for the ecological health of aquatic systems and drinking water production from surface water. Elevated loads of DOC in reservoirs increase the costs for drinking water production and may result in the formation of toxic by-products during chlorination of the raw water. Understanding the dynamics and mechanisms of DOC export from catchments is an important prerequisite for a mitigation of these problems. Developing robust quantitative models that can replicate observed current dynamics or even predict future trends is challenging as catchments are complex systems that integrate a large number of hydrologic and biogeochemical processes to generate an integral solute flux signal at the catchment outlet. Physically based numerical process models that try to represent all possible processes and simulate the system bottom-up are often unwieldy and difficult to parameterize (e.g. equifinality). Simpler conceptual models are typically based on a set of assumptions about the functioning of the system that are often not grounded in the "reality" or complexity of a specific site and which can constrain our ability to understand the system. New sensing technologies that provide highly resolved data sets (in time and space) can open a complimentary window to look at the system in a data-driven top-down approach. Export of DOC from a small forested catchment in southern Germany is used as an example to illustrate how highly resolved concentration and discharge time series can help to decipher complex DOC export dynamics and challenge and/or support process representations and assumptions in a conceptual and a process-based numerical model for the catchment.

  9. Formation of “Tuffisitic Kimberlites” by phreatomagmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurszlaukis, Stephan; Lorenz, Volker

    2008-06-01

    The rock type "Tuffisitic Kimberlite" (TK) occurs in the deeper diatremes of some Southern African, Canadian and Siberian kimberlite pipes and has been considered a unique rock type related to a particular emplacement process. The key features of this rock type are its fragmental nature, its massive, well-mixed appearance and a specific matrix mineralogy characterized by the presence of serpentine and microlitic clinopyroxene and the absence or scarcity of carbonate. Historically, all these features were thought to be related to a highly specific intrusive-extrusive magmatic emplacement process. In this process, the expansion of magmatic volatiles drives the fluidization of a pre-existing, shallow-crustal, vertical magma reservoir (the "embryonic pipe") and its consequent evolution into the final diatreme after breakthrough to the surface. The specific matrix mineralization is explained by the dissociation of carbonate into CO 2 and CaO. While the expanding CO 2 drives the fluidization process, CaO reacts with SiO 2 released from xenolith and olivine alteration to form microlitic clinopyroxene. With the phreatomagmatic process chain we offer an alternative model that can readily explain this specific rock type. Ongoing explosions in a downward penetrating root zone excavate a pipe consisting of a rather regular, cone-shaped diatreme underlain by the irregular root zone. At this stage the pipe in its majority is infilled by warm to hot pyroclastic tephra. During thermohydraulic explosions in the root zone the expansion of water vapor homogenizes the overlying diatreme tephra and mixes it with the adjacent country-rock lithologies. This result in the massive, well-mixed volcaniclastic rock type typical for TKBs. Post-emplacement hydrothermal alteration and mineralization under epi- to mesothermal conditions are considered responsible for the observed specific matrix mineralogy. Carbonate is frequently present in coherent root zone rocks but is rare or absent due to

  10. Internal social processes of discipline formation: the case of kinanthropometry.

    PubMed

    Vangrunderbeek, Hans; Claessens, Albrecht L; Delheye, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    In 1972, the term 'kinanthropometry', derived from the Greek words 'kinein' (to move), 'anthropos' (human) and 'metrein' (to measure), was launched in the international, Francophone journal Kinanthropologie by the Canadian William Ross and the Belgians, Marcel Hebbelinck, Bart Van Gheluwe and Marie-Louise Lemmens. The authors defined this neologism as 'the scientific discipline for the study of the size, shape, proportion, scope and composition of the human being and its gross motor functions'. Presenting a theoretical framework for the analysis of the internal social processes of discipline formation - derived from the social history-of-science tradition - this article critically examines whether kinanthropometry was indeed promoted and developed by its community members as a scientific discipline. Therefore, the focus will be on its conceptualisation and positioning within the field of kinanthropology/kinesiology and on its development by a scholarly association, i.e. the International Working Group on Kinanthropometry (IWGK). The strong emphasis of the kinanthropometry community on the standardisation of measurement techniques and its practical and professional application hampered its disciplinary development. Findings of this study could serve as a basis for future 'fundamental' investigations addressing questions of disciplinary development within the field(s) of physical education, kinesiology and sport science(s).

  11. Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Fowler, Thomas David; Karanikas, John Michael

    2009-12-29

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

  12. Deciphering Antarctic Intermediate Water Variability during the PLIO-PLEISTOCENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, C.; deMenocal, P. B.; Goldstein, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) plays a fundamental role in the modern global thermohaline circulation because it is the coldwater route from the Southern Hemisphere to the North Atlantic Ocean replacing North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) (e.g. Oppo and Curry, 2012). Additionally, AAIW is also an important source water in (sub)tropical upwelling regions in the equatorial eastern Pacific and Benguela region (Kubota et al., 2014; Sarmiento et al., 2004). Deciphering AAIW variability through time is critical to understanding its role in global climate change (e.g. Santoso and England, 2004). Our study focuses on reconstructing AAIW during the warm Pliocene (~4 million years ago) and early Pleistocene. This time period marks the transition from warm Pliocene greenhouse conditions towards icehouse conditions, which most likely affected AAIW variability (Karas et al., 2011). To reconstruct changes in AAIW formation, northward extent and possible influence on (sub)tropical upwelling regions, we will use foraminiferal neodymium isotopes (ɛNd) and benthic Mg/Ca from South Atlantic Site 516 and Southwest Pacific Site 1125.

  13. Evidence of biogeochemical processes in iron duricrust formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levett, Alan; Gagen, Emma; Shuster, Jeremiah; Rintoul, Llew; Tobin, Mark; Vongsvivut, Jitraporn; Bambery, Keith; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Southam, Gordon

    2016-11-01

    Canga is a moderately hard iron-rich duricrust primarily composed of goethite as a result of the weathering of banded iron formations. Canga duricrusts lack a well-developed soil profile and consequently form an innate association with rupestrian plants that may become ferruginised, contributing to canga possessing macroscopic biological features. Examination of polished canga using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) revealed the biological textures associated with canga extended to the sub-millimetre scale in petrographic sections and polished blocks. Laminae that formed by abiotic processes and regions where goethite cements were formed in association with microorganisms were observed in canga. Biological cycling of iron within canga has resulted in two distinct forms of microbial fossilisation: permineralisation of multispecies biofilms and mineralisation of cell envelopes. Goethite permineralised biofilms frequently formed around goethite-rich kaolinite grains in close proximity to goethite bands and were composed of micrometre-scale rod-shaped, cocci and filamentous microfossils. In contrast, the cell envelopes immobilised by authigenic iron oxides were primarily of rod-shaped microorganisms, were not permineralised and occurred in pore spaces within canga. Complete mineralisation of intact rod-shaped casts and the absence of permineralisation suggested mineralised cell envelopes may represent fossilised iron-oxidising bacteria in the canga ecosystem. Replication of these iron-oxidising bacteria appeared to infill the porous regions within canga. Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy demonstrated that organic biomarkers were poorly preserved with only weak bands indicative of aliphatic methylene (CH2) associated with permineralised microbial biofilms. High resolution imaging of microbial fossils in canga that had been etched with oxalic acid supported the poor preservation of organic biomarkers within canga

  14. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.

  15. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuousmore » formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.« less

  16. Consideration of formation process for the nuclei on precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, J.; Okamoto, M.

    2003-12-01

    The very isotropic microwave background and the Hubble expansion indicate that the universe has evolved from an earlier state of high temperature and density that can be reasonably well described by Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmological models. The nuclear evolution of non-degenerate matter expanding from very high temperature was studied in detail for various values of the expansion rate and of the proton-neutron abundance difference and baryon density[1,2,3]. In this calculation, many nuclear reactions were included, and its results suggested important reaction process for the evolution of nuclear abundances. 3He and 4He are very important elements in these nuclear reactions as the primordial nucleosynthesis. Microscopic study for few body system is one main topic in nuclear theoretical physics. In this field, very accurate calculations are available by using the Faddeev equations[4]. Recently, many data for pd, p-3He and d-3He have been obtained including polarized observables. Model calculations for systems including 3He and 4He (for example, d + 3He -> p + 4He) are carried out using the Faddeev equations based on the meson exchange models[4]. This model reproduces well the empirical phase shifts which are determined by so-called phase-shift analyses using all of available scattering data measured at various laboratories around the world[5,6,7]. Constructions of models for the nuclear reactions including 3He and 4He will give important information for calculations of the primordial nucleosynthesis after big-ban. The calculations are carried out until the sum of the abundances at each mass number ceases to change. Various different set of initial conditions for the baryon mass density, the expansion rate and the neutron-proton ratio are used. Dusts kept in precursor asteroid nebular form precursor asteroid, then, formations of planet start [8]. Possible values of parameters in the initial conditions for theoretical calculations will be searched

  17. Formation and processing of organics in the early solar system.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, J F

    1999-01-01

    Until pristine samples can be returned from cometary nuclei, primitive meteorites represent our best source of information about organic chemistry in the early solar system. However, this material has been affected by secondary processing on asteroidal parent bodies which probably did not affect the material now present in cometary nuclei. Production of meteoritic organic matter apparently involved the following sequence of events: Molecule formation by a variety of reaction pathways in dense interstellar clouds; Condensation of those molecules onto refractory interstellar grains; Irradiation of organic-rich interstellar-grain mantles producing a range of molecular fragments and free radicals; Inclusion of those interstellar grains into the protosolar nebula with probable heating of at least some grain mantles during passage through the shock wave bounding the solar accretion disc; Agglomeration of residual interstellar grains and locally produced nebular condensates into asteroid-sized planetesimals; Heating of planetesimals by decay of extinct radionuclides; Melting of ice to produce liquid water within asteroidal bodies; Reaction of interstellar molecules, fragments and radicals with each other and with the aqueous environment, possibly catalysed by mineral grains; Loss of water and other volatiles to space yielding a partially hydrated lithology containing a complex suite of organic molecules; Heating of some of this organic matter to generate a kerogen-like complex; Mixing of heated and unheated material to yield the meteoritic material now observed. Properties of meteoritic organic matter believed to be consistent with this scenario include: Systematic decrease of abundance with increasing C number in homologous series of characterisable molecules; Complete structural diversity within homologous series; Predominance of branched-chain isomers; Considerable isotopic variability among characterisable molecules and within kerogen-like material; Substantial

  18. Deciphering the mystery of thalidomide teratogenicity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takumi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    Thalidomide was originally developed in 1954 as a sedative that was commonly used to ameliorate morning sickness. However, thalidomide exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy caused multiple birth defects (e.g. phocomelia and amelia), affecting ≈ 10,000 children worldwide in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Thalidomide is now recognized as a clinically effective, albeit strictly restricted, drug for the treatment of leprosy and multiple myeloma. Investigators have studied thalidomide teratogenicity for half a century, proposing over 30 hypotheses to account for its actions. Among these, the anti-angiogenesis and oxidative stress models have gained widespread support. Nonetheless, the precise molecular mechanisms and direct targets of thalidomide have not heretofore been elucidated. We developed ferrite-glycidyl methacrylate beads that enable magnetic separation and efficient purification of ligand-binding molecules; the beads were recently employed to identify cereblon as a primary target of thalidomide. Cereblon forms an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex with DDB1, Cul4A, and Roc1, which is important for the expression of fibroblast growth factor 8, an essential regulator of limb development. Expression of a drug binding-deficient mutant of cereblon suppressed thalidomide-induced effects in zebrafish and chicks. This suggests that thalidomide downregulates fibroblast growth factor 8 expression and induces limb malformation by binding to wild-type cereblon, inhibiting the function of the associated E3 ubiquitin ligase. The present review summarizes the teratogenicity of thalidomide, including existing models for its mode of action, and discusses the identification of cereblon as a key molecule for deciphering the longstanding mystery of thalidomide teratogenicity.

  19. Challenges of deciphering gastric cancer heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hudler, Petra

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer is in decline in most developed countries; however, it still accounts for a notable fraction of global mortality and morbidity related to cancer. High-throughput methods are rapidly changing our view and understanding of the molecular basis of gastric carcinogenesis. Today, it is widely accepted that the molecular complexity and heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumour, of gastric adenocarcinomas present significant obstacles in elucidating specific biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Although genome-wide sequencing and gene expression studies have revealed the intricate nature of the molecular changes that occur in tumour landscapes, the collected data and results are complex and sometimes contradictory. Several aberrant molecules have already been tested in clinical trials, although their diagnostic and prognostic utilities have not been confirmed thus far. The gold standard for the detection of sporadic gastric cancer is still the gastric endoscopy, which is considered invasive. In addition, genome-wide association studies have confirmed that genetic variations are important contributors to increased cancer risk and could participate in the initiation of malignant transformation. This hypothesis could in part explain the late onset of sporadic gastric cancers. The elaborate interplay of polymorphic low penetrance genes and lifestyle and environmental risk factors requires additional research to decipher their relative impacts on tumorigenesis. The purpose of this article is to present details of the molecular heterogeneity of sporadic gastric cancers at the DNA, RNA, and proteome levels and to discuss issues relevant to the translation of basic research data to clinically valuable tools. The focus of this work is the identification of relevant molecular changes that could be detected non-invasively. PMID:26457012

  20. Deciphering Ecohydrological Interactions Using Stable Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J.; Evaristo, J. A.; Jasechko, S.

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the nature of ecohydrological interconnections and scaling that knowledge gained at single points to watersheds is challenging. One tool that that has proved useful in this regard is stable isotope tracing. Single isotope studies have been used recently to quantify landuse change effects on streamflow source apportionment and ecological effects on transit time distributions of water at the catchment scale. However, most work to date has assumed that plant transpiration, groundwater recharge and streamflow are all sourced or mediated by the same well mixed reservoir—the soil. Recent work in Oregon and Mexico has shown evidence of ecohydrological separation, whereby different subsurface compartmentalized pools of water supply either plant transpiration fluxes or the combined fluxes of groundwater recharge and streamflow. However, these findings have not yet been widely tested. Here we assemble the first dual isotope database for δ2H and δ18O extracted from 47 globally-distributed stable isotopic datasets. We use these data to test the ecohydrological separation hypothesis. We combine this dual isotope dataset with global precipitation, streamwater, groundwater and soil water datasets. Our results show that precipitation, streamwater and groundwater from the 47 sites plot approximately along the δ2H/δ18O slope of eight, suggesting that local precipitation inputs supply streamwater and groundwater. Soil waters extracted from the 47 studies plot below the regression of local streamwater and groundwater with a slope of 6.6±0.05 ‰. Local plant xylem waters from our matched dataset plot on a slope 6.6±0.07 ‰ consistent with local soil waters. The tight association of soil water slopes and not that of local groundwater or streamflow suggests that plants use soil water that does not itself contribute to groundwater recharge or stream water. This ubiquity of subsurface water compartmentalization is surprising and has important implications for how we

  1. Challenges of deciphering gastric cancer heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Hudler, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is in decline in most developed countries; however, it still accounts for a notable fraction of global mortality and morbidity related to cancer. High-throughput methods are rapidly changing our view and understanding of the molecular basis of gastric carcinogenesis. Today, it is widely accepted that the molecular complexity and heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumour, of gastric adenocarcinomas present significant obstacles in elucidating specific biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Although genome-wide sequencing and gene expression studies have revealed the intricate nature of the molecular changes that occur in tumour landscapes, the collected data and results are complex and sometimes contradictory. Several aberrant molecules have already been tested in clinical trials, although their diagnostic and prognostic utilities have not been confirmed thus far. The gold standard for the detection of sporadic gastric cancer is still the gastric endoscopy, which is considered invasive. In addition, genome-wide association studies have confirmed that genetic variations are important contributors to increased cancer risk and could participate in the initiation of malignant transformation. This hypothesis could in part explain the late onset of sporadic gastric cancers. The elaborate interplay of polymorphic low penetrance genes and lifestyle and environmental risk factors requires additional research to decipher their relative impacts on tumorigenesis. The purpose of this article is to present details of the molecular heterogeneity of sporadic gastric cancers at the DNA, RNA, and proteome levels and to discuss issues relevant to the translation of basic research data to clinically valuable tools. The focus of this work is the identification of relevant molecular changes that could be detected non-invasively. PMID:26457012

  2. Deciphering the chronology of internal wedge deformation by means of strontium isotopes of vein carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Alfons; Dielforder, Armin; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The formation and growth of accretionary complexes is accompanied by a suite of deformation processes, ranging from early compaction of unconsolidated sediments near the trench to pervasive visco-plastic deformation of well cemented rocks beyond the down-dip limit of the seismogenic zone. Although the integrated record of previous field studies, seismic surveys and borehole data provided invaluable insights into the architecture of accretionary complexes, the relative timing and precise conditions of different deformation modes have remained largely elusive. Here we present a new approach to decipher the chronology of internal wedge deformation by means of radiogenic strontium isotopes of vein carbonates. Our study area is located within the Paleogene accretionary complex of the central European Alps, comprising a ~4 km thick sequence of Upper Cretaceous to Eocene shelf sediments and syn-orogenic turbidites. We sampled different types of mineral veins that were formed during sediment compaction, nappe stacking, nappe internal thrusting, folding, layer parallel shear, normal faulting, extensional fracturing and regional out-of-sequence thrusting. We show that the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of these veins record an evolution from initially seawater derived fluids toward diagenetic-metamorphic fluids within the accretionary complex. The combination of structural analysis and Sr isotope geochemistry allows us to resolve the relative timing of different deformation events on a resolution that cannot be assessed by field observations solely. By extending the Sr-record with quartz-calcite oxygen isotope thermometry, we further constrain the temperature range of different deformation processes and demonstrate, how internal wedge deformation differs between the aseimic and seismogenic zone.

  3. Mechanical behaviour and formation process of silkworm silk gut.

    PubMed

    Cenis, José L; Madurga, Rodrigo; Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador D; Lozano-Pérez, A Abel; Marí-Buyé, Núria; Meseguer-Olmo, Luis; Plaza, Gustavo R; Guinea, Gustavo V; Elices, Manuel; Del Pozo, Francisco; Pérez-Rigueiro, José

    2015-12-14

    High performance silk fibers were produced directly from the silk glands of silkworms (Bombyx mori) following an alternative route to natural spinning. This route is based on a traditional procedure that consists of soaking the silk glands in a vinegar solution and stretching them by hand leading to the so called silkworm guts. Here we present, to the authors' best knowledge, the first comprehensive study on the formation, properties and microstructure of silkworm gut fibers. Comparison of the tensile properties and microstructural organization of the silkworm guts with those of naturally spun fibers allows gain of a deeper insight into the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the fiber, as well as the relationship between the microstructure and properties of these materials. In this regard, it is proved that an acidic environment and subsequent application of tensile stress in the range of 1000 kPa are sufficient conditions for the formation of a silk fiber.

  4. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a checkerboard pattern staged process

    SciTech Connect

    de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre; Pingo-Almada, Monica M; Miller, David Scott

    2009-06-02

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to two or more first sections of the formation with one or more first heaters in two or more of the first sections. The provided heat may mobilize first hydrocarbons in two or more of the first sections. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons are produced through production wells located in two or more second sections of the formation. The first sections and the second sections are arranged in a checkerboard pattern. A portion of at least one of the second sections proximate at least one production well is provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second sections with one or more second heaters in the second sections to further heat the second sections.

  5. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David Scott

    2009-07-21

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

  6. Process for selectively plugging subterranean formations with a melamine resin

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, D.O.

    1984-09-25

    Highly permeable zones in a subterranean formation are selectively plugged by injecting a melamine formaldehyde solution via a well into the highly permeable zones. The solution is water soluble and preferentially enters water-containing zones where it reacts to form a resin at a temperature of from about 25/sup 0/ C. to about 120/sup 0/ C. and a pH of from about 7 to 12 and over a period of from about 1 to 4 days. The resulting resin substantially plugs the highly permeable zones in the formation.

  7. Deciphering the Minimal Algorithm for Development and Information-genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Tang, Chao; Li, Hao

    During development, cells with identical genomes acquires different fates in a highly organized manner. In order to decipher the principles underlining development, we used C.elegans as the model organism. Based on a large set of microscopy imaging, we first constructed a ``standard worm'' in silico: from the single zygotic cell to about 500 cell stage, the lineage, position, cell-cell contact and gene expression dynamics are quantified for each cell in order to investigate principles underlining these intensive data. Next, we reverse-engineered the possible gene-gene/cell-cell interaction rules that are capable of running a dynamic model recapitulating the early fate decisions during C.elegans development. we further formulized the C.elegans embryogenesis in the language of information genesis. Analysis towards data and model uncovered the global landscape of development in the cell fate space, suggested possible gene regulatory architectures and cell signaling processes, revealed diversity and robustness as the essential trade-offs in development, and demonstrated general strategies in building multicellular organisms.

  8. BATHYMETRIC IRREGULARITIES, JET FORMATION, AND SUBSEQUENT MIXING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that bathymetric contours influence and steer currents and that irregularities in bathymetry contribute to the formation of aquatic non-buoyant jets and buoyant plumes. For example, bathymetric irregularities can channel flow through canyons or accelerate flow ov...

  9. Core Formation Under Dynamic Conditions: Physical Processes and Geochemical Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmer, T.; Gaetani, G.; Jones, J. H.; Sparks, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated liquid metal segregation from a solid silicate matrix under conditions of applied stress. Liquid moves in fractures and formation of fayalitic olivine from orthopyroxene by migrating Fe-Ni-S-O liquids is observed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands

    DOEpatents

    Davies, David K.; Mondragon, III, Julius J.; Hara, Philip Scott

    2003-04-29

    A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

  11. Single molecule image formation, reconstruction and processing: introduction.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Amit; Piestun, Rafael; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2016-07-01

    The ability to image at the single molecule scale has revolutionized research in molecular biology. This feature issue presents a collection of articles that provides new insights into the fundamental limits of single molecule imaging and reports novel techniques for image formation and analysis. PMID:27409708

  12. Optically thin ice clouds in Arctic : Formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouan, C.; Girard, E.; Pelon, J.; Blanchet, J.; Wobrock, W.; Gultepe, I.; Gayet, J.; Delanoë, J.; Mioche, G.; Adam de Villiers, R.

    2010-12-01

    Arctic ice cloud formation during winter is poorly understood mainly due to lack of observations and the remoteness of this region. Their influence on Northern Hemisphere weather and climate is of paramount importance, and the modification of their properties, linked to aerosol-cloud interaction processes, needs to be better understood. Large concentration of aerosols in the Arctic during winter is associated to long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols from the mid-latitudes to the Arctic. Observations show that sulphuric acid coats most of these aerosols. Laboratory and in-situ measurements show that at cold temperature (<-30°C), acidic coating lowers the freezing point and deactivates ice nuclei (IN). Therefore, the IN concentration is reduced in these regions and there is less competition for the same available moisture. As a result, large ice crystals form in relatively small concentrations. It is hypothesized that the observed low concentration of large ice crystals in thin ice clouds is linked to the acidification of aerosols. Extensive measurements from ground-based sites and satellite remote sensing (CloudSat and CALIPSO) reveal the existence of two types of extended optically thin ice clouds (TICs) in the Arctic during the polar night and early spring. The first type (TIC-1) is seen only by the lidar, but not the radar, and is found in pristine environment whereas the second type (TIC-2) is detected by both sensors, and is associated with high concentration of aerosols, possibly anthropogenic. TIC-2 is characterized by a low concentration of ice crystals that are large enough to precipitate. To further investigate the interactions between TICs clouds and aerosols, in-situ, airborne and satellite measurements of specific cases observed during the POLARCAT and ISDAC field experiments are analyzed. These two field campaigns took place respectively over the North Slope of Alaska and Northern part of Sweden in April 2008. Analysis of cloud type can be

  13. Optically thin ice clouds in Arctic; Formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouan, Caroline; Pelon, Jacques; Girard, Eric; Blanchet, Jean-Pierre; Wobrock, Wolfram; Gayet, Jean-Franćois; Schwarzenböck, Alfons; Gultepe, Ismail; Delanoë, Julien; Mioche, Guillaume

    2010-05-01

    Arctic ice cloud formation during winter is poorly understood mainly due to lack of observations and the remoteness of this region. Yet, their influence on Northern Hemisphere weather and climate is of paramount importance, and the modification of their properties, linked to aerosol-cloud interaction processes, needs to be better understood. Large concentration of aerosols in the Arctic during winter is associated to long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols from the mid-latitudes to the Arctic. Observations show that sulphuric acid coats most of these aerosols. Laboratory and in-situ measurements show that at cold temperature (< -30°C), acidic coating lowers the freezing point and deactivates ice nuclei (IN). Therefore, the IN concentration is reduced in these regions and there is less competition for the same available moisture. As a result, large ice crystals form in relatively small concentrations. It is hypothesized that the observed low concentration of large ice crystals in thin ice clouds is linked to the acidification of aerosols. To check this, it is necessary to analyse cloud properties in the Arctic. Extensive measurements from ground-based sites and satellite remote sensing (CloudSat and CALIPSO) reveal the existence of two types of extended optically thin ice clouds (TICs) in the Arctic during the polar night and early spring. The first type (TIC-1) is seen only by the lidar, but not the radar, and is found in pristine environment whereas the second type (TIC-2) is detected by both sensors, and is associated with high concentration of aerosols, possibly anthropogenic. TIC-2 is characterized by a low concentration of ice crystals that are large enough to precipitate. To further investigate the interactions between TICs clouds and aerosols, in-situ, airborne and satellite measurements of specific cases observed during the POLARCAT and ISDAC field experiments are analyzed. These two field campaigns took place respectively over the North Slope of

  14. Process for biological material carbon-carbon bond formation

    DOEpatents

    Hollingsworth, Rawle I.; Jung, Seunho; Mindock, Carol A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for providing vicinal dimethyl long chain between alkyl groups of organic compounds is described. The process uses intact or disrupted cells of various species of bacteria, particularly Thermoanaerobacter sp., Sarcina sp. and Butyrivibrio sp. The process can be conducted in an aqueous reaction mixture at room temperatures.

  15. Process for biological material carbon-carbon bond formation

    DOEpatents

    Hollingsworth, R.I.; Jung, S.; Mindock, C.A.

    1998-12-22

    A process for providing vicinal dimethyl long chain between alkyl groups of organic compounds is described. The process uses intact or disrupted cells of various species of bacteria, particularly Thermoanaerobacter sp., Sarcina sp. and Butyrivibrio sp. The process can be conducted in an aqueous reaction mixture at room temperatures. 8 figs.

  16. The detached haze layer in Titan's mesosphere: The formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, P.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.

    2008-09-01

    , which is of the right order of magnitude to explain the detached layer. This hypothesis requires that additional material condense on the meteoritic smoke particles. Unfortunately, the main photochemical products on Titan (HCN, C2H2, C2H6, etc.) do not condense at the temperature and pressure in the detached layer. The saturation mixing ratio for species present in Titan's mesosphere are shown in Fig. 1. The vapour pressure of each species is calculated assuming the HASI vertical temperature profile [4]. The species that come closest to condensing are H2O and C6N2. There is some water vapor present from ablation of icy micrometeorites in Titan's atmosphere, but the mole fraction corresponding to saturation vapor pressure of water at 520 km is 1.6 × 10-2, many orders of magnitude larger than expected [11]. Similarly, the mole fraction of C6N2 at 520 km is expected to be much smaller than the saturation value of 5 × 10-6 [12]. Hence, the growth of particles through condensation cannot explain the detached haze layer. Advection processes in the atmosphere have been related to the formation of the Voyager detached haze layer [13]. In this picture, meridional winds transport the haze particles polewards, constraining them at a specific altitude region, before depositing them at the pole, while the upwelling part of the circulation transports large particles from the main haze layer upwards, enhancing in this way the opacity of the detached haze layer. Yet, the meridional winds are estimated to be υ~3 cm s-1 in the region of the stratospheric zonal jet near 0.1 mbar based on CIRS measurements [14]. Assuming this value to hold in the region of the detached haze layer implies a horizontal motion characteristic time of H~R/v = 108 s. A 40 nm particle has a settling velocity of υ S~1 cm s-1 at 500 km, and the characteristic time to fall 20 km is only 2 × 106 s implying that the particles fall out of the region before they are transported to the pole. Thus, the dynamical

  17. Text Processing and Formatting: Composure, Composition and Eros.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, John C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Review of computer software offering text editing/processing capabilities highlights work habits, elements of computer style and composition, buffers, the CRT, line- and screen-oriented text editors, video attributes, "swapping,""cache" memory, "disk emulators," text editing versus text processing, and UNIX operating system. Specific programs…

  18. Star formation and cosmic massive black hole formation, a universal process organized by angular momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    It is suggested that star formation is organized following the same principles as we have applied in a recent explanation of galaxy and massive black hole formation. In this scenario angular momentum is randomly distributed by tidal torquing among condensations, Lyman-{alpha} clouds or cores for star formation during the initial non-linear phase of collapse. This angular momentum is characterized by the parameter, {lambda}, the ratio of the angular momentum of the cloud to that of a Keplerian orbit with the same central mass and radius. This parameter is calculated in very many simulations of structure formation of the universe as well as core formation and appears to be universal and independent of any scale. The specific angular momentum during the collapse of every cloud is locally conserved and universally produces a near flat rotation curve M{sub formation of a flat rotation curve (protostellar) disk of mass M{sub dsk} {sup -}30 M{sub o} of radius R{sub dsk} {approx_equal} 1100 AU or 5.4 x 10{sup -3} pc. In such a disk {Sigma} {proportional_to} 1/R and reaches the RVI condition at R{sub crit} {approx_equal} 40 AU where M{sub

  19. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bagge, D; Hjelm, M; Johansen, C; Huber, I; Gram, L

    2001-05-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buffer adhered readily to stainless steel surfaces. Maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter were reached in 8 h at 25 degrees C and reflected the cell density in suspension. Numbers of adhering bacteria from a suspension containing 10(8) CFU/ml were much lower in a laminar flow system (modified Robbins device) (reaching 10(2) CFU/cm(2)) than in a batch system (reaching 10(7) CFU/cm(2)), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were not dependent on the availability of carbohydrate (lactate or glucose) or on iron starvation. The number of S. putrefaciens bacteria on the surface was partly influenced by the presence of other bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) which reduced the numbers of S. putrefaciens bacteria in the biofilm. Numbers of bacteria on the surface must be quantified to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on adhesion and biofilm formation. We used a combination of fluorescence microscopy (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and in situ hybridization, for mixed-culture studies), ultrasonic removal of bacteria from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces. PMID:11319118

  20. Vetting and Letting: Cohabiting Stepfamily Formation Processes in Low-Income Black Families

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Megan; Golub, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined cohabiting union formation processes by analyzing in-depth interview data collected from 30 individuals in cohabiting relationships: 15 low-income Black mothers of adolescents and their partners. Prior research suggests that cohabiting union formation is a gradual, nondeliberative process. In contrast, most couples in this study described a gradual but highly deliberative process. Mothers focused primarily on vetting their partners to ensure child well-being and less on when and how their partners officially came to live with them, a process the authors call vetting and letting. Mothers delineated 4 strategies to ensure their child’s well-being when vetting their partners, and their partners reported that they understood the importance of participating in this process. The authors argue that vetting and letting is a child-centered family formation process, not a partner-centered union formation process, and that cohabiting union processes may vary substantially by subpopulation. PMID:26556922

  1. Transition and separation process in brine channels formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Alessia; Bochicchio, Ivana; Fabrizio, Mauro

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the formation of brine channels in sea ice. The model includes a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation for the solid-liquid phase change, a diffusion equation of the Cahn-Hilliard kind for the solute dynamics, and the heat equation for the temperature change. The macroscopic motion of the fluid is also considered, so the resulting differential system couples with the Navier-Stokes equation. The compatibility of this system with the thermodynamic laws and a maximum theorem is proved.

  2. Core Formation Process and Light Elements in the Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Sakairi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    Si, O, and S are major candidates for light elements in the planetary core. In the early stage of the planetary formation, the core formation started by percolation of the metallic liquid though silicate matrix because Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si eutectic temperatures are significantly lower than the solidus of the silicates. Therefore, in the early stage of accretion of the planets, the eutectic liquid with S enrichment was formed and separated into the core by percolation. The major light element in the core at this stage will be sulfur. The internal pressure and temperature increased with the growth of the planets, and the metal component depleted in S was molten. The metallic melt contained both Si and O at high pressure in the deep magma ocean in the later stage. Thus, the core contains S, Si, and O in this stage of core formation. Partitioning experiments between solid and liquid metals indicate that S is partitioned into the liquid metal, whereas O is weakly into the liquid. Partitioning of Si changes with the metallic iron phases, i.e., fcc iron-alloy coexisting with the metallic liquid below 30 GPa is depleted in Si. Whereas hcp-Fe alloy above 30 GPa coexisting with the liquid favors Si. This contrast of Si partitioning provides remarkable difference in compositions of the solid inner core and liquid outer core among different terrestrial planets. Our melting experiments of the Fe-S-Si and Fe-O-S systems at high pressure indicate the core-adiabats in small planets, Mercury and Mars, are greater than the slope of the solidus and liquidus curves of these systems. Thus, in these planets, the core crystallized at the top of the liquid core and 'snowing core' formation occurred during crystallization. The solid inner core is depleted in both Si and S whereas the liquid outer core is relatively enriched in Si and S in these planets. On the other hand, the core adiabats in large planets, Earth and Venus, are smaller than the solidus and liquidus curves of the systems. The

  3. Process for recovering hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon-bearing formation

    SciTech Connect

    Alston, R.B.; Braden, W.B.; Flournoy, K.H.

    1980-03-11

    A method is described for transporting heavy crude oil through a pipeline which involves introducing into a pipeline or well-bore with the viscous hydrocarbons an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) coupling agent whereby there is spontaneously formed a low viscosity, salt tolerant, oil-in-water emulsion. Also disclosed is a method of recovery of hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon bearing formation employing an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) a coupling agent.

  4. Film formation from monodisperse acrylic lattices 2. Influence of drying temperature on the film formation process.

    PubMed

    te Nijenhuis, Klaas; Zohrehvand, Shiva

    2005-04-01

    The influence of drying temperature on the properties of latex films was investigated by gravimetry, turbidimetry (i.e., analysis of transmission spectra and interference), atomic force microscopy and measurement of water vapor permeability. Several pitfalls in the determination of water content of dried films that absorb water after being submerged in it have been proposed, such as fading boundaries, remaining water after drying and change of particle sizes. At moderately higher temperatures film formation is improved. This improvement follows from the formation of smoother film surfaces (AFM), lower water vapor permeabilities and smaller values for delta lambda(min). On the other hand, defects as cracks and channels also are created, especially at high temperatures. It appears, however, that these channels do not run from the one surface of a film to the other.

  5. Effect of channel plane form on formation process of Sandbars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Gen; Yasuda, Hiroyasu

    Almost no explanation is given about development process of sand bar in non-straighten channel because the phenomenon of sand bar has been investigated using straighten channel. This study conducted a numerical experiment of development process of sand bar in a meandering channel and a figure-of-eight(gourd) as fixed wall. The results shows that the development process clearly differs in channel of straighten, meandering and figure-of-eight(gourd). The result of figure-of-eight(gourd) doesn't occur mode degradation and keep multiple bars.

  6. Formative Assessment: A Systematic and Artistic Process of Instruction for Supporting School and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Formative assessment is a potentially powerful instructional process because the practice of sharing assessment information that supports learning is embedded into the instructional process by design. If the potential of formative assessment is to be realized, it must transform from a collection of abstract theories and research methodologies and…

  7. Nanostructures formation in ferroelectrics in the process of phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishchuk, V.; Spiridonov, N.; Sobolev, V.

    2014-11-01

    Inhomogeneous states caused by the coexistence of the ferroelectric (FE) and antiferroelectric (AFE) phases in lead-zirconate-titanate based solid solutions have been investigated. It has been found that the domains of the FE and AFE phases with sizes of the order of 20 nm to 30 nm coexist in the bulk of the samples due to a small difference in the free energies of these phases. The coherent character of the interphase boundaries (IPBs) leads to the concentration of the elastic stresses along these boundaries. These elastic stresses cause the local decomposition of the solid solution and formation of segregates near the IPBS due to the condition that equivalent positions of the crystal lattice are occupied by the ions with different sizes. The sizes of the segregates formed in this way are of the order 8 nm to 15 nm. Some physical effects caused by the presence of these segregate nanostructures are analyzed and discussed.

  8. Colloidal crystal formation: nano-dewetting and the assembly process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, Frank; Muldarisnur, Mulda

    2016-04-01

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles is a promising approach for fabrication of three-dimensional periodic structures which are especially interesting for photonic crystals. This approach is simple and cheap, but it still suffers under the existence of many intrinsic defects. The efforts to improve the self-assembly process have led to many deposition methods with a different degree of controllability. One of the best fabrication techniques is the capillary deposition method leading to non-scattered photon propagation in the order of 80 μm. To improve understanding of the selfassembly process we investigate the stages of the process separately. The most important stage is likely the deposition of suspended particles into a dense arrangement forming a crystal. This is studied spectroscopically. Another crucial stage is the drying of colloidal crystal which is connected with a continuous shrinkage process. Several minutes after starting the drying, a surprise occurs: The system expands shortly before it shrinks monotonously until reaching its final state after about one day. We called this "v"-event because of the characteristic shape of the curve for the Bragg peak. The event is assigned to the start of a nano-dewetting process occurring at the colloidal particles.

  9. Chondritic Meteorites: Nebular and Parent-Body Formation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1997-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites are the products of condensation, agglomeration and accretion of material in the solar nebula; these objects are the best sources of information regarding processes occurring during the early history of the solar system. We obtain large amounts of high-quality chemical and petrographic data and use them to infer chemical fractionation processes that occurred in the solar nebula and on meteorite parent bodies during thermal metamorphism, shock metamorphism and aqueous alteration. We compare diverse groups of chondrites and model their different properties in terms of processes that differed at different nebular locations or on different parent-bodies. In order to expand our set of geochemically important elements (particularly Si, C, P and S) and to distinguish the different oxidation states of Fe, Greg Kallemeyn spent three months (1 Sept. - 30 Nov. 1995) at the Smithsonian Institution to learn Eugene Jarosewich's wet chemical techniques. Key specimens from the recently established CK, CR and R chondrite groups were analyzed.

  10. Chondritic Meteorites: Nebular and Parent-Body Formation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is important to identify features in chondrites that formed as a result of parent-body modification in order to disentangle nebular and asteroidal processes. However, this task is difficult because unmetamorphosed chondritic meteorites are mixtures of diverse components including various types of chondrules, chondrule fragments, refractory and mafic inclusions, metal-sulfide grains and fine-grained matrix material. Shocked chondrites can contain melt pockets, silicate-darkened material, metal veins, silicate melt veins, and impact-melt-rock clasts. This grant paid for several studies that went far in helping to distinguish primitive nebular features from those produced during asteroidal modification processes.

  11. Models of formation and some algorithms of hyperspectral image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achmetov, R. N.; Stratilatov, N. R.; Yudakov, A. A.; Vezenov, V. I.; Eremeev, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Algorithms and information technologies for processing Earth hyperspectral imagery are presented. Several new approaches are discussed. Peculiar properties of processing the hyperspectral imagery, such as multifold signal-to-noise reduction, atmospheric distortions, access to spectral characteristics of every image point, and high dimensionality of data, were studied. Different measures of similarity between individual hyperspectral image points and the effect of additive uncorrelated noise on these measures were analyzed. It was shown that these measures are substantially affected by noise, and a new measure free of this disadvantage was proposed. The problem of detecting the observed scene object boundaries, based on comparing the spectral characteristics of image points, is considered. It was shown that contours are processed much better when spectral characteristics are used instead of energy brightness. A statistical approach to the correction of atmospheric distortions, which makes it possible to solve the stated problem based on analysis of a distorted image in contrast to analytical multiparametric models, was proposed. Several algorithms used to integrate spectral zonal images with data from other survey systems, which make it possible to image observed scene objects with a higher quality, are considered. Quality characteristics of hyperspectral data processing were proposed and studied.

  12. Thermoplastic processing of proteins for film formation--a review.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Izquierdo, V M; Krochta, J M

    2008-03-01

    Increasing interest in high-quality food products with increased shelf life and reduced environmental impact has encouraged the study and development of edible and/or biodegradable polymer films and coatings. Edible films provide the opportunity to effectively control mass transfer among different components in a food or between the food and its surrounding environment. The diversity of proteins that results from an almost limitless number of side-chain amino-acid sequential arrangements allows for a wide range of interactions and chemical reactions to take place as proteins denature and cross-link during heat processing. Proteins such as wheat gluten, corn zein, soy protein, myofibrillar proteins, and whey proteins have been successfully formed into films using thermoplastic processes such as compression molding and extrusion. Thermoplastic processing can result in a highly efficient manufacturing method with commercial potential for large-scale production of edible films due to the low moisture levels, high temperatures, and short times used. Addition of water, glycerol, sorbitol, sucrose, and other plasticizers allows the proteins to undergo the glass transition and facilitates deformation and processability without thermal degradation. Target film variables, important in predicting biopackage performance under various conditions, include mechanical, thermal, barrier, and microstructural properties. Comparisons of film properties should be made with care since results depend on parameters such as film-forming materials, film formulation, fabrication method, operating conditions, testing equipment, and testing conditions. Film applications include their use as wraps, pouches, bags, casings, and sachets to protect foods, reduce waste, and improve package recyclability.

  13. Radical formation, chemical processing, and explosion of interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The ultraviolet radiation in interstellar space is shown to create a sufficient steady-state density of free radicals in the grain mantle material consisting of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen to satisfy the critical condition for initiation of chain reactions. The criterion for minimum critical particle size for maintaining the chain reaction is of the order of the larger grain sizes in a distribution satisfying the average extinction and polarization measures. The triggering of the explosion of interstellar grains leading to the ejection of complex interstellar molecules is shown to be most probable where the grains are largest and where radiation is suddenly introduced; i.e., in regions of new star formation. Similar conditions prevail at the boundaries between very dark clouds and H II regions. When the energy released by the chemical activity of the free radicals is inadequate to explode the grain, the resulting mantle material must consist of extremely large organic molecules which are much more resistant to the hostile environment of H II regions than the classical dirty-ice mantles made up of water, methane, and ammonia.

  14. Formative Processes Governing Ross Sea Polynya Areal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Of the 17 million km^2 of sea ice in the Southern Ocean, ~10% is generated through coastal polynyal systems. The largest and greatest contributor to sea ice formation in the Antarctic is the Ross Sea Polynya which exists in a region where sea ice trends are positive and significant. Understanding polynya areal dynamics and the contributing physical factors will give further insight into the future of Ross Sea ice production. Previous studies have established coastal winds and surface temperatures as key contributors to the development and maintenance of coastal polynyas. However, much that is understood is based on physically sound inference. While the influence of these variables have been studied separately, their concerted roles have not been quantified, neither has any indication of their variation with time been established. Automatic weather station data produced by the Antarctic Automatic Weather Station Program was acquired from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and polynya area data was produced through the application of the Polynya Signature Simulation Method onto Special Sensor Microwave Imager input acquired from the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Wind speed, wind direction, sea surface temperature, near surface air temperature, oceanic temperature, and tidal fluctuations are examined as physically significant contributors to polynya areal variability and are considered in a multivariate regression model at a 95% confidence level. This study quantifies the degree to which each variable contributes to Ross Sea Polynya areal dynamics, and determines how their influences vary seasonally and in the long term.

  15. Formation and Degradation of Beta-casomorphins in Dairy Processing.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Doan; Johnson, Stuart Keith; Busetti, Francesco; Solah, Vicky Ann

    2015-01-01

    Milk proteins including casein are sources of peptides with bioactivity. One of these peptides is beta-casomorphin (BCM) which belongs to a group of opioid peptides formed from β-casein variants. Beta-casomorphin 7 (BCM7) has been demonstrated to be enzymatically released from the A1 or B β-casein variant. Epidemiological evidence suggests the peptide BCM 7 is a risk factor for development of human diseases, including increased risk of type 1 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases but this has not been thoroughly substantiated by research studies. High performance liquid chromatography coupled to UV-Vis and mass spectrometry detection as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been used to analyze BCMs in dairy products. BCMs have been detected in raw cow's milk and human milk and a variety of commercial cheeses, but their presence has yet to be confirmed in commercial yoghurts. The finding that BCMs are present in cheese suggests they could also form in yoghurt, but be degraded during yoghurt processing. Whether BCMs do form in yoghurt and the amount of BCM forming or degrading at different processing steps needs further investigation and possibly will depend on the heat treatment and fermentation process used, but it remains an intriguing unknown.

  16. Formation and Degradation of Beta-casomorphins in Dairy Processing

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duc Doan; Johnson, Stuart Keith; Busetti, Francesco; Solah, Vicky Ann

    2015-01-01

    Milk proteins including casein are sources of peptides with bioactivity. One of these peptides is beta-casomorphin (BCM) which belongs to a group of opioid peptides formed from β-casein variants. Beta-casomorphin 7 (BCM7) has been demonstrated to be enzymatically released from the A1 or B β-casein variant. Epidemiological evidence suggests the peptide BCM 7 is a risk factor for development of human diseases, including increased risk of type 1 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases but this has not been thoroughly substantiated by research studies. High performance liquid chromatography coupled to UV-Vis and mass spectrometry detection as well as enzyme–linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been used to analyze BCMs in dairy products. BCMs have been detected in raw cow's milk and human milk and a variety of commercial cheeses, but their presence has yet to be confirmed in commercial yoghurts. The finding that BCMs are present in cheese suggests they could also form in yoghurt, but be degraded during yoghurt processing. Whether BCMs do form in yoghurt and the amount of BCM forming or degrading at different processing steps needs further investigation and possibly will depend on the heat treatment and fermentation process used, but it remains an intriguing unknown. PMID:25077377

  17. Formation and Degradation of Beta-casomorphins in Dairy Processing.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Doan; Johnson, Stuart Keith; Busetti, Francesco; Solah, Vicky Ann

    2015-01-01

    Milk proteins including casein are sources of peptides with bioactivity. One of these peptides is beta-casomorphin (BCM) which belongs to a group of opioid peptides formed from β-casein variants. Beta-casomorphin 7 (BCM7) has been demonstrated to be enzymatically released from the A1 or B β-casein variant. Epidemiological evidence suggests the peptide BCM 7 is a risk factor for development of human diseases, including increased risk of type 1 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases but this has not been thoroughly substantiated by research studies. High performance liquid chromatography coupled to UV-Vis and mass spectrometry detection as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been used to analyze BCMs in dairy products. BCMs have been detected in raw cow's milk and human milk and a variety of commercial cheeses, but their presence has yet to be confirmed in commercial yoghurts. The finding that BCMs are present in cheese suggests they could also form in yoghurt, but be degraded during yoghurt processing. Whether BCMs do form in yoghurt and the amount of BCM forming or degrading at different processing steps needs further investigation and possibly will depend on the heat treatment and fermentation process used, but it remains an intriguing unknown. PMID:25077377

  18. Secondary organic aerosol formation through fog processing of VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herckes, P.; Hutchings, J. W.

    2010-07-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) have been determined in highly concentrated amounts (>1 ug/L) in intercepted clouds in northern Arizona (USA). These VOCs are found in concentrations much higher than predicted by partitioning alone. The reactivity of BTEX in the fog/cloud aqueous phase was investigated through laboratory studies. BTEX species showed fast degradation in the aqueous phase in the presence of peroxides and light. Observed half-lives ranged from three and six hours, substantially shorter than the respective gas phase half-lives (several days). The observed reaction rates were on the order of 1 ppb/min but decreased substantially with increasing concentrations of organic matter (TOC). The products of BTEX oxidation reactions were analyzed using HPLC-UV and LCMS. The first generation of products identified included phenol and cresols which correspond to the hydroxyl-addition reaction to benzene and toluene. Upon investigating of multi-generational products, smaller, less volatile species are predominant although a large variety of products is found. Most reaction products have substantially lower vapor pressure and will remain in the particle phase upon droplet evaporation. The SOA generation potential of cloud and fog processing of BTEX was evaluated using simple calculations and showed that in ideal situations these reactions could add up to 9% of the ambient aerosol mass. In more conservative scenarios, the contribution of the processing of BTEX was around 1% of ambient aerosol concentrations. Overall, cloud processing of VOC has the potential to contribute to the atmospheric aerosol mass. However, the contribution will depend upon many factors such as the irradiation, organic matter content in the droplets and droplet lifetime.

  19. STARBURST-DRIVEN GALACTIC WINDS: FILAMENT FORMATION AND EMISSION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jackie L.; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2009-09-20

    We have performed a series of three-dimensional simulations of the interaction of a supersonic wind with a nonspherical radiative cloud. These simulations are motivated by our recent three-dimensional model of a starburst-driven galactic wind interacting with an inhomogeneous disk, which shows that an optically emitting filament can be formed by the breakup and acceleration of a cloud into a supersonic wind. In this study, we consider the evolution of a cloud with two different geometries (fractal and spherical) and investigate the importance of radiative cooling on the cloud's survival. We have also undertaken a comprehensive resolution study in order to ascertain the effect of the assumed numerical resolution on the results. We find that the ability of the cloud to radiate heat is crucial for its survival, with a radiative cloud experiencing a lower degree of acceleration and having a higher relative Mach number to the flow than in the adiabatic case. This diminishes the destructive effect of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the cloud. While an adiabatic cloud is destroyed over a short period of time, a radiative cloud is broken up via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability into numerous small, dense cloudlets, which are drawn into the flow to form a filamentary structure. The degree of fragmentation is highly dependent on the resolution of the simulation, with the number of cloudlets formed increasing as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is better resolved. Nevertheless, there is a clear qualitative trend, with the filamentary structure still persistent at high resolution. The geometry of the cloud affects the speed at which the cloud fragments; a wind more rapidly breaks up the cloud in regions of least density. A cloud with a more inhomogeneous density distribution fragments faster than a cloud with a more uniform structure (e.g., a sphere). We confirm the mechanism behind the formation of the Halpha emitting filaments found in our global simulations of a

  20. Novel ArF photoresist polymer to suppress the roughness formation in plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Uesugi, Takuji; Okada, Takeru; Wada, Akira; Samukawa, Seiji

    2013-03-01

    The serious problem associated with 193-nm lithography using an ArF photoresist is roughness formation of photoresist polymer during plasma processes. We have previously investigated the mechanism of roughness formation caused by plasma. The main deciding factor for roughness formation is a chemical reaction between photoresist polymer and reactive species from plasma. The lactone group in photoresist polymer is highly chemically reactive, and shrinking the lactone structure enhances the roughness formation. In this paper, on the basis of the mechanism of roughness formation, we propose a novel ArF photoresist polymer. The roughness formation was much more suppressed in the novel photoresist polymer during plasma etching process than in the previous type. In the novel photoresist polymer, chemical reactions were spread evenly on the photoresist film surface by adding the polar structure. As a result, decreases in the lactone group were inhibited, leading to suppressing ArF photoresist roughness.

  1. [Death and dying in the nurse formation process].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Wilker Invenção Azevedo; Amorim, Rita de Cruz

    2008-06-01

    Death is one of the great mysteries of life. We live in a death denying-society. This aim of the present qualitative study was to see if undergraduate Nursing students are prepared to face death and dying during training. Seven students enrolled in the discipline "Supervised Training II", the last discipline of the course were interviewed using a semi-structured script, and the collected data were submitted to content analysis. The following categories were discussed: facing death in daily life, reaction to death, and dying in training. It was observed that the process of death and dying is not approached in a manner that supplies the students' needs in routine situations that require them to provide dying patients humane conditions to die.

  2. Recovery and regeneration of spent MHD seed material by the formate process

    DOEpatents

    Sheth, Atul C.; Holt, Jeffrey K.; Rasnake, Darryll G.; Solomon, Robert L.; Wilson, Gregory L.; Herrigel, Howard R.

    1991-01-01

    The specification discloses a spent seed recovery and regeneration process for an MHM power plant employing an alkali metal salt seed material such as potassium salt wherein the spent potassium seed in the form of potassium sulfate is collected from the flue gas and reacted with calcium hydroxide and carbon monoxide in an aqueous solution to cause the formation of calcium sulfate and potassium formate. The pH of the solution is adjusted to supress formation of formic acid and to promote precipitation of any dissolved calcium salts. The solution containing potassium formate is then employed to provide the potassium salt in the form of potassium formate or, optionally, by heating the potassium formate under oxidizing conditions to convert the potassium formate to potassium carbonate.

  3. Recovery and regeneration of spent MHD seed material by the formate process

    DOEpatents

    Sheth, A.C.; Holt, J.K.; Rasnake, D.G.; Solomon, R.L.; Wilson, G.L.; Herrigel, H.R.

    1991-10-15

    The specification discloses a spent seed recovery and regeneration process for an MHD power plant employing an alkali metal salt seed material such as potassium salt wherein the spent potassium seed in the form of potassium sulfate is collected from the flue gas and reacted with calcium hydroxide and carbon monoxide in an aqueous solution to cause the formation of calcium sulfate and potassium formate. The pH of the solution is adjusted to suppress formation of formic acid and to promote precipitation of any dissolved calcium salts. The solution containing potassium formate is then employed to provide the potassium salt in the form of potassium formate or, optionally, by heating the potassium formate under oxidizing conditions to convert the potassium formate to potassium carbonate. 5 figures.

  4. Geochemical constraints on magma formation and transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, O.; Antoshechkina, P. M.; Dasgupta, R.; Rudge, J. F.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Primitive basalts provide an invaluable probe of the mantle's thermo-chemical structure. What these samples show is that the Earth's interior is widely variable in its trace element, isotopic and even major element composition, on the km to the hemispherical scale. This heterogeneity has profound implications for not only the history of the solid Earth, but the oceans and atmosphere as well, as it represents ~4 billions of years of elemental transport back into the mantle via subduction recycling of oceanic crustal to mantle sections. Reconstructing planetary evolution through the volcanic record of mantle composition is therefore a primary aim of igneous geochemistry. However, between the solid mantle and our chemical analyses lie a series of melt generation, aggregation and transport processes, themselves poorly understood, that are potentially critical in controlling the amplitude and style of chemical heterogeneity preserved in an erupted basalt. If these processes are also sensitive to mantle potential temperature, the degree of melting and the presence of lithological heterogeneity, then the geochemical record may not only be biased as a whole, but biased in a relative sense between different geodynamic settings: such a dichotomy may be represented by ocean islands and mid-ocean ridges. Here we combine observational and modelling approaches to understand how varying conditions of melt generation and transport affect basalt chemical variability. Focusing first on Iceland, we combine new and existing melt inclusion data to investigate how chemical variability may be controlled by tectonic parameters (on versus off rift) and source enrichment. We find that on Iceland the key parameter controlling variability is enrichment, with the most enriched basalts preserving diminished variability compared with more depleted eruptions. However, on a larger scale enriched sources preserve the greatest variability: we see this both in terms of the greater variability of

  5. Processes of ordered structure formation in polypeptide thin film solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Botiz, I.; Schlaad, H.; Reiter, G.

    2010-06-17

    An experimental study is presented on the hierarchical assembly of {alpha}-helical block copolymers polystyrene-poly({gamma}-benzyl-L-glutamate) into anisotropic ordered structures. We transformed thin solid films into solutions through exposure to solvent vapor and studied the nucleation and growth of ordered three-dimensional structures in such solutions, with emphasis on the dependence of these processes on supersaturation with respect to the solubility limit. Interestingly, polymer solubility could be significantly influenced via variation of humidity in the surrounding gas phase. It is concluded that the interfacial tension between the ordered structures and the solution increased with humidity. The same effect was observed for other protic non-solvents in the surrounding gas phase and is attributed to a complexation of poly({gamma}-benzyl-L-glutamate) by protic non-solvent molecules (via hydrogen-bonding interactions). This change of polymer solubility was demonstrated to be reversible by addition or removal of small amounts of protic non-solvent in the surrounding gas phase. At a constant polymer concentration, ordered ellipsoidal structures could be dissolved by removing water or methanol present in the solution. Such structures formed once again when water or methanol was reintroduced via the vapor phase.

  6. Wavefront curvature limitations and compensation to polar format processing for synthetic aperture radar images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-01-01

    Limitations on focused scene size for the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation are derived. A post processing filtering technique for compensating the spatially variant blurring in the image is examined. Modifications to this technique to enhance its robustness are proposed.

  7. Glass formation processes in mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Dette, Hans P; Koop, Thomas

    2015-05-14

    Recent experiments suggest that organic aerosol particles may transform into a glassy state at room temperature under dry conditions. Information on glass forming processes in mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles is sparse, however, because inorganic crystal nucleation is usually very likely in such mixtures. Here we investigate the glass transition temperatures Tg of various organics (trehalose, sucrose, citric acid, sorbitol, and glycerol as well as 3-MBTCA) in binary mixtures with either NaNO3 or NH4HSO4 at different mass fractions. The glassy samples were prepared with the MARBLES technique by atomizing dilute aqueous solutions into aerosol particles and subsequent diffusion drying. The resulting aerosol particles were collected and their phase behavior was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. At small and intermediate inorganic mass fractions salt crystallization did not occur. Instead, the single-phase mixtures remained in an amorphous state upon drying such that determination of their Tg was possible. From these measurements the Tg value of pure NaNO3 and pure NH4HSO4 could be inferred through extrapolation, resulting in values of Tg(NaNO3) ≈ 290 K and Tg(NH4HSO4) ≈ 220 K. Upon drying of NH4HSO4/3-MBTCA mixtures, phase-separated samples formed in which the inorganic-rich and organic-rich phases each show an independent glass transition. Our measurements provide a route toward establishing Tg values of inorganic salts that usually crystallize readily, and they may explain the reported contradicting observations of NaNO3 aerosol particles to either crystallize or remain amorphous upon drying at room temperature. PMID:25490407

  8. Comparison of different procedures to stabilize biogas formation after process failure in a thermophilic waste digestion system: Influence of aggregate formation on process stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kleyboecker, A.; Liebrich, M.; Kasina, M.; Kraume, M.; Wittmaier, M.; Wuerdemann, H.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of process recovery with calcium oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids and phosphate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of VFAs by the precipitates resulting in the formation of aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acid uptake and phosphate release by the phosphate-accumulating organisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbial degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. - Abstract: Following a process failure in a full-scale biogas reactor, different counter measures were undertaken to stabilize the process of biogas formation, including the reduction of the organic loading rate, the addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the introduction of calcium oxide (CaO). Corresponding to the results of the process recovery in the full-scale digester, laboratory experiments showed that CaO was more capable of stabilizing the process than NaOH. While both additives were able to raise the pH to a neutral milieu (pH > 7.0), the formation of aggregates was observed particularly when CaO was used as the additive. Scanning electron microscopy investigations revealed calcium phosphate compounds in the core of the aggregates. Phosphate seemed to be released by phosphorus-accumulating organisms, when volatile fatty acids accumulated. The calcium, which was charged by the CaO addition, formed insoluble salts with long chain fatty acids, and caused the precipitation of calcium phosphate compounds. These aggregates were surrounded by a white layer of carbon rich organic matter, probably consisting of volatile fatty acids. Thus, during the process recovery with CaO, the decrease in the amount of accumulated acids in the liquid phase was likely enabled by (1) the formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids, (2) the adsorption of volatile fatty acids by the precipitates, (3) the acid uptake by phosphorus-accumulating organisms and (4

  9. Research on droplet formation and dripping behavior during the electroslag remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu-long; Dong, Yan-wu; Jiang, Zhou-hua; Cao, Hai-bo; Hou, Dong; Feng, Qian-long

    2016-04-01

    A better understanding of droplet formation and dripping behavior would be useful in the efficient removal of impurity elements and nonmetallic inclusions from liquid metals. In the present work, we developed a transparent experimental apparatus to study the mechanisms of droplet formation and the effects of filling ratio on droplet behavior during the electroslag remelting (ESR) process. A high-speed camera was used to clearly observe, at small time scales, the droplet formation and dripping phenomenon at the slag/metal interface during a stable ESR process. The results illustrate that a two-stage process for droplet formation and dripping occurs during the ESR process and that the droplet diameter exhibits a parabolic distribution with increasing filling ratio because of the different shape and thermal state of the electrode tip. This work also confirms that a relatively large filling ratio reduces electricity consumption and improves ingot quality.

  10. Deciphering skeletal patterning: clues from the limb.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Francesca V; Martin, Gail R

    2003-05-15

    Even young children can distinguish a Tyrannosaurus rex from a Brontosaurus by observing differences in bone size, shape, number and arrangement, that is, skeletal pattern. But despite our extensive knowledge about cartilage and bone formation per se, it is still largely a mystery how skeletal pattern is established. Much of what we do know has been learned from studying limb development in chicken and mouse embryos. Based on the data from such studies, models for how limb skeletal pattern is established have been proposed and continue to be hotly debated.

  11. A survey of SAR image-formation processing for earth resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayma, R. W.; Jordan, R. L.; Manning, B. N.

    1977-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in active microwave sensors for earth resources applications. A particular example is the Seasat-A radar. However, to obtain spatial resolutions comparable to optical sensors at radar frequencies, sophisticated image formation processing techniques must be applied to the raw data. This paper briefly compares processing requirements for non-coherent optical and coherent radar imaging systems, and then discusses the image formation processing requirements for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. Both optical and digital techniques are addressed, and examples of hardware and imagery for each processing technique are presented.

  12. A survey of SAR image-formation processing for earth resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayma, R. W.; Jordan, R. L.; Manning, B. N.

    1977-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in active microwave sensors for earth resources applications, such as the SEASAT-A radar. However, to obtain spatial resolutions comparable to optical sensors at radar frequencies, sophisticated image formation processing techniques must be applied to the raw data. Processing requirements for non-coherent optical and coherent radar imaging systems are compared. The image formation processing requirements for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are discussed. Both optical and digital techniques are addressed, and examples of hardware and imagery for each processing technique are presented.

  13. Deciphering Martian climatic history using returned samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, D. A.; Krieger, D. B.; Brigham, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    By necessity, a Mars sample return mission must sample the upper few meters of the Martian surface. This material was subjected to a wide variety of physical processes. Presently, the most important processes are believed to be wind-driven erosion and deposition, and water ice accumulation at higher latitudes. A sample return mission represents an opportunity to better understand and quantify these important geological processes. By obtaining sample cores at key locations, it may be possible to interpret much of recent Martian climatic history.

  14. Formation kinetics of potential fermentation inhibitors in a steam explosion process of corn straw.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuzhen; Wang, Lan; Chen, Hongzhang

    2013-01-01

    The weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds formed during lignocellulose pretreatment are potential inhibitors of subsequent enzymatic and microbial processes. In this work, the effects of the steam explosion process on the formation of weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds were explored. The correlations of different steam explosion conditions and formation kinetics of degradation products showed that the formation of weak acids and furan derivatives was in the first-order reactions, which are expressed as [Formula: see text]. The formation of weak acids and furan derivatives increases with pretreatment temperature and time. On the other hand, the formation of phenolic compounds showed typical characteristics of continuous reaction, expressed as [Formula: see text]. The formation was affected by the active energies in two stages, temperature and time, and thus existed at extreme value. This work revealed the formation rules of weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds in a steam explosion process and provided theoretical guidelines for improving the process and limiting the production of certain inhibitors. PMID:23188657

  15. Pre-Processing Code System for Data in ENDF/B Format.

    2015-04-01

    Version 08 PREPRO2015-2 is a modular set of computer codes, each of which reads evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF/B format, processes the data and outputs it in the ENDF/B format. Each code performs one or more independent operations on the data. The codes are named "the pre-processing" codes, because they are designed to pre process ENDF/B data, for later, further processing for use in applications. These codes are designed to operate on virtually anymore » type of computer with the included capability of optimization on any given computer. They can process datasets in any ENDF/B format, ENDF/B-I through ENDF/B-VII. This package containes updated content. Additional information is available on the PREPRO website: http://www-nds.iaea.org/ndspub/endf/prepro/.« less

  16. Pre-Processing Code System for Data in ENDF/B Format.

    SciTech Connect

    CULLEN, D. E.

    2015-04-01

    Version 08 PREPRO2015-2 is a modular set of computer codes, each of which reads evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF/B format, processes the data and outputs it in the ENDF/B format. Each code performs one or more independent operations on the data. The codes are named "the pre-processing" codes, because they are designed to pre process ENDF/B data, for later, further processing for use in applications. These codes are designed to operate on virtually any type of computer with the included capability of optimization on any given computer. They can process datasets in any ENDF/B format, ENDF/B-I through ENDF/B-VII. This package containes updated content. Additional information is available on the PREPRO website: http://www-nds.iaea.org/ndspub/endf/prepro/.

  17. Systems biology as an approach for deciphering microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Kumar Singh, Puneet; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2015-03-01

    Different systems biology approaches may have a significant consequence in deciphering microbial interactions. Here, we endeavor to summarize, epigrammatic description of sophisticated techniques and software that provides an enhanced understanding of metagenomics data analysis. Apparently, such techniques are helpful to catalog various analysis categories and components that add appraisal to understand this approach. In addition, the constructions of metabolic networks of various genes present in human gut microbiome also give significant directions for determining the topological features of target enzymes.

  18. The experimental production of matrix lumps within chondrules: Evidence of post-formational processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Hewins, Roger H.

    1993-01-01

    The processes that acted upon chondrules after their formation are as important clues to the nature of the early solar nebula as are the exact processes that formed the chondrules. Recent experiments have studied the rim forming processes and the effects the processes have on chondrules. We present below information on how matrix inclusions found within chondrules may have been formed and the potential usefulness of this information.

  19. Fast processing of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) metadata using multiseries DICOM format

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Mahmoud; Philbin, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) information model combines pixel data and its metadata in a single object. There are user scenarios that only need metadata manipulation, such as deidentification and study migration. Most picture archiving and communication system use a database to store and update the metadata rather than updating the raw DICOM files themselves. The multiseries DICOM (MSD) format separates metadata from pixel data and eliminates duplicate attributes. This work promotes storing DICOM studies in MSD format to reduce the metadata processing time. A set of experiments are performed that update the metadata of a set of DICOM studies for deidentification and migration. The studies are stored in both the traditional single frame DICOM (SFD) format and the MSD format. The results show that it is faster to update studies’ metadata in MSD format than in SFD format because the bulk data is separated in MSD and is not retrieved from the storage system. In addition, it is space efficient to store the deidentified studies in MSD format as it shares the same bulk data object with the original study. In summary, separation of metadata from pixel data using the MSD format provides fast metadata access and speeds up applications that process only the metadata. PMID:26158117

  20. DECIPHER, a search-based approach to chimera identification for 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Noguera, Daniel R

    2012-02-01

    DECIPHER is a new method for finding 16S rRNA chimeric sequences by the use of a search-based approach. The method is based upon detecting short fragments that are uncommon in the phylogenetic group where a query sequence is classified but frequently found in another phylogenetic group. The algorithm was calibrated for full sequences (fs_DECIPHER) and short sequences (ss_DECIPHER) and benchmarked against WigeoN (Pintail), ChimeraSlayer, and Uchime using artificially generated chimeras. Overall, ss_DECIPHER and Uchime provided the highest chimera detection for sequences 100 to 600 nucleotides long (79% and 81%, respectively), but Uchime's performance deteriorated for longer sequences, while ss_DECIPHER maintained a high detection rate (89%). Both methods had low false-positive rates (1.3% and 1.6%). The more conservative fs_DECIPHER, benchmarked only for sequences longer than 600 nucleotides, had an overall detection rate lower than that of ss_DECIPHER (75%) but higher than those of the other programs. In addition, fs_DECIPHER had the lowest false-positive rate among all the benchmarked programs (<0.20%). DECIPHER was outperformed only by ChimeraSlayer and Uchime when chimeras were formed from closely related parents (less than 10% divergence). Given the differences in the programs, it was possible to detect over 89% of all chimeras with just the combination of ss_DECIPHER and Uchime. Using fs_DECIPHER, we detected between 1% and 2% additional chimeras in the RDP, SILVA, and Greengenes databases from which chimeras had already been removed with Pintail or Bellerophon. DECIPHER was implemented in the R programming language and is directly accessible through a webpage or by downloading the program as an R package (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu).

  1. Other factors to consider in the formation of chloropropandiol fatty esters in oil processes.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Muhamad Roddy; Siew, Wai Lin; Ibrahim, Nuzul Amri; Kuntom, Ainie; Abd Razak, Raznim Arni

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the processing steps of extracting palm oil from fresh fruit bunches in a way that may impact on the formation of chloropropandiol fatty esters (3-MCPD esters), particularly during refining. Diacylglycerols (DAGs) do not appear to be a critical factor when crude palm oils are extracted from various qualities of fruit bunches. Highly hydrolysed oils, in spite of the high free fatty acid (FFA) contents, did not show exceptionally high DAGs, and the oils did not display a higher formation of 3-MCPD esters upon heat treatment. However, acidity measured in terms of pH appears to have a strong impact on 3-MCPD ester formation in the crude oil when heated at high temperatures. The differences in the extraction process of crude palm oil from current commercial processes and that from a modified experimental process showed clearly the effect of acidity of the oil on the formation of 3-MCPD esters. This paper concludes that the washing or dilution step in palm oil mills removes the acidity of the vegetative materials and that a well-optimised dilution/washing step in the extraction process will play an important role in reducing formation of 3-MCPD esters in crude palm oil upon further heat processing.

  2. Other factors to consider in the formation of chloropropandiol fatty esters in oil processes.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Muhamad Roddy; Siew, Wai Lin; Ibrahim, Nuzul Amri; Kuntom, Ainie; Abd Razak, Raznim Arni

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the processing steps of extracting palm oil from fresh fruit bunches in a way that may impact on the formation of chloropropandiol fatty esters (3-MCPD esters), particularly during refining. Diacylglycerols (DAGs) do not appear to be a critical factor when crude palm oils are extracted from various qualities of fruit bunches. Highly hydrolysed oils, in spite of the high free fatty acid (FFA) contents, did not show exceptionally high DAGs, and the oils did not display a higher formation of 3-MCPD esters upon heat treatment. However, acidity measured in terms of pH appears to have a strong impact on 3-MCPD ester formation in the crude oil when heated at high temperatures. The differences in the extraction process of crude palm oil from current commercial processes and that from a modified experimental process showed clearly the effect of acidity of the oil on the formation of 3-MCPD esters. This paper concludes that the washing or dilution step in palm oil mills removes the acidity of the vegetative materials and that a well-optimised dilution/washing step in the extraction process will play an important role in reducing formation of 3-MCPD esters in crude palm oil upon further heat processing. PMID:25798697

  3. Integrating Individual Learning Processes and Organizational Knowledge Formation: Foundational Determinants for Organizational Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Ji Hoon; Chermack, Thomas J.; Kim, Hong Min

    2008-01-01

    This research examined the link between learning processes and knowledge formation through an integrated literature review from both academic and practical viewpoints. Individuals' learning processes and organizational knowledge creation were reviewed by means of theoretical and integrative analysis based on a lack of empirical research on the…

  4. Probing Distinct Fullerene Formation Processes from Carbon Precursors of Different Sizes and Structures.

    PubMed

    Han, Jong Yoon; Choi, Tae Su; Kim, Soyoung; Lee, Jong Wha; Ha, Yoonhoo; Jeong, Kwang Seob; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Hee Cheul; Kim, Hugh I

    2016-08-16

    Fullerenes, cage-structured carbon allotropes, have been the subject of extensive research as new materials for diverse purposes. Yet, their formation process is still not clearly understood at the molecular level. In this study, we performed laser desorption ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry (LDI-IM-MS) of carbon substrates possessing different molecular sizes and structures to understand the formation process of fullerene. Our observations show that the formation process is strongly dependent on the size of the precursor used, with small precursors yielding small fullerenes and large graphitic precursors generally yielding larger fullerenes. These results clearly demonstrate that fullerene formation can proceed via both bottom-up and top-down processes, with the latter being favored for large precursors and more efficient at forming fullerenes. Furthermore, we observed that specific structures of carbon precursors could additionally affect the relative abundance of C60 fullerene. Overall, this study provides an advanced understanding of the mechanistic details underlying the formation processes of fullerene.

  5. Probing Distinct Fullerene Formation Processes from Carbon Precursors of Different Sizes and Structures.

    PubMed

    Han, Jong Yoon; Choi, Tae Su; Kim, Soyoung; Lee, Jong Wha; Ha, Yoonhoo; Jeong, Kwang Seob; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Hee Cheul; Kim, Hugh I

    2016-08-16

    Fullerenes, cage-structured carbon allotropes, have been the subject of extensive research as new materials for diverse purposes. Yet, their formation process is still not clearly understood at the molecular level. In this study, we performed laser desorption ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry (LDI-IM-MS) of carbon substrates possessing different molecular sizes and structures to understand the formation process of fullerene. Our observations show that the formation process is strongly dependent on the size of the precursor used, with small precursors yielding small fullerenes and large graphitic precursors generally yielding larger fullerenes. These results clearly demonstrate that fullerene formation can proceed via both bottom-up and top-down processes, with the latter being favored for large precursors and more efficient at forming fullerenes. Furthermore, we observed that specific structures of carbon precursors could additionally affect the relative abundance of C60 fullerene. Overall, this study provides an advanced understanding of the mechanistic details underlying the formation processes of fullerene. PMID:27434606

  6. Surfactant process for promoting gas hydrate formation and application of the same

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Rudy E.; Zhong, Yu

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of storing gas using gas hydrates comprising forming gas hydrates in the presence of a water-surfactant solution that comprises water and surfactant. The addition of minor amounts of surfactant increases the gas hydrate formation rate, increases packing density of the solid hydrate mass and simplifies the formation-storage-decomposition process of gas hydrates. The minor amounts of surfactant also enhance the potential of gas hydrates for industrial storage applications.

  7. The KEGG resource for deciphering the genome.

    PubMed

    Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu; Kawashima, Shuichi; Okuno, Yasushi; Hattori, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    A grand challenge in the post-genomic era is a complete computer representation of the cell and the organism, which will enable computational prediction of higher-level complexity of cellular processes and organism behavior from genomic information. Toward this end we have been developing a knowledge-based approach for network prediction, which is to predict, given a complete set of genes in the genome, the protein interaction networks that are responsible for various cellular processes. KEGG at http://www.genome.ad.jp/kegg/ is the reference knowledge base that integrates current knowledge on molecular interaction networks such as pathways and complexes (PATHWAY database), information about genes and proteins generated by genome projects (GENES/SSDB/KO databases) and information about biochemical compounds and reactions (COMPOUND/GLYCAN/REACTION databases). These three types of database actually represent three graph objects, called the protein network, the gene universe and the chemical universe. New efforts are being made to abstract knowledge, both computationally and manually, about ortholog clusters in the KO (KEGG Orthology) database, and to collect and analyze carbohydrate structures in the GLYCAN database.

  8. The KEGG resource for deciphering the genome.

    PubMed

    Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu; Kawashima, Shuichi; Okuno, Yasushi; Hattori, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    A grand challenge in the post-genomic era is a complete computer representation of the cell and the organism, which will enable computational prediction of higher-level complexity of cellular processes and organism behavior from genomic information. Toward this end we have been developing a knowledge-based approach for network prediction, which is to predict, given a complete set of genes in the genome, the protein interaction networks that are responsible for various cellular processes. KEGG at http://www.genome.ad.jp/kegg/ is the reference knowledge base that integrates current knowledge on molecular interaction networks such as pathways and complexes (PATHWAY database), information about genes and proteins generated by genome projects (GENES/SSDB/KO databases) and information about biochemical compounds and reactions (COMPOUND/GLYCAN/REACTION databases). These three types of database actually represent three graph objects, called the protein network, the gene universe and the chemical universe. New efforts are being made to abstract knowledge, both computationally and manually, about ortholog clusters in the KO (KEGG Orthology) database, and to collect and analyze carbohydrate structures in the GLYCAN database. PMID:14681412

  9. Formation of disinfection by-products in the ultraviolet/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Bolton, James R; Andrews, Susan A; Hofmann, Ron

    2015-06-15

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) formation may be a concern when applying ultraviolet light and free chlorine (UV/chlorine) as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) for drinking water treatment, due to typically large chlorine doses (e.g. 5-10 mg L(-1) as free chlorine). A potential mitigating factor is the low chlorine contact times for this AOP treatment (e.g. seconds). Full-scale and pilot-scale test results showed minimal trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetic acid (HAA) formation during UV/chlorine treatment, while dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) were produced rapidly. Adsorbable organic halide (AOX) formation was significant when applying the UV/chlorine process in water that had not been previously chlorinated, while little additional formation was observed in prechlorinated water. Chlorine photolysis led to chlorate and bromate formation, equivalent to approximately 2-17% and 0.01-0.05% of the photolyzed chlorine, respectively. No perchlorate or chlorite formation was observed. During simulated secondary disinfection of AOP-treated water, DBP formation potential for THMs, HAAs, HANs, and AOX was observed to increase approximately to the same extent as was observed for pretreatment using the more common AOP of UV combined with hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2).

  10. Biofilm formation of Salmonella serotypes in simulated meat processing environments and its relationship to cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huhu; Ding, Shijie; Dong, Yang; Ye, Keping; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2013-10-01

    Salmonella attached to meat contact surfaces encountered in meat processing facilities may serve as a source of cross-contamination. In this study, the influence of serotypes and media on biofilm formation of Salmonella was investigated in a simulated meat processing environment, and the relationships between biofilm formation and cell characteristics were also determined. All six serotypes (Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg, Salmonella Derby, Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Indiana, Salmonella Infantis, and Salmonella Typhimurium) can readily form biofilms on stainless steel surfaces, and the amounts of biofilms were significantly influenced by the serotypes, incubation media, and incubation time used in this study. Significant differences in cell surface hydrophobicity, autoaggregation, motility, and growth kinetic parameters were observed between individual serotypes tested. Except for growth kinetic parameters, the cell characteristics were correlated with the ability of biofilm formation incubated in tryptic soy broth, whereas no correlation with biofilm formation incubated in meat thawing-loss broth (an actual meat substrate) was found. Salmonella grown in meat thawing-loss broth showed a "cloud-shaped" morphology in the mature biofilm, whereas when grown in tryptic soy broth it had a "reticulum-shaped" appearance. Our study provides some practical information to understand the process of biofilm formation on meat processing contact surfaces.

  11. Deciphering arboviral emergence within insular ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Tortosa, Pablo; Pascalis, Hervé; Guernier, Vanina; Cardinale, Eric; Le Corre, Matthieu; Goodman, Steven M; Dellagi, Koussay

    2012-08-01

    The spatial dynamics of zoonotic arthropod-borne viruses is a fashionable though challenging topic. Inter-human local transmission of a given arbovirus during an outbreak and its spread over large distances are considered as key parameters of emergence. Here, we suggest that insular ecosystems provide ideal natural "laboratory" conditions to uncouple local transmission from long distance spread, and differentiate these two processes. Due to geographic isolation, often-limited land surface area and relatively homogenous ecosystems, oceanic islands display low species richness and often-high levels of endemism. These aspects provide the means for comprehensive entomological surveys and investigations of original host/pathogen interactions. In addition, islands are interconnected through discrete anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic exchanges: whilst islands maintain a substantial level of human and domestic animal exchange with other neighbouring or distant territories, they also comprise dispersal and migratory pathways of volant organisms (insects, birds and bats). Hence, both anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic exchanges in island systems are easier to identify and investigate than in continuous, continental systems. Finally, island ecosystems tend to be notably simpler, more prone to invasive taxa and, therefore, easier to document the colonization or displacement of vector species. These different aspects are presented and overlaid upon the spread of arboviruses within two distinct insular systems: islands of Polynesia and the south-western Indian Ocean. The former have been repeatedly affected by Dengue fever epidemics, while the latter recently suffered four successive epidemics, probably of east African origin, three of which involved the emerging viruses Chikungunya, Rift Valley and Dengue fever. Here, we review some new insights into arboviral spread and evolution associated with investigations that followed these epidemics, as well as several aspects that

  12. Magnetic Evolution of the <100> Interstitial Loop Formation Process in bcc Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haixuan; Stoller, Roger; Stocks, G. Malcolm

    2013-03-01

    Interstitial loops are a signature of radiation damage in materials and are only observed in systems far from equilibrium state due to their high formation energies (approximately 4eV). Unlike other bcc metals, in which the interstitial loops are almost exclusively 1/2 <111> type, two types of loops, <100>and 1/2 <111> are identified in bcc iron. Although 1/2 <111> loops can be formed directly by atomic displacment cascades, the mechanism of <100> loop formation had remained undetermined since they were observed fifty years ago. Recently, the formation mechanism has been discovered using self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) simulations. Here we describe the influence of magnetism in the corresponding loop formation process using the ab initio locally self-consistent multiple-scattering (LSMS) method. Significant magnetic moment changes during the loop formation process are observed and their effect on the loop stability are evaluated. In addition, the effects of <100> loop formation on the microstructural evolution and material properties will be discussed. Work supported by the Center for Defect Physics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  13. Bromate formation from bromide oxidation by the UV/persulfate process.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing-Yun; Shang, Chii

    2012-08-21

    Bromate formation from bromide oxidation by the UV/persulfate process was investigated, along with changes in pH, persulfate dosages, and bromide concentrations in ultrapure water and in bromide-spiked real water. In general, the bromate formation increased with increasing persulfate dosage and bromide concentration. The bromate formation was initiated and primarily driven by sulfate radicals (SO(4)(•-)) and involved the formation of hypobromous acid/hypobromite (HOBr/OBr(-)) as an intermediate and bromate as the final product. Under the test conditions, the rate of the first step driven by SO(4)(•-) is slower than that of the second step. Direct UV photolysis of HOBr/OBr(-) to form bromate and the photolysis of bromate are insignificant. The bromate formation was similar for pH 4-7 but decreased over 90% with increasing pH from 7 to above 9. Less bromate was formed in the real water sample than in ultrapure water, which was primarily attributable to the presence of natural organic matter that reacts with bromine atoms, HOBr/OBr(-) and SO(4)(•-). The extent of bromate formation and degradation of micropollutants are nevertheless coupled processes unless intermediate bromine species are consumed by NOM in real water. PMID:22831804

  14. XAFS studies of monodisperse Au nanoclusters formation in the etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Huang, Ting; Liu, Wei; Bao, Jie; Huang, Yuanyuan; Cao, Yuanjie; Yao, Tao; Sun, Zhihu; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the formation mechanism of gold nanoclusters is essential to the development of their synthetic chemistry. Here, by using x-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, UV-Vis and MS spectra, the formation process of monodisperse Au13 nanoclusters is investigated. We find that a critical step involving the formation of smaller Au8-Au11 metastable intermediate clusters induced by the HCl + HSR etching of the polydisperse Aun precursor clusters occurs firstly. Then these intermediate species undergo a size-growth to Au13 cores, followed by a slow structure rearrangement to reach the final stable structure. This work enriches the understanding of cluster formation chemistry and may guide the way towards the design and the controllable synthesis of nanoclusters.

  15. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique.

  16. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique. PMID:26812153

  17. Investigation of cu-BTA complex formation during Cu chemical mechanical planarization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byoung-Jun; Shima, Shohei; Hamada, Satomi; Park, Jin-Goo

    2016-10-01

    The effect of Cu surface conditions on Cu-BTA complex formation was investigated using contact angle, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and XPS measurements which is of interest to Cu Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) process. During Cu CMP process BTA is widely used as a corrosion inhibitor, reacts with Cu and forms a strong Cu-BTA complex. Thus, it is very essential to remove Cu-BTA complex during post-Cu CMP cleaning process as Cu-BTA complex causes severe problems such as particle contamination and watermark due to its hydrophobic nature. In this report, the Cu-BTA complex formation at various Cu surfaces (as received, pure Cu and Cu oxide) was investigated in order to understand its adsorption reaction and develop effective post-Cu CMP cleaning process.

  18. Excimer laser annealing: A gold process for CZ silicon junction formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, David C.; Bottenberg, William R.; Byron, Stanley; Alexander, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A cold process using an excimer laser for junction formation in silicon has been evaluated as a way to avoid problems associated with thermal diffusion. Conventional thermal diffusion can cause bulk precipitation of SiOx and SiC or fail to completely activate the dopant, leaving a degenerate layer at the surface. Experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of fabricating high quality p-n junctions using a pulsed excimer laser for junction formation at remelt temperature with ion-implanted surfaces. Solar-cell efficiency exceeding 16 percent was obtained using Czochralski single-crystal silicon without benefit of back surface field or surface passivation. Characterization shows that the formation of uniform, shallow junctions (approximately 0.25 micron) by excimer laser scanning preserves the minority carrier lifetime that leads to high current collection. However, the process is sensitive to initial surface conditions and handling parameters that drive the cost up.

  19. Pearl formation: persistence of the graft during the entire process of biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Arnaud-Haond, S; Goyard, E; Vonau, V; Herbaut, C; Prou, J; Saulnier, D

    2007-01-01

    Most bivalves species of the genus Pinctada are well known throughout the world for production of white or black pearls of high commercial value. For cultured pearl production, a mantle allograft from a donor is implanted into the gonad of a recipient oyster, together with a small inorganic bead. Because of the dedifferentiation of cells during the first steps of the host oyster's immunological reaction, so far the fate of the graft and its exact role in the process of pearl formation could not be determined via classical histological methods. Here we report the first molecular evidence of the resilience of the graft in the recipient organism by showing that cells containing genome from the donor are still present at the end of pearl formation. These results suggest the existence of a unique biological cooperation leading to the successful biomineralization process of nacreous secretion in pearl formation.

  20. NMDA-R inhibition affects cellular process formation in Tilapia melanocytes; a model for pigmented adrenergic neurons in process formation and retraction.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Olalekan Michael; Okunnuga, Adetokunbo Adedotun; Fabiyi, Temitope Deborah; Olajide, Olayemi Joseph; Akinrinade, Ibukun Dorcas; Adeniyi, Philip Adeyemi; Ojo, Abiodun Ayodele

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease has long been described to be a product of dopamine and (or) melanin loss in the substanstia nigra (SN). Although most studies have focused on dopaminergic neurons, it is important to consider the role of pigment cells in the etiology of the disease and to create an in vitro live cell model for studies involving pigmented adrenergic cells of the SN in Parkinsonism. The Melanocytes share specific features with the pigmented adrenergic neurons as both cells are pigmented, contain adrenergic receptors and have cellular processes. Although the melanocyte cellular processes are relatively short and observable only when stimulated appropriately by epinephrine and other factors or molecules. This study employs the manipulation of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor (NMDA-R), a major receptor in neuronal development, in the process formation pattern of the melanocyte in order to create a suitable model to depict cellular process elongation and shortening in pigmented adrenergic cells. NMDA-R is an important glutamate receptor implicated in neurogenesis, neuronal migration, maturation and cell death, thus we investigated the role of NMDA-R potentiation by glutamate/KCN and its inhibition by ketamine in the behavior of fish scale melanocytes in vitro. This is aimed at establishing the regulatory role of NMDA-R in this cell type (melanocytes isolated form Tilapia) in a similar manner to what is observable in the mammalian neurons. In vitro live cell culture was prepared in modified Ringer's solution following which the cells were treated as follows; Control, Glutamate, Ketamine, Glutamate + Ketamine, KCN + Ketamine and KCN. The culture was maintained for 10 min and the changes were captured in 3D-Time frame at 0, 5 and 10 min for the control and 5, 7 and 10 min for each of the treatment category. Glutamate treatment caused formation of short cellular processes localized directly on the cell body while ketamine treatment (inhibition of NMDA-R) facilitated

  1. Researching International Processes of Education Policy Formation: Conceptual and Methodological Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, D. Brent, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This article elaborates one approach to conceptualizing and investigating international processes of education policy formation (IPEPF), which are dynamic, multi-level and processual in nature. This contribution is important because, although research is increasingly conducted on phenomena with such characteristics, extended discussions of how…

  2. The Professional Competence Formation in the Training Process in Higher Educational Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burganova, Roza I.; Abdugalina, Sairan E.; Shaiheslyamova, Kazyna O.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of professional competence formation in the specialists' training process at the university in contemporary socio-economic and socio-cultural conditions originating in the Republic of Kazakhstan. The emphasis is laid on new scientific and pedagogical approaches to its solution. Special attention is paid to the…

  3. Formation Processes and Impacts of Reactive and Nonreactive Minerals in Permeable Reactive Barriers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., changes in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction,...

  4. FORMATION PROCESSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF REACTIVE AND NON-REACTIVE MINERAL PRECIPITATES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., change in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction, ...

  5. A Case Study on the Formation and Sharing Process of Science Classroom Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Jina; Song, Jinwoong

    2016-01-01

    The teaching and learning of science in school are influenced by various factors, including both individual factors, such as member beliefs, and social factors, such as the power structure of the class. To understand this complex context affected by various factors in schools, we investigated the formation and sharing process of science classroom…

  6. Level of Processing Modulates the Neural Correlates of Emotional Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchey, Maureen; LaBar, Kevin S.; Cabeza, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Emotion is known to influence multiple aspects of memory formation, including the initial encoding of the memory trace and its consolidation over time. However, the neural mechanisms whereby emotion impacts memory encoding remain largely unexplored. The present study used a levels-of-processing manipulation to characterize the impact of emotion on…

  7. Embedded Formative Assessment and Classroom Process Quality: How Do They Interact in Promoting Science Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decristan, Jasmin; Klieme, Eckhard; Kunter, Mareike; Hochweber, Jan; Büttner, Gerhard; Fauth, Benjamin; Hondrich, A. Lena; Rieser, Svenja; Hertel, Silke; Hardy, Ilonca

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the interplay between curriculum-embedded formative assessment--a well-known teaching practice--and general features of classroom process quality (i.e., cognitive activation, supportive climate, classroom management) and their combined effect on elementary school students' understanding of the scientific concepts of…

  8. Influence of California-style black ripe olive processing on the formation of acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Charoenprasert, Suthawan; Mitchell, Alyson

    2014-08-27

    Methods used in processing California-style black ripe olives generate acrylamide. California-style black ripe olives contain higher levels of acrylamide (409.67 ± 42.60-511.91 ± 34.08 μg kg(-1)) as compared to California-style green ripe olives (44.02 ± 3.55-105.79 ± 22.01 μg kg(-1)), Greek olives (<1.42 μg kg(-1)), and Spanish olives (not detected), indicating that the higher temperatures used to sterilize the California-style green ripe and black ripe olives are required for acrylamide formation. Preprocessing brine storage influenced the formation of acrylamide in a time-dependent manner. Acrylamide increased during the first 30 days of storage. Longer brine storage times (>30 days) result in lower acrylamide levels in the finished product. The presence of calcium ions in the preprocessing brining solution results in higher levels of acrylamide in finished products. Air oxidation during lye processing and the neutralization of olives prior to sterilization significantly increase the formation of acrylamide in the finished products. Conversely, lye-processing decreases the levels of acrylamide in the final product. These results indicate that specific steps in the California-style black ripe olive processing may be manipulated to mitigate the formation of acrylamide in finished products.

  9. Formation of low-dimensional crystalline nucleus region during insulin amyloidogenesis process

    SciTech Connect

    Amdursky, Nadav; Gazit, Ehud; Rosenman, Gil

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observe lag-phase crystallization process in insulin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystallization is a result of the formation of higher order oligomers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystallization also changes the secondary structure of the protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spectroscopic signature can be used for amyloid inhibitors assay. -- Abstract: Insulin, as other amyloid proteins, can form amyloid fibrils at certain conditions. The self-assembled aggregation process of insulin can result in a variety of conformations, starting from small oligomers, going through various types of protofibrils, and finishing with bundles of fibrils. One of the most common consensuses among the various self-assembly processes that are suggested in the literature is the formation of an early stage nucleus conformation. Here we present an additional insight for the self-assembly process of insulin. We show that at the early lag phase of the process (prior to fibril formation) the insulin monomers self-assemble into ordered nanostructures. The most notable feature of this early self-assembly process is the formation of nanocrystalline nucleus regions with a strongly bound electron-hole confinement, which also change the secondary structure of the protein. Each step in the self-assembly process is characterized by an optical spectroscopic signature, and possesses a narrow size distribution. By following the spectroscopic signature we can measure the potency of amyloid fibrils inhibitors already at the lag phase. We further demonstrate it by the use of epigallocatechin gallate, a known inhibitor for insulin fibrils. The findings can result in a spectroscopic-based application for the analysis of amyloid fibrils inhibitors.

  10. Envirotyping for deciphering environmental impacts on crop plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunbi

    2016-04-01

    Global climate change imposes increasing impacts on our environments and crop production. To decipher environmental impacts on crop plants, the concept "envirotyping" is proposed, as a third "typing" technology, complementing with genotyping and phenotyping. Environmental factors can be collected through multiple environmental trials, geographic and soil information systems, measurement of soil and canopy properties, and evaluation of companion organisms. Envirotyping contributes to crop modeling and phenotype prediction through its functional components, including genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI), genes responsive to environmental signals, biotic and abiotic stresses, and integrative phenotyping. Envirotyping, driven by information and support systems, has a wide range of applications, including environmental characterization, GEI analysis, phenotype prediction, near-iso-environment construction, agronomic genomics, precision agriculture and breeding, and development of a four-dimensional profile of crop science involving genotype (G), phenotype (P), envirotype (E) and time (T) (developmental stage). In the future, envirotyping needs to zoom into specific experimental plots and individual plants, along with the development of high-throughput and precision envirotyping platforms, to integrate genotypic, phenotypic and envirotypic information for establishing a high-efficient precision breeding and sustainable crop production system based on deciphered environmental impacts. PMID:26932121

  11. Deciphering the evolutionary history of open and closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Sazer, Shelley; Lynch, Michael; Needleman, Daniel

    2014-11-17

    The origin of the nucleus at the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition represents one of the most important events in the evolution of cellular organization. The nuclear envelope encircles the chromosomes in interphase and is a selectively permeable barrier between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm and an organizational scaffold for the nucleus. It remains intact in the 'closed' mitosis of some yeasts, but loses its integrity in the 'open' mitosis of mammals. Instances of both types of mitosis within two evolutionary clades indicate multiple evolutionary transitions between open and closed mitosis, although the underlying genetic changes that influenced these transitions remain unknown. A survey of the diversity of mitotic nuclei that fall between these extremes is the starting point from which to determine the physiologically relevant characteristics distinguishing open from closed mitosis and to understand how they evolved and why they are retained in present-day organisms. The field is now poised to begin addressing these issues by defining and documenting patterns of mitotic nuclear variation within and among species and mapping them onto a phylogenic tree. Deciphering the evolutionary history of open and closed mitosis will complement cell biological and genetic approaches aimed at deciphering the fundamental organizational principles of the nucleus.

  12. Envirotyping for deciphering environmental impacts on crop plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunbi

    2016-04-01

    Global climate change imposes increasing impacts on our environments and crop production. To decipher environmental impacts on crop plants, the concept "envirotyping" is proposed, as a third "typing" technology, complementing with genotyping and phenotyping. Environmental factors can be collected through multiple environmental trials, geographic and soil information systems, measurement of soil and canopy properties, and evaluation of companion organisms. Envirotyping contributes to crop modeling and phenotype prediction through its functional components, including genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI), genes responsive to environmental signals, biotic and abiotic stresses, and integrative phenotyping. Envirotyping, driven by information and support systems, has a wide range of applications, including environmental characterization, GEI analysis, phenotype prediction, near-iso-environment construction, agronomic genomics, precision agriculture and breeding, and development of a four-dimensional profile of crop science involving genotype (G), phenotype (P), envirotype (E) and time (T) (developmental stage). In the future, envirotyping needs to zoom into specific experimental plots and individual plants, along with the development of high-throughput and precision envirotyping platforms, to integrate genotypic, phenotypic and envirotypic information for establishing a high-efficient precision breeding and sustainable crop production system based on deciphered environmental impacts.

  13. Study of the formation process of titanium oxides containing micro arc oxidation film on Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yingwei; Dong, Kaihui; Shan, Dayong; Han, En-Hou

    2014-09-01

    A novel micro arc oxidation (MAO) film is developed to protect Mg alloys from corrosion. This film contains plenty of titanium oxides, which exhibits higher chemical stability than traditional MAO films. Especially, the micropores on the surface of the film are in situ sealed during the film formation process instead of the sealing pores post treatment. The film formation process is investigated by the observation of surface and cross-section morphologies and analysis of chemical composition. It is found that the sizes of micropores increase but the quantities decrease with increasing oxidation voltages. The micropores are open in the initial stage of oxidation and then they are sealed gradually. The growth direction of the film takes place change at different oxidation voltages. The elements of F and Ti play a significant role in the film growth process.

  14. The Policy Formation Process: A Conceptual Framework for Analysis. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    A conceptual framework for analysis which is intended to assist both the policy analyst and the policy researcher in their empirical investigations into policy phenomena is developed. It is meant to facilitate understanding of the policy formation process by focusing attention on the basic forces shaping the main features of policy formation as a dynamic social-political-organizational process. The primary contribution of the framework lies in its capability to suggest useful ways of looking at policy formation reality. It provides the analyst and the researcher with a group of indicators which suggest where to look and what to look for when attempting to analyze and understand the mix of forces which energize, maintain, and direct the operation of strategic level policy systems. The framework also highlights interconnections, linkage, and relational patterns between and among important variables. The framework offers an integrated set of conceptual tools which facilitate understanding of and research on the complex and dynamic set of variables which interact in any major strategic level policy formation process.

  15. Mechanism of hologram formation in fixation-free rehalogenating bleaching processes.

    PubMed

    Neipp, Cristian; Pascual, Inmaculada; Beléndez, Augusto

    2002-07-10

    The mechanism of hologram formation in fixation-free rehalogenating bleaching processes have been treated by different authors. The experiments carried out on Agfa 8E75 HD plates led to the conclusion that material transfer from the exposed to the unexposed zones is the main mechanism under theprocess. We present a simple model that explains the mechanism of hologram formation inside the emulsion. Also quantitative data obtained using both Agfa 8E75 HD and Slavich PFG-01 fine-grained red-sensitive emulsions are given and good agreement between theory and experiments are found.

  16. Study of the formation, prevention, and recovery of plutonium from plutonium esters in the Purex process

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L. W.; Burney, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses the basic Purex process to separate /sup 239/Pu from /sup 238/U and fission products. Dark-brown, dense solids containing up to 30% Pu have previously occurred in rotameters in the plutonium finishing operations. The kinetics of formation of this mixture of DBP- and MBP-Pu esters suggest two methods to prevent the formation of the solids. A selective dissolution method using NaOH metathesis has been developed to separate the phosphate ester from the plutonium before dissolution of the residual plutonium hydroxide in a HNO/sub 3/-HF medium.

  17. The evolution of the earth's crust and of ore-formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugarinov, A. I.

    Special attention is given to various aspects of the Precambrian geochronology of various regions. A geochronological scale of the Precambrian is discussed, noting that correlations between continents that have been carried out with this scale are recognized internationally. Attention is also given to various problems concerning the evolution of the crust during the earth's geological history. Studies on the formation of ore deposits are included which deal not only with the origin of the ore but also with determining the exact physicochemical parameters of the ore-formation process.

  18. A 'tool box' for deciphering neuronal circuits in the developing chick spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hadas, Yoav; Etlin, Alex; Falk, Haya; Avraham, Oshri; Kobiler, Oren; Panet, Amos; Lev-Tov, Aharon; Klar, Avihu

    2014-10-29

    The genetic dissection of spinal circuits is an essential new means for understanding the neural basis of mammalian behavior. Molecular targeting of specific neuronal populations, a key instrument in the genetic dissection of neuronal circuits in the mouse model, is a complex and time-demanding process. Here we present a circuit-deciphering 'tool box' for fast, reliable and cheap genetic targeting of neuronal circuits in the developing spinal cord of the chick. We demonstrate targeting of motoneurons and spinal interneurons, mapping of axonal trajectories and synaptic targeting in both single and populations of spinal interneurons, and viral vector-mediated labeling of pre-motoneurons. We also demonstrate fluorescent imaging of the activity pattern of defined spinal neurons during rhythmic motor behavior, and assess the role of channel rhodopsin-targeted population of interneurons in rhythmic behavior using specific photoactivation.

  19. Essential processes for cognitive behavioral clinical supervision: Agenda setting, problem-solving, and formative feedback.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jorden A; Ballantyne, Elena C; Scallion, Laura M

    2015-06-01

    Clinical supervision should be a proactive and considered endeavor, not a reactive one. To that end, supervisors should choose supervision processes that are driven by theory, best available research, and clinical experience. These processes should be aimed at helping trainees develop as clinicians. We highlight 3 supervision processes we believe should be used at each supervision meeting: agenda setting, encouraging trainee problem-solving, and formative feedback. Although these are primarily cognitive-behavioral skills, they can be helpful in combination with other supervision models. We provide example dialogue from supervision exchanges, and discuss theoretical and research support for these processes. Using these processes not only encourages trainee development but also models for them how to use the same processes and approaches with clients.

  20. Statistical Behavior of Formation Process of Magnetic Vortex State in Ni80Fe20 Nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Keisuke, Yamada; Kasai, Shinya

    2011-01-14

    Magnetic vortices in magnetic nanodots, which are characterized by an in-plane (chirality) and an out-of-plane (polarity) magnetizations, have been intensively attracted because of their high potential for technological application to data storage and memory scheme as well as their scientific interest for an understanding of fundamental physics in magnetic nanostructures. Complete understanding of the formation process of vortex state in magnetic vortex systems is very significant issue to achieve storage and memory technologies using magnetic vortices and understand intrinsic physical properties in magnetic nanostructures. In our work, we have statistically investigated the formation process of vortex state in permalloy (Py, Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) nanodisks through the direct observation of vortex structure utilizing a magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy (MTXM) with a high spatial resolution down to 20 nm. Magnetic imaging in Py nanodots was performed at the Fe L{sub 3} (707 eV) absorption edge. Figure 1 shows in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic components observed in 40 nm thick nanodot arrays with different dot radius of r = 500 and 400 nm, respectively. Vortex chirality, either clockwise (CW) or counter-clockwise (CCW), and polarity, either up or down, are clearly visible in both arrays. To investigate the statistical behavior in formation process of the vortex state, the observation of vortex structure at a remanant state after saturation of nanodots by an external magnetic field of 1 kOe has been repeatedly performed over 100 times for each array. The typical MTXM images of vortex chirality taken in two successive measurements together with their overlapped images in nanodot arrays of r = 500 and 400 nm are displayed in Fig. 2. Within the statistical measurement, the formation process of chirality of either CW or CCW is quite stochastic in each nanodot. Similar behavior is also witnessed in the formation of vortex polarity observed in consecutive

  1. Examining the role of reciprocity within the formative assessment process alongside prospective teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaftan, Juliann M.

    This self-study examines the role of reciprocity within the formative assessment process in order to explore preservice teacher understandings of the complexities of the teaching/learning/assessment process. I study myself in relation to my practice in order to provide an account of how my knowledge of teaching is lived out in practice. Through the various chapters, I give the reader glimpses of my background and the particular situations that draw out theory/practice relations. The conceptual framework gives the reader an idea of the assumptions that frame my thinking. In particular, I articulate knowledge as experiential and perception as multi-layered. Self-study methodology enables a sharing of my professional history in relation to my practice by making the interaction of theory/practice relations transparent. The chapters on formative assessment and the depth of reciprocity share my knowledge in action as seen through the course design, materials used, social interactions, temporality of the daily schedule and pivotal moments. There is a recognition of the importance played by noticing the details and being open to the unexpected during these pivotal moments. Interaction, complexity and growth are seen as pervasive qualities that permeate the reciprocity of formative assessment when it is used to promote embodied understandings. What emerges by studying the dynamics of reciprocity is the range of depth of understanding that is encountered and allowed by various students. A pedagogy of embodiment is revealed as being connected with the role of reciprocity in formative assessment. When formative assessment is used as a process to expose student thinking and foster interaction, the complexity of the teaching/learning/assessment interaction is brought to light. Students who actively attempt to give meaning to and make sense of this complexity, through the reciprocity of formative assessment, come to embody a new, lived understanding of the teaching

  2. Deciphering Late-Pleistocence landscape evolution: linking proxies by combining pedo-stratigraphy and luminescence dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, Sebastian; Meszner, Sascha; Faust, Dominik; Fuchs, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Interpreting former landscape evolution asks for understanding the processes that sculpt such landforms by means of deciphering complex systems. For reconstructing terrestrial Quaternary environments based on loess archives this might be considered, at least, as a three step process: (1) Identifying valuable records in appropriate morphological positions in a previously defined research area, (2) analysing the profiles by field work and laboratory methods and finally (3) linking the previously considered pseudo-isolated systems to set up a comprehensive picture. Especially the first and the last step might bring some pitfalls, as it is tempting to specify single records as pseudo-isolated, closed systems. They might be, with regard to their preservation in their specific morphological position, but in fact they are part of a complex, open system. Between 2008 and 2013, Late-Pleistocene loess archives in Saxony have been intensively investigated by field and laboratory methods. Linking pedo- and luminescence dating based chronostratigraphies, a composite profile for the entire Saxonian Loess Region has been established. With this, at least, two-fold approach we tried to avoid misinterpretations that might appear when focussing on one standard profile in an open morphological system. Our contribution focuses on this multi-proxy approach to decipher the Late-Pleistocene landscape evolution in the Saxonian Loess Region. Highlighting the challenges and advantages of combining different methods, we believe that (1) this multi-proxy approach is without alternative, (2) the combination of different profiles may simplify the more complex reality, but it may be a useful generalisation to understand and reveal the stratigraphical significance of the landscape evolution in this region.

  3. Elucidation of an Iterative Process of Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation of Prebiotic Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loison, Aurélie; Dubant, Stéphane; Adam, Pierre; Albrecht, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory experiments carried out under plausible prebiotic conditions (under conditions that might have occurred at primitive deep-sea hydrothermal vents) in water and involving constituents that occur in the vicinity of submarine hydrothermal vents (e.g., CO, H2S, NiS) have disclosed an iterative Ni-catalyzed pathway of C-C bond formation. This pathway leads from CO to various organic molecules that comprise, notably, thiols, alkylmono- and disulfides, carboxylic acids, and related thioesters containing up to four carbon atoms. Furthermore, similar experiments with organic compounds containing various functionalities, such as thiols, carboxylic acids, thioesters, and alcohols, gave clues to the mechanisms of this novel synthetic process in which reduced metal species, in particular Ni(0), appear to be the key catalysts. Moreover, the formation of aldehydes (and ketones) as labile intermediates via a hydroformylation-related process proved to be at the core of the chain elongation process. Since this process can potentially lead to organic compounds with any chain length, it could have played a significant role in the prebiotic formation of lipidic amphiphilic molecules such as fatty acids, potential precursors of membrane constituents.

  4. Comparison of poultry processing equipment surfaces for susceptibility to bacterial attachment and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, J W; Silvers, S

    2000-08-01

    During processing of poultry meat products, broiler carcasses come in contact with many solid surfaces. Bacteria from the carcasses can attach to wet equipment surfaces, form biofilms, and provide a source of cross-contamination for subsequent carcasses. In this study an array of common equipment surface materials was compared for susceptibility to bacterial attachment and biofilms. To model mixed microbial populations relevant to poultry processing, samples were taken directly from the processing line and exposed to the surface materials. Whole carcasses were rinsed with phosphate-buffered saline (100 mL), and the rinse was diluted in nutrient broth. Absorbance values (412 nm) of the suspensions at varying dilutions containing test surfaces were compared hourly with controls without test surfaces. The kinetics of bacterial attachment and biofilm formation on test surfaces were determined under the influence of pH, time, and bacterial cell density, and the elemental composition of the surface materials was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Our results showed that surfaces vary in affinity for bacterial attachment and biofilm formation. Analysis by spectrophotometry and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that attachment to stainless steel, polyethylene, and belting was not significantly different from controls. Attachment to picker-finger rubber was significantly less than attachment to stainless steel and the other surfaces. In fact, picker-finger rubber inhibits bacterial contamination. An increased understanding of bacterial attachment and biofilm formation will assist in the development of interventions to counteract these processes and, thereby, enhance plant sanitation and pathogen control.

  5. Applications of all optical signal processing for advanced optical modulation formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuccio, Scott R.

    signal processing may play a role in the future development of more efficient optical transmission systems. The hope is that performing signal processing in the optical domain may reduce optical-to-electronic conversion inefficiencies, eliminate bottlenecks and take advantage of the ultrahigh bandwidth inherent in optics. While 40 to 50 Gbit/s electronic components are the peak of commercial technology and 100 Gbit/s capable RF components are still in their infancy, optical signal processing of these high-speed data signals may provide a potential solution. Furthermore, any optical processing system or sub-system must be capable of handling the wide array of data formats and data rates that networks may employ. It is also worth noting that future networks may use a combination of data-rates and formats while it has been estimated that "we may start seeing the first commercial use of Terabit Ethernets by 2015". -Robert Metcalfe. To this end, the work presented in this Ph.D. dissertation is aimed at addressing the issue of optical processing for advanced optical modulation formats. All optical multiplexing and demultiplexing of Pol-MUX and phase and QAM encoded signals at the 100 Gbit/s Ethernet standard is addressed. The creation and development of an extremely large continuously tunable all-optical delay capable of handling a variety of modulation formats and data rates is presented. As optical delays are viewed as a critical element to achieve efficient and reconfigurable signal processing, the presented delay line is also utilized to enable a tunable packet buffer capable of handling data packets of varying rate, varying size, and multiple modulation formats.

  6. Suppression of compensating native defect formation during semiconductor processing via excess carriers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alberi, Kirstin; Scarpulla, M. A.

    2016-06-21

    In many semiconductors, compensating defects set doping limits, decrease carrier mobility, and reduce minority carrier lifetime thus limiting their utility in devices. Native defects are often responsible. Suppressing the concentrations of compensating defects during processing close to thermal equilibrium is difficult because formation enthalpies are lowered as the Fermi level moves towards the majority band edge. Excess carriers, introduced for example by photogeneration, modify the formation enthalpy of semiconductor defects and thus can be harnessed during crystal growth or annealing to suppress defect populations. Herein we develop a rigorous and general model for defect formation in the presence of steady-statemore » excess carrier concentrations by combining the standard quasi-chemical formalism with a detailed-balance description that is applicable for any defect state in the bandgap. Considering the quasi-Fermi levels as chemical potentials, we demonstrate that increasing the minority carrier concentration increases the formation enthalpy for typical compensating centers, thus suppressing their formation. Furthermore, this effect is illustrated for the specific example of GaSb. While our treatment is generalized for excess carrier injection or generation in semiconductors by any means, we provide a set of guidelines for applying the concept in photoassisted physical vapor deposition.« less

  7. Suppression of compensating native defect formation during semiconductor processing via excess carriers.

    PubMed

    Alberi, K; Scarpulla, M A

    2016-01-01

    In many semiconductors, compensating defects set doping limits, decrease carrier mobility, and reduce minority carrier lifetime thus limiting their utility in devices. Native defects are often responsible. Suppressing the concentrations of compensating defects during processing close to thermal equilibrium is difficult because formation enthalpies are lowered as the Fermi level moves towards the majority band edge. Excess carriers, introduced for example by photogeneration, modify the formation enthalpy of semiconductor defects and thus can be harnessed during crystal growth or annealing to suppress defect populations. Herein we develop a rigorous and general model for defect formation in the presence of steady-state excess carrier concentrations by combining the standard quasi-chemical formalism with a detailed-balance description that is applicable for any defect state in the bandgap. Considering the quasi-Fermi levels as chemical potentials, we demonstrate that increasing the minority carrier concentration increases the formation enthalpy for typical compensating centers, thus suppressing their formation. This effect is illustrated for the specific example of GaSb. While our treatment is generalized for excess carrier injection or generation in semiconductors by any means, we provide a set of guidelines for applying the concept in photoassisted physical vapor deposition. PMID:27323863

  8. Suppression of compensating native defect formation during semiconductor processing via excess carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberi, K.; Scarpulla, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    In many semiconductors, compensating defects set doping limits, decrease carrier mobility, and reduce minority carrier lifetime thus limiting their utility in devices. Native defects are often responsible. Suppressing the concentrations of compensating defects during processing close to thermal equilibrium is difficult because formation enthalpies are lowered as the Fermi level moves towards the majority band edge. Excess carriers, introduced for example by photogeneration, modify the formation enthalpy of semiconductor defects and thus can be harnessed during crystal growth or annealing to suppress defect populations. Herein we develop a rigorous and general model for defect formation in the presence of steady-state excess carrier concentrations by combining the standard quasi-chemical formalism with a detailed-balance description that is applicable for any defect state in the bandgap. Considering the quasi-Fermi levels as chemical potentials, we demonstrate that increasing the minority carrier concentration increases the formation enthalpy for typical compensating centers, thus suppressing their formation. This effect is illustrated for the specific example of GaSb. While our treatment is generalized for excess carrier injection or generation in semiconductors by any means, we provide a set of guidelines for applying the concept in photoassisted physical vapor deposition.

  9. High-throughput process development of chromatography steps: advantages and limitations of different formats used.

    PubMed

    Łącki, Karol M

    2012-10-01

    In the past, development of a chromatographic separation method has been accomplished by performing a series of experiments using either manual or automated chromatography systems. The screening of a vast experimental space became very expensive because all experiments had to be performed in a serial manner, and the chromatography systems used were designed for relatively large columns and, therefore, the experiments required large sample volumes. To address these issues, high-throughput miniaturized methods employing different operating principles and/or formats have been introduced. Herein, a technical review of the most common high-throughput formats used for the development of chromatographic purification steps is presented. The formats considered include minicolumns, prefilled pipette tips, and microtiter filter plates prefilled with chromatography resins. Advantages and limitations of each format are discussed through the prism of chromatographic theory, engineering principles, and known mass-transfer mechanisms. A roadmap for applicability of the different formats for process development purposes and implementation of a Quality by Design initiative for designing/optimization of chromatography steps is also discussed.

  10. Suppression of compensating native defect formation during semiconductor processing via excess carriers

    PubMed Central

    Alberi, K.; Scarpulla, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    In many semiconductors, compensating defects set doping limits, decrease carrier mobility, and reduce minority carrier lifetime thus limiting their utility in devices. Native defects are often responsible. Suppressing the concentrations of compensating defects during processing close to thermal equilibrium is difficult because formation enthalpies are lowered as the Fermi level moves towards the majority band edge. Excess carriers, introduced for example by photogeneration, modify the formation enthalpy of semiconductor defects and thus can be harnessed during crystal growth or annealing to suppress defect populations. Herein we develop a rigorous and general model for defect formation in the presence of steady-state excess carrier concentrations by combining the standard quasi-chemical formalism with a detailed-balance description that is applicable for any defect state in the bandgap. Considering the quasi-Fermi levels as chemical potentials, we demonstrate that increasing the minority carrier concentration increases the formation enthalpy for typical compensating centers, thus suppressing their formation. This effect is illustrated for the specific example of GaSb. While our treatment is generalized for excess carrier injection or generation in semiconductors by any means, we provide a set of guidelines for applying the concept in photoassisted physical vapor deposition. PMID:27323863

  11. Motivational influences on impression formation: outcome dependency, accuracy-driven attention, and individuating processes.

    PubMed

    Neuberg, S L; Fiske, S T

    1987-09-01

    How might being outcome dependent on another person influence the processes that one uses to form impressions of that person? We designed three experiments to investigate this question with respect to short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency. In all three experiments, subjects expected to interact with a young man formerly hospitalized as a schizophrenic, and they received information about the person's attributes in either written profiles or videotapes. In Experiment 1, short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency led subjects to use relatively individuating processes (i.e., to base their impressions of the patient on his particular attributes), even under conditions that typically lead subjects to use relatively category-based processes (i.e., to base their impressions on the patient's schizophrenic label). Moreover, in the conditions that elicited individuating processes, subjects spent more time attending to the patient's particular attribute information. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the attention effects in Experiment 1 were not merely a function of impression positivity and that outcome dependency did not influence the impression formation process when attribute information in addition to category-level information was unavailable. Finally, Experiment 3 manipulated not outcome dependency but the attentional goal of forming an accurate impression. We found that accuracy-driven attention to attribute information also led to individuating processes. The results of the three experiments indicate that there are important influences of outcome dependency on impression formation. These results are consistent with a model in which the tendency for short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency to facilitate individuating impression formation processes is mediated by an increase in accuracy-driven attention to attribute information.

  12. Motivational influences on impression formation: outcome dependency, accuracy-driven attention, and individuating processes.

    PubMed

    Neuberg, S L; Fiske, S T

    1987-09-01

    How might being outcome dependent on another person influence the processes that one uses to form impressions of that person? We designed three experiments to investigate this question with respect to short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency. In all three experiments, subjects expected to interact with a young man formerly hospitalized as a schizophrenic, and they received information about the person's attributes in either written profiles or videotapes. In Experiment 1, short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency led subjects to use relatively individuating processes (i.e., to base their impressions of the patient on his particular attributes), even under conditions that typically lead subjects to use relatively category-based processes (i.e., to base their impressions on the patient's schizophrenic label). Moreover, in the conditions that elicited individuating processes, subjects spent more time attending to the patient's particular attribute information. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the attention effects in Experiment 1 were not merely a function of impression positivity and that outcome dependency did not influence the impression formation process when attribute information in addition to category-level information was unavailable. Finally, Experiment 3 manipulated not outcome dependency but the attentional goal of forming an accurate impression. We found that accuracy-driven attention to attribute information also led to individuating processes. The results of the three experiments indicate that there are important influences of outcome dependency on impression formation. These results are consistent with a model in which the tendency for short-term, task-oriented outcome dependency to facilitate individuating impression formation processes is mediated by an increase in accuracy-driven attention to attribute information. PMID:3656080

  13. Kinetics of the formation of radicals in meat during high pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Bolumar, Tomas; Skibsted, Leif H; Orlien, Vibeke

    2012-10-15

    The kinetics of the formation of radicals in meat by high pressure processing (HPP) has been described for the first time. A threshold for the radicals to form at 400 MPa at 25 °C and at 500 MPa at 5 °C has been found. Above this threshold, an increased formation of radicals was observed with increasing pressure (400-800 MPa), temperature (5-40 °C) and time (0-60 min). The volume of activation (ΔV(#)) was found to have the value -17 ml mol(-1). The energy of activation (E(a)) was calculated to be 25-29 kJ mol(-1) within the pressure range (500-800 MPa) indicating high independence on the temperature at high pressures whereas the reaction was strongly dependent at atmospheric pressure (E(a)=181 kJ mol(-1)). According to the effect of the processing conditions on the reaction rate, three groups of increasing order of radical formation were established: (1) 55 °C at 0.1 MPa, (2) 500 and 600 MPa at 25 °C and 65 °C at 0.1 MPa, and (3) 700 MPa at 25 °C and 75 °C at 0.1 MPa. The implication of the formation of radicals as initiators of lipid oxidation under HPP is discussed.

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of the process of biofilm formation in Rhizobium etli CFN42.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Pérez, Agustín; Vargas, María Del Carmen; Hernández, Magdalena; Aguirre-von-Wobeser, Eneas; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Encarnacion, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    Organisms belonging to the genus Rhizobium colonize leguminous plant roots and establish a mutually beneficial symbiosis. Biofilms are structured ecosystems in which microbes are embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, and their development is a multistep process. The biofilm formation processes of R. etli CFN42 were analyzed at an early (24-h incubation) and mature stage (72 h), comparing cells in the biofilm with cells remaining in the planktonic stage. A genome-wide microarray analysis identified 498 differentially regulated genes, implying that expression of ~8.3 % of the total R. etli gene content was altered during biofilm formation. In biofilms-attached cells, genes encoding proteins with diverse functions were overexpressed including genes involved in membrane synthesis, transport and chemotaxis, repression of flagellin synthesis, as well as surface components (particularly exopolysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides), in combination with the presence of activators or stimulators of N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthesis This suggests that R. etli is able to sense surrounding environmental conditions and accordingly regulate the transition from planktonic and biofilm growth. In contrast, planktonic cells differentially expressed genes associated with transport, motility (flagellar and twitching) and inhibition of exopolysaccharide synthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of nodulation and nitrogen assimilation-related genes being involved in biofilm formation in R. etli. These results contribute to the understanding of the physiological changes involved in biofilm formation by bacteria.

  15. The indication of Martian gully formation processes by slope-area analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conway, S.J.; Balme, M.R.; Murray, J.B.; Towner, M.C.; Okubo, C.H.; Grindrod, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    The formation process of recent gullies on Mars is currently under debate. This study aims to discriminate between the proposed formation processes - pure water flow, debris flow and dry mass wasting - through the application of geomorphological indices commonly used in terrestrial geomorphology. High-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) of Earth and Mars were used to evaluate the drainage characteristics of small slope sections. Data from Earth were used to validate the hillslope, debris-flow and alluvial process domains previously found for large fluvial catchments on Earth, and these domains were applied to gullied and ungullied slopes on Mars. In accordance with other studies, our results indicate that debris flow is one of the main processes forming the Martian gullies that were being examined. The source of the water is predominantly distributed surface melting, not an underground aquifer. Evidence is also presented indicating that other processes may have shaped Martian crater slopes, such as ice-assisted creep and solifluction, in agreement with the proposed recent Martian glacial and periglacial climate. Our results suggest that, within impact craters, different processes are acting on differently oriented slopes, but further work is needed to investigate the potential link between these observations and changes in Martian climate. ?? The Geological Society of London 2011.

  16. Formation of Volatile Tea Constituent Indole During the Oolong Tea Manufacturing Process.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lanting; Zhou, Ying; Gui, Jiadong; Fu, Xiumin; Mei, Xin; Zhen, Yunpeng; Ye, Tingxiang; Du, Bing; Dong, Fang; Watanabe, Naoharu; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-06-22

    Indole is a characteristic volatile constituent in oolong tea. Our previous study indicated that indole was mostly accumulated at the turn over stage of oolong tea manufacturing process. However, formation of indole in tea leaves remains unknown. In this study, one tryptophan synthase α-subunit (TSA) and three tryptophan synthase β-subunits (TSBs) from tea leaves were isolated, cloned, sequenced, and functionally characterized. Combination of CsTSA and CsTSB2 recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli exhibited the ability of transformation from indole-3-glycerol phosphate to indole. CsTSB2 was highly expressed during the turn over process of oolong tea. Continuous mechanical damage, simulating the turn over process, significantly enhanced the expression level of CsTSB2 and amount of indole. These suggested that accumulation of indole in oolong tea was due to the activation of CsTSB2 by continuous wounding stress from the turn over process. Black teas contain much less indole, although wounding stress is also involved in the manufacturing process. Stable isotope labeling indicated that tea leaf cell disruption from the rolling process of black tea did not lead to the conversion of indole, but terminated the synthesis of indole. Our study provided evidence concerning formation of indole in tea leaves for the first time. PMID:27263428

  17. Depression and the impression-formation continuum: piecemeal processing despite the availability of category information.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J A; Weary, G

    1993-04-01

    A study explored depressed-nondepressed differences in impression formation. From S. T. Fiske and S. L. Neuberg's (1990) model of impression formation, mildly depressed perceivers were hypothesized to engage in more piecemeal processing when forming an impression of a target other, even when nondepressed perceivers would typically use less effortful, categorical processing. With an idiographic technique designed by M. Pavelchak (1989), depressed Ss were shown to use trait attributes in evaluating a person, even when induced to categorize the individual. Nondepressed Ss relied on category information when available, replicating Pavelchak's study. Depressed Ss' results are interpreted as arising from a motivation to engage in effortful analysis of social information, stemming from feelings of lack of control over life events. PMID:8473980

  18. Depression and the impression-formation continuum: piecemeal processing despite the availability of category information.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J A; Weary, G

    1993-04-01

    A study explored depressed-nondepressed differences in impression formation. From S. T. Fiske and S. L. Neuberg's (1990) model of impression formation, mildly depressed perceivers were hypothesized to engage in more piecemeal processing when forming an impression of a target other, even when nondepressed perceivers would typically use less effortful, categorical processing. With an idiographic technique designed by M. Pavelchak (1989), depressed Ss were shown to use trait attributes in evaluating a person, even when induced to categorize the individual. Nondepressed Ss relied on category information when available, replicating Pavelchak's study. Depressed Ss' results are interpreted as arising from a motivation to engage in effortful analysis of social information, stemming from feelings of lack of control over life events.

  19. Processes of Formation of Spheroidal Concretions and Inferences for "Blueberries" in Meridiani Planum Sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Max

    2005-01-01

    The MER Opportunity Athena Science team has described spheroidal hematite nodules in sediments at Meridiani Planum on Mars [1]. They were informally referred to as "Blueberries" in the initial press releases and for brevity that is the name to be used in this abstract. Not all spheroidal objects in sediments are nodular concretions, but this paper will discuss the diagenetic processes possibly relevant to understanding the origin of the Blueberries. There are many occurrences of spheroidal diagenetic concretions in terrestrial sediments and detailed work has been done to understand the processes of their formation. In particular, it is possible to reconstruct the controls on their shapes and compositions, both mineral and chemical. Although there may not be good analogs for the Meridiani Planum hematite spherules on Earth, it may be possible to deduce the former environmental conditions that led to their formation and whether they might retain (or even be) biosignatures.

  20. Robust carrier formation process in low-band gap organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Kouhei; Kamioka, Hayato; Yasuda, Takeshi; Han, Liyuan; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2013-10-01

    By means of femto-second time-resolved spectroscopy, we investigated the carrier formation process against film morphology and temperature (T) in highly-efficient organic photovoltaic, poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b '] dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b] thiophenediyl

  1. Verbalization and imagery in the process of formation of operator labor skills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mistyuk, V. V.

    1975-01-01

    Sensorimotor control tests show that mastering operational skills occurs under conditions that stimulate the operator to independent active analysis and summarization of current information with the goal of clarifying the signs and the integral images that are a model of the situation. Goal directed determination of such an image requires inner and external speech, activates and improves the thinking of the operator, accelerates the training process, increases its effectiveness, and enables the formation of strategies in anticipating the course of events.

  2. The planté formation process for lead—acid positive electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampson, Noel; Lazarides, Constantine; Henderson, M.

    1981-11-01

    The perchlorate assisted oxidation of lead to lead dioxide in dilute sulphuric acid containing perchlorate ion has been investigated under conditions similar to those used for Planté electrode production. The optimum concentration of perchlorate ion has been estimated. It is shown that if the electrode is not fully passivated by lead sulphate before the potential is increased to form PbO 2, the process of PbO 2 formation proceeds progressively.

  3. Amines compounds as inhibitors of PCDD/Fs de novo formation on sintering process fly ash.

    PubMed

    Xhrouet, Céline; Nadin, Caroline; De Pauw, Edwin

    2002-06-15

    The polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are highly toxic compounds produced by some natural processes and different human activities. Waste incineration as well as steel and iron industries, in particular, the sintering process, are among the principal sources of these pollutants. In this paper, two inhibitors, triethanolamine (TEA) and monoethanolamine (MEA) are tested relating to their abilityto prevent the de novo formation of PCDD/Fs on sinter plant fly ash. The amounts of both PCDDs and PCDFs, formed by thermal treatment of the fly ash, decrease when inhibitors are added. The best results, up to 90% reduction of the PCDD/ Fs formation, are obtained when MEA is mixed with the fly ash at the highest concentration tested (2 wt %). The addition of inhibitors modifies the PCDFs/PCDDs ratios and, under some experimental conditions, the PCDD/Fs homologue distributions, suggesting that more than one pathway for the de novo formation of PCDD/Fs exist. On the other hand, no modification in the PCDD/Fs isomer distributions is observed as a result of the addition of inhibitors, in accordance with the possible thermodynamic control of these distributions. The temperature tested, 325 and 400 degrees C, does not affect the inhibition activity; however, longer reaction times (4 h instead of 2 h) give better percentages of PCDD/Fs reduction. The results suggest that the two inhibitors and especially MEA can reduce the PCDD/Fs formation on sinter plant fly ash under various conditions of temperature and reaction time, making them suitable for use in the real process. Tests performed in parallel at a real sinter plant are in good agreement with the laboratory experiments and confirm that the use of inhibitors is an appropriate technique for the prevention of PCDD/Fs emissions from sintering processes.

  4. Studies into the formation of PBDEs and PBDD/Fs in the iron ore sintering process.

    PubMed

    Drage, D S; Aries, E; Harrad, S

    2014-07-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PBDD/Fs) were detected in stack emissions from UK sinter plants. The sum of 36 PBDE congeners was measured at a mean concentration of 295 ng/N m(3) with a standard deviation of 96 ng/N m(3). The mean PBDD/F concentrations were 0.14 ng WHO-TEQ/m(3) (range=0.03-0.39). PBDD/F emission concentrations were approximately ten times lower than their PCDD/F homologues. To understand the possible formation mechanisms of brominated organic species in iron ore sintering, both full-scale and laboratory experiments using an experimental sintering process were carried out. A complete PBDE mass balance was undertaken for a full scale sinter plant showing that PBDEs were already present in the raw materials such as iron ores and coke breeze and that a significant proportion of the PBDE inputs were actually destroyed during the process. A number of controlled experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale sintering apparatus (sinter pot). These were designed to investigate: (a) mass balance of PBDEs during sintering, (b) the relationship between the availability of bromide (as KBr) and PBDE emissions, and (c) the influence of the availability of both bromide and PBDEs on PBDD/F formation. As observed in the full scale plant, the PBDEs already present in the raw materials were mostly destroyed during the process (79-96%) for all sinter pot experiments. Increasing amounts of KBr in the raw sinter mix did not result in a significant increase in PBDE formation suggesting that there was no PBDE formation in sintering via de novo synthesis. No relationship was observed between PBDE inputs and PBDD/F emissions indicating that PBDEs did not act as precursors for PBDD/Fs formation. Finally, PBDD/F formation was enhanced substantially with increasing amounts of KBr suggesting that their formation mechanism was similar to that of PCDD/Fs via de novo synthesis.

  5. Design and process aspects of laboratory scale SCF particle formation systems.

    PubMed

    Vemavarapu, Chandra; Mollan, Matthew J; Lodaya, Mayur; Needham, Thomas E

    2005-03-23

    Consistent production of solid drug materials of desired particle and crystallographic morphologies under cGMP conditions is a frequent challenge to pharmaceutical researchers. Supercritical fluid (SCF) technology gained significant attention in pharmaceutical research by not only showing a promise in this regard but also accommodating the principles of green chemistry. Given that this technology attained commercialization in coffee decaffeination and in the extraction of hops and other essential oils, a majority of the off-the-shelf SCF instrumentation is designed for extraction purposes. Only a selective few vendors appear to be in the early stages of manufacturing equipment designed for particle formation. The scarcity of information on the design and process engineering of laboratory scale equipment is recognized as a significant shortcoming to the technological progress. The purpose of this article is therefore to provide the information and resources necessary for startup research involving particle formation using supercritical fluids. The various stages of particle formation by supercritical fluid processing can be broadly classified into delivery, reaction, pre-expansion, expansion and collection. The importance of each of these processes in tailoring the particle morphology is discussed in this article along with presenting various alternatives to perform these operations.

  6. Formation, molecular structure, and morphology of humins in biomass conversion: influence of feedstock and processing conditions.

    PubMed

    van Zandvoort, Ilona; Wang, Yuehu; Rasrendra, Carolus B; van Eck, Ernst R H; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Heeres, Hero J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2013-09-01

    Neither the routes through which humin byproducts are formed, nor their molecular structure have yet been unequivocally established. A better understanding of the formation and physicochemical properties of humins, however, would aid in making biomass conversion processes more efficient. Here, an extensive multiple-technique-based study of the formation, molecular structure, and morphology of humins is presented as a function of sugar feed, the presence of additives (e.g., 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene), and the applied processing conditions. Elemental analyses indicate that humins are formed through a dehydration pathway, with humin formation and levulinic acid yields strongly depending on the processing parameters. The addition of implied intermediates to the feedstocks showed that furan and phenol compounds formed during the acid-catalyzed dehydration of sugars are indeed included in the humin structure. IR spectra, sheared sum projections of solid-state 2DPASS (13) C NMR spectra, and pyrolysis GC-MS data indicate that humins consist of a furan-rich polymer network containing different oxygen functional groups. The structure is furthermore found to strongly depend on the type of feedstock. A model for the molecular structure of humins is proposed based on the data presented. PMID:23836679

  7. Self-consistent modeling of jet formation process in the nanosecond laser pulse regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mezel, C.; Hallo, L.; Breil, J.; Souquet, A.; Guillemot, F.; Hebert, D.

    2009-12-15

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct printing technique. Because of its high application potential, interest continues to increase. LIFT is routinely used in printing, spray generation and thermal-spike sputtering. Biological material such as cells and proteins have already been transferred successfully for the creation of biological microarrays. Recently, modeling has been used to explain parts of the ejection transfer process. No global modeling strategy is currently available. In this paper, a hydrodynamic code is utilized to model the jet formation process and estimate the constraints obeyed by the bioelements during the transfer. A self-consistent model that includes laser energy absorption, plasma formation via ablation, and hydrodynamic processes is proposed and confirmed with experimental results. Fundamental physical mechanisms via one-dimensional modeling are presented. Two-dimensional (2D) simplified solutions of the jet formation model equations are proposed. Predicted results of the model are jet existence and its velocity. The 2D simulation results are in good agreement with a simple model presented by a previous investigator.

  8. Characterization of aquatic humic substances to DBPs formation in advanced treatment processes for conventionally treated water.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Yu, Myong-Jin

    2007-05-01

    An advanced water treatment demonstration plant consisted of ozone/granular activated carbon processes was operated to study feasibility of the processes. Natural organic matter (NOM) from raw and process waters at the demonstration plant was isolated into humic and non-humic fractions by physicochemical fractionation method to investigate characteristics of humic fraction (i.e., humic substances, HS) as a predominant haloform reactant. Ozone did not significantly oxidize the carboxylic fraction (from 39.1 to 35.9%), while GAC removed some of the carboxylic fraction (from 35.9 to 29.1%). Formation potential of trihalomethanes (THMs) as compared to haloacetic acids formation potential (HAAFP) was highly influenced by HS. Higher yields of THMs resulted from chlorination of HS with a higher phenolic content and phenolic fraction in the HS gradually decreased from 60.5% to 15.8% through the water treatment. The structural and functional changes of HS were identified by elemental, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) analyses, and these results were mutually consistent. The functional distribution data obtained by using A-21 resin could be used to support the interpretation of data obtained from the spectroscopic analyses. Decreases in ratio of UV absorbance at 253 nm and 203 nm (A(253)/A(203)) and DBPFPs/DOC showed consistent trends, therefore, A(253)/A(203) ratio may be a good indicator for the disinfection by-product formation potentials (DBPFPs).

  9. Design and process aspects of laboratory scale SCF particle formation systems.

    PubMed

    Vemavarapu, Chandra; Mollan, Matthew J; Lodaya, Mayur; Needham, Thomas E

    2005-03-23

    Consistent production of solid drug materials of desired particle and crystallographic morphologies under cGMP conditions is a frequent challenge to pharmaceutical researchers. Supercritical fluid (SCF) technology gained significant attention in pharmaceutical research by not only showing a promise in this regard but also accommodating the principles of green chemistry. Given that this technology attained commercialization in coffee decaffeination and in the extraction of hops and other essential oils, a majority of the off-the-shelf SCF instrumentation is designed for extraction purposes. Only a selective few vendors appear to be in the early stages of manufacturing equipment designed for particle formation. The scarcity of information on the design and process engineering of laboratory scale equipment is recognized as a significant shortcoming to the technological progress. The purpose of this article is therefore to provide the information and resources necessary for startup research involving particle formation using supercritical fluids. The various stages of particle formation by supercritical fluid processing can be broadly classified into delivery, reaction, pre-expansion, expansion and collection. The importance of each of these processes in tailoring the particle morphology is discussed in this article along with presenting various alternatives to perform these operations. PMID:15725549

  10. Formation and post-deposition compression of smooth and processable silicon thin films from nanoparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafferis, Noah T.; Sturm, James C.

    2012-03-01

    We report the formation of smooth and processable silicon thin-films from single-crystal silicon-nanoparticle suspensions. Single-crystal Si-nanoparticles (1-4 nm) are produced and suspended in various solvents. Films deposited from the suspension are mechanically stable and can be patterned and processed upon deposition. Physical compression of the films is presented as a mechanism to reduce porosity and global roughness. These thin-films, ˜100 nm thick and deposited from a single droplet, contain significant levels of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Resistivities of the as-deposited films are ˜7.107 Ω.cm—comparable to intrinsic nanocrystalline-Si.

  11. Apparatus and process to enhance the uniform formation of hollow glass microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Ray F

    2013-10-01

    A process and apparatus is provided for enhancing the formation of a uniform population of hollow glass microspheres. A burner head is used which directs incoming glass particles away from the cooler perimeter of the flame cone of the gas burner and distributes the glass particles in a uniform manner throughout the more evenly heated portions of the flame zone. As a result, as the glass particles are softened and expand by a released nucleating gas so as to form a hollow glass microsphere, the resulting hollow glass microspheres have a more uniform size and property distribution as a result of experiencing a more homogenous heat treatment process.

  12. Study on formation mechanism of periodic ripple on finished KDP crystal in cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Guipeng; Guan, Chaoliang

    2015-07-01

    A kind of formation mechanism of periodic ripple on finished KDP (potassium dihydrogen phosphate) crystal in cutting process is studied by analyzing the change of equivalent axial stiffness of aerostatic spindle and consequent motion of spindle shaft caused by fluctuation of supply air pressure. The analysis shows that fluctuation of supply air pressure is one of the reasons to cause surface ripple. Correlative experiments are taken and validate the analysis. By strictly controlling air pressure fluctuation, the Peak-to-Valley (PV) value of surface ripple generated by both spiral turning and face flycutting processes are reduced to less than 5nm.

  13. Langevin Dynamics Deciphers the Motility Pattern of Swimming Parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaburdaev, Vasily; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Pfohl, Thomas; Engstler, Markus; Friedrich, Rudolf; Stark, Holger

    2011-05-01

    The parasite African trypanosome swims in the bloodstream of mammals and causes the highly dangerous human sleeping sickness. Cell motility is essential for the parasite’s survival within the mammalian host. We present an analysis of the random-walk pattern of a swimming trypanosome. From experimental time-autocorrelation functions for the direction of motion we identify two relaxation times that differ by an order of magnitude. They originate from the rapid deformations of the cell body and a slower rotational diffusion of the average swimming direction. Velocity fluctuations are athermal and increase for faster cells whose trajectories are also straighter. We demonstrate that such a complex dynamics is captured by two decoupled Langevin equations that decipher the complex trajectory pattern by referring it to the microscopic details of cell behavior.

  14. The becoming: students' reflections on the process of professional identity formation in medical education.

    PubMed

    Sharpless, Joanna; Baldwin, Nell; Cook, Robert; Kofman, Aaron; Morley-Fletcher, Alessio; Slotkin, Rebecca; Wald, Hedy S

    2015-06-01

    Professional identity formation (PIF) within medical education is the multifaceted, individualized process through which students develop new ways of being in becoming physicians. Personal backgrounds, values, expectations, interests, goals, relationships, and role models can all influence PIF and may account for diversity of both experience and the active constructive process of professional formation. Guided reflection, including reflective writing, has been used to enhance awareness and meaning making within the PIF process for both students and medical educators and to shed light on what aspects of medical education are most constructive for healthy PIF. Student voices about the PIF process now emerging in the literature are often considered and interpreted by medical educators within qualitative studies or in broad theoretical overviews of PIF.In this Commentary, the authors present a chorus of individual student voices from along the medical education trajectory. Medical students (years 1-4) and a first-year resident in pediatrics respond to a variety of questions based on prevalent PIF themes extracted from the literature to reflect on their personal experiences of PIF. Topics queried included pretending in medical education, role of relationships, impact of formal and informal curricula on PIF (valuable aspects as well as suggestions for change), and navigating and developing interprofessional relationships and identities. This work aims to vividly illustrate the diverse and personal forces at play in individual students' PIF processes and to encourage future pedagogic efforts supporting healthy, integrated PIF in medical education. PMID:25881650

  15. The becoming: students' reflections on the process of professional identity formation in medical education.

    PubMed

    Sharpless, Joanna; Baldwin, Nell; Cook, Robert; Kofman, Aaron; Morley-Fletcher, Alessio; Slotkin, Rebecca; Wald, Hedy S

    2015-06-01

    Professional identity formation (PIF) within medical education is the multifaceted, individualized process through which students develop new ways of being in becoming physicians. Personal backgrounds, values, expectations, interests, goals, relationships, and role models can all influence PIF and may account for diversity of both experience and the active constructive process of professional formation. Guided reflection, including reflective writing, has been used to enhance awareness and meaning making within the PIF process for both students and medical educators and to shed light on what aspects of medical education are most constructive for healthy PIF. Student voices about the PIF process now emerging in the literature are often considered and interpreted by medical educators within qualitative studies or in broad theoretical overviews of PIF.In this Commentary, the authors present a chorus of individual student voices from along the medical education trajectory. Medical students (years 1-4) and a first-year resident in pediatrics respond to a variety of questions based on prevalent PIF themes extracted from the literature to reflect on their personal experiences of PIF. Topics queried included pretending in medical education, role of relationships, impact of formal and informal curricula on PIF (valuable aspects as well as suggestions for change), and navigating and developing interprofessional relationships and identities. This work aims to vividly illustrate the diverse and personal forces at play in individual students' PIF processes and to encourage future pedagogic efforts supporting healthy, integrated PIF in medical education.

  16. Cloud processing of organic compounds: Secondary organic aerosol and nitrosamine formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, James W., III

    Cloud processing of atmospheric organic compounds has been investigated through field studies, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling. Observational cloud chemistry studies were performed in northern Arizona and fog studies in central Pennsylvania. At both locations, the cloud and fogs showed low acidity due to neutralization by soil dust components (Arizona) and ammonia (Pennsylvania). The field observations showed substantial concentrations (20-5500 ng•L -1) of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the cloud droplets. The potential generation of secondary organic aerosol mass through the processing of these anthropogenic VOCs was investigated through laboratory and modeling studies. Under simulated atmospheric conditions, in idealized solutions, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) degraded quickly in the aqueous phase with half lives of approximately three hours. The degradation process yielded less volatile products which would contribute to new aerosol mass upon cloud evaporation. However, when realistic cloud solutions containing natural organic matter were used in the experiments, the reaction kinetics decreased with increasing organic carbon content, resulting in half lives of approximately 7 hours. The secondary organic aerosol (SUA) mass formation potential of cloud processing of BTEX was evaluated. SOA mass formation by cloud processing of BTEX, while strongly dependent on the atmospheric conditions, could contribute up to 9% of the ambient atmospheric aerosol mass, although typically ˜1% appears realistic. Field observations also showed the occurrence of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a potent carcinogen, in fogs and clouds (100-340 ng•L -1). Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the formation of NDMA from nitrous acid and dimethylamine in the homogeneous aqueous phase within cloud droplets. While NDMA was produced in the cloud droplets, the low yields (<1%) observed could not explain observational concentrations

  17. Tectonic and Aqueous Processes in the Formation of Mass-wasting Features on Mars and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Fundamental to the advancement of planetary geology is an understanding of the interaction between tectonic and aqueous processes on planetary surfaces. This dissertation examines this interaction within two geomorphologic processes: landslide emplacement, on Mars and on Earth, and the formation of seasonal slope features on Mars. Long-runout landsliding in equatorial Valles Marineris, Mars is among the most prominent geomorphic occurrences shaping the canyon. However, the mechanism of landslide long-distance transport, and the highly debated role of water therein, remains elusive. Through systematic mapping of high-resolution satellite images, integrated with spectral analysis, we show that hydrated silicates played a decisive role in facilitating landslide transport by lubricating the basal sliding zone. This conclusion implies that clay minerals, generated by ancient water-rock interactions, exert a long-lasting influence on Mars surface processes. The Eureka Valley (EV) landslide is an unexamined, well-preserved long-runout landslide in arid southeast Eureka Valley, California. The field, photogeologic, spectral, and luminescence dating investigation presented here support initiation as a result of fault-generated fracture during the mid to early Holocene at minimum, and transport lubricated by the presence of basal clays, characterized by 3-D internal deformation, as the most likely EV landslide emplacement mechanism. This geomorphological characterization may be applied to long-runout landslides on Earth and other planetary surfaces, suggesting that their emplacement likely does not require the participation of water. Recurring slope lineae (RSL) are seasonal, narrow, low-albedo features extending down steep, equator-facing Mars slopes. RSL formation has been largely attributed to the seepage of near-surface water, though its source is not well understood. Through detailed analysis of high-resolution satellite images of RSL geologic contexts, we quantify the

  18. Modifying the processing and handling of frozen broccoli for increased sulforaphane formation.

    PubMed

    Dosz, Edward B; Jeffery, Elizabeth H

    2013-09-01

    Frozen broccoli can provide a cheaper product, with a longer shelf life and less preparation time than fresh broccoli. We previously showed that several commercially available frozen broccoli products do not retain the ability to generate the cancer-preventative agent sulforaphane. We hypothesized that this was because the necessary hydrolyzing enzyme myrosinase was destroyed during blanching, as part of the processing that frozen broccoli undergoes. This study was carried out to determine a way to overcome loss of hydrolyzing activity. Industrial blanching usually aims to inactivate peroxidase, although lipoxygenase plays a greater role in product degradation during frozen storage of broccoli. Blanching at 86 °C or higher inactivated peroxidase, lipoxygenase, and myrosinase. Blanching at 76 °C inactivated 92% of lipoxygenase activity, whereas there was only an 18% loss in myrosinase-dependent sulforaphane formation. We considered that thawing frozen broccoli might disrupt membrane integrity, allowing myrosinase and glucoraphanin to come into contact. Thawing frozen broccoli for 9 h did not support sulforaphane formation unless an exogenous source of myrosinase was added. Thermal stability studies showed that broccoli root, as a source of myrosinase, was not more heat stable than broccoli floret. Daikon radish root supported some sulforaphane formation even when heated at 125 °C for 10 min, a time and temperature comparable to or greater than microwave cooking. Daikon radish (0.25%) added to frozen broccoli that was then allowed to thaw supported sulforaphane formation without any visual alteration to that of untreated broccoli.

  19. The influence of VAR processes and parameters on white spot formation in Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Damkroger, B.K.; Kelley, J.B.; Schlienger, M.E.; Van Den Avyle, J.A.; Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.

    1994-05-01

    Significant progress has occurred lately regarding the classification, characterization, and formation of white spots during vacuum arc remelting (VAR). White spots have been generally split into three categories: discrete white spots, which are believed to be associated with undissolved material which has fallen in from the shelf, crown, or torus regions; dendritic white spots, usually associated with dendrite clusters having fallen from the electrode; and solidification white spots, believed to be caused by local perturbations in the solidifications conditions. Characteristics and proposed formation mechanisms of white spots are reviewed and discussed in context of physical processes occurring during VAR, such as fluid flow and arc behavior. Where possible, their formation mechanisms will be considered with respect to specific operating parameters. In order to more fully understand the formation of solidification white spots, an experimental program has been begun to characterize the solidification stability of Alloy 718 and variants with respect to changes in growth rate and thermal environment. A description of the experimental program and preliminary results are included.

  20. Process of Hypertrophic Scar Formation: Expression of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing-Qing; Yang, Si-Si; Tan, Jiang-Lin; Luo, Gao-Xing; He, Wei-Feng; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic scar is one of the most common complications and often causes the disfigurement or deformity in burn or trauma patients. Therapeutic methods on hypertrophic scar treatment have limitations due to the poor understanding of mechanisms of hypertrophic scar formation. To throw light on the molecular mechanism of hypertrophic scar formation will definitely improve the outcome of the treatment. This study aimed to illustrate the negative role of eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6) in the process of human hypertrophic scar formation, and provide a possible indicator of hypertrophic scar treatment and a potential target molecule for hypertrophic scar. Methods: In the present study, we investigated the protein expression of eIF6 in the human hypertrophic scar of different periods by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Results: In the hypertrophic scar tissue, eIF6 expression was significantly decreased and absent in the basal layer of epidermis in the early period, and increased slowly and began to appear in the basal layer of epidermis by the scar formation time. Conclusions: This study confirmed that eIF6 expression was significantly related to the development of hypertrophic scar, and the eIF6 may be a target molecule for hypertrophic scar control or could be an indicator of the outcomes for other treatment modalities. PMID:26481747

  1. [Formation of Halogenated By-products in Co²⁺ Activated Peroxymonosulfate Oxidation Process].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo; Jin, Hao; Dong, Wei; Ji, Yue-fei; Lu, Jun-he

    2016-05-15

    Sulfate radicals (SO₄·⁻) generated by Co²⁺ catalyzed activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) are highly oxidative and can be applied to degrade various organic pollutants. It was revealed in this research that bromide could be transformed in this process to reactive bromine species which reacted with phenol subsequently, leading to the formation of bromophenols and brominated by-products such as bromoform and dibromoacetic acid. The formation of the brominated by-products first increased and then decreased. The maximum yields of bromoform (10.3 µmol · L⁻¹) and dibromoacetic acid (14.6 µmol · L⁻¹) occurred at approximately 8 h with initial phenol, PMS, Br⁻, Co²⁺, concentrations of 0.05, 1.0, 0.2, and 5 µmol · L⁻¹, respectively. Formation of the brominated by-products decreased with increasing pH. With constant total halides, increasing Cl⁻/Br⁻ ratio decreased the total formation of halogenated by- products but generated more chlorinated byproducts. The findings of this research can provide valuable information in assessing the feasibility of SO₄·⁻ based oxidation technologies in real practice. PMID:27506036

  2. About the influence of the presentation format on arithmetical-fact retrieval processes.

    PubMed

    Noël, M P; Fias, W; Brysbaert, M

    1997-06-01

    This article presents the results of two experiments. In Experiment 1, French-speaking participants were asked first to retrieve the product of two numbers presented in Arabic or verbal code, and then to perform a number-matching task on the same material to assess the encoding time difference between numerals in the two formats. Experiment 2 involved the same multiplication task with Dutch-speaking participants who name two-digit numbers in reverse order. The format effects obtained by Campbell and Clark (1992); Campbell (1994) for multiplication were replicated. However, several observations suggest that some of these effects may be due to encoding time differences between word and digit numerals. The same size-by-format interaction was found for the number-matching task as for the multiplication task, and the effect disappeared with practice in the multiplication task. Finally, despite the fact that the linguistic structure of number names differs between French and Dutch, the types of error produced in both groups were identical. The last result does not match with the hypothesis that operand intrusion errors are due to interference between reading processes and arithmetical-fact retrieval processes. Implications of these findings for the debate about the nature of arithmetical-fact retrieval are discussed.

  3. Processing of Double-Differential Cross Sections in the New ENDF-VI Format.

    1987-08-28

    Version 00 GROUPXS does file handling and processing of the double-differential continuum-emission cross sections stored in the new MF6 format of ENDF/VI. It treats the energy-angle data that are supposed to be represented by a Legendre-polynomial expansion in the center-of-mass system and can do the following: (1) Conversion of MF6 data from center-of-mass system to the laboratory system, with the possibility to continue the calculation with the options (2), (3), and (4). (2) Conversion ofmore » Legendre-polynomial representation into point-wise angular data, in MF6 format. (3) Conversion of data from MF6 into MF4 + MF5 (ENDF-V). (4) Calculation of group constants, scattering matrices and transfer matrices for arbitrary group structures with a fusion micro-flux weighting spectrum (PN-approximation). The code treats only continuum reaction types that are stored in the MF6 format with the restrictions as specified for the European Fusion File (EFF1). These restrictions are not inconvenient for the purpose of fusion neutronics calculations and they facilitate relatively simple processing .« less

  4. A case study on the formation and sharing process of science classroom norms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jina; Song, Jinwoong

    2016-03-01

    The teaching and learning of science in school are influenced by various factors, including both individual factors, such as member beliefs, and social factors, such as the power structure of the class. To understand this complex context affected by various factors in schools, we investigated the formation and sharing process of science classroom norms in connection with these factors. By examining the developmental process of science classroom norms, we identified how the norms were realized, shared, and internalized among the members. We collected data through classroom observations and interviews focusing on two elementary science classrooms in Korea. From these data, factors influencing norm formation were extracted and developed as stories about norm establishment. The results indicate that every science classroom norm was established, shared, and internalized differently according to the values ingrained in the norms, the agent of norm formation, and the members' understanding about the norm itself. The desirable norms originating from values in science education, such as having an inquiring mind, were not established spontaneously by students, but were instead established through well-organized norm networks to encourage concrete practice. Educational implications were discussed in terms of the practice of school science inquiry, cultural studies, and value-oriented education.

  5. Adsorption and Thermal Processing of Glycolaldehyde, Methyl Formate, and Acetic Acid on Graphite at 20 K.

    PubMed

    Burke, Daren J; Puletti, Fabrizio; Woods, Paul M; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben; Brown, Wendy A

    2015-07-01

    We present the first detailed comparative study of the adsorption and thermal processing of the three astrophysically important C2O2H4 isomers glycolaldehyde, methyl formate, and acetic acid adsorbed on a graphitic grain analogue at 20 K. The ability of the individual molecule to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds is extremely important, dictating the growth modes of the ice on the surface and the measured desorption energies. Methyl formate forms only weak intermolecular bonds and hence wets the graphite surface, forming monolayer, bilayer, and multilayer ices, with the multilayer having a desorption energy of 35 kJ mol(-1). In contrast, glycolaldehyde and acetic acid dewet the surface, forming clusters even at the very lowest coverages. The strength of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding for glycolaldehyde and acetic acid is reflected in their desorption energies (46.8 and 55 kJ mol(-1), respectively), which are comparable to those measured for other hydrogen-bonded species such as water. Infrared spectra show that all three isomers undergo structural changes as a result of thermal processing. In the case of acetic acid and glycolaldehyde, this can be assigned to the formation of well-ordered, crystalline, structures where the molecules form chains of hydrogen-bonded moieties. The data reported here are of relevance to astrochemical studies of hot cores and star-forming regions and can be used to model desorption from interstellar ices during the warm up phase with particular importance for complex organic molecules.

  6. Limits Imposed on Heat Produced during Core Formation by Radiative Transfer Processes and Thermodynamic Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criss, R. E.; Hofmeister, A.

    2010-12-01

    The popular view that Earth is sufficiently hot to still be shedding primordal heat, largely originating in the core, is inconsistent with thermodynamic constraints and recent heat transport studies. Previous work presumes that the large difference in gravitational potential energy (Ug) between a fictious, homogeneous reference state and Earth’s current layered configuration of metallic core and rocky mantle was converted to frictional heat during core formation, greatly increasing temperature (T) inside the Earth. However, heating (ΔT >0) was deduced by assuming that Ug is positive, which is inconsistent with Newton’s law of gravitation. Use of an erroneous sign for ΔUg has prevented recognition that the process is an exothermic transformation. Thermodynamic principles were not considered in previous analyses: neglecting the effect of the change in configuration on entropy and energy contributes greatly to the view that heat is retained. Instead, stringent limits are set on the permissible temperature increase by the rapid rate of ballistic radiative transfer, a process associated with transient events, as well as by the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics. In the static, instantaneous model of core formation, configurational entropy (S) of the Earth decreases upon forming the ordered layered state; this entropy decrease is offset by a greater increase in S of the surrounding universe, which can only be accomplished by release of heat to space (the surroundings). Instantaneous dissipation of heat in the static model reasonably approximates radiative processes being superfast. Core formation involves negligible changes in volume and rotational energy, so Helmholtz free energy (=Ug-TS) is conserved, as in atmospheric processes and other graviational-thermodynamic problems. Because S of the universe is immense and heat must flow from hotter to colder bodies, negligible heat from core formation is retained, consistent with the exothermic nature of this transition

  7. A novel process for methanol synthesis. [Concurrent sythesis of methly formate and methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MeOH) by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two-step reaction in series, the carbonylation reaction taking place mainly in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the copper chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. Interaction between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we investigated the effect of pore diffusion on reaction rate and obtained an expression for the rate of reaction for the methanol/methyl formate concurrent synthesis.

  8. Platinum Partitioning at Low Oxygen Fugacity: Implications for Core Formation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Lanziroti, A.; Newville, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSE = Au, Re, and the Pt-group elements) are tracers of silicate / metal interactions during planetary processes. Since most core-formation models involve some state of equilibrium between liquid silicate and liquid metal, understanding the partioning of highly siderophile elements (HSE) between silicate and metallic melts is a key issue for models of core / mantle equilibria and for core formation scenarios. However, partitioning models for HSE are still inaccurate due to the lack of sufficient experimental constraints to describe the variations of partitioning with key variable like temperature, pressure, and oxygen fugacity. In this abstract, we describe a self-consistent set of experiments aimed at determining the valence of platinum, one of the HSE, in silicate melts. This is a key information required to parameterize the evolution of platinum partitioning with oxygen fugacity.

  9. Formation processes of nanometer sized particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, J.; Vacaresse, G. D. G. J.; Stoffels, W. W.

    2008-09-07

    In this paper, formation and growth processes of nanometer and micrometer sized dust particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf (13.56 MHz) plasmas are investigated as function of temperature in the range 25-100 deg. C. During experiments the pressure was typically 0.8 mbar and the forward power to the plasma was {approx}70 Watt. Measuring the fundamental voltage, current and phase angle together with their harmonics (up to the fourth) gives a good method to monitor the creation and growth of these dust particles in time. Furthermore, laser light scattering measurements are performed to give information about the dust particle density. It has been shown that dust particle formation in these conditions depends greatly on temperature.

  10. A Multi-Wavelength Investigation of the Star Formation Processes in the SHIELD Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Yaron G.; McNichols, Andrew Thomas; Cannon, John M.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the relationships between HI mass surface density and star formation in the 12 galaxies that comprise the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-Mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD galaxies were selected from the first ~10% of data from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey; they harbor low-mass HI reservoirs (6.6 < log(M(HI)) < 7.8) that make them critical testbeds for our understanding of the process of star formation in shallow potential wells. Using HI imaging from the VLA, Hα imaging from the WIYN 3.5m telescope, and archival GALEX imaging (available for most sample members), we compare the locations and intensities of star formation with the properties of the neutral ISM. Despite the low HI column densities observed in these systems, each SHIELD galaxy has a significant blue stellar population; there is ongoing star formation in all but one of the galaxies. We find that the regions of Hα emission are co-located with regions of high HI column densities. We compare the degree of overlap of HI dense knots with local UV maxima, with the goal of identifying whether Hα or UV emission more strongly correlates with regions of high HI column density. We calculate the specific SFR and SFR density for the galaxies in the sample, and examine the relationships of HI mass and SFR (from Hα, UV, and averaged from both) for selected sources. We also calculate the star formation efficiency (SFE) for each galaxy in the sample (total SFR / total gas mass) and note its dependence on HI column density.This work is a result of collaboration with the SHIELD Team and is supported by NSF grant 1211683.

  11. Processes influencing secondary aerosol formation in the San Joaquin Valley during winter

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick W. Lurmann; Steven G. Brown; Michael C. McCarthy; Paul T. Roberts

    2006-12-15

    Air quality data collected in the California Regional PM10/PM2.5 Air Quality Study (CRPAQS) are analyzed to qualitatively assess the processes affecting secondary aerosol formation in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). This region experiences some of the highest fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass concentrations in California ({le} 188 {mu}g/m{sup 3} 24-hr average), and secondary aerosol components (as a group) frequently constitute over half of the fine aerosol mass in winter. The analyses are based on 15 days of high-frequency filter and canister measurements and several months of wintertime continuous gas and aerosol measurements. The phase-partitioning of nitrogen oxide (NOx)-related nitrogen species and carbonaceous species shows that concentrations of gaseous precursor species are far more abundant than measured secondary aerosol nitrate or estimated secondary organic aerosols. Comparisons of ammonia and nitric acid concentrations indicate that ammonium nitrate formation is limited by the availability of nitric acid rather than ammonia. Time-resolved aerosol nitrate data collected at the surface and on a 90-m tower suggest that both the daytime and nighttime nitric acid formation pathways are active, and entrainment of aerosol nitrate formed aloft at night may explain the spatial homogeneity of nitrate in the SJV. NOx and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions plus background O{sub 3} levels are expected to determine NOx oxidation and nitric acid production rates, which currently control the ammonium nitrate levels in the SJV. Secondary organic aerosol formation is significant in winter, especially in the Fresno urban area. Formation of secondary organic aerosol is more likely limited by the rate of VOC oxidation than the availability of VOC precursors in winter. 59 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effect of Processing Pressure on Isolated Pore Formation during Controlled Directional Solidification in Small Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Matthew C.; Anilkumar, Amrutur V.; Grugel, RIchard N.; Lee, Chun P.

    2008-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments were performed, using succinonitrile saturated with nitrogen gas, to examine the effects of in-situ processing pressure changes on the formation growth, and evolution of an isolated, cylindrical gaseous pore. A novel solidification facility, capable of processing thin cylindrical samples (I.D. < 1.0 mm), under controlled pressure conditions, was used for the experiments. A new experimental method for growing the isolated pore from a seed bubble is introduced. The experimental results indicate that an in-situ processing pressure change will result in either a transient change in pore diameter or a complete termination of pore growth, indicating that pressure changes can be used as a control parameter to terminate bubble growth. A simple analytical model has been introduced to explain the experimental observations.

  13. Combustion and structure formation in SHS processes under microgravity conditions: SHS plans for microgravity experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merzhanov, A. G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper outlines ISMAN suggestions for the joint NASA-RSA project 'Combustion and Structure formation in SHS Processes under Microgravity Conditions'. The basic ideas of this work naturally follow from our almost 30-year experience in the field of SHS. As a matter of fact, we have already obtained some results in the following two directions closely related to the microgravity problem. One is the studies on SHS processes in the field of centrifugal forces. These studies aimed at the intensification of gravity-sensitive SHS processes in multicomponent highly caloric systems forming melts at high overloads (up to 2000 g). In other words, these studies had the objectives that are inverse to those in the microgravity studies. The second group of results directly relates to the microgravity problem and the project under consideration. These experiments played the important role in establishing links between SHS and microgravity.

  14. Relationships between type I and type II chondrules: Implications on chondrule formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Johan; Libourel, Guy; Soulié, Camille

    2015-07-01

    In unequilibrated chondrites, the ferromagnesian silicates in chondrules exhibit wide ranges of mg# = Mg/(Mg + Fe), allowing to sub-divide porphyritic chondrules into either type I (mg# > 0.9) or type II (mg# < 0.9). Although both chondrule types formed under oxidizing conditions relative to the canonical solar nebula, it is generally inferred that type II chondrules formed in more oxidizing conditions than type I. In order to check whether this redox difference was established during chondrule formation, or reflects differences in their precursors, we have undertaken a set of experiments aimed at heating type I olivine-rich (A) chondrule proxy, i.e. forsterite + Fe metal + Ca-Mg-Si-Al glass mixtures, under oxidizing conditions. We show that high temperature (isothermal) oxidation of type IA-like assemblages is a very efficient and rapid process (e.g. few tens of minutes) to form textures similar to type IIA chondrules. Due to the rapid dissolution of Fe metal blebs, a FeO increase in the melt and in combination with the dissolution of magnesian olivine allows the melt to reach ferroan olivine saturation. Crystallization of ferroan olivine occurs either as new crystal in the mesostasis or as overgrowths on the remaining unresorbed forsterite grains (relicts). Interruption of this process at any time before its completion by rapid cooling allows to reproduce the whole range of textures and chemical diversity observed in type A chondrules, i.e. from type I to type II. Several implications on chondrule formation processes can be inferred from the presented experiments. Type I chondrules or fragments of type I chondrules are very likely the main precursor material involved in the formation of most type II chondrules. Formation of porphyritic olivine type II chondrules is very likely the result of processes generating crystal growth by chemical disequilibrium at high temperature rather than processes generating crystallization only by cooling rates. This questions the

  15. Acrylamide: inhibition of formation in processed food and mitigation of toxicity in cells, animals, and humans.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel

    2015-06-01

    Potentially toxic acrylamide is largely derived from the heat-inducing reactions between the amino group of the amino acid asparagine and carbonyl groups of glucose and fructose in plant-derived foods including cereals, coffees, almonds, olives, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. This review surveys and consolidates the following dietary aspects of acrylamide: distribution in food, exposure and consumption by diverse populations, reduction of the content in different food categories, and mitigation of adverse in vivo effects. Methods to reduce acrylamide levels include selecting commercial food with a low acrylamide content, selecting cereal and potato varieties with low levels of asparagine and reducing sugars, selecting processing conditions that minimize acrylamide formation, adding food-compatible compounds and plant extracts to food formulations before processing that inhibit acrylamide formation during processing of cereal products, coffees, teas, olives, almonds, and potato products, and reducing multiorgan toxicity (antifertility, carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, teratogenicity). The herein described observations and recommendations are of scientific interest for food chemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology, but also have the potential to benefit nutrition, food safety, and human health. PMID:25989363

  16. An efficient means to mitigate wavefront curvature effects in polar format processed SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnehan, Robert; Yasuda, Mark; Doerry, Armin

    2012-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images processed using the polar format algorithm (PFA) may exhibit distortion if the curvature of the spherical wavefronts are not accounted for. The distortion manifests in geometric shifts and defocusing of targets, and intensifies as distances between pixels and the scene reference position increase. In this work, we demonstrate a method to mitigate the effects of wavefront curvature by applying localized (space-variant) phase corrections to sub-regions selected from the polar format processed image. The modified sub-images are then reassembled into a full image. To minimize discontinuities in the reconstructed image, the spatially variant phase adjustments are made to regions larger than the sub-images, and pared down before being reinserted into the complete image. The result is a SAR process that retains the efficiency of the PFA, yet avoids scene size limitations due to wavefront curvature distortions. The method is illustrated and validated using simulations and real data collected by the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Lynx® Multi-mode Radar System.

  17. Acrylamide: inhibition of formation in processed food and mitigation of toxicity in cells, animals, and humans.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel

    2015-06-01

    Potentially toxic acrylamide is largely derived from the heat-inducing reactions between the amino group of the amino acid asparagine and carbonyl groups of glucose and fructose in plant-derived foods including cereals, coffees, almonds, olives, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. This review surveys and consolidates the following dietary aspects of acrylamide: distribution in food, exposure and consumption by diverse populations, reduction of the content in different food categories, and mitigation of adverse in vivo effects. Methods to reduce acrylamide levels include selecting commercial food with a low acrylamide content, selecting cereal and potato varieties with low levels of asparagine and reducing sugars, selecting processing conditions that minimize acrylamide formation, adding food-compatible compounds and plant extracts to food formulations before processing that inhibit acrylamide formation during processing of cereal products, coffees, teas, olives, almonds, and potato products, and reducing multiorgan toxicity (antifertility, carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, teratogenicity). The herein described observations and recommendations are of scientific interest for food chemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology, but also have the potential to benefit nutrition, food safety, and human health.

  18. Formation of asymmetrical structured silica controlled by a phase separation process and implication for biosilicification.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jia-Yuan; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Li, Xi-Ming; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Biogenetic silica displays intricate patterns assembling from nano- to microsize level and interesting non-spherical structures differentiating in specific directions. Several model systems have been proposed to explain the formation of biosilica nanostructures. Of them, phase separation based on the physicochemical properties of organic amines was considered to be responsible for the pattern formation of biosilica. In this paper, using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, Si(OCH2CH3)4) as silica precursor, phospholipid (PL) and dodecylamine (DA) were introduced to initiate phase separation of organic components and influence silica precipitation. Morphology, structure and composition of the mineralized products were characterized using a range of techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), infrared spectra (IR), and nitrogen physisorption. The results demonstrate that the phase separation process of the organic components leads to the formation of asymmetrically non-spherical silica structures, and the aspect ratios of the asymmetrical structures can be well controlled by varying the concentration of PL and DA. On the basis of the time-dependent experiments, a tentative mechanism is also proposed to illustrate the asymmetrical morphogenesis. Therefore, our results imply that in addition to explaining the hierarchical porous nanopatterning of biosilica, the phase separation process may also be responsible for the growth differentiation of siliceous structures in specific directions. Because organic amine (e.g., long-chair polyamines), phospholipids (e.g., silicalemma) and the phase separation process are associated with the biosilicification of diatoms, our results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of biosilicification.

  19. Formation of Asymmetrical Structured Silica Controlled by a Phase Separation Process and Implication for Biosilicification

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia-Yuan; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Li, Xi-Ming; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Biogenetic silica displays intricate patterns assembling from nano- to microsize level and interesting non-spherical structures differentiating in specific directions. Several model systems have been proposed to explain the formation of biosilica nanostructures. Of them, phase separation based on the physicochemical properties of organic amines was considered to be responsible for the pattern formation of biosilica. In this paper, using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, Si(OCH2CH3)4) as silica precursor, phospholipid (PL) and dodecylamine (DA) were introduced to initiate phase separation of organic components and influence silica precipitation. Morphology, structure and composition of the mineralized products were characterized using a range of techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), infrared spectra (IR), and nitrogen physisorption. The results demonstrate that the phase separation process of the organic components leads to the formation of asymmetrically non-spherical silica structures, and the aspect ratios of the asymmetrical structures can be well controlled by varying the concentration of PL and DA. On the basis of the time-dependent experiments, a tentative mechanism is also proposed to illustrate the asymmetrical morphogenesis. Therefore, our results imply that in addition to explaining the hierarchical porous nanopatterning of biosilica, the phase separation process may also be responsible for the growth differentiation of siliceous structures in specific directions. Because organic amine (e.g., long-chair polyamines), phospholipids (e.g., silicalemma) and the phase separation process are associated with the biosilicification of diatoms, our results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of biosilicification. PMID:23585878

  20. Automated system function allocation and display format: Task information processing requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerwinski, Mary P.

    1993-01-01

    An important consideration when designing the interface to an intelligent system concerns function allocation between the system and the user. The display of information could be held constant, or 'fixed', leaving the user with the task of searching through all of the available information, integrating it, and classifying the data into a known system state. On the other hand, the system, based on its own intelligent diagnosis, could display only relevant information in order to reduce the user's search set. The user would still be left the task of perceiving and integrating the data and classifying it into the appropriate system state. Finally, the system could display the patterns of data. In this scenario, the task of integrating the data is carried out by the system, and the user's information processing load is reduced, leaving only the tasks of perception and classification of the patterns of data. Humans are especially adept at this form of display processing. Although others have examined the relative effectiveness of alphanumeric and graphical display formats, it is interesting to reexamine this issue together with the function allocation problem. Currently, Johnson Space Center is the test site for an intelligent Thermal Control System (TCS), TEXSYS, being tested for use with Space Station Freedom. Expert TCS engineers, as well as novices, were asked to classify several displays of TEXSYS data into various system states (including nominal and anomalous states). Three different display formats were used: fixed, subset, and graphical. The hypothesis tested was that the graphical displays would provide for fewer errors and faster classification times by both experts and novices, regardless of the kind of system state represented within the display. The subset displays were hypothesized to be the second most effective display format/function allocation condition, based on the fact that the search set is reduced in these displays. Both the subset and the

  1. Formation Of Silicon-Based Heterostructures In Multichamber Integrated-Processing Thin-Film Deposition Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucovsky, Gerald; Kim, Sang S.; Tsu, David V.; Parsons, Gregory N.; Fitch, J. T.

    1990-02-01

    This paper describes the formation of heterostructure devices using multichamber, integrated-processing thin-film deposition systems with UHV-compatible inter-chamber transfer. We describe the application of remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (Remote PECVD) for deposition of semiconducting and dielectric thin films in representative device structures. Special attention is directed to: i) deposition conditions necessary for control of thin-film and interface chemistry; and ii) post-deposition-annealing for the stabilization of physical and electronic properties of the heterostructures, including the interfaces between the constituent layers.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Strain induced semiconductor nanotubes: from formation process to device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiuling

    2008-10-01

    Semiconductor nanotubes (SNTs) represent a new class of nanotechnology building blocks. They are formed by a combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches, using strain induced self-rolling mechanism from epitaxially grown heterojunction films. This review summarizes several aspects of this emerging field, including the SNT formation process, its dependence on crystal orientation, strain direction and geometry as well as the structural, electronic and optical properties and their implications. The precise controllability of structural and spatial positioning and versatile functionality make SNTs and related three-dimensional (3D) architectures promising candidates for practical applications in next generation nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices.

  3. Kinetics and microtextures formation during serpentinization: role of grain scale processes and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    malvoisin, B.; Brunet, F.; Carlut, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization of mantle rocks plays a key role on the physical properties of the lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges and in subduction zones. This reaction is controlled by processes occurring at scales ranging from the grain to the lithosphere but the relative importance of these processes on the kinetics and microtextures formation has not been investigated. First, hydrothermal experiments on powders of San Carlos olivine at 500 bars in the 250 - 350 °C range were monitored with a magnetic method to study the kinetics and processes of the reaction at the grain scale. For an initial grain size (IGS) > 5 μm, lizardite, brucite, magnetite and hydrogen formed at a rate one to two orders of magnitude slower than the kinetics used to model serpentinization-related processes. Moreover, the serpentinization rate decreased linearly with the square of the IGS and reaction progress vs. time curves displayed a sigmoid form. The kinetics were controlled by the dissolution of olivine increasing with its reactive surface area which was generated with two cooperating processes (etch pits and grain fracturing) during the first stages of the reaction. Then, hydrothermal experiments were conducted on sintered San Carlos olivine to investigate the role of transport on the reaction. On sintered with a grain size of 1 to 5 μm, low reaction progresses of ~ 3 % in 10 months were obtained and the rate of serpentinization was one order of magnitude slower than on powders and one order of magnitude faster than on a single grain of the size of the sintered. Kinetics were controlled by a coupling between the reaction rate at the grain scale and the rate of fluid pathways formation at grain boundaries. Lizardite precipitated where olivine dissolved whereas magnetite and brucite segregated at the surface of the sintered. These results are in agreement with the observation of magnetite formation and segregation in fractures in naturally serpentinized peridotites and could explain the sparse

  4. Development of a carbonaceous selective absorber for solar thermal energy collection and process for its formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, John D.

    1989-02-01

    The main goal of the US Department of Energy supported part of this project is to develop information about controlling the complicated chemical processes involved in the formation of a carbonaceous selective absorber and learn what equipment will allow production of this absorber commercially. The work necessary to accomplish this goal is not yet complete. Formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber in the conveyor oven tried so far has been unsatisfactory, because the proper conditions for applying the carbonaceous coating in each conveyor oven fabricated, either have been difficult to obtain, or have been difficult to maintain over an extended period of time. A new conveyor oven is nearing completion which is expected to allow formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber on absorber tubes in a continuous operation over many days without the necessity of cleaning the conveyor oven or changing the thickness of the electroplated nickel catalyst to compensate for changes in the coating environment in the oven. Work under this project concerned with forming and sealing glass panels to test ideas on evacuated glass solar collector designs and production have been generally quite satisfactory. Delays in completion of the selective absorber work, has caused postponement of the fabrication of a small prototype evacuated glass solar collector panel. Preliminary cost estimates of the selective absorber and solar collector panel indicate that this collector system should be lower in cost than evacuated solar collectors now on the market.

  5. Modeling the formation of polar stratospheric clouds with allowance for kinetic and heterogeneous processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloyan, A. E.; Yermakov, A. N.; Arutyunyan, V. O.

    2015-05-01

    A new mathematical model of global transport of multicomponent gaseous admixtures and aerosols in the atmosphere and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) in both hemispheres has been constructed. Two types of PSCs are considered: type Ia, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), and type Ib, supercooled ternary solutions of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O (STS). New equations are used to describe the variation in gas- and condensed-phase components on the basis of their thermodynamic properties. The formation of PSCs is coupled with sulfate aerosols generated in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and with chemical and kinetic transformation processes (photochemistry, nucleation, condensation/evaporation, and coagulation). Using this coupled model, numerical experiments were performed to reproduce the spatial and temporal variability of PSCs in winter in both hemispheres. First, the formation of primary sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere is considered and then these aerosols are incorporated to the PSC model. The results of the numerical experiments are analyzed.

  6. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to determine if the formation of the generally observed layer of large porosity adjacent to the as-nitride surfaces of reaction bonded silicon nitrides could be prevented during processing. Isostatically pressed test bars were prepared from wet vibratory milled Si powder. Sintering and nitriding were each done under three different conditions:(1) bars directly exposed to the furnance atmosphere; (2) bars packed in Si powder; (3) bars packed in Si3N4 powder. Packing the bars in either Si of Si3N4 powder during sintering retarded formation of the layer of large porosity. Only packing the bars in Si prevented formation of the layer during nitridation. The strongest bars (316 MPa) were those sintered in Si and nitrided in Si3N4 despite their having a layer of large surface porosity; failure initiated at very large pores and inclusions. The alpha/beta ratio was found to be directly proportional to the oxygen content; a possible explanation for this relationship is discussed.

  7. DECIPHERING NATURALLY-OCCURRING PB CONTAMINATION IMPACTING DRINKING WATER WELLS: SHAKER VILLAGE CATCHMENT, MAINE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace Pb concentrations in groundwater within glacial deposits across Maine fluctuate considerably. Deciphering the distribution and sources of naturally occurring Pb in groundwater with only the use of conventional anomaly identification techniques presents a challenge. In a rep...

  8. Analysis of glow discharges for understanding the process of film formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venugopalan, M.; Avni, R.

    1984-01-01

    The physical and chemical processes which occur during the formation of different types of films in a variety of glow discharge plasmas are discussed. Emphasis is placed on plasma diagnostic experiments using spectroscopic methods, probe analysis, mass spectrometric sampling and magnetic resonance techniques which are well suited to investigate the neutral and ionized gas phase species as well as some aspects of plasma surface interactions. The results on metallic, semi-conducting and insulating films are reviewed in conjunction with proposed models and the problem encountered under film deposition conditions. It is concluded that the understanding of film deposition process requires additional experimental information on plasma surface interactions of free radicals and the synergetic effects where photon, electron and ion bombardment change the reactivity of the incident radical with the surface.

  9. Post-adsorption process of Yb phosphate nano-particle formation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, MingYu; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Kazuya; Kozai, Naofumi; Kamiishi, Eigo; Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the post-adsorption process of ytterbium (Yb) phosphate nano-particle formation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). The yeast grown in P-rich medium were exposed to 1.44 × 10-4 mol/L Yb(III) solution for 2-120 h, and 2 months at 25 ± 1 °C at an initial pH of 3, 4, or 5, respectively. Ytterbium concentrations in solutions decreased as a function of exposure time. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses revealed that nano-sized blocky Yb phosphate with an amorphous phase formed on the yeast cells surfaces in the solutions with Yb. These nano-sized precipitates that formed on the cell surfaces remained stable even after 2 months of exposure at 25 ± 1 °C around neutral pHs. The EXAFS data revealed that the chemical state of the accumulated Yb on the cell surfaces changed from the adsorption on both phosphate and carboxyl sites at 30 min to Yb phosphate precipitates at 5 days, indicating the Yb-phosphate precipitation as a major post-adsorption process. In addition, the precipitation of Yb phosphate occurred on cell surfaces during 7 days of exposure in Yb-free solution after 2 h of exposure (short-term Yb adsorption) in Yb solution. These results suggest that the released P from the inside of yeast cells reacted with adsorbed Yb on cell surfaces, resulting in the formation of Yb precipitates, even though no P was added to the exposure solution. In an abiotic system, the EXAFS data showed that the speciation of sorbed Yb on the reference materials, carboxymethyl cellulose and Ln resin, did not change even when the Yb was exposed to P solution, without forming Yb phosphate precipitates. This result strongly suggests that the cell surface of the yeast plays an important role in the Yb-phosphate precipitation process, not only as a carrier of the

  10. Ventifact Formation in the Mojave Desert: Field Analogs for Martian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laity, J. E.; Bridges, N. T.; Boyle, T. K.

    2001-01-01

    Two field studies in the Mojave Desert, California, shed light on processes of ventifact formation. The field sites are located on a ridge at Little Cowhole Mountain, which lies approximately 12 km south of Baker, and on an unnamed ridge situated along the northern boundary of the Mojave River Sink (Rasor Road site). The rocks at Little Cowhole Mountain are a blue-grey marble/dolomite, whereas those at Rasor Road are Miocene volcanic rocks (basalt). At both sites the abrasive agent is a fine-grained aeolian sand which was probably derived largely from the Mojave River. There are minimal modem inputs of sand to either site: abrasion occurs as a result of unique climatic and topographic conditions which allow pre-existing sand to be recycled from one aspect of the ridge to the other. Climatic conditions are well suited for ventifact formation. Owing, to the dry climate (marked by low average relative humidity, infrequent dew, and low annual rainfall), rates of chemical weathering are low. Where resurfacing of the rocks by sand abrasion proceeds at a rate greater than weathering, the ventifacts are considered "active." Active ventifacts are found atop and straddling the ridge crests, in the zone of maximum wind velocity and sediment supply. Inactive ventifacts occur where modem weathering Processes exceed abrasion rates; principally on the basal two-thirds of the hillslope, where wind velocity and sediment supply are lower. At intermediate locations between the slope base and crest, ventifacts are either active or inactive, depending on local conditions. The presence of relict ventifacts at the study sites, as well as elsewhere in the eastern Mojave Desert, suggests that the conditions for venti fact formation must have been more intense and extensive in the past. Together, the studies illustrate that the processes that interact to form ventifacts are highly complex, and must be studied at many scales. Small-scale effects, such as local topography, plant cover, or

  11. Tromantadine inhibits HSV-1 induced syncytia formation and viral glycoprotein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ickes, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Tromantadine inhibits a late event in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) replication, visualized by the inhibition of both the size and number of syncytia. Tromantadine can be added at any time between 1 and 9 h post infection with complete inhibition of syncytia formation. Glycan synthesis of the viral glycoproteins, important for syncytia formation, is incomplete due to tromantadine treatment. Tromantadine does not inhibit the initiation of glycosylation, since viral glycoproteins, gX{sub t}, synthesized in the presence of tromantadine still incorporate {sup 3}H-glucosamine. Tromantadine does not inhibit the transport of t e viral glycoproteins to the cell surface, since glycoproteins B, C, and D are expressed, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence. Tromantadine inhibition of HSV-1 glycoprotein processing is demonstrated by an increase in mobility of the radioimmunoprecipitated gX{sub t}, on SDS-PAGE. The gX{sub t} of KOS, a non-syncytial strain of HSV-1, had a similar increase in mobility, suggesting that the block in glycoprotein processing is a general effect of tromantadine treatment. Fucose, which is incorporated into oligosaccharides in the medial Golgi, is incorporated into gX{sub t}, indicating that the tromantadine block in glycoprotein processing occurs after this step. Lectin binding studies and SDS-PAGE analysis of gC processed in the presence of tromantadine, gC{sub t}, indicates that it has terminal galactose residues in both N- and O-linked glycans (binds Peanut and Ricin Agglutinins, respectively). The inhibition of sialylation of N-linked glycans by tromantadine was indicated by the extent of the increase in SDS-PAGE mobility of the G protein from Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. O-glycanase digestion and SDS-PAGE analysis of gC{sub t} indicate that the O-linked disaccharide NAcGal-Galactose is present.

  12. Formation of nanoporous pyrobitumen residues during maturation processes within the Barnett Shale (Fort Worth Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, S.; Wirth, R.; Schreiber, A.; Schulz, H.-M.; Horsfield, B.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrocarbon generation processes occur within organic-rich shales as a response to increases in thermal maturation. Shale gas reservoir quality is thought to be largely dependent on the extent to which solid organic material has been converted to pore space during catagenesis. Although pores may drastically vary in variety and abundance within differing shales, the occurrence of nanopores within organic particles has recently been documented for an important number of gas shale systems (i.e., Barnett, Haynesville, Utica, Eagle Ford, Woodford, Horn River, Marcellus, Posidonia …). However, despite their ubiquitous nature, the formation and the geochemical nature of these nanoporous organic compounds remain unclear. Here, we present the characterization of samples from the organic-rich Mississippian Barnett shale gas system (Fort Worth Basin, Texas, USA) at varying stages of thermal maturation. Using a combination of compositional organic geochemistry and spectromicroscopy techniques, including synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM - data collected using the CLS 10ID-1 STXM beamline) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we document a net increase in sample geochemical heterogeneity with increasing maturity. In addition to the presence of bitumen in samples of oil window maturity, very likely genetically derived from thermally degraded kerogen, the formation of nanoporous pyrobitumen has been inferred for samples of gas window maturity, likely resulting from the formation of gaseous hydrocarbons by secondary cracking of bitumen compounds. By providing in-situ insights into the fate of bitumen and pyrobitumen as a response to the thermal evolution of the macromolecular structure of kerogen, the present contribution constitutes an important step towards better constraining hydrocarbon generation processes occurring within unconventional gas shale systems.

  13. MODELING THE FORMATION OF GIANT PLANET CORES. I. EVALUATING KEY PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Levison, Harold F.; Thommes, Edward; Duncan, Martin J.

    2010-04-15

    One of the most challenging problems we face in our understanding of planet formation is how Jupiter and Saturn could have formed before the solar nebula dispersed. The most popular model of giant planet formation is the so-called core accretion model. In this model a large planetary embryo formed first, mainly by two-body accretion. This is then followed by a period of inflow of nebular gas directly onto the growing planet. The core accretion model has an Achilles heel, namely the very first step. We have undertaken the most comprehensive study of this process to date. In this study, we numerically integrate the orbits of a number of planetary embryos embedded in a swarm of planetesimals. In these experiments, we have included a large number of physical processes that might enhance accretion. In particular, we have included (1) aerodynamic gas drag, (2) collisional damping between planetesimals, (3) enhanced embryo cross sections due to their atmospheres, (4) planetesimal fragmentation, and (5) planetesimal-driven migration. We find that the gravitational interaction between the embryos and the planetesimals leads to the wholesale redistribution of material-regions are cleared of material and gaps open near the embryos. Indeed, in 90% of our simulations without fragmentation, the region near those embryos is cleared of planetesimals before much growth can occur. Thus, the widely used assumption that the surface density distribution of planetesimals is smooth can lead to misleading results. In the remaining 10% of our simulations, the embryos undergo a burst of outward migration that significantly increases growth. On timescales of {approx}10{sup 5} years, the outer embryo can migrate {approx}6 AU and grow to roughly 30 M {sub +}. This represents a largely unexplored mode of core formation. We also find that the inclusion of planetesimal fragmentation tends to inhibit growth except for a narrow range of fragment migration rates.

  14. [Formation process of nitrogenous disinfection byproduct trichloronitromethane in drinking water and its influencing factors].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun-Sheng; Zou, Bang-Wen; Miao, Jia; Fu, Yang-Ping; Shen, Jia-Chen

    2013-08-01

    A novel method is described in this paper, which uses methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as extractant and 1,2-dibromopropane as internal standard for the determination of nitrogenous disinfection byproduct trichloronitromethane (TCNM) by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The formation process of TCNM and its influencing factors were evaluated with methylamine as the precursor during chlorination. The results indicated that the TCNM amount produced under alkaline condition was higher than those produced under the neutral and acidic conditions, and the TCNM amount increased with the increase of pH value. It was found that the TCNM amount increased with the increase of chlorine addition when the chlorine dosage was in the range of 2-8 mmol x L(-1). However, the TCNM amount was reduced when the chlorine dosage was enhanced from 8 mmol x L(-1) to 12 mmol x L(-1), under which conditions the concentration of free chlorine was higher and methylamine was turned into nitriles and aldehydes through other reactions. It was also found that the TCNM amount increased with the increase of methylamine addition when the methylamine dosage was in the range of 0.5-4 mmol x L(-1). Temperature was another important factor that affected the TCNM formation from methylamine especially in the range of 10-30 degrees C and the higher the temperature, the more the TCNM amount produced. The formation process of TCNM from methylamine by chlorination was in accordance with the mechanism of an electrophilic reaction, in which HClO and ClO(-) could be used as the electrophilic reagents to attack methylamine and then to form TCNM.

  15. Effect of annealing process on the phase formation in poly(vinylidene fluoride) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Ibtisam Yahya; Yahaya, Muhammad; Jumali, Mohd Hafizuddin Haji; Shanshool, Haider Mohammed

    2014-09-03

    This work reports the initial study on the effect of annealing process on the crystalline phase of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) thin film. PVDF powder was dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide before spin-coated onto a glass substrate to form a film. The films were annealed at 30°C, 90°C and 110°C for 5 hrs. The crystalline phase of the powder PVDF as received was investigated by using XRD and FTIR techniques. Moreover, the crystalline phases of thin films after annealing were investigated by using the same techniques. XRD analysis showed that in powder form PVDF exists in α-phase. Each annealed PVDF thin films exhibited identical formation of three-phases material namely γ (as major phase) while α and β phases as the minor phases. The FTIR analysis showed that the powder form of PVDF exists in α and β phases. FTIR measurement further confirmed the XRD results implying that the annealing process has no significant effect on the phase formation in PVDF films.

  16. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.

  17. Effects of stacking fault energy on defect formation process in face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Taira; Yang, Yingjuan; Hirabayashi, Junichi; Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of stacking fault energies (SFEs) on defect formation by the collision cascade process for face-centred cubic metals, we used six sets of interatomic potentials with different SFEs while keeping the other properties almost identical. Molecular dynamic simulations of the collision cascade were carried out using these potentials with primary knock-on atom energies (EPKA) of 10 and 20 keV at 100 K. Neither the number of residual defects nor the size distributions for both self-interstitial atom (SIA) type and vacancy type clusters were affected by the difference in the SFE. In the case of EPKA = 20 keV, the ratio of glissile SIA clusters increased as the SFE decreased, which was not expected by a prediction based on the classical dislocation theory. The trend did not change after annealing at 1100 K for 100 ps. For vacancy clusters, few stacking fault tetrahedrons (SFTs) formed before the annealing. However, lower SFEs tended to increase the SFT fraction after the annealing, where large vacancy clusters formed at considerable densities. The findings of this study can be used to characterise the defect formation process in low SFE metals such as austenitic stainless steels.

  18. Processes and controlling factors of polygenetic dolomite formation in the Transdanubian Range, Hungary: a synopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, János; Hips, Kinga; Budai, Tamás; Győri, Orsolya; Lukoczki, Georgina; Kele, Sándor; Demény, Attila; Poros, Zsófia

    2016-06-01

    In the Transdanubian Range (Hungary), dolostone and dolomitic limestone appear in a number of sedimentary successions formed from the Late Permian to the Late Triassic in various depositional settings and under various diagenetic conditions, whereas only a negligible amount of dolomite was detected in the post-Triassic formations. Seven dolomite-bearing units representing ramp, small and large carbonate platforms, and intraplatform basin settings are presented in this synopsis. In most cases, multi-stage and polygenetic dolomitization was inferred. The main mass of the dolostones was formed via near-surface diagenetic processes, which were commonly preceded by the formation of synsedimentary dolomite. Accordingly, surficial conditions that prevailed during sediment deposition controlled the dolomite-forming processes and thus the lateral extension and the time span of dolomitization. The area of episodic subaerial exposure was a critical controlling factor of the lateral extension of the near-surface dolomite genesis, whereas its temporal extension was mostly governed by climate. Burial diagenesis usually resulted in only moderate dolomitization, either in connection with compactional fluid flow or via thermal convection. The Triassic fault zones provided conduits for fluid flow that led to both replacive dolomitization and dolomite cement precipitation. In the Late Triassic extensional basins, synsedimentary fault-controlled dolomitization of basinal deposits was reconstructed.

  19. Effect of annealing process on the phase formation in poly(vinylidene fluoride) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Ibtisam Yahya; Yahaya, Muhammad; Jumali, Mohd Hafizuddin Haji; Shanshool, Haider Mohammed

    2014-09-01

    This work reports the initial study on the effect of annealing process on the crystalline phase of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) thin film. PVDF powder was dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide before spin-coated onto a glass substrate to form a film. The films were annealed at 30°C, 90°C and 110°C for 5 hrs. The crystalline phase of the powder PVDF as received was investigated by using XRD and FTIR techniques. Moreover, the crystalline phases of thin films after annealing were investigated by using the same techniques. XRD analysis showed that in powder form PVDF exists in α-phase. Each annealed PVDF thin films exhibited identical formation of three-phases material namely γ (as major phase) while α and β phases as the minor phases. The FTIR analysis showed that the powder form of PVDF exists in α and β phases. FTIR measurement further confirmed the XRD results implying that the annealing process has no significant effect on the phase formation in PVDF films.

  20. Process of defect formation and diffusion in metals induced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvonkov, Alexander D.; Boranbaeva, H. M.

    1990-10-01

    There have been conducted researches for the presence of defects in specimens of repined carbonyl iron after the treatment by continuous radiation of C02-laser under subcritical conditions. High degree of presence of the defects is characterized by appearance of cellular dislocation structure and by considerable oversaturation of vacancies. There have been also investigated the conditions of realization of an accelerated diffusion of boron in iron and steels in treating by continuous radiation of CD2-- laser. It was revealed that the boron redistribution from the previously created layer of borides on the metal surface is accomplished in steels to the depthes of up to 3 mm. The accelerated oxygen diffusion stimulated by the laser radiation has been investigated on the basis of the obtained results of the process of internal oxidation of alloy Cu-Sn (0. 55 at 7. ). There has been proposed the model of process of accelerated transport. 2. FORMATION OF DEFECTS IN CARBONYL IRON UNDER CONTINUOUS LASER RADIATION The investigation of the defect formation under the continuous laser radiation 10. 6 sam) was conducted with the specimens (4x0. 8x80) mm of carbonyl iron 0. 008 C 0. 047 Mn Al + Si + S) refined in hydrogen atmosphere. The laser treatment was accomplished without flashing the metal surface. Treatment characteristics: radiation power P (0. 25-1. 1 kV. Specimen displacement speed under the laser beam V (10-2. 5) mm/s

  1. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng-han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan-Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell−cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin (E-cad-ECD) in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role. PMID:26290581

  2. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; et al

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest thatmore » the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.« less

  3. The significance of ACTH for the process of formation of complex heparin compounds in the blood during immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudryashov, B. A.; Shapiro, F. B.; Lomovskaya, F. B.; Lyapina, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) was administered to rats at different times following adrenalectomy. Adrenocorticotropin caused a significant increase in the formation of heparin complexes even in the absence of stress factor. When ACTH secretion is blocked, immobilization stress is not accompanied by an increase in the process of complex formation. The effect of ACTH on the formation of heparin complexes was mediated through its stimulation of the adrenal cortex.

  4. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure

    PubMed Central

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G.; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A.; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern. PMID:26578797

  5. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-17

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern.

  6. Deciphering Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Yohai; Galanti, Eli

    2016-07-01

    This summer, the Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in course for close flybys of the planet, obtaining a high precision gravity spectrum of Jupiter. This data can be used to estimate the depth of Jupiter's observed cloud-level wind, and decipher the possible internal flows, that might be decoupled from the surface wind. In this talk, we discuss the Juno gravity experiment, and the possible outcomes with regard to the flows on Jupiter. We show several ways in which the gravity spectrum might be used to study the large scale flows: 1. measurements of the high order even harmonics which beyond J10 are dominated by the dynamics; 2. measurements of odd gravity harmonics which have no contribution from a static planet, and therefore are a pure signature of dynamics; 3. upper limits on the depth of the surface flow can be obtained by comparing low order even harmonics from dynamical models to the difference between the measured low order even harmonics and the largest possible values of a static planet; 4. direct latitudinally varying measurements of the gravity field exerted on the spacecraft. We will discuss how these methods may be applied given the expected sensitivities of the Juno gravity experiment. In addition, we present an inverse adjoint model, which allows given the gravity data, to infer the flows that produce it. This will allow, hopefully, to make significant progress in one of the longest-standing question in planetary atmospheric dynamics regarding the nature of the flows on the giant planets.

  7. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-17

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern. PMID:26578797

  8. Flame Experiments at the Advanced Light Source: New Insights into Soot Formation Processes

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Nils; Skeen, Scott A.; Michelsen, Hope A.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    The following experimental protocols and the accompanying video are concerned with the flame experiments that are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory1-4. This video demonstrates how the complex chemical structures of laboratory-based model flames are analyzed using flame-sampling mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron-generated vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. This experimental approach combines isomer-resolving capabilities with high sensitivity and a large dynamic range5,6. The first part of the video describes experiments involving burner-stabilized, reduced-pressure (20-80 mbar) laminar premixed flames. A small hydrocarbon fuel was used for the selected flame to demonstrate the general experimental approach. It is shown how species’ profiles are acquired as a function of distance from the burner surface and how the tunability of the VUV photon energy is used advantageously to identify many combustion intermediates based on their ionization energies. For example, this technique has been used to study gas-phase aspects of the soot-formation processes, and the video shows how the resonance-stabilized radicals, such as C3H3, C3H5, and i-C4H5, are identified as important intermediates7. The work has been focused on soot formation processes, and, from the chemical point of view, this process is very intriguing because chemical structures containing millions of carbon atoms are assembled from a fuel molecule possessing only a few carbon atoms in just milliseconds. The second part of the video highlights a new experiment, in which an opposed-flow diffusion flame and synchrotron-based aerosol mass spectrometry are used to study the chemical composition of the combustion-generated soot particles4. The experimental results indicate that the widely accepted H-abstraction-C2H2-addition (HACA) mechanism is not the sole molecular growth process responsible for the formation of the

  9. Flame experiments at the advanced light source: new insights into soot formation processes.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Nils; Skeen, Scott A; Michelsen, Hope A; Wilson, Kevin R; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    The following experimental protocols and the accompanying video are concerned with the flame experiments that are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(1-4). This video demonstrates how the complex chemical structures of laboratory-based model flames are analyzed using flame-sampling mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron-generated vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. This experimental approach combines isomer-resolving capabilities with high sensitivity and a large dynamic range(5,6). The first part of the video describes experiments involving burner-stabilized, reduced-pressure (20-80 mbar) laminar premixed flames. A small hydrocarbon fuel was used for the selected flame to demonstrate the general experimental approach. It is shown how species' profiles are acquired as a function of distance from the burner surface and how the tunability of the VUV photon energy is used advantageously to identify many combustion intermediates based on their ionization energies. For example, this technique has been used to study gas-phase aspects of the soot-formation processes, and the video shows how the resonance-stabilized radicals, such as C3H3, C3H5, and i-C4H5, are identified as important intermediates(7). The work has been focused on soot formation processes, and, from the chemical point of view, this process is very intriguing because chemical structures containing millions of carbon atoms are assembled from a fuel molecule possessing only a few carbon atoms in just milliseconds. The second part of the video highlights a new experiment, in which an opposed-flow diffusion flame and synchrotron-based aerosol mass spectrometry are used to study the chemical composition of the combustion-generated soot particles(4). The experimental results indicate that the widely accepted H-abstraction-C2H2-addition (HACA) mechanism is not the sole molecular growth process responsible for the formation

  10. Removal of disinfection by-products formation potential by biologically intensified process.

    PubMed

    An, Dong; Li, Wei-guang; Cui, Fu-yi; He, Xin; Zhang, Jin-song

    2005-01-01

    The removal of disinfection by-products formation potential (DBPFP) in artificially intensified biological activated carbon (IBAC) process which is developed on the basis of traditional ozone granular activated carbon was evaluated. By IBAC removals of 31% and 68% for THMFP and HAAFP were obtained respectively. Under identical conditions, the removals of the same substances were 4% and 32% respectively only by the granular activated carbon (GAC) process. Compared with GAC, the high removal rates of the two formed potential substances were due to the increasing of bioactivity of the media and the synergistic capabilities of biological degradation cooperating with lactivated carbon adsorption of organic compounds. A clear linear correlation (R2 = 0.9562 and R2 = 0.9007) between DOC HAAFP removal rate and Empty Bed Contact Time (EBCT) of IBAC process was observed, while that between THMFP removal rate and EBCT of GAC was R2 = 0.9782. In addition certain linear correlations between THMFP, HAAFP and UV254 (R2 = 0.855 and R2 = 0.7702) were found for the treated water. For IBAC process there are also more advantages such as long backwashing cycle time, low backwashing intensity and prolonging activated carbon lifetime and so on. PMID:16295913

  11. Processes of benthic foraminiferal fossil assemblage formation on the continental slope

    SciTech Connect

    Loubere, P. )

    1991-03-01

    Theoretical analysis of benethic foraminiferal fossil assemblage formation shows that the assemblage eventually preserved in the sediments is an integrated result of species' test production rate, microhabitat behavior, and biogeochemical processes that control the probability of species' test preservation. The biogeochemical processes that influence test preservation in slope sediments are controlled by the flux of organic carbon to the sea-bed and the botton water oxygen concentration. These variables also affect the depth of the biotic habitation zone in the sediments. Therefore, organic carbon flux and bottom water oxygen content should be reflected in benthic foraminiferal fossil assemblages for both ecologic and taphonomic reasons. An integrated study of fossil assemblage generation was conducted on the Gulf of Mexico continental slope using box cores collected along depth transects across the oxygen minimum, and using live and dead assemblage analysis combined with {sup 210}Pb measurements to quantify biotic activity in the sediments and pore water nutrient and metals analysis to quantify biogeochemical processes acting in the sediment habitation zone. The results show that the size of the habitation zone and live standing stock are influenced by organic carbon flux and oxygen supply to the sea-bed. The fossil assemblage is created progressively through the upper 10-20 cm of sediment and biologichemically driven test destruction (taphonomic process) is important in determining the assemblage that enters the geologic record.

  12. [Influence of temperature on spatial fibrin clot formation process in thrombodynamics].

    PubMed

    Shcherbina, I A; Lipets, E N; Abaeva, A A; Balandina, A N; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the process of spatial fibrin clot formation in non-steered platelet-free plasma at the temperatures from 20°C to 43°C using thrombodynamics - the novel in vitro hemostasis assay, which imitates the process of hemostatic clot growth in vivo. During data processing the following parameters were calculated: initial (V i ) and stationary (V st ) rates of clot growth which characterize initiation and propagation phases of clotting process, and clot size on the 30 th minute. The temperature dependence of extrinsic and intrinsic tenase activities, which determine values of the initial and stationary clot growth rates, respectively, have been also measured. It was established that the temperature lowering from 37°C to 24°C extends mainly on the initiation phase of clot growth, while the stationary rate of clot growth changes insignificantly. Meanwhile none of the thrombodynamics parameters shows the dramatic change of plasma coagulation system condition at the temperature of 24°C (acute hypothermia). Using the thrombodynamics assay an assumption, that the temperature lowering does not change the state of plasma hemostasis system significantly has been confirmed.

  13. International Processes of Education Policy Formation: An Analytic Framework and the Case of Plan 2021 in El Salvador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, D. Brent, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This article uses multiple perspectives to frame international processes of education policy formation and then applies the framework to El Salvador's Plan 2021 between 2003 and 2005. These perspectives are policy attraction, policy negotiation, policy imposition, and policy hybridization. Research reveals that the formation of Plan 2021 was the…

  14. Ion-induced Processing of Cosmic Silicates: A Possible Formation Pathway to GEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, C.; Sabri, T.; Wendler, E.; Henning, Th.

    2016-11-01

    Ion-induced processing of dust grains in the interstellar medium and in protoplanetary and planetary disks plays an important role in the entire dust cycle. We have studied the ion-induced processing of amorphous MgFeSiO4 and Mg2SiO4 grains by 10 and 20 keV protons and 90 keV Ar+ ions. The Ar+ ions were used to compare the significance of the light protons with that of heavier, but chemically inert projectiles. The bombardment was performed in a two-beam irradiation chamber for in situ ion-implantation at temperatures of 15 and 300 K and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy to monitor the alteration of the silicate composition under ion irradiation. A depletion of oxygen from the silicate structure by selective sputtering of oxygen from the surface of the grains was observed in both samples. The silicate particles kept their amorphous structure, but the loss of oxygen caused the reduction of ferrous (Fe2+) ions and the formation of iron inclusions in the MgFeSiO4 grains. A few Si inclusions were produced in the iron-free magnesium silicate sample pointing to a much less efficient reduction of Si4+ and formation of metallic Si inclusions. Consequently, ion-induced processing of magnesium-iron silicates can produce grains that are very similar to the glassy grains with embedded metals and sulfides frequently observed in interplanetary dust particles and meteorites. The metallic iron inclusions are strong absorbers in the NIR range and therefore a ubiquitous requirement to increase the temperature of silicate dust grains in IR-dominated astrophysical environments such as circumstellar shells or protoplanetary disks.

  15. Modern Limnology and Varve Formation Processes in Lake Montcortès (Southern Pyrenees, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapote forné, M.; López, P.; Puche, E.; Safont, E.; Cañellas-Boltà, N.; Gomà, J.; Buchaca, T.; Pérez-Zanón, N.; Sigró, J.; Rull, V.; Vegas-Vilarrúbia, T.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Montcortès is a karstic lake located in Catalonian Pyrenees (Spain). Its sediments consist of biogenic varves composed of a couplet of calcite and organic matter layers and occasional detrital layer. Previous studies of the lake's sediments spanning the last 1500 years proposed that the lake was meromictic and that calcite layers formed due to endogenic precipitation in the epilimnion during spring/summer, driven by diatom blooms. These processes would have been influenced by variations in calcium saturation, trophic state and water temperature of the lake. The presence of phosphorous and biological differences between planktonic diatoms Cyclotella comta and C.cyclopuncta, would have produced additional differences in calcite sublayering. In order to improve comprehension of limnological variables that influence varve formation processes, monthly field campaigns including sediment traps deployment have been carried out during two concurrent years (2013-2015). The lake mixed once during winter. Endogenic calcite precipitation related with high primary production and calcium saturation in metalimnetic water was confirmed. Trapped material composition revealed low but constant calcite precipitation through the year with higher intensities during summer and autumn, coinciding with high relative abundances of C. cyclopuncta and C.ocellata. Nutrient content was very low throughout both years, particularly phosphorous. It seems to be removed by coprecipitation of calcium phosphate with calcite during summer, probably inhibiting part of calcite precipitation reaction. In contrast to previous hypotheses, currently calcite precipitation occurs through the whole year, mainly during summer and autumn months, and may be triggered by nucleation with picoplankton. Our study shows that processes leading to varve formation are highly complex and that any extrapolation to different regions or time periods should be handled with caution

  16. FUEL PROCESSING FOR FUEL CELLS: EFFECTS ON CATALYST DURABILITY AND CARBON FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. BORUP; M. INBODY; B. MORTON; L. BROWN

    2001-05-01

    On-board production of hydrogen for fuel cells for automotive applications is a challenging developmental task. The fuel processor must show long term durability and under challenging conditions. Fuel processor catalysts in automotive fuel processors will be exposed to large thermal variations, vibrations, exposure to uncontrolled ambient conditions, and various impurities from ambient air and from fuel. For the commercialization of fuel processors, the delineation of effects on catalyst activity and durability are required. We are studying fuels and fuel constituent effects on the fuel processor system as part of the DOE Fuel Cells for Transportation program. Pure fuel components are tested to delineate the fuel component effect on the fuel processor and fuel processor catalysts. Component blends are used to simulate ''real fuels'', with various fuel mixtures being examined such as reformulated gasoline and naptha. The aliphatic, napthenic, olefin and aromatic content are simulated to represent the chemical kinetics of possible detrimental reactions, such as carbon formation, during fuel testing. Testing has examined the fuel processing performance of different fuel components to help elucidate the fuel constituent effects on fuel processing performance and upon catalyst durability. Testing has been conducted with vapor fuels, including natural gas and pure methane. The testing of pure methane and comparable testing with natural gas (97% methane) have shown some measurable differences in performance in the fuel processor. Major gasoline fuel constituents, such as aliphatic compounds, napthanes, and aromatics have been compared for their effect on the fuel processing performance. Experiments have been conducted using high-purity compounds to observe the fuel processing properties of the individual components and to document individual fuel component performance. The relative carbon formation of different fuel constituents have been measured by monitoring carbon via

  17. Formation and Destruction Processes of Interstellar Dust: From Organic Molecules to carbonaceous Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Biennier, L.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the formation and destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. interstellar dust presents a continuous size distribution from large molecules, radicals and ions to nanometer-sized particles to micron-sized grains. The lower end of the dust size distribution is thought to be responsible for the ubiquitous spectral features that are seen in emission in the IR (UIBs) and in absorption in the visible (DIBs). The higher end of the dust-size distribution is thought to be responsible for the continuum emission plateau that is seen in the IR and for the strong absorption seen in the interstellar UV extinction curve. All these spectral signatures are characteristic of cosmic organic materials that are ubiquitous and present in various forms from gas-phase molecules to solid-state grains. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar chemistry and in the formation of organic molecules, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of dust. Recent space observations in the UV (HST) and in the IR (ISO) help place size constraints on the molecular component of carbonaceous IS dust and indicate that small (ie., subnanometer) PAHs cannot contribute significantly to the IS features in the UV and in the IR. Studies of large molecular and nano-sized IS dust analogs formed from PAH precursors have been performed in our laboratory under conditions that simulate diffuse ISM environments (the particles are cold -100 K vibrational energy, isolated in the gas phase and exposed to a high-energy discharge environment in a cold plasma). The species (molecules, molecular fragments, ions, nanoparticles, etc) formed in the pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) plasma source are detected with a high-sensitivity cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). We will present new experimental results that indicate that nanoparticles are generated in the

  18. Experimental demonstration of a format-flexible single-carrier coherent receiver using data-aided digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Elschner, Robert; Frey, Felix; Meuer, Christian; Fischer, Johannes Karl; Alreesh, Saleem; Schmidt-Langhorst, Carsten; Molle, Lutz; Tanimura, Takahito; Schubert, Colja

    2012-12-17

    We experimentally demonstrate the use of data-aided digital signal processing for format-flexible coherent reception of different 28-GBd PDM and 4D modulated signals in WDM transmission experiments over up to 7680 km SSMF by using the same resource-efficient digital signal processing algorithms for the equalization of all formats. Stable and regular performance in the nonlinear transmission regime is confirmed. PMID:23263118

  19. Experimental demonstration of a format-flexible single-carrier coherent receiver using data-aided digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Elschner, Robert; Frey, Felix; Meuer, Christian; Fischer, Johannes Karl; Alreesh, Saleem; Schmidt-Langhorst, Carsten; Molle, Lutz; Tanimura, Takahito; Schubert, Colja

    2012-12-17

    We experimentally demonstrate the use of data-aided digital signal processing for format-flexible coherent reception of different 28-GBd PDM and 4D modulated signals in WDM transmission experiments over up to 7680 km SSMF by using the same resource-efficient digital signal processing algorithms for the equalization of all formats. Stable and regular performance in the nonlinear transmission regime is confirmed.

  20. Deciphering Transcriptional Programming during Pod and Seed Development Using RNA-Seq in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan)

    PubMed Central

    Pazhamala, Lekha T.; Agarwal, Gaurav; Bajaj, Prasad; Kumar, Vinay; Kulshreshtha, Akanksha; Saxena, Rachit K.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Seed development is an important event in plant life cycle that has interested humankind since ages, especially in crops of economic importance. Pigeonpea is an important grain legume of the semi-arid tropics, used mainly for its protein rich seeds. In order to understand the transcriptional programming during the pod and seed development, RNA-seq data was generated from embryo sac from the day of anthesis (0 DAA), seed and pod wall (5, 10, 20 and 30 DAA) of pigeonpea variety “Asha” (ICPL 87119) using Illumina HiSeq 2500. About 684 million sequencing reads have been generated from nine samples, which resulted in the identification of 27,441 expressed genes after sequence analysis. These genes have been studied for their differentially expression, co-expression, temporal and spatial gene expression. We have also used the RNA-seq data to identify important seed-specific transcription factors, biological processes and associated pathways during seed development process in pigeonpea. The comprehensive gene expression study from flowering to mature pod development in pigeonpea would be crucial in identifying candidate genes involved in seed traits directly or indirectly related to yield and quality. The dataset will serve as an important resource for gene discovery and deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying various seed related traits. PMID:27760186

  1. Possibility of wave control of the formation of twinned austenite in the process of the formation of bainitic ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchenko, M. P.; Chashchina, V. G.

    2015-04-01

    An analysis has been performed of the elastic fields of the basic dislocation loops of carriers of shear deformation on {558}γ planes close to the habit planes of the basic component of the bimodal distribution of ferrite habits in a bainite macroplate. It has been shown that there are extrema of the elastic field that can be associated with the creation of plates of austenite twins in the wave regime. The formation of an additional component of the distribution of the ferrite habits is mainly associated with the regions of twinned austenite.

  2. The process of ghost-rock karstification and its role in the formation of cave systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, C.; Quinif, Y.; Baele, J.-M.; Barriquand, L.; Bini, A.; Bruxelles, L.; Dandurand, G.; Havron, C.; Kaufmann, O.; Lans, B.; Maire, R.; Martin, J.; Rodet, J.; Rowberry, M. D.; Tognini, P.; Vergari, A.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an extensive review of the process of ghost-rock karstification and highlights its role in the formation of cave systems. The process integrates chemical weathering and mechanical erosion and extends a number of existing theories pertaining to continental landscape development. It is a two stage process that differs in many respects from the traditional single-stage process of karstification by total removal. The first stage is characterised by chemical dissolution and removal of the soluble species. It requires low hydrodynamic energy and creates a ghost-rock feature filled with residual alterite. The second stage is characterised by mechanical erosion of the undissolved particles. It requires high hydrodynamic energy and it is only then that open galleries are created. The transition from the first stage to the second is driven by the amount of energy within the thermodynamic system. The process is illustrated by detailed field observations and the results of the laboratory analyses of samples taken from the karstotype area around Soignies in southern Belgium. Thereafter, a series of case studies provide a synthesis of field observations and laboratory analyses from across western Europe. These studies come from geologically distinct parts of Belgium, France, Italy, and the United Kingdom. The process of ghost-rock karstification challenges a number of axioms associated with the process of karstification by total removal. On the basis of the evidence presented it is argued that it is no longer acceptable to use karst morphologies as a basis with which to infer specific karstogenetic processes and it is no longer necessary for a karst system to relate to base level as ghost-rock karstification proceeds along transmissive pathways in the rock. There is also some evidence to suggest that ghost-rock karstification may be superseded by karstification by total removal, and vice versa, according to the amount of energy within the thermodynamic system

  3. Transformation of humic acid and halogenated byproduct formation in UV-chlorine processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Jiang, Yan; An, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Huijuan; Hu, Chun; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-10-01

    The synergistic effect of ultraviolet light (UV) and chlorine on the structural transformation of Humic Acid (HA) and formation of chloro-disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in water were investigated, with chlorination as a reference. The transformation and mineralization of HA were enhanced upon co-exposure to UV and chlorine. Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies revealed that hydroxyl radical (OH) and chlorine radical (Cl) were predominant active species in a pH range from 4 to 7, while Cl dominated at pH 2 and pH higher than 7. The impact of different radicals on the transformation of HA was investigated by UV254, fluorescence and TOC measurements. OH were found to be responsible for the removal of chromophoric groups and mineralization of HA, while Cl mainly reacted with HA and intermediates from HA degradation. Due to the competitive and synergistic reaction of OH and Cl with HA, higher removal of HA and lower formation of chloro-DBPs appeared in UV-chlorine than chlorination, thus the combined UV-chlorine processes should be a promising method for water purification.

  4. Processes involved in the formation of silver clusters on silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S. R.; Chini, T. K.; Datta, D.; Hippler, R.; Shyjumon, I.; Smirnov, B. M.

    2008-12-01

    We analyze scanning electron microscopy measurements for structures formed in the deposition of solid silver clusters onto a silicon(100) substrate and consider theoretical models of cluster evolution onto a surface as a result of diffusion and formation of aggregates of merged clusters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data are presented in addition to energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) measurements of the these films. Solid silver clusters are produced by a DC magnetron sputtering source with a quadrupole filter for selection of cluster sizes (4.1 and 5.6 nm or 1900 and 5000 atoms per cluster in this experiment); the energy of cluster deposition is 0.7 eV/atom. Rapid thermal annealing of the grown films allows analysis of their behavior at high temperatures. The results exhibit formation of cluster aggregates via the diffusion of deposited solid clusters along the surface; an aggregate consists of up to hundreds of individual clusters. This process is essentially described by the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model, and thus a grown porous film consists of cluster aggregates joined by bridges. Subsequent annealing of this film leads to its melting at temperatures lower than to the melting point of bulk silver. Analysis of evaporation of this film at higher temperatures gives a binding energy in bulk silver of ɛ0= (2.74 ± 0.03) eV/atom.

  5. Control of Listeria monocytogenes in the processing environment by understanding biofilm formation and resistance to sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Manios, Stavros G; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can colonize in the food processing environment and thus pose a greater risk of cross-contamination to food. One of the proposed mechanisms that facilitates such colonization is biofilm formation. As part of a biofilm, it is hypothesized that L. monocytogenes can survive sanitization procedures. In addition, biofilms are difficult to remove and may require additional physical and chemical mechanisms to reduce their presence and occurrence. The initial stage of biofilm formation is attachment to surfaces, and therefore it is important to be able to determine the ability of L. monocytogenes strains to attach to various inert surfaces. In this chapter, methods to study bacterial attachment to surfaces are described. Attachment is commonly induced by bringing planktonic cells into contact with plastic, glass, or stainless steel surfaces with or without food residues ("soil") in batch or continuous (e.g., with constant flow of nutrients) culture. Measurement of biofilm formed is carried out by detaching cells (with various mechanical methods) and measuring the viable counts or by measuring the total attached biomass. Resistance of biofilms to sanitizers is commonly carried out by exposure of the whole model surface bearing the attached cells to a solution of sanitizer, followed by measuring the survivors as described above.

  6. Chain formation and aging process in biocompatible polydisperse ferrofluids: experimental investigation and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Bakuzis, Andris Figueiroa; Branquinho, Luis César; e Castro, Leonardo Luiz; e Eloi, Marcos Tiago de Amaral; Miotto, Ronei

    2013-05-01

    We review the use of Monte Carlo simulations in the description of magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid carrier. Our main focus is the use of theory and simulation as tools for the description of the properties of ferrofluids. In particular, we report on the influence of polydispersity and short-range interaction on the self-organization of nanoparticles. Such contributions are shown to be extremely important for systems characterized by particles with diameters smaller than 10nm. A new 3D polydisperse Monte Carlo implementation for biocompatible magnetic colloids is proposed. As an example, theoretical and simulation results for an ionic-surfacted ferrofluid dispersed in a NaCl solution are directly compared to experimental data (transmission electron microscopy - TEM, magneto-transmissivity, and electron magnetic resonance - EMR). Our combined theoretical and experimental results suggest that during the aging process two possible mechanisms are likely to be observed: the nanoparticle's grafting decreases due to aggregate formation and the Hamaker constant increases due to oxidation. In addition, we also briefly discuss theoretical agglomerate formation models and compare them to experimental data.

  7. Control of disinfection by-product formation using ozone-based advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Chung; Wang, Yu-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    The effects of ozone dosage, water temperature and catalyst addition in an ozonation-fluidized bed reactor (O3/FBR) on treated water quality and on the control of chlorinated and ozonated disinfection by-products (DBPs) were investigated. A biofiltration column was used to evaluate its removal efficiency on biodegradable organic matter and to reduce DBP formation. The Dong-Gang River, polluted by agricultural and domestic wastewater in Pingtung, Taiwan, was used as the water source. The treated water quality in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biodegradable DOC, ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) and specific UV absorbance (SUVA) improved with increasing ozone and catalyst dosages. Catalytic ozonation was more effective than ozonation alone at reducing the formation of DBPs at a given dosage. Experimental results show that water temperature had little effect on the treated water quality with the O3/FBR system used in this study (p > 0.05). The combination of O3/FBR and the biofiltration process effectively decreased the amount ofDBP precursors. The concentration of total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) was less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) requirement, which is 80 microg/L, for all treated waters and the concentration of five haloacetic acids (HAA5) fell below 60 microg/L with an ozone dosage higher than 2.5 mg/L.

  8. Investigation of Pyrene Excimer formation in various manufacturing processes and ionic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2013-03-01

    Electrospun pyrene (Py)/polystyrene/tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate (TBAPF6) thin films can provide high-sensitivity and high-selectivity detection of nitro-aromatic explosives through fluorescence quenching of the Py excimers. However, we have found that the formation of Py excimers in Py/PS/TBAPF6 thin films depends greatly on the manufacturing processes. Our results indicate that high solvent vapor pressure promotes the Py excimer fluorescence, while high temperature (around or greater than Tg of the PS) has an opposite effect in absence of solvent - reducing the Py excimer fluorescence. Moreover, we have found that salts structure such as cation chain length, anion strength can significantly affect the formation of Py excimer both in solution and solid state, presumably due to self-aggregation of the salts and electrostatic interactions between ions and pyrene excimer. 13C-NMR and steady-state fluorescence result indicate that the salt induces peak shift to the downfield in the spectra and quenches the Py excimer intensity drastically. Ph.D. Candidate, Institute of Material Science, Polymer program

  9. Formation of PCDD/Fs in the sintering process: influence of the raw materials.

    PubMed

    Xhrouet, Céline; de Pauw, Edwin

    2004-08-01

    The sintering process is among the major sources of PCDD/Fs in the environment. This research studies the influence of the raw materials in this type of industrial plant on the amounts of PCDD/Fs generated. Particular interest is given to coke, which constitutes the principal source of carbon for the de novo synthesis of PCDD/Fs, and to the dust collected in the electrostatic precipitator (E.S.P. dust), usually recycled in the raw materials. The de novo synthesis of PCDD/Fs is simulated at the laboratory scale by thermal treatments of the samples. The use of a particular coke as a fuel does not drastically reduce the formation of PCDD/Fs. Actually, the global amounts of PCDD/Fs generated from the graphite and the two cokes tested are very similar. Only modifications in the fingerprint are observed. On the other hand, the addition of 10 wt % dust collected in the electrostatic precipitator leads to the formation of amounts of PCDD/Fs multiplied by a factor larger than 10(3). These results imply caution against the recycling of this E.S.P. dust in the raw materials.

  10. Chain formation and aging process in biocompatible polydisperse ferrofluids: experimental investigation and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Bakuzis, Andris Figueiroa; Branquinho, Luis César; e Castro, Leonardo Luiz; e Eloi, Marcos Tiago de Amaral; Miotto, Ronei

    2013-05-01

    We review the use of Monte Carlo simulations in the description of magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid carrier. Our main focus is the use of theory and simulation as tools for the description of the properties of ferrofluids. In particular, we report on the influence of polydispersity and short-range interaction on the self-organization of nanoparticles. Such contributions are shown to be extremely important for systems characterized by particles with diameters smaller than 10nm. A new 3D polydisperse Monte Carlo implementation for biocompatible magnetic colloids is proposed. As an example, theoretical and simulation results for an ionic-surfacted ferrofluid dispersed in a NaCl solution are directly compared to experimental data (transmission electron microscopy - TEM, magneto-transmissivity, and electron magnetic resonance - EMR). Our combined theoretical and experimental results suggest that during the aging process two possible mechanisms are likely to be observed: the nanoparticle's grafting decreases due to aggregate formation and the Hamaker constant increases due to oxidation. In addition, we also briefly discuss theoretical agglomerate formation models and compare them to experimental data. PMID:23360743

  11. Empirical analysis of the lane formation process in bidirectional pedestrian flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feliciani, Claudio; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on pedestrian bidirectional streams and the mechanisms leading to spontaneous lane formation by examining the flow formed by two groups of people walking toward each other in a mock corridor. Flow ratio is changed by changing each group size while maintaining comparable total flow and density. By tracking the trajectories of each pedestrian and analyzing the data obtained, five different phases were recognized as contributing to the transition from unidirectional to bidirectional flow including the spontaneous creation and dissolution of lanes. It has been shown that a statistical treatment is required to understand the fundamental characteristics of pedestrian dynamics and some two-dimensional quantities such as order parameter and rotation range were introduced to allow a more complete analysis. All the quantities observed showed a clear relationship with flow ratio and helped distinguishing between the different characteristic phases of the experiment. Results show that balanced bidirectional flow becomes the most stable configuration after lanes are formed, but the lane creation process requires pedestrians to laterally move to a largest extent compared to low flow-ratio configurations. This finding allows us to understand the reasons why balanced bidirectional flow is efficient at low densities, but quickly leads to deadlock formation at high densities.

  12. CONSTRAINTS ON FEEDBACK PROCESSES DURING THE FORMATION OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, M.; De La Rosa, I. G.; La Barbera, F.; De Carvalho, R. R.

    2012-06-20

    Galaxies are found to obey scaling relations between a number of observables. These relations follow different trends at the low- and high-mass ends. The processes driving the curvature of scaling relations remain uncertain. In this Letter, we focus on the specific family of early-type galaxies, deriving the star formation histories of a complete sample of visually classified galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.025, covering a stellar mass interval from 10{sup 9} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. Our sample features the characteristic 'knee' in the surface brightness versus mass distribution at M{sub *} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} . We find a clear difference between the age and metallicity distributions of the stellar populations above and beyond this knee, which suggests a sudden transition from a constant, highly efficient mode of star formation in high-mass galaxies, gradually decreasing toward the low-mass end of the sample. At fixed mass, our early-type sample is more efficient in building up the stellar content at early times in comparison to the general population of galaxies, with half of the stars already in place by redshift z {approx} 2 for all masses. The metallicity-age trend in low-mass galaxies is not compatible with infall of metal-poor gas, suggesting instead an outflow-driven relation.

  13. Hall effect on a Merging Formation Process of a Field-Reversed Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminou, Yasuhiro; Guo, Xuehan; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    2015-11-01

    Counter-helicity spheromak merging is one of the formation methods of a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). In counter-helicity spheromak merging, two spheromaks with opposing toroidal fields merge together, through magnetic reconnection events and relax into a FRC, which has no or little toroidal field. This process contains magnetic reconnection and a relaxation phenomena, and the Hall effect has some essential effects on these process because the X-point in the magnetic reconnection or the O-point of the FRC has no or little magnetic field. However, the Hall effect as both global and local effect on counter-helicity spheromak merging has not been elucidated. In this poster, we conducted 2D/3D Hall-MHD simulations and experiments of counter-helicity spheromak merging. We find that the Hall effect enhances the reconnection rate, and reduces the generation of toroidal sheared-flow. The suppression of the ``slingshot effect'' affects the relaxation process. We will discuss details in the poster.

  14. Formation and emission of brominated dioxins and furans during secondary aluminum smelting processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Liu, Guorui; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Li, Sumei; Liu, Wenbin; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-03-01

    Secondary aluminum smelting (SAl) processes have previously been found to be important sources of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs). It is crucial that the key factors that influence the formation and emission of PBDD/Fs are identified to allow techniques for decreasing PBDD/F emissions during SAl processes to be developed. In this study, stack gas samples were collected from four typical secondary aluminum smelters that used different raw materials, and the samples were analyzed to allow differences between PBDD/F emissions from different SAl plants to be assessed. The composition of the raw materials was found to be one of the key factors influencing the amounts of PBDD/Fs emitted. The PBDD/F emission factors (per tonne of aluminum produced) for the plants using 100% (Plant1), 80% (Plant2), and 50% (Plant3) dirty aluminum scrap in the raw material feed were 180, 86, and 14 μg t(-1), respectively. The amounts of PBDD/Fs emitted at different stages of the smelting process (feeding-fusion, refining, and casting) were compared, and the feeding-fusion stage was found to be the main stage in which PBDD/Fs were formed and emitted. Effective aluminum scrap pretreatments could significantly decrease PBDD/F emissions. Much higher polybrominated dibenzofuran concentrations than polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxin concentrations were found throughout the SAl process. The more-brominated congeners (including octabromodibenzo-p-dioxin, octabromodibenzofuran, heptabromodibenzo-p-dioxins, and heptabromodibenzofurans) were the dominant contributors to the total PBDD/F concentrations. The results could help in the development of techniques and strategies for controlling PBDD/F emissions during metallurgical processes.

  15. Characterization of phenolic constituents inhibiting the formation of sulfur-containing volatiles produced during garlic processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Qing; Zhou, Hua; Zhou, Mei-Yun; Hu, Xing-Peng; Ou, Shi-Yi; Yan, Ri-An; Liao, Xiao-Jian; Huang, Xue-Song; Fu, Liang

    2015-01-28

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.), which is a widely distributed plant, is globally used as both spice and food. This study identified five novel phenolic compounds, namely, 8-(3-methyl-(E)-1-butenyl)diosmetin, 8-(3-methyl-(E)-1-butenyl)chrysin, 6-(3-methyl-(E)-1-butenyl)chrysin, and Alliumones A and B, along with nine known compounds 6-14 from the ethanol extract of garlic. The structures of these five novel phenolic compounds were established via extensive 1D- and 2D-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. The effects of the phenolic compounds isolated from garlic on the enzymatical or nonenzymatical formation of sulfur-containing compounds produced during garlic processing were examined. Compound 12 significantly reduced the thermal decomposition of alliin, whereas compound 4 exhibited the highest percentage of alliinase inhibition activity (36.6%).

  16. Near-infrared image formation and processing for the extraction of hand veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzida, Nabila; Hakim Bendada, Abdel; Maldague, Xavier P.

    2010-10-01

    The main objective of this work is to extract the hand vein network using a non-invasive technique in the near-infrared region (NIR). The visualization of the veins is based on a relevant feature of the blood in relation with certain wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. In the present paper, we first introduce the image formation in the NIR spectral band. Then, the acquisition system will be presented as well as the method used for the image processing in order to extract the vein signature. Extractions of this pattern on the finger, on the wrist and on the dorsal hand are achieved after exposing the hand to an optical stimulation by reflection or transmission of light. We present meaningful results of the extracted vein pattern demonstrating the utility of the method for a clinical application like the diagnosis of vein disease, of primitive varicose vein and also for applications in vein biometrics.

  17. Monitoring process of human keloid formation based on second harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. S.; Chen, S.; Chen, J. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zheng, L. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Wang, D. J.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, the morphological variation of collagen among the whole dermis from keloid tissue was investigated using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. In the deep dermis of keloids, collagen bundles show apparently regular gap. In the middle dermis, the collagen bundles are randomly oriented and loosely arranged in the pattern of fine mesh while the collagen bundles are organized in a parallel manner in the superficial dermis near the epidermis. The developed parameters COI and BD can be used to further quantitatively describe these changes. Our results demonstrate the potential of SHG microscopy to understand the formation process of human keloid scar at the cellular level through imaging collagen variations in different depth of dermis.

  18. Teachers and the religious socialization of adolescents: facilitation of meaningful religious identity formation processes.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Malayev, Maya; Schachter, Elli P; Rich, Yisrael

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of religious education on student religious identity over and above parent religiosity by examining student perceptions of two aspects of teacher functioning: teacher caring and teacher as role-model. We posited that effects of these variables on students' religious identity are mediated by student perceptions that the school provides a non-alienating religious atmosphere and meaningful religious studies. Participants were 2691 male and female students (grades 9-12) in 152 classes of 25 schools from the Jewish public-religious sector in Israel. Results indicate that in addition to their parents' religiosity, adolescents' perceptions of their teachers as role models and their religious studies as meaningful are important variables affecting their religious identity. Moreover, this research suggests that religious identity formation processes flourish in an educational environment which students perceive as accommodating religious exploration. PMID:24439626

  19. Photoreduction processes and nanocluster formation induced by a CO2 laser on silicate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar', A. M.; Mukhamedgalieva, A. F.; Shvedov, I. M.

    2009-09-01

    The photoreduction processes stimulated either the cw (power density 105-106 W/cm2) or pulsed (pulse energy 3-4 J, pulse duration 200 ns, effective laser spot diameter 1 mm) radiation of a CO2 laser on the surfaces of fused and crystalline quartz, as well as of natural silicates (nepheline KNa3[AlSiO4]4, rhodonite CaMn4[Si5O15], and zircon ZrSiO4), are studied. The X-ray emission analysis of irradiated surfaces showed that the laser irradiation of these materials leads to the sublimation of silicon oxides and the enrichment of surfaces with constituent metal elements. Laser radiation also stimulates the formation of silicon and metal nanoclusters on irradiated surfaces. The appearance of these nanoclusters is confirmed by both photoluminescence and X-ray emission studies of irradiated surfaces.

  20. Synthesis and formation mechanism of pinnoite by the phase transition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Feng; Dong, Yaping; Peng, Jiaoyu; Wang, Liping; Li, Wu

    2016-06-01

    Pinnoite (MgB2O(OH)6) for the first time was synthesized using the solid-liquid-solid conversion method. The effects of reaction time, pH value and concentrations of magnesium and borate were investigated. Pinnoite was synthesized under the optimum condition of 8 mmol hungtsaoite and 1% boric acid solution at 80 °C. The products were determined using X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, TG-DSC and a UV-vis spectrometer. The change processes of the surface morphology of pinnoite were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the formation mechanism of pinnoite was discussed according to the changes in the content of precipitation and pH value.

  1. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Microstructural examination of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has shown that there is often a region adjacent to the as-nitrided surfaces that is even more porous than the interior of this already quite porous material. Because this layer of large porosity is considered detrimental to both the strength and oxidation resistance of RBSN, a study was undertaken to determine if its formation could be prevented during processing. All test bars studied were made from a single batch of Si powder which was milled for 4 hours in heptane in a vibratory mill using high density alumina cylinders as the grinding media. After air drying the powder, bars were compacted in a single acting die and hydropressed.

  2. Effects of thermal and athermal processing on the formation of buried SiC layers

    SciTech Connect

    Katharria, Y. S.; Kumar, Sandeep; Kanjilal, D.; Chauhan, Devki; Ghatak, J.; Bhatta, U.; Satyam, P. V.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, systematic investigations on 100 keV C ion implanted Si (100) substrates annealed subsequently at a temperature of 1000 deg. C for 2 h or athermally processed using 110 MeV Ni{sup 8+} ion irradiation have been performed. A detailed analysis using the techniques of x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at high resolutions is performed. The observations suggest the formation of cubic silicon carbide ({beta}-SiC) crystallites surrounded by an amorphous background in the samples thermally annealed at 1000 deg. C. However, ion irradiation did not influence the as-implanted layers to any significant extent. Various defects formed after annealing inside C implanted Si such as missing planes, edge dislocations, and grain boundaries during thermal crystallization are visualized through high resolution TEM.

  3. Using Image Processing Techniques for Cluster Analysis, and Droplet Formation in Phase Separating Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory; Oprisan, Ana; Hegseth, John; Oprisan, Sorinel; Lecoutre, Carole; Garrabos, Yves; Beysens, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    A series of experiments were performed using the Alice II apparatus in microgravity to study phase separation near critical temperature. Using image analysis techniques, we were able to obtain quantitative information regarding the morphology of gas-liquid interface near critical point of pure SF6 fluid in microgravity. Growth laws for liquid and gas clusters were extracted based on image segmentation both with thresholding and k-means clustering. By measuring the image features we analyzed the formation of spherical droplets during late stage of phase separation for a series of full view images. The growth of a wetting layer around the border of the cell containing the fluid was also investigated using image processing techniques.

  4. Teachers and the religious socialization of adolescents: facilitation of meaningful religious identity formation processes.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Malayev, Maya; Schachter, Elli P; Rich, Yisrael

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of religious education on student religious identity over and above parent religiosity by examining student perceptions of two aspects of teacher functioning: teacher caring and teacher as role-model. We posited that effects of these variables on students' religious identity are mediated by student perceptions that the school provides a non-alienating religious atmosphere and meaningful religious studies. Participants were 2691 male and female students (grades 9-12) in 152 classes of 25 schools from the Jewish public-religious sector in Israel. Results indicate that in addition to their parents' religiosity, adolescents' perceptions of their teachers as role models and their religious studies as meaningful are important variables affecting their religious identity. Moreover, this research suggests that religious identity formation processes flourish in an educational environment which students perceive as accommodating religious exploration.

  5. Cosmochemical evidence for astrophysical processes during the formation of our solar system

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Glenn J.; Boss, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Through the laboratory study of ancient solar system materials such as meteorites and comet dust, we can recognize evidence for the same star-formation processes in our own solar system as those that we can observe now through telescopes in nearby star-forming regions. High temperature grains formed in the innermost region of the solar system ended up much farther out in the solar system, not only the asteroid belt but even in the comet accretion region, suggesting a huge and efficient process of mass transport. Bi-polar outflows, turbulent diffusion, and marginal gravitational instability are the likely mechanisms for this transport. The presence of short-lived radionuclides in the early solar system, especially 60Fe, 26Al, and 41Ca, requires a nearby supernova shortly before our solar system was formed, suggesting that the Sun was formed in a massive star-forming region similar to Orion or Carina. Solar system formation may have been “triggered” by ionizing radiation originating from massive O and B stars at the center of an expanding HII bubble, one of which may have later provided the supernova source for the short-lived radionuclides. Alternatively, a supernova shock wave may have simultaneously triggered the collapse and injected the short-lived radionuclides. Because the Sun formed in a region where many other stars were forming more or less contemporaneously, the bi-polar outflows from all such stars enriched the local region in interstellar silicate and oxide dust. This may explain several observed anomalies in the meteorite record: a near absence of detectable (no extreme isotopic properties) presolar silicate grains and a dichotomy in the isotope record between 26Al and nucleosynthetic (nonradiogenic) anomalies. PMID:22106251

  6. Bubble Formation and Transport during Microgravity Materials Processing: Model Experiments on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Lee, C. P.

    2003-01-01

    Flow Visualization experiments on the controlled melting and solidification of succinonitrile were conducted in the glovebox facility of the International Space Station (ISS). The experimental samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with pure succinonitrile (SCN) under 450 millibar of nitrogen. Porosity in the samples arose from natural shrinkage, and in some cases by direct insertion of nitrogen bubbles, during solidification of the liquid SCN. The samples were processed in the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) apparatus that is placed in the glovebox facility (GBX) aboard the ISS. Experimental processing parameters of temperature gradient and translation speed, as well as camera settings, were remotely monitored and manipulated from the ground Telescience Center (TSC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. During the experiments, the sample is first subjected to a unidirectional melt back, generally at 10 microns per second, with a constant temperature gradient ahead of the melting interface. The temperatures in the sample are monitored by six in situ thermocouples. Real time visualization of the controlled directional melt back shows bubbles of different sizes initiating at the melt interface and, upon dislodging from the melting solid, migrating at different speeds into the temperature field ahead of them, before coming to rest. The thermocapillary flow field set up in the melt, ahead of the interface, is dramatic in the context of the large bubbles, and plays a major role in dislodging the bubble. A preliminary analysis of the observed bubble formation and mobility during melt back and its implication to future microgravity experiments is presented and discussed.

  7. Bubble Formation and Transport during Microgravity Materials Processing: Model Experiments on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Lee, C. P.

    2003-01-01

    Flow Visualization experiments on the controlled melting and solidification of succinonitrile were conducted in the glovebox facility of the International Space Station (ISS). The experimental samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with pure succinonitrile (SCN) under 450 millibar of nitrogen. Porosity in the samples arose from natural shrinkage, and in some cases by direct insertion of nitrogen bubbles, during solidification of the liquid SCN. The samples were processed in the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) apparatus that is placed in the glovebox facility (GBX) aboard the ISS. Experimental processing parameters of temperature gradient and translation speed, as well as camera settings, were remotely monitored and manipulated from the ground Telescience Center (TSC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. During the experiments, the sample is first subjected to a unidirectional melt back, generally at 10 microns per second, with a constant temperature gradient ahead of the melting interface. The temperatures in the sample are monitored by six in situ thermocouples. Real time visualization of the controlled directional melt back shows bubbles of different sizes initiating at the melt interface and, upon dislodging from the melting solid, migrating at different speeds into the temperature field ahead of them, before coming to rest. The thermocapillary flow field set up in the melt, ahead of the interface, is dramatic in the context of the large bubbles, and plays a major role in dislodging the bubble. A preliminary analysis of the observed bubble formation and mobility during melt back and its implication to future microgravity experiments is presented and discussed.

  8. Cosmochemical evidence for astrophysical processes during the formation of our solar system.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Glenn J; Boss, Alan

    2011-11-29

    Through the laboratory study of ancient solar system materials such as meteorites and comet dust, we can recognize evidence for the same star-formation processes in our own solar system as those that we can observe now through telescopes in nearby star-forming regions. High temperature grains formed in the innermost region of the solar system ended up much farther out in the solar system, not only the asteroid belt but even in the comet accretion region, suggesting a huge and efficient process of mass transport. Bi-polar outflows, turbulent diffusion, and marginal gravitational instability are the likely mechanisms for this transport. The presence of short-lived radionuclides in the early solar system, especially (60)Fe, (26)Al, and (41)Ca, requires a nearby supernova shortly before our solar system was formed, suggesting that the Sun was formed in a massive star-forming region similar to Orion or Carina. Solar system formation may have been "triggered" by ionizing radiation originating from massive O and B stars at the center of an expanding HII bubble, one of which may have later provided the supernova source for the short-lived radionuclides. Alternatively, a supernova shock wave may have simultaneously triggered the collapse and injected the short-lived radionuclides. Because the Sun formed in a region where many other stars were forming more or less contemporaneously, the bi-polar outflows from all such stars enriched the local region in interstellar silicate and oxide dust. This may explain several observed anomalies in the meteorite record: a near absence of detectable (no extreme isotopic properties) presolar silicate grains and a dichotomy in the isotope record between (26)Al and nucleosynthetic (nonradiogenic) anomalies.

  9. Effects of calcium-based sorbents on PCDD/F formation from pentachlorophenol combustion process.

    PubMed

    Lu, S Y; Chen, T; Yan, J H; Li, X D; Ni, Y L M J; Cen, K F

    2007-08-17

    Calcium-based sorbents are widely employed to reduce the acidic gases emission from combustion processes, and also have effects on trace organic pollutants formation and emission. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of calcium-based sorbents on pentachlorophenol (PCP) forming PCDDs/Fs during high temperature combustion processes. The results indicated that highly chlorinated PCDD/F homologues were the predominant dioxin products from PCP thermo decomposition, and only minor increasing of PCDDs happened when Ca/Cl ratio was lower than 1, while a major jump occurred when Ca/Cl ratio increased from 1 to 2. The CaO addition clearly promoted the production of all chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins homologue and 4-7DFs homologue. Comparison of total PCDD/F emission and its I-TEQ for three different calcium-based sorbents addition (CaO, CaCO3, basic fly ash) indicated that CaO and fly ash containing CaO had almost the same promotion effects on PCDDs/Fs originated from PCP, while CaCO3 inhibit PCDD/F formation greatly with inhibition efficiency up to 70%. Such effects may be partly proved by the observed clearly different micro-surface structures of their reaction residues. The mechanism of CaO on condensation and dechlorination reactions for PCP forming PCDDs and acid-base interaction were proposed to speculate the promotion effects of CaO, and the reaction precedence was used to speculate the inhibition effects of CaCO3 on PCDDs/Fs originated from PCP. The results of the present paper might be useful for the industrial application of calcium-based sorbents to control PCDD/F emission.

  10. Functional metagenomics to decipher food-microbe-host crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Larraufie, Pierre; de Wouters, Tomas; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle; Blottière, Hervé M; Doré, Joël

    2015-02-01

    The recent developments of metagenomics permit an extremely high-resolution molecular scan of the intestinal microbiota giving new insights and opening perspectives for clinical applications. Beyond the unprecedented vision of the intestinal microbiota given by large-scale quantitative metagenomics studies, such as the EU MetaHIT project, functional metagenomics tools allow the exploration of fine interactions between food constituents, microbiota and host, leading to the identification of signals and intimate mechanisms of crosstalk, especially between bacteria and human cells. Cloning of large genome fragments, either from complex intestinal communities or from selected bacteria, allows the screening of these biological resources for bioactivity towards complex plant polymers or functional food such as prebiotics. This permitted identification of novel carbohydrate-active enzyme families involved in dietary fibre and host glycan breakdown, and highlighted unsuspected bacterial players at the top of the intestinal microbial food chain. Similarly, exposure of fractions from genomic and metagenomic clones onto human cells engineered with reporter systems to track modulation of immune response, cell proliferation or cell metabolism has allowed the identification of bioactive clones modulating key cell signalling pathways or the induction of specific genes. This opens the possibility to decipher mechanisms by which commensal bacteria or candidate probiotics can modulate the activity of cells in the intestinal epithelium or even in distal organs such as the liver, adipose tissue or the brain. Hence, in spite of our inability to culture many of the dominant microbes of the human intestine, functional metagenomics open a new window for the exploration of food-microbe-host crosstalk. PMID:25417646

  11. Functional metagenomics to decipher food-microbe-host crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Larraufie, Pierre; de Wouters, Tomas; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle; Blottière, Hervé M; Doré, Joël

    2015-02-01

    The recent developments of metagenomics permit an extremely high-resolution molecular scan of the intestinal microbiota giving new insights and opening perspectives for clinical applications. Beyond the unprecedented vision of the intestinal microbiota given by large-scale quantitative metagenomics studies, such as the EU MetaHIT project, functional metagenomics tools allow the exploration of fine interactions between food constituents, microbiota and host, leading to the identification of signals and intimate mechanisms of crosstalk, especially between bacteria and human cells. Cloning of large genome fragments, either from complex intestinal communities or from selected bacteria, allows the screening of these biological resources for bioactivity towards complex plant polymers or functional food such as prebiotics. This permitted identification of novel carbohydrate-active enzyme families involved in dietary fibre and host glycan breakdown, and highlighted unsuspected bacterial players at the top of the intestinal microbial food chain. Similarly, exposure of fractions from genomic and metagenomic clones onto human cells engineered with reporter systems to track modulation of immune response, cell proliferation or cell metabolism has allowed the identification of bioactive clones modulating key cell signalling pathways or the induction of specific genes. This opens the possibility to decipher mechanisms by which commensal bacteria or candidate probiotics can modulate the activity of cells in the intestinal epithelium or even in distal organs such as the liver, adipose tissue or the brain. Hence, in spite of our inability to culture many of the dominant microbes of the human intestine, functional metagenomics open a new window for the exploration of food-microbe-host crosstalk.

  12. Impact of Process Parameters on the Laser-induced Nanoparticle Formation During Keyhole Welding under Remote Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Tobias; Dickmann, Klaus; Ostendorf, Andreas

    The interaction between the vapor plume and the incident laser radiation affects remote laser welding. Relating to laser systems with an emitted wavelength around 1 μm, a significant loss mechanism can be traced back to the extinction by laser-induced particle formation. Due to the tight coupling between the particle formation and the evaporation rate inside the keyhole, the particle formation shows a strong dependence on the keyhole geometry and thus on process parameters (e.g. feed rate and laser beam power). In order to verify the relationship between particle formation and process parameters, the beam of a broadband LED was guided through the vapor plume during the welding processes with a fiber laser. The attenuated probe beam was analyzed in dependence on the wavelength. In addition, the propagation of the vapor plume was investigated by using high speed imaging.

  13. Geochemistry of fossiliferous carbonate concretions from the Cretaceous Santana Formation - assessing the role of microbial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimhofer, Ulrich; Schwark, Lorenz; Ariztegui, Daniel; Martill, David M.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    Exceptional fossil preservation (incl. soft-tissue phosphatization) within organic-rich black shales is often associated with the formation of a protective carbonate shell surrounding the fossil specimen. Whereas the mechanisms controlling soft-tissue mineralization during the earliest stage of fossilization are considerably well understood (e.g. Briggs and Kear, 1993), only limited information is currently available on the complex biogeochemical processes which lead to the precipitation of the concretionary carbonate mantle around the fossils. This study focuses on the organic and inorganic geochemistry of carbonate concretions derived from black shale deposits of the Early Cretaceous Santana Formation, Araripe Basin, NE Brazil (Martill, 1993; Heimhofer et al. 2008). This konservat-type fossil lagerstätte is world famous for its fossiliferous concretions hosting an exceptionally preserved fish and reptile fauna. The principle aim is twofold including (1) identification of the type and source of organic matter trapped within the Santana concretions and (2) assessment of the different microbial or microbially-mediated processes associated with successive concretion growth during early burial. Based on sedimentological evidence and palaeoenvironmental considerations, the involvement of a prokaryotic mat in early fossilization of the Santana biota has been proposed (Martill, 1988). At this stage, 3 different carbonate concretions hosting fossil fish remains (incl. Notelops brama, Calamopleurus sp. und an unknown specimen) have been analysed with a combined approach including organic molecular geochemistry, high-resolution stable isotope analysis, micro-XRF scanning and sedimentary petrography. Petrographic inspection shows a distinct zonal pattern of the carbonate shell surrounding the fossils. The innermost zone I shows an undulating and discontinuous lamination superimposed on a clotted fabric. Zone II is characterized by the frequent abundance of finely dispersed

  14. Zeolite Formation and Weathering Processes Within the Martian Regolith: An Antarctic Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Socki, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    As more information is obtained about the nature of the surface compositions and processes operating on Mars, it is clear that significant erosional and depositional features are present on the surface. Apparent aqueous or other fluid activity on Mars has produced many of the erosional and outflow features observed. Evidence of aqueous activity on Mars has been reported by earlier studies. Gooding and colleagues championed the cause of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration processes recorded in Martian meteorites. Oxygen isotope studies on Martian meteorites by Karlsson et al. and Romenek et al. gave evidence for two separate water reservoirs on Mars. The oxygen isotopic compositions of the host silicate minerals was different from the oxygen isotopic composition of the secondary alteration products within the SNC meteorites. This implied that the oxygen associated with fluids which produced the secondary alteration was from volatiles which were possibly added to the planetary inventory after formation of the primary silicates from which the SNC s were formed. The source of the oxygen may have been from a cometary or volatile-rich veneer added to the planet in its first 600 million years.

  15. Rapid LC-MS drug metabolite profiling using microsomal enzyme bioreactors in a parallel processing format.

    PubMed

    Bajrami, Besnik; Zhao, Linlin; Schenkman, John B; Rusling, James F

    2009-12-15

    Silica nanoparticle bioreactors featuring thin films of enzymes and polyions were utilized in a novel high-throughput 96-well plate format for drug metabolism profiling. The utility of the approach was illustrated by investigating the metabolism of the drugs diclofenac (DCF), troglitazone (TGZ), and raloxifene, for which we observed known metabolic oxidation and bioconjugation pathways and turnover rates. A broad range of enzymes was included by utilizing human liver (HLM), rat liver (RLM) and bicistronic human-cyt P450 3A4 (bicis.-3A4) microsomes as enzyme sources. This parallel approach significantly shortens sample preparation steps compared to an earlier manual processing with nanoparticle bioreactors, allowing a range of significant enzyme reactions to be processed simultaneously. Enzyme turnover rates using the microsomal bioreactors were 2-3 fold larger compared to using conventional microsomal dispersions, most likely because of better accessibility of the enzymes. Ketoconazole (KET) and quinidine (QIN), substrates specific to cyt P450 3A enzymes, were used to demonstrate applicability to establish potentially toxic drug-drug interactions involving enzyme inhibition and acceleration. PMID:19904994

  16. Influence of Powder Metallurgical Processing Routes on Phase Formations in a Multicomponent NbSi-Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemüller, C.; Hartwig, T.; Mulser, M.; Adkins, N.; Wickins, M.; Heilmaier, M.

    2014-09-01

    Refractory metal silicide composites on the basis of Nbss-Nb5Si3 have been investigated as potential alternatives for nickel-base superalloys for years because of their low densities and good high-temperature strengths. NbSi-based composites are typically produced by arc-melting or casting. Samples in this study, however, were produced by powder metallurgy because of the potential for near net-shape component fabrication with very homogeneous microstructures. Either gas atomized powder or high-energy mechanically alloyed elemental powders were compacted by powder injection molding or hot isostatic pressing. Heat treatments were applied for phase stability evaluation. Slight compositional changes (oxygen, nitrogen, or iron) introduced by the processing route, i.e., powder production and consolidation, can affect phase formations and phase transitions during the process. Special focus is put on the distinction between different silicides (Nb5Si3 and Nb3Si) and silicide modifications (α-, β-, and γ-Nb5Si3), respectively. These were evaluated by x-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy measurements with the additional inclusion of thermodynamic calculations using the calculated phase diagram method.

  17. BIOFILM FORMATION OF Vibrio cholerae ON STAINLESS STEEL USED IN FOOD PROCESSING.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Rojas, Héctor; Duque, Zoilabet; Suárez, Paula; Contreras, Monica; García-Amado, M Alexandra; Alciaturi, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae represents a significant threat to human health in developing countries. This pathogen forms biofilms which favors its attachment to surfaces and its survival and transmission by water or food. This work evaluated the in vitro biofilm formation of V. cholerae isolated from clinical and environmental sources on stainless steel of the type used in food processing by using the environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Results showed no cell adhesion at 4 h and scarce surface colonization at 24 h. Biofilms from the environmental strain were observed at 48 h with high cellular aggregations embedded in Vibrio exopolysaccharide (VPS), while less confluence and VPS production with microcolonies of elongated cells were observed in biofilms produced by the clinical strain. At 96 h the biofilms of the environmental strain were released from the surface leaving coccoid cells and residual structures, whereas biofilms of the clinical strain formed highly organized structures such as channels, mushroom-like and pillars. This is the first study that has shown the in vitro ability of V. cholerae to colonize and form biofilms on stainless steel used in food processing.

  18. Conserved developmental processes and the formation of evolutionary novelties: examples from butterfly wings.

    PubMed

    Saenko, Suzanne V; French, Vernon; Brakefield, Paul M; Beldade, Patrícia

    2008-04-27

    The origin and diversification of evolutionary novelties-lineage-specific traits of new adaptive value-is one of the key issues in evolutionary developmental biology. However, comparative analysis of the genetic and developmental bases of such traits can be difficult when they have no obvious homologue in model organisms. The finding that the evolution of morphological novelties often involves the recruitment of pre-existing genes and/or gene networks offers the potential to overcome this challenge. Knowledge about shared developmental processes obtained from extensive studies in model organisms can then be used to understand the origin and diversification of lineage-specific structures. Here, we illustrate this approach in relation to eyespots on the wings of Bicyclus anynana butterflies. A number of spontaneous mutations isolated in the laboratory affect eyespots, lepidopteran-specific features, and also processes that are shared by most insects. We discuss how eyespot mutants with disturbed embryonic development may help elucidate the genetic pathways involved in eyespot formation, and how venation mutants with altered eyespot patterns might shed light on mechanisms of eyespot development. PMID:18192179

  19. BIOFILM FORMATION OF Vibrio cholerae ON STAINLESS STEEL USED IN FOOD PROCESSING

    PubMed Central

    FERNÁNDEZ-DELGADO, Milagro; ROJAS, Héctor; DUQUE, Zoilabet; SUÁREZ, Paula; CONTRERAS, Monica; GARCÍA-AMADO, M. Alexandra; ALCIATURI, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae represents a significant threat to human health in developing countries. This pathogen forms biofilms which favors its attachment to surfaces and its survival and transmission by water or food. This work evaluated the in vitro biofilm formation of V. cholerae isolated from clinical and environmental sources on stainless steel of the type used in food processing by using the environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Results showed no cell adhesion at 4 h and scarce surface colonization at 24 h. Biofilms from the environmental strain were observed at 48 h with high cellular aggregations embedded in Vibrio exopolysaccharide (VPS), while less confluence and VPS production with microcolonies of elongated cells were observed in biofilms produced by the clinical strain. At 96 h the biofilms of the environmental strain were released from the surface leaving coccoid cells and residual structures, whereas biofilms of the clinical strain formed highly organized structures such as channels, mushroom-like and pillars. This is the first study that has shown the in vitro ability of V. cholerae to colonize and form biofilms on stainless steel used in food processing. PMID:27253749

  20. BIOFILM FORMATION OF Vibrio cholerae ON STAINLESS STEEL USED IN FOOD PROCESSING.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Rojas, Héctor; Duque, Zoilabet; Suárez, Paula; Contreras, Monica; García-Amado, M Alexandra; Alciaturi, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae represents a significant threat to human health in developing countries. This pathogen forms biofilms which favors its attachment to surfaces and its survival and transmission by water or food. This work evaluated the in vitro biofilm formation of V. cholerae isolated from clinical and environmental sources on stainless steel of the type used in food processing by using the environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Results showed no cell adhesion at 4 h and scarce surface colonization at 24 h. Biofilms from the environmental strain were observed at 48 h with high cellular aggregations embedded in Vibrio exopolysaccharide (VPS), while less confluence and VPS production with microcolonies of elongated cells were observed in biofilms produced by the clinical strain. At 96 h the biofilms of the environmental strain were released from the surface leaving coccoid cells and residual structures, whereas biofilms of the clinical strain formed highly organized structures such as channels, mushroom-like and pillars. This is the first study that has shown the in vitro ability of V. cholerae to colonize and form biofilms on stainless steel used in food processing. PMID:27253749

  1. Conserved developmental processes and the formation of evolutionary novelties: examples from butterfly wings.

    PubMed

    Saenko, Suzanne V; French, Vernon; Brakefield, Paul M; Beldade, Patrícia

    2008-04-27

    The origin and diversification of evolutionary novelties-lineage-specific traits of new adaptive value-is one of the key issues in evolutionary developmental biology. However, comparative analysis of the genetic and developmental bases of such traits can be difficult when they have no obvious homologue in model organisms. The finding that the evolution of morphological novelties often involves the recruitment of pre-existing genes and/or gene networks offers the potential to overcome this challenge. Knowledge about shared developmental processes obtained from extensive studies in model organisms can then be used to understand the origin and diversification of lineage-specific structures. Here, we illustrate this approach in relation to eyespots on the wings of Bicyclus anynana butterflies. A number of spontaneous mutations isolated in the laboratory affect eyespots, lepidopteran-specific features, and also processes that are shared by most insects. We discuss how eyespot mutants with disturbed embryonic development may help elucidate the genetic pathways involved in eyespot formation, and how venation mutants with altered eyespot patterns might shed light on mechanisms of eyespot development.

  2. Hydrothermally processed 1D hydroxyapatite: Mechanism of formation and biocompatibility studies.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Zoran S; Ignjatović, Nenad; Wu, Victoria; Žunič, Vojka; Veselinović, Ljiljana; Škapin, Srečo; Miljković, Miroslav; Uskoković, Vuk; Uskoković, Dragan

    2016-11-01

    Recent developments in bone tissue engineering have led to an increased interest in one-dimensional (1D) hydroxyapatite (HA) nano- and micro-structures such as wires, ribbons and tubes. They have been proposed for use as cell substrates, reinforcing phases in composites and carriers for biologically active substances. Here we demonstrate the synthesis of 1D HA structures using an optimized, urea-assisted, high-yield hydrothermal batch process. The one-pot process, yielding HA structures composed of bundles of ribbons and wires, was typified by the simultaneous occurrence of a multitude of intermediate reactions, failing to meet the uniformity criteria over particle morphology and size. To overcome these issues, the preparation procedure was divided to two stages: dicalcium phosphate platelets synthesized in the first step were used as a precursor for the synthesis of 1D HA in the second stage. Despite the elongated particle morphologies, both the precursor and the final product exhibited excellent biocompatibility and caused no reduction of viability when tested against osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells in 2D culture up to the concentration of 2.6mg/cm(2). X-ray powder diffraction combined with a range of electron microscopies and laser diffraction analyses was used to elucidate the formation mechanism and the microstructure of the final particles. The two-step synthesis involved a more direct transformation of DCP to 1D HA with the average diameter of 37nm and the aspect ratio exceeding 100:1. The comparison of crystalline domain sizes along different crystallographic directions showed no signs of significant anisotropy, while indicating that individual nanowires are ordered in bundles in the b crystallographic direction of the P63/m space group of HA. Intermediate processes, e.g., dehydration of dicalcium phosphate, are critical for the formation of 1D HA alongside other key aspects of this phase transformation, it must be investigated in more detail in the continuous

  3. Hydrothermally processed 1D hydroxyapatite: Mechanism of formation and biocompatibility studies.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Zoran S; Ignjatović, Nenad; Wu, Victoria; Žunič, Vojka; Veselinović, Ljiljana; Škapin, Srečo; Miljković, Miroslav; Uskoković, Vuk; Uskoković, Dragan

    2016-11-01

    Recent developments in bone tissue engineering have led to an increased interest in one-dimensional (1D) hydroxyapatite (HA) nano- and micro-structures such as wires, ribbons and tubes. They have been proposed for use as cell substrates, reinforcing phases in composites and carriers for biologically active substances. Here we demonstrate the synthesis of 1D HA structures using an optimized, urea-assisted, high-yield hydrothermal batch process. The one-pot process, yielding HA structures composed of bundles of ribbons and wires, was typified by the simultaneous occurrence of a multitude of intermediate reactions, failing to meet the uniformity criteria over particle morphology and size. To overcome these issues, the preparation procedure was divided to two stages: dicalcium phosphate platelets synthesized in the first step were used as a precursor for the synthesis of 1D HA in the second stage. Despite the elongated particle morphologies, both the precursor and the final product exhibited excellent biocompatibility and caused no reduction of viability when tested against osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells in 2D culture up to the concentration of 2.6mg/cm(2). X-ray powder diffraction combined with a range of electron microscopies and laser diffraction analyses was used to elucidate the formation mechanism and the microstructure of the final particles. The two-step synthesis involved a more direct transformation of DCP to 1D HA with the average diameter of 37nm and the aspect ratio exceeding 100:1. The comparison of crystalline domain sizes along different crystallographic directions showed no signs of significant anisotropy, while indicating that individual nanowires are ordered in bundles in the b crystallographic direction of the P63/m space group of HA. Intermediate processes, e.g., dehydration of dicalcium phosphate, are critical for the formation of 1D HA alongside other key aspects of this phase transformation, it must be investigated in more detail in the continuous

  4. Nano-Resolution X-ray Tomography for Deciphering Wiring Diagram of Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, H.; Sagara, H.; Takeuchi, A.; Ohigashi, T.; Yashiro, W.; Uesugi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Momose, A.; Takagi, T.

    2011-09-01

    Neural circuits in the central nervous system are the substrate of various high-order brain functions. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying neuronal information processing in the brain. Anatomical and functional graph structures of neural networks with actual connections will provide us with perspectives to elucidate the brain complexity. Here, we aim to develop a three-dimensional mouse brain atlas of neural circuits using nano-resolution x-ray tomography by synchrotron radiation. In addition to identifying a large number of synapses, our research will also clarify the structure of neuronal networks for understanding the most complex organ in the body. In this study, we observed metal-stained biological tissues of the mouse brain using hard x-ray Zernike-type phase-contrast microscopy with 60-nm resolution at SPring-8. As a result, the nano-resolution hard x-ray phase-contrast microscope revealed nerve fibers and organelles including mitochondria and synapses in the neural tissue. In the near future, this information will be utilized to begin deciphering the wiring diagram of the brain by using nano-resolution x-ray tomography.

  5. Carbon Disulfide (CS2) Mechanisms in Formation of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Formation from Unconventional Shale Gas Extraction and Processing Operations and Global Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Rich, Alisa L; Patel, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS2) has been historically associated with the production of rayon, cellophane, and carbon tetrachloride. This study identifies multiple mechanisms by which CS2 contributes to the formation of CO2 in the atmosphere. CS2 and other associated sulfide compounds were found by this study to be present in emissions from unconventional shale gas extraction and processing (E&P) operations. The breakdown products of CS2; carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are indirect greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to CO2 levels in the atmosphere. The heat-trapping nature of CO2 has been found to increase the surface temperature, resulting in regional and global climate change. The purpose of this study is to identify five mechanisms by which CS2 and the breakdown products of CS2 contribute to atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The five mechanisms of CO2 formation are as follows: Chemical Interaction of CS2 and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) present in natural gas at high temperatures, resulting in CO2 formation;Combustion of CS2 in the presence of oxygen producing SO2 and CO2;Photolysis of CS2 leading to the formation of COS, CO, and SO2, which are indirect contributors to CO2 formation;One-step hydrolysis of CS2, producing reactive intermediates and ultimately forming H2S and CO2;Two-step hydrolysis of CS2 forming the reactive COS intermediate that reacts with an additional water molecule, ultimately forming H2S and CO2. CS2 and COS additionally are implicated in the formation of SO2 in the stratosphere and/or troposphere. SO2 is an indirect contributor to CO2 formation and is implicated in global climate change. PMID:25987843

  6. Carbon Disulfide (CS2) Mechanisms in Formation of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Formation from Unconventional Shale Gas Extraction and Processing Operations and Global Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Rich, Alisa L; Patel, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS2) has been historically associated with the production of rayon, cellophane, and carbon tetrachloride. This study identifies multiple mechanisms by which CS2 contributes to the formation of CO2 in the atmosphere. CS2 and other associated sulfide compounds were found by this study to be present in emissions from unconventional shale gas extraction and processing (E&P) operations. The breakdown products of CS2; carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are indirect greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to CO2 levels in the atmosphere. The heat-trapping nature of CO2 has been found to increase the surface temperature, resulting in regional and global climate change. The purpose of this study is to identify five mechanisms by which CS2 and the breakdown products of CS2 contribute to atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The five mechanisms of CO2 formation are as follows: Chemical Interaction of CS2 and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) present in natural gas at high temperatures, resulting in CO2 formation;Combustion of CS2 in the presence of oxygen producing SO2 and CO2;Photolysis of CS2 leading to the formation of COS, CO, and SO2, which are indirect contributors to CO2 formation;One-step hydrolysis of CS2, producing reactive intermediates and ultimately forming H2S and CO2;Two-step hydrolysis of CS2 forming the reactive COS intermediate that reacts with an additional water molecule, ultimately forming H2S and CO2. CS2 and COS additionally are implicated in the formation of SO2 in the stratosphere and/or troposphere. SO2 is an indirect contributor to CO2 formation and is implicated in global climate change.

  7. Determining if Active Learning through a Formative Assessment Process Translates to Better Performance in Summative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosas, Aidan Bradley; Raju, Shiwani Rani; Schuett, Burkhardt Siegfried; Chuck, Jo-Anne; Millar, Thomas James

    2016-01-01

    Formative assessment used in a level 2 unit, Immunology, gave outcomes that were both surprising and applicable across disciplines. Four formative tests were given and reviewed during class time. The students' attitudes to formative assessment were evaluated using questionnaires and its effectiveness in closing the gap was measured by the…

  8. Digital interpolators for polar format processing. [of synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, John W.; Hudson, Ralph E.; Bayma, Robert W.; Nelson, Jeffrey E.

    1989-01-01

    The polar format approach to SAR image formation requires data to be interpolated from a warped grid onto a Cartesian lattice. In general, this requires that data be interpolated between varying sampling rates. In this paper, frequency-domain optimality criteria for polar format interpolators are defined and justified, and an approach to designing the corresponding digital filters is described.

  9. Observations and Simulations of Formation of Broad Plasma Depletions Through Merging Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chao-Song; Retterer, J. M.; Beaujardiere, O. De La; Roddy, P. A.; Hunton, D.E.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Pfaff, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Broad plasma depletions in the equatorial ionosphere near dawn are region in which the plasma density is reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude over thousands of kilometers in longitude. This phenomenon is observed repeatedly by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during deep solar minimum. The plasma flow inside the depletion region can be strongly upward. The possible causal mechanism for the formation of broad plasma depletions is that the broad depletions result from merging of multiple equatorial plasma bubbles. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of the merging mechanism with new observations and simulations. We present C/NOFS observations for two cases. A series of plasma bubbles is first detected by C/NOFS over a longitudinal range of 3300-3800 km around midnight. Each of the individual bubbles has a typical width of approx 100 km in longitude, and the upward ion drift velocity inside the bubbles is 200-400 m/s. The plasma bubbles rotate with the Earth to the dawn sector and become broad plasma depletions. The observations clearly show the evolution from multiple plasma bubbles to broad depletions. Large upward plasma flow occurs inside the depletion region over 3800 km in longitude and exists for approx 5 h. We also present the numerical simulations of bubble merging with the physics-based low-latitude ionospheric model. It is found that two separate plasma bubbles join together and form a single, wider bubble. The simulations show that the merging process of plasma bubbles can indeed occur in incompressible ionospheric plasma. The simulation results support the merging mechanism for the formation of broad plasma depletions.

  10. Hydrocarbon transport and shearing processes in the Antelope Shale, Monterey Formation, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Dholakia, S.K.; Aydin, A.; Pollard, D.D. )

    1996-01-01

    An essential component of the development and management of a fractured reservoir is the basic understanding of the fracture system and its effect on hydrocarbon flow. In the Antelope Shale, a siliceous shale member of the Monterey Formation in the Buena Vista Hills field (BVH), San Joaquin Valley (SJV), the relationship between the fracture system and hydrocarbon productivity is poorly understood. An integrative approach, employing both geological and geophysical methods, to fracture characterization in the Antelope Shale is important for a better understanding of the connected fracture network and for identifying hydrocarbon-carrying fractures. This knowledge will aid in future reservoir management plans for the BVH field, specifically CO[sub 2] enhanced oil recovery from the existing reservoir. Field studies of the Antelope Shale at Chico Martinez Creek in the SJV demonstrate the importance of shearing processes for the migration of hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbons primarily occur in brecciated zones which are oriented parallel to bedding. The internal architecture of early stage breccia zones is well-organized with sets of hydrocarbon-stained fractures oriented both at high angles and parallel to bedding. In later stage breccia zones, internal organization is disrupted and consists of fragments of the host rock surrounded by hydrocarbons. Subsurface studies which include core and FMS data demonstrate comparable shear-related features in the Monterey Formation. Oil-stained breccia zones are observed in core from the Antelope Shale from a field near BVH. Breccia zones are documented in FMS data from offshore Monterey fields and similar features are being sought in FMS data from SJV in Antelope Shale.

  11. Hydrocarbon transport and shearing processes in the Antelope Shale, Monterey Formation, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Dholakia, S.K.; Aydin, A.; Pollard, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    An essential component of the development and management of a fractured reservoir is the basic understanding of the fracture system and its effect on hydrocarbon flow. In the Antelope Shale, a siliceous shale member of the Monterey Formation in the Buena Vista Hills field (BVH), San Joaquin Valley (SJV), the relationship between the fracture system and hydrocarbon productivity is poorly understood. An integrative approach, employing both geological and geophysical methods, to fracture characterization in the Antelope Shale is important for a better understanding of the connected fracture network and for identifying hydrocarbon-carrying fractures. This knowledge will aid in future reservoir management plans for the BVH field, specifically CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery from the existing reservoir. Field studies of the Antelope Shale at Chico Martinez Creek in the SJV demonstrate the importance of shearing processes for the migration of hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbons primarily occur in brecciated zones which are oriented parallel to bedding. The internal architecture of early stage breccia zones is well-organized with sets of hydrocarbon-stained fractures oriented both at high angles and parallel to bedding. In later stage breccia zones, internal organization is disrupted and consists of fragments of the host rock surrounded by hydrocarbons. Subsurface studies which include core and FMS data demonstrate comparable shear-related features in the Monterey Formation. Oil-stained breccia zones are observed in core from the Antelope Shale from a field near BVH. Breccia zones are documented in FMS data from offshore Monterey fields and similar features are being sought in FMS data from SJV in Antelope Shale.

  12. A role for self-gravity at multiple length scales in the process of star formation.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Alyssa A; Rosolowsky, Erik W; Borkin, Michelle A; Foster, Jonathan B; Halle, Michael; Kauffmann, Jens; Pineda, Jaime E

    2009-01-01

    Self-gravity plays a decisive role in the final stages of star formation, where dense cores (size approximately 0.1 parsecs) inside molecular clouds collapse to form star-plus-disk systems. But self-gravity's role at earlier times (and on larger length scales, such as approximately 1 parsec) is unclear; some molecular cloud simulations that do not include self-gravity suggest that 'turbulent fragmentation' alone is sufficient to create a mass distribution of dense cores that resembles, and sets, the stellar initial mass function. Here we report a 'dendrogram' (hierarchical tree-diagram) analysis that reveals that self-gravity plays a significant role over the full range of possible scales traced by (13)CO observations in the L1448 molecular cloud, but not everywhere in the observed region. In particular, more than 90 per cent of the compact 'pre-stellar cores' traced by peaks of dust emission are projected on the sky within one of the dendrogram's self-gravitating 'leaves'. As these peaks mark the locations of already-forming stars, or of those probably about to form, a self-gravitating cocoon seems a critical condition for their existence. Turbulent fragmentation simulations without self-gravity-even of unmagnetized isothermal material-can yield mass and velocity power spectra very similar to what is observed in clouds like L1448. But a dendrogram of such a simulation shows that nearly all the gas in it (much more than in the observations) appears to be self-gravitating. A potentially significant role for gravity in 'non-self-gravitating' simulations suggests inconsistency in simulation assumptions and output, and that it is necessary to include self-gravity in any realistic simulation of the star-formation process on subparsec scales.

  13. Formation and Processing of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Catechol as a Model for Atmospheric HULIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Krüger, Heinz-Ulrich; Grothe, Hinrich; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2010-05-01

    A particular fraction of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) termed HUmic Like Substances (HULIS) attracted attention only recently in atmospheric aerosol, initiating a discourse about their aromaticity and other properties, such as reactivity and hygroscopicity. A major portion of HULIS originates from volatile organic compounds, which are formed by abiotic oxidation reactions involving mainly OH radicals, ozone, nitrogen oxides and possibly halogens. Subsequently, the particles provide surface for heterogeneous reactions with atmospheric trace gases. Thus, aerosol smog-chamber studies with appropriate precursors are needed to generate SOA with HULIS qualities in situ inside the smog chamber and study their possible interactions. Catechol and guaiacol were chosen as aromatic precursors for synthetic HULIS production. The SOA was produced in a 700 L aerosol smog chamber, equipped with a solar simulator. SOA formation from each precursor was investigated at simulated environmental conditions (humidity, light, and presence of oxidizers) and characterized with respect to HULIS properties by particle classifiers, Fourier Transform IR spectroscopy (by long-path absorption and attenuated total reflection), UV/VIS spectroscopy, high-resolution mass-spectroscopy and temperature-programmed-desorption mass-spectrometry. High-resolution imaging was obtained using Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEGSEM). After HULIS formation the aerosol particles were exposed to atmospheric halogen species to study their processing with those trace gases, released by sea salt-activation. Those investigations show that aromatic precursors like catechol and guaiacol are suitable to form synthetic HULIS for laboratory-scale measurements with physical and chemical properties described in literature. However, sunlight and relative humidity play a major role in particle production and composition of functional groups, which are the anchor points for heterogeneous atmospheric

  14. A role for self-gravity at multiple length scales in the process of star formation.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Alyssa A; Rosolowsky, Erik W; Borkin, Michelle A; Foster, Jonathan B; Halle, Michael; Kauffmann, Jens; Pineda, Jaime E

    2009-01-01

    Self-gravity plays a decisive role in the final stages of star formation, where dense cores (size approximately 0.1 parsecs) inside molecular clouds collapse to form star-plus-disk systems. But self-gravity's role at earlier times (and on larger length scales, such as approximately 1 parsec) is unclear; some molecular cloud simulations that do not include self-gravity suggest that 'turbulent fragmentation' alone is sufficient to create a mass distribution of dense cores that resembles, and sets, the stellar initial mass function. Here we report a 'dendrogram' (hierarchical tree-diagram) analysis that reveals that self-gravity plays a significant role over the full range of possible scales traced by (13)CO observations in the L1448 molecular cloud, but not everywhere in the observed region. In particular, more than 90 per cent of the compact 'pre-stellar cores' traced by peaks of dust emission are projected on the sky within one of the dendrogram's self-gravitating 'leaves'. As these peaks mark the locations of already-forming stars, or of those probably about to form, a self-gravitating cocoon seems a critical condition for their existence. Turbulent fragmentation simulations without self-gravity-even of unmagnetized isothermal material-can yield mass and velocity power spectra very similar to what is observed in clouds like L1448. But a dendrogram of such a simulation shows that nearly all the gas in it (much more than in the observations) appears to be self-gravitating. A potentially significant role for gravity in 'non-self-gravitating' simulations suggests inconsistency in simulation assumptions and output, and that it is necessary to include self-gravity in any realistic simulation of the star-formation process on subparsec scales. PMID:19122636

  15. Galaxy image processing and morphological modeling: Applications to understanding galaxy formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Joseph B.

    This dissertation presents improvements in methods of processing and analyzing data from optical telescopes. With my collaborators, I have developed software tools which have been successfully used on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). I have participated in applying this software in studies of the properties of galaxies. These studies have led to advances in the understanding of early-type galaxies, including some of the brightest and most massive galaxies in the Universe. The software package we have developed, called GALM ORPH, has been made publicly available to enable other researchers to use it in their studies. We present the models and the methods used by GALM ORPH to model the light distribution in images of galaxies. We used simulations to test the effects of errors which come from noise, background light, blending of sources, and incorrect model selection. We present a method which effectively chooses the best class of model for a given data image. We use GALMORPH in various observational studies of galaxies. With 50,000 early-type galaxies, we measure the correlations of size, luminosity, and velocity dispersion. Our precision measurements of all these quantities provides a useful benchmark for theoretical models of galaxy formation and evolution. We study the brightest galaxies in clusters (BCGs) to see how their properties differ from the bulk population of galaxies. We find a qualitative agreement between the observed scaling relations of BCGs and the prediction of models which incorporate merger-driven growth with quenched star formation in more massive halos. We present the first observational limit of the highest velocity dispersion using the large galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, ruling out line-of-sight superpositions using the Hubble Space Telescope. We also present a method for measuring the optical light from images of galaxies which contain active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a

  16. Formation process of MCM-41 precursor and porous texture of MCM-41

    SciTech Connect

    Naono, Hiromitu; Hakuman, Masako; Tsunehisa, Takashi; Tamura, Nobuki; Nakai, Kazuyuki

    2000-04-15

    The formation process of the MCM-41 precursors (silicate/surfactant complex) was investigated on the basis of the pH titration curves of Na{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} in the presence of [C{sub 16}H{sub 33}N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]Cl. Measurements of the pH titration curves were carried out using the computer-controlled gravimetric titrator constructed in their laboratory. The white precipitate (MCM-41 precursor) was abruptly formed at pH 11.1 (298 K) and at pH 9.9 (343 K). Formation of the MCM-41 precursor can be explained by coagulation of the rod-like micelle colloids whose surface is covered by the condensed silicate anions of (HSiO{sub 3}){sub n}{sup n{minus}}. The porous texture of the MCM-41 samples whose precursors were synthesized under different conditions was analyzed on the basis of the adsorption isotherms of nitrogen at 77 K. It has been shown that the MCM-41 sample whose precursor was prepared at pH 9.9 and 343 K shows one sharp peak (r{sub p} = 1.65 nm) in the pore size distribution curve, but the MCM-41 samples whose precursors were prepared at pH 6.5--5.0 and 343 K give two peaks (r{sub p} = 1.66 nm and r{sub p} = 2.12--2.36 nm). The appearance of the second peak (r{sub p} = 2.12--2.36 nm) has been considered to be in connection with the destruction of the MCM-41 precursor into small fragments in acidic medium.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation of sp3 hybridized bonds in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon deposition processes.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yasuo; Horiguchi, Seishi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    The formation process of sp3 hybridized carbon networks (i.e., diamondlike structures) in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon (DLC) films has been studied with the use of molecular-dynamics simulations. The processes simulated in this study are injections of hydrocarbon (CH3 and CH) beams into amorphous carbon (a-C) substrates. It has been shown that diamondlike sp3 structures are formed predominantly at a subsurface level when the beam energy is relatively high, as in the "subplantation" process for hydrogen-free DLC deposition. However, for hydrogenated DLC deposition, the presence of abundant hydrogen at subsurface levels, together with thermal spikes caused by energetic ion injections, substantially enhances the formation of carbon-to-carbon sp3 bonds. Therefore, the sp3 bond formation process for hydrogenated DLC films essentially differs from that for hydrogen-free DLC films.

  18. Formation of Oxidized Organic Aerosol (OOA) through Fog Processing in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilardoni, S.; Paglione, M.; Rinaldi, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Massoli, P.; Hillamo, R. E.; Carbone, S.; Lanconelli, C.; Laaksonen, A. J.; Russell, L. M.; Poluzzi, V.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, C.

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous phase chemistry might be responsible for the formation of a significant fraction of the organic aerosol (OA) observed in the atmosphere, and could explain some of the discrepancies between OA concentration and properties predicted by models and observed in the environment. Aerosol - fog interaction and its effect on submicron aerosol properties were investigated in the Po Valley (northern Italy) during fall 2011, in the framework of the Supersite project (ARPA Emilia Romagna). Composition and physical properties of submicron aerosol were measured online by a High Resolution- Time of Flight - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS), a Soot Photometer - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS), and a Tandem Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS). Organic functional group analysis was performed off-line by Hydrogen - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H-NMR) spectrometry and by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. Aerosol absorption, scattering, and total extinction were measured simultaneously with a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), a Nephelometer, and a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Spectrometer particle extinction monitor (CAPS PMex), respectively. Water-soluble organic carbon in fog-water was characterized off-line by HR-TOF-AMS. Fourteen distinct fog events were observed. Fog dissipation left behind an aerosol enriched in particles larger than 400 nm, typical of fog and cloud processing, and dominated by secondary species, including ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and oxidized OA (OOA). Source apportionment of OA allowed us to identify OOA as the difference between total OA and primary OA (hydrocarbon like OA and biomass burning OA). The formation of OOA through fog processing is proved by the correlation of OOA concentration with hydroxyl methyl sulfonate signal and by the similarity of OOA spectra with organic mass spectra obtained by re-aerosolization of fog water samples. The oxygen to carbon ratio and the hydrogen to carbon ratio of

  19. The effect of dust and gas energetics on the clustered star formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Andrea

    The effect of dust/gas heating and cooling is shown to have a significant effect on the process of clustered star formation. Compared to an isothermal simulation, a simulation with a more accurate description of the equation of state produces an order of magnitude fewer stars as well as stars of much greater mass. The energetics algorithm used to calculate the dust and gas temperature includes the radiative heating of dust, dust-gas collisional heating/cooling, cosmic-ray heating, and molecular cooling. It uses DUSTY, a spherical continuum radiative transfer code, to model the dust temperature distribution around young stellar objects with various luminosities and surrounding gas and dust density distributions. The gas temperature is then determined by assuming energy balance. Before the complete energetics algorithm is included in a simulation, first only the dust heating component is included. The gas temperature is then set solely by the dust temperature. The resultant mass functions of our simulations which include heating are compared to those which assume an isothermal equation of state. We find that including dust heating severely limits star formation; we form at least an order of magnitude fewer objects when we include dust heating compared to an isothermal simulation. The mass functions from our simulations which include heating are much more similar than the mass functions from our isothermal simulations to the observed mass functions, in that they are able to form high-mass stars ( M [Special characters omitted.] 10[Special characters omitted.] ). The distribution of the high-mass objects is well- approximated by the Salpeter initial mass function. Including the complete energetics algorithm in a simulation produces results similar to a simulation with only dust heating. Both simulations have similar density profile parameters. The mass accretion, mass, and luminosity evolution of the sinks is also similar. The average temperature, however, is cooler

  20. An Insight to the Modeling of 1 × 1 Rib Loop Formation Process on Circular Weft Knitting Machine using Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sadhan Chandra

    2015-10-01

    The mechanics of single jersey loop formation is well-reported is literature. However, as the concept of any model of double jersey loop formation process is not available in accessible international literature. Therefore, it was planned to develop a model of 1 × 1 rib loop formation process on dial and cylinder machine using computer so that the influence of various input variables on the final loop length as well on the profile of tension on the yarn inside Knitting Zone (KZ) can be understood. The model provides an insight into the mechanics of 1 × 1 rib loop formation system on dial and cylinder machine. Besides, the degree of agreement between predicted and measured values of loop length and cam forces as well as theoretical analysis of the model have justified the acceptability of the model.

  1. Deciphering the morphology of ice films on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thürmer, Konrad

    2011-03-01

    Although extensive research has been aimed at the structure of ice films, questions regarding basic processes that govern film evolution remain. Recently we discovered how ice films as many as 30 molecular layers thick can be imaged with STM. The observed morphology yields new insights about water-solid interactions and how they affect the structure of ice films. This talk gives an overview of this progress for crystalline ice films on Pt(111) [2-5]. STM reveals a first molecular water layer very different from bulk ice: besides the usual hexagons it also contains pentagons and heptagons. Slightly thicker films (~ 1 nm, at T> 120 K) arecomprisedof ~ 3 nm - highcrystallites , surroundedbytheone - molecule - thickwettinglayer . Thesecrystalsdewetbynucleatinglayersontheirtopfacets [ 4 ] . Measurementsofthenucleationrateasafunctionofcrystalheightprovideestimatesoftheenergyoftheice - Ptinterface . ForT > 115 Ksurfacediffusionisfastenoughthatsurfacesmoothingand 2 D - islandripeningisobservable [ 5 ] . ByquantifyingtheT - dependentripeningofislandarrayswedeterminedtheactivationenergyforsurfaceself - diffusion . Theshapeofthese 2 Dislandsvariesstronglywithfilmthickness . Weattributethistoatransitionfrompolarizediceatthesubstratetowardsprotondisorderatlargerfilmthicknesses . Despitefastsurfacediffusionicemultilayersareoftenfarfromequilibrium . Forexample , icegrowsbetween ~ 120 and ~ 160 K in its cubic variant rather than in its equilibrium hexagonal form. We found this to be a consequence of the mismatch in the atomic Pt-step height and the ice-bilayer separation and propose a mechanism of cubic-ice formation via growth spirals around screw dislocations. Joint work with N.C. Bartelt and S. Nie, Sandia Natl. Labs, CA. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences, U.S. DOE under Contracts No. DEAC04-94AL85000.

  2. Deciphering Pressure-Temperature path of the Stak eclogites (Pakistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Pierre; Vidal, Olivier; Engi, Martin

    2013-04-01

    in China and the Western Gneiss province in Norway (Lanari et al., 2013). Lanari, P., Riel, N., Guillot, S., Vidal, O., Schwartz, S., Pêcher, A., Hattori, K. (2013).Deciphering High-Pressure metamorphism in collisional context using microprobe-mapping methods: application to the Stak eclogitic massif (NW Himalaya). In Press, Geology, doi:10.1130/G33523.1.

  3. Reading Hidden Messages Through Deciphered Manual Alphabets on Classic Artwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castronovo, Joseph Anthony, Jr.

    1998-10-01

    Decipherment is the tool used to uncover several types of hand signs that played vital roles in the creation of hidden messages in classic artwork. A 3,100 B.C. bas-relief of The 'Kaph' Telescope, formerly named The Narmer Palette, and Michaelangelo Buonarrotte's Battle of Cascina of 1506 were two key works of art that show certain similarities even though separated by 4,500 years. It is evident that Renaissance humanists provided artists with certain knowledge of the ancients. Results of incorporating a number of minor works of art showed that the competence of ancient Egyptians, Cretans and Australian Aboriginals, to name a few, as astronomers, was underestimated. Some deciphered Indus seals attested to a global understanding of the universe, with Gemini and the star of Thuban at the center of their attention. Certain forms of secrecy had to be undertaken for various reasons throughout the millennia. Three examples are: (1) In Italy, to keep controversial and truthful teachings discreet and hidden, artists embedded them in artwork long before the plight of Galileo Galilei and his discoveries. (2) Among Jewish Kabbalists, a well-known design was obscured in The Arnolfini Wedding painting for fear it would be lost due to persecution. (3) Michaelangelo Buonarrotte indicated several meanings through the hands of The Statue of Moses. They were overlooked by several societies, including the gesticulating culture of Italy, because they oppressed the value of signed languages. Spatial decipherment may testify to a need for the restoration of a spatial writing system for expanded linguistic accessibility. A 21st century model community for sign language residents and employees will benefit visual learners, particularly visual artists and non-phonetic decipherers, to better uncover, understand and perhaps use ancient hand forms to restore ancient knowledge. Moreover, the National Association of Teaching English (NATE) has recently endorsed the addition of two skills

  4. The synthesis and formation process of a new cubic conductive Cu7O(8-y)(NO3) compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazawa, Ichiro; Sugise, Ryoji; Terada, Norio; Jo, Masatoshi; Oka, Kunihiko

    1990-08-01

    The synthesis and formation process of a new cubic conductive Cu7O(8-y)(NO3) compound was studied. This material was formed as an intermediate compound in the decomposition process of copper nitrate by a firing process in oxygen flowing gas. It has a CuO2 plane in its lattice structure and is a parent material of the new metallic copper oxide compounds.

  5. Zeolite Formation and Weathering Processes in Dry Valleys of Antartica: Martian Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Socki, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    been identified within the soil columns because they are fragile; i.e. they are euhedral, unabraded, and unfractured, strongly suggesting in situ formation. Their presence in Antarctic samples is another indication that diagenic processes are active in cold-desert environments. The presence of zeolites, and other clays along with halites, sulfates, carbonates, and hydrates are to be expected within the soil columns on Mars at the Gusev and Isidis Planitia regions. The presence of such water-bearing minerals beneath the surface supplies one of the requirements to support biological activity on Mars.

  6. How far can we go in hydrological modelling without any knowledge of runoff formation processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayzel, Georgy

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological modelling is a challenging scientific issue for the last 50 years and tend to be it further because of the highest level of runoff formation processes complexity at the different spatio-temporal scales. Enormous number of modelling-related papers have submitted to the top-ranked journals every year, but in this publication speed race authors have pay increasing attention to the models and data they use by itself rather than underlying watershed processes. Great community effort of the free and open-source models sharing with high availability of hydrometeorological data sources led to conceptual shifting paradigm of hydrological science to the technical-oriented direction. In the third-world countries this shifting is more clear by the reason of field studies absence and obligatory requirement of practical significance of the research supported by the government funds. As a result we get a state of hydrological modelling discipline closer to the aim of high Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) achievement rather than watershed processes understanding. Both lumped physically-based land-surface model SWAP (Soil Water - Atmosphere - Plants) and SCE-UA (Shuffled Complex Evolution method developed at The University of Arizona) technique for robust model parameters search were used for the runoff modelling of 323 MOPEX watersheds. No one special data analysis and expert knowledge-based decisions were not performed. Median value of NSE is 0.652 and 90% of watersheds have efficiency bigger than 0.5. Thus without any information of particular features of each watershed satisfactory modelling results were obtained. To prove our conclusions we build cutting-edge conceptual rainfall-runoff model based on decision trees and adaptive boosting machine learning algorithms for the one small watershed in USA. No one special data analysis or feature engineering was not performed too. Obtained results demonstrate great model prediction power both for learning and testing

  7. In situ studies on controlling an atomically-accurate formation process of gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Cheng, Hao; Jiang, Yong; Huang, Ting; Bao, Jie; Sun, Zhihu; Jiang, Zheng; Ma, Jingyuan; Sun, Fanfei; Liu, Qinghua; Yao, Tao; Deng, Huijuan; Wang, Shuxin; Zhu, Manzhou; Wei, Shiqiang

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the molecular formation mechanism of metal nanoclusters is essential for developing chemistry for accurate control over their synthesis. Herein, the ``top-down'' synthetic process of monodisperse Au13 nanoclusters via HCl etching of polydisperse Aun clusters (15 <= n <= 65) is traced by a combination of in situ X-ray/UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent mass spectrometry. It is revealed experimentally that the HCl-induced synthesis of Au13 is achieved by accurately controlling the etching process with two distinctive steps, in sharp contrast to the traditional thiol-etching mechanism through release of the Au(i) complex. The first step involves the direct fragmentation of the initial larger Aun clusters into metastable intermediate Au8-Au13 smaller clusters. This is a critical step, which allows for the secondary size-growth step of the intermediates toward the atomically monodisperse Au13 clusters via incorporating the reactive Au(i)-Cl species in the solution. Such a secondary-growth pathway is further confirmed by the successful growth of Au13 through reaction of isolated Au11 clusters with AuClPPh3 in the HCl environment. This work addresses the importance of reaction intermediates in guiding the way towards controllable synthesis of metal nanoclusters.Knowledge of the molecular formation mechanism of metal nanoclusters is essential for developing chemistry for accurate control over their synthesis. Herein, the ``top-down'' synthetic process of monodisperse Au13 nanoclusters via HCl etching of polydisperse Aun clusters (15 <= n <= 65) is traced by a combination of in situ X-ray/UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent mass spectrometry. It is revealed experimentally that the HCl-induced synthesis of Au13 is achieved by accurately controlling the etching process with two distinctive steps, in sharp contrast to the traditional thiol-etching mechanism through release of the Au(i) complex. The first step involves the direct

  8. Case studies on the formation of chalcogenide self-assembled monolayers on surfaces and dissociative processes

    PubMed Central

    Bendounan, Azzedine; Harish, Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh; Giglia, Angelo; Kubsky, Stefan; Sirotti, Fausto; Pasquali, Luca; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Summary This report examines the assembly of chalcogenide organic molecules on various surfaces, focusing on cases when chemisorption is accompanied by carbon–chalcogen atom-bond scission. In the case of alkane and benzyl chalcogenides, this induces formation of a chalcogenized interface layer. This process can occur during the initial stages of adsorption and then, after passivation of the surface, molecular adsorption can proceed. The characteristics of the chalcogenized interface layer can be significantly different from the metal layer and can affect various properties such as electron conduction. For chalcogenophenes, the carbon–chalcogen atom-bond breaking can lead to opening of the ring and adsorption of an alkene chalcogenide. Such a disruption of the π-electron system affects charge transport along the chains. Awareness about these effects is of importance from the point of view of molecular electronics. We discuss some recent studies based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy that shed light on these aspects for a series of such organic molecules. PMID:26977383

  9. Effect of plasma processing and organosilane modifications of polyethylene on Aeromonas hydrophila biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kregiel, Dorota; Niedzielska, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our research was to study how the modifications of polyethylene--a material commonly used in medicine and water industry--influence bacterial cell attachment and biofilm formation. The native surface was activated and modified using two-step process consisting in the activation of native surface with a H2O vapor plasma followed by its treatment with various organosilanes, namely, [3(tertbutylamine-2hydroxy) propyloxypropyl] diethoxymethylsilane, 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctylmethyldimethoxysilane, dimethoxydimethylsilane, and isobutylmethyldimethoxysilane. The effect of polyethylene modification after chemical treatment was analyzed using surface tension measurement. The adhesive properties of Aeromonas hydrophila LOCK0968 were studied in water with a low concentration of organic compounds, using luminometric and microscopic methods, and the viability of the adhered bacterial cells was evaluated using the colony forming units method. After two-week incubation the chemically modified materials exhibited better antiadhesive and antibacterial characteristics in comparison to the native surface. Among the examined modifying agents, dimethoxydimethylsilane showed the best desired properties. PMID:24605323

  10. Factors affecting the harem formation process by young Misaki feral stallions.

    PubMed

    Khalil, A M; Murakami, N

    1999-06-01

    For the past 12 years, a study was conducted in the Misaki area (southern Kyushu Island, Japan) to investigate young males form new harems, how they acquire the mares and the factors affecting the process of new harem formation. Young males formed new harems between the ages of 3.8 and 7.6 yr, and 93% of these new harem groups were formed at the beginning of the breeding season. The most common way (87%) for young males to form a new harem was by acquiring wandering mares which had separated from their groups, whereas 13% stole unstable mares from established bands. The fact that all young males obtained harems the new at an early age, with an average age of 5.2 yr (n = 15) could be explained high female biased sex ratio (3:1), and great number of wandering mares per stallion (2.5:1). At the time new harem groups were formed, aggression, fighting or such behavior as active herding or driving mares was not observed among stallions because the "unstable" mares were most likely to be abducted by stallions. PMID:10423690

  11. Using Argument Visualization to Enhance e-Participation in the Legislation Formation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukis, Euripidis; Xenakis, Alexandros; Tseperli, Nektaria

    Most public policy problems are ‘wicked’, being characterised by high complexity, many heterogeneous views and conflicts among various stakeholders. Therefore citizens interested to participate in such debates in order to be sufficiently informed should study large amounts of relevant material, such as reports, laws, committees’ minutes, etc., which are in legalistic or in other specialist languages, or very often their substance is hidden in political rhetoric, putting barriers to a meaningful participation. In this paper we present the results of the research we have conducted for addressing this problem through the use of ‘Computer Supported Argument Visualization’ (CSAV) methods for supporting and enhancing e-participation in the legislation formation process. This approach has been implemented in a pilot e-participation project and then evaluated using both quantitative and qualitative methods based on the ‘Technology Acceptance Model’ (TAM), with positive results. Based on the conclusions of this evaluation an enrichment of the IBIS framework has been developed for improving the visualization of legal documents.

  12. Particle formation and characterization of mackerel reaction oil by gas saturated solution process.

    PubMed

    Tanbirul Haque, A S M; Chun, Byung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Most of the health benefits of fish oil can be attributed to the presence of omega-3 fatty acids like Docosahexenoic acid (DHA) and Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). There are few dietary sources of EPA and DHA other than oily fish. EPA and DHA have great potential effect on human health. In this research, Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) extracted mackerel oil was reacted by enzyme at different systems to improve the EPA and DHA. Different types of immobilize enzyme TL-IM, RM-IM, Novozyme 435 were assessed for improving PUFAs. Best result was found at non-pressurized system using TL-IM. Reacted oil particle were obtained with polyethylene glycol by gas saturated solution process (PGSS). Different parameters like temperature, pressure, agitation speed and nozzle size effect on particle formulation were observed. SEM and PSA analysis showed, small size non spherical particles were obtained. It was found that after particle formation poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were present in particle as same in oil. PUFAs release from particle was almost linear against constant time duration. Oil quality in particle not change significantly, in this contrast this study will be helpful for food and pharmaceutical industry to provide high EPA and DHA containing powder. PMID:26787949

  13. CO₂ processing and hydration of fruit and vegetable tissues by clathrate hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Satoshi; Nakano, Kohei; Thammawong, Manasikan; Umeda, Hiroki; Yoneyama, Akio; Takeda, Tohoru; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Matsuo, Seiji

    2016-08-15

    CO2 hydrate can be used to preserve fresh fruits and vegetables, and its application could contribute to the processing of carbonated frozen food. We investigated water transformation in the frozen tissue of fresh grape samples upon CO2 treatment at 2-3 MPa and 3°C for up to 46 h. Frozen fresh bean, radish, eggplant and cucumber samples were also investigated for comparison. X-ray diffraction indicated that after undergoing CO2 treatment for several hours, structure I CO2 hydrate formed within the grape tissue. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging using the diffraction-enhanced imaging technique revealed the presence of CO2 hydrate within the intercellular spaces of these tissues. The carbonated produce became effervescent because of the dissociation of CO2 hydrate through the intercellular space, especially above the melting point of ice. In addition, suppressed metabolic activity resulting from CO2 hydrate formation, which inhibits water and nutrient transport through intercellular space, can be expected. PMID:27006222

  14. Swelling related to ettringite crystal formation in chromite ore processing residue.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Dermatas, Dimitris; Wazne, Mahmoud; Sanchez, Adriana M; Chrysochoou, Maria; Grubb, Dennis G

    2007-08-01

    Several million tons of Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) were deposited at two sites in New Jersey and Maryland, USA, and over time they exhibited extensive heaving phenomena. Ettringite, a needle-shaped mineral and an expansive mineral commonly recognized in the literature concerning cement- and soil, has been identified extensively in numerous COPR samples collected from these sites. It was therefore believed that ettringite formation and its crystal growth are strongly associated with COPR heaving. We investigated the correlation between ettringite and the heaving phenomena in COPR materials that contained no initial ettringite. Two identical COPR samples were exposed to a 4% w/w sulfate solution (25 degrees C, 50 degrees C) in a confined swell test apparatus. Both swell test samples were analyzed by means of X-ray powder diffraction. The peak intensities of newly formed ettringite were more pronounced in the sample tested at 50 degrees C, and swell development was only observed in this sample. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed well-crystallized ettringite needles exceeding 40 microm in length for this sample, while ettringite crystals less than 15 microm in length formed in the sample tested at 25 degrees C. Therefore, the results suggest that the quantity of ettringite and the extent of crystallization play a key role in the heave of COPR. PMID:17505893

  15. The Formation Process of Massive Close Spectroscopic Binaries: The Fission Hypothesis Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.; Ostriker, J.

    2013-06-01

    The vast majority of massive Main-Sequence stars (M>20 Mo) seem to be born in close interactive binary systems (Chini et al. 2012, Sana et al. 2012). The very process by which these systems form is still a mystery and has received little attention so far. Because the binary separation is so tight (less than 1AU), break-up of a critically rotating protostar ("fission") remains an interesting possibility. However, standard current star formation theory treats fission as unlikely (cf. Tohline 2002, ARAA). We question this view and investigate minimum energy states of compressible polytropic analogs to the well-known incompressible MacLaurin spheroids. Dynamical non-axisymmetric instability at a critical ratio of rotational to gravitational energy (cf. Ostriker and Bodenheimer 1973) during the shrinkage of an accreting, rapidly rotating, bloated, massive protostar AFTER ACCRETION DECLINES may provide the conditions for break-up into a close binary system. Time dependent hydro-dynamical simulations are required to either confirm or reject this hypothesis.

  16. Digital image database processing to simulate image formation in ideal lighting conditions of the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda-Santos, Jessica; Santiago-Alvarado, Agustin; Cruz-Félix, Angel S.; Hernández-Méndez, Arturo

    2015-09-01

    The pupil size of the human eye has a large effect in the image quality due to inherent aberrations. Several studies have been performed to calculate its size relative to the luminance as well as considering other factors, i.e., age, size of the adapting field and mono and binocular vision. Moreover, ideal lighting conditions are known, but software suited to our specific requirements, low cost and low computational consumption, in order to simulate radiation adaptation and image formation in the retina with ideal lighting conditions has not yet been developed. In this work, a database is created consisting of 70 photographs corresponding to the same scene with a fixed target at different times of the day. By using this database, characteristics of the photographs are obtained by measuring the luminance average initial threshold value of each photograph by means of an image histogram. Also, we present the implementation of a digital filter for both, image processing on the threshold values of our database and generating output images with the threshold values reported for the human eye in ideal cases. Some potential applications for this kind of filters may be used in artificial vision systems.

  17. Science Teachers' Representations of Classroom Practice in the Process of Formative Assessment Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia, Sara C.; Furtak, Erin Marie; Morrison, Deb; Renga, Ian Parker

    2016-09-01

    Formative assessment has been recognized as an essential element of effective classroom practice; as a result, teachers are increasingly required to create formative assessments for their classrooms. This study examines data drawn from a long-term, site-based professional development program that supported a department of biology teachers in the iterative design and enactment of common formative assessment tools. We analyze teacher conversations to understand how teachers collaborated to design formative assessments. Results indicate that when teachers attended to problems of practice related to teaching evolution, increased transparency in their talk helped build consensus about the design of formative assessment tools. These results highlight the importance of encouraging transparency in teacher dialog when they are engaged in collaborative design of formative assessments.

  18. [Influencing Factors of Assimilable Organic Carbon (AOC) Formation in Drinking Water During Ozonation Process].

    PubMed

    Dong, Bing-zhi; Zhang, Jia-li; He, Chang

    2016-05-15

    The influences of ozone dosage, pH and ionic strength on the formation of Assimilable Organic Carbon (AOC) during ozonation were investigated. The result demonstrated that within the range of 1-5 mg · L⁻¹ O₃, the formation of AOC increased with increasing ozone dosage, but higher ozone dosage (9 mg · L⁻¹) resulted in reduction of AOC formation. AOC formation increased with higher pH but decreased with increasing ionic strength. The result also showed that AOC formation with hydrophobic fraction (HPO) was the most, followed by transphilic fraction (TPI), and charged hydrophilic fraction (CHPI), while neutral hydrophilic fraction (NHPI) was the least. It was found that AOC formation related closely with SUVA of small molecular weight organics, and the lower SUVA produced more AOC. PMID:27506038

  19. Sulfur barrier for use with in situ processes for treating formations

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Christensen, Del Scot

    2009-12-15

    Methods for forming a barrier around at least a portion of a treatment area in a subsurface formation are described herein. Sulfur may be introduced into one or more wellbores located inside a perimeter of a treatment area in the formation having a permeability of at least 0.1 darcy. At least some of the sulfur is allowed to move towards portions of the formation cooler than the melting point of sulfur to solidify the sulfur in the formation to form the barrier.

  20. In situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation after drive process treatment

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Stanecki, John

    2010-09-21

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing a drive fluid to a hydrocarbon containing layer of the tar sands formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the layer. At least some first hydrocarbons from the layer are produced. Heat is provided to the layer from one or more heaters located in the formation. At least some second hydrocarbons are produced from the layer of the formation. The second hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons that are upgraded compared to the first hydrocarbons produced by using the drive fluid.

  1. CO2 + N2O mixture gas hydrate formation kinetics and effect of soil minerals on mixture-gas hydrate formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkh-Amgalan, T.; Kyung, D.; Lee, W.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 mitigation is one of the most pressing global scientific topics in last 30 years. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the main greenhouse gases (GHGs) defined by the Kyoto Protocol and its global warming potential (GWP) of one metric ton is equivalent to 310 metric tons of CO2. They have similar physical and chemical properties and therefore, mixture-gas (50% CO2 + 50% N2O) hydrate formation process was studied experimentally and computationally. There were no significant research to reduce N20 gas and we tried to make hydrate to mitigate N20 and CO2 in same time. Mixture gas hydrate formation periods were approximately two times faster than pure N2O hydrate formation kinetic in general. The fastest induction time of mixture-gas hydrate formation observed in Illite and Quartz among various soil mineral suspensions. It was also observed that hydrate formation kinetic was faster with clay mineral suspensions such as Nontronite, Sphalerite and Montmorillonite. Temperature and pressure change were not significant on hydrate formation kinetic; however, induction time can be significantly affected by various chemical species forming under the different suspension pHs. The distribution of chemical species in each mineral suspension was estimated by a chemical equilibrium model, PHREEQC, and used for the identification of hydrate formation characteristics in the suspensions. With the experimental limitations, a study on the molecular scale modeling has a great importance for the prediction of phase behavior of the gas hydrates. We have also performed molecular dynamics computer simulations on N2O and CO2 hydrate structures to estimate the residual free energy of two-phase (hydrate cage and guest molecule) at three different temperature ranges of 260K, 273K, and 280K. The calculation result implies that N2O hydrates are thermodynamically stable at real-world gas hydrate existing condition within given temperature and pressure. This phenomenon proves that mixture-gas could be

  2. A comparative study of abiological granular sludge (ABGS) formation in different processes for zinc removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chai, Liyuan; Yan, Xu; Li, Qingzhu; Yang, Bentao; Wang, Qingwei

    2014-11-01

    Abiological granular sludge (ABGS) formation is a potential and facile strategy for improving sludge settling performance during zinc removal from wastewater using chemical precipitation. In this study, the effect of pH, seed dosage, and flocculant dosage on ABGS formation and treated water quality was investigated. Results show that settling velocity of ABGS can reach up to 4.00 cm/s under optimal conditions, e.g., pH of 9.0, zinc oxide (ZnO) seeds dosage of 1.5 g/l, and polyacrylamide (PAM) dosage of 10 mg/l. More importantly, ABGS formation mechanism was investigated in NaOH precipitation process and compared with that in bio-polymer ferric sulfate (BPFS)-NaOH precipitation process regarding their sludge structure and composition. In the NaOH precipitation process, ABGS formation depends on some attractions between particles, such as van der Waals attraction and bridging attraction. However, during the BPFS-NaOH sludge formation process, steric repulsion becomes dominant due to the adsorption of BPFS on ZnO seeds. This repulsion further causes extremely loose structure and poor settling performance of BPFS-NaOH sludge.

  3. Distributions, profiles and formation mechanisms of polychlorinated naphthalenes in cement kilns co-processing municipal waste incinerator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Zhan, Jiayu; Zhao, Yuyang; Li, Li; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Fu, Jianjie; Li, Chunping; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-07-01

    Co-processing municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash in cement kilns is challenging because the unintentional production of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during the process is not well understood. The distributions, profiles and formation mechanisms of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) as new POPs covered under Stockholm Convention in two cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash were studied. The average concentrations of PCNs in stack gas samples were 710 ng m(-3). The PCN concentration in particle samples collected from different process stages in the cement kilns ranged from 1.1 to 84.7 ng g(-1). Three process sites including suspension pre-heater boiler, humidifier tower, and the kiln back-end bag filter were identified to be the major formation sites of PCNs in cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash. The PCN distribution patterns were similar to that of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs), which indicates the possibility for simultaneous control of PCNs and PCDD/Fs in cement kilns co-processing fly ash. Chlorination was suggested to be an important formation mechanism of PCNs, and chlorination pathways of PCN congeners are proposed based on the congener profiles. Thermodynamic calculations, including relative thermal energies (ΔE) and standard free energy of formation (ΔG), and the charge densities of the carbon atoms in PCN supported the proposed chlorination mechanisms for PCN formation. The results presented in this study might provide helpful information for developing techniques and strategies to control PCN emissions during cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash.

  4. Distributions, profiles and formation mechanisms of polychlorinated naphthalenes in cement kilns co-processing municipal waste incinerator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Zhan, Jiayu; Zhao, Yuyang; Li, Li; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Fu, Jianjie; Li, Chunping; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-07-01

    Co-processing municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash in cement kilns is challenging because the unintentional production of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during the process is not well understood. The distributions, profiles and formation mechanisms of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) as new POPs covered under Stockholm Convention in two cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash were studied. The average concentrations of PCNs in stack gas samples were 710 ng m(-3). The PCN concentration in particle samples collected from different process stages in the cement kilns ranged from 1.1 to 84.7 ng g(-1). Three process sites including suspension pre-heater boiler, humidifier tower, and the kiln back-end bag filter were identified to be the major formation sites of PCNs in cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash. The PCN distribution patterns were similar to that of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs), which indicates the possibility for simultaneous control of PCNs and PCDD/Fs in cement kilns co-processing fly ash. Chlorination was suggested to be an important formation mechanism of PCNs, and chlorination pathways of PCN congeners are proposed based on the congener profiles. Thermodynamic calculations, including relative thermal energies (ΔE) and standard free energy of formation (ΔG), and the charge densities of the carbon atoms in PCN supported the proposed chlorination mechanisms for PCN formation. The results presented in this study might provide helpful information for developing techniques and strategies to control PCN emissions during cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash. PMID:27135696

  5. Formation of calcium aluminates in the lime sinter process. [Extraction of alumina from fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, K.S.

    1980-03-01

    A study of the formation of several calcium aluminates from pure components in the lime sinter process was undertaken to determine the kinetics of formation and subsequent leaching using a dilute sodium carbonate solution. The composition CaO 61.98%, SiO/sub 2/ 26.67%, and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ 11.53% was used. Isothermal sintering runs of 0.2 to 10.0 h were carried out at 1200, 1250, 1300, and 1350/sup 0/C. When the sintering temperature was below the eutectic temperature (1335/sup 0/C), the ternary mixture behaved like two binary systems, i.e. CaO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and CaO-SiO/sub 2/. Only one compound, 3CaO.SiO/sub 2/, was formed between CaO and SiO/sub 2/. With lower sintering temperature and shorter sintering time, the ..beta..-phase was dominant. However, when both temperature and time increased, more and more of the ..beta..-C/sub 2/S was transformed into the ..gamma..-phase. Several different aluminates were formed during the sintering of CaO and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The compounds CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 3CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were observed at all tested sintering temperatures, while the 5CaO.3Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ phase was found only at 1200/sup 0/C and 12CaO.7Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ at 1250/sup 0/C or higher. The first compound formed between CaO and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was probably 12CaO.7Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, but the amount did not increase immediately with time. The first dominant compound between CaO and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was CaO.3Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. When the calcium ion diffused through the product layer of CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 3CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was formed. If unreacted Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were present after the formation of CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CaO.2Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ would form. Subsequent leaching of the sinters showed that the extractable alumina in the products increased with both sintering temperature and time, reaching a max of about 90%. These extraction data corresponded very well to the quantities of aluminates in the sinters. 59 figures, 13 tables.

  6. Wax barrier for use with in situ processes for treating formations

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Carter, Ernest E.; Son, Jaime Santos; Bai, Taixu; Khoda Verdian, Mohamad Fereydoon

    2010-04-27

    Methods for forming a barrier around at least a portion of a treatment area in a subsurface formation are described herein. A material including wax may be introduced into one or more wellbores. The material introduced into two or more wells may mix in the formation and congeal to form a barrier to fluid flow.

  7. Interspecies interactions result in enhanced biofilm formation by co-cultures of bacteria isolated from a food processing environment.

    PubMed

    Røder, Henriette L; Raghupathi, Prem K; Herschend, Jakob; Brejnrod, Asker; Knøchel, Susanne; Sørensen, Søren J; Burmølle, Mette

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial attachment and biofilm formation can lead to poor hygienic conditions in food processing environments. Furthermore, interactions between different bacteria may induce or promote biofilm formation. In this study, we isolated and identified a total of 687 bacterial strains from seven different locations in a meat processing environment and evaluated their biofilm formation capability. A diverse group of bacteria was isolated and most were classified as poor biofilm producers in a Calgary biofilm device assay. Isolates from two sampling sites, the wall and the meat chopper, were further examined for multispecies biofilm formation. Eight strains from each sampling site were chosen and all possible combinations of four member co-cultures were tested for enhanced biofilm formation at 15 °C and 24 °C. In approximately 20% of the multispecies consortia grown at 15 °C, the biofilm formation was enhanced when comparing to monospecies biofilms. Two specific isolates (one from each location) were found to be present in synergistic combinations with higher frequencies than the remaining isolates tested. This data provides insights into the ability of co-localized isolates to influence co-culture biofilm production with high relevance for food safety and food production facilities.

  8. Formation and dissolution processes of the 6-thioguanine (6TG) self-assembled monolayer. A kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Madueño, Rafael; Pineda, Teresa; Sevilla, José Manuel; Blázquez, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    This is a report on the kinetics of the destruction and formation processes of the 6-thioguanine self-assembled monolayer (6TG SAM) on a mercury electrode from acid solutions by chronoamperometry. The destruction of the 6TG SAM that has been previously formed under open circuit potential conditions is carried out by stepping the potential from an initial value where the chemisorbed layer is stable up to potentials where the molecules are no longer chemisorbed. The destruction of the SAM has been described by a model that involves three types of contributions: (i) a Langmuir-type adsorption process, (ii) a 2D nucleation mechanism followed by a growth controlled by surface diffusion, and (iii) a 2D nucleation mechanism followed by a growth at a constant rate. The nonlinear fit of the experimental transients by using this procedure allows the quantitative determination of the individual contributions to the overall process. The kinetics of the formation process is studied under electrochemical conditions. The chronoamperometric experiment allows us to monitor the early stages of 6TG SAM formation. The implications of the physisorbed state at low potentials in the type of monolayer formation and destruction processes as well as the influence of temperature are also discussed. PMID:16851120

  9. Formation and dissolution processes of the 6-thioguanine (6TG) self-assembled monolayer. A kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Madueño, Rafael; Pineda, Teresa; Sevilla, José Manuel; Blázquez, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    This is a report on the kinetics of the destruction and formation processes of the 6-thioguanine self-assembled monolayer (6TG SAM) on a mercury electrode from acid solutions by chronoamperometry. The destruction of the 6TG SAM that has been previously formed under open circuit potential conditions is carried out by stepping the potential from an initial value where the chemisorbed layer is stable up to potentials where the molecules are no longer chemisorbed. The destruction of the SAM has been described by a model that involves three types of contributions: (i) a Langmuir-type adsorption process, (ii) a 2D nucleation mechanism followed by a growth controlled by surface diffusion, and (iii) a 2D nucleation mechanism followed by a growth at a constant rate. The nonlinear fit of the experimental transients by using this procedure allows the quantitative determination of the individual contributions to the overall process. The kinetics of the formation process is studied under electrochemical conditions. The chronoamperometric experiment allows us to monitor the early stages of 6TG SAM formation. The implications of the physisorbed state at low potentials in the type of monolayer formation and destruction processes as well as the influence of temperature are also discussed.

  10. Using a paleo perspective to decipher climate controls on erosion and landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roering, J. J.; Marshall, J. A.; Granger, D. E.; Fox, M.; Gavin, D. G.; White, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Today, topographic, erosion, and climate data are measured in abundance but the role of climate in modulating sediment production and landscape evolution remains difficult to characterize. Studies that quantify climate controls on denudation by analyzing multiple study areas with varying temperature and precipitation are hampered by site-to-site variations in topography, substrate, and vegetation, as well as uncertainty in the state of landscape adjustment. Alternatively, sedimentary records at a given location provide a means to track how climate variations influence sediment flux and weathering rates and mechanisms. Cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in well-dated sediment cores provide a means to quantify how erosion rates track climate, particularly orbital (or Milankovitch), fluctuations. Most cosmogenic analyses of erosion assume steady exhumation. By contrast, time-varying cosmogenic concentrations at a given location require a systematic inverse analysis of inheritance to decipher actual erosion rate changes that integrate in observed cosmogenic concentrations. Failure to consider transient erosion results in biased interpretations of paleo-erosion datasets. Here, we use a suite of inverse methods to constrain erosion rates through the last 50kya at our forested, steepland field site in western Oregon where Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) erosion rates are observed to be 2.5x faster than modern rates. Both paleoclimate simulations and paleovegetation data indicate colder and drier conditions during the LGM across our study domain, such that temperature, rather than precipitation, may be the dominant driver of geomorphic processes during glacial intervals in many mid-latitude regions. Other climate dependencies will apply elsewhere, but the coupling of process theory and climate reconstructions with well-characterized sedimentary records will help resolve the enigmatic role of climate fluctuations.

  11. Formation and Evolution Process of Typical Alluvial fan in North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongmei, Z.; Hua, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Through Quaternary scientific drilling, well-logging, sampling and testing at Hutuo River Alluvial Fan in North China Plain, combined with existing lithology and lithofacies data of borehole, and comprehensive analysises with approaches of sedimentology, palaeontology, climatostratigraphy, we have identified the formation and evolution process of Hutuo River Alluvial Fan, our results indicate that: 1) There are three phases of large-scale alluvial fan during Quaternary period in the Hutuo River alluvial fan, which were buried in the depth of 40 ~ 70m, 70 ~ 130m, 130 ~ 160m respectively, with corresponding geological age are middle Pleistocene, early and mid-term of early Pleistocene, early-term of early Pleistocene. The leading edge of Hutuo River Alluvial Fan reached to counties of Ning jin, Hengshui, Wuqiang and, Raoyang. 2) The sedimentary facies of Hutuo River Alluvial Fan include alluvial facies and lake - swamp facies. Alluvial facies have been widely distributed from the piedmont area to Xinji county, including two sub-facies of river bed and alluvial flat facies. Lake-swamp facies mainly appeared at Shen county and it's east, and also scattered in the piedmont and the central of the fan. 3) On the basis of the lithology, lithofacies characteristics and stratigraphic cycles, and combined with biostratigraphic characteristics and luminescence age, we can definite the division of Quaternary geological boundary of Hutuo River Alluvial Fan as follows: Q4 / Q3 - -8.85m; Q3 / Q2 -32.68 m; Q2 / Q1 -73.84m; Q1 / N2 - 157.04m.

  12. Clarifying the role of rigidity contrasts and rock interface strength in sill formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, J.; Pavier, M.; Menand, T.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    2012-04-01

    Field observations, numerical and analogue models suggest rigidity contrasts may play an important role in sill formation processes. We present results from analogue experiments and rock strength tests which explore the additional role that rock interface strength could have on the geometry and propagation dynamics of magmatic intrusions. Dyed water (a magma analogue) was injected into layers of solidified gelatine (a crustal analogue) to form experimental dykes and sills. The intrusions were pressure-driven and injected under initially hydrostatic conditions. From 4 to ~15 °C gelatine deforms elastically, and under these conditions the tensile strength of the gelatine (Youngs Modulus) evolves following a power-law relationship that plateaus with time. Varying the concentration of the gelatine allows layer strength contrasts as low as 1% to be created. Our results show that in a two-layered system the upper layer needs to be at least 10% more rigid than the lower layer to cause dyke arrest. An experimental sill then forms if the interface between the layers is weak; otherwise a lateral dyke forms. To test rock interface strength variation in nature we used a 1 kN servo hydraulic test machine to test 5 mm thick cuboidal specimens of sandstone-siltstone rock core where the interface between the strata is preserved. By measuring the load required to grow a starter crack running along the lithological contact between the layers we can calculate its fracture toughness (a measure of the material resistance to the growth of a crack). The results show the rock interfaces have intermediate fracture toughness to their parent units. These results bring into question the relative roles of magma viscosity versus rock fracturing in controlling the nature and propagation dynamics of magmatic intrusions.

  13. Holocene loess deposition and soil formation as competing processes, Matanuska Valley, southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; McGeehin, J.P.; Beann, J.; Fisher, E.

    2004-01-01

    Although loess-paleosol sequences are among the most important records of Quaternary climate change and past dust deposition cycles, few modern examples of such sedimentation systems have been studied. Stratigraphic studies and 22 new accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon ages from the Matanuska Valley in southern Alaska show that loess deposition there began sometime after ???6500 14C yr B.P. and has continued to the present. The silts are produced through grinding by the Matanuska and Knik glaciers, deposited as outwash, entrained by strong winds, and redeposited as loess. Over a downwind distance of ???40 km, loess thickness, sand content, and sand-plus-coarse-silt content decrease, whereas fine-silt content increases. Loess deposition was episodic, as shown by the presence of paleosols, at distances >10 km from the outwash plain loess source. Stratigraphic complexity is at a maximum (i.e., the greatest number of loesses and paleosols) at intermediate (10-25 km) distances from the loess source. Surface soils increase in degree of development with distance downwind from the source, where sedimentation rates are lower. Proximal soils are Entisols or Inceptisols, whereas distal soils are Spodosols. Ratios of mobile CaO, K2O, and Fe2O3 to immobile TiO2 show decreases in surface horizons with distance from the source. Thus, as in China, where loess deposition also takes place today, eolian sedimentation and soil formation are competing processes. Study of loess and paleosols in southern Alaska shows that particle size can vary over short distances, loess deposition can be episodic over limited time intervals, and soils developed in stabilized loess can show considerable variability under the same vegetation. ?? 2004 University of Washington. All rights reserved.

  14. LANDSAT-D data format control book. Volume 6, appendix C: Partially processed multispectral scanner high density tape (HDT-AM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, K. E.

    1982-01-01

    The format of high density tapes which contain partially processed LANDSAT 4 and LANDSAT D prime MSS image data is defined. This format is based on and is compatible with the existing format for partially processed LANDSAT 3 MSS image data HDTs.

  15. Effect of pH and chemical mechanical planarization process conditions on the copper-benzotriazole complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Jin-Yong; Hamada, Satomi; Shima, Shohei; Park, Jin-Goo

    2016-06-01

    Benzotriazole (BTA) has been used to protect copper (Cu) from corrosion during Cu chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) processes. However, an undesirable Cu-BTA complex is deposited after Cu CMP processes and it should be completely removed at post-Cu CMP cleaning for next fabrication process. Therefore, it is very important to understand of Cu-BTA complex formation behavior for its applications such as Cu CMP and post-Cu CMP cleaning. The present study investigated the effect of pH and polisher conditions on the formation of Cu-BTA complex layers using electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and the surface contact angle. The wettability was not a significant factor for the polishing interface, as no difference in the contact angles was observed for these processes. Both electrochemical techniques revealed that BTA had a unique advantage of long-term protection for Cu corrosion in an acidic condition (pH 3).

  16. Thermochemical study of processes of complex formation of Cu2+ ions with L-glutamine in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Gridchin, S. N.; Lutsenko, A. A.

    2010-11-01

    Heats of the interaction of Cu(NO3)2 solutions with L-glutamine solutions were measured directly by calorimetry at a temperature of 298.15 K and ionic strength values of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 (KNO3). Using RRSU universal software, the experimental data were subjected to rigorous mathematical treatment with allowances made for several concurrent processes in the system. The heats of formation of the CuL+ and CuL2 complexes were calculated from the calorimetric measurements. The standard heats of the complex formation of Cu2+ with L-glutamine were obtained by extrapolation to zero ionic strength. The complete thermodynamic characteristic (Δr H o, Δr G o, Δr S o) of the complex formation processes in a Cu2+—L-glutamine system was obtained.

  17. Peat formation processes through the millennia in tidal marshes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, Judith Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine peat formation processes throughout the millennia in four tidal marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Peat cores collected at each site were analyzed for bulk density, loss on ignition, and percent organic carbon. Core data and spline fit age-depth models were used to estimate inorganic sedimentation, organic accumulation, and carbon sequestration rates in the marshes. Bulk density and percent organic matter content of peat fluctuated through time at all sites, suggesting that peat formation processes are dynamic and responsive to watershed conditions. The balance between inorganic sedimentation and organic accumulation at the sites also varied through time, indicating that marshes may rely more strongly on either norganic or organic matter for peat formation at particular times in their existence. Mean carbon sequestration rates found in this study (0.38-0.79 Mg C ha-1 year-1) were similar to other long-term estimates for temperate peatlands.

  18. Formation of Research Competence of the Future Elementary School Teachers--In the Process of Professional Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syzdykbayeva, Aigul Dzhumanazarovna; Bainazarova, Tursynay Beysembekovna; Aitzhanova, Elmira Nyrmahankyzy

    2015-01-01

    The present article presents the structural-functional model of formation of research competence of future elementary school teachers in the process of professional training. This model includes a set of interrelated and interdependent structural components: target; informative; procedural; estimate-effective structural components. The article…

  19. Lessons Learnt from Applying Action Research to Support Strategy Formation Processes in Long-Term Care Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Hendrik; Dewulf, Geert; Voordijk, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates how action research (AR) that is aimed at scaling-up experiments can be applied to support a strategy formation process (SFP) in a subsidized long-term care network. Previous research has developed numerous AR frameworks to support experiments in various domains, but has failed to explain how to apply AR and action learning…

  20. In situ conversion process systems utilizing wellbores in at least two regions of a formation

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Hsu, Chia-Fu

    2011-09-27

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of elongated heaters located in a plurality of openings in the formation. At least two of the heaters are substantially parallel to each other for at least a portion of the lengths of the heaters. At least two of the heaters have first end portions in a first region of the formation and second end portions in a second region of the formation. A source of time-varying current is configured to apply time-varying current to at least two of the heaters. The first end portions of at least two heaters are configured to have substantially the same voltage applied to them. The second portions of at least two heaters are configured to have substantially the same voltage applied to them.

  1. Kinetics of elementary processes relevant to incipient soot formation. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1998-03-09

    In order to better understand the mechanism of soot formation (one of the most challenging problems in the study of hydrocarbon combustion chemistry), reliable rate constants for the key reaction steps involved in the formation and polymerization of aromatic hydrocarbons in the inception stage are required for kinetic modeling. In this DOE sponsored work, the authors have developed three new experimental methods: cavity ring-down (CRD) spectrometry, pyrolysis/Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (p/FTIRS) and pulsed laser photolysis/mass spectrometry (PLP/MS) for kinetic measurements of C{sub 6}H{sub 5} reactions pivotal to incipient soot formation chemistry. In addition, the authors have also carried out ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculations for several key elementary combustion reactions relevant to soot formation. The results are briefly summarized in the report using selected examples for more detailed discussion. 84 refs.

  2. Processes of Formation of Spheroidal Concretions and Inferences for "Blueberries" in Meridiani Planum Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, M. L.

    2005-03-01

    Formation of spheroidal concretions on Earth results generally from reactions of organic matter in oxidized sediments. Had organic matter been present in Merididani Planum it could have produced a reduced iron mineral phase later oxidized to hematite.

  3. [Distinguishing normal identity formation process for sexual minorities from obsessive compulsive disorder with sexual orientation obsessions].

    PubMed

    Igartua, Karine J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In synthesizing a homosexual or bisexual identity, an individual may go through different stages before coming to a positive healthy identity. It is likely that there will be a period in which homosexual yearnings will be unwanted. Sometimes this distress leads the person to consult a health professional. Conversion therapy has been proven both ineffective and harmful and therefore has been ethically prohibited by all major psychiatric and psychological associations. The responsible clinician will attempt to assist the individual in his acceptance of his sexual minority. Occasionally individuals without homoeroticism consult because of distress related to sexual identity questioning which poses a different problem for clinicians especially if the situation goes unrecognized. The objective of this paper is to describe homosexual obsessive compulsive disorder (HOCD) and distinguish it clinically from the normal process of sexual minority identity formation in western culture.Methods A literature review yielded very few descriptions of homosexual OCD. A retrospective chart review of all patients seen in the last 3 years at the McGill University Sexual Identity Centre was conducted to identify all the cases of OCD. Six cases were found, 4 of which were of HOCD and are presented. Similarities between cases are highlighted.Results All cases were young men with relatively little relationship and sexual experience. Most were rather shy and had some other obsessional history in the past though often at a sub-clinical threshold. Obsessional doubt about their orientation was very distressing and did not abate over time as would normally occur with a homoerotic individual. The four patients who had an obsession of being gay despite little or no homoerotism are presented in detail. They all presented mental compulsions, avoidance and physiological monitoring. Continuous internal debate trying to prove or disprove sexual orientation was a ubiquitous mental

  4. Dynamic processes in the lithosphere leading to extension, rifting and basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The similarity of ages of extensional core complexes, co-genetic basin formation, and kinematically compatible movements along large strike-slip faults in western North America to ages of comparable events within the Himalayas-Alps orogenic belt leads to the speculation that strain related to changes in Pacific (PAC)-North America(NA) plate motions may be recorded on a global scale affecting the coupled plates and extending eastward across Eurasia. The contemporaneous global deformation reflects abrupt changes in PAC-NA plate motions in response to coupling following convergence of buoyant oceanic lithosphere, commonly part of a spreading center, which impedes subduction and leads to collision followed by coupling when the buoyant lithosphere binds against the base of the overriding continental plate. Critical coupling of a sufficiently long ridge segment leads to "capture", after which the former movements of the newly coupled plates are integrated abruptly and changed from previous directions. In western North America, episodes of capture of the NA plate by the (PAC) plate are recorded by break-up unconformities (ca. 55, 35, and 17 Ma) and basins commonly within extensional domains distinguished by age and direction of tectonic transport (Eocene [~55-42 Ma], ca. 285o, Oligocene [~35-20 Ma], 240o, Miocene [17-0 Ma], ca. 280o). The transport directions record the integration of the southwesterly motion of NA , related to mantle convection, and the northwesterly motion of PAC, driven by slab pull. Following each coupling event, PAC moves westward dragging: 1) the formerly subducting Farallon slab, 2) the coupled, formerly overriding, NA plate, and 3) Eurasia (EA), with it. In response to the strong extension that is imposed upon rocks within domains encompassed by the PAC-NA coupled region, and along the southern margin of Eurasia, brittle deformation, accommodated by normal and strike-slip faults, and formation of contemporaneous basins, takes place. Core

  5. Formation processes of floe size distribution in the marginal ice zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, T.; Kohout, A.; Fraser, A.

    2013-12-01

    Since the marginal ice zone (MIZ) is the outer sea ice zone, its behavior is key to the understanding of the variability of sea ice extent associated with climate change. Especially for the melting processes in MIZ, where relatively small ice floes are dominant, floe size distribution (FSD) is an important parameter because smaller ice floes are subject to stronger lateral melting due to their larger cumulative perimeters. As the MIZ is characterized by vigorous interaction between sea ice and waves, breakup of sea ice due to flexural forcing and collisions is considered to play an essential role in the determination of FSD there. However, the available data have been very limited so far. Analysis of the observations of ice floes with a heli-borne video camera, focusing on the floe size ranging from 2 m to 100 m, in the Sea of Okhotsk, the Weddell Sea and off East Antarctica, revealed that while FSD is basically scale-invariant, a regime shift occurs at a size of about a few tens of meters, irrespective of the study region. It was also shown 1) that the floe size at which regime shift occurs slightly increases from 20 to 40 m with ice thickness, consistent with the theory of the flexural failure of sea ice; and 2) that to explain the scale invariance in FSD for smaller floes, a fragility of sea ice which is relevant to the strength of sea ice relative to waves can be a useful physical parameter to be correlated with the fractal dimension. Thus these results confirm the importance of wave-ice interaction to the formation of FSD. Based on this, a possible mechanism of the melting process was hypothesized that in the melting season sea ice extent retreats keeping the FSD relative to the ice edge nearly constant. As a next step and to confirm and further investigate this result, we planned to conduct the concurrent measurements of FSD, wave activities, and ice thickness off East Antarctica during the Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem Experiment 2 (SIPEX2) in September to

  6. Perspectives on deciphering mechanisms underlying plant heat stress response and thermotolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bokszczanin, Kamila L.; Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios

    2013-01-01

    Global warming is a major threat for agriculture and food safety and in many cases the negative effects are already apparent. The current challenge of basic and applied plant science is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of heat stress response (HSR) and thermotolerance in detail and use this information to identify genotypes that will withstand unfavorable environmental conditions. Nowadays X-omics approaches complement the findings of previous targeted studies and highlight the complexity of HSR mechanisms giving information for so far unrecognized genes, proteins and metabolites as potential key players of thermotolerance. Even more, roles of epigenetic mechanisms and the involvement of small RNAs in thermotolerance are currently emerging and thus open new directions of yet unexplored areas of plant HSR. In parallel it is emerging that although the whole plant is vulnerable to heat, specific organs are particularly sensitive to elevated temperatures. This has redirected research from the vegetative to generative tissues. The sexual reproduction phase is considered as the most sensitive to heat and specifically pollen exhibits the highest sensitivity and frequently an elevation of the temperature just a few degrees above the optimum during pollen development can have detrimental effects for crop production. Compared to our knowledge on HSR of vegetative tissues, the information on pollen is still scarce. Nowadays, several techniques for high-throughput X-omics approaches provide major tools to explore the principles of pollen HSR and thermotolerance mechanisms in specific genotypes. The collection of such information will provide an excellent support for improvement of breeding programs to facilitate the development of tolerant cultivars. The review aims at describing the current knowledge of thermotolerance mechanisms and the technical advances which will foster new insights into this process. PMID:23986766

  7. Examination of the formation process of pre-solvated and solvated electron in n-alcohol using femtosecond pulse radiolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toigawa, Tomohiro; Gohdo, Masao; Norizawa, Kimihiro; Kondoh, Takafumi; Kan, Koichi; Yang, Jinfeng; Yoshida, Yoichi

    2016-06-01

    The formation process of pre-solvated and solvated electron in methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH), n-butanol (BuOH), and n-octanol (OcOH) were investigated using a fs-pulse radiolysis technique by observing the pre-solvated electron at 1400 nm. The formation time constants of the pre-solvated electrons were determined to be 1.2, 2.2, 3.1, and 6.3 ps for MeOH, EtOH, BuOH, and OcOH, respectively. The formation time constants of the solvated electrons were determined to be 6.7, 13.6, 22.2, and 32.9 ps for MeOH, EtOH, BuOH, and OcOH, respectively. The formation dynamics and structure of the pre-solvated and solvated electrons in n-alcohols were discussed based on relation between the obtained time constant and dielectric relaxation time constant from the view point of kinetics. The observed formation time constants of the solvated electrons seemed to be strongly correlated with the second component of the dielectric relaxation time constants, which are related to single molecule motion. On the other hand, the observed formation time constants of the pre-solvated electrons seemed to be strongly correlated with the third component of the dielectric relaxation time constants, which are related to dynamics of hydrogen bonds.

  8. Elucidating N2O Formation during the Cyclic NOx Storage and Reduction Process Using CO as a Reductant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Xiuting; Zhu, Jinxin; Wang, Jianqiang; Shen, Meiqing

    2015-07-01

    The N2O formation pathway and effect of H2O on N2O formation during the NOx storage and reduction (NSR) process using CO as a reductant were investigated over a Pt-BaO/Al2O3 catalyst. The NSR activity measurements and transient in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments were performed to evaluate N2O evolution and elucidate the N2O formation mechanism. N2O is formed in the lean, rich, and delay2 phases. In the lean phase, N2O formation is related to the reactions between surface isocyanate and gaseous NO/O2 and NO is more responsible for N2O formation than O2. Moreover, N2O production decreases with H2O because of the hydrolysis of isocyanate species. In the rich phase, the amount of N2O formation also decreases in the presence of H2O at a higher temperature because of the high reduction ability of H2 generated from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction. During the delay2 phase, N2O is mainly formed by nitrite species reacting with Pt(0)-CO. Furthermore, the presence of H2O decreases the stability of nitrites and results in more N2O production at a low temperature.

  9. Stellar and Gas Phase Metallicity of Low Surface Brighness Galaxies: Implication on Star Formation Process within Young Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon

    2015-08-01

    Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, whose central surface brightness, μB, is fainter than 23 mag/arcsec2 in the B-band, have been one of the most intriguing galaxy populations. Their unique characteristics, such as blue colors in optical and near-infrared light, low metallicity, low stellar and gas surface densities, low dust content, and high gas mass fraction (up to 90%), resemble physical conditions of young galaxies of the early Universe whose interstellar medium (ISM) has not been enriched before major star formation activities initiated and should provide a testbed for star formation process at the exremly low surface density regime. Given that their star formation histories are still poorly constrained, LSB galaxies are known to have large specific star formation rates (sSFRs) with large gas fractions. There is also a correlation between their sSFRs and gas fractions. One of plausible scenarios is that the star formation efficiency may be an increasing funtion of time, perhaps due in part to the slow build up of metals and dust. Moreover, it is suspected that, being located in low number density area in terms of galaxy environment, LSB galaxies may receive additional gas to fuel their star formation activity via sporadic cold gas accretion, especially toward their outskirt regions analogous to extended ultraviolet disks. Due to their relatively isolated nature without having endured much interactions, LSB galaxies can mimic star formation processes of disk galaxies of the early Universe within their interstellar media (ISM). We present preliminary results based on stellar and gas phase metallicity of LSB galaxies along with their environment parameters to show how star-forming ISM of young disk galaxies before metal enrichment.

  10. Conquering the Mesoscale of Africa's Landscapes: deciphering the Genomic Record of Individuating Landforms with Geoecodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotterill, Fenton P. D.

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of Earth System Science, landscapes are the templates structuring the biosphere: the membranes interfacing between exosphere and geosphere. The hosts of earth surface processes, in their dynamics and complexity, landscapes hold a pivotal position in the evolving earth system - not least in their archives of Earth history. Their landforms document impacts of formative events originating in extra-terrestrial, geological and climatic processes. Nevertheless, major challenges to reconstruct dynamics at this interface between geosphere and exosphere hamper research efforts. Events at the mesoscale over evolutionary timescales are an important reason for why the academic schools of mega- versus process geomorphology persist (see Summerfield MA 2005. Trans. Inst. Brit Geogr NS, 30, 402-415). Austere limits on what their respective methods can reveal in mesoscale phenomena face several problems (besides costs of sampling and analyses). One, surviving landforms often lack the requisite minerals (e.g. of volcanic events). Second, the spatial resolution of orthodox methods (e.g. thermochronology) cannot resolve mesoscale patterns. Third, the surface dating tools with superb spatial precision have finitee temporal limits (Luminescence-Dating and Cosmogenic Isotopes). Fourth, and by no means least, the cumulative impact of earth surface processes has overwritten and/or eroded physical evidence of earlier formative events. (This problem is exemplified in tropical landscapes where deep, pervasive bioturbation is the dominant earth surface process!) The cumulative outcome of these inherent turnovers of landscapes has shaped the inherent emptiness of the Rock Record, which sets absolute limits on its archives (Ager D 1993. The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record; Miall AD 2015. in: Strata and Time: Probing the Gaps in Our Understanding. Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 404, http://dx.doi.org/10.1144/SP404.4). These limitations on mesoscale

  11. A comparison of iodinated trihalomethane formation from chlorine, chlorine dioxide and potassium permanganate oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yang; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Yi-Li; Lin, Lin; Ye, Tao; Tian, Fu-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the formation of iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THMs) from iodide-containing raw waters oxidized by chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) and potassium permanganate (KMnO₄) at different oxidant concentrations, reaction times, pHs, initial iodide concentrations and bromide to iodide mass ratios. Among the six investigated I-THMs, iodoform was the major species formed during the oxidation using chlorine, ClO₂ and KMnO₄. When oxidant concentration increased from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, the formation of I-THMs increased and then decreased for chlorine and ClO₂, but kept increasing for KMnO₄. As the reaction time went by, I-THM concentration increased to a plateau within 10 h (ClO₂ within only 1 h, especially) for all the three oxidants. I-THM formation gradually increased from pH 3.0 to 9.0 and remained stable at pH values higher than 7.5 for chlorine; however, for ClO₂ and KMnO₄ the highest I-THM formation showed at pH 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. As initial iodide concentration increased from 20 to 800 μg/L, the total amount and species of I-THMs increased for the three oxidants. Iodide contributed to I-THM formation much more significantly than bromide.

  12. Variations and factors that influence the formation of polychlorinated naphthalenes in cement kilns co-processing solid waste.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Zhan, Jiayu; Liu, Guorui; Zhao, Yuyang; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-09-01

    Pilot studies of unintentionally produced pollutants should be performed before waste being co-processed in cement kilns. Polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) formation and emission from cement kilns co-processing sorted municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, and waste acid, however, have not previously been studied. Here, PCNs were analyzed in stack gas samples and solid samples from different stages of three cement production runs. PCN destruction efficiencies were higher when waste was co-processed (93.1% and 88.7% in two tests) than when waste was not co-processed (39.1%), so co-processing waste would not increase PCN outputs. The PCN concentrations were higher in particle samples from the C1 preheater and stages at back end of kiln than in particle samples from other stages, suggesting that cyclone preheater and back end of kiln should be focused for controlling PCN emissions. Besides that, based on the variation of PCN concentrations and corresponding operating conditions in different stages, the temperature, feeding materials, and chlorine content were suggested as the main factors influencing PCN formation. The PCN homologue and congener profiles suggested chlorination and dechlorination were the main PCN formation and decomposition pathways, and congeners CN-23, CN-46, and CN-59 appear to be appropriate indicators of PCNs emitted from coal-burning sources.

  13. Variations and factors that influence the formation of polychlorinated naphthalenes in cement kilns co-processing solid waste.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Zhan, Jiayu; Liu, Guorui; Zhao, Yuyang; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-09-01

    Pilot studies of unintentionally produced pollutants should be performed before waste being co-processed in cement kilns. Polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) formation and emission from cement kilns co-processing sorted municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, and waste acid, however, have not previously been studied. Here, PCNs were analyzed in stack gas samples and solid samples from different stages of three cement production runs. PCN destruction efficiencies were higher when waste was co-processed (93.1% and 88.7% in two tests) than when waste was not co-processed (39.1%), so co-processing waste would not increase PCN outputs. The PCN concentrations were higher in particle samples from the C1 preheater and stages at back end of kiln than in particle samples from other stages, suggesting that cyclone preheater and back end of kiln should be focused for controlling PCN emissions. Besides that, based on the variation of PCN concentrations and corresponding operating conditions in different stages, the temperature, feeding materials, and chlorine content were suggested as the main factors influencing PCN formation. The PCN homologue and congener profiles suggested chlorination and dechlorination were the main PCN formation and decomposition pathways, and congeners CN-23, CN-46, and CN-59 appear to be appropriate indicators of PCNs emitted from coal-burning sources. PMID:27187059

  14. Mesophilic co-digestion of dairy manure and lipid rich solid slaughterhouse wastes: process efficiency, limitations and floating granules formation.

    PubMed

    Pitk, Peep; Palatsi, Jordi; Kaparaju, Prasad; Fernández, Belén; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-08-01

    Lipid and protein rich solid slaughterhouse wastes are attractive co-substrates to increase volumetric biogas production in co-digestion with dairy manure. Addition of decanter sludge (DS), containing 42.2% of lipids and 35.8% of proteins (total solids basis), up to 5% of feed mixture resulted in a stable process without any indication of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) or free ammonia (NH3) inhibition and in 3.5-fold increase of volumetric biogas production. Contrary, only lipids addition as technical fat (TF) at over 2% of feed mixture resulted in formation of floating granules (FG) and process efficiency decrease. Formed FG had low biodegradability and its organic part was composed of lipids and calcium salts of LCFAs. Anaerobic digestion process intentionally directed to FG formation, could be a viable option for mitigation and control of lipids overload and derived LCFA inhibition. PMID:24907576

  15. The impacts of ozonation on oil sands process-affected water biodegradability and biofilm formation characteristics in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geelsu; Dong, Tao; Islam, Md Sahinoor; Sheng, Zhiya; Pérez-Estrada, Leónidas A; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2013-02-01

    To examine the effects of the ozonation process (as an oxidation treatment for water and wastewater treatment applications) on microbial biofilm formation and biodegradability of organic compounds present in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), biofilm reactors were operated continuously for 6weeks. Two types of biofilm substrate materials: polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC), and two types of OSPW-fresh and ozonated OSPWs-were tested. Endogenous microorganisms, in OSPW, quickly formed biofilms in the reactors. Without ozonation, the bioreactor (using endogenous microorganisms) removed 13.8% of the total acid-extractable organics (TAO) and 18.5% of the parent naphthenic acids (NAs) from fresh OSPW. The combined ozonation and biodegradation process removed 87.2% of the OSPW TAO and over 99% of the OSPW parent NAs. Further UPLC/HRMS analysis showed that NA biodegradability decreased as the NA cyclization number increased. Microbial biofilm formation was found to depend on the biofilm substrate type.

  16. Background Information: Deciphering Gamma Ray Burst Physics With Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    nearly the speed of light. Optical studies of a December 1997 burst (GRB 971214) indicated a distance for it of nearly 12 billion light-years. With distances known, astronomers could calculate the amount of energy released during the explosion. The answers were astounding. GRB 970508, in a mere 15 seconds, released nearly ten times more energy than our Sun will release in its entire, 10-billion-year lifetime. GRB 971214, for one or two seconds, outshone the entire rest of the universe. These energies ruled out many of the numerous theories for the origin of Gamma Ray Bursts that had arisen over the previous three decades. Many answers about the origins of Gamma Ray Bursts and the physics of the fireballs will come from radio telescopes. The VLA, with its combination of sensitivity and resolving power, "has a unique role to play in deciphering GRB fireball physics," said Dale Frail of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. First, radio astronomers can see the GRB fireball far longer than it is visible at other wavelengths. A Gamma Ray Burst is visible in the gamma rays for typically seconds or minutes, in X-rays for days, and in visible light for weeks, based on the past year's experience. "With radio telescopes, we can see the fireballs for months, gaining new information every day," said Greg Taylor, also of NRAO in Socorro. "Also, at other wavelengths, they see the emission only as it is rapidly getting weaker. At radio wavelengths, we can study the emission as it rises in strength, peaks, then slowly decays." In addition, radio observations can measure the size of the fireball. "Only radio telescopes can measure the size, and we can do it in three different ways," Frail said. These techniques involve studying the scintillation, or "twinkling" of the radio emission; absorption characteristics of the emission; and, for bright, energetic afterglows, direct measurements of sizes can be made through the great resolving power of continent-wide radio

  17. Deciphering the Origin of Plume-Textured Geodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlick, George Donald; Jones, Francis Tucker

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an interpretation of the inward and outward growth and formation of plume textured geodes available from southern Brazil. Field occurrence, morphology of vesicles, growth history, closure of the agate shell, microscopic features, coherent reflection of light from convoluted surfaces, and accessory minerals of the inner cavity are…

  18. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Degradation Using UV-Persulfate Process: Modeling of the Degradation and Chlorate Formation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yajie; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Yalei; Peng, Yue; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua; Niu, Junfeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Crittenden, John C

    2016-01-19

    In this study, we investigated the destruction and by-product formation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) using ultraviolet light and persulfate (UV-PS). Additionally, we developed a first-principles kinetic model to simulate both PFOA destruction and by-product and chlorate (ClO3(-)) formation in ultrapure water (UW), surface water (SW), and wastewater (WW). PFOA degradation was significantly suppressed in the presence of chloride and carbonate species and did not occur until all the chloride was converted to ClO3(-) in UW and for low DOC concentrations in SW. The model was able to simulate the PS decay, pH changes, radical concentrations, and ClO3(-) formation for UW and SW. However, our model was unable to simulate PFOA degradation well in WW, possibly from PS activation by NOM, which in turn produced sulfate radicals. PMID:26686982

  19. Stories we teach by: intersections among faculty biography, student formation, and instructional processes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Becoming a professional who embodies certain dispositions is known as identity formation. Little research has explored what intentions educators hold for student identity formation or how such intentions influence their teaching. Nine faculty members (all female) in an occupation-centered curriculum were interviewed and observed over 8 weeks. Data were analyzed primarily through narrative writing and data matrixes. Ultimately, educators in this study taught who they were; each personified an implicit curriculum, which conveyed the kind of people students were to become and the ways of knowing they were to adopt through the culture, artifacts, rituals, and modes of communication within a program. In the formation of self-defining professionals who embody occupational therapy's ethos, equal attention is needed to the biographical experiences of faculty members, to thoughtful design of the implicit curriculum, and to the ways of knowing portrayed to students every day in the classroom.

  20. Contemporary Role of the Decipher® Test in Prostate Cancer Management: Current Practice and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dalela, Deepansh; Löppenberg, Björn; Sood, Akshay; Sammon, Jesse; Abdollah, Firas

    2016-01-01

    We performed a systematic literature search to identify original articles and editorials about the Decipher® Prostate Cancer Test (GenomeDx Biosciences, San Diego, CA) to provide an overview of the current literature and its present role in urologic clinical practice. The Decipher test, which uses the expression of 22 selected RNA markers (from a total of over 1.4 million), showed a very high discrimination in predicting clinical metastasis (0.75–0.83) and cancer-specific mortality (0.78) in external validation studies, outperforming all routinely available clinicopathologic characteristics. Further, the timing of postoperative radiotherapy (adjuvant vs salvage) may be guided based on Decipher scores. The Decipher test was also the only independent predictor of clinical metastasis in patients with biochemical recurrence after surgery. The Decipher Genomic Resource Information Database (GRID) is a novel research tool that captures 1.4 million marker expressions per patient and may facilitate precision-guided, individualized care to patients with prostate cancer. In this era of precision medicine, Decipher, along with the Decipher GRID platform, is a promising genomic tool that may aid in managing prostate cancer patients throughout the continuum of care and delivering appropriate treatment at an individualized level. PMID:27162506

  1. Molecular interactions, proton exchange, and photoinduced processes prompted by an inclusion process and a [2]pseudorotaxane formation.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Amal Kumar; Suresh, Moorthy; Kesharwani, Manoj K; Gangopadhyay, Monalisa; Agrawal, Manoj; Boricha, Vinod P; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Das, Amitava

    2013-09-20

    Appropriate design of the host and guest components allows formation of a novel [2]pseudorotaxane complex with an interrupted photoinduced electron transfer (PET)-coupled fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) response. This is the first example of an inclusion complex with NO6-based azacrown ether as the host unit (H). Different guest molecules (G1, G2, G3, and G4) with varying stopper size are used for the studies. Unlike G1, G2, and G3, G4 with a relatively bulkier stopper fails to form a [2]pseudorotaxane complex. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry measurements reveal a systematic increase in the association constant for H·G1, H·G2, and H·G3 with a change in the stopper size. Thermodynamic data suggest that the formation of H·G1/H·G2/H·G3 is exclusively driven by a large positive entropic gain (TΔS = 19.69/26.80/21.81 kJ·mol(-1)), while the enthalpy change is slightly negative for H·G1/H·G3 (-2.61/-1.97 kJ·mol(-1)) and slightly positive for H·G2 (ΔH = 5.98 kJ·mol(-1)). For these three inclusion complexes, an interrupted PET-coupled FRET response is observed with varying efficiency, which is attributed to the subtle differences in acidity of the NH2(+) unit of the guest molecules and thus the proton exchange ability between the host and respective guest. This is substantiated by the results of the computational studies. PMID:23952368

  2. Formation of cataclasites in shallow-subsurface settings - meteoric diagenetic processes control fault rock formation at seismogenic faults in the Abruzzi Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, Hugo; Pomella, Hannah; Sanders, Diethard

    2014-05-01

    To understand the interaction of surface and tectonic processes during the formation of fault rocks, we studied two faults located in the Abruzzi Appenines NE of L'Aquila, that have been active in historical time. The south-dipping Assergi fault is at least 17 km long, with an offset of 2.5 km in its central part. Over most of its extent, the fault is evident by a scarp. Present day morphology is related to selective erosion, as the fault scarp is covered in some areas by lithified talus deposits. The talus is, however, in many places involved in the faulting. The Campo Imperatore fault is about 30 km long, with an offset of 2 km. The fault is located a few km north of the Assergi fault and has approximately the same orientation. It seems to be complimentary to the Assergi fault: where the offset across the Assergi fault diminishes, throw of the Campo Imperatore fault increases. The fault scarp of the Campo Imperatore fault is partly covered by active alluvial fans, but older lithified fans are offset by related antithetic faults. Both faults have several meters of fault rocks; The fault rocks of the Campo Imperatore fault are kakirites. Cataclasites of the Assergi fault vary in thickness between 15 and 3 meters, which is related to the presence of Riedel shears that offset the boundary between the host rock and the fault rock. Within the cataclasites diffuse Riedel planes crosscut the fault rocks and offset diffuse or sharp planes parallel to the main fault that can be closely spaced. Diffuse zones parallel to the main fault show karstic vugs produced by meteoric dissolution. The vugs may be lined or filled by calcite cement, and/or with internal sediments (e. g., lime mud, vadose silt, dissolution clasts of cataclasite). Meteoric dissolution guided by the main faults also resulted in large karstic pores filled with collapse breccias and flowstones; clasts of flowstones and flowstone-cemented breccias, in turn, locally became reworked into cataclasites. Presence

  3. Degradation of carbamazepine by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process and formation of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Xia, Ying; Li, Ting; Yao, Tian; Shi, Zhou; Zhu, Shumin; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals in water are commonly found and are not efficiently removed by current treatment processes. Degradation of antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process was systematically investigated in this study. The results showed that the UV/chlorine process was more effective at degrading CBZ than either UV or chlorination alone. The CBZ degradation followed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, and the degradation rate constants (kobs) were affected by the chlorine dose, solution pH, and natural organic matter concentration to different degrees. Degradation of CBZ greatly increased with increasing chlorine dose and decreasing solution pH during the UV/chlorine process. Additionally, the presence of natural organic matter in the solution inhibited the degradation of CBZ. UV photolysis, chlorination, and reactive species (hydroxyl radical •OH and chlorine atoms •Cl) were identified as responsible for CBZ degradation in the UV/chlorine process. Finally, a degradation pathway for CBZ in the UV/chlorine process was proposed and the formation potentials of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-products were evaluated. Enhanced formation of trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetonitrile, and trichloronitromethane precursors should be considered when applying UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to drinking water. PMID:27164884

  4. Investigation on the asymmetry of thermal condition and grain defect formation in the customary directional solidification process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, D.; Wu, Q.; Hollad, S.; Bührig-Polaczek, A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the non-uniformity of the thermal condition and the corresponding grain defect formation in the customary Bridgman process were investigated. The casting clusters in radial alignment were directionally solidified in a Bridgman furnace. It was found that in the casting cluster, the shadow side facing the central rod was ineffectively heated in the hot zone and ineffectively cooled in the cooling zone during withdrawal, compared with the heater side facing the furnace heater. The metallographic examination of the simplified turbine blades exhibited that the platforms on the shadow side are very prone to stray grain formation, while the heater side reveals a markedly lower tendency for that. The asymmetric thermal condition causes the asymmetrical formation of these grain defects. This non-uniformity of the thermal condition should be minimized as far as possible, in order to effectively optimize the quality of the SC superalloy components.

  5. Multi-format all-optical processing based on a large-scale, hybridly integrated photonic circuit.

    PubMed

    Bougioukos, M; Kouloumentas, Ch; Spyropoulou, M; Giannoulis, G; Kalavrouziotis, D; Maziotis, A; Bakopoulos, P; Harmon, R; Rogers, D; Harrison, J; Poustie, A; Maxwell, G; Avramopoulos, H

    2011-06-01

    We investigate through numerical studies and experiments the performance of a large scale, silica-on-silicon photonic integrated circuit for multi-format regeneration and wavelength-conversion. The circuit encompasses a monolithically integrated array of four SOAs inside two parallel Mach-Zehnder structures, four delay interferometers and a large number of silica waveguides and couplers. Exploiting phase-incoherent techniques, the circuit is capable of processing OOK signals at variable bit rates, DPSK signals at 22 or 44 Gb/s and DQPSK signals at 44 Gbaud. Simulation studies reveal the wavelength-conversion potential of the circuit with enhanced regenerative capabilities for OOK and DPSK modulation formats and acceptable quality degradation for DQPSK format. Regeneration of 22 Gb/s OOK signals with amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise and DPSK data signals degraded with amplitude, phase and ASE noise is experimentally validated demonstrating a power penalty improvement up to 1.5 dB.

  6. Investigation on the effect of zeolite precursor on the formation process of MCM-41 containing zeolite Y building units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Xiong, Guang; Liu, Liping; Wang, Longlong

    2013-04-01

    The formation process of MCM-41 containing zeolite Y building units has been investigated by UV Raman spectroscopy, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption and electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). It is found that the precursor containing zeolite Y secondary building units promotes the formation of a metastable mesopore structure just after mixing the zeolite precursors with CTAB. In contrast, the low-polymerized aluminosilicates and well-crystallized zeolite crystals cannot be assembled with CTAB at this stage. The result supports that the zeolite secondary building units should promote to the formation of the mesopore wall. This has been ascribed to its high anionic charge density as well as the appropriate multidentate coordination. Lowering down the pH value to 9.3 facilitates the further polymerization of the aluminosilicate species to build up a stable mesoporous phase.

  7. A one-step process for oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsion formation using a single surfactant.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Mamata; Rousseau, Dérick

    2012-11-15

    A one-step double emulsification protocol using one surfactant was developed for oil-in-water-in-oil (O(1)/W/O(2)) double emulsions. Two n-alkane oils and three different surfactants were studied, with focus placed on a formulation containing mineral oil, glycerol monoleate (GMO) and deionized water. Phenomenologically, double emulsion formation and stability originate from the combined actions of phase inversion and interfacial charging of the oil/water interface during high shear homogenization. Based on the extent of double emulsion formation and stability, a critical emulsification zone dependent on the weight ratios of GMO to water was identified. Within this critical zone, enhanced O(1)/W/O(2) emulsion formation occurred at higher pH and lower salt concentrations, demonstrating the key role of interfacial charging on double emulsification. Overall, this novel approach provides a novel platform for the development of double emulsions with simple compositions and processing requirements.

  8. The Process of Pedagogical Culture Formation in the Future Social Worker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minzhanov, Nurlan A.; Ertysbaeva, Gaukhar N.

    2016-01-01

    The paper is aimed at studying the features of pedagogical culture formation in future social workers and developing methods to improve the professional and pedagogical preparation quality of students in the "Social work" specialty. In the study, a survey of students in the "Social work" specialty (n = 400), and a standardized…

  9. Synthesis of metal nanoparticles inside living human cells based on the intracellular formation process.

    PubMed

    El-Said, Waleed A; Cho, Hyeon-Yeol; Yea, Cheol-Heon; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2014-02-12

    Intracellular and extracellular formation of Au and Ag NPs with different sizes and shapes using human cells has been developed as green method, which does not require the use of any reducing agents. Also, the cell lysis is used for production of different metal NPs. Our results demonstrate that treatment of human cells with various metal ions cause cell fixation.

  10. Social Processes of Health and Physical Education Teachers' Identity Formation: Reproducing and Changing Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirna, K.; Tinning, R.; Rossi, T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines Initial Teacher Education students' experiences of participation in health and physical education (HPE) subject department offices and the impact on their understandings and identity formation. Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, field, and practice along with Wenger's communities of practice form the theoretical frame used…

  11. Isotope-labeling studies on the formation pathway of acrolein during heat processing of oils.

    PubMed

    Ewert, Alice; Granvogl, Michael; Schieberle, Peter

    2014-08-20

    Acrolein (2-propenal) is classified as a foodborne toxicant and was shown to be present in significant amounts in heated edible oils. Up to now, its formation was mainly suggested to be from the glycerol part of triacylglycerides, although a clear influence of the unsaturation of the fatty acid moiety was also obvious in previous studies. To unequivocally clarify the role of the glycerol and the fatty acid parts in acrolein formation, two series of labeled triacylglycerides were synthesized: [(13)C(3)]-triacylglycerides of stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acid and [(13)C(54)]-triacylglycerides with labeled stearic, oleic, and linoleic acid, but with unlabeled glycerol. Heating of each of the seven intermediates singly in silicon oil and measurement of the formed amounts of labeled and unlabeled acrolein clearly proved the fatty acid backbone as the key precursor structure. Enzymatically synthesized pure linoleic acid and linolenic acid hydroperoxides were shown to be the key intermediates in acrolein formation, thus allowing the discussion of a radical-induced reaction pathway leading to the formation of the aldehyde. Surprisingly, although several oils contained high amounts of acrolein after heating, deep-fried foods themselves, such as donuts or French fries, were low in the aldehyde.

  12. What probability distribution functions tell us about the processes of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Ossenkopf, V.; Klessen, R. S.; Csengeri, T.; Girichidis, P.; Federrath, C.; Tremblin, P.; Bontemps, S.; Peretto, N.; Simon, R.

    2016-05-01

    Probability distribution functions of column density (N-PDFs) are used to evaluate the relative importance of gravity, turbulence, magnetic fields, geometry, and radiative feedback governing the cloud's density structure and star-formation activity. These proce- sses influence the N-PDF and thus determine their shape, ranging from a purely lognormal distribution to one with power-law tail(s).

  13. Research of physical-chemical processes in optically transparent materials during coloring points formation by volumetric-graphical laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidov, Nicolay N.; Sushkova, L. T.; Rufitskii, M. V.; Kudaev, Serge V.; Galkin, Arkadii F.; Orlov, Vitalii N.; Prokoshev, Valerii G.

    1996-03-01

    A distinctive feature of glass is a wide range of correlation between internal absorption and admittance of electro-magnetic streams in a wide wavelength scope starting from gamma rays and up to infrared radiation. This factor provides an opportunity for search of new realizations of processes for machining, control and exploitation of glassware for home appliances, radioelectronics and illumination.

  14. Contribution of Neutron Star Mergers to the r-Process Chemical Evolution in the Hierarchical Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2016-10-01

    The main astronomical source of r-process elements has not yet been identified. One plausible site is neutron star mergers (NSMs), but from the perspective of the Galactic chemical evolution, it has been pointed out that NSMs cannot reproduce the observed r-process abundance distribution of metal-poor stars at [{Fe}/{{H}}]\\lt -3. Recently, Tsujimoto & Shigeyama pointed out that NSM ejecta can spread into a much larger volume than ejecta from a supernova. We re-examine the enrichment of r-process elements by NSMs considering this difference in propagation using the chemical evolution model under the hierarchical galaxy formation. The observed r-process enhanced stars around [{Fe}/{{H}}]∼ -3 are reproduced if the star formation efficiency is lower for low-mass galaxies under a realistic delay-time distribution for NSMs. We show that a significant fraction of NSM ejecta escape from its host proto-galaxy to pollute intergalactic matter and other proto-galaxies. The propagation of r-process elements over proto-galaxies changes the abundance distribution at [{Fe}/{{H}}]\\lt -3 and obtains distribution compatible with observations of the Milky Way halo stars. In particular, the pre-enrichment of intergalactic medium explains the observed scarcity of extremely metal-poor stars without Ba and abundance distribution of r-process elements at [{Fe}/{{H}}]≲ -3.5.

  15. Investigating the Relative Contributions of Secondary Ice Formation Processes to Ice Crystal Number Concentrations Within Mixed-Phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, S.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of the in-cloud ice nuclei concentration can be three or four orders of magnitude less than those of the in-cloud ice crystal number concentration. Different secondary formation processes, active after initial ice nucleation, have been proposed to explain this discrepancy, but their relative importance, and even the exact physics of each mechanism, are still unclear. We construct a simple bin microphysics model (2IM) including depositional growth, the Hallett-Mossop process, ice-ice collisions, and ice-ice aggregation, with temperature- and supersaturation-dependent efficiencies for each process. 2IM extends the time-lag collision model of Yano and Phillips to additional bins and incorporates the aspect ratio evolution of Jensen and Harrington. Model output and measured ice crystal size distributions are compared to answer three questions: (1) how important is ice-ice aggregation relative to ice-ice collision around -15°C, where the Hallett-Mossop process is no longer active; (2) what process efficiencies lead to the best reproduction of observed ice crystal size distributions; and (3) does ice crystal aspect ratio affect the dominant secondary formation process. The resulting parameterization is intended for eventual use in larger-scale mixed-phase cloud schemes.

  16. Effect of Variation in Process Parameters on the Formation of Freckle in INCONEL 718 by Vacuum Arc Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianhui; Ward, R. Mark; Jacobs, Mike H.; Barratt, Mark D.

    2008-12-01

    In order to study the effect of variation in process parameters on the final ingot of INCONEL 718 during vacuum arc remelting, a 508-mm-diameter vacuum arc remelting (VAR) ingot of INCONEL 718 was produced under conditions of variation in electrode diameter and arc gap. It was sectioned and analyzed in the as-cast state. Freckle was found in the midradius and center regions when the electrode diameter and arc gap changed. The experimental results were discussed in relation to composition, current distribution, and fluid flow. Freckle formation was found to be associated with large changes in melting conditions probably resulting in significant perturbation of the fluid flow in the melt pool and mushy zone. Instability in the solidification process may contribute to the initiation and formation of freckle defects in INCONEL 718 ingot.

  17. Statistical synthesis of radiometric imaging formation in scanning radiometers with signal weight processing by Kravchenko windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosyuk, V. K.; Kravchenko, V. F.; Pavlikov, V. V.; Pustovoit, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    Statistical optimization of the radiometric images (RMIs) algorithms formation in scanning radiometers with weight correction of the antenna amplitude-phase distribution and synchronous sliding strobing of the received noise-like signal by a function describing the antenna pattern corrected by temporal Kravchenko windows is performed for the first time. The ambiguity function (AF) of the scanning radiometer, which determines the RMI quality, is found. It is established that the AF shape substantially depends on the amplitude field distribution (AFD) in the antenna. It is shown that the use of the AFD in the antenna in the form of weight functions (classic and Kravchenko) makes it possible to correct the AF shape and to increase the RMI quality. A simulation of the RMI formation algorithm is performed. It follows from the analysis of simulation data that the use of the weight Kravchenko functions provides higher accuracy of the RMI restoration compared with classic weight functions.

  18. Using Structured e-Forum to Support the Legislation Formation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xenakis, Alexandros; Loukis, Euripides

    Many public policy problems are 'wicked', being characterised by high complexity, many heterogeneous views and conflicts among various stakeholders, and also lack of mathematically 'optimal' solutions and predefined algorithms for calculating them. The best approach for addressing such problems is through consultation and argumentation among stakeholders. The e-participation research has investigated and suggested several ICT tools for this purpose, such as e-forum, e-petition and e-community tools. This paper investigates the use of an advanced ICT tool, the structured e-forum, for addressing such wicked problems associated with the legislation formation. For this purpose we designed, implemented and evaluated two pilot e-consultations on legislation under formation in the Parliaments of Austria and Greece using a structured e-forum tool based on the Issue Based Information Systems (IBIS) framework. The conclusions drawn reveal the advantages offered by the structured e-forum, but also its difficulties as well.

  19. Mechanism of formation of magnetite from ferrous hydroxide in aqueous corrosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olowe, A. A.; Rezel, D.; Génin, J. M. R.

    1989-03-01

    The stoichiometric conditions for the formation of ferrous hydroxide Fe(OH)2, by mixing Fe2+ ions with caustic soda NaOH, leads by oxidation to magnetite, irrelevant of the foreign anions, e.g. Cl- or SO4 2-, as demonstrated from Mössbauer spectroscopy. The electrochemical potential Eh and pH value of the initial conditions correspond to the drastic change from basic to acidic medium, observed when varying the initial Fe2+/OH- ratio. Mössbauer analysis of the end products of oxidation at various temperatures shows that magnetite is only obtained at stoichiometry at very low temperature, but extends off stoichiometry at higher temperatures. The mechanism of formation of magnetite through an intermediate compound is discussed.

  20. Silicide formation process of Er films with Ta and TaN capping layers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Juyun; Choi, Seongheum; Kim, Jungwoo; Na, Sekwon; Lee, Hoo-Jeong; Lee, Seok-Hee; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2013-12-11

    The phase development and defect formation during the silicidation reaction of sputter-deposited Er films on Si with ∼20-nm-thick Ta and TaN capping layers were examined. TaN capping effectively prevented the oxygen incorporation from the annealing atmosphere, which resulted in complete conversion to the ErSi2-x phase. However, significant oxygen penetration through the Ta capping layer inhibited the ErSi2-x formation, and incurred the growth of several Er-Si-O phases, even consuming the ErSi2-x layer formed earlier. Both samples produced a number of small recessed defects at an early silicidation stage. However, large rectangular or square-shaped surface defects, which were either pitlike or pyramidal depending on the capping layer identity, were developed as the annealing temperature increased. The origin of different defect generation mechanisms was suggested based on the capping layer-dependent silicidation kinetics.

  1. Skin formation and bubble growth during drying process of polymer solution.

    PubMed

    Arai, S; Doi, M

    2012-07-01

    When a polymer solution with volatile solvent is dried, skins are often formed at the surface of the solution. It has been observed that after the skin is formed, bubbles often appear in the solution. We conducted experiments to clarify the relation between the skin formation and the bubble formation. We measured the time dependence of the thickness of the skin layer, the size of the bubbles, and the pressure in the solution. From our experiments, we concluded that i) the gas in the bubble is a mixture of solvent vapor and air dissolved in the solution, ii) the bubble nucleation is assisted by the pressure decrease in the solution covered by the skin layer, and iii) the growth of the bubbles is diffusion limited, mainly limited by the diffusion of air molecules dissolved in the solution.

  2. Subnanosecond processes in the stage of breakdown formation in gas at a high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Bykov, N. M.; Ivanov, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the prebreakdown stage of a discharge in nitrogen at pressures of a few tens of atmospheres, gap voltages higher than 140 kV, and a voltage rise time of about 1 ns. Breakdown occurs at the front of the voltage pulse; i.e., the time of breakdown formation is shorter than the front duration. It is shown that, in gaps with a nonuniform electric field, the breakdown formation time is mainly determined by the time of avalanche development to the critical number of charge carriers. The subsequent stages of breakdown (the development of the ionization wave and the buildup of the conductivity in the weakly conducting channel bridging the gap) turn out to be shorter than this time or comparable to it.

  3. Influence of interface on the formation process of polymer coatings on metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, O. G.; Maksimov, A. V.; Moiseeva, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is in development of the model that allows to investigate the conformations of macromolecules near the interface “dielectric-metal” depending on the conditions of formation of the polymer coating. In the modified model of “sticky tape”, one part of macromolecule is anchored to the metal surface while the other can be elongated due to effective mean (molecular) field of dipolar type formed by free ends of other chains. The dynamic Monte-Carlo method for Langmuir’s model is used for calculation of adhesion force taking into account the interaction energy of monomers with the metal surface. It is shown that conformation of polymer chain is defined by temperature conditions of its formation. The obtained results are confirmed by the data of production tests on polymer coatings in JSC “Severstal”.

  4. Pastoral formation process for seminarians a new model for developing psychologically healthy pastors.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Barbara E; Myers, Katherine Mills; Jordan, Merle R; Jelinek, Bonnie Scott; Plumley, Ann

    2009-01-01

    The Pastoral Formation Program is based on systems theory. It examines the connections between family of origin history and a healthy career in ministry. Through exploration of a seminarian's spiritual, emotional, and psychological health, participants gain insight into personal family history and how it can lead to repetition. Program goals are to develop clergy with a clear understanding of their history, its impact on their professional life, and skills that will help them in ministry.

  5. Narrow-band radiation wavelength measurement by processing digital photographs in RAW format

    SciTech Connect

    Kraiskii, A V; Mironova, T V; Sultanov, T T

    2012-12-31

    The technique of measuring the mean wavelength of narrow-band radiation in the 455 - 625-nm range using the image of the emitting surface is presented. The data from the camera array unprocessed by the built-in processor (RAW format) are used. The method is applied for determining the parameters of response of holographic sensors. Depending on the wavelength and brightness of the image fragment, the mean square deviation of the wavelength amounts to 0.3 - 3 nm. (experimental techniques)

  6. Investigation of HNCO isomer formation in ice mantles by UV and thermal processing: An experimental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Giuliano, B. M.; Caro, G. M. Muñoz; Cernicharo, J.; Marcelino, N.

    2014-06-10

    Current gas-phase models do not account for the abundances of HNCO isomers detected in various environments, suggesting their formation in icy grain mantles. We attempted to study a formation channel of HNCO and its possible isomers by vacuum-UV photoprocessing of interstellar ice analogs containing H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO, HCN, CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} followed by warm-up under astrophysically relevant conditions. Only the H{sub 2}O:NH{sub 3}:CO and H{sub 2}O:HCN ice mixtures led to the production of HNCO species. The possible isomerization of HNCO to its higher energy tautomers following irradiation or due to ice warm-up has been scrutinized. The photochemistry and thermal chemistry of H{sub 2}O:NH{sub 3}:CO and H{sub 2}O:HCN ices were simulated using the Interstellar Astrochemistry Chamber, a state-of-the-art ultra-high-vacuum setup. The ice was monitored in situ by Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy in transmittance. A quadrupole mass spectrometer detected the desorption of the molecules in the gas phase. UV photoprocessing of H{sub 2}O:NH{sub 3}:CO and H{sub 2}O:HCN ices lead to the formation of OCN{sup –} as a main product in the solid state and a minor amount of HNCO. The second isomer HOCN has been tentatively identified. Despite its low efficiency, the formation of HNCO and the HOCN isomers by UV photoprocessing of realistic simulated ice mantles might explain the observed abundances of these species in photodissociation regions, hot cores, and dark clouds.

  7. Numerical modelling of the formation process of planets from protoplanetary cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, N. N.; Eneyev, T. M.

    1979-01-01

    Evolution of the plane protoplanetary cloud, consisting of a great number of gravitationally interacting and uniting under collision bodies (protoplanets) moving in the central field of a large mass (the Sun or a planet), is considered. It is shown that in the course of protoplanetary cloud evolution the ring zones of matter expansion and compression occur with the subsequent development leading to formation of planets, rotating about their axes mainly directly. The principal numerical results were obtained through digital simulation of planetary accumulation.

  8. Investigation of HNCO Isomer Formation in Ice Mantles by UV and Thermal Processing: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Giuliano, B. M.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Cernicharo, J.; Marcelino, N.

    2014-06-01

    Current gas-phase models do not account for the abundances of HNCO isomers detected in various environments, suggesting their formation in icy grain mantles. We attempted to study a formation channel of HNCO and its possible isomers by vacuum-UV photoprocessing of interstellar ice analogs containing H2O, NH3, CO, HCN, CH3OH, CH4, and N2 followed by warm-up under astrophysically relevant conditions. Only the H2O:NH3:CO and H2O:HCN ice mixtures led to the production of HNCO species. The possible isomerization of HNCO to its higher energy tautomers following irradiation or due to ice warm-up has been scrutinized. The photochemistry and thermal chemistry of H2O:NH3:CO and H2O:HCN ices were simulated using the Interstellar Astrochemistry Chamber, a state-of-the-art ultra-high-vacuum setup. The ice was monitored in situ by Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy in transmittance. A quadrupole mass spectrometer detected the desorption of the molecules in the gas phase. UV photoprocessing of H2O:NH3:CO and H2O:HCN ices lead to the formation of OCN- as a main product in the solid state and a minor amount of HNCO. The second isomer HOCN has been tentatively identified. Despite its low efficiency, the formation of HNCO and the HOCN isomers by UV photoprocessing of realistic simulated ice mantles might explain the observed abundances of these species in photodissociation regions, hot cores, and dark clouds.

  9. An investigation of voids formation mechanisms and their effects on freeze and thaw processes of lithium and lithium fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Yang, Jae-Young

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms of void formation during the cooldown and freezing of lithium coolant within the primary loop of SP-100 type systems are investigated. These mechanisms are: (1) homogeneous nucleation; (2) heterogeneous nucleation; (3) normal segregation of helium gas dissolved in liquid lithium; and (4) shrinkage of lithium during freezing. To evaluate the void formation potential due to segregation, a numerical scheme that couples the freezing and mass diffusion processes in both the solid and liquid regions is developed. The results indicated that the formation of He bubbles is unlikely by either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation during the cooldown process. However, homogeneous nucleation of He bubbles following the segregation of dissolved He in liquid lithium ahead of the solid-liquid interface is likely to occur. Results also show that total volume of He void is insignificant when compared to that of shrinkage voids. In viewing this, the subsequent research focuses on the effects of shrinkage void forming during freezing of lithium on subsequent thaw processes are investigated using a numerical scheme that is based on a single (solid/liquid) cell approach. The cases of lithium-fluoride are also investigated to show the effect of larger volume shrinkage upon freezing on the freeze and thaw processes. Results show that a void forming at the wall appreciably reduces the solid-liquid interface velocity, during both freeze and thaw, and causes a substantial rise in the wall temperature during thaw. However, in the case of Li, the maximum wall temperature was much lower than the melting temperature of PWC-11, which is used as the structure material in the SP-100 system. Hence, it is included that a formation of hot spots is unlikely during the startup or restart of the SP-100 system.

  10. Radical-assisted melanoidin formation during thermal processing of foods as well as under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, T; Bors, W; Stettmaier, K

    1999-02-01

    Color-generating reactions of protein-bound lysine with carbohydrates were studied under thermal as well as under physiological conditions to gain insights into the role of protein/carbohydrate reactions in the formation of food melanoidins as well as nonenzymatic browning products in vivo. EPR spectroscopy of orange-brown melanoidins, which were isolated from heated aqueous solutions of bovine serum albumin and glycolaldehyde, revealed the protein-bound 1,4-bis(5-amino-5-carboxy-1-pentyl)pyrazinium radical cation (CROSSPY) as a previously unknown type of cross-linking amino acid leading to protein dimerization. To verify their formation in foods, wheat bread crust and roasted cocoa as well as coffee beans, showing elevated nonenzymatic browning, were investigated by EPR spectroscopy. An intense radical was detected, which, by comparison with the radical formed upon reaction bovine serum albumin with glycolaldehyde, was identified as the protein-bound CROSSPY. The radical-assisted protein oligomerization as well as the browning of bovine serum albumin in the presence of glycolaldehyde occurred also rapidly under physiological conditions, thereby suggesting CROSSPY formation to be probably involved also in nonenzymatic glycation reactions in vivo.

  11. Antioxidant Compounds in Traditional Indian Pickles May Prevent the Process-Induced Formation of Benzene.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Mahesh M; Adiani, Vanshika; Variyar, Prasad; Sharma, Arun; Singhal, Rekha S

    2016-01-01

    Pickles in the Indian market contain ascorbic acid from the raw material used and benzoate as an added preservative that are involved in the formation of benzene in soft drinks. In this work, 24 market pickle samples were surveyed for benzene content, as well as its precursors and other constituents that influence its formation. The analysis showed that pickle samples were high in acid content (low pH) and showed significant amount of ascorbic acid, minerals (Cu and Fe), and benzoic acid present in them. Also, most samples exhibited high antioxidant activity that might be attributed to the ingredients used, such as fruits and spices. The solid-phase microextraction headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed in-house for benzene analysis. Eleven of 24 samples had benzene, with the highest concentration of 4.36 ± 0.82 μg of benzene per kg of pickle for a lime pickle that was also reported to have highest benzoic acid and considerably less hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) scavenging activity. However, benzene levels for all 11 samples were considerably below the World Health Organization regulatory limit of 10 μg/kg for benzene in mineral water. Studies on model systems revealed that the high antioxidant activity of Indian pickles may have had a strong inhibitory effect on benzene formation.

  12. Antioxidant Compounds in Traditional Indian Pickles May Prevent the Process-Induced Formation of Benzene.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Mahesh M; Adiani, Vanshika; Variyar, Prasad; Sharma, Arun; Singhal, Rekha S

    2016-01-01

    Pickles in the Indian market contain ascorbic acid from the raw material used and benzoate as an added preservative that are involved in the formation of benzene in soft drinks. In this work, 24 market pickle samples were surveyed for benzene content, as well as its precursors and other constituents that influence its formation. The analysis showed that pickle samples were high in acid content (low pH) and showed significant amount of ascorbic acid, minerals (Cu and Fe), and benzoic acid present in them. Also, most samples exhibited high antioxidant activity that might be attributed to the ingredients used, such as fruits and spices. The solid-phase microextraction headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed in-house for benzene analysis. Eleven of 24 samples had benzene, with the highest concentration of 4.36 ± 0.82 μg of benzene per kg of pickle for a lime pickle that was also reported to have highest benzoic acid and considerably less hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) scavenging activity. However, benzene levels for all 11 samples were considerably below the World Health Organization regulatory limit of 10 μg/kg for benzene in mineral water. Studies on model systems revealed that the high antioxidant activity of Indian pickles may have had a strong inhibitory effect on benzene formation. PMID:26735038

  13. Genes involved in Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation at a simulated food processing plant temperature of 15 °C.

    PubMed

    Piercey, Marta J; Hingston, Patricia A; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2016-04-16

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic foodborne bacterium whose persistence in food processing environments is in part attributed to its biofilm formation. Most biofilm studies have been carried out at 30-37 °C rather than at temperatures found in the food processing plants (i.e., 10-20 °C). The objective of the present study was to mine for novel genes that contribute to L. monocytogenes biofilm formation at 15 °C using the random insertional mutagenesis approach. A library of 11,024 L. monocytogenes 568 (serotype 1/2a) Himar1 insertional mutants was created. Mutants with reduced or enhanced biofilm formation at 15 °C were detected in microtiter plate assays with crystal violet and safranin staining. Fourteen mutants expressed enhanced biofilm phenotypes, and harbored transposon insertions in genes encoding cell wall biosynthesis, motility, metabolism, stress response, and cell surface associated proteins. Deficient mutants (n=5) contained interruptions in genes related to peptidoglycan, teichoic acid, or lipoproteins. Enhanced mutants produced significantly (p<0.05) higher cell densities in biofilm formed on stainless steel (SS) coupons at 15 °C (48 h) than deficient mutants, which were also more sensitive to benzalkonium chloride. All biofilm deficient mutants and four enhanced mutants in the microtiter plate assay (flaA, cheR, lmo2563 and lmo2488) formed no biofilm in a peg lid assay (Calgary biofilm device) while insertions in lmo1224 and lmo0543 led to excess biofilm in all assays. Two enhanced biofilm formers were more resistant to enzymatic removal with DNase, proteinase K or pectinase than the parent strain. Scanning electron microscopy of individual biofilms made by five mutants and the parent on SS surfaces showed formation of heterogeneous biofilm with dense zones by immotile mutants, while deficient mutants exhibited sparse growth. In conclusion, interruptions of 9 genes not previously linked to biofilm formation in L. monocytogenes (lmo2572, lmo

  14. Genes involved in Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation at a simulated food processing plant temperature of 15 °C.

    PubMed

    Piercey, Marta J; Hingston, Patricia A; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2016-04-16

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic foodborne bacterium whose persistence in food processing environments is in part attributed to its biofilm formation. Most biofilm studies have been carried out at 30-37 °C rather than at temperatures found in the food processing plants (i.e., 10-20 °C). The objective of the present study was to mine for novel genes that contribute to L. monocytogenes biofilm formation at 15 °C using the random insertional mutagenesis approach. A library of 11,024 L. monocytogenes 568 (serotype 1/2a) Himar1 insertional mutants was created. Mutants with reduced or enhanced biofilm formation at 15 °C were detected in microtiter plate assays with crystal violet and safranin staining. Fourteen mutants expressed enhanced biofilm phenotypes, and harbored transposon insertions in genes encoding cell wall biosynthesis, motility, metabolism, stress response, and cell surface associated proteins. Deficient mutants (n=5) contained interruptions in genes related to peptidoglycan, teichoic acid, or lipoproteins. Enhanced mutants produced significantly (p<0.05) higher cell densities in biofilm formed on stainless steel (SS) coupons at 15 °C (48 h) than deficient mutants, which were also more sensitive to benzalkonium chloride. All biofilm deficient mutants and four enhanced mutants in the microtiter plate assay (flaA, cheR, lmo2563 and lmo2488) formed no biofilm in a peg lid assay (Calgary biofilm device) while insertions in lmo1224 and lmo0543 led to excess biofilm in all assays. Two enhanced biofilm formers were more resistant to enzymatic removal with DNase, proteinase K or pectinase than the parent strain. Scanning electron microscopy of individual biofilms made by five mutants and the parent on SS surfaces showed formation of heterogeneous biofilm with dense zones by immotile mutants, while deficient mutants exhibited sparse growth. In conclusion, interruptions of 9 genes not previously linked to biofilm formation in L. monocytogenes (lmo2572, lmo

  15. UV-based advanced oxidation processes for the treatment of odour compounds: efficiency and by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Zoschke, Kristin; Dietrich, Norman; Börnick, Hilmar; Worch, Eckhard

    2012-10-15

    The occurrence of the taste and odour compounds geosmin and 2-methyl isoborneol (2-MIB) affects the organoleptic quality of raw waters from drinking water reservoirs worldwide. UV-based oxidation processes for the removal of these substances are an alternative to adsorption and biological processes, since they additionally provide disinfection of the raw water. We could show that the concentration of geosmin and 2-MIB could be reduced by VUV irradiation and the combination of UV irradiation with ozone and hydrogen peroxide in pure water and water from a drinking water reservoir. The figure of merit EE/O is an appropriate tool to compare the AOPs and showed that VUV and UV/O(3) yielded the lowest treatment costs for the odour compounds in pure and raw water, respectively. Additionally, VUV irradiation with addition of ozone, generated by the VUV lamp, was evaluated. The generation of ozone and the irradiation were performed in a single reactor system using the same low-pressure mercury lamp, thereby reducing the energy consumption of the treatment process. The formation of the undesired by-products nitrite and bromate was investigated. The combination of VUV irradiation with ozone produced by a VUV lamp avoided the formation of relevant concentrations of the by-products. The internal generation of ozone is capable to produce ozone concentrations sufficient to reduce EE/O below 1 kWh m(-3) and without the risk of the formation of nitrite or bromate above the maximum contaminant level.

  16. Deciphering the glycosaminoglycan code with the help of microarrays.

    PubMed

    de Paz, Jose L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2008-07-01

    Carbohydrate microarrays have become a powerful tool to elucidate the biological role of complex sugars. Microarrays are particularly useful for the study of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a key class of carbohydrates. The high-throughput chip format enables rapid screening of large numbers of potential GAG sequences produced via a complex biosynthesis while consuming very little sample. Here, we briefly highlight the most recent advances involving GAG microarrays built with synthetic or naturally derived oligosaccharides. These chips are powerful tools for characterizing GAG-protein interactions and determining structure-activity relationships for specific sequences. Thereby, they contribute to decoding the information contained in specific GAG sequences. PMID:18563243

  17. Deciphering the glycosaminoglycan code with the help of microarrays.

    PubMed

    de Paz, Jose L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2008-07-01

    Carbohydrate microarrays have become a powerful tool to elucidate the biological role of complex sugars. Microarrays are particularly useful for the study of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a key class of carbohydrates. The high-throughput chip format enables rapid screening of large numbers of potential GAG sequences produced via a complex biosynthesis while consuming very little sample. Here, we briefly highlight the most recent advances involving GAG microarrays built with synthetic or naturally derived oligosaccharides. These chips are powerful tools for characterizing GAG-protein interactions and determining structure-activity relationships for specific sequences. Thereby, they contribute to decoding the information contained in specific GAG sequences.

  18. Formation of a metastable ferromagnetic tau phase during containerless melt processing in Mn-Al-C alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. J.; Perepezko, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the production of a metastable ferromagnetic tau phase directly from the melt in Mn(0.55)Al(0.433)C(0.017), using a containerless processing method involving levitation melting followed by quenching. Using the results from differential thermal analysis measurements and an analysis of the phase equilibria, it was found that the minimum amount of undercooling level required for ferromagnetic metastable tau phase formation in this alloy was Delta T = 87 K. The attainment of this undercooling may be facilitated by the application of containerless melt processing.

  19. Influence of the turbulence on the processes formation and relaxation of periodical artificial irregularities in the lower ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terina, Galina

    2016-07-01

    The periodic artificial irregularities (PAI) are formed in the standing wave field of powerful radio emission. The study the scattering of probing radio pulses on PAI allowed to create a method diagnostics of the ionospheric plasma parameters - the resonance scattering method (RSM) of radio waves on the periodic artificial irregularities. The different mechanisms of PAI formation in D and E ranges of the lower ionosphere were investigated (G.I. Terina, J.Atm.Terr.Phys., 1996, 58, 645). However the height range 75-90 km where there is turbulent diffusion, remained unstudied. In present paper the study results the processes formation and relaxation of periodic artificial irregularities in this height range are considered. For the analysis the processes of the formation and the relaxation of PAI one can use quasi-hydrodynamic equation for the homogeneous isotropic ionospheric plasma. Under the small disturbances, quasi-neutral plasma and some assumptions can to obtain the differential equations for regular and fluctuation PAI parts, which take account: the ambipolar diffusion, the temperature dependence of the coefficient of electrons recombination, the temperature dependence of the coefficient of the electrons attachment to the neutral molecules and also the turbulent diffusion and caused by it small-scale irregularities of the electron density. The solutions of the inhomogeneous and homogeneous equations present the processes of the formation and relaxation of PAI accordingly. The numerical estimations of obtained solutions showed that the main reasons of PAI formation in considered range of heights are the small-scale irregularities of the electron concentration and the turbulence diffusion. The obtained results qualitatively agree with results of experimental investigations. The experiments were carried out at the heating facilities "Zimenki" and "Sura". The heater transmitter periodically was switched on for several seconds and off for the same duration. The

  20. The r-Process in Metal Poor Stars and Black Hole Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R N; Famiano, M A; Meyer, B S; Motizuki, Y; Kajino, T; Roederer, I U

    2011-11-30

    Nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei in metal-poor stars is generally ascribed to the r-process, as the abundance pattern in many such stars agrees with the inferred Solar r-process abundances. Nonetheless, a significant number of these stars do not share this r-process template. they suggest that many such stars have begun an r-process, but it was prevented from running to completion in more massive stars by collapse to black holes, creating a 'truncated r-process,' or 'tr-process'. The observed fraction of tr-process stars is found to be consistent with expectations from the initial mass function (IMF), and they suggest that an apparent sharp truncation observed at around mass 160 could result from a combination of collapses to black holes and the difficulty of observing the higher mass rare earths. They test the tr-process hypothesis with calculations that are terminated before all r-process trajectories have been ejected. These produce qualitative agreement with observation when both black hole collapse and observational realities are taken into account.

  1. Simulation of the Electric Signal During the Formation and Departure of Droplets in the Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharicha, A.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.; Karimi-Sibaki, E.

    2016-04-01

    In the ESR process, it is very difficult to make experimental observations of the phenomena occurring within the molten slag. At present, the state of the process is solely evaluated from the variation of the measured electric variables. The present paper proposes the use of 3D numerical model to explore the complex coupling existing between the electrodynamics and the phase distribution during the process. The droplet formation during melting of an electrode under the action of a strong DC current is simulated with a multiphase-magnetohydrodynamic approach. A volume-of-fluid approach is used for the interface tracking, and the potential formulation is used to determine the electric and magnetic fields. The Lorentz force and the Joule heating are recalculated at each time step as a function of the phase distribution. The evolution of the electric resistance of the system during the droplet formation and departure is reported. The results are compared with the measurements made in experimental and industrial-scale ESR processes. Two values of metal/slag interfacial tension of 1 and 0.1 N m-1 are explored. The effects of the control system as well as the presence of a horizontal magnetic field are also investigated. These results open the possibility to link online the voltage signal variation with real physical phenomena happening during the process.

  2. Controlling the nanodot formation on GaAs surface during focused ion beam processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhamodaran, S.; Ramkumar, J.

    2010-12-01

    GaAs processed using gallium-focused ion beams for the fabrication of photonic devices mostly results in gallium nanodots on the surface. These gallium nanodots may produce unwanted effects and deteriorate the optical and electrical properties of the devices. We have investigated the FIB processing of GaAs with and without exposure to an insulator-enhanced etching precursor gas (XeF2) to explore the use of XeF2 during GaAs processing. It is reported that without the gas, FIB processing results in nanodots on the surface that vary in size and density depending on processing parameters such as incident energy, beam current, angle and dwell time. Processing with insulator (XeF2)-enhanced etching gas irrespective of the process parameters eliminates the nanodots and results in a smooth surface, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. This method will be useful for surfaces which require dry processing without exposure to any wet chemical etching.

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of the process of formation of sulfur compounds in oxygen gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    G.Ya. Gerasimov; T.M. Bogacheva

    2001-05-15

    A thermodynamic approach to the description of the behavior of the system fuel-oxidizer in oxygen gasification of coal is used to reveal the main mechanisms of the process of capture of sulfur by the mineral part of the coal and to determine the fundamental possibility of the process for coals from different coal fields.

  4. Deciphering CAPTCHAs: what a Turing test reveals about human cognition.

    PubMed

    Hannagan, Thomas; Ktori, Maria; Chanceaux, Myriam; Grainger, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Turning Turing's logic on its head, we used widespread letter-based Turing Tests found on the internet (CAPTCHAs) to shed light on human cognition. We examined the basis of the human ability to solve CAPTCHAs, where machines fail. We asked whether this is due to our use of slow-acting inferential processes that would not be available to machines, or whether fast-acting automatic orthographic processing in humans has superior robustness to shape variations. A masked priming lexical decision experiment revealed efficient processing of CAPTCHA words in conditions that rule out the use of slow inferential processing. This shows that the human superiority in solving CAPTCHAs builds on a high degree of invariance to location and continuous transforms, which is achieved during the very early stages of visual word recognition in skilled readers. PMID:22396750

  5. Deciphering CAPTCHAs: what a Turing test reveals about human cognition.

    PubMed

    Hannagan, Thomas; Ktori, Maria; Chanceaux, Myriam; Grainger, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Turning Turing's logic on its head, we used widespread letter-based Turing Tests found on the internet (CAPTCHAs) to shed light on human cognition. We examined the basis of the human ability to solve CAPTCHAs, where machines fail. We asked whether this is due to our use of slow-acting inferential processes that would not be available to machines, or whether fast-acting automatic orthographic processing in humans has superior robustness to shape variations. A masked priming lexical decision experiment revealed efficient processing of CAPTCHA words in conditions that rule out the use of slow inferential processing. This shows that the human superiority in solving CAPTCHAs builds on a high degree of invariance to location and continuous transforms, which is achieved during the very early stages of visual word recognition in skilled readers.

  6. Influence of process conditions and water quality on the formation of mutagenic byproducts in UV/H2O2 processes.

    PubMed

    Hofman-Caris, Roberta C H M; Harmsen, Danny J H; Puijker, Leo; Baken, Kirsten A; Wols, Bas A; Beerendonk, E F; Keltjens, Leo L M

    2015-05-01

    UV/H2O2 processes in drinking water treatment may generate byproducts which cause an increased response in Ames fluctuation assays. As this probably involves a mixture of substances in very low concentrations, it is challenging to identify the individual byproducts. Therefore it was studied under which conditions mutagenic byproducts are formed and how this can be prevented. It was found that positive Ames fluctuation test responses only are obtained when Medium Pressure UV lamps are used, and not with Low Pressure lamps. This probably is explained by the photolysis of nitrate, which plays an important role in the formation of mutagenic byproducts. The most important parameters involved in the formation of such byproducts were demonstrated to be the nitrate concentration, the natural organic matter, the UV spectrum of the lamps, and the UV dose applied. These factors explain up to 74-87% of the Ames fluctuation test responses after UV/H2O2 drinking water treatment. By taking this into account, drinking water utilities can estimate whether UV processes applied in their case may cause the formation of mutagenic byproducts, and how to take measures to prevent it. PMID:25746498

  7. Influence of process conditions and water quality on the formation of mutagenic byproducts in UV/H2O2 processes.

    PubMed

    Hofman-Caris, Roberta C H M; Harmsen, Danny J H; Puijker, Leo; Baken, Kirsten A; Wols, Bas A; Beerendonk, E F; Keltjens, Leo L M

    2015-05-01

    UV/H2O2 processes in drinking water treatment may generate byproducts which cause an increased response in Ames fluctuation assays. As this probably involves a mixture of substances in very low concentrations, it is challenging to identify the individual byproducts. Therefore it was studied under which conditions mutagenic byproducts are formed and how this can be prevented. It was found that positive Ames fluctuation test responses only are obtained when Medium Pressure UV lamps are used, and not with Low Pressure lamps. This probably is explained by the photolysis of nitrate, which plays an important role in the formation of mutagenic byproducts. The most important parameters involved in the formation of such byproducts were demonstrated to be the nitrate concentration, the natural organic matter, the UV spectrum of the lamps, and the UV dose applied. These factors explain up to 74-87% of the Ames fluctuation test responses after UV/H2O2 drinking water treatment. By taking this into account, drinking water utilities can estimate whether UV processes applied in their case may cause the formation of mutagenic byproducts, and how to take measures to prevent it.

  8. Identification of indicators of groundwater quality formation process using a zoning model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiu-yan; Yang, Hongbin; Cao, Yuqing; Wang, Wenke

    2014-06-01

    Drinking water safety is a world-wide focus. In Yinchuan Plain of western China, groundwater is mostly saline water, and it has generated many problems for the life of local residents. Yinchuan Plain exhibits differences from the mountain area to the plain in terrain and elevation, and landforms and scales. Such differences resulted in hydro-geological water storage structures with different water yield properties and permeabilities of the aquifers. These water storage structures are the places where the groundwater moves and is retained, as well as where the air-water-rock interaction and the migration and differentiation between substances in the water take place. With the arid climate and intense irrigation in Yinchuan Plain, the hydro-chemical features of the groundwater exhibit distinct zonation. To explore the formative mechanism of the groundwater quality in Yinchuan Plain, a zoning model for the formation of groundwater quality is established in three layers, the first layer shows the geological and hydrogeological conditions that express the landform and landscape, geological age, lithology, and hydrodynamic features of the studied area. The second layer indicates the zonation of the formation of groundwater quality. According to the major hydro-geochemical actions, the plain is divided from west to east into lixiviation, evaporation, and evaporation-mixing zones. The third layer contains the hydrodynamic features that express the hydro-chemical type, salinity, and the contents of the major ions as well as trace elements fluorine and arsenic. The features of each zone are quantitatively expressed with thermodynamic, hydrodynamic, and hydro-chemical indicators.

  9. The connection between dark and baryonic matter in the process of galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Sebastian

    Current galaxy formation theory still struggles to explain many essential galaxy properties. This thesis addresses these problems in the context of the interplay between baryons and dark matter in the concordance cosmological model. In the first part, we investigate galaxy abundance and scaling relations using a compilation of observational data along with large-scale cosmological simulations of dark matter (DM). We find that the standard cosmological model, in conjunction with halo abundance matching (HAM) and simple dynamical corrections, fits all basic statistics of galaxies more massive than the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This zero-parameter model predicts the observed luminosity-velocity relation of early-and late-type galaxies, as well as the clustering of bright galaxies and the observed abundance of galaxies as a function of circular velocity. However, we find that all DM halos more massive than the LMC are much more abundant than the galaxies they host. Motivated by the model's shortcomings, in the second part we study the effect of baryons on galaxy formation using numerical simulations that include gas physics. We implement a model of star formation (SF) and stellar feedback based directly on observations of star-forming regions, where stellar feedback from massive stars includes radiation pressure, photoheating, supernovae, and stellar winds. We find that stellar radiation has a strong effect at z > 1, where it efficiently suppresses SF by dispersing cold and dense gas, preventing runaway growth of the stellar component, and yielding rising SF histories that reproduce many observations. Stellar feedback produces bulgeless discs with rotation curves and baryon fractions in excellent agreement with data. Feedback-driven blowouts reduce the central DM density of a dwarf, relieving tension between ACDM and observations. Based on these results, we begin to characterize the baryon cycle of galaxies and its imprint on studies of the circumgalactic medium

  10. Low-temperature process of the formation of tubular and graphene carbon structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dubkov, S. V.; Gavrilov, S. A.; Gromov, D. G. Krasulin, G. A.

    2011-12-15

    The formation of carbon nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition enhanced by glow-discharge plasma is considered. The studies are conducted in the temperature range 300 to 700 Degree-Sign C. Dependences of the structure of the carbon deposit on the thickness of the Ni catalyst film and on the concentration of the carbon-containing component in the vapor phase are analyzed. The reproducible growth of arrays of homogeneous vertical nanotubes or graphene flakes is observed at a low temperature ({approx}350 Degree-Sign C). The electrical properties of the structures are studied.

  11. Pathway fraction of bromate formation during O₃ and O₃/H₂O₂ processes in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shengqi; Mao, Yuqin; Lv, Miao; Sun, Lili; Wang, Xiaomao; Yang, Hongwei; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2016-02-01

    Ozone process has been widely used for drinking water treatment recently. In the oxidation process, bromate is formed by three pathways, i.e., the direct pathway, the direct-indirect pathway and the indirect-direct pathway. This study developed a method to calculate the percentage of these three pathways for bromate formation during O3 process and O3/H2O2 process. Two kinds of water, distilled water containing bromide (DW) and surface water from the Yellow River (SW) were selected as raw rater. The result showed that in natural water systems, the direct-indirect pathway was dominant for bromate formation during the oxidation process. When 3 mg L(-1) O3 was used as the only oxidant, nearly 26% of bromide ion was transferred into bromate in two kinds of water after 80 min. The dominant pathway in DW was the direct pathway (48.5%) and the direct-indirect pathway (46.5%), while that was the direct-indirect pathway (68.9%) in SW. When O3/H2O2 were used as oxidants, as the H2O2 dosage increased, the fractions of bromate formation by direct pathway and direct-indirect pathway decreased, while that by indirect-direct pathway increased. The conversion ratio from bromide to bromate first kept stable or increased, then decreased and reached its minimum when [H2O2]/[O3] ratio was 1.0 in DW and 1.5 in SW. Under this condition the indirect-direct pathway took the largest fraction of 70.7% in DW and 64.0% in SW, respectively.

  12. Role of Tropomodulin’s Leucine Rich Repeat Domain in the Formation of Neurite-like Processes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Actin dynamics is fundamental for neurite development; monomer depolymerization from pointed ends is rate-limiting in actin treadmilling. Tropomodulins (Tmod) make up a family of actin pointed end-capping proteins. Of the four known isoforms, Tmod1–Tmod3 are expressed in brain cells. We investigated the role of Tmod’s C-terminal (LRR) domain in the formation of neurite-like processes by overexpressing Tmod1 and Tmod2 with deleted or mutated LRR domains in PC12 cells, a model system used to study neuritogenesis. Tmod1 overexpression results in a normal quantity and a normal length of processes, while Tmod2 overexpression reduces both measures. The Tmod2 overexpression phenotype is mimicked by overexpression of Tmod1 with the LRR domain removed or with three point mutations in the LRR domain that disrupt exposed clusters of conserved residues. Removal of Tmod2’s LRR domain does not significantly alter the outgrowth of neurite-like processes compared to that of Tmod2. Overexpression of chimeras with the N-terminal and C-terminal domains switched between Tmod1 and Tmod2 reinforces the idea that Tmod1’s LRR domain counteracts the reductive effect of the Tmod N-terminal domain upon formation of processes while Tmod2’s LRR domain does not. We suggest that the TM-dependent actin capping ability of both Tmods inhibits the formation of processes, but in Tmod1, this inhibition can be controlled via its LRR domain. Circular dichroism, limited proteolysis, and molecular dynamics demonstrate structural differences in the C-terminal region of the LRR domains of Tmod1, Tmod2, and the Tmod1 mutant. PMID:24746171

  13. Pathway fraction of bromate formation during O₃ and O₃/H₂O₂ processes in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shengqi; Mao, Yuqin; Lv, Miao; Sun, Lili; Wang, Xiaomao; Yang, Hongwei; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2016-02-01

    Ozone process has been widely used for drinking water treatment recently. In the oxidation process, bromate is formed by three pathways, i.e., the direct pathway, the direct-indirect pathway and the indirect-direct pathway. This study developed a method to calculate the percentage of these three pathways for bromate formation during O3 process and O3/H2O2 process. Two kinds of water, distilled water containing bromide (DW) and surface water from the Yellow River (SW) were selected as raw rater. The result showed that in natural water systems, the direct-indirect pathway was dominant for bromate formation during the oxidation process. When 3 mg L(-1) O3 was used as the only oxidant, nearly 26% of bromide ion was transferred into bromate in two kinds of water after 80 min. The dominant pathway in DW was the direct pathway (48.5%) and the direct-indirect pathway (46.5%), while that was the direct-indirect pathway (68.9%) in SW. When O3/H2O2 were used as oxidants, as the H2O2 dosage increased, the fractions of bromate formation by direct pathway and direct-indirect pathway decreased, while that by indirect-direct pathway increased. The conversion ratio from bromide to bromate first kept stable or increased, then decreased and reached its minimum when [H2O2]/[O3] ratio was 1.0 in DW and 1.5 in SW. Under this condition the indirect-direct pathway took the largest fraction of 70.7% in DW and 64.0% in SW, respectively. PMID:26615492

  14. Education and personalized genomics: deciphering the public's genetic health report

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Neil E; Myers, Richard M; Gunter, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Where do members of the public turn to understand what genetic tests mean in terms of their own health? Now that genome-wide association studies and complete genome sequencing are widely available, the importance of education in personalized genomics cannot be overstated. Although some media have introduced the concept of genetic testing to better understand health and disease, the public's understanding of the scope and impact of genetic variation has not kept up with the pace of the science or technology. Unfortunately, the likely sources to which the public turn to for guidance – their physician and the media – are often no better prepared. We examine several venues for information, including print and online guides for both lay and health-oriented audiences, and summarize selected resources in multiple formats. We also note on the roadblocks to progress and discuss ways to remove them, as urgent action is needed to connect people with their genomes in a meaningful way. PMID:20161675

  15. [The processes of methane formation and oxidation in the soils of the Russian arctic tundra].

    PubMed

    Berestovskaia, Iu Iu; Rusanov, I I; Vasil'eva, L V; Pimenov, N V

    2005-01-01

    Methane emission from the following types of tundra soils was studied: coarse humic gleyey loamy cryo soil, peaty gley soil, and peaty gleyey midloamy cryo soil of the arctic tundra. All the soils studied were found to be potential sources of atmospheric methane. The highest values of methane emission were recorded in August at a soil temperature of 8-10 degrees C. Flooded parcels were the sources of atmospheric methane throughout the observation period. The rates of methane production and oxidation in tundra soils of various types at 5 and 15 degrees C were studied by the radioisotope method. Methane oxidation was found to occur in bog water, in the green part of peat moss, and in all the soil horizons studied. Methane formation was recorded in the horizons of peat, in clay with plant roots, and in peaty moss dust of the bogey parcels. At both temperatures, the methane oxidation rate exceeded the rate of methane formation in all the horizons of the mossy-lichen tundra and of the bumpy sinkhole complex. Methanogenesis prevailed only in a sedge-peat moss bog at 15 degrees C. Enrichment bacterial cultures oxidizing methane at 5 and 15 degrees C were obtained. Different types of methanotrophic bacteria were shown to be responsible for methane oxidation under these conditions. A representative of type I methylotrophs oxidized methane at 5 degrees C, and Methylocella tundrae, a psychroactive representative of an acidophilic methanotrophic genus Methylocella, at 15 degrees C. PMID:15938404

  16. Triggering processes and star formation in AGN: multi-wavelength matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara

    2016-08-01

    AGN can be selected via an array of multi-wavelength diagnostics, spanning the X-ray and optical, to the mid-IR and radio. Many studies of AGN and host galaxy properties focus on samples selected in only one of these domains. However, AGN selected at different wavelengths can exhibit very different properties, such that understanding the "big picture" requires a simultaneous multi-wavelength approach. In this talk, I will present a homogeneous analysis of 3 large samples of z~0 AGN, selected in the radio, mid-IR and optical in order to address the following two questions: what are the triggering mechanisms of AGN accretion, and what are the star formation rates of the host galaxies? Thanks to the combination of multi-wavelength data, large samples, and homogeneous treatment, it is possible to distinguish different triggering mechanisms (e.g. mergers vs. secular) contributing to different AGN samples, and clearly measure differences in their relative star formation rates.

  17. Inhibitory effect of glutamic acid on the scale formation process using electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Karar, A; Naamoune, F; Kahoul, A; Belattar, N

    2016-08-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate CaCO3 in water has some important implications in geoscience researches, ocean chemistry studies, CO2 emission issues and biology. In industry, the scaling phenomenon may cause technical problems, such as reduction in heat transfer efficiency in cooling systems and obstruction of pipes. This paper focuses on the study of the glutamic acid (GA) for reducing CaCO3 scale formation on metallic surfaces in the water of Bir Aissa region. The anti-scaling properties of glutamic acid (GA), used as a complexing agent of Ca(2+) ions, have been evaluated by the chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods in conjunction with a microscopic examination. Chemical and electrochemical study of this water shows a high calcium concentration. The characterization using X-ray diffraction reveals that while the CaCO3 scale formed chemically is a mixture of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the one deposited electrochemically is a pure calcite. The effect of temperature on the efficiency of the inhibitor was investigated. At 30 and 40°C, a complete scaling inhibition was obtained at a GA concentration of 18 mg/L with 90.2% efficiency rate. However, the efficiency of GA decreased at 50 and 60°C. PMID:26824779

  18. Simulation of geochemical processes responsible for the formation of the Zhezqazghan deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhenko, B. N.; Cherkasova, E. V.

    2014-05-01

    Physicochemical computer simulation of water-rock systems at a temperature of 25-150°C and under a pressure of up to 600 bar has been carried out for quantitative description of the mineralization formation conditions at sandstone- and shale-hosted copper deposits. The simulation is based on geological and geochemical information concerning the Zhezqazghan deposit and considers (i) a source of ore matter, (ii) composition of the fluid that transfers ore matter to the ore formation zone, and (iii) factors of ore concentration. It has been shown that extraction of copper from minerals of rocks and its accumulation in aqueous solution are optimal at a high mass ratio of rock to water (R/W > 10), Eh of +200 to -100 mV, and an obligatory content of chloride ions in the aqueous phase. The averaged ore-bearing fluid Cl95SO44//Ca50(Na + K)30Mg19 (eq %), pH ˜ 4, mineralization of up to 400 g/L, is formed by the interaction of red sandstone beds with a sedimentogenic brine (a product of metamorphism of seawater in carbonate rocks enriched in organic matter). The ore concentration proceeds in the course of cooling from 150 to 50°C during filtration of ore-bearing fluid through red sandstone beds in the rock-water system thermodynamically opened with respect to the reductive components.

  19. A unified mechanism to quantitatively understand silica particle formation from tetraethyl orthosilicate in batch and semi-batch processes.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Daisuke; Nakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Haruyuki; Konno, Mikio

    2013-03-15

    Factors for controlling sizes of silica particles formed in the hydrolysis and condensation of silicon alkoxides were examined in batch and semi-batch processes with our model previously proposed. Particle sizes in the particle formation were simulated for buffer systems to reduce time-variation in pH. Effectiveness of the buffer system to suppress time-variation in ionic strength was experimentally verified in a silicon alkoxide concentration range of 0.01-0.1 M. Comparison of experimental particle sizes with calculated ones showed that the addition of electrolytes slightly decreased surface potential of silica particles in both batch and semi-batch processes, and the surface potential values estimated for the semi-batch process were lower than that for batch process. In simulation of the number of particles formed in the processes, the particle number had strong dependences on surface potential and Debye-Hückel parameter. The simulated number of particles formed in semi-batch process was smaller than that in batch process under the same surface potential and Debye-Hückel parameter. The combination of the low surface potential and the small number of particles revealed that the semi-batch process was suitable for producing a small number of particles, which provides enlargement of size range of silica particles formed in the method. PMID:23295029

  20. Application of Thermohydrogen Processing for Formation of Ultrafine Equiaxed Grains in Near α Ti600 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yong; Li, Miaoquan

    2009-12-01

    In this article, the grain refinement of the near α Ti600 alloy by thermohydrogen processing (THP) is investigated. The THP processing includes hydrogenation, high-temperature deformation, and vacuum dehydrogenation. The microstructural evolution in each stage of THP processing was carefully investigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results show that face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydride ( δ phase) precipitates in the hydrogenated Ti600 alloy at the hydrogen contents of 0.31 wt pct and above. The critical role of hydrides in the processing of grain refinement is clearly demonstrated. The hydrides divided the α grains in hydrogenation treatment, promoted α-phase recrystallization, and facilitated the stabilization of finer α grain size in isothermal compression.

  1. A Study on Reactive Spray Deposition Technology Processing Parameters in the Context of Pt Nanoparticle Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, Justin M.; Maric, Radenka

    2015-12-01

    Catalytic materials are complex systems in which achieving the desired properties (i.e., activity, selectivity and stability) depends on exploiting the many degrees of freedom in surface and bulk composition, geometry, and defects. Flame aerosol synthesis is a process for producing nanoparticles with ample processing parameter space to tune the desired properties. Flame dynamics inside the reactor are determined by the input process variables such as solubility of precursor in the fuel; solvent boiling point; reactant flow rate and concentration; flow rates of air, fuel and the carrier gas; and the burner geometry. In this study, the processing parameters for reactive spray deposition technology, a flame-based synthesis method, are systematically evaluated to understand the residence times, reactant mixing, and temperature profiles of flames used in the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles. This provides a framework for further study and modeling. The flame temperature and length are also studied as a function of O2 and fuel flow rates.

  2. Modeling the relative contributions of secondary ice formation processes to ice crystal number concentrations within mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Sylvia; Hoose, Corinna; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of in-cloud ice crystal number concentrations can be three or four orders of magnitude greater than the in-cloud ice nuclei number concentrations. This discrepancy can be explained by various secondary ice formation processes, which occur after initial ice nucleation, but the relative importance of these processes, and even the exact physics of each, is still unclear. A simple bin microphysics model (2IM) is constructed to investigate these knowledge gaps. 2IM extends the time-lag collision parameterization of Yano and Phillips, 2011 to include rime splintering, ice-ice aggregation, and droplet shattering and to incorporate the aspect ratio evolution as in Jensen and Harrington, 2015. The relative contribution of the secondary processes under various conditions are shown. In particular, temperature-dependent efficiencies are adjusted for ice-ice aggregation versus collision around -15°C, when rime splintering is no longer active, and the effect of aspect ratio on the process weighting is explored. The resulting simulations are intended to guide secondary ice formation parameterizations in larger-scale mixed-phase cloud schemes.

  3. Satellite observations and EMAC model calculations of sulfate aerosols from Kilauea: a study of aerosol formation, processing, and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, Marloes; Beirle, Steffen; Brühl, Christoph; Dörner, Steffen; Pozzer, Andrea; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The currently most active volcano on Earth is Mount Kilauea on Hawaii, as it has been in a state of continuous eruption since 1983. The opening of a new vent in March 2008 caused half a year of strongly increased SO2 emissions, which in turn led to the formation of a sulfate plume with an extent of at least two thousand kilometers. The plume could be clearly identified from satellite measurements from March to November, 2008. The steady trade winds in the region and the lack of interfering sources allowed us to determine the life time of SO2 from Kilauea using only satellite-based measurements (no a priori or model information). The current investigation focuses on sulfate aerosols: their formation, processing and subsequent loss. Using space-based aerosol measurements by MODIS, we study the evolution of aerosol optical depth, which first increases as a function of distance from the volcano due to aerosol formation from SO2 oxidation, and subsequently decreases as aerosols are deposited to the surface. The outcome is compared to results from calculations using the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) model to test the state of understanding of the sulfate aerosol life cycle. For this comparison, a particular focus is on the role of clouds and wet removal processes.

  4. Peat Formation Processes Through the Millennia in Tidal Marshes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, J.Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine peat formation processes throughout the millennia in four tidal marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Peat cores collected at each site were analyzed for bulk density, loss on ignition, and percent organic carbon. Core data and spline fit age-depth models were used to estimate inorganic sedimentation, organic accumulation, and carbon sequestration rates in the marshes. Bulk density and percent organic matter content of peat fluctuated through time at all sites, suggesting that peat formation processes are dynamic and responsive to watershed conditions. The balance between inorganic sedimentation and organic accumulation at the sites also varied through time, indicating that marshes may rely more strongly on either inorganic or organic matter for peat formation at particular times in their existence. Mean carbon sequestration rates found in this study (0. 38-0. 79 Mg C ha-1 year-1) were similar to other long-term estimates for temperate peatlands. ?? 2011 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation (outside the USA).

  5. Marine metaproteomics: deciphering the microbial metabolic food web.

    PubMed

    Williams, Timothy J; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Metaproteomics can be applied to marine systems to discover metabolic processes in the ocean. This review describes current breakthroughs regarding marine microbes in the areas of microbial procurement of nutrients, important and previously unrecognized metabolic processes, functional roles for proteins with previously unknown functions, and intricate networks of metabolic interactions between symbiotic microbes and their hosts. By recognizing that metaproteomics empowers our understanding of the roles that marine microbes play in global biogeochemical cycles, the achievements to date from this advancing field highlight the enormous potential that the future holds.

  6. Time to Translate: Deciphering the Codon in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firooznia, Fardad

    2015-01-01

    I describe and evaluate a fun and simple role-playing exercise that allows students to actively work through the process of translation. This exercise can easily be completed during a 50-minute class period, with time to review the steps and contemplate complications such as the effects of various types of mutations.

  7. SKA studies of nearby galaxies: star-formation, accretion processes and molecular gas across all environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beswick, R.; Brinks, E.; Perez-Torres, M.; Richards, A. M. S.; Aalto, S.; Alberdi, A.; Argo, M. K.; van Bemmel, I.; Conway, J. E.; Dickinson, C.; Fenech, D.; Gray, M. D.; Kloeckner, H. R.; Murphy, E.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Peel, M. W.; Rushton, A.; Schinnerer, E.

    2015-04-01

    The SKA will be a transformational instrument in the study of our local Universe. In particular, by virtue of its high sensitivity (both to point sources and diffuse low surface brightness emission), angular resolution and the frequency ranges covered, the SKA will undertake a very wide range of astrophysical research in the field of nearby galaxies. By surveying vast numbers of nearby galaxies of all types with $\\mu$Jy sensitivity and sub-arcsecond angular resolutions at radio wavelengths, the SKA will provide the cornerstone of our understanding of star-formation and accretion activity in the local Universe. In this chapter we outline the key continuum and molecular line science areas where the SKA, both during phase-1 and when it becomes the full SKA, will have a significant scientific impact.

  8. The role of vaporization and dissipation processes in the formation of the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, O. I.; Markova, O. M.; Manzon, B. M.

    1987-04-01

    The experimental data of Markova et al. (1986) on the changing compositions of basalt and lherzolite melts and complementary vapors after heating at progressively increasing temperatures are compared with the compositions of the earth and lunar mantles to determine the role of selective vaporization and vapor dissipation in the formation of the moon. The cause for the paucity in volatile components seen in the lunar mantle, as compared with the earth mantle, is explained in the framework of a mechanism involving impact evaporation and selective dissipation of vapor at the stage of lunar accretion, when collisions in the swarm of bodies in earth orbit and the bombardment of lunar planetesimals took place. This mechanism explains the cause of the deficit on the moon of heavy volatile elements (such as Pb and Rb), K and Na oxides, MgO, and SiO2, and the lack of a deficit of less volatile Al2O3 and FeO.

  9. The growth of discs and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation - I. Fast evolution versus secular processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, C.; Mutch, S. J.; Croton, D. J.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical model for the evolution of mass, angular momentum and size of galaxy discs and bulges, and we implement it into the semi-analytic galaxy formation code, Semi-Analytic Galaxy Evolution. The model follows both secular and violent evolutionary channels, including smooth accretion, disc instabilities, minor and major mergers. We find that the combination of our recipe with hierarchical clustering produces two distinct populations of bulges: merger-driven bulges, akin to classical bulges and ellipticals, and instability-driven bulges, akin to secular (or pseudo-)bulges. The model mostly reproduces the mass-size relation of gaseous and stellar discs, the evolution of the mass-size relation of ellipticals, the Faber-Jackson relation, and the magnitude-colour diagram of classical and secular bulges. The model predicts only a small overlap of merger-driven and instability-driven components in the same galaxy, and predicts different bulge types as a function of galaxy mass and disc fraction. Bulge type also affects the star formation rate and colour at a given luminosity. The model predicts a population of merger-driven red ellipticals that dominate both the low-mass and high-mass ends of the galaxy population, and span all dynamical ages; merger-driven bulges in disc galaxies are dynamically old and do not interfere with subsequent evolution of the star-forming component. Instability-driven bulges dominate the population at intermediate galaxy masses, especially thriving in massive discs. The model green valley is exclusively populated by instability-driven bulge hosts. Through the present implementation, the mass accretion history is perceivable in the galaxy structure, morphology and colours.

  10. Shear-Induced Amyloid Formation in the Brain: I. Potential Vascular and Parenchymal Processes

    PubMed Central

    Trumbore, Conrad N.

    2016-01-01

    Shear distortion of amyloid-beta (Aβ) solutions accelerates amyloid cascade reactions that may yield different toxic oligomers than those formed in quiescent solutions. Recent experiments indicate that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) containing Aβ flow through narrow brain perivascular pathways and brain parenchyma. This paper suggests that such flow causes shear distortion of Aβ molecules involving conformation changes that may be one of the initiating events in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease. Aβ shearing can occur in or around brain arteries and arterioles and is suggested as the origin of cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposits in cerebrovascular walls. Comparatively low flow rates of ISF within the narrow extracellular spaces (ECS) of the brain parenchyma are suggested as a possible initiating factor in both the formation of neurotoxic Aβ42 oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Aβ42 in slow-flowing ISF can gain significant shear energy at or near the walls of tortuous brain ECS flow paths, promoting the formation of a shear-distorted, excited state hydrophobic Aβ42* conformation. This Aβ42* molecule could possibly be involved in one of two paths, one involving rapid adsorption to a brain membrane surface, ultimately forming neurotoxic oligomers on membranes, and the other ultimately forming plaque within the ECS flow pathways. Rising Aβ concentrations combined with shear at or near critical brain membranes are proposed as contributing factors to Alzheimer’s disease neurotoxicity. These hypotheses may be applicable in other neurodegenerative diseases, including tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies, in which shear-distorted proteins also may form in the brain ECS. PMID:27567812

  11. HIV-1 Tat protein promotes formation of more-processive elongation complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, R A; Sharp, P A

    1991-01-01

    The Tat protein of HIV-1 trans-activates transcription in vitro in a cell-free extract of HeLa nuclei. Quantitative analysis of the efficiency of elongation revealed that a majority of the elongation complexes generated by the HIV-1 promoter were not highly processive and terminated within the first 500 nucleotides. Tat trans-activation of transcription from the HIV-1 promoter resulted from an increase in processive character of the elongation complexes. More specifically, the analysis suggests that there exist two classes of elongation complexes initiating from the HIV promoter: a less-processive form and a more-processive form. Addition of purified Tat protein was found to increase the abundance of the more-processive class of elongation complex. The purine nucleoside analog, 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) inhibits transcription in this reaction by decreasing the efficiency of elongation. Surprisingly, stimulation of transcription elongation by Tat was preferentially inhibited by the addition of DRB. Images PMID:1756726

  12. Bioactive glasses with improved processing. Part 1. Thermal properties, ion release and apatite formation.

    PubMed

    Groh, Daniel; Döhler, Franziska; Brauer, Delia S

    2014-10-01

    Bioactive glasses, particularly Bioglass® 45S5, have been used to clinically regenerate human bone since the mid-1980s; however, they show a strong tendency to undergo crystallization upon heat treatment, which limits their range of applications. Attempts at improving their processing (by reducing their tendency to crystallize) have included increasing their silica content (and thus their network connectivity), incorporating intermediate oxides or reducing their phosphate content, all of which reduce glass bioactivity. Therefore, bioactive glasses known for their good processing (e.g. 13-93) are considerably less bioactive. Here, we investigated if the processing of 45S5 bioactive glass can be improved while maintaining its network connectivity and phosphate content. The results show that, by increasing the calcium:alkali cation ratio, partially substituting potassium for sodium (thereby making use of the mixed alkali effect) and adding small amounts of fluoride, bioactive glasses can be obtained which have a larger processing window (suggesting that they can be processed more easily, allowing for sintering of scaffolds or drawing into fibres) while degrading readily and forming apatite in aqueous solution within a few hours. PMID:24880003

  13. Biogenic amine formation and nitrite reactions in meat batter as affected by high-pressure processing and chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Capillas, C; Aller-Guiote, P; Carballo, J; Colmenero, F Jiménez

    2006-12-27

    Changes in biogenic amine formation and nitrite depletion in meat batters as affected by pressure-temperature combinations (300 MPa/30 min/7, 20, and 40 degrees C), cooking process (70 degrees C/30 min), and storage (54 days/2 degrees C) were studied. Changes in residual nitrite concentration in raw meat batters were conditioned by the temperature and not by the pressure applied. Cooking process decreased (P < 0.05) the residual nitrite concentration in all samples. High-pressure processing and cooking treatment increased (P < 0.05) the nitrate content. Whereas protein-bound nitrite concentration decreased with pressure processing, no effect was observed with the heating process of meat batters. High-pressure processing conditions had no effect on the rate of residual nitrite loss throughout the storage. The application of high pressure decreased (P < 0.05) the concentration of some biogenic amines (tyramine, agmatine, and spermine). Irrespective of the high processing conditions, generally, throughout storage biogenic amine levels did not change or increased, although quantitatively this effect was not very important.

  14. Exploitation of a Self-limiting Process for Reproducible Formation of Ultrathin Ni(1-x)Pt(x) Silicide Films

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; B Yang; Y Zhu; S Gaudet; S Rossnagel; A Kellock; A Ozcan; C Murray; P Desjardins; et al.

    2011-12-31

    This letter reports on a process scheme to obtain highly reproducible Ni{sub 1-x}Pt{sub x} silicide films of 3-6 nm thickness formed on a Si(100) substrate. Such ultrathin silicide films are readily attained by sputter deposition of metal films, metal stripping in wet chemicals, and final silicidation by rapid thermal processing. This process sequence warrants an invariant amount of metal intermixed with Si in the substrate surface region independent of the initial metal thickness, thereby leading to a self-limiting formation of ultrathin silicide films. The crystallographic structure, thickness, uniformity, and morphological stability of the final silicide films depend sensitively on the initial Pt fraction.

  15. Formation of heterostructure devices in a multichamber processing environment with in-vacuo surface analysis diagnostics and in-situ process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucovsky, Gerald; Kim, Sang S.; Fitch, J. T.; Wang, Cheng

    1991-03-01

    This paper addresses issues related to multichamber and in-situ processing of heterostructure electronic devices. We discuss the design and operation of two UHV-compatible multichamber systems one designed for one-inch wafers and a second for three-each wafers. Each of these provides: i) substrate introduction via a load-lock chamber ii) surface preparation by a plasma-assisted surface cleaning process iii) thin film deposition of semiconductors and dielectrics by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (remote PECVD) iv) surface analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and either reflection high energy or low energy electron diffraction (RHEED or LEED) and v) inter-chamber substrate transfer in a UHV compatible environment (1O8 Torr). These systems have been designed exploit the low temperature ( deposition of electronic-quality thin film dielectrics and semiconductors produced by the remote PECVD process. The combination of remote PECVD film deposition coupled with in-vacuo substrate processing has defined processing windows for the formation of heterojunction devices including: i) gate stacks for crystalline silicon c-Si field effect transistors FET''s ii) amorphous silicon a-Si thin film transistors TFT''s and simple TFT circuits and iii) amorphous and microcrystalline sic-Si silicon p-i-n photovoltaic devices. The effectiveness of single-wafer processing is measured by the ability to produce and to maintain electronic-quality interfaces between the various dielectric and semiconductor films that are utilized in these device structures.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations on the Oligomer-Formation Process of the GNNQQNY Peptide from Yeast Prion Protein Sup35

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuqing; Chen, Hao; Bai, Hongjun; Lai, Luhua

    2007-01-01

    Oligomeric intermediates are possible cytotoxic species in diseases associated with amyloid deposits. Understanding the early steps of fibril formation at atomic details may provide useful information for the rational therapeutic design. In this study, using the heptapeptide GNNQQNY from the yeast prion-like protein Sup35 as a model system, for which a detailed atomic structure of the fibril formed has been determined by x-ray microcrystallography, we investigated its oligomer-formation process from monomer to tetramer at the atomistic level by means of a molecular dynamics simulation with explicit water. Although the number of simulations was limited, the qualitative statistical data gave some interesting results, which indicated that the oligomer formation might start from antiparallel β-sheet-like dimers. When a new single peptide strand was added to the preformed dimers to form trimers and then tetramers, the transition time from disorder aggregates to regular ones for the parallel alignment was found to be obviously much less than for the antiparallel one. Moreover, the parallel pattern also statistically stayed longer, providing more chances for oligomer extending, although the number of parallel stack events was almost equal to antiparallel ones. Therefore, our simulations showed that new strands might prefer to extend in a parallel arrangement to form oligomers, which agrees with the microcrystal structure of the amyloid fibril formed by this peptide. In addition, analysis of the π-π stacking of aromatic residues showed that this type of interaction did not play an important role in giving directionality for β-strand alignment but played a great influence on stabilizing the structures formed in the oligomer-formation process. PMID:17483185

  17. Formation of halogenated disinfection by-products in cobalt-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation processes in the presence of halides.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiping; Dong, Wei; Kong, Deyang; Ji, Yuefei; Lu, Junhe; Yin, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Sulfate radicals (SO4(-)) generated by activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and persulfate (PS) are highly oxidative and applied to degrade various organic pollutants. This research was designed to investigate formation of halogenated by-products in Co(2+) activated PMS process in the presence of halides and natural organic matter (NOM). It was revealed that no halogenated by-products were detected in the presence of Cl(-) while 189 μg/L bromoform and 100.7 μg/L dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were found after 120 h when 2 mg/L NOM, 0.1 mM Br(-), 1.0 mM PMS, and 5 μL Co(2+) were present initially. These products are known as disinfection by-products (DBPs) since they are formed in water disinfection processes. Formation of DBPs was even more significant in the absence of Co(2+). The data indicate that both PMS and SO4(-) can transform Br(-) to reactive bromine species which react with NOM to form halogenated by-products. Less DBP formation in Co(2+)-PMS systems was due to the further destruction of DBPs by SO4(-). More DBPs species including chlorinated ones were detected in the presence of both Cl(-) and Br(-). However, more brominated species produced than chlorinate ones generally. The total DBP yield decreased with the increase of Cl(-) content when total halides kept constant. This is one of the few studies that demonstrate the formation of halogenated DBPs in Co(2+)/PMS reaction systems, which should be taken into consideration in the application of SO4(-) based oxidation technologies. PMID:27093695

  18. Ceramic thin-film formation on functionalized interfaces through biomimetic processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, B.C.; Rieke, P.C.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Campbell, A.A.; Fryxell, G.E.; Graff, G.L.; Song, L.; Liu, J.; Virden, J.W.; McVay, G.L. )

    1994-04-01

    Processing routes have been developed for the production of thin ceramic films through precipitation from aqueous solutions. The techniques are based on crystal nucleation and growth onto functionalized interfaces. Surface functionalization routes have been developed by the mimicking of schemes used by organisms to produce complex ceramic composites such as teeth, bones, and shells. High-quality, dense polycrystalline films of oxides, hydroxides, and sulfides have now been prepared for [open quotes]biomimetic[close quotes] synthesis techniques. Ceramic films can be synthesized on plastics and other materials at temperatures below 100[degrees]C. As a low-temperature process in which water rather than organic solvents is used, this synthesis is environmentally benign. Nanocrystalline ceramics can be produced, sometimes with preferred crystallite orientation. The direct deposition of high-resolution patterned films has also been demonstrated. The process is well suited to the production of organic-inorganic composites.

  19. Chemical evolution of r-process elements in the hierarchical galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka

    2015-08-01

    In the concordance cosmology, galaxies are formed hierarchically. Metal-poor stars in the stellar halo are thought to be relics of stars formed in dwarf galaxies in the early universe. In order to investigate metal enrichment history in the early universe, we have been built the chemical evolution model with merger trees.In this presentation, we show our results of chemical evolution computations for r-process elements. For the r-process elements, two possible astronomical sources have been proposed: supernova and coalescence of neutron star binary. Recent nucleosynthetic studies favor the neutron star merger scenario but previous chemical evolution studies pointed out difficulties. We discuss the origin of r-process elements using our hierarchical chemical evolution model.

  20. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Keum, Jong; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Belianinov, Alex; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2016-04-20

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films, a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g., I(-), Cl(-), Br(-)) in the formation of the mixed-halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl(-) ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or, alternatively, where they are located is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br(-) or Cl(-) ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I(-) ions prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl(-) ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performing and cost-effective optoelectronic devices. PMID:26931634