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Sample records for decreased angiotensin ii

  1. Angiotensin II Moderately Decreases Plasmodium Infection and Experimental Cerebral Malaria in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Baravian, Charlotte; Edagha, Innocent; Ty, Maureen C; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Xu, Wenyue; Rodriguez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II, a peptide hormone that regulates blood pressure, has been proposed as a protective factor against cerebral malaria based on a genetic analysis. In vitro studies have documented an inhibitory effect of angiotensin II on Plasmodium growth, while studies using chemical inhibitors of angiotensin II in mice showed protection against experimental cerebral malaria but not major effects on parasite growth. To determine whether the level of angiotensin II affects Plasmodium growth and/or disease outcome in malaria, elevated levels of angiotensin II were induced in mice by intradermal implantation of osmotic mini-pumps providing constant release of this hormone. Mice were then infected with P. berghei and monitored for parasitemia and incidence of cerebral malaria. Mice infused with angiotensin II showed decreased parasitemia seven days after infection. The development of experimental cerebral malaria was delayed and a moderate increase in survival was observed in mice with elevated angiotensin II, as confirmed by decreased number of cerebral hemorrhages compared to controls. The results presented here show for the first time the effect of elevated levels of angiotensin II in an in vivo model of malaria. The decreased pathogenesis observed in mice complements a previous human genetic study, reinforcing the hypothesis of a beneficial effect of angiotensin II in malaria.

  2. Angiotensin II Moderately Decreases Plasmodium Infection and Experimental Cerebral Malaria in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Baravian, Charlotte; Edagha, Innocent; Ty, Maureen C.; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Xu, Wenyue; Rodriguez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II, a peptide hormone that regulates blood pressure, has been proposed as a protective factor against cerebral malaria based on a genetic analysis. In vitro studies have documented an inhibitory effect of angiotensin II on Plasmodium growth, while studies using chemical inhibitors of angiotensin II in mice showed protection against experimental cerebral malaria but not major effects on parasite growth. To determine whether the level of angiotensin II affects Plasmodium growth and/or disease outcome in malaria, elevated levels of angiotensin II were induced in mice by intradermal implantation of osmotic mini-pumps providing constant release of this hormone. Mice were then infected with P. berghei and monitored for parasitemia and incidence of cerebral malaria. Mice infused with angiotensin II showed decreased parasitemia seven days after infection. The development of experimental cerebral malaria was delayed and a moderate increase in survival was observed in mice with elevated angiotensin II, as confirmed by decreased number of cerebral hemorrhages compared to controls. The results presented here show for the first time the effect of elevated levels of angiotensin II in an in vivo model of malaria. The decreased pathogenesis observed in mice complements a previous human genetic study, reinforcing the hypothesis of a beneficial effect of angiotensin II in malaria. PMID:26376293

  3. Angiotensin-(1-7) decreases skeletal muscle atrophy induced by angiotensin II through a Mas receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Franco; Morales, María Gabriela; Meneses, Carla; Simon, Felipe; Brandan, Enrique; Abrigo, Johanna; Vazquez, Yaneisi; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass, an increase in myosin heavy chain (MHC) degradation and increase in the expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases: atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Angiotensin II (AngII) induces muscle atrophy. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], through its receptor Mas, produces the opposite effects than AngII. We assessed the effects of Ang-(1-7) on the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by AngII. Our results show that Ang-(1-7), through Mas, prevents the effects induced by AngII in muscle gastrocnemius: the decrease in the fibre diameter, muscle strength and MHC levels and the increase in atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Ang-(1-7) also induces AKT phosphorylation. In addition, our analysis in vitro using C2C12 myotubes shows that Ang-(1-7), through a mechanism dependent on Mas, prevents the decrease in the levels of MHC and the increase in the expression of the atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, both induced by AngII. Ang-(1-7) induces AKT phosphorylation in myotubes; additionally, we demonstrated that the inhibition of AKT with MK-2206 decreases the anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7). Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that Ang-(1-7) counteracts the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by AngII through a mechanism dependent on the Mas receptor, which involves AKT activity. Our study indicates that Ang-(1-7) is novel molecule with a potential therapeutical use to improve muscle wasting associated, at least, with pathologies that present high levels of AngII.

  4. Decrease in blood pressure and regression of cardiovascular complications by angiotensin II vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Futoshi; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kyutoku, Mariko; Miyake, Takashi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have been recently developed to treat various diseases such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and Alzheimer's disease in addition to infectious diseases. However, before use in the clinical setting, vaccines targeting self-antigens must be demonstrated to be effective and safe, evoking an adequate humoral immune response from B cells while avoiding T cell activation in response to self. Although the vaccine targeting angiotensin II (Ang II) is efficient in rodents and humans, little is known regarding the immunological activation and safety of the vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency and safety of an Ang II peptide vaccine in mice. Immunization with Ang II conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) successfully induced the production of anti-Ang II antibody, which blocked Ang II signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells. However, Ang II itself did not activate T cells, as assessed by the proliferation and lymphokine production of T cells in immunized mice, whereas KLH activated T cells. In an Ang II-infused model, the non-immunized mice showed high blood pressure (BP), whereas the immunized mice (Ang II-KLH) showed a significant decrease in systolic BP, accompanied by significant reductions in cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Importantly, anti-Ang II antibody titer was not elevated even after the administration of large amounts of Ang II, indicating that Ang II itself boosted antibody production, most likely due to less activation of T cells. In addition, no accumulation of inflammatory cells was observed in immunized mice, because endogenous Ang II would not activate T cells after immunization with Ang II-KLH. Taken together, these data indicate that vaccines targeting Ang II might be effective to decrease high BP and prevent cardiovascular complications without severe side effects.

  5. Swimming training prevents fat deposition and decreases angiotensin II-induced coronary vasoconstriction in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Endlich, Patrick Wander; Claudio, Erick Roberto Gonçalves; da Silva Gonçalves, Washington Luiz; Gouvêa, Sonia Alves; Moysés, Margareth Ribeiro; de Abreu, Glaucia Rodrigues

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of chronic swimming training (ST) on the deposition of abdominal fat and vasoconstriction in response to angiotensin II (ANG II) in the coronary arterial bed of estrogen deficient rats. Twenty-eight 3-month old Wistar female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary sham (SS), sedentary-ovariectomized (SO), swimming-trained sham (STS) and swimming-trained ovariectomized (STO). ST protocol consisted of a continuous 60-min session, with a 5% BW load attached to the tail, completed 5 days/week for 8-weeks. The retroperitoneal, parametrial, perirenal and inguinal fat pads were measured. The intrinsic heart rate (IHR), coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and a concentration-response curve to ANG II in the coronary bed was constructed using the Langendorff preparation. Ovariectomy (OVX) significantly reduced 17-β-estradiol plasma levels in SO and STO groups (p<0.05). The STO group had a significantly reduced retroperitoneal and parametrial fat pad compared with the SO group (p<0.05). IHR values were similar in all groups; however, baseline CPP was significantly reduced in the SO, STS and STO groups compared with the SS group (p<0.05). ANG II caused vasoconstriction in the coronary bed in a concentration-dependent manner. The SO group had an increased response to ANG II when compared with all other experimental groups (p<0.05), which was prevented by 8-weeks of ST in the STO group (p<0.05). OVX increased ANG II-induced vasoconstriction in the coronary vascular bed and abdominal fat pad deposition. Eight weeks of swimming training improved these vasoconstrictor effects and decreased abdominal fat deposition in ovariectomized rats.

  6. Lead exposure, begun in utero, decreases renin and angiotensin II in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Victery, W.; Vander, A.J.; Markel, H.; Katzman, L.; Shulak, J.M.; Germain, C.

    1982-05-01

    Male rats were exposed continously to Pb in utero and after birth by giving their mothers, during pregnancy and lactation, drinking water containing 0, 5, or 25 ppm Pb (as Pb acetate) and then continuing this regimen after weaning for approximately 5 months. At the time of sacrifice (5 months) the 5- and 25-ppm groups had mean blood Pb concentrations of 5.6 and 18.2 ..mu..g/dl, respectively. No differences in systolic blood pressure occurred between groups. Rats exposed to 25 ppm manifested a significant decrease in basal plasma renin activity (PRA) but a significant increase in PRA during stimulation of renin release by acute volume depletion. In this latter state, the ratio of angiotensin II to PRA was significantly reduced in the 25-ppm group. Groups exposed to 5 and 25 ppm both had significant decreases in renal renin concentration. We conclude that chronic exposure of rats to doses of Pb which produce blood Pb concentrations similar to those generally present in urban human populations does not induce hypertension but does inhibit renin synthesis and release, as well as reducing plasma angiotension II concentration at any given PRA, either by inhibiting conversion of AI to AII or by enhancing AII catabolism.

  7. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Hao; Lin, Marina; Groban, Leanne

    2015-03-27

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression.

  8. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... side effects include: Dizziness Elevated blood potassium level (hyperkalemia) Localized swelling of tissues (angioedema) There have been ... 31, 2016. Townsend RR. Major side effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers. http://www.uptodate. ...

  9. Aerobic exercise training-induced left ventricular hypertrophy involves regulatory MicroRNAs, decreased angiotensin-converting enzyme-angiotensin ii, and synergistic regulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin (1-7).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tiago; Hashimoto, Nara Y; Magalhães, Flávio C; Fernandes, Fernanda B; Casarini, Dulce E; Carmona, Adriana K; Krieger, José E; Phillips, M Ian; Oliveira, Edilamar M

    2011-08-01

    Aerobic exercise training leads to a physiological, nonpathological left ventricular hypertrophy; however, the underlying biochemical and molecular mechanisms of physiological left ventricular hypertrophy are unknown. The role of microRNAs regulating the classic and the novel cardiac renin-angiotensin (Ang) system was studied in trained rats assigned to 3 groups: (1) sedentary; (2) swimming trained with protocol 1 (T1, moderate-volume training); and (3) protocol 2 (T2, high-volume training). Cardiac Ang I levels, Ang-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, and protein expression, as well as Ang II levels, were lower in T1 and T2; however, Ang II type 1 receptor mRNA levels (69% in T1 and 99% in T2) and protein expression (240% in T1 and 300% in T2) increased after training. Ang II type 2 receptor mRNA levels (220%) and protein expression (332%) were shown to be increased in T2. In addition, T1 and T2 were shown to increase ACE2 activity and protein expression and Ang (1-7) levels in the heart. Exercise increased microRNA-27a and 27b, targeting ACE and decreasing microRNA-143 targeting ACE2 in the heart. Left ventricular hypertrophy induced by aerobic training involves microRNA regulation and an increase in cardiac Ang II type 1 receptor without the participation of Ang II. Parallel to this, an increase in ACE2, Ang (1-7), and Ang II type 2 receptor in the heart by exercise suggests that this nonclassic cardiac renin-angiotensin system counteracts the classic cardiac renin-angiotensin system. These findings are consistent with a model in which exercise may induce left ventricular hypertrophy, at least in part, altering the expression of specific microRNAs targeting renin-angiotensin system genes. Together these effects might provide the additional aerobic capacity required by the exercised heart.

  10. Angiotensin II causes weight loss and decreases circulating insulin-like growth factor I in rats through a pressor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Brink, M; Wellen, J; Delafontaine, P

    1996-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system regulates normal cardiovascular homeostasis and is activated in certain forms of hypertension and in heart failure. Angiotensin II has multiple physiological effects and we have shown recently that its growth-promoting effects on vascular smooth muscle require autocrine activation of the IGF I receptor. To study the effect of angiotensin II on circulating IGF I, we infused rats with 500 ng/kg/min angiotensin II for up to 14 d. Angiotensin II markedly reduced plasma IGF I levels (56 and 41% decrease at 1 and 2 wk, respectively) and IGF binding protein-3 levels, and increased IGF binding protein-2 levels, a pattern suggestive of dietary restriction. Compared with sham, angiotensin II-infused hypertensive rats lost 18-26% of body weight by 1 wk, and pair-feeding experiments indicated that 74% of this loss was attributable to a reduction in food intake. The vasodilator hydralazine and the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan had comparable effects to reverse angiotensin II-induced hypertension, but only losartan blocked the changes in body weight and in circulating IGF I and its binding proteins produced by angiotensin II. Moreover, in Dahl rats that were hypertensive in response to a high-salt diet, none of these changes occurred. Thus, angiotensin II produces weight loss through a pressor-independent mechanism that includes a marked anorexigenic effect and an additional (likely metabolic) effect. These findings have profound implications for understanding the pathophysiology of conditions, such as congestive heart failure, in which the renin-angiotensin system is activated. PMID:8647943

  11. Decreased angiotensin II binding affinity and binding capacity in the anterior pituitary gland of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gutkind, J.S.; Castren, E.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG) binding sites were quantified in single pituitary glands from 4-week-old and 14-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and age-matched male normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats after incubation with /sup 125/I-(Sar/sup 1/)-ANG, autoradiography with computerized densitometry, and comparison to /sup 125/I-standards. The maximum binding capacity (B/sub max/) decreased while the dissociation constant (K/sub d/) for ANG increased in 14-week-old SHR when compared to age-matched WKY control rats. Conversely, no difference between rat strains was found in 4-week-old animals. Our results suggest that pituitary ANG binding sites may play a role in the pathophysiology of established genetic hypertension.

  12. Angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7) decrease sFlt1 release in normal but not preeclamptic chorionic villi: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During preeclampsia, placental angiogenesis is impaired. Factors released from the placenta including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PLGF), soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt1), and soluble endoglin (sEng) are regulatory molecules of placental development and function. While the renin angiotensin system has been shown to regulate angiogenic factors in other research fields, these mechanisms have not been extensively studied during pregnancy. Methods We evaluated the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) and angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] on the release of VEGF, PLGF, sFlt1, and sEng from placental chorionic villi (CV). CV were collected from nulliparous third-trimester normotensive and preeclamptic subjects. CV were incubated for 0, 2, 4, and 16 hours with or without Ang II (1 nM and 1 microM) or Ang-(1-7) (1 nM and 1 microM). The release of VEGF, PLGF, sFlt1, sEng, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and human placenta lactogen (HPL) was measured by ELISA. Results The release of sFlt1, PLGF, sEng from normal and preeclamptic CV increased over time. Release of sFlt1 and sEng was significantly higher from preeclamptic CV. VEGF was below the detectable level of the assay in normal and preeclamptic CV. After 2 hours, sFlt1 release from normal CV was significantly inhibited with Ang II (1 nM and 1 microM) and Ang-(1-7) (1 nM and 1 microM). There was a time-dependent increase in HPL indicating that the CV were functioning normally. Conclusions Our study demonstrates a critical inhibitory role of angiotensin peptides on sFlt1 in normal pregnancy. Loss of this regulation in preeclampsia may allow sFlt1 to increase resulting in anti-angiogenesis and end organ damage in the mother. PMID:21050477

  13. Angiotensin III as well as angiotensin II regulates water flow through aquaporins in a clam worm.

    PubMed

    Satou, Ryousuke; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Ido, Hiroki; Tomomatsu, Masayuki; Suzuki, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Yukio

    2005-07-01

    Angiotensin III has been reported to exist in various animals and tissues. The physiological role, however, is still unclear except that brain angiotensin III is a central regulator of vasopressin release. In this study, angiotensin III as well as angiotensin II enhanced an increase in body weight of clam worms of Perinereis sp. under a hypo-osmotic condition and suppressed a decrease in body weight under a hyper-osmotic condition. When clam worms were treated with tetrachloroaurate (III) after angiotensin-treatment, these enhancing and suppressive effects of the angiotensins under hypo- and hyper-osmotic conditions were inhibited. In contrast, when clam worms were pretreated with tetrachloroaurate (III) before angiotensin-treatment, these effects of angiotensins were not inhibited. Since tetrachloroaurate (III) is a representative blocker of aquaporins, these results indicate that angiotensin III as well as angiotensin II regulates water flow through aquaporins in clam worms.

  14. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  15. Activation of Local Chorionic Villi Angiotensin II Levels But Not Angiotensin (1–7) in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Lauren; Merrill, David C.; Neves, Liomar A.A.; Stovall, Kathryn; Gallagher, Patricia E.; Diz, Debra I.; Moorefield, Cheryl; Gruver, Courtney; Ferrario, Carlos M.; Brosnihan, K. Bridget

    2009-01-01

    The chorionic villi in the placenta are responsible for the regulation of fetal oxygen and nutrient transport. Although the peripheral renin-angiotensin system is activated during normal pregnancy, the regulation of the local chorionic villi renin-angiotensin system remains unknown. Therefore, placental chorionic villous tissue was collected from nulliparous third-trimester normotensive or preeclamptic subjects and was analyzed for angiotensin peptide content, angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2, neprilysin, angiotensin II type 1 (AT1), angiotensin II type 2, Mas receptor mRNAs, and angiotensin receptor density and subtype. Angiotensin II in chorionic villi was significantly higher in preeclamptic subjects, whereas angiotensin (1–7) was not different. Angiotensinogen and AT1 receptor gene expression was significantly higher in preeclamptic subjects. No differences were observed in renin, ACE, ACE2, or neprilysin gene expression. Mas receptor mRNA in preeclamptic subjects was decreased. The AT1 receptor was the predominant receptor subtype in normal and preeclamptic chorionic villi. There was no difference in the density of the AT1, angiotensin II type 2, and angiotensin (1–7) receptors. These results indicate that enhanced chorionic villous expression of angiotensin II may result from increased angiotensinogen. Elevated angiotensin II, acting through the AT1 receptor, may favor vasoconstriction in placental chorionic villi and contribute to impaired fetal blood flow and decreased fetal nutrition observed during preeclampsia. PMID:18259034

  16. Selective C1 Lesioning Slightly Decreases Angiotensin II type I Receptor Expression in the Rat Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM)

    PubMed Central

    Bourassa, Erick A.; Stedenfeld, Kristen A.; Sved, Alan F.; Speth, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is regulated in large part by the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mammals. Projections from the RVLM to the intermediolateral column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord innervate preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system causing elevation of blood pressure and heart rate. A large proportion, but not all, of the neurons in the RVLM contain the enzymes necessary for the production of epinephrine and are identified as the C1 cell group. Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates the RVLM acting upon AT1 receptors. To assess the proportion of AT1 receptors that are located on C1 neurons in the rat RVLM this study employed an antibody to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin, to selectively destroy C1 neurons in the RVLM. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the RVLM was reduced by 57 % in the toxin injected RVLM compared to the contralateral RVLM. In contrast, densitometric analysis of autoradiographic images of 125I-sarcosine1, isoleucine8 Ang II binding to AT1 receptors of the injected side RVLM revealed a small (10%) reduction in AT1 receptor expression compared to the contralateral RVLM. These results suggest that the majority of AT1 receptors in the rat RVLM are located on non-C1 neurons or glia. PMID:26138553

  17. Dietary peptides from the non-digestible fraction of Phaseolus vulgaris L. decrease angiotensin II-dependent proliferation in HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells through the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; Liang, Katie; González de Mejía, Elvira; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to determine the ability of peptides present in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans to decrease angiotensin II (AngII) through the blockade of RAS and its effect on the proliferation of HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells. Pure synthesized peptides GLTSK and GEGSGA and the peptide fractions (PF) of cultivars Azufrado Higuera and Bayo Madero were used. The cells were pretreated with pure peptides, PF or AGT at their IC50 or IC25 values, in comparison with the simultaneous treatment of peptides and AGT. For western blot and microscopy analysis, 100 μM and 0.5 mg mL(-1) were used for pure peptides and PF treatments, respectively. According to the ELISA tests, GLTSK and GEGSGA decreased (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AGT to angiotensin I (AngI) by 38 and 28%, respectively. All the peptides tested reduced (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AngI to AngII from 38 to 50%. When the cells were pretreated with both pure peptides and PF before exposure to AGT, the effectiveness inhibiting cell proliferation was higher than the simultaneous treatment suggesting their preventive effects. GLTSK and GEGSGA interacted with the catalytic site of renin, the angiotensin-I converting enzyme, and the AngII receptor, mainly through hydrogen bonds, polar, hydrophobic and cation-π interactions according to molecular docking. Through confocal microscopy, it was determined that GLTSK and GEGSGA caused the decrease (p < 0.05) of AngII-dependent STAT3 nuclear activation in HCT116 cells by 66 and 23%, respectively. The results suggest that peptides present in the common bean NDF could potentially ameliorate the effects of RAS overexpression in colorectal cancer.

  18. A forskolin derivative, colforsin daropate hydrochloride, inhibits the decrease in cortical renal blood flow induced by noradrenaline or angiotensin II in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Junichi; Minami, Kouichiro; Segawa, Kayoko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Shiraishi, Munehiro; Yamamoto, Chikako; Sata, Takeyoshi; Sung-Teh, Kim; Shigematsu, Akio

    2004-01-01

    A forskolin derivative, colforsin daropate hydrochloride (CDH), acts directly on adenylate cyclase to increase the intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels which produce a positive inotropic effect and a lower blood pressure. However, little is known about the effects of CDH on the renal function. We used laser Doppler flowmetry to measure the cortical renal blood flow (RBF) in male Wistar rats given a continuous intravenous infusion of CDH and evaluated the effects of CDH on the noradrenaline (NA) and angiotensin II (AngII) induced increases in blood pressure and reductions in RBF. Continuous intravenous administration of CDH at 0.25 microg/kg/min did not affect the mean arterial pressure (MAP), but increased heart rate and RBF. Continuous intravenous administration of CDH at high doses (0.5-0.75 microg/kg/min) decreased the MAP, with little effect on the RBF. The administration of exogenous NA (1.7 microg/kg) increased the MAP and decreased the RBF. However, a bolus injection of NA did not decrease the RBF during continuous intravenous administration of CDH, and CDH did not affect the NA-induced increase in MAP. The administration of exogenous AngII (100 ng/kg) increased MAP and decreased RBF and heart rate, but a bolus injection of AngII did not decrease RBF during continuous intravenous administration of CDH. These results suggest that CDH plays a protective role against the pressor effects and the decrease in RBF induced by NA or AngII.

  19. Decreased insulin sensitivity during dietary sodium restriction is not mediated by effects of angiotensin II on insulin action.

    PubMed

    Perry, Colin G; Palmer, Tim; Cleland, Steven J; Morton, Ian J; Salt, Ian P; Petrie, John R; Gould, Gwyn W; Connell, John M C

    2003-08-01

    We have previously reported that modest dietary sodium restriction, as advocated in management guidelines for diabetes, may reduce insulin sensitivity. It has since been suggested that this effect may be mediated via cross-talk between insulin and angiotensin II (AII)-stimulated intracellular second messengers. In order to assess the effect of 5 days of modest sodium restriction (to <80 mmol/day target sodium intake) on insulin sensitivity, 15 healthy males underwent a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp study. One phase was supplemented with sodium tablets and the other with matched placebo. Insulin sensitivity (M) was reduced during dietary sodium restriction [median M value, 10.2 mg/kg per min (interquartile range 9.50-13.85) versus 12.8 mg/kg per min (interquartile range 9.60-14.30), P <0.05]. To elucidate potential mechanisms that may explain this observation, we investigated the effect of AII on insulin action in isolated adipocytes obtained from healthy females. No effect of AII on insulin-mediated glucose transport or suppression of lipolysis was observed. In conclusion, despite the observation that dietary sodium restriction was associated with a median 15% reduction in insulin sensitivity, we found no evidence of a direct effect of AII on insulin action in human adipocytes.

  20. Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Decreases Transforming Growth Factor-β Type II Receptor Expression and Function in Human Renal Proximal Tubule Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-Lin; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), via its receptors, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and plays an important role in the development of renal tubulointersitial fibrosis. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R), which mediates beneficial renal physiological functions, has received attention as a prospective therapeutic target for renoprotection. In this study, we investigated the effect and underlying mechanism of AT2R on the TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) expression and function in human proximal tubular cells (HK-2). Here, we show that the AT2R agonist CGP42112A decreased TGF-βRII protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in HK-2 cells. The inhibitory effect of the AT2R on TGF-βRII expression was blocked by the AT2R antagonists PD123319 or PD123177. Stimulation with TGF-β1 enhanced EMT in HK-2 cells, which was prevented by pre-treatment with CGP42112A. One of mechanisms in this regulation is associated with the increased TGF-βRII degradation after activation of AT2R. Furthermore, laser confocal immunofluorescence microscopy showed that AT2R and TGF-βRII colocalized in HK-2 cells. AT2R and TGF-βRII coimmunoprecipitated and this interaction was increased after AT2R agonist stimulation for 30 min. The inhibitory effect of the AT2R on TGF-βRII expression was also blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, indicating that nitric oxide is involved in the signaling pathway. Taken together, our study indicates that the renal AT2R regulates TGF-βRII expression and function via the nitric oxide pathway, which may be important in the control of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

  1. Angiotensin II, sympathetic nerve activity and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity has been reported to be increased in both humans and animals with chronic heart failure. One of the mechanisms believed to be responsible for this phenomenon is increased systemic and cerebral angiotensin II signaling. Plasma angiotensin II is increased in humans and animals with chronic heart failure. The increase in angiotensin II signaling enhances sympathetic nerve activity through actions on both central and peripheral sites during chronic heart failure. Angiotensin II signaling is enhanced in different brain sites such as the paraventricular nucleus, the rostral ventrolateral medulla and the area postrema. Blocking angiotensin II type 1 receptors decreases sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex when therapy is administered to the paraventricular nucleus. Injection of an angiotensin receptor blocker into the area postrema activates the sympathoinhibitory baroreflex. In peripheral regions, angiotensin II elevates both norepinephrine release and synthesis and inhibits norepinephrine uptake at nerve endings, which may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity seen in chronic heart failure. Increased circulating angiotensin II during chronic heart failure may enhance the sympathoexcitatory chemoreflex and inhibit the sympathoinhibitory baroreflex. In addition, increased circulating angiotensin II can directly act on the central nervous system via the subfornical organ and the area postrema to increase sympathetic outflow. Inhibition of angiotensin II formation and its type 1 receptor has been shown to have beneficial effects in chronic heart failure patients.

  2. Angiotensin II Blockade and Renal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Current national guidelines have recommended the use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, including angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), in preference to other antihypertensive agents for treating hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the mechanisms underlying the renoprotective effects of ARBs are multiple and complex. Blood pressure reduction by systemic vasodilation with an ARB contributes to its beneficial effects in treating kidney disease. Furthermore, ARB-induced renal vasodilation results in an increase in renal blood flow, leading to improvement of renal ischemia and hypoxia. ARBs are also effective in reducing urinary albumin excretion through a reduction in intraglomerular pressure and the protection of glomerular endothelium and/or podocyte injuries. In addition to blocking angiotensin II-induced renal cell and tissue injuries, ARBs can decrease intrarenal angiotensin II levels by reducing proximal tubular angiotensinogen and production of collecting duct renin, as well as angiotensin II accumulation in the kidney. In this review, we will briefly summarize our current understanding of the pharmacological effects of an ARB in the kidney. We will also discuss the possible mechanisms responsible for the renoprotective effects of ARBs on type 2 diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23176216

  3. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  4. A peripherally administered, centrally acting angiotensin II AT2 antagonist selectively increases brain AT1 receptors and decreases brain tyrosine hydroxylase transcription, pituitary vasopressin and ACTH

    PubMed Central

    Macova, Miroslava; Pavel, Jaroslav; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    The physiological actions of brain Angiotensin II AT2 receptors and their relationship to Angiotensin II AT1 receptors remain controversial. To further clarify their role, we determined to what extent systemic administration of an AT2 receptor antagonist affected AT2 receptor binding within the brain and the expression of AT1 receptors. For this purpose, we subcutaneously administered the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319 (1 mg/kg/day) to adult male rats for two weeks via osmotic minipumps. We also studied the content of pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone and vasopressin, representative of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis activation, and the tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression in the locus coeruleus as a measure of central norepinephrine function. We found significant decreases in AT2 receptor binding in brain areas inside the blood brain barrier, the inferior olive and the locus coeruleus. AT2 receptor blockade increased AT1 receptor binding and mRNA expression not only in the subfornical organ and the median eminence, situated outside the blood brain barrier, but also in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, located inside the blood brain barrier. These changes paralleled decreased expression of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in the locus coeruleus and decreased pituitary adrenocorticotropic and vasopressin content. Our results demonstrate that sustained peripheral administration of an AT2 antagonist decreases binding to brain AT2 receptors, indicating that this drug is a useful tool for the study of their central role. AT2 receptor activity inhibition up-regulates AT1 receptor expression in specific brain areas. Blockade of brain AT2 receptors is compatible with enhanced hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and decreased central sympathetic system activity. PMID:19038235

  5. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  6. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  7. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors decrease angiotensin II-induced vascular fibrosis: role of RhoA/ROCK and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Rupérez, Mónica; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Esteban, Vanesa; Carvajal, Gisselle; Plaza, Juan José; Egido, Jesús; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2007-08-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-coenzyme A (CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) present beneficial effects in cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to cardiovascular damage through the production of profibrotic factors, such as connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Our aim was to investigate whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors could modulate Ang II responses, evaluating CTGF expression and the mechanisms underlying this process. In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) atorvastatin and simvastatin inhibited Ang II-induced CTGF production. The inhibitory effect of statins on CTGF upregulation was reversed by mevalonate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, suggesting that RhoA inhibition could be involved in this process. In VSMCs, statins inhibited Ang II-induced Rho membrane localization and activation. In these cells Ang II regulated CTGF via RhoA/Rho kinase activation, as shown by inhibition of Rho with C3 exoenzyme, RhoA dominant-negative overexpression, and Rho kinase inhibition. Furthermore, activation of p38MAPK and JNK, and redox process were also involved in Ang II-mediated CTGF upregulation, and were downregulated by statins. In rats infused with Ang II (100 ng/kg per minute) for 2 weeks, treatment with atorvastatin (5 mg/kg per day) diminished aortic CTGF and Rho activation without blood pressure modification. Rho kinase inhibition decreased CTGF upregulation in rat aorta, mimicking statin effect. CTGF is a vascular fibrosis mediator. Statins diminished extracellular matrix (ECM) overexpression caused by Ang II in vivo and in vitro. In summary, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors inhibit several intracellular signaling systems activated by Ang II (RhoA/Rho kinase and MAPK pathways and redox process) involved in the regulation of CTGF. Our results may explain, at least in part, some beneficial effects of statins in cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Upregulation of ERK1/2-eNOS via AT2 Receptors Decreases the Contractile Response to Angiotensin II in Resistance Mesenteric Arteries from Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hagihara, Graziela N.; Lobato, Nubia S.; Filgueira, Fernando P.; Akamine, Eliana H.; Aragão, Danielle S.; Casarini, Dulce E.; Carvalho, Maria Helena C.; Fortes, Zuleica B.

    2014-01-01

    It has been clearly established that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKS) are important mediators of angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling via AT1 receptors in the vasculature. However, evidence for a role of these kinases in changes of Ang II-induced vasoconstriction in obesity is still lacking. Here we sought to determine whether vascular MAPKs are differentially activated by Ang II in obese animals. The role of AT2 receptors was also evaluated. Male monosodium glutamate-induced obese (obese) and non-obese Wistar rats (control) were used. The circulating concentrations of Ang I and Ang II, determined by HPLC, were increased in obese rats. Ang II-induced isometric contraction was decreased in endothelium-intact resistance mesenteric arteries from obese compared with control rats and exhibited a retarded AT1 receptor antagonist response. Blocking of AT2 receptors and inhibition of either endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) or extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) restored Ang II-induced contraction in obese rats. Western blot analysis revealed increased protein expression of AT2 receptors in arteries from obese rats. Basal and Ang II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was also increased in obese rats. Blockade of either AT1 or AT2 receptors corrected the increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in arteries from obese rats to levels observed in control preparations. Phosphorylation of eNOS was increased in obese rats. Incubation with the ERK1/2 inhibitor before Ang II stimulation did not affect eNOS phosphorylation in control rats; however, it corrected the increased phosphorylation of eNOS in obese rats. These results clearly demonstrate that enhanced AT2 receptor and ERK1/2-induced, NO-mediated vasodilation reduces Ang II-induced contraction in an endothelium-dependent manner in obese rats. PMID:25170617

  9. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockade decreases CTGF/CCN2-mediated damage and fibrosis in normal and dystrophic skeletal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Morales, María Gabriela; Cabrera, Daniel; Vio, Carlos P; Brandan, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN-2) is mainly involved in the induction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The levels of CTGF correlate with the degree and severity of fibrosis in many tissues, including dystrophic skeletal muscle. The CTGF overexpression in tibialis anterior skeletal muscle using an adenoviral vector reproduced many of the features observed in dystrophic muscles including muscle damage and regeneration, fibrotic response and decrease in the skeletal muscle strength. The renin–angiotensin system is involved in the genesis and progression of fibrotic diseases through its main fibrotic components angiotensin-II and its transducer receptor AT-1. The use of AT-1 receptor blockers (ARB) has been shown to decrease fibrosis. In this paper, we show the effect of AT-1 receptor blockade on CTGF-dependent biological activity in skeletal muscle cells as well as the response to CTGF overexpression in normal skeletal muscle. Our results show that in myoblasts ARB decreased CTGF-mediated increase of ECM protein levels, extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK-1/2) phosphorylation and stress fibres formation. In tibialis anterior muscle overexpressing CTGF using an adenovirus, ARB treatment decreased CTGF-mediated increase of ECM molecules, α-SMA and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation levels. Quite remarkable, ARB was able to prevent the loss of contractile force of tibialis anterior muscles overexpressing CTGF. Finally, we show that ARB decreased the levels of fibrotic proteins, CTGF and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation augmented in a dystrophic skeletal muscle from mdx mice. We propose that ARB is a novel pharmacological tool that can be used to decrease the fibrosis induced by CTGF in skeletal muscle associated with muscular dystrophies. PMID:21645240

  10. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist decreases plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 and soluble adhesion molecules in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tsutamoto, T; Wada, A; Maeda, K; Mabuchi, N; Hayashi, M; Tsutsui, T; Ohnishi, M; Sawaki, M; Fujii, M; Matsumoto, T; Kinoshita, M

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of an angiotensin (Ang II) type 1 receptor antagonist on immune markers in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Ang II stimulates production of immune factors via the Ang II type 1 receptor in vitro, and the long-term effects of Ang II type 1 receptor antagonists on plasma markers of immune activation are unknown in patients with CHF. Twenty-three patients with mild to moderate CHF with left ventricular dysfunction were randomly divided into two groups: treatment with Ang II type 1 receptor (candesartan cilexetil) (n = 14) or placebo (n = 9). We measured plasma levels of immune factors such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1). We also measured plasma levels of the neurohumoral factors such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a biological marker of ANP and BNP. Plasma levels of TNFalpha, IL-6, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were increased in the 23 CHF patients compared with normal subjects and significantly decreased after 14 weeks of candesartan cilexetil treatment, but did not change in the placebo group. Plasma levels of BNP, which is a marker of ventricular injury, significantly decreased, and the molar ratio of plasma cGMP to cardiac natriuretic peptides (ANP + BNP) was significantly increased after candesartan cilexetil treatment, but did not change in the placebo group. These findings suggest that 14 weeks of treatment with an Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist (candesartan cilexetil) decreased plasma levels of the immune markers such as TNFalpha, IL-6, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 and that it improved the biological compensatory action of endogenous cardiac natriuretic peptides in patients with mild to moderate CHF.

  11. Intracellular angiotensin II activates rat myometrium

    PubMed Central

    Deliu, Elena; Tica, Andrei A.; Motoc, Dana; Brailoiu, G. Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II is a modulator of myometrial activity; both AT1 and AT2 receptors are expressed in myometrium. Since in other tissues angiotensin II has been reported to activate intracellular receptors, we assessed the effects of intracellular administration of angiotensin II via microinjection on myometrium, using calcium imaging. Intracellular injection of angiotensin II increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in myometrial cells in a dose-dependent manner. The effect was abolished by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan but not by the AT2 receptor antagonist PD-123319. Disruption of the endo-lysosomal system, but not that of Golgi apparatus, prevented the angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. Blockade of AT1 receptor internalization had no effect, whereas blockade of microautophagy abolished the increase in [Ca2+]i produced by intracellular injection of angiotensin II; this indicates that microautophagy is a critical step in transporting the peptide into the endo-lysosomes lumenum. The response to angiotensin II was slightly reduced in Ca2+-free saline, indicating a major involvement of Ca2+ release from internal stores. Blockade of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors with heparin and xestospongin C or inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U-73122 abolished the response to angiotensin II, supporting the involvement of PLC-IP3 pathway. Angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was slightly reduced by antagonism of ryanodine receptors. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that in myometrial cells, intracellular angiotensin II activates AT1-like receptors on lysosomes and activates PLC-IP3-dependent Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum; the response is further augmented by a Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism via ryanodine receptors activation. PMID:21613610

  12. Mechanisms of angiotensin II natriuresis and antinatriuresis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Hall, J E; Montani, J P; Guyton, A C; Langford, H G; Cornell, J E

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of changes in renal arterial pressure (RAP), renal hemodynamics, and tubular reabsorption in mediating the natriuretic and antinatriuretic actions of angiotensin II (ANG II). In seven anesthetized dogs, endogenous ANG II formation was blocked with captopril, and ANG II was infused intravenously at rates of 5-1,215 ng X kg-1 X min-1 while RAP was either servo-controlled at the preinfusion level or permitted to increase. When RAP was servo-controlled, ANG II infusion at all rates from 5-1,215 ng X kg-1 X min-1 decreased urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) and fractional sodium excretion (FENa) while increasing fractional reabsorption of lithium (FRLi) (an index of proximal tubular fractional sodium reabsorption) and causing no change in calculated distal tubule fractional sodium reabsorption (FRDNa). When RAP was permitted to increase, ANG II infusion rates up to 45 ng X kg-1. min-1 also decreased UNaV and FENa while increasing FRLi and causing no change in FRDNa. However, at 135 ng X kg-1 X min-1 and above, UNaV and FENa increased while FRLi and FRDNa decreased when RAP was allowed to rise, even though renal blood flow and filtration fraction were not substantially different from the values observed when RAP was servo-controlled. Filtered sodium load was slightly higher when RAP was permitted to increase during ANG II infusion compared with when RAP was servo-controlled, although the differences were not statistically significant. Thus, even very large doses of ANG II cause antinatriuresis when RAP is prevented from increasing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The role of angiotensin II receptors in stroke protection.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2012-06-01

    The hypothesis that angiotensin II (Ang II) might have a stroke-protective role was first proposed by Brown and Brown about 25 years ago. Their hypothesis was generated from the results of the first Medical Research Council trial in patients with mild to moderate hypertension, which showed that patients treated with the diuretic bendrofluazide had a 70% decrease in strokes compared with those treated with the β-blocker propranolol for similar blood pressure reduction. This hypothesis, which remained dormant for many years, was recently resurrected by several experimental studies that showed that the brain possesses its own renin-angiotensin system (RAS) similar to the one existing in the systemic circulation. These studies also showed that the brain RAS plays an important role in stroke prevention and neuronal protection through its active peptide Ang II. In addition, these studies demonstrated that the beneficial effects of Ang II are mediated through stimulation of its subtype 2 receptors, and possibly through stimulation of the subtype 4 receptors by Ang IV, a metabolite of Ang II. Drugs that selectively block the Ang II subtype 1 receptors, such as the angiotensin receptor blockers, have shown superior protection against strokes and neuronal damage than drugs that decrease the generation of Ang II, such as the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and β-blockers. In this review, the role of the Ang II receptors and their mechanism of action regarding stroke prevention are discussed in view of the evidence from experimental and clinical studies.

  14. Measurement of immunoreactive angiotensin peptides in rat tissues: some pitfalls in angiotensin II analysis.

    PubMed

    De Silva, P E; Husain, A; Smeby, R R; Khairallah, P A

    1988-10-01

    Angiotensin II, the major effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system, is an endocrine and paracrine regulator of tissue function. To determine its physiological role, it is important to quantify angiotensin II and related fragment peptides in tissues and plasma as a first step toward understanding angiotensin II metabolism within tissues. A fully characterized, sensitive, and reproducible immunochemical assay has been developed for quantitating angiotensin II immunoreactivity in tissues and plasma. We identified two methodological events of critical importance, incompletely addressed in previously reported studies. First, the nonspecific interference resulting from Sep-Pak processing was found to be due to hydrophobic impurities in the octade-casilane absorbent which were eliminated by washing the Sep-Pak with tetrahydrofuran and hexane before use. Second, a significant discrepancy was observed in the recoveries of angiotensin II and 125I-angiotensin II added to tissue extracts following high-pressure liquid chromatography. Angiotensin II immunoreactivity extracted from decapitated rat adrenal gland, brain, and kidney (target organs for angiotensin II), ovary and uterus (potential target organs for angiotensin II), and plasma has been characterized. The predominant component of the angiotensin II immunoreactivity was the biologically active octapeptide angiotensin II. However, in the brain, the ratio of angiotensin II to C-terminal angiotensin II immunoreactive fragments was lower than observed in other tissues studied. Other angiotensin II C-terminal immunoreactive peptide fragments-the biologically active heptapeptide and the biologically inactive angiotensin(3-8) and angiotensin(4-8)--were also detected in variable quantities in the various tissues.

  15. Proteinuria, a modifiable risk factor: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).

    PubMed

    Dykeman-Sharpe, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Microalbuminuria and proteinuria have been determined to be modifiable risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease as well as risk factors for cardiovascular events. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers have been demonstrated to decrease proteinuria at all stages and slow the progression of renal disease. Proteinuria can be used as a marker of successful treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease in combination with other established targets. This article discusses the various diagnostic tests used for the detection of microalbuminuria and proteinuria and appropriate pharmaceutical treatment.

  16. Unexpected binding of an octapeptide to the angiotensin II receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, R.L.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Rosenberg, E.; Hoeprich, P.; Teitelbaum, A.; Brunck, T.; Colby, C.B.; Gloff, C.

    1987-12-01

    An octapeptide, TBI-22 (Lys-Gly-Val-Tyr-Ile, His-Ala-Leu), inhibited binding of angiotensin II by a solubilized angiotensin receptor partially purified from rabbit liver. This inhibition appears to result from competition for binding to the same receptor. Radioiodinated TBI-22, like angiotensin II, bound to the solubilized receptor with an affinity such that the binding was inhibited 50% by unlabeled TBI-22 or angiotensin II at nanomolar concentrations. The binding reaction, like that for angiotensin II, required p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. TBI-22 and angiotensin II share the sequence Val-Tyr-Ile-His; this tetrapeptide alone, however, did not inhibit binding of angiotensin II. Replacement of the tyrosine residue by aspartic acid in TBI-22 greatly reduced the ability of the peptide to compete with angiotensin II for binding, suggesting an important contribution of this residue to the configuration required for recognition by the receptor.

  17. Effect of angiotensin II infusion on rhythmic clock gene expression and local renin-angiotensin system in the aorta of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Herichova, I; Zsoldosova, K; Vesela, A; Zeman, M

    2014-07-01

    Endogenous daily rhythms in physiology are regulated by the circadian system consisting of the central and peripheral components. The renin-angiotensin system, involved predominantly in water balance and blood pressure control, exerts 24 h rhythmicity in many of its parameters. The present study is aimed to study possible interactions between these two control systems. We analyzed effects induced by angiotensin II administration on clock gene expression in the aorta of rat and an ability of angiotensin II to influence the local tissue renin-angiotensin system. Angiotensin II was infused in a dose of 100 ng/kg/min by subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 28 days to male Wistar rats. Gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Angiotensin II administration resulted in an increase in blood pressure, heart weight/body weight index, and water intake in comparison with controls. We observed a significant phase advance in per2 and npas2 mRNA rhythms and decreased mesor of npas2 rhythmic expression in the aorta of angiotensin II-treated rats compared to control. Angiotensin II administration did not influence daily pattern and level of at1 mRNA expression. The ratio ace/ace2 showed a rhythmic pattern in the aorta of control rats with peak levels in the dark period. Angiotensin II infusion influenced clock gene expression and diminished a daily rhythm in ace/ace2 mRNA ratio indicating modulatory effect of angiotensin II on tissue renin-angiotensin system in the aorta.

  18. Control of glomerular filtration rate by circulating angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Coleman, T G; Guyton, A C; Kastner, P R; Granger, J P

    1981-09-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have provided evidence that the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in controlling glomerular filtration rate (GFR) through an efferent arteriolar vasoconstrictor mechanism; however, the relative importance of circulating versus intrarenally formed angiotensin II (ANG II) in this control has not been determined. In the present study, the role of circulating ANG II in regulating GFR during reduced renal artery pressure (RAP) was examined in sodium-depleted dogs. After 90 min of infusion of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor SQ 14225, which presumably inhibited formation of both circulating and intrarenal ANG II, reduction of RAP to 81 +/- 2 mmHg resulted in marked decreases in GFR, filtration fraction (FF), and calculated efferent arteriolar resistance (RE), whereas renal blood flow (RBF) was maintained approximately 40% above initial control levels determined before SQ 14225 infusion. Replacement of circulating ANG II during SQ 14225 infusion, by intravenous infusion of ANG II at rates that decreased RBF to control levels, increased GFR, FF, and RE to levels not significantly different from control while RAP was maintained constant by aortic constriction. These observations suggest that circulating ANG II plays an important role in regulating RE and GFR during reductions in RAP. The importance of intrarenally formed ANG II in controlling GFR remains to be determined.

  19. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  20. Use of Enterally Delivered Angiotensin II Type Ia Receptor Antagonists to Reduce the Severity of Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Koga, Hiroyuki; Larsen, Scott D.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Turbiak, Anjanette J.; Jin, Xiaohong; Lucas, Peter C.; Lipka, Elke; Hillfinger, John; Kim, Jae Seung

    2011-01-01

    Background Renin-angiotensin system blockade reduces inflammation in several organ systems. Having found a fourfold increase in angiotensin II type Ia receptor expression in a dextran sodium sulfate colitis model, we targeted blockade with angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists to prevent colitis development. Because hypotension is a major complication of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists use, we hypothesized that use of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists compounds which lack cell membrane permeability, and thus enteric absorption, would allow for direct enteral delivery at far higher concentrations than would be tolerated systemically, yet retain efficacy. Methods Based on the structure of the angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist losartan, deschloro-losartan was synthesized, which has extremely poor cell membrane permeability. Angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy was evaluated by determining the ability to block NF-κB activation in vitro. Dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in mice and angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy delivered transanally was assessed. Results In vitro, deschloro-losartan demonstrated near equal angiotensin II type Ia receptor blockade compared to losartan as well as another angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist, candesartan. In the dextran sodium sulfate model, each compound significantly improved clinical and histologic scores and epithelial cell apoptosis. Abundance of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL6 mRNA were significantly decreased with each compound. In vitro and in vivo intestinal drug absorption, as well as measures of blood pressure and mucosal and colonic blood flow, showed significantly lower uptake of deschloro-losartan compared to losartan and candesartan. Conclusions This study demonstrated efficacy of high-dose angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists in this colitis model. We postulate that a specially designed angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist with

  1. Angiotensin II in Refractory Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Elio; Gleeson, Patrick J; Annoni, Filippo; Agosta, Sara; Orlando, Sergio; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Scolletta, Sabino

    2017-05-01

    Refractory septic shock is defined as persistently low mean arterial blood pressure despite volume resuscitation and titrated vasopressors/inotropes in patients with a proven or suspected infection and concomitant organ dysfunction. Its management typically requires high doses of catecholamines, which can induce significant adverse effects such as ischemia and arrhythmias. Angiotensin II (Ang II), a key product of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, is a vasopressor agent that could be used in conjunction with other vasopressors to stabilize critically ill patients during refractory septic shock, and reduce catecholamine requirements. However, very few clinical data are available to support Ang II administration in this setting. Here, we review the current literature on this topic to better understand the role of Ang II administration during refractory septic shock, differentiating experimental from clinical studies. We also consider the potential role of exogenous Ang II administration in specific organ dysfunction and possible pitfalls with Ang II in sepsis. Various issues remain unresolved and future studies should investigate important topics such as: the optimal dose and timing of Ang II administration, a comparison between Ang II and the other vasopressors (epinephrine; vasopressin), and Ang II effects on microcirculation.

  2. Plasma angiotensin II concentrations in diabetic ketoacidosis and in hyperosmolar non-ketotic hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P A; Gonggrijp, H; Crowley, M J; Ferriss, J B; O'Sullivan, D J

    1981-01-01

    Plasma angiotensin II concentrations were measured in 14 patients in diabetic ketoacidosis and in two patients with hyperosmolar non-ketotic hyperglycemia, before treatment and again when blood glucose control was restored. In the ketoacidosis group plasma angiotensin II before treatment was markedly raised in all patients with otherwise uncomplicated diabetes, but was within the normal range in some patients with long-term complications such as neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy. Mean angiotensin II before treatment was significantly higher in otherwise uncomplicated patients than in those with long-term complications. However, plasma angiotensin II decreased with improved control in all. Angiotensin II levels did not correlate with indices of rehydration such as changes in blood urea, packed cell volume and calculated changes in plasma volume. There was, however, a significant negative association between pre-treatment angiotensin II and pH. Two patients with hyperosmolar non-ketotic hyperglycemia were more dehydrated but less acidotic. Pre-treatment angiotensin II in each was well below the mean of the ketoacidosis group. These data are further evidence that the renin-angiotensin system may be imparied in diabetics with long-term complications. In addition, they suggest that factors other than fluid depletion are also important in activating the renin-angiotensin system in uncontrolled diabetes.

  3. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated augmentation of renal interstitial fluid angiotensin II in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Akira; Seth, Dale M; Navar, L Gabriel

    2003-10-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent hypertension is associated with augmented intrarenal concentrations of Ang II; however, the distribution of the increased intrarenal Ang II has not been fully established. To determine the changes in renal interstitial fluid Ang II concentrations in Ang II-induced hypertension and the consequences of treatment with an angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker. Rats were selected to receive vehicle (5% acetic acid subcutaneously; n = 6), Ang II (80 ng/min subcutaneously, via osmotic minipump; n = 7) or Ang II plus an AT1 receptor antagonist, candesartan cilexetil (10 mg/kg per day, in drinking water; n = 6) for 13-14 days, at which time, experiments were performed on anesthetized rats. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the renal cortex and were perfused at 2 microl/min. The effluent dialysate concentrations of Ang I and Ang II were measured by radioimmunoassay and reported values were corrected for the equilibrium rates at this perfusion rate. Ang II-infused rats developed greater mean arterial pressures (155 +/- 7 mmHg) than vehicle-infused rats (108 +/- 3 mmHg). Ang II-infused rats showed greater plasma (181 +/- 30 fmol/ml) and kidney (330 +/- 38 fmol/g) Ang II concentrations than vehicle-infused rats (98 +/- 14 fmol/ml and 157 +/- 22 fmol/g, respectively). Renal interstitial fluid Ang II concentrations were much greater than plasma concentrations, averaging 5.74 +/- 0.26 pmol/ml in Ang II-infused rats - significantly greater than those in vehicle-infused rats (2.86 +/- 0.23 pmol/ml). Candesartan treatment prevented the hypertension (87 +/- 3 mmHg) and led to increased plasma Ang II concentrations (441 +/- 27 fmol/ml), but prevented increases in kidney (120 +/- 15 fmol/g) and renal interstitial fluid (2.15 +/- 0.12 pmol/ml) Ang II concentrations. These data indicate that Ang II-infused rats develop increased renal interstitial fluid concentrations of Ang II, which may contribute to the increased vascular resistance and

  4. Angiotensin II: role in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Córdova, Gonzalo; Salas, José Diego

    2012-09-01

    Skeletal muscle, the main protein reservoir in the body, is a tissue that exhibits high plasticity when exposed to changes. Muscle proteins can be mobilized into free amino acids when skeletal muscle wasting occurs, a process called skeletal muscle atrophy. This wasting is an important systemic or local manifestation under disuse conditions (e.g., bed rest or immobilization), in starvation, in older adults, and in several diseases. The molecular mechanisms involved in muscle wasting imply the activation of specific signaling pathways which ultimately manage muscle responses to modulate biological events such as increases in protein catabolism, oxidative stress, and cell death by apoptosis. Many factors have been involved in the generation and maintenance of atrophy in skeletal muscle, among them angiotensin II (Ang-II), the main peptide of renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Together with Ang-II, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and the Ang-II receptor type 1 (AT-1 receptor) are expressed in skeletal muscle, forming an important local axis that can regulate its function. In many of the conditions that lead to muscle wasting, there is an impairment of RAS in a global or local fashion. At this point, there are several pieces of evidence that suggest the participation of Ang-II, ACE, and AT-1 receptor in the generation of skeletal muscle atrophy. Interestingly, the Ang-II participation in muscle atrophy is strongly ligated to the regulation of hypertrophic activity of factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). In this article, we reviewed the current state of Ang-II and RAS function on skeletal muscle wasting and its possible use as a therapeutic target to improve skeletal muscle function under atrophic conditions.

  5. Effect of angiotensin II and captopril on renal tubular function in man.

    PubMed Central

    Düsing, R; Moritz, J; Glänzer, K; Kramer, H J

    1985-01-01

    The effects of nonpressor doses of intravenous angiotensin II and of the converting enzyme inhibitor captopril on renal excretory function were investigated in eight healthy volunteers during sustained water diuresis on a constant intake of 150 mmol sodium per day. The angiotensin II-analogue val5-angiotensin II-asp1-beta-amide was infused i.v. at an average dose of 2.6 ng kg-1 min-1 which was the highest dose without a significant effect on arterial blood pressure. This subpressor dose of angiotensin II significantly decreased urine volume, urinary excretion of sodium, chloride and phosphate and distal delivery [(CH2O + CCl)/GFR X 100] in the absence of changes in GFR or distal fractional chloride absorption [CH2O/(CH2O + CCl)]. In a second series of experiments, an oral dose of 50 mg of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril was given to the sodium replete volunteers. In this study, captopril did not affect arterial blood pressure, GFR or any of the determined parameters of renal tubular function. Our results strongly suggest that the nonpressor dose of angiotensin II induced renal retention of sodium chloride via increased absorption in the proximal tubule. Thus, they further support the concept that angiotensin II participates in the regulation of renal sodium chloride excretion by affecting proximal tubular absorptive capacity. However, in the sodium replete stage, angiotensin II is of no major importance in regulating sodium chloride excretion. PMID:3884028

  6. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of ACE2 enzymatic activity. Examination of the subcellular localization of ACE2 revealed that Ang-II treatment leads to ACE2 internalization and degradation into lysosomes. These effects were prevented by both the Ang-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan and the lysosomal inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, in HEK293T cells, which lack endogenous AT1R, Ang-II failed to promote ACE2 internalization. Moreover, this effect could be induced after AT1R transfection. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AT1R and ACE2 form complexes and these interactions were decreased by Ang-II treatment, which also enhanced ACE2 ubiquitination. In contrast, ACE2 activity was not changed by transfection of AT2 or Mas receptors. In vivo, Ang-II-mediated hypertension was blunted by chronic infusion of leupeptin in wildtype C57Bl/6, but not in ACE2 knockout mice. Overall, this is the first demonstration that elevated Ang-II levels reduce ACE2 expression and activity by stimulation of lysosomal degradation through an AT1R-dependent mechanism. PMID:25225202

  7. Angiotensin II-regulated transcription regulatory genes in adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romero, Damian G; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E

    2010-11-29

    Transcription regulatory genes are crucial modulators of cell physiology and metabolism whose intracellular levels are tightly controlled in response to extracellular stimuli. We previously reported a set of 29 transcription regulatory genes modulated by angiotensin II in H295R human adrenocortical cells and their roles in regulating the expression of the last and unique enzymes of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid biosynthetic pathways, 11β-hydroxylase and aldosterone synthase, respectively, using gene expression reporter assays. To study the effect of this set of transcription regulatory genes on adrenal steroidogenesis, H295R cells were transfected by high-efficiency nucleofection and aldosterone and cortisol were measured in cell culture supernatants under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. BCL11B, BHLHB2, CITED2, ELL2, HMGA1, MAFF, NFIL3, PER1, SERTAD1, and VDR significantly stimulated aldosterone secretion, while EGR1, FOSB, and ZFP295 decreased aldosterone secretion. BTG2, HMGA1, MITF, NR4A1, and ZFP295 significantly increased cortisol secretion, while BCL11B, NFIL3, PER1, and SIX2 decreased cortisol secretion. We also report the effect of some of these regulators on the expression of endogenous aldosterone synthase and 11β-hydroxylase under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. In summary, this study reports for the first time the effects of a set of angiotensin II-modulated transcription regulatory genes on aldosterone and cortisol secretion and the expression levels of the last and unique enzymes of the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid biosynthetic pathways. Abnormal regulation of mineralocorticoid or glucocorticoid secretion is involved in several pathophysiological conditions. These transcription regulatory genes may be involved in adrenal steroidogenesis pathologies; thus they merit additional study as potential candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Oxidative DNA Damage in Kidneys and Heart of Hypertensive Mice Is Prevented by Blocking Angiotensin II and Aldosterone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Susanne; Amann, Kerstin; Mandel, Philipp; Zimnol, Anna; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recently, we could show that angiotensin II, the reactive peptide of the blood pressure-regulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system, causes the formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in kidneys and hearts of hypertensive mice. To further investigate on the one hand the mechanism of DNA damage caused by angiotensin II, and on the other hand possible intervention strategies against end-organ damage, the effects of substances interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system on angiotensin II-induced genomic damage were studied. Methods In C57BL/6-mice, hypertension was induced by infusion of 600 ng/kg • min angiotensin II. The animals were additionally treated with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan, the mineralocorticoid receptor blocker eplerenone and the antioxidant tempol. DNA damage and the activation of transcription factors were studied by immunohistochemistry and protein expression analysis. Results Administration of angiotensin II led to a significant increase of blood pressure, decreased only by candesartan. In kidneys and hearts of angiotensin II-treated animals, significant oxidative stress could be detected (1.5-fold over control). The redox-sensitive transcription factors Nrf2 and NF-κB were activated in the kidney by angiotensin II-treatment (4- and 3-fold over control, respectively) and reduced by all interventions. In kidneys and hearts an increase of DNA damage (3- and 2-fold over control, respectively) and of DNA repair (3-fold over control) was found. These effects were ameliorated by all interventions in both organs. Consistently, candesartan and tempol were more effective than eplerenone. Conclusion Angiotensin II-induced DNA damage is caused by angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated formation of oxidative stress in vivo. The angiotensin II-mediated physiological increase of aldosterone adds to the DNA-damaging effects. Blocking angiotensin II and mineralocorticoid receptors therefore

  9. Angiotensin II acts through the angiotensin 1a receptor to upregulate pendrin

    PubMed Central

    Verlander, Jill W.; Hong, Seongun; Pech, Vladimir; Bailey, James L.; Agazatian, Diana; Matthews, Sharon W.; Coffman, Thomas M.; Le, Thu; Inagami, Tadashi; Whitehill, Florence M.; Weiner, I. David; Farley, Donna B.; Kim, Young Hee

    2011-01-01

    Pendrin is an anion exchanger expressed in the apical regions of B and non-A, non-B intercalated cells. Since angiotensin II increases pendrin-mediated Cl− absorption in vitro, we asked whether angiotensin II increases pendrin expression in vivo and whether angiotensin-induced hypertension is pendrin dependent. While blood pressure was similar in pendrin null and wild-type mice under basal conditions, following 2 wk of angiotensin II administration blood pressure was 31 mmHg lower in pendrin null than in wild-type mice. Thus pendrin null mice have a blunted pressor response to angiotensin II. Further experiments explored the effect of angiotensin on pendrin expression. Angiotensin II administration shifted pendrin label from the subapical space to the apical plasma membrane, independent of aldosterone. To explore the role of the angiotensin receptors in this response, pendrin abundance and subcellular distribution were examined in wild-type, angiotensin type 1a (Agtr1a) and type 2 receptor (Agtr2) null mice given 7 days of a NaCl-restricted diet (< 0.02% NaCl). Some mice received an Agtr1 inhibitor (candesartan) or vehicle. Both Agtr1a gene ablation and Agtr1 inhibitors shifted pendrin label from the apical plasma membrane to the subapical space, independent of the Agtr2 or nitric oxide (NO). However, Agtr1 ablation reduced pendrin protein abundance through the Agtr2 and NO. Thus angiotensin II-induced hypertension is pendrin dependent. Angiotensin II acts through the Agtr1a to shift pendrin from the subapical space to the apical plasma membrane. This Agtr1 action may be blunted by the Agtr2, which acts through NO to reduce pendrin protein abundance. PMID:21921024

  10. Angiotensin II, hypertension, and angiotensin II receptor antagonism: Roles in the behavioural and brain pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Roelofs, Monica; van der Lugt, Robert; Heerschap, Arend; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen Ahr

    2016-01-01

    Elevated angiotensin II causes hypertension and contributes to Alzheimer's disease by affecting cerebral blood flow. Angiotensin II receptor blockers may provide candidates to reduce (vascular) risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. We studied effects of two months of angiotensin II-induced hypertension on systolic blood pressure, and treatment with the angiotensin II receptor blockers, eprosartan mesylate, after one month of induced hypertension in wild-type C57bl/6j and AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 (AβPP/PS1/Alzheimer's disease) mice. AβPP/PS1 showed higher systolic blood pressure than wild-type. Subsequent eprosartan mesylate treatment restored this elevated systolic blood pressure in all mice. Functional connectivity was decreased in angiotensin II-infused Alzheimer's disease and wild-type mice, and only 12 months of Alzheimer's disease mice showed impaired cerebral blood flow. Only angiotensin II-infused Alzheimer's disease mice exhibited decreased spatial learning in the Morris water maze. Altogether, angiotensin II-induced hypertension not only exacerbated Alzheimer's disease-like pathological changes such as impairment of cerebral blood flow, functional connectivity, and cognition only in Alzheimer's disease model mice, but it also induced decreased functional connectivity in wild-type mice. However, we could not detect hypertension-induced overexpression of Aβ nor increased neuroinflammation. Our findings suggest a link between midlife hypertension, decreased cerebral hemodynamics and connectivity in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Eprosartan mesylate treatment restored and beneficially affected cerebral blood flow and connectivity. This model could be used to investigate prevention/treatment strategies in early Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Strict angiotensin blockade prevents the augmentation of intrarenal angiotensin II and podocyte abnormalities in type 2 diabetic rats with microalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Akira; Nakagawa, Toshitaka; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Yukiko; Okada, Noriyuki; Konishi, Yoshio; Morikawa, Takashi; Okumura, Michiaki; Meda, Isseiki; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Hosomi, Naohisa; Mori, Takefumi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Imanishi, Masahito

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Beneficial effects of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers have been indicated for patients with diabetic nephropathy. We investigated the effects of an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, telmisartan, on intrarenal angiotensin II levels and the progression of albuminuria or glomerular injury in type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty rats with microalbuminuria. Methods and Results Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were randomly treated with telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day, orally), hydralazine (25 mg/kg/day in drinking water) or vehicle from the initiation of albuminuria (13 weeks old). At this age, Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty rats showed low but detectable albuminuria (1.0±0.1 mg/day) and higher systolic blood pressure, postprandial blood glucose and kidney angiotensin II levels than age-matched nondiabetic Long–Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats. At 35 weeks of age, vehicle-treated Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty rats did not show apparent glomerular injury or tubulointerstitial fibrosis but did exhibit severe albuminuria (72.6±5.9 mg/day) and accumulation of cytoplasmic granules containing albumin in podocytes. Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty rats also showed higher systolic blood pressure, postprandial blood glucose, collagen gene expression, desmin staining (a marker of podocyte injury) and angiotensin II levels than Long–Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats. Treatment with telmisartan did not affect postprandial blood glucose but decreased systolic blood pressure, collagen gene expression, desmin staining and angiotensin II levels. Telmisartan also prevented the development of albuminuria (0.6±0.1 mg/day at 35 weeks old) and accumulation of cytoplasmic granules. Hydralazine treatment resulted in a similar reduction in systolic blood pressure and partially attenuated the albuminuria (35.4±1.8 mg/day at 35 weeks old) but did not affect the other parameters. Conclusion The present results suggest the contribution of

  12. Liver Angiotensinogen Is the Primary Source of Renal Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Niimura, Fumio; Shimizu, Akihiro; Pastan, Ira; Saito, Akihiko; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Ichikawa, Iekuni

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II content in the kidney is much higher than in the plasma, and it increases more in kidney diseases through an uncertain mechanism. Because the kidney abundantly expresses angiotensinogen mRNA, transcriptional dysregulation of angiotensinogen within the kidney is one potential cause of increased renal angiotensin II in the setting of disease. Here, we observed that kidney-specific angiotensinogen knockout mice had levels of renal angiotensinogen protein and angiotensin II that were similar to those levels of control mice. In contrast, liver-specific knockout of angiotensinogen nearly abolished plasma and renal angiotensinogen protein and renal tissue angiotensin II. Immunohistochemical analysis in mosaic proximal tubules of megalin knockout mice revealed that angiotensinogen protein was incorporated selectively in megalin-intact cells of the proximal tubule, indicating that the proximal tubule reabsorbs filtered angiotensinogen through megalin. Disruption of the filtration barrier in a transgenic mouse model of podocyte-selective injury increased renal angiotensin II content and markedly increased both tubular and urinary angiotensinogen protein without an increase in renal renin activity, supporting the dependency of renal angiotensin II generation on filtered angiotensinogen. Taken together, these data suggest that liver-derived angiotensinogen is the primary source of renal angiotensinogen protein and angiotensin II. Furthermore, an abnormal increase in the permeability of the glomerular capillary wall to angiotensinogen, which characterizes proteinuric kidney diseases, enhances the synthesis of renal angiotensin II. PMID:22518004

  13. Gender differences in response to acute and chronic angiotensin II infusion: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Toering, Tsjitske J; van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Visser, Folkert W; Buikema, Hendrik; Navis, Gerjan; Faas, Marijke M; Lely, A Titia

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease progress at a slower rate to end stage renal disease than men. As angiotensin II has both hemodynamic and direct renal effects, we hypothesized that the female protection may result from gender differences in responses to angiotensin II. Therefore, we studied gender differences in response to angiotensin II, during acute (human) and chronic (rats) angiotensin II administration. In young healthy men (n = 18) and women (n = 18) we studied the responses of renal hemodynamics (125I-iothalamate and 131I-Hippuran) and blood pressure to graded angiotensin II infusion (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 ng/kg/min for 1 h). Men had increased responses of diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.05), and a more pronounced decrease in effective renal plasma flow (P = 0.009) than women. We measured the changes in proteinuria and blood pressure in response to chronic administration (200 ng/kg/min for 3 weeks) of angiotensin II in rats. Male rats had an increased response of proteinuria compared with females (GEE analysis, P = 0.001). Male, but not female, angiotensin II-treated rats had increased numbers of renal interstitial macrophages compared to sham-treated rats (P < 0.001). In conclusion, gender differences are present in the response to acute and chronic infusion of angiotensin II. Difference in angiotensin II sensitivity could play a role in gender differences in progression of renal disease. PMID:26149279

  14. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  15. [Angiotensin II receptor antagonists: different or equivalent?].

    PubMed

    Mounier-Vehier, C; Devos, P

    ARA-II: Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA-II) belong to a recent class of antihypertensive drugs whose mechanism of action is similar to converting enzyme inhibitors (CEI). ARA-II are particularly interesting due to the excellent clinical and biological tolerance, similar to placebo, and their antihypertensive efficacy, comparable with classical drug classes. PUBLISHED TRIALS: A meta-analysis, published by Conlin in the American Journal of Hypertension, suggests that ARA-II, specifically losartan, valsartan, irbesartan and candesartan, have an equipotent blood pressure lowering effect. The careful lecture of this meta-analysis however discloses a faulty methodology from which no valid conclusion can be drawn. Since this early publication, several other comparative studies have been published. These multicentric, randomized double-blind studies enrolled a sufficient number of patients and demonstrated a clinical difference between certain ARA-II at usual dosages. CLINICAL PRACTICE: These studies do have an impact on everyday practice. For the practitioner, the goal is to obtain and then maintain a long-term and optimal reduction in the blood pressure level (reduction or prevention of target-organ disorders and cardiovascular complications of high blood pressure). This reduction in the cardiovascular risk will also depend directly on tolerance and compliance to the antihypertensive treatment. This element must also be considered in assessing treatment efficacy, independent of the blood pressure lowering effect. The results of several other studies will be published in 2001-2003. These large-scale studies on ARA-II related morbidity and mortality will be most useful in determining the role of these drugs in different therapeutic strategies compared with other drug classes.

  16. [Urinary levels of angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II in patients with severe aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    López-de la Vega, César; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Lomelí-Estrada, Catalina; Pastelín-Hernández, Gustavo; del Valle-Mondragón, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Strengthen knowledge about the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis. Urinary levels of angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II were compared between two samples: A) forty five patients with severe aortic stenosis, without systemic arterial hypertension and with normal kidney and normal left ventricular systolic function; B) control group: twenty one persons without cardiovascular disease. there would be no difference between urinary levels. The average of angiotensin-(1-7) urinary concentration in severe aortic stenosis patients was 2.102 pmol/mL and 5.591 pmol/mL for the control group. The average of Ang II was 0.704 pmol/mL and 0.185 pmol/mL respectively. Using t-Student test, we determine that the difference in urinary concentration of angiotensin-(1-7) [p=0.633] and the difference of angiotensin II (p=0.631), were statistically significant. documented a statistically significant difference in urinary levels angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7) within the group of patients with severe aortic stenosis.

  17. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Limits Angiotensin II-Induced DNA Oxidation and Protein Nitration in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pialoux, Vincent; Poulin, Marc J.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Muruve, Daniel A.; Chirico, Erica N.; Faes, Camille; Sola, Darlene Y.; Ahmed, Sofia B.

    2017-01-01

    Compared to other cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, celecoxib is associated with a lower cardiovascular risk, though the mechanism remains unclear. Angiotensin II is an important mediator of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of vascular disease. Cyclooxygenase-2 may modify the effects of angiotensin II though this has never been studied in humans. The purpose of the study was to test the effects of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition on plasma measures of oxidative stress, the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1, and nitric oxide metabolites, both at baseline and in respose to Angiotensin II challenge in healthy humans. Measures of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, advanced oxidation protein products, nitrotyrosine, endothelin-1, and nitric oxide metabolites were assessed from plasma samples drawn at baseline and in response to graded angiotensin II infusion (3 ng/kg/min × 30 min, 6 ng/kg/min × 30 min) before and after 14 days of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition in 14 healthy subjects (eight male, six female) in high salt balance, a state of maximal renin angiotensin system suppression. Angiotensin II infusion significantly increased plasma oxidative stress compared to baseline (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine; +17%; advanced oxidation protein products; +16%), nitrotyrosine (+76%). Furthermore, levels of endothelin-1 levels were significantly increased (+115%) and nitric oxide metabolites were significantly decreased (−20%). Cycloxygenase-2 inhibition significantly limited the increase in 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, nitrotyrosine and the decrease in nitric oxide metabolites induced by angiotensin II infusion, though no changes in advanced oxidation protein products and endothelin-1 concentrations were observed. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition with celecoxib partially limited the angiotensin II-mediated increases in markers of oxidative stress in humans, offering a potential physiological pathway for the improved cardiovascular risk profile of this drug. PMID:28344559

  18. Angiotensin II stimulates sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    King, Victoria L; English, Victoria L; Bharadwaj, Kalyani; Cassis, Lisa A

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) facilitates sympathetic neurotransmission by regulating norepinephrine (NE) synthesis, release, and uptake. These effects of AngII contribute to cardiovascular control. Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that chronic AngII infusion decreased body weight of rats. We hypothesized that AngII facilitates sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue and may thereby decrease body weight. The effect of chronic AngII infusion on the NE uptake transporter and NE turnover was examined in metabolic (interscapular brown adipose tissue, ISBAT; epididymal fat, EF) and cardiovascular tissues (left ventricle, LV; kidney) of rats. To examine the uptake transporter saturation isotherms were performed using [3H]nisoxetine (NIS). At doses that lowered body weight, AngII significantly increased ISBAT [3H]NIS binding density. To quantify NE turnover, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT) was injected in saline-infused, AngII-infused, or saline-infused rats that were pair-fed to food intake of AngII-infused rats. AngII significantly increased the rate of NE decline in all tissues compared to saline. The rate of NE decline in EF was increased to a similar extent by AngII and by pair feeding. In rats administered AngII and propranolol, reductions in food and water intake and body weight were eliminated. These data support the hypothesis that AngII facilitates sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue. Increased sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissue following AngII exposure is suggested to contribute to reductions in body weight. PMID:24224084

  19. ACE2: Angiotensin II/Angiotensin-(1-7) balance in cardiorenal injury

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Nagata, Sayaka; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Our current recognition of the renin-angiotensin system is more convoluted than originally thought due to the discovery of multiple novel enzymes, peptides, and receptors inherent to this interactive biochemical cascade. Over the last decade angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has emerged as a key player in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease due to its pivotal role in metabolizing vasoconstrictive/hypertrophic/proliferative angiotensin II into favorable angiotensin-(1-7). This review addresses a considerable advancement in research on the role of tissue ACE2 in development and progression of hypertension and cardiorenal injury. We also summarize the results from recent clinical and experimental studies suggesting that serum or urine soluble ACE2 may serve as a novel biomarker or independent risk factor relevant for diagnosis and prognosis of cardiorenal disease. Recent proceedings on novel therapeutic approaches to enhance ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) axis are also reviewed. PMID:24510672

  20. Decreased androgen levels and improved menstrual pattern after angiotensin II receptor antagonist telmisartan treatment in four hypertensive patients with polycystic ovary syndrome: case series.

    PubMed

    Jensterle, Mojca; Janez, Andrej; Vrtovec, Bojan; Meden-Vrtovec, Helena; Pfeifer, Marija; Prezelj, Janez; Kocjan, Tomaz

    2007-12-01

    We describe 4 consecutive hypertensive women with polycystic ovary syndrome, classified according to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) criteria, treated with telmisartan 40 mg/d for six months. Blood pressure, menstrual pattern, body mass index (BMI), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and androstenedione were recorded and measured before and after telmisartan treatment. Obese hypertensive polycystic ovary syndrome patients had a decrease in systolic blood pressure. Marked drop-off in serum androgen concentrations was observed in all four patients. Three patients improved their menstrual cyclicity. The improvements were independent of changes in weight. The reduction of androgen concentrations and improvement in menstrual pattern was achieved despite a non-significant change of fasting insulin levels in patients, who were not considered severely insulin resistant at baseline. These findings may provide a new basis for a proper choice of the antihypertensive drug in hypertensive women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

  1. Decreased Androgen Levels and Improved Menstrual Pattern after Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonist Telmisartan Treatment in Four Hypertensive Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Jensterle, Mojca; Janez, Andrej; Vrtovec, Bojan; Meden-Vrtovec, Helena; Pfeifer, Marija; Prezelj, Janez; Kocjan, Tomaz

    2007-01-01

    We describe 4 consecutive hypertensive women with polycystic ovary syndrome, classified according to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) criteria, treated with telmisartan 40 mg/d for six months. Blood pressure, menstrual pattern, body mass index (BMI), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and androstenedione were recorded and measured before and after telmisartan treatment. Obese hypertensive polycystic ovary syndrome patients had a decrease in systolic blood pressure. Marked drop-off in serum androgen concentrations was observed in all four patients. Three patients improved their menstrual cyclicity. The improvements were independent of changes in weight. The reduction of androgen concentrations and improvement in menstrual pattern was achieved despite a non-significant change of fasting insulin levels in patients, who were not considered severely insulin resistant at baseline. These findings may provide a new basis for a proper choice of the antihypertensive drug in hypertensive women with polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:18074422

  2. Angiotensin-(1-9) reverses experimental hypertension and cardiovascular damage by inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme/Ang II axis.

    PubMed

    Ocaranza, Maria Paz; Moya, Jackeline; Barrientos, Victor; Alzamora, Rodrigo; Hevia, Daniel; Morales, Cristobal; Pinto, Melissa; Escudero, Nicolás; García, Lorena; Novoa, Ulises; Ayala, Pedro; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo; Godoy, Ivan; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Jalil, Jorge E; Michea, Luis

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the biological effects of angiotensin-(1-9), but available evidence shows that angiotensin-(1-9) has beneficial effects in preventing/ameliorating cardiovascular remodeling. In this study, we evaluated whether angiotensin-(1-9) decreases hypertension and reverses experimental cardiovascular damage in the rat. Angiotensin-(1-9) (600  ng/kg per min for 2 weeks) reduced already-established hypertension in rats with early high blood pressure induced by angiotensin II infusion or renal artery clipping. Angiotensin-(1-9) also improved cardiac (assessed by echocardiography) and endothelial function in small-diameter mesenteric arteries, cardiac and aortic wall hypertrophy, fibrosis, oxidative stress, collagen and transforming growth factor type β - 1 protein expression (assessed by western blot). The beneficial effect of angiotensin-(1-9) was blunted by coadministration of the angiotensin type 2(AT2) receptor blocker PD123319 (36  ng/kg per min) but not by coadministration of the Mas receptor blocker A779 (100  ng/kg per min). Angiotensin-(1-9) treatment also decreased circulating levels of Ang II, angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and oxidative stress in aorta and left ventricle. Whereas, Ang-(1-9) increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA levels in aorta as well as plasma nitrate levels. Angiotensin-(1-9) reduces hypertension, ameliorates structural alterations (hypertrophy and fibrosis), oxidative stress in the heart and aorta and improves cardiac and endothelial function in hypertensive rats. These effects were mediated by the AT2 receptor but not by the angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis.

  3. DIOL Triterpenes Block Profibrotic Effects of Angiotensin II and Protect from Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-López, Raquel; Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Gómez-Hurtado, Nieves; Delgado, Carmen; Visitación Bartolomé, Maria; San Román, José Alberto; Cordova, Claudia; Lahera, Vicente; Nieto, Maria Luisa; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background The natural triterpenes, erythrodiol and uvaol, exert anti-inflammatory, vasorelaxing and anti-proliferative effects. Angiotensin II is a well-known profibrotic and proliferative agent that participates in the cardiac remodeling associated with different pathological situations through the stimulation and proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate the preventive effects of the natural triterpenes erythrodiol and uvaol on the proliferation and collagen production induced by angiotensin II in cardiac myofibroblasts. Their actions on cardiac hypertrophy triggered by angiotensin II were also studied. Methodology/Principal Findings The effect of erythrodiol and uvaol on angiotensin II-induced proliferation was evaluated in cardiac myofibroblasts from adult rats in the presence or the absence of the inhibitors of PPAR-γ, GW9662 or JNK, SP600125. The effect on collagen levels induced by angiotensin II was evaluated in cardiac myofibroblasts and mouse heart. The presence of low doses of both triterpenes reduced the proliferation of cardiac myofibroblasts induced by angiotensin II. Pretreatment with GW9662 reversed the effect elicited by both triterpenes while SP600125 did not modify it. Both triterpenes at high doses produced an increase in annexing-V binding in the presence or absence of angiotensin II, which was reduced by either SP600125 or GW9662. Erythrodiol and uvaol decreased collagen I and galectin 3 levels induced by angiotensin II in cardiac myofribroblasts. Finally, cardiac hypertrophy, ventricular remodeling, fibrosis, and increases in myocyte area and brain natriuretic peptide levels observed in angiotensin II-infused mice were reduced in triterpene-treated animals. Conclusions/Significance Erythrodiol and uvaol reduce cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricle remodeling induced by angiotensin II in mice by diminishing fibrosis and myocyte area. They also modulate growth and survival of cardiac

  4. Angiotensin II binding to cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: identification of angiotensin II receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.; Printz, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    Physiological experiments have provided evidence that angiotensin II stimulates catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland. Their laboratory and others have now shown by receptor autoradiography the presence of angiotensin II receptors (AIIR) in bovine and rat adrenal medulla. In order to extend these studies they have undertaken to define AIIR on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were isolated using the method of Levitt including cell enrichment with Percoll gradient centrifugation. Primary cultures of bovine adrenal medullary cells were maintained in DME/F12 medium containing 10% FCS. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, PNMT, DBH and Chromagranin A. Cultured cells bind with high affinity and specificity (/sup 125/I)-ANG II yielding a K/sub D/ of 0.74 nM and B/sub max/ of 24,350 sites/cell. After Percoll treatment values of .77 nm and 34,500 sites/cell are obtained. K/sub D/ values are in close agreement with that obtained in adrenal slices by Healy. Competition studies identify a rank order of binding by this receptor similar to that of other tissues. They conclude that cultured chromaffin cells provide a suitable model system for the investigation and characterization of the ANG II receptor and for cellular studies of its functional significance.

  5. Angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart. Predominance of the angiotensin-converting enzyme pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, L S; Abraham, W T; Meixell, G E; Vamvakias, B N; Quaife, R A; Lowes, B D; Roden, R L; Peacock, S J; Groves, B M; Raynolds, M V

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the contribution of myocardial tissue angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to angiotensin II (Ang II) formation in the human heart is low compared with non-ACE pathways. However, little is known about the actual in vivo contribution of these pathways to Ang II formation in the human heart. To examine angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart, we administered intracoronary 123I-labeled angiotensin I (Ang I) with and without intracoronary enalaprilat to orthotopic heart transplant recipients. The fractional conversion of Ang I to Ang II, calculated after separation of angiotensin peptides by HPLC, was 0.415 +/- 0.104 (n = 5, mean +/- SD). Enalaprilat reduced fractional conversion by 89%, to a value of 0.044 +/- 0.053 (n = 4, P = 0.002). In a separate study of explanted hearts, a newly developed in vitro Ang II-forming assay was used to examine cardiac tissue ACE activity independent of circulating components. ACE activity in solubilized left ventricular membrane preparations from failing hearts was 49.6 +/- 5.3 fmol 125I-Ang II formed per minute per milligram of protein (n = 8, +/- SE), and 35.9 +/- 4.8 fmol/min/mg from nonfailing human hearts (n = 7, P = 0.08). In the presence of 1 microM enalaprilat, ACE activity was reduced by 85%, to 7.3 +/- 1.4 fmol/min/mg in the failing group and to 4.6 +/- 1.3 fmol/min/mg in the nonfailing group (P < 0.001). We conclude that the predominant pathway for angiotensin II formation in the human heart is through ACE. Images PMID:7657820

  6. Left ventricular hypertrophy and angiotensin II receptor blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Maeda, K; Nakamura, M; Watanabe, T; Yoshikawa, J; Hirohashi, K

    2005-01-01

    Angiotensin II plays a significant role in cell growth and proliferation in model systems and in humans. Numerous studies have shown that left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) increases the risk of coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, stroke or transient ischemic attack; all-cause deaths, and sudden death. The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) has provided beneficial effects on LVH regression and on cardiac remodeling in the presence of hypertension and heart failure. The new class of ARBs appears to provide cardioprotective effects that are similar to those of the ACE inhibitors. Most of the beneficial effects provided by these agents appear to be related to a more complete blockade of the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor. However, costimulation of the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor appears to increase nitric oxide and thus causes some bradykinin-like effects. Evidence for the role of angiotensin II in promoting LVH as well as abnormal regulation of the angiotensin II signal transduction pathways in model systems and in humans has been reviewed. Secondly, the mechanisms for the beneficial effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers studied in model systems and in humans, including possible involvement in the formation of reactive oxygen species by mononuclear cells, are presented. Finally, results from large-scale interventions such as the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction (LIFE) study, as well as an overview of the Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial involving the use of ARB in high-risk patients, are presented.

  7. The brain renin-angiotensin system modulates angiotensin II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Baltatu, O; Silva, J A; Ganten, D; Bader, M

    2000-01-01

    The potential involvement of the brain renin-angiotensin system in the hypertension induced by subpressor doses of angiotensin II was tested by the use of newly developed transgenic rats with permanent inhibition of brain angiotensinogen synthesis [TGR(ASrAOGEN)]. Basal systolic blood pressure monitored by telemetry was significantly lower in TGR(ASrAOGEN) than in Sprague-Dawley rats (parent strain) (122.5+/-1.5 versus 128.9+/-1.9 mm Hg, respectively; P<0.05). The increase in systolic blood pressure induced by 7 days of chronic angiotensin II infusion was significantly attenuated in TGR(ASrAOGEN) in comparison with control rats (29.8+/-4.2 versus 46. 3+/-2.5 mm Hg, respectively; P<0.005). Moreover, an increase in heart/body weight ratio was evident only in Sprague-Dawley (11.1%) but not in TGR(ASrAOGEN) rats (2.8%). In contrast, mRNA levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and collagen III in the left ventricle measured by ribonuclease protection assay were similarly increased in both TGR(ASrAOGEN) (ANP, x2.5; collagen III, x1.8) and Sprague-Dawley rats (ANP, x2.4; collagen III, x2) as a consequence of angiotensin II infusion. Thus, the expression of these genes in the left ventricle seems to be directly stimulated by angiotensin II. However, the hypertensive and hypertrophic effects of subpressor angiotensin II are at least in part mediated by the brain renin-angiotensin system.

  8. Angiotensinogen Exerts Effects Independent of Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Wu, Congqing; Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Chen, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Mingming; Graham, Mark J.; Mullick, Adam E.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Feldman, David L.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study determined whether angiotensinogen (AGT) has angiotensin (Ang)II-independent effects using multiple genetic and pharmacological manipulations. Approach and Results All study mice were in LDL receptor -/- background and fed a saturated fat-enriched diet. In mice with floxed alleles and a neomycin cassette in intron 2 of the AGT gene (hypoAGT mice), plasma AGT concentrations were > 90% lower compared to their wild type littermates. HypoAGT mice had lower SBP, less atherosclerosis, and diminished body weight gain and liver steatosis. Low plasma AGT concentrations and all phenotypes were recapitulated in mice with hepatocyte-specific deficiency of AGT or pharmacological inhibition of AGT by antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) administration. In contrast, inhibition of AGT cleavage by a renin inhibitor, aliskiren, failed to alter body weight gain and liver steatosis in LDL receptor -/- mice. In mice with established adiposity, administration of AGT ASO versus aliskiren led to equivalent reductions of SBP and atherosclerosis. AGT ASO administration ceased body weight gain and further reduced body weight, whereas aliskiren did not affect body weight gain during continuous saturated fat-enriched diet feeding. Structural comparisons of AGT proteins in zebrafish, mouse, rat and human revealed 4 highly conserved sequences within the des(AngI)AGT domain. des(AngI)AGT, through adeno-associated viral infection in hepatocyte-specific AGT deficient mice, increased body weight gain and liver steatosis, but did not affect atherosclerosis. Conclusions AGT contributes to body weight gain and liver steatosis through functions of the des(AngI)AGT domain, which are independent of AngII production. PMID:26681751

  9. Effect of chronic intracerebroventricular angiotensin II infusion on vasopressin release in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, G. H.; Chee, O.; Riggs, R. V.; Keil, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the chronic infusion of angiotensin II into the lateral cerebral ventricle on the release of arginine vasopressin in rats are investigated. Rats were subjected to a continuous infusion of angiotensin at a rate of 1 microgram/h for five days, during which they were offered water, isotonic saline or hypertonic saline ad libitum or 40 ml water/day, and fluid intake, changes in body weight, plasma sodium ion concentrations and plasma and pituitary arginine vasopressin levels were measured. Angiotensin II is found to increase the fluid intake of rats given isotonic saline and decrease plasma sodium ion levels with no changes in plasma or pituitary arginine vasopressin in those given water or isotonic saline. However, in rats given hypertonic saline, plasma sodium concentrations remained at control levels while plasma vasopressin increased, and in water-restricted rats the effects of angiotensin II were intermediate. Results thus demonstrate that angiotensin II-stimulated arginine vasopressin release is reduced under conditions in which plasma sodium ion concentration becomes dilute, compatible with a central role of angiotensin in the regulation of salt and water balance.

  10. Effect of chronic intracerebroventricular angiotensin II infusion on vasopressin release in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, G. H.; Chee, O.; Riggs, R. V.; Keil, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the chronic infusion of angiotensin II into the lateral cerebral ventricle on the release of arginine vasopressin in rats are investigated. Rats were subjected to a continuous infusion of angiotensin at a rate of 1 microgram/h for five days, during which they were offered water, isotonic saline or hypertonic saline ad libitum or 40 ml water/day, and fluid intake, changes in body weight, plasma sodium ion concentrations and plasma and pituitary arginine vasopressin levels were measured. Angiotensin II is found to increase the fluid intake of rats given isotonic saline and decrease plasma sodium ion levels with no changes in plasma or pituitary arginine vasopressin in those given water or isotonic saline. However, in rats given hypertonic saline, plasma sodium concentrations remained at control levels while plasma vasopressin increased, and in water-restricted rats the effects of angiotensin II were intermediate. Results thus demonstrate that angiotensin II-stimulated arginine vasopressin release is reduced under conditions in which plasma sodium ion concentration becomes dilute, compatible with a central role of angiotensin in the regulation of salt and water balance.

  11. Origin of the angiotensin II secreted by cells.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1994-03-01

    Circulating angiotensin II is unique in that it is formed in the blood by the interaction of circulating proteins. There are in addition many local renin-angiotensin systems in tissues in which angiotensin II is apparently secreted by various types of cells. This brief review considers the possible pathways for synthesis of locally produced angiotensin II in the brain, the anterior pituitary, the testes, the ovaries, the adrenal cortex, the kidneys, the heart, blood vessel walls, and brown and white fat. Synthesis by cells in culture is also reviewed. The possibility that certain cells contain a complete intracellular renin-angiotensin system is not ruled out, but there are problems with this hypothesis. Proteases other than renin may be involved, and there may be different pathways in different tissues. However, it appears that at least in some tissues, angiotensinogen is produced in one population of cells and transported in a paracrine fashion to other renin-containing cells, where it serves as the substrate for production of angiotensin II.

  12. Angiotensin II directly impairs adipogenic differentiation of human preadipose cells.

    PubMed

    Palominos, Marisol M; Dünner, Natalia H; Wabitsch, Martin; Rojas, Cecilia V

    2015-10-01

    Angiotensin II reduces adipogenic differentiation of preadipose cells present in the stroma-vascular fraction of human adipose tissue, which also includes several cell types. Because of the ability of non-adipose lineage cells in the stroma-vascular fraction to respond to angiotensin II, it is not possible to unequivocally ascribe the anti-adipogenic response to a direct effect of this hormone on preadipose cells. Therefore, we used the human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) preadipocyte cell strain to investigate the consequences of angiotensin II treatment on adipogenic differentiation under serum-free conditions, by assessing expression of typical adipocyte markers perilipin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), at the transcript and protein level. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that perilipin and FABP4 transcripts were, respectively, reduced to 0.33 ± 0.07 (P < 0.05) and 0.41 ± 0.19-fold (P < 0.05) in SGBS cells induced to adipogenic differentiation in the presence of angiotensin II. Western Blot analysis corroborated reduction of the corresponding proteins to 0.23 ± 0.21 (P < 0.01) and 0.46 ± 0.30-fold (P < 0.01) the respective controls without angiotensin II. Angiotensin II also impaired morphological changes associated with early adipogenesis. Hence, we demonstrated that angiotensin II is able to directly reduce adipogenic differentiation of SGBS preadipose cells.

  13. Central interactions of aldosterone and angiotensin II in aldosterone- and angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Beltz, Terry G; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2011-02-01

    Many studies have implicated both angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (Aldo) in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the progression of renal injury, and cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. In several cases, ANG II and Aldo have been shown to have synergistic interactions in the periphery. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that ANG II and Aldo interact centrally in Aldo- and ANG II-induced hypertension in male rats. In rats with blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measured by DSI telemetry, intracerebroventricular (icv) infusions of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and RU28318 or the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist irbesartan significantly inhibited Aldo-induced hypertension. In ANG II-induced hypertension, icv infusion of RU28318 significantly reduced the increase in BP. Moreover, icv infusions of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger tempol or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin attenuated Aldo-induced hypertension. To confirm these effects of pharmacological antagonists, icv injections of either recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying siRNA silencers of AT1aR (AT1aR-siRNA) or MR (MR-siRNA) significantly attenuated the development of Aldo-induced hypertension. The immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses of AT1aR-siRNA- or MR-siRNA-injected rats showed a marked reduction in the expression of AT1R or MR in the paraventricular nucleus compared with scrambled siRNA rats. When animals from all studies underwent ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium, there was a smaller reduction in the fall of BP in animals receiving icv AT1R or MR antagonists. These results suggest that ANG II and Aldo interact in the brain in a mutually cooperative manner such that the functional integrity of both brain AT1R and MR are necessary for hypertension to be induced by either systemic ANG II or Aldo. The pressor effects produced by systemic ANG II or Aldo involve increased central ROS and

  14. Mechanism of adrenal angiotensin II receptor changes after nephrectomy in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J G

    1981-01-01

    At 48 h after bilateral nephrectomy in rats there is a two- to threefold increase in the number of adrenal angiotensin II receptors and a decrease in Kd of smooth muscle angiotensin II receptors. These changes have been attributed to the absence of circulating angiotensin II. Serum K+, which increases after nephrectomy may be an important and overlooked modulator. Therefore, the present experiments were designed to assess the role of K+ as a regulator of angiotensin II receptors after nephrectomy. Serum K+ was controlled with Na polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate), a resin designed to exchange Na+ for K+ in the gastrointestinal tract. Acutely nephrectomized rats were divided into two groups: experimental animals received Kayexalate resin every 12 h for four doses, and controls received Kayexalate exchanged with KCl in vitro before gavage. There was a significant positive correlation serum K+ and aldosterone (r = 0.78, P less than 0.001). Kayexalate maintained a normal serum K+ of 5.9 +/- 0.2 meq/liter (n = 27), aldosterone 25 +/- 3 ng/dl (n = 27) and adrenal receptor concentration of 934 +/- 156 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). Control animals had significantly higher serum K+ of 10.5 +/- 0.4 meq/liter (n = 23), aldosterone 435 +/- 32 (n = 23), and adrenal receptors of 2726 +/- 235 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). There was a linear relationship between serum K+ and number of adrenal receptors (r = 0.87). No such relationship was present in uterine smooth muscle. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that K+ modulates the number of adrenal but not smooth muscle angiotensin II receptors after nephrectomy. This is the first evidence that potassium modulates angiotensin II receptors independently of changes in angiotensin II blood levels. PMID:6259213

  15. Drinking induced by angiotensin II in fishes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Uemura, H; Takei, Y; Itatsu, N; Ozawa, M; Ichinohe, K

    1983-02-01

    Among 20 species of freshwater fishes examined, Pseudorasbora parva, Rhodeus ocellatus, Cobitis anguillicaudatus, Carassius auratus, Oryzias latipes, Gambusia affinis, and Gyrinocheilus anymonieri were found to drink water like seawater fishes, while 13 remaining species did not drink. For fish species found exclusively in fresh water, angiotensin II (AII) treatment did not induce drinking. In contrast, those freshwater fishes which survive in estuarine brackish water (Leuciscus hakonensis, C. carassius, Parasilurus asotus, G. affinis, Chaenogobius annularis, Tridentiger obscurus, and G. anymonieri responded to AII by drinking. Furthermore, some freshwater fishes which survive either in hypertonic water (C. auratus) or in sea water (Anguilla japonica and O. latipes) also responded to AII by drinking. Of 17 seawater fishes examined, Eptatretus burgeri, Triakis scyllia, and Heterodontus japonicus failed to drink water, and for Trachurus japonicus, Platichthys bicoloratus, and Glossogobius giuris fasciatopunctatus, water intake was minor (similar to freshwater fishes). The 11 remaining seawater fishes drank water. AII did not induce drinking in fishes living exclusively in sea water. However, seawater fishes which survive either in tide pools (Chasmichthys dolichognathus gulosus) or in brackish water (Sillago japonica, Mugil cephalus, G. giuris fasciatopunctatus) responded to AII by drinking. P. bicoloratus, Acanthopagrus schlegeli, and Fugu niphobles were exceptional, in that they survive in brackish water, but did not respond to AII. Although some exceptions exist, it is generally concluded that a drinking response to AII is characteristic of fishes which encounter water more hypertonic than that in which they typically reside. Accordingly, a drinking mechanism induced by AII may be a compensatory emergency reaction to dehydration stress.

  16. Angiotensin II-induced angiotensin II type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2009-02-01

    Upon activation, the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1Rs) rapidly undergoes endocytosis. After a series of intracellular processes, the internalized AT1Rs recycle back to the plasma membrane or are trafficked to proteasomes or lysosomes for degradation. We recently reported that AT1Rs degrades in proteasomes upon stimulation of the D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) in human renal proximal tubule and HEK-293 cells. This is in contrast to the degradation of AT1R in lysosomes upon binding Ang II. However, the dynamic regulation of the AT1Rs in lysosomes is not well understood. Here we investigated the AT1Rs lysosomal degradation using FRET-FLIM in HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing the human AT1R tagged with EGFP as the donor fluorophore. Compared to its basal state, the lifetime of AT1Rs decreased after a 5-minute treatment with Ang II treatment and colocalized with Rab5 but not Rab7 and LAMP1. With longer Ang II treatment (30 min), the AT1Rs lifetime decreased and co-localized with Rab5, as well as Rab7 and LAMP1. The FLIM data are corroborated with morphological and biochemical co-immunoprecipitation studies. These data demonstrate that Ang II induces the internalization of AT1Rs into early sorting endosomes prior to trafficking to late endosomes and subsequent degradation in lysosomes.

  17. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein downregulates vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hirohide; Ichiki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Jiro; Takeda, Kotaro; Miyazaki, Ryohei; Hashimoto, Toru; Narabayashi, Eriko; Kitamoto, Shiro; Tokunou, Tomotake; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) by hypoxia stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and increases the expression of target genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor. Although the systemic renin-angiotensin system is activated by hypoxia, the role of PHD in the regulation of the renin-angiotensin system remains unknown. We examined the effect of PHD inhibition on the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R). Hypoxia, cobalt chloride, and dimethyloxalylglycine, all known to inhibit PHD, reduced AT(1)R expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. Knockdown of PHD2, a major isoform of PHDs, by RNA interference also reduced AT(1)R expression. Cobalt chloride diminished angiotensin II-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Cobalt chloride decreased AT(1)R mRNA through transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Oral administration of cobalt chloride (14 mg/kg per day) to C57BL/6J mice receiving angiotensin II infusion (490 ng/kg per minute) for 4 weeks significantly attenuated perivascular fibrosis of the coronary arteries without affecting blood pressure level. These data suggest that PHD inhibition may be beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases by inhibiting renin-angiotensin system via AT(1)R downregulation.

  18. Calcitonin, angiotensin II and FPP significantly modulate mouse sperm function.

    PubMed

    Fraser, L R; Pondel, M D; Vinson, G P

    2001-03-01

    Fertilization-promoting peptide (FPP) regulates the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cAMP pathway to elicit capacitation-dependent responses, stimulating capacitation in uncapacitated spermatozoa and then arresting it in capacitated cells, thereby inhibiting spontaneous acrosome reactions. Like FPP, calcitonin and angiotensin II are found in seminal plasma and so might affect sperm function; this study investigated responses in uncapacitated and capacitated mouse spermatozoa to these three peptides. Both calcitonin (5 ng/ml) and angiotensin II (1 and 10nmol/l), like FPP (100nmol/l), significantly stimulated capacitation, assessed using chlortetracycline (CTC) fluorescence and fertilization in vitro analyses. Combinations of two or three peptides, at high and low, non-stimulatory concentrations, were more stimulatory than the individual peptides, suggesting that they may act on the same signalling pathway, plausibly AC/cAMP; preliminary data indicate that calcitonin does stimulate cAMP production. In capacitated cells, FPP and calcitonin elicited pertussis toxin-sensitive inhibition of spontaneous acrosome loss, suggesting involvement of inhibitory G proteins; angiotensin II had no detectable effect. When all three peptides were used, angiotensin II did not interfere with inhibitory responses to FPP/calcitonin. These results suggest that angiotensin II, calcitonin and FPP may somehow modulate the AC/cAMP signal transduction pathway, but the precise mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated.

  19. Chronic blockade of angiotensin II formation during sodium deprivation.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Guyton, A C; Smith, M J; Coleman, T G

    1979-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the mechanisms by which the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) regulates arterial pressure (AP) and renal function during chronic sodium deprivation. Intravenous infusion of the converting enzyme inhibitor SQ 14225 (14 microgram.kg-1.mm-1) for 8 days in 12 sodium-deficient dogs caused a marked decrease in AP from 90 +/- 1 to 67 +/- 2 mmHg and a reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), filtration fraction (FF), and plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC). Despite the fall in AP and GFR, urinary Na excretion and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) increased above control levels. In four dogs, infusion of aldosterone (200 micrograms/day) for 8 days during continuous SQ 14225 infusion restored PAC to levels above control, but did not significantly change AP or renal function from the values observed during SQ 14225 infusion alone. However, infusion of angiotensin II (AII) (10 or 20 ng.kg-1.min-1) for 5--8 days during continuous SQ 14225 infusion almost completely restored AP and renal function to control levels. These data indicate that the RAS plays a major role in regulating AP, renal hemodynamics, and Na excretion during Na deprivation, probably through the direct effects of AII rather than through changes in PAC.

  20. Metabolomics in angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mervaala, Eero; Biala, Agnieszka; Merasto, Saara; Lempiäinen, Juha; Mattila, Ismo; Martonen, Essi; Eriksson, Ove; Louhelainen, Marjut; Finckenberg, Piet; Kaheinen, Petri; Muller, Dominik N; Luft, Friedrich C; Lapatto, Risto; Oresic, Matej

    2010-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces mitochondrial dysfunction. We tested whether Ang II alters the "metabolomic" profile. We harvested hearts from 8-week-old double transgenic rats harboring human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGRs) and controls (Sprague-Dawley), all with or without Ang II type 1 receptor (valsartan) blockade. We used gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry to detect 247 intermediary metabolites. We used a partial least-squares discriminate analysis and identified 112 metabolites that differed significantly after corrections (false discovery rate q <0.05). We found great differences in the use of fatty acids as an energy source, namely, decreased levels of octanoic, oleic, and linoleic acids in dTGR (all P<0.01). The increase in cardiac hypoxanthine levels in dTGRs suggested an increase in purine degradation, whereas other changes supported an increased ketogenic amino acid tyrosine level, causing energy production failure. The metabolomic profile of valsartan-treated dTGRs more closely resembled Sprague-Dawley rats than untreated dTGRs. Mitochondrial respiratory chain activity of cytochrome C oxidase was decreased in dTGRs, whereas complex I and complex II were unaltered. Mitochondria from dTGR hearts showed morphological alterations suggesting increased mitochondrial fusion. Cardiac expression of the redox-sensitive and the cardioprotective metabolic sensor sirtuin 1 was increased in dTGRs. Interestingly, valsartan changed the level of 33 metabolites and induced mitochondrial biogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Thus, distinct patterns of cardiac substrate use in Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The finding underscores the importance of Ang II in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and cardiac metabolomics, even in healthy hearts.

  1. A frame shifted disulfide bridged analogue of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Boris; Kühn, Christian; Ehlert, Dennis K; Lindeberg, Gunnar; Lindman, Susanna; Karlén, Anders; Hallberg, Anders

    2003-03-20

    N-(2-Mercaptoethyl)glycine [NMGly] was incorporated into the 3 and 5 positions of angiotensin II and oxidized to give the corresponding cyclized disulfide c[NMGly(3,5)]Ang II. The binding affinity to the angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)) of this conformationally constrained analogue, which is related to the potent Ang II agonist c[Hcy(3,5)]Ang II, was examined. The analogue had no affinity to the AT(1) receptor. Theoretical conformational analysis was performed to compare the conformational characteristics of model compounds of c[Hcy(3,5)]Ang II and the frame shifted analogue c[NMGly(3,5)]Ang II in an attempt to explain the lack of affinity.

  2. The angiotensin II receptor 2 is expressed and mediates angiotensin II signaling in lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Königshoff, Melanie; Wilhelm, Anke; Jahn, Andreas; Sedding, Daniel; Amarie, Oana Veronica; Eul, Bastian; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Günther, Andreas; Eickelberg, Oliver; Rose, Frank

    2007-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a severe interstitial lung disease unresponsive to currently available therapies. In IPF, initial alveolar epithelial cell damage leads to activation of fibroblast-(myo)fibroblasts, which deposit an increased amount of a collagen-rich extracellular matrix. Angiotensin II (ANGII) signaling, mediated via angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1) or type 2 (AGTR2), controls tissue remodeling in fibrosis, but the relevance of AGTR2 remains elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated increased expression of AGTR1 und AGTR2 in human and rodent lung tissues from patients with IPF and mice subjected to bleomycin-induced fibrosis, respectively. Both AGTR1 und AGTR2 localized to interstitial fibroblasts. Quantitative analysis of cell surface expression in primary mouse fibroblasts revealed a significant increase of AGTR2 surface expression in fibrotic fibroblasts, whereas AGTR1 surface expression levels remained similar. ANGII treatment of normal fibroblasts led to enhanced migration and proliferation, which was abrogated after pretreatment with losartan (LOS), an AGTR1 inhibitor. In contrast, in fibrotic fibroblasts, migration and proliferation was modified only by AGTR2, but not AGTR1 inhibition (using PD123319). ANGII-induced effects were mediated via phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and p42/44, which was blocked via LOS and PD123319, respectively. Similar effects of AGTR1 and AGTR2 inhibition were observed using conditioned media of alveolar epithelial cells, a prominent source of ANGII in the lung in vivo. In summary, we conclude that ANGII signaling occurs primarily via AGTR1 in normal fibroblasts, while AGTR2-mediated effects are dominant on activated (myo)-fibroblasts, a receptor switch that may perturb epithelial-mesenchymal interaction, thereby further perpetuating fibrogenesis.

  3. Angiotensin II potentiates α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Witman, Melissa A H; McDaniel, John; Fjeldstad, Anette S; Trinity, Joel D; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Runnels, Sean; Morgan, David E; Sander, Mikael; Richardson, Russell S; Wray, D Walter

    2013-03-01

    Aging is characterized by increased sympatho-excitation, expressed through both the α-adrenergic and RAAS (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone) pathways. Although the independent contribution of these two pathways to elevated vasoconstriction with age may be substantial, significant cross-talk exists that could produce potentiating effects. To examine this interaction, 14 subjects (n=8 young, n=6 old) underwent brachial artery catheterization for administration of AngII (angiotensin II; 0.8-25.6 ng/dl per min), NE [noradrenaline (norepinephrine); 2.5-80 ng/dl per min] and AngII with concomitant α-adrenergic antagonism [PHEN (phentolamine); 10 μg/dl per min]. Ultrasound Doppler was utilized to determine blood flow, and therefore vasoconstriction, in both infused and contralateral (control) limbs. Arterial blood pressure was measured directly, and sympathetic nervous system activity was assessed via microneurography and plasma NE analysis. AngII sensitivity was significantly greater in the old, indicated by both greater maximal vasoconstriction (-59±4% in old against -48±3% in young) and a decreased EC50 (half-maximal effective concentration) (1.4±0.2 ng/dl per min in old against 2.6±0.7 μg/dl per min in young), whereas the maximal NE-mediated vasoconstriction was similar between these groups (-58±9% in old and -62±5% in young). AngII also increased venous NE in the old group, but was unchanged in the young group. In the presence of α-adrenergic blockade (PHEN), maximal AngII-mediated vasoconstriction in the old was restored to that of the young (-43±8% in old and -39±6% in young). These findings indicate that, with healthy aging, the increased AngII-mediated vasoconstriction may be attributed, in part, to potentiation of the α-adrenergic pathway, and suggest that cross-talk between the RAAS and adrenergic systems may be an important consideration in therapeutic strategies targeting these two pathways.

  4. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) and lactation: an update.

    PubMed

    Shannon, M E; Malecha, S E; Cha, A J

    2000-05-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are commonly used for the treatment of hypertension. ACEIs have been promoted as first-line therapy for selected patients with chronic hypertension and for the prevention of diabetic nephropathy, thus creating the potential for frequent ACEI exposure among women of childbearing age. ARBs are the most recent addition to the available options for antihypertensive agents. This review specifically focuses on the most up-to-date information regarding these newer antihypertensives with regard to lactation.

  5. CD38 promotes angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiao-Hui; Hong, Xuan; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xiao, Yun-Fei; Chen, Ting-Tao; Deng, Li-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Jian-Bin; Ji, Guang-Ju; Fu, Mingui; Deng, Ke-Yu; Xin, Hong-Bo

    2017-03-12

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an early hallmark during the clinical course of heart failure and regulated by various signalling pathways. Recently, we observed that mouse embryonic fibroblasts from CD38 knockout mice were significantly resistant to oxidative stress such as H2 O2 -induced injury and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced injury. In addition, we also found that CD38 knockout mice protected heart from ischaemia reperfusion injury through activating SIRT1/FOXOs-mediated antioxidative stress pathway. However, the role of CD38 in cardiac hypertrophy is not explored. Here, we investigated the roles and mechanisms of CD38 in angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Following 14 days of Ang-II infusion with osmotic mini-pumps, a comparable hypertension was generated in both of CD38 knockout and wild-type mice. However, the cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were much more severe in wild-type mice compared with CD38 knockout mice. Consistently, RNAi-induced knockdown of CD38 decreased the gene expressions of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and reactive oxygen species generation in Ang-II-stimulated H9c2 cells. In addition, the expression of SIRT3 was elevated in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells, in which SIRT3 may further activate the FOXO3 antioxidant pathway. The intracellular Ca(2+) release induced by Ang-II markedly decreased in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells, which might be associated with the decrease of nuclear translocation of NFATc4 and inhibition of ERK/AKT phosphorylation. We concluded that CD38 plays an essential role in cardiac hypertrophy probably via inhibition of SIRT3 expression and activation of Ca(2+) -NFAT signalling pathway. Thus, CD38 may be a novel target for treating cardiac hypertrophy.

  6. Angiotensin II for the Treatment of Vasodilatory Shock.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Ashish; English, Shane W; Wang, Xueyuan S; Ham, Kealy; Tumlin, James; Szerlip, Harold; Busse, Laurence W; Altaweel, Laith; Albertson, Timothy E; Mackey, Caleb; McCurdy, Michael T; Boldt, David W; Chock, Stefan; Young, Paul J; Krell, Kenneth; Wunderink, Richard G; Ostermann, Marlies; Murugan, Raghavan; Gong, Michelle N; Panwar, Rakshit; Hästbacka, Johanna; Favory, Raphael; Venkatesh, Balasubramanian; Thompson, B Taylor; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Jensen, Jeffrey; Kroll, Stew; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Tidmarsh, George F; Deane, Adam M

    2017-08-03

    Vasodilatory shock that does not respond to high-dose vasopressors is associated with high mortality. We investigated the effectiveness of angiotensin II for the treatment of patients with this condition. We randomly assigned patients with vasodilatory shock who were receiving more than 0.2 μg of norepinephrine per kilogram of body weight per minute or the equivalent dose of another vasopressor to receive infusions of either angiotensin II or placebo. The primary end point was a response with respect to mean arterial pressure at hour 3 after the start of infusion, with response defined as an increase from baseline of at least 10 mm Hg or an increase to at least 75 mm Hg, without an increase in the dose of background vasopressors. A total of 344 patients were assigned to one of the two regimens; 321 received a study intervention (163 received angiotensin II, and 158 received placebo) and were included in the analysis. The primary end point was reached by more patients in the angiotensin II group (114 of 163 patients, 69.9%) than in the placebo group (37 of 158 patients, 23.4%) (odds ratio, 7.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.76 to 13.3; P<0.001). At 48 hours, the mean improvement in the cardiovascular Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (scores range from 0 to 4, with higher scores indicating more severe dysfunction) was greater in the angiotensin II group than in the placebo group (-1.75 vs. -1.28, P=0.01). Serious adverse events were reported in 60.7% of the patients in the angiotensin II group and in 67.1% in the placebo group. Death by day 28 occurred in 75 of 163 patients (46%) in the angiotensin II group and in 85 of 158 patients (54%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.07; P=0.12). Angiotensin II effectively increased blood pressure in patients with vasodilatory shock that did not respond to high doses of conventional vasopressors. (Funded by La Jolla Pharmaceutical Company; ATHOS-3 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT

  7. Interleukin-10 deficiency aggravates angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Woo-Young; Cha, Hye-Na; Heo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Jang, Byung Ik; Lee, In-Kye; Park, So-Young

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the role of interleukin (IL)-10 in angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling. Angiotensin II was infused subcutaneously (1.1mg/kg/day) for one week in IL-10 knockout and wild-type mice, after which cardiac function and hypertrophy were assessed by echocardiogram. IL-10 gene expression in the heart was increased by angiotensin II infusion. Plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and gene expression of BNP in the heart were increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II, and plasma BNP levels were further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. IL-10 deficiency increased the left ventricular dimension, whereas treatment with angiotensin II increased heart weight. Angiotensin II significantly reduced cardiac function in IL-10 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. Gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II infusion, and these increases were further enhanced by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Gene expression of collagen I/III and collagen III protein levels were increased by angiotensin II but not by IL-10 deficiency. Gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase2/9 was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II, and this expression was further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Akt phosphorylation was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II and further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Phosphorylation of p38 was increased by IL-10 deficiency. These results suggest that IL-10 deficiency causes deterioration in cardiac functions in angiotensin II-infused mice, suggesting that IL-10 plays a protective role against angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to renal dysfunction and damage caused by angiotensin II in mice.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Brett L; Anderson, Larry J; Estes, Anne M; Yaghini, Fariborz A; Fang, Xiao R; Porter, Jason; Gonzalez, Frank J; Campbell, William B; Malik, Kafait U

    2012-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to the development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiology. In view of the critical role of angiotensin II in the kidney, as well as in salt and water homeostasis, and blood pressure regulation, we determined the contribution of cytochrome P450 1B1 to renal dysfunction and injury associated with angiotensin II-induced hypertension in male Cyp1b1(+/+) and Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II infusion (700 ng/kg per minute) given by miniosmotic pumps for 13 and 28 days increased systolic blood pressure in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice; this increase was significantly reduced in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased renal Cyp1b1 activity, vascular resistance, and reactivity to vasoconstrictor agents and caused endothelial dysfunction in Cyp1b1(+/+) but not Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased water consumption and urine output, decreased urine osmolality, increased urinary Na(+) and K(+) excretion, and caused proteinuria and albuminuria in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice that was diminished in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Infusion of angiotensin II for 28 but not 13 days caused renal fibrosis, tubular damage, and inflammation in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice, which was minimized in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased levels of 12- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids; reactive oxygen species; and activity of NADPH oxidase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and c-Src in the kidneys of Cyp1b1(+/+) but not Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. These data suggest that increased thirst, renal dysfunction, and injury and inflammation associated with angiotensin II-induced hypertension in mice depend on cytochrome P450 1B1 activity, thus indicating that cytochrome P450 1B1 could serve as a novel target for treating renal disease and hypertension.

  9. Anthocyans-rich Aronia melanocarpa extract possesses ability to protect endothelial progenitor cells against angiotensin II induced dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Parzonko, Andrzej; Oświt, Aleksandra; Bazylko, Agnieszka; Naruszewicz, Marek

    2015-12-15

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) may provide protection against atherosclerosis and plaque rupture by their innate ability to replace dysfunctional or damaged endothelial cells in plaque microvessels. There is evidence that angiotensin II may impair the angiogenic functions of EPCs in the atherosclerotic plaque by accelerating senescence and inhibiting their proliferation through oxidative stress induction. In this study, we examined whether chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) fruit extract, containing mainly anthocyanins with potent antioxidative properties, could protect EPCs against angiotensin-induced oxidative stress. EPCs were isolated from peripheral blood of young healthy volunteers and cultivated on fibronectin-coated plates in the presence or absence of angiotensin II (1 µM) and chokeberry extract (1-25 µg/ml). EPCs exposed to chokeberry extract prior to angiotensin II showed a significant increase of proliferation and telomerase activity, and a decrease in the percentage of senescent cells and intracellular ROS formation in comparison to angiotensin II treated cells. Furthermore, extract increased migration ability, adhesion to fibronectin and the angiogenic potential of EPC in vitro diminished by angiotensin II in a concentration-dependent manner. That effect was related to the activation of the Nrf2 transcription factor and the increase of HO-1 expression. Our results suggested that chokeberry extract may protect EPCs against angiotensin II-induced dysfunction and could play a potential role in the prevention of coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Complex pathologies of angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms*

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.; Lu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is the primary bioactive peptide of the renin angiotensin system that plays a critical role in many cardiovascular diseases. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII into mice induces the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Like human AAAs, AngII-induced AAA tissues exhibit progressive changes and considerable heterogeneity. This complex pathology provides an impediment to the quantification of aneurysmal tissue composition by biochemical and immunostaining techniques. Therefore, while the mouse model of AngII-induced AAAs provides a salutary approach to studying the mechanisms of the evolution of AAAs in humans, meaningful interpretation of mechanisms requires consideration of the heterogeneous nature of the diseased tissue. PMID:21796801

  11. Estrogen regulation of the brain renin-angiotensin system in protection against angiotensin II-induced sensitization of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Zhang, Zhongming; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2014-07-15

    This study investigated sex differences in the sensitization of angiotensin (ANG) II-induced hypertension and the role of central estrogen and ANG-(1-7) in this process. Male and female rats were implanted for telemetered blood pressure (BP) recording. A subcutaneous subpressor dose of ANG II was given alone or concurrently with intracerebroventricular estrogen, ANG-(1-7), an ANG-(1-7) receptor antagonist A-779 or vehicle for 1 wk (induction). After a 1-wk rest (delay), a pressor dose of ANG II was given for 2 wk (expression). In males and ovariectomized females, subpressor ANG II had no sustained effect on BP during induction, but produced an enhanced hypertensive response to the subsequent pressor dose of ANG II during expression. Central administration of estrogen or ANG-(1-7) during induction blocked ANG II-induced sensitization. In intact females, subpressor ANG II treatment produced a decrease in BP during induction and delay, and subsequent pressor ANG II treatment given during expression produced only a slight but significant increase in BP. However, central blockade of ANG-(1-7) by intracerebroventricular infusion of A-779 during induction restored the decreased BP observed in females during induction and enhanced the pressor response to the ANG II treatment during expression. RT-PCR analyses indicated that estrogen given during induction upregulated mRNA expression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) antihypertensive components, whereas both central estrogen and ANG-(1-7) downregulated mRNA expression of RAS hypertensive components in the lamina terminalis. The results indicate that females are protected from ANG II-induced sensitization through central estrogen and its regulation of brain RAS.

  12. Estrogen regulation of the brain renin-angiotensin system in protection against angiotensin II-induced sensitization of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongming; Beltz, Terry G.; Guo, Fang; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated sex differences in the sensitization of angiotensin (ANG) II-induced hypertension and the role of central estrogen and ANG-(1–7) in this process. Male and female rats were implanted for telemetered blood pressure (BP) recording. A subcutaneous subpressor dose of ANG II was given alone or concurrently with intracerebroventricular estrogen, ANG-(1–7), an ANG-(1–7) receptor antagonist A-779 or vehicle for 1 wk (induction). After a 1-wk rest (delay), a pressor dose of ANG II was given for 2 wk (expression). In males and ovariectomized females, subpressor ANG II had no sustained effect on BP during induction, but produced an enhanced hypertensive response to the subsequent pressor dose of ANG II during expression. Central administration of estrogen or ANG-(1–7) during induction blocked ANG II-induced sensitization. In intact females, subpressor ANG II treatment produced a decrease in BP during induction and delay, and subsequent pressor ANG II treatment given during expression produced only a slight but significant increase in BP. However, central blockade of ANG-(1–7) by intracerebroventricular infusion of A-779 during induction restored the decreased BP observed in females during induction and enhanced the pressor response to the ANG II treatment during expression. RT-PCR analyses indicated that estrogen given during induction upregulated mRNA expression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) antihypertensive components, whereas both central estrogen and ANG-(1–7) downregulated mRNA expression of RAS hypertensive components in the lamina terminalis. The results indicate that females are protected from ANG II-induced sensitization through central estrogen and its regulation of brain RAS. PMID:24858844

  13. p47(phox) is required for afferent arteriolar contractile responses to angiotensin II and perfusion pressure in mice.

    PubMed

    Lai, En Yin; Solis, Glenn; Luo, Zaiming; Carlstrom, Mattias; Sandberg, Kathryn; Holland, Steven; Wellstein, Anton; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2012-02-01

    Myogenic and angiotensin contractions of afferent arterioles generate reactive oxygen species. Resistance vessels express neutrophil oxidase-2 and -4. Angiotensin II activates p47(phox)/neutrophil oxidase-2, whereas it downregulates NOX-4. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that p47(phox) enhances afferent arteriolar angiotensin contractions. Angiotensin II infusion in p47(phox) +/+ but not -/- mice increased renal cortical NADPH oxidase activity (7±1-12±1 [P<0.01] versus 5±1-7±1 10(3) · RLU · min(-1) · μg protein(-1) [P value not significant]), mean arterial pressure (77±2-91±2 [P<0.005] versus 74±2-77±1 mm Hg [P value not significant]), and renal vascular resistance (7.5±0.4-10.1±0.7 [P<0.01] versus 7.9±0.4-8.3±0.4 mm Hg/mL · min(-1) · gram kidney weight(-1) [P value not significant]). Afferent arterioles from p47(phox) -/- mice had a lesser myogenic response (3.1±0.4 versus 1.4±0.2 dynes · cm(-1) · mm Hg(-1); P<0.02) and a lesser (P<0.05) contraction to 10(-6) M angiotensin II (diameter change +/+: 9.3±0.2-3.4±0.6 μm versus -/-: 9.9±0.6-7.5±0.4 μm). Angiotensin and increased perfusion pressure generated significantly (P<0.05) more reactive oxygen species in p47(phox) +/+ than -/- arterioles. Angiotensin II infusion increased the maximum responsiveness of afferent arterioles from p47(phox) +/+ mice to 10(-6) M angiotensin II yet decreased the response in p47(phox) -/- mice. The angiotensin infusion increased the sensitivity to angiotensin II only in p47(phox) +/+ mice. We conclude that p47(phox) is required to enhance renal NADPH oxidase activity and basal afferent arteriolar myogenic and angiotensin II contractions and to switch afferent arteriolar tachyphylaxis to sensitization to angiotensin during a prolonged angiotensin infusion. These effects likely contribute to hypertension and renal vasoconstriction during infusion of angiotensin II.

  14. Angiotensin II, sodium, and cardiovascular hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Harrap, S B; Mitchell, G A; Casley, D J; Mirakian, C; Doyle, A E

    1993-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) may cause cardiovascular hypertrophy as a consequence of increased blood pressure or possibly by direct trophic actions. To dissociate Ang II and blood pressure in young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), we used sodium loading during angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor treatment. Animals were treated between 6 and 10 weeks of age with perindopril to lower Ang II and blood pressure, or with perindopril and 1% saline drinking fluid or perindopril and aldosterone infusion to lower Ang II but maintain high blood pressure. Blood pressure, heart weight, and media/lumen ratio of mesenteric resistance arteries were studied while rats were on treatment at 10 weeks of age and 15 weeks after treatment at 25 weeks of age. Perindopril lowered blood pressure and inhibited the development of cardiovascular hypertrophy. Saline or aldosterone restored high blood pressure during perindopril treatment and resulted in increased heart weight/body weight and resistance artery media/lumen ratios in direct proportion to the elevation of blood pressure. Because increased structure occurred despite perindopril treatment, we conclude that direct trophic actions of Ang II are not essential for the development of cardiovascular hypertrophy in young SHR and that the antitrophic actions of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors depend more on changes in blood pressure than on Ang II. However, restoration of blood pressure and structure by sodium during perindopril treatment raises the possibility that the design of the cardiovascular system and blood pressure may depend indirectly on Ang II through effects on sodium metabolism.

  15. Signaling of angiotensin II-induced vascular protein synthesis in conduit and resistance arteries in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Christine; Martens, Fabrice MAC; Girardot, Daphné; Dao, Huy Hao; Touyz, Rhian M; Moreau, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Background From in vitro studies, it has become clear that several signaling cascades are involved in angiotensin II-induced cellular hypertrophy. The aim of the present study was to determine some of the signaling pathways mediating angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced protein synthesis in vivo in large and small arteries. Methods Newly synthesized proteins were labeled during 4 hours with tritiated leucine in conscious control animals, or animals infused for 24 hours with angiotensin II (400 ng/kg/min). Hemodynamic parameters were measure simultaneously. Pharmacological agents affecting signaling cascades were injected 5 hours before the end of Ang II infusion. Results Angiotensin II nearly doubled the protein synthesis rate in the aorta and small mesenteric arteries, without affecting arterial pressure. The AT1 receptor antagonist Irbesartan antagonized the actions of Ang II. The Ang II-induced protein synthesis was associated with increased extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation in aortic, but not in mesenteric vessels. Systemic administration of PD98059, an inhibitor of the ERK-1/2 pathway, produced a significant reduction of protein synthesis rate in the aorta, and only a modest decrease in mesenteric arteries. Rapamycin, which influences protein synthesis by alternative signaling, had a significant effect in both vessel types. Rapamycin and PD98059 did not alter basal protein synthesis and had minimal effects on arterial pressure. Conclusion ERK1/2 and rapamycin-sensitive pathways are involved in pressure-independent angiotensin II-induced vascular protein synthesis in vivo. However, their relative contribution may vary depending on the nature of the artery under investigation. PMID:15134586

  16. The effect of taurine on chronic heart failure: actions of taurine against catecholamine and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Schaffer, Stephen; Azuma, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Taurine, a ubiquitous endogenous sulfur-containing amino acid, possesses numerous pharmacological and physiological actions, including antioxidant activity, modulation of calcium homeostasis and antiapoptotic effects. There is mounting evidence supporting the utility of taurine as a pharmacological agent against heart disease, including chronic heart failure (CHF). In the past decade, angiotensin II blockade and β-adrenergic inhibition have served as the mainstay in the treatment of CHF. Both groups of pharmaceutical agents decrease mortality and improve the quality of life, a testament to the critical role of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin--angiotensin system in the development of CHF. Taurine has also attracted attention because it has beneficial actions in CHF, in part by its demonstrated inhibition of the harmful actions of the neurohumoral factors. In this review, we summarize the beneficial actions of taurine in CHF, focusing on its antagonism of the catecholamines and angiotensin II.

  17. RGS4 inhibits angiotensin II signaling and macrophage localization during renal reperfusion injury independent of vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Paul; Jin, Xiaohua; Proctor, Brandon M.; Farley, Michelle; Roy, Nilay; Chin, Matthew S.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Vollmann, Elisabeth; Perro, Mario; Hoffman, Ryan J.; Chung, Joseph; Chauhan, Nikita; Mistri, Murti; Muslin, Anthony J.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Siedlecki, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a major contributor to the severity of acute kidney injury. In the context of vasospasm-independent reperfusion injury we studied the potential anti-inflammatory role of the Gα-related RGS protein, RGS4. Transgenic RGS4 mice were resistant to 25 minute injury, although post-ischemic renal arteriolar diameter was equal to the wild type early after injury. A 10 minute unilateral injury was performed to study reperfusion without vasospasm. Eighteen hours after injury blood flow was decreased in the inner cortex of wild type mice with preservation of tubular architecture. Angiotensin II levels in the kidneys of wild type and transgenic mice were elevated in a sub-vasoconstrictive range 12 and 18 hours after injury. Angiotensin II stimulated pre-glomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to secrete the macrophage chemoattractant, RANTES; a process decreased by angiotensin II R2 (AT2) inhibition. However, RANTES increased when RGS4 expression was suppressed implicating Gα protein activation in an AT2-RGS4-dependent pathway. RGS4 function, specific to VSMC, was tested in a conditional VSMC-specific RGS4 knockout showing high macrophage density by T2 MRI compared to transgenic and non-transgenic mice after the 10 minute injury. Arteriolar diameter of this knockout was unchanged at successive time points after injury. Thus, RGS4 expression, specific to renal VSMC, inhibits angiotensin II-mediated cytokine signaling and macrophage recruitment during reperfusion, distinct from vasomotor regulation. PMID:25469849

  18. Intrarenal role of angiotensin II in controlling sodium excretion during dehydration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Trippodo, N C; Hall, J E; Lohmeier, T E; Guyton, A C

    1977-05-01

    1. The intrarenal role of angiotensin II in controlling sodium excretion was examined in anaesthetized, dehydrated dogs by infusing the angiotensin II antagonist Sar1-Ile8-angiotensin II directly into the renal artery. Comparisons were made with dehydrated dogs receiving only sodium chloride solution intrarenally. 2. Intrarenal angiotensin II blockade resulted in significant increases in urinary sodium excretion and urine flow rate. 3. The results indicate that during the high-renin state of dehydration endogenous angiotensin II has intrarenal effects which lead to salt and water retention.

  19. Angiotensin II infusion induces marked diaphragmatic skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Rezk, Bashir M; Yoshida, Tadashi; Semprun-Prieto, Laura; Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are characterized by increased angiotensin II (Ang II) levels and are often accompanied by significant skeletal muscle wasting that negatively impacts mortality and morbidity. Both CHF and CKD patients have respiratory muscle dysfunction, however the potential effects of Ang II on respiratory muscles are unknown. We investigated the effects of Ang II on diaphragm muscle in FVB mice. Ang II induced significant diaphragm muscle wasting (18.7±1.6% decrease in weight at one week) and reduction in fiber cross-sectional area. Expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF-1) and of the pro-apoptotic factor BAX was increased after 24 h of Ang II infusion (4.4±0.3 fold, 3.1±0.5 fold and 1.6±0.2 fold, respectively, compared to sham infused control) suggesting increased muscle protein degradation and apoptosis. In Ang II infused animals, there was significant regeneration of injured diaphragm muscles at 7 days as indicated by an increase in the number of myofibers with centralized nuclei and high expression of embryonic myosin heavy chain (E-MyHC, 11.2±3.3 fold increase) and of the satellite cell marker M-cadherin (59.2±22.2% increase). Furthermore, there was an increase in expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, 1.8±0.3 fold increase) in Ang II infused diaphragm, suggesting the involvement of IGF-1 in diaphragm muscle regeneration. Bone-marrow transplantation experiments indicated that although there was recruitment of bone-marrow derived cells to the injured diaphragm in Ang II infused mice (267.0±74.6% increase), those cells did not express markers of muscle stem cells or regenerating myofibers. In conclusion, Ang II causes marked diaphragm muscle wasting, which may be important for the pathophysiology of respiratory muscle dysfunction and cachexia in conditions such as CHF and CKD.

  20. Angiotensin II induces differential insulin action in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Surapongchai, Juthamard; Prasannarong, Mujalin; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon

    2017-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) is reportedly involved in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The present investigation evaluated the effects of two ANGII doses on the phenotypic characteristics of insulin resistance syndrome and insulin action and signaling in rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused with either saline (SHAM) or ANGII at a commonly used pressor dose (100 ng/kg/min; ANGII-100) or a higher pressor dose (500 ng/kg/min; ANGII-500) via osmotic minipumps for 14 days. We demonstrated that ANGII-100-infused rats exhibited the phenotypic features of non-obese insulin resistance syndrome, including hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance of glucose uptake in the soleus muscle, whereas ANGII-500-treated rats exhibited diabetes-like symptoms, such as post-prandial hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion and hypertriglyceridemia. At the cellular level, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the soleus muscle of the ANGII-100 group was 33% lower (P < 0.05) than that in the SHAM group and was associated with increased insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Ser(307) and decreased Akt Ser(473) and AS160 Thr(642) phosphorylation and GLUT-4 expression. However, ANGII-500 infusion did not induce skeletal muscle insulin resistance or impair insulin signaling elements as initially anticipated. Moreover, we found that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the ANGII-500 group was accompanied by the enhanced expression of ACE2 and MasR proteins, which are the key elements in the non-classical pathway of the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, this study demonstrates for the first time that chronic infusion with these two pressor doses of ANGII induced differential metabolic responses at both the systemic and skeletal muscle levels. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  1. Clinical Profile of Eprosartan: A Different Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Blankestijn, P. J; Rupp, H

    2008-01-01

    Rationale. The goal of antihypertensive treatment is to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Apart from blood pressure lowering per se, also reducing the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system appears to be important. Angiotensin II receptor blocker drugs (ARBs) have provided a useful class of anti-hypertensive drugs. Eprosartan is a relatively new ARB which is chemically distinct (non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole) from all other ARBs (biphenyl tetrazoles). An analysis has been made on available experimental and clinical data on eprosartan which not only is an effective and well tolerated antihypertensive agent, but also lowers the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system. Experimental and pharmacokinetic studies on eprosartan have shown differences with the other ARBs. The distinct properties of this non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole ARB might be relevant in the effort to reduce cardiovascular risk, also beyond its blood pressure lowering capacity. PMID:18855637

  2. Retrieval improvement is induced by water shortage through angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Lia; Maldonado, Héctor; Delorenzi, Alejandro

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) has an evolutionary preserved role in determining adaptative responses to water-shortages. In addition, it has been shown to modulate diverse phases of memory. Still, it is not clear whether ANGII improves or spoils memory. We demonstrated that endogenous angiotensins enhance consolidation of a long-term associative memory in the crab Chasmagnathus and that water shortage improves memory consolidation through brain ANGII actions. Here, we show that weakly trained crabs, when water-deprived, exhibit enhanced retrieval. Subsequently, memory retention is indistinguishable from that of strongly trained crabs. ANGII, but not angiotensin IV, is a necessary and sufficient condition for such enhancing effect. We conclude that ANGII released due to water shortage leads to enhanced memory retrieval. Thus, it seems that ANGII has an evolutionary preserved role as a multifunction coordinator that enables an adaptative response to water-shortage. The facilitation of memory consolidation and retrieval would be among those coordinated functions.

  3. Angiotensin II modulates salty and sweet taste sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Noriatsu; Iwata, Shusuke; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Horio, Nao; Sanematsu, Keisuke; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2013-04-10

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying gustatory detection of dietary sodium is important for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. Here, we show that Angiotensin II (AngII), a major mediator of body fluid and sodium homeostasis, modulates salty and sweet taste sensitivities, and that this modulation critically influences ingestive behaviors in mice. Gustatory nerve recording demonstrated that AngII suppressed amiloride-sensitive taste responses to NaCl. Surprisingly, AngII also enhanced nerve responses to sweeteners, but had no effect on responses to KCl, sour, bitter, or umami tastants. These effects of AngII on nerve responses were blocked by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) antagonist CV11974. In behavioral tests, CV11974 treatment reduced the stimulated high licking rate to NaCl and sweeteners in water-restricted mice with elevated plasma AngII levels. In taste cells AT1 proteins were coexpressed with αENaC (epithelial sodium channel α-subunit, an amiloride-sensitive salt taste receptor) or T1r3 (a sweet taste receptor component). These results suggest that the taste organ is a peripheral target of AngII. The specific reduction of amiloride-sensitive salt taste sensitivity by AngII may contribute to increased sodium intake. Furthermore, AngII may contribute to increased energy intake by enhancing sweet responses. The linkage between salty and sweet preferences via AngII signaling may optimize sodium and calorie intakes.

  4. Evodiamine inhibits angiotensin II-induced rat cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    He, Na; Gong, Qi-Hai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jing-Yi; Lin, Shu-Xian; Hou, Hua-Hua; Wu, Qin; Sun, An-Sheng

    2017-09-05

    To investigate the effects of evodiamine (Evo), a component of Evodiaminedia rutaecarpa Juss.) Benth, on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and further explore the potential mechanisms. Cardiomyocytes from neonatal Sprague Dawley rats were isolated and characterized, and then the cadiomyocyte cultures were randomly divided into control, model (Ang II 0.1 μmol/L), and Evo (0.03, 0.3, 3 μmol/L) groups. The cardiomyocyte surface area, protein level, intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) concentration, activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and content of nitric oxide (NO) were measured, respectively. The mRNA expressions of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), calcineurin (CaN), extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK-2), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) of cardiomyocytes were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction. The protein expressions of calcineurin catalytic subunit (CnA) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) were detected by Western blot analysis. Compared with the control group, Ang II induced cardiomyocytes hypertrophy, as evidenced by increased cardiomyocyte surface area, protein content, and ANF mRNA expression; increased intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) concentration and expressions of CaN mRNA, CnA protein, and ERK-2 mRNA, but decreased MKP-1 protein expression (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Compared with Ang II, Evo (0.3, 3 μmol/L) significantly attenuated Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, decreased the [Ca(2+)]i concentration and expressions of CaN mRNA, CnA protein, and ERK-2 mRNA, but increased MKP-1 protein expression (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Most interestingly, Evo increased the NOS activity and NO production, and upregulated the eNOS mRNA expression (P<0.05). Evo signifificantly attenuated Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and this effect was partly due to promotion of NO production, reduction of [Ca(2+)]i concentration, and inhibition of CaN and

  5. Central cardiovascular actions of angiotensin II in trout.

    PubMed

    Le Mével, Jean-Claude; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi

    2008-05-15

    In mammals, a large body of evidence supports the existence of a brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) acting independently or synergistically with the endocrine RAS to maintain diverse physiological functions, notably cardiovascular homeostasis. The RAS is of ancient origin and although most components of the RAS are present within the brain of teleost fishes, little is known regarding the central physiological actions of the RAS in these vertebrates. The present review encompasses the most relevant functional data for a role of the brain RAS in cardiovascular regulations in our experimental animal model, the unanesthetized trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. This paper mainly focuses on the central effect of angiotensin II (ANG II) on heart rate, blood pressure, heart rate variability and cardiac baroreflex, after intracerebroventricular injection or local microinjection of the peptide within the dorsal vagal motor nucleus. The probable implications of the parasympathetic nervous system in ANG II-evoked changes in the cardiac responses are also discussed.

  6. Urinary angiotensin II: a marker of renal tissue activity?

    PubMed

    Reams, G; Villarreal, D; Wu, Z; Bauer, J H

    1994-01-01

    The methodology for the collection, extraction, separation and measurement of urinary angiotensin II [the octapeptide, ANG(1-8)] is described. To determine the origin of urinary ANG(1-8), mean arterial pressure, renal hemodynamics and the arterial, renal venous and urinary concentrations of ANG(1-8) were examined prior to and following the constant intra-arterial infusion of tritiated angiotensin II [3H-ANG(1-8)] in graded doses of 0.5, 2.0 and 2.5 ng/kg/min in 5 uninephrectomized, anesthetized female dogs. The infusion of 3H-ANG-(1-8) had no significant effect on mean arterial pressure, glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow or urine flow rate. The mean concentration of ANG(1-8) in the urine was 3.7 fmol/ml. None or only trace amounts of 3H-ANG(1-8) were detected in the urine in spite of marked increases in renal arterial 3H-ANG(1-8) concentrations. These observations suggest that urinary ANG(1-8) was derived de novo from the intrarenal generation of angiotensin II. In addition, plasma and urinary concentrations of ANG(1-8) were assessed in patients with essential hypertension undergoing treatment with either a diuretic (n = 14) or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (n = 14). Although the concentrations of plasma ANG(1-8) responded appropriately to the respective therapies, the urinary excretion of ANG(1-8) was not different following either therapy. These data suggest that ANG(1-8) collected from the urinary bladder may not occur in adequate concentrations to accurately assess the activity of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system.

  7. Role of α1D -adrenoceptors in vascular wall hypertrophy during angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Ortíz, I A; Rodríguez-Hernández, S N; López-Guerrero, J J; Del Valle-Mondragón, L; López-Sánchez, P; Touyz, R M; Villalobos-Molina, R

    2015-09-01

    The in vivo effect of continuous angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion on arterial blood pressure, vascular hypertrophy and α1 -adrenoceptors (α1 -ARs) expression was explored. Alzet(®) minipumps filled with Ang II (200 ng kg(-1)  min(-1) ) were subcutaneously implanted in male Wistar rats (3 months-old). Groups of rats were also treated with losartan, an AT1 R antagonist, or with BMY 7378, a selective α1D -AR antagonist. Blood pressure was measured by tail-cuff; after 2 or 4 weeks of treatment, vessels were isolated for functional and structural analyses. Angiotensin II increased systolic blood pressure. Phenylephrine-induced contraction in aorta was greater (40% higher) in Ang II-treated rats than in the controls, and similar effect occurred with KCl 80 mm. Responses in tail arteries were not significantly different among the different groups. Angiotensin II decreased α1D -ARs without modifying the other α1 -ARs and induced an increase in media thickness (hypertrophy) in aorta, while no structural change occurred in tail artery. Losartan prevented and reversed hypertension and hypertrophy, while BMY 7378 prevented and reversed the aorta's hypertrophic response, without preventing or reversing hypertension. Findings indicate that Ang II-induced aortic hypertrophic response involves Ang II-AT1 Rs and α1D -ARs. Angiotensin II-induced α1D -AR-mediated vascular remodeling occurs independently of hypertension. Findings identify a α1D -AR-mediated process whereby Ang II influences aortic hypertrophy independently of blood pressure elevation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Captopril intake decreases body weight gain via angiotensin-(1-7).

    PubMed

    Oh, Young-Bin; Kim, Jong Hun; Park, Byung Mun; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2012-09-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] plays a beneficial role in cardiovascular physiology by providing a counterbalance to the function of angiotensin II (Ang II). Although Ang II has been shown to be an adipokine secreted by adipocyte and affect lipid metabolism, the role of Ang-(1-7) in adipose tissue remains to be clarified. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Ang-(1-7) affects lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. Ang-(1-7) increased glycerol release from primary adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner. A lipolytic effect of Ang-(1-7) was attenuated by pretreatment with A-779, a Mas receptor blocker and with an inhibitor of phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), or eNOS. However, losartan and PD123319 did not cause any change in Ang-(1-7)-induced lipolysis. Ang-(1-7)-induced lipolysis had an addictive effect with isoproterenol. In normal rats, chronic intake of captopril for 4 wks decreased body weight gain and the amount of adipose tissue and increased plasma Ang-(1-7) level. These effects were attenuated by administration of A-779. The levels of Mas receptor and phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (p-HSL) were significantly increased by treatment with captopril and these captopril-mediated effects were attenuated by the administration of A-779. There was no difference in diameter of adipocytes among sham, captopril- and captopril+A-779-treated groups. The similar effects of captopril on body weight, expression of Mas receptor, and p-HSL were observed in Ang-(1-7)-treated rats. These results suggest that captopril intake decreased body weight gain partly through Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor/PI3K pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Angiotensin-(1-7) regulates Angiotensin II-induced VCAM-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ren, Jingyi; Chan, Kenneth; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We for the first time found that Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on VCAM-1 is mediated by MAS receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Ang-(1-7) is due to the suppression of NF-kappaB translocation. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) are key effector peptides in the renin-angiotensin system. Increased circulatory Ang II level is associated with the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis, whereas Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. However, whether Ang-(1-7) regulates the action of Ang II on vascular endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. We investigated the effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the context of atherogenesis, specifically endothelial cell VCAM-1 expression that is implicated in early plaque formation. The results show that Ang II increased VCAM-1 mRNA expression and protein displayed on EC surface, while Ang-(1-7) alone exerted no effects. However, Ang-(1-7) significantly suppressed Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Ang-(1-7) also inhibited the Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity driven by transcription factor NF-KappaB. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay and ELISA showed that Ang II facilitated the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in ECs, and this was attenuated by the presence of Ang-(1-7). The inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation were all reversed by the competitive antagonist of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor. Our results suggest that Ang-(1-7) mediates its affects on ECs through the Mas receptor, and negatively regulates Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression by attenuating nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  10. Metabolic switch and hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes following treatment with angiotensin II are prevented by AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Bettina Johanna; Lenski, Matthias; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2008-11-21

    Angiotensin II induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, but its consequences on cardiomyocyte metabolism and energy supply are not completely understood. Here we investigate the effect of angiotensin II on glucose and fatty acid utilization and the modifying role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of metabolism and proliferation. Treatment of H9C2 cardiomyocytes with angiotensin II (Ang II, 1 microm, 4 h) increased [(3)H]leucine incorporation, up-regulated the mRNA expression of the hypertrophy marker genes MLC, ANF, BNP, and beta-MHC, and decreased the phosphorylation of the negative mTOR-regulator tuberin (TSC-2). Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes showed similar results. Western blot analysis revealed a time- and concentration-dependent down-regulation of AMPK-phosphorylation in the presence of angiotensin II, whereas the protein expression of the catalytic alpha-subunit remained unchanged. This was paralleled by membrane translocation of glucose-transporter type 4 (GLUT4), increased uptake of [(3)H]glucose and transient down-regulation of phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), whereas fatty acid uptake remained unchanged. Similarly, short-term transaortic constriction in mice resulted in down-regulation of P-AMPK and P-ACC but up-regulation of GLUT4 membrane translocation in the heart. Preincubation of cardiomyocytes with the AMPK stimulator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR; 1 mM, 4 h) completely prevented the angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. In addition, AICAR reversed the metabolic effects of angiotensin II: GLUT4 translocation was reduced, but ACC phosphorylation and TSC phosphorylation were elevated. In summary, angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes is accompanied by decreased activation of AMPK, increased glucose uptake, and decreased mTOR inhibition. Stimulation with the AMPK activator AICAR reverses these metabolic changes, increases fatty acid utilization, and inhibits

  11. Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

  12. The Novel Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Azilsartan Medoxomil Ameliorates Insulin Resistance Induced by Chronic Angiotensin II Treatment in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lastra, Guido; Santos, Fernando R.; Hooshmand, Payam; Hooshmand, Paria; Mugerfeld, Irina; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.; Henriksen, Erik J.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin receptor (type 1) blockers (ARBs) can reduce both hypertension and insulin resistance induced by local and systemic activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The effectiveness of azilsartan medoxomil (AZIL-M), a novel imidazole-based ARB, to facilitate metabolic improvements in conditions of angiotensin II (Ang II)-associated insulin resistance is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of chronic AZIL-M treatment on glucose transport activity and key insulin signaling elements in red skeletal muscle of Ang II-treated rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 8 weeks with or without Ang II (200 ng/kg/min) combined with either vehicle or AZIL-M (1 mg/kg/day). Ang II induced significant (p < 0.05) increases in blood pressure, which were completely prevented by AZIL-M. Furthermore, Ang II reduced insulin-mediated glucose transport activity in incubated soleus muscle, and AZIL-M co-treatment increased this parameter. Moreover, AZIL-M treatment of Ang II-infused animals increased the absolute phosphorylation of insulin signaling molecules, including Akt [both Ser473 (81%) and Thr308 (23%)] and AS160 Thr642 (42%), in red gastrocnemius muscle frozen in situ. Absolute AMPKα (Thr172) phosphorylation increased (98%) by AZIL-M treatment, and relative Thr389 phosphorylation of p70 S6K1, a negative regulator of insulin signaling, decreased (51%) with AZIL-M treatment. These results indicate that ARB AZIL-M improves the in vitro insulin action on glucose transport in red soleus muscle and the functionality of the Akt/AS160 axis in red gastrocnemius muscle in situ in Ang II-induced insulin-resistant rats, with the latter modification possibly associated with enhanced AMPKα and suppressed p70 S6K1 activation. PMID:23922555

  13. Adhesion ability of angiotensin II with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Preu, Julia; Tiefenauer, Louis; Gutberlet, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The octa-peptide angiotensin II (Ang II, (H2NAspArgValTyrIleHisProPheCOOH)) is one of the key player on blood pressure regulation in mammals. Predominantly binding to the Angiotensin type 1 and 2 receptors, the hormone is one of several peptide ligands binding to G protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The active hormone derives from a high molecular weight precursor sequentially cleaved by the proteases renin and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). The chemical nature of the amino acid sequence has an impact on the behavior in the proximity of membranes, demonstrated using different membrane model systems and biophysical methods. Applying electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering a detailed view on the adhesion of the peptide with model membrane surfaces was performed. The role of specific amino acids involved in the interaction with the phospholipid head group were investigated and, studying a truncated version of Ang II, Ang (1-7), the key role of the C-terminal phenylalanine was proven. Truncation of the C-terminal amino acid abolishes the binding of the peptide to the membrane surface. A shift in pH, altering the protonation state of the central histidine residue impairs the adhesion of Ang II.

  14. Central mineralocorticoid receptors and the role of angiotensin II and glutamate in the paraventricular nucleus of rats with angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Alexander; Leenen, Frans H H

    2013-05-01

    A chronic increase in circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) activates an aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor-ouabain neuromodulatory pathway in the brain that increases neuronal activation in hypothalamic nuclei, such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and causes progressive hypertension. Several models of chronic sympathetic hyperactivity are associated with an increase in AT1 and glutamate receptor activation in the PVN. The current study evaluated whether increased angiotensin type 1 (AT1) and glutamate receptor-dependent signaling in the PVN contributes to the maintenance of blood pressure (BP) in Ang II-hypertensive Wistar rats, and the role of aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor pathway in this enhanced signaling. After subcutaneous infusion of Ang II for 2 weeks, in conscious rats BP and heart rate were recorded after (1) 10-minute bilateral infusions of candesartan and kynurenate in the PVN; (2) 1 hour intracerebroventricular infusion of eplerenone, and (3) candesartan and kynurenate after eplerenone. Candesartan or kynurenate in the PVN fully reversed the increase in BP from circulating Ang II. Kynurenate after candesartan or candesartan after kynurenate did not further lower BP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of eplerenone at 16 hours after its infusion fully reversed the increase in BP from circulating Ang II. After eplerenone, candesartan and kynurenate in the PVN did not further decrease BP. These findings suggest that increased mineralocorticoid receptor activation in the brain activates a slow neuromodulatory pathway that maintains enhanced AT1 and glutamate receptor-dependent signaling in the PVN, and thereby the hypertension from a chronic increase in circulating Ang II.

  15. Myometrial angiotensin II receptor subtypes change during ovine pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, B E; Ipson, M A; Shaul, P W; Kamm, K E; Rosenfeld, C R

    1993-01-01

    Although regulation of angiotensin II receptor (AT) binding in vascular and uterine smooth muscle is similar in nonpregnant animals, studies suggest it may differ during pregnancy. We, therefore, examined binding characteristics of myometrial AT receptors in nulliparous (n = 7), pregnant (n = 24, 110-139 d of gestation), and postpartum (n = 21, 5 to > or = 130 d) sheep and compared this to vascular receptor binding. We also determined if changes in myometrial binding reflect alterations in receptor subtype. By using plasma membrane preparations from myometrium and medial layer of abdominal aorta, we determined receptor density and affinity employing radioligand binding; myometrial AT receptor subtypes were assessed by inhibiting [125I]-ANG II binding with subtype-specific antagonists. Compared to nulliparous ewes, myometrial AT receptor density fell approximately 90% during pregnancy (1,486 +/- 167 vs. 130 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein) and returned to nulliparous values > or = 4 wk postpartum; vascular binding was unchanged. Nulliparous myometrium expressed predominantly AT2 receptors (AT1/AT2 congruent to 15%/85%), whereas AT1 receptors predominated during pregnancy (AT1/AT2 congruent to 80%/20%). By 5 d postpartum AT1/AT2 congruent to 40%/60%, and > 4 wk postpartum AT2 receptors again predominated (AT1/AT2 congruent to 15%/85%). In studies of ANG II-induced force generation, myometrium from pregnant ewes (n = 10) demonstrated dose-dependent increases in force (P < 0.001), which were inhibited with an AT1 receptor antagonist. Postpartum myometrial responses were less at doses > or = 10(-9) M (P < 0.05) and unaffected by AT2 receptor antagonists. Vascular and myometrial AT receptor binding are differentially regulated during ovine pregnancy, the latter primarily reflecting decreases in AT2 receptor expression. This is the first description of reversible changes in AT receptor subtype in adult mammals. PMID:8227339

  16. Angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) is an independent prognosticator of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and promotes cells proliferation via mTOR activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shau-Hsuan; Lu, Hung-I; Chang, Alice Y.W.; Huang, Wan-Ting; Lin, Wei-Che; Lee, Ching-Chang; Tien, Wan-Yu; Lan, Ya-Chun; Tsai, Hsin-Ting; Chen, Chang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the angiotensin II/ angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) and angiotensin II type II receptor (AT2R) signaling pathway in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the expression levels of AT1R and AT2R in tissues from 152 surgically resected ESCC patients, and those expression levels were then correlated with treatment outcomes. The angiotensin II/AT1R/AT2R signaling pathway and its biological effects in the context of ESCC were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results In human samples, AT1R overexpression was univariately associated with inferior overall survival and remained multivariately independent (hazard ratio=1.812). In vitro, angiotensin II stimulated the growth of ESCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with irbesartan or AT1R-RNAi knockdown but not treatment with PD123319 significantly decreased the level of angiotensin II-induced ESCC cell proliferation. Angiotensin II also caused mTOR activation in a dose-dependent manner, and everolimus or mTOR-RNAi knockdown significantly suppressed the level of angiotensin II-induced ESCC cell proliferation. Furthermore, AT1R-RNAi knockdown suppressed the activation of mTOR. Clinically, AT1R expression was also correlated with phosphorylated mTOR expression. In a xenograft model, local angiotensin II injection enhanced tumor growth, and this effect could be decreased by treatment with irbesartan or everolimus. In a 4-NQO-induced-ESCC murine model, irbesartan significantly decreased the incidence of esophageal tumor. Conclusions These findings suggest that AT1R overexpression is an independent adverse prognosticator for patients with ESCC and that angiotensin II/AT1R signaling stimulates ESCC growth, in part through mTOR activation. PMID:27564102

  17. Drinking behaviour in rats treated with isoprenaline, angiotensin II or angiotensin antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Emma

    1979-01-01

    1. Isoprenaline hydrochloride injected subcutaneously in rats given a choice test of 1·8% NaCl and water, first induced saline intake which started immediately and was almost concluded in 15 min, followed by a copious water intake. When either saline or water were given in a separate test, saline intake surpassed the water intake in the first 15 min. 2. The delay of 15, 30 or 60 min after injection of isoprenaline, 100 μg/kg, before drinking was allowed, significantly reduced saline intake but did not modify the amount of water subsequently drunk. 3. Isoprenaline caused a sudden drop in arterial blood pressure, the extent and duration depending on the dose. The time of maximum drop 3-4 min after injection coincided with the time the rat drank salt. 4. Isoprenaline-induced saline drinking was significantly reduced after bilateral nephrectomy but water intake was unaffected. 5. The beta-adrenoceptor blocking agent, propranolol, inhibited isoprenaline-induced NaCl and water intake, while the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phenoxybenzamine abolished isoprenaline-induced NaCl intake and enhanced water intake. 6. Saralasin acetate (P-113), a competitive inhibitor of angiotensin II, given into the third brain ventricle, prevented the isoprenaline-induced NaCl and water intake as well as angiotensin II-induced drinking. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor SQ-20881 reduced the isoprenaline-induced NaCl and water intake. 7. In conclusion, hypotension might be a component of salt drinking evoked by isoprenaline although the dipsogenic action of beta-stimulation is mainly due to endogenous renin-angiotensin activation. PMID:231100

  18. Angiotensin II receptors in amphibian kidney. [Calyptocephalella caudiverbera

    SciTech Connect

    Tchernitchin, S.M.; Galli, S.M.; Raizada, M.

    1986-03-05

    The localization of Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors in the Amphibia kidney was investigated by radioautography and binding studies. /sup 125/I-Ang II was injected into the dorsal aorta of anesthetized toads, Calyptocephalella caudiverbera. The kidney excised 2 and 10 min after injection show intense labeling in the glomeruli and a lesser amount in the tubules. Ang II labeling was found in the proximal, distal and collecting tubules. The thin connecting segment (diluting segment) also shows a distinct labeling. Afferent and efferent arterioles and interstitial connective tissue do not show radioautographic granules above the background level. Ang II binding studies of glomerular and tubular membranes show that the binding of /sup 125/I-Ang II is higher in the glomerular than in the tubular membranes with a Kd of 1.9 x 10/sup -9/M and 1.0 x 10/sup -9/M respectively. Their results show that angiotensin II receptors in the amphibian nephron are present in the glomeruli and tubular segments, supporting the hypothesis of the intrarenal action of Ang II in this group of vertebrates.

  19. New Perspectives in the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) II: Albumin Suppresses Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Activity in Human

    PubMed Central

    Fagyas, Miklós; Úri, Katalin; Siket, Ivetta M.; Fülöp, Gábor Á.; Csató, Viktória; Daragó, Andrea; Boczán, Judit; Bányai, Emese; Szentkirályi, István Elek; Maros, Tamás Miklós; Szerafin, Tamás; Édes, István; Papp, Zoltán; Tóth, Attila

    2014-01-01

    About 8% of the adult population is taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to treat cardiovascular disease including hypertension, myocardial infarction and heart failure. These drugs decrease mortality by up to one-fifth in these patients. We and others have reported previously that endogenous inhibitory substances suppress serum ACE activity, in vivo, similarly to the ACE inhibitor drugs. Here we have made an effort to identify this endogenous ACE inhibitor substance. ACE was crosslinked with interacting proteins in human sera. The crosslinked products were immunoprecipitated and subjected to Western blot. One of the crosslinked products was recognized by both anti-ACE and anti-HSA (human serum albumin) antibodies. Direct ACE-HSA interaction was confirmed by binding assays using purified ACE and HSA. HSA inhibited human purified (circulating) and human recombinant ACE with potencies (IC50) of 5.7±0.7 and 9.5±1.1 mg/mL, respectively. Effects of HSA on the tissue bound native ACE were tested on human saphenous vein samples. Angiotensin I evoked vasoconstriction was inhibited by HSA in this vascular tissue (maximal force with HSA: 6.14±1.34 mN, without HSA: 13.54±2.63 mN), while HSA was without effects on angiotensin II mediated constrictions (maximal force with HSA: 18.73±2.17 mN, without HSA: 19.22±3.50 mN). The main finding of this study is that HSA was identified as a potent physiological inhibitor of the ACE. The enzymatic activity of ACE appears to be almost completely suppressed by HSA when it is present in its physiological concentration. These data suggest that angiotensin I conversion is limited by low physiological ACE activities, in vivo. PMID:24691203

  20. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  1. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  2. Auto-inhibitory regulation of angiotensin II functionality in hamster aorta during the early phases of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscila Cristina; Pernomian, Larissa; Côco, Hariane; Gomes, Mayara Santos; Franco, João José; Marchi, Kátia Colombo; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; Uyemura, Sergio Akira; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato; de Oliveira, Ana Maria

    2016-06-15

    Emerging data point the crosstalk between dyslipidemia and renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Advanced dyslipidemia is described to induce RAS activation in the vasculature. However, the interplay between early dyslipidemia and the RAS remains unexplored. Knowing that hamsters and humans have a similar lipid profile, we investigated the effects of early and advanced dyslipidemia on angiotensin II-induced contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II (1.0pmol/l to 1.0µmol/l) were obtained in the hamster thoracic aorta. We also investigated the modulatory action of NAD(P)H oxidase on angiotensin II-induced contraction using ML171 (Nox-1 inhibitor, 0.5µmol/l) and VAS2870 (Nox-4 inhibitor, 5µmol/l). Early dyslipidemia was detected in hamsters treated with a cholesterol-rich diet for 15 days. Early dyslipidemia decreased the contraction induced by angiotensin II and the concentration of Nox-4-derived hydrogen peroxide. Advanced dyslipidemia, observed in hamsters treated with cholesterol-rich diet for 30 days, restored the contractile response induced by angiotensin II by compensatory mechanism that involves Nox-4-mediated oxidative stress. The hyporresponsiveness to angiotensin II may be an auto-inhibitory regulation of the angiotensinergic function during early dyslipidemia in an attempt to reduce the effects of the upregulation of the vascular RAS during the advanced stages of atherogenesis. The recovery of vascular angiotensin II functionality during the advanced phases of dyslipidemia is the result of the upregulation of redox-pro-inflammatory pathway that might be most likely involved in atherogenesis progression rather than in the recovery of vascular function. Taken together, our findings show the early phase of dyslipidemia may be the most favorable moment for effective atheroprotective therapeutic interventions.

  3. Angiotensin-(1-7) blocks the angiotensin II-stimulated superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Polizio, Ariel Héctor; Gironacci, Mariela Mercedes; Tomaro, Maria Luján; Peña, Clara

    2007-07-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7), a bioactive compound of the renin-angiotensin system, exerts effects leading to blood pressure reduction which counterbalance Ang II pressor actions. The present study was conducted to examine Ang-(1-7) and Ang II effects on superoxide anion production in rat aorta using the lucigenin chemiluminescence method. Ang II dose-dependently increased superoxide anion formation when compared to control levels; a maximal increase (2.5-fold) was observed with 1 x 10(-10)M peptide concentration. The Ang II-stimulated superoxide formation was blocked by 1 x 10(-10)M losartan, the specific AT(1) receptor antagonist, but not by 1 x 10(-10)M PD 123319, the AT(2) receptor antagonist, suggesting that the increased superoxide levels caused by Ang II are mediated through AT(1) receptors activation. The Ang II-stimulated superoxide production was not modified by 2 x 10(-8)M allopurinol or 1 x 10(-7)M indomethacin, but was completely abolished by NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors: 1 x 10(-8)M diphenylene iodonium, or 2 x 10(-8)M apocynin, demonstrating that NAD(P)H oxidase participates in such response. In contrast to Ang II, Ang-(1-7) concentrations ranging 1 x 10(-12) to 1 x 10(-6)M did not modify superoxide anion levels, but prevented the Ang II-enhanced superoxide production. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Ang-(1-7) blocks the pro-oxidant effects of Ang II, thus reducing the superoxide anion production and delaying the hypertension development.

  4. Apelin Is a Negative Regulator of Angiotensin II-Mediated Adverse Myocardial Remodeling and Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Zhou; Wang, Wang; Jin, Hai-Yan; Chen, Xueyi; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Xu, Ying-Le; Song, Bei; Penninger, Josef M; Oudit, Gavin Y; Zhong, Jiu-Chang

    2017-10-03

    The apelin pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of cardiovascular homeostasis and disease. However, the exact role of pyr1-apelin-13 in angiotensin (Ang) II-mediated heart disease remains unclear. We used apelin-deficient (APLN(-)(/y)) and apolipoprotein E knockout mice to evaluate the regulatory roles of pyr1-apelin-13. The 1-year aged APLN(-)(/y) mice developed myocardial hypertrophy and dysfunction with reduced angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 levels. Ang II infusion (1.5 mg kg(-)(1) d(-)(1)) for 4 weeks potentiated oxidative stress, pathological hypertrophy, and myocardial fibrosis in young APLN(-)(/y) hearts resulting in exacerbation of cardiac dysfunction. Importantly, daily administration of 100 μg/kg pyr1-apelin-13 resulted in upregulated angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 levels, decreased superoxide production and expression of hypertrophy- and fibrosis-related genes leading to attenuated myocardial hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction in the Ang II-infused apolipoprotein E knockout mice. In addition, pyr1-apelin-13 treatment largely attenuated Ang II-induced apoptosis and ultrastructural injury in the apolipoprotein E knockout mice by activating Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation signaling. In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts, exposure of Ang II decreased angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 protein and increased superoxide generation, cellular proliferation, and migration, which were rescued by pyr1-apelin-13, and Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase agonist stimulation. The increased superoxide generation and apoptosis in cultured cardiofibroblasts in response to Ang II were strikingly prevented by pyr1-apelin-13 which was partially reversed by cotreatment with the Akt inhibitor MK2206. In conclusion, pyr1-apelin-13 peptide pathway is a negative regulator of aging-mediated and Ang II-mediated adverse myocardial remodeling and dysfunction and represents a potential candidate to prevent and treat

  5. Effects of angiotensin II and its blockers Sar1-Ile8-angiotensin II and DuP 753 on drinking in ducks in relation to properties of subfornical organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Simon, E; Schmid, H A

    1996-01-01

    Properties of systemically applied angiotensin II in stimulating water intake of normally hydrated ducks were studied and the results compared with properties of angiotensin II-responsive neurons of the subfornical organ which are considered as targets for circulating angiotensin II acting as a dipsogen. Following intravenous infusion of hypertonic saline (2000 mosmol.kg-1 at 0.3 ml.min-1 for 1 h), intravenous infusion of 0.3 ml.min-1 isotonic saline with angiotensin II (200 ng.min-1), starting 1 h later, stimulated drinking in each case at an angiotensin II plasma level of about 1400 pg.ml-1. Without hypertonic priming, the same angiotensin II infusion did not stimulate drinking in each experiment; however, if effective, repeated infusions of ANGII induced stable dipsogenic responses. Angiotensin II infusions did not alter plasma levels of antidiuretic hormone. Sar1-Ile8-angiotensin II, a non-selective angiotensin II antagonist, acted weakly as a partial agonist when infused at a dose 200-fold higher than angiotensin II and effectively blocked the dipsogenic action of angiotensin II; this corresponds to the inhibition of angiotensin II-induced excitation by Sar1-Ile8-angiotensin II observed in duck subfornical organ neurons. DuP 753 (losartan), an angiotensin II antagonist specifically blocking AT1 receptors in mammals, had equivocal effects on angiotensin II-induced drinking in ducks at rates 50- and 200-fold higher than angiotensin II, which corresponds to the weak inhibitory action of this compound on angiotensin II-induced neuronal excitation in the duck SFO. Blood pressure was only marginally elevated by the applied angiotensin II dose and Sar1-Ile8-angiotensin II had no effect.

  6. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 promotes angiotensin II sensitivity in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Suzanne D.; Zsengellér, Zsuzsanna K.; Khankin, Eliyahu V.; Lo, Agnes S.; Rajakumar, Augustine; DuPont, Jennifer J.; McCurley, Amy; Moss, Mary E.; Zhang, Dongsheng; Clark, Christopher D.; Seely, Ellen W.; Kang, Peter M.; Stillman, Isaac E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy in which patients develop profound sensitivity to vasopressors, such as angiotensin II, and is associated with substantial morbidity for the mother and fetus. Enhanced vasoconstrictor sensitivity and elevations in soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFLT1), a circulating antiangiogenic protein, precede clinical signs and symptoms of preeclampsia. Here, we report that overexpression of sFlt1 in pregnant mice induced angiotensin II sensitivity and hypertension by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation and promoting oxidative stress in the vasculature. Administration of the NOS inhibitor l-NAME to pregnant mice recapitulated the angiotensin sensitivity and oxidative stress observed with sFlt1 overexpression. Sildenafil, an FDA-approved phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor that enhances NO signaling, reversed sFlt1-induced hypertension and angiotensin II sensitivity in the preeclampsia mouse model. Sildenafil treatment also improved uterine blood flow, decreased uterine vascular resistance, and improved fetal weights in comparison with untreated sFlt1-expressing mice. Finally, sFLT1 protein expression inversely correlated with reductions in eNOS phosphorylation in placental tissue of human preeclampsia patients. These data support the concept that endothelial dysfunction due to high circulating sFLT1 may be the primary event leading to enhanced vasoconstrictor sensitivity that is characteristic of preeclampsia and suggest that targeting sFLT1-induced pathways may be an avenue for treating preeclampsia and improving fetal outcomes. PMID:27270170

  7. Photoreleasable ligands to study intracrine angiotensin II signalling

    PubMed Central

    Tadevosyan, Artavazd; Létourneau, Myriam; Folch, Benjamin; Doucet, Nicolas; Villeneuve, Louis R; Mamarbachi, Aida M; Pétrin, Darlaine; Hébert, Terence E; Fournier, Alain; Chatenet, David; Allen, Bruce G; Nattel, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that intracellular angiotensin II (Ang-II) contributes to the regulation of cardiac contractility, renal salt reabsorption, vascular tone and metabolism; however, work on intracrine Ang-II signalling has been limited to indirect approaches because of a lack of selective intracellularly-acting probes. Here, we aimed to synthesize and characterize cell-permeant Ang-II analogues that are inactive without uncaging, but release active Ang-II upon exposure to a flash of UV-light, and act as novel tools for use in the study of intracrine Ang-II physiology. We prepared three novel caged Ang-II analogues, [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II, Ang-II-ODMNB and [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II-ODMNB, based upon the incorporation of the photolabile moiety 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl (DMNB). Compared to Ang-II, the caged Ang-II analogues showed 2–3 orders of magnitude reduced affinity toward both angiotensin type-1 (AT1R) and type-2 (AT2R) receptors in competition binding assays, and greatly-reduced potency in contraction assays of rat thoracic aorta. After receiving UV-irradiation, all three caged Ang-II analogues released Ang-II and potently induced the contraction of rat thoracic aorta. [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II showed the most rapid photolysis upon UV-irradiation and was the focus of subsequent characterization. Whereas Ang-II and photolysed [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation (via AT1R) and cGMP production (AT2R), caged [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II did not. Cellular uptake of [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II was 4-fold greater than that of Ang-II and significantly greater than uptake driven by the positive-control HIV TAT(48–60) peptide. Intracellular photolysis of [Tyr(DMNB)4]Ang-II induced an increase in nucleoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]n), and initiated 18S rRNA and nuclear factor kappa B mRNA synthesis in adult cardiac cells. We conclude that caged Ang-II analogues represent powerful new tools for use in the selective study of intracrine signalling via Ang-II. PMID:25433071

  8. Therapeutic trials comparing angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Elliott, W J

    2000-08-01

    Two independent pharmacologic methods of specifically interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been brought to the marketplace: angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). These agents have the potential not only to be very widely used for a broad variety of clinical indications but also to compete against each other as treatments for hypertension, heart failure, renal impairment, and other conditions. Many short-term comparative studies of these two classes of drugs have now been completed. Most have focused on surrogate endpoints, such as blood pressure, renal function, or cough. These studies have generally concluded that ARBs are better tolerated but that the two drug classes otherwise have similar efficacy. The largest clinical trial comparing ARBs and ACE inhibitors thus far completed, Evaluation of Losartan in the Elderly (ELITE 2), failed to confirm the results of a smaller study; it did not demonstrate a significant improvement in outcomes (death or hospitalization for heart failure) with an ARB used alone, despite better tolerability. Many longer-term outcome studies with survival endpoints are under way, but most will compare the combination against an ACE inhibitor alone. These studies will define the optimal use of these agents in medicine for decades to come.

  9. Angiotensin II type 2 receptors and nitric oxide sustain oxygenation in the clipped kidney of early Goldblatt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Palm, Fredrik; Connors, Stephanie G; Mendonca, Margarida; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2008-02-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) decrease the glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow in the clipped kidneys of early 2-kidney, 1-clip Goldblatt hypertensive rats, but the consequences for oxygenation are unclear. We investigated the hypothesis that angiotensin II type 1 or angiotensin II type 2 receptors or NO synthase mediate renal oxygenation responses to ACEI. Three weeks after left renal artery clipping, kidney function, oxygen (O(2)) use, renal blood flow, renal cortical blood flow, and renal cortical oxygen tension (Po(2)) were measured after acute administration of an ACEI (enalaprilat) and after acute administration of ACEI following acute administration of an angiotensin II type 1 or angiotensin II type 2 receptor blocker (candesartan or PD-123,319) or an NO synthase blocker (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester with control of renal perfusion pressure) and compared with mechanical reduction in renal perfusion pressure to the levels after ACEI. The basal renal cortical Po(2) of clipped kidneys was significantly lower than contralateral kidneys (35+/-1 versus 51+/-1 mm Hg; n=40 each). ACEI lowered renal venous Po(2), cortical Po(2), renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and cortical blood flow and increased the renal vascular resistance in the clipped kidney, whereas mechanical reduction in renal perfusion pressure was ineffective. PD-123,319 and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but not candesartan, reduced the Po(2) of clipped kidneys and blocked the fall in Po(2) with acute ACEI administration. In conclusion, oxygen availability in the clipped kidney is maintained by angiotensin II generation, angiotensin II type 2 receptors, and NO synthase. This discloses a novel mechanism whereby angiotensin can prevent hypoxia in a kidney challenged with a reduced perfusion pressure.

  10. Long-term regulation of arterial pressure, glomerular filtration and renal sodium reabsorption by angiotensin II in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Guyton, A C; Smith, M J; Coleman, T G

    1980-12-01

    1. This study was designed to quantify the role of angiotensin II in determining the chronic relationships between arterial pressure, renal haemodynamics and sodium excretion. 2. In six control dogs sodium balance was achieved during chronic increases in sodium intake from 5 to 495 mmol/day with small increases in arterial pressure (7mmHg), moderate increases in glomerular filtration rate (19%) and decreases in filtration fraction. Similar increases in sodium intake in dogs whose circulating levels of angiotensin II were fixed, due to a constant intravenous infusion of 4.85 pmol of angiotensin II min-1 kg-1, caused large increases in arterial pressure (42%), glomerular filtration rate (31%), filtration fraction and calculated renal sodium reabsorption above control. In six dogs whose angiotensin II formation was blocked by SQ 14 225, sodium balance at intakes of 5-80 mmol/day occurred at reduced arterial pressure, glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction and sodium reabsorption although plasma aldosterone concentration was not substantially different from that in control dogs. At sodium intakes above 240 mmoL/day arterial pressure was not altered by SQ 14 225. 3. These data indicate that during chronic variations in sodium intake angiotensin II plays a major role, independently of changes in plasma aldosterone concentration, in allowing sodium balance without large fluctuations in glomerular filtration rate or arterial pressure. The mechanism whereby angiotensin II conserves sodium chronically is through increased sodium reabsorption, since steady-state sodium reabsorption was increased by angiotensin II and decreased by SQ 14 225.

  11. Angiotensin I conversion to angiotensin II stimulates cortical collecting duct sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Komlosi, Peter; Fuson, Amanda L; Fintha, Attila; Peti-Peterdi, János; Rosivall, Laszlo; Warnock, David G; Bell, Phillip Darwin

    2003-08-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II directly stimulates epithelial sodium channel activity in the rabbit cortical collecting duct. Because Ang I and converting enzyme analogues might be present in the distal nephron, this raises the possibility of intraluminal generation of Ang II. Conversion of Ang I to Ang II was monitored by Ang II-dependent changes in intracellular sodium concentration as a reflection of sodium transport across the apical membrane. This involved imaging-based fluorescence microscopy with sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate in isolated, perfused, cortical collecting-duct segments from rabbit kidney. Principal and intercalated cells were differentiated by rhodamine-conjugated peanut lectin. Control principal cell intracellular sodium concentration, during perfusion with 25 mmol/L NaCl and zero sodium in the bath plus monensin (10(-5) mol/L) averaged 5.8+/-0.14 mmol/L (n=156). The increase in intracellular sodium concentration, when luminal NaCl was increased from 25 to 150 mmol/L, was elevated by 3.5-fold in the presence of intraluminal Ang I (10(-6) mol/L). Also, the effects of Ang I on sodium transport were not significantly different from the effects of Ang II (10(-9) mol/L). Ang I was used in micromolar concentrations to ensure that there was sufficient substrate available for conversion to Ang II. Inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme with captopril reduced the stimulatory effect of Ang I. These results suggest that intraluminal conversion of Ang I to Ang II can occur in the cortical collecting duct, resulting in enhanced apical sodium entry.

  12. Brain-Targeted (Pro)Renin Receptor Knockdown attenuates Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wencheng; Peng, Hua; Cao, Theresa; Sato, Ryosuke; McDaniels, Sarah. J.; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel; Feng, Yumei

    2012-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor is a newly discovered member of the brain renin-angiotensin system. To investigate the role of brain (pro)renin receptor in hypertension, adeno-associated virus-mediated (pro)renin receptor shRNA was used to knockdown (pro)renin receptor expression in the brain of non-transgenic normotensive and human renin-angiotensinogen double transgenic hypertensive mice. Blood pressure was monitored using implanted telemetric probes in conscious animals. Real-time PCR and immunostaining were performed to determine (pro)renin receptor, angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin mRNA levels. Plasma vasopressin levels were determined by Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay. Double transgenic mice exhibited higher blood pressure, elevated cardiac and vascular sympathetic tone, and impaired spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. Intracerebroventricular delivery of (pro)renin receptor shRNA significantly reduced blood pressure, cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic tone, and improved baroreflex sensitivity compared to the control virus treatment in double transgenic mice. (Pro)renin receptor knockdown significantly reduced angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin levels in double transgenic mice. These data indicate that (pro)renin receptor knockdown in the brain attenuates angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and is associated with a decrease insympathetic tone and an improvement of the baroreflex sensitivity. In addition, brain-targeted (pro)renin receptor knockdown is associated with down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin levels. We conclude that central (pro)renin receptor contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension in human renin-angiotensinogen transgenic mice. PMID:22526255

  13. Mas receptor mediates cardioprotection of angiotensin-(1-7) against Angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac remodelling through inhibition of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Liu, Xuebo; Xu, Jianfeng; Weng, Liqing; Ren, Jun; Ge, Junbo; Zou, Yunzeng

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in the onset and development of cardiac remodelling associated with changes of autophagy. Angiotensin1-7 [Ang-(1-7)] is a newly established bioactive peptide of renin-angiotensin system, which has been shown to counteract the deleterious effects of Ang II. However, the precise impact of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy remained essentially elusive. The aim of the present study was to examine if Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced autophagy and the underlying mechanism involved. Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to Ang II for 48 hrs while mice were infused with Ang II for 4 weeks to induce models of cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. LC3b-II and p62, markers of autophagy, expression were significantly elevated in cardiomyocytes, suggesting the presence of autophagy accompanying cardiac hypertrophy in response to Ang II treatment. Besides, Ang II induced oxidative stress, manifesting as an increase in malondialdehyde production and a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. Ang-(1-7) significantly retarded hypertrophy, autophagy and oxidative stress in the heart. Furthermore, a role of Mas receptor in Ang-(1-7)-mediated action was assessed using A779 peptide, a selective Mas receptor antagonist. The beneficial responses of Ang-(1-7) on cardiac remodelling, autophagy and oxidative stress were mitigated by A779. Taken together, these result indicated that Mas receptor mediates cardioprotection of angiotensin-(1-7) against Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac remodelling through inhibition of oxidative stress. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  14. Angiotensin II Increased Neuronal Stem Cell Proliferation: Role of AT2R

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jie; Yang, Lu; Buch, Shilpa; Gao, Lie

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), known a potent vasoactive substance in the renin-angiotensin system in the brain, plays a critical role in systemic blood pressure control. However, increasing evidence indicated that the physiological role of Ang II go beyond its vasoactive effect. In the present study, we demonstrated that Ang II type-1 receptor (AT1R) and type-2 receptor (AT2R) were expressed in primary rat hippocampal neuronal stem cells (NSCs). Treatment of rat hippocampal NSCs with Ang II increased cell proliferation. Pretreatment of NSCs with specific AT2R, but not AT1R, antagonist significantly suppressed Ang II-induced cell proliferation. Furthermore, Ang II stimulated ERK and Akt phosphorylation in NSCs. Pretreatment of MEK inhibitor, but not PI3K inhibitor, inhibited Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation as well as cell proliferation. In addition, stimulation of NSCs with Ang II decreased expression of KV 1.2/KV 3.1 channels and blocked K+ currents which lie downstream of ERK activation. Taken together, these findings underpin the role of AT2R as a novel target that regulates cell proliferation mediated by Ang II with implications for therapeutic intervention for regulation of neurogenesis. PMID:23691054

  15. Angiotensin II protects cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons against rotenone-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Grammatopoulos, Tom N; Ahmadi, Ferogh; Jones, Susan M; Fariss, Marc W; Weyhenmeyer, James A; Zawada, W Michael

    2005-05-31

    In this study, we demonstrate that angiotensin II (Ang II) protects dopamine (DA) neurons from rotenone toxicity in vitro. Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures from E15 rats were grown for 5 days and then cultured in the presence of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, rotenone. Acute exposure (20 h) to 20 nM rotenone reduced the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH+) neurons by 50 +/- 6% when compared to untreated cultures. Pre-treatment of VM cultures with 100 nM Ang II decreased TH+ neuronal loss to 25 +/- 10% at the 20-nM rotenone concentration. Ang II in the presence of the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist, losartan, was even more effective in protecting DA neurons showing a loss of only 13 +/- 4% at 20 nM rotenone. Conversely, the AT2R antagonist, PD123319, abolished the protective effects of Ang II. Furthermore, both the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801, and the antioxidant, alpha-tocopheryl succinate (vitamin E analogue), prevented rotenone-induced toxicity. Here, we show that acute exposure of VM cultures to the pesticide rotenone leads to dopaminergic neuronal cell death and that angiotensin acting through the AT2 receptor protects dopamine neurons from rotenone toxicity.

  16. The effect of sublingual captopril versus intravenous enalaprilat on angiotensin II plasma levels.

    PubMed

    van Onzenoort, Hein A; Bussink, Michiel; Menheere, Paul P; van Mook, Walther N; van der Kuy, Paul-Hugo M

    2006-06-01

    A 44-year-old woman, with a history of familial adenomatous polyposis, complicated by carcinoma of the colon, for which a proctocolectomy had been performed, now presented with metastasis located in the pancreas. Treatment consisted of chemotherapy followed by a partial pancreaticoduodenectomy. Due to ischemia, resection of the small intestines was performed the same day. After admission, a transesophageal echocardiography showed an ejection fraction of 40%. Because enteral administration of drugs was impossible, intravenous enalaprilat 2 mg once a day for 1 day followed by sublingual captopril 25 mg twice a day were started. Blood samples were taken before and after administration. After 1 day of sublingual captopril treatment the angiotensin II level decreased with more than 50%, comparable to the decrease seen after intravenous administration of enalaprilat. Sublingual captopril has been used in the treatment of hypertensive crisis and heart failure. Although frequently reported, no study has investigated the effect on angiotensin II levels after sublingual administration in heart failure patients. This case-report demonstrated that sublingual administration of 25 mg captopril twice a day yielded a considerable decrease in angiotensin II plasma levels which was comparable to the effect seen after an intravenous administration of 2 mg enalaprilat.

  17. Intracisternal galanin/angiotensin II interactions in central cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Parrado, Concepción; Vela, Carmen; Coveñas, Rafael; Yanaihara, Noboru; Fuxe, Kjell; González-Barón, Salvador; Narváez, José A

    2005-04-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the interactions between angiotensin II (Ang II) and galanin(1-29) [GAL(1-29)] or its N-terminal fragment galanin(1-15) [GAL(1-15)] on central cardiovascular control. The involvement of angiotensin type1 (AT1) receptor subtype was analyzed by the AT1 antagonist, DuP 753. Anesthesized male Sprague-Dawley rats received intracisternal microinjections of Ang II (3 nmol) with GAL(1-29) (3 nmol) or GAL(1-15) (0.1 nmol) alone or in combination. The changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) recorded from the femoral artery were analyzed. The injection of Ang II and GAL(1-15) alone did not produce any change in MAP. However, coinjections of both Ang II and GAL(1-15) elicited a significant vasopressor response. This response was blocked by DuP 753. Ang II and GAL(1-15) alone produced an increase in HR. The coinjections of Ang II with GAL(1-15) induced an increase in HR not significantly different from the tachycardia produced by each peptide. The presence of DuP 753 counteracted this response. GAL(1-29) alone elicited a transient vasopressor response that disappeared in the presence of Ang II. The coinjections of Ang II with GAL(1-29) and with DuP 753 restored the transient vasopressor effect produced by GAL(1-29). GAL(1-29) produced a slight but significant tachycardic effect that was not modified in the presence of Ang II. The presence of DuP 753 did not modify the tachycardic response produced by Ang II and GAL(1-29). These results give indications for the existence of a differential modulatory effect of Ang II with GAL(1-15) and GAL(1-29) on central blood pressure response that might be dependent on the activity of the angiotensin AT1 receptor subtype.

  18. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage.

    PubMed

    Villapol, Sonia; Balarezo, María G; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2015-11-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article.Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan's blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking and

  19. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage

    PubMed Central

    Balarezo, María G.; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M.; Symes, Aviva J.

    2015-01-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article. Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan’s blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking

  20. Therapeutic perspective: starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Jarred, Ghassan; Kennedy, R Lee

    2010-02-01

    There are extensive data confirming involvement of the renin-angiotensin system in microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. Blockade of the system with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) is regarded as the first-line approach to managing hypertension and end-organ protection in patients with diabetes. ACE inhibitors are still the preferred agents for most patients. Dose should be lower with renal impairment unless an agent which is not excreted by the kidneys is chosen. Dose should be titrated up to the maximum tolerated to optimize end-organ protection, and intermediate-acting agents should be given in a twice daily divided dose when higher doses are used. Electrolytes should be checked before commencing, 1-2 weeks later, and after each dose increment. A modest decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and increase in creatinine often occurs with ACE inhibitors or ARBs. The agents may need to be discontinued if eGFR decreases by >15%, if creatinine increases by >20%, or if hyperkalemia develops. Cough occurs in 5-10% of patients taking ACE inhibitor, but not with ARBs. Angioedema is probably equally common with ACE inhibitor or ARBs. It is not widely appreciated that ACE inhibitors may precipitate hypoglycaemia in patients taking glucose-lowering medication. The combination of ACE inhibitor and ARB is not routinely indicated for either hypertension or end-organ protection. While patients should not be denied the undoubted benefits of these important classes of drugs, we should also guard against their indiscriminate use in patients with diabetes. We must also ensure that patients receive appropriate counselling and monitoring.

  1. Therapeutic perspective: starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Jarred, Ghassan; Kennedy, R. Lee

    2010-01-01

    There are extensive data confirming involvement of the renin-angiotensin system in microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. Blockade of the system with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) is regarded as the first-line approach to managing hypertension and end-organ protection in patients with diabetes. ACE inhibitors are still the preferred agents for most patients. Dose should be lower with renal impairment unless an agent which is not excreted by the kidneys is chosen. Dose should be titrated up to the maximum tolerated to optimize end-organ protection, and intermediate-acting agents should be given in a twice daily divided dose when higher doses are used. Electrolytes should be checked before commencing, 1–2 weeks later, and after each dose increment. A modest decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and increase in creatinine often occurs with ACE inhibitors or ARBs. The agents may need to be discontinued if eGFR decreases by >15%, if creatinine increases by >20%, or if hyperkalemia develops. Cough occurs in 5–10% of patients taking ACE inhibitor, but not with ARBs. Angioedema is probably equally common with ACE inhibitor or ARBs. It is not widely appreciated that ACE inhibitors may precipitate hypoglycaemia in patients taking glucose-lowering medication. The combination of ACE inhibitor and ARB is not routinely indicated for either hypertension or end-organ protection. While patients should not be denied the undoubted benefits of these important classes of drugs, we should also guard against their indiscriminate use in patients with diabetes. We must also ensure that patients receive appropriate counselling and monitoring. PMID:23148146

  2. Cyclic pressure and angiotensin II influence the biomechanical properties of aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Myles, Valtresa; Liao, Jun; Warnock, James N

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a known risk factor for aortic stenosis. The elevated blood pressure increases the transvalvular load and can elicit inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Elevated cyclic pressure and the vasoactive agent angiotensin II (Ang II) both promote collagen synthesis, an early hallmark of aortic sclerosis. In the current study, it was hypothesized that elevated cyclic pressure and/or angiotensin II decreases extensibility of aortic valve leaflets due to an increase in collagen content and/or interstitial cell stiffness. Porcine aortic valve leaflets were exposed to pressure conditions of increasing magnitude (static atmospheric pressure, 80, and 120 mmHg) with and without 10−6 M Ang II. Biaxial mechanical testing was performed to determine extensibility in the circumferential and radial directions and collagen content was determined using a quantitative dye-binding method at 24 and 48 h. Isolated aortic valve interstitial cells exposed to the same experimental conditions were subjected to atomic force microscopy to assess cellular stiffness at 24 h. Leaflet tissue incubated with Ang II decreased tissue extensibility in the radial direction, but not in the circumferential direction. Elevated cyclic pressure decreased extensibility in both the radial and circumferential directions. Ang II and elevated cyclic pressure both increased the collagen content in leaflet tissue. Interstitial cells incubated with Ang II were stiffer than those incubated without Ang II while elevated cyclic pressure caused a decrease in cell stiffness. The results of the current study demonstrated that both pressure and Ang II play a role in altering the biomechanical properties of aortic valve leaflets. Ang II and elevated cyclic pressure decreased the extensibility of aortic valve leaflet tissue. Ang II induced direction specific changes in extensibility, demonstrating different response mechanisms. These findings help to provide a better understanding of

  3. Rosuvastatin prevents angiotensin II-induced vascular changes by inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase and COX-1

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Rocchina; Fornai, Matteo; Duranti, Emiliano; Antonioli, Luca; Rugani, Ilaria; Aydinoglu, Fatma; Ippolito, Chiara; Segnani, Cristina; Bernardini, Nunzia; Taddei, Stefano; Blandizzi, Corrado; Virdis, Agostino

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose NAD(P)H oxidase and COX-1 participate in vascular damage induced by angiotensin II. We investigated the effect of rosuvastatin on endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodelling, changes in extracellular matrix components and mechanical properties of small mesenteric arteries from angiotensin II-infused rats. Experimental Approach Male rats received angiotensin II (120 ng·kg−1·min−1, subcutaneously) for 14 days with or without rosuvastatin (10 mg·kg−1·day−1, oral gavage) or vehicle. Vascular functions and morphological parameters were assessed by pressurized myography. Key Results In angiotensin II-infused rats, ACh-induced relaxation was attenuated compared with controls, less sensitive to L-NAME, enhanced by SC-560 (COX-1 inhibitor) or SQ-29548 (prostanoid TP receptor antagonist), and normalized by the antioxidant ascorbic acid or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors. After rosuvastatin, relaxations to ACh were normalized, fully sensitive to L-NAME, and no longer affected by SC-560, SQ-29548 or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors. Angiotensin II enhanced intravascular superoxide generation, eutrophic remodelling, collagen and fibronectin depositions, and decreased elastin content, resulting in increased vessel stiffness. All these changes were prevented by rosuvastatin. Angiotensin II increased phosphorylation of NAD(P)H oxidase subunit p47phox and its binding to subunit p67phox, effects inhibited by rosuvastatin. Rosuvastatin down-regulated vascular Nox4/NAD(P)H isoform and COX-1 expression, attenuated the vascular release of 6-keto-PGF1α, and enhanced copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase expression. Conclusion and Implications Rosuvastatin prevents angiotensin II-induced alterations in resistance arteries in terms of function, structure, mechanics and composition. These effects depend on restoration of NO availability, prevention of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived oxidant excess, reversal of COX-1 induction and its prostanoid production, and stimulation of

  4. Renal denervation attenuates aldosterone expression and associated cardiovascular pathophysiology in angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Rui; Ruan, Cheng-Chao; Xu, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Jing; Wu, Yong-Jie; Ma, Yu; Zhu, Ding-Liang; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system interacts with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we sought to determine if renal denervation (RDN) inhibits aldosterone expression and associated cardiovascular pathophysiological changes in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension. Bilateral RDN or SHAM operation was performed before chronic 14-day Ang II subcutaneous infusion (200ng/kg/min) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Bilateral RDN blunted Ang II-induced hypertension and ameliorated the mesenteric vascular dysfunction. Cardiovascular hypertrophy in response to Ang II was significantly attenuated by RDN as shown by histopathology and transthoracic echocardiography. Moreover, Ang II-induced vascular and myocardial inflammation and fibrosis were suppressed by RDN with concurrent decrease in fibronectin and collagen deposition, macrophage infiltration, and MCP-1 expression. Interestingly, RDN also inhibited Ang II-induced aldosterone expression in the plasma, kidney and heart. This was associated with the reduction of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the adrenal gland. Ang II promoted aldosterone secretion which was partly attenuated by CGRP in the adrenocortical cell line, suggesting a protective role of CGRP in this model. Activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathway was both inhibited by RDN especially in the heart. These results suggest that the regulation of the renal sympathetic nerve in Ang II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiological changes is likely mediated by aldosterone, with CGRP involvement. PMID:27661131

  5. Osthole Alleviates Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis via Modulating Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/Angiotensin-(1-7) Axis and Decreasing Inflammation Responses in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuewen; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) plays modulating roles in lung pathophysiology, including pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and acute lung injury. Pulmonary fibrosis is a common complication in these interstitial lung diseases, and PF always has a poor prognosis and short survival. To date, there are few promising methods for treating PF, and they are invariably accompanied by severe side effects. Recent studies have showed that the traditional Chinese herbal extract, osthole, had beneficial effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI) via an ACE2 pathway. Here we further investigated the protective effects of osthole on bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis and attempted to determine the underlying mechanism. PF mode rats were induced by bleomycin (BLM) and then subsequently administered osthole. Histopathological analyses were employed to identify PF changes. The results showed that BLM resulted in severe PF and diffuse lung inflammation, together with significant elevation of inflammatory factors and a marked increase in expression of angiotensin II (ANG II) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1). ACE2 and angiotensin-(1-7) [ANG-(1-7)] were both greatly reduced after BLM administration. Meanwhile, osthole treatment attenuated BLM induced PF and inflammation, decreased the expression of these inflammatory mediators, ANG II, and TGF-β1, and reversed ACE2 and ANG-(1-7) production in rat lungs. We conclude that osthole may exert beneficial effects on BLM induced PF in rats, perhaps via modulating the ACE2/ANG-(1-7) axis and inhibiting lung inflammation pathways.

  6. Angiotensin II revisited: new roles in inflammation, immunology and aging

    PubMed Central

    Benigni, Ariela; Cassis, Paola; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    That the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in regulation of blood pressure, vasoconstriction, sodium intake and potassium excretion is well established. Studies in the last few years have however documented new roles for this molecule as a pro-inflammatory molecule and more recently as a possible pro-fibrotic agent that contributes to progressive deterioration of organ function in disease. Binding of Ang II to its receptors (in particular AT1) mediates intracellular free radical generation that contributes to tissue damage by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction. Blocking Ang II signalling protects against neurodegenerative processes and promotes longevity in rodents. Altogether these findings open the unanticipated perspective for exploring Ang II signalling in therapeutic interventions in inflammatory diseases and aging-related tissue injury. This review extends from the discovery of Ang II and its implications in renal and cardiovascular physiology to cover the roles of the system in inflammation, tissue injury, autoimmunity, oxidative stress and aging. PMID:20597104

  7. Angiotensin II-related hypertension and eye diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marin Garcia, Pablo Jesus; Marin-Castaño, Maria Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Systemic vascular disease, especially hypertension, has been suspected as a risk factor for some eye diseases including, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Hypertension can contribute to chronic diseases by hemodynamic injury and/or cellular actions induced by hypertension-related hormones or growth factors. Among the most important is Angiotensin II (Ang II), which controls blood pressure and induces different cellular functions that may be dependent or independent of its effect on blood pressure. Importantly, as is true for heart, kidney and other organs, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is present in the eye. So, even in the absence of hypertension, local production of Ang II could be involved in eye diseases. The goal of this manuscript is to review the most relevant scientific evidence supporting the role of the RAS activation, in the development of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, and highlight the importance of Ang II in the etiology of these diseases. PMID:25276298

  8. The Cooperative Effect of Local Angiotensin-II in Liver with Adriamycin Hepatotoxicity on Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Eylem; Guven, Celal; Sahin, Leyla; Dursun, Nurcan

    2016-03-28

    Adriamycin (ADR) is a drug used clinically for anticancer treatment; however, it causes adverse effects in the liver. The mechanism by which these adverse effects occur remains unclear, impeding efforts to enhance the therapeutic effects of ADR. Its hepatotoxicity might be related to increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction. The interaction between ADR and the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the liver is unclear. ADR might activate the RAS. Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) leads to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study we investigated whether ADR's hepatotoxicity interacts with local RAS in causing oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction in the rat liver. Rats were divided into 5 groups: control, ADR, co-treated ADR with captopril, co-treated ADR with Aliskiren, and co-treated ADR with both captopril and Aliskiren. Mitochondria and cytosol were separated from the liver, then biochemical measurements were made from them. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels were evaluated. ADR remarkably decreased MMP and ATP in liver mitochondria (p<0.05). Co-administration with ADR and Aliskiren and captopril improved the dissipation of MMP (p<0.05). The decreased ATP level was restored by treatment with inhibitors of ACE and renin. Angiotensin-II may contribute to hepatotoxicity of in the ADR via mitochondrial oxidative production, resulting in the attenuation of MMP and ATP production.

  9. Role of angiotensin II receptor subtype activation in cognitive function and ischaemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Mogi, Masaki

    2011-07-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1) ) receptor blockers (ARBs) reduce the onset of stroke, stroke severity and the incidence and progression of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. We can expect that ARBs exert these effects by both AT(1) receptor blockade and angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2) ) receptor stimulation. Moreover, recent experimental results support the notion that AT(2) receptor stimulation with AT(1) receptor blockade could contribute to protection against ischaemic brain damage at least partly due to an increase in cerebral blood flow and decrease in oxidative stress, and prevent cognitive decline. Cellular therapy has been focused on as a new therapeutic approach to restore injured neurons. In this context, it has been reported that AT(2) receptor stimulation enhances neurite outgrowth and decreases neural damage, thereby enhancing neurogenesis. Moreover, additional beneficial effects of ARBs with an AT(1) receptor blocking action with a partial peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonistic effect have been reported, and interaction of AT(2) receptor activation and PPAR-γ might be involved in these ARBs' effects. This article reviews the effects of regulation of activation of angiotensin II receptor subtypes on ischaemic brain damage and cognitive function, focusing on the effects of AT(2) receptor stimulation. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. The Cooperative Effect of Local Angiotensin-II in Liver with Adriamycin Hepatotoxicity on Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Taskin, Eylem; Guven, Celal; Sahin, Leyla; Dursun, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    Background Adriamycin (ADR) is a drug used clinically for anticancer treatment; however, it causes adverse effects in the liver. The mechanism by which these adverse effects occur remains unclear, impeding efforts to enhance the therapeutic effects of ADR. Its hepatotoxicity might be related to increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction. The interaction between ADR and the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the liver is unclear. ADR might activate the RAS. Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) leads to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study we investigated whether ADR’s hepatotoxicity interacts with local RAS in causing oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction in the rat liver. Material/Methods Rats were divided into 5 groups: control, ADR, co-treated ADR with captopril, co-treated ADR with Aliskiren, and co-treated ADR with both captopril and Aliskiren. Mitochondria and cytosol were separated from the liver, then biochemical measurements were made from them. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels were evaluated. Results ADR remarkably decreased MMP and ATP in liver mitochondria (p<0.05). Co-administration with ADR and Aliskiren and captopril improved the dissipation of MMP (p<0.05). The decreased ATP level was restored by treatment with inhibitors of ACE and renin. Conclusions Angiotensin-II may contribute to hepatotoxicity of in the ADR via mitochondrial oxidative production, resulting in the attenuation of MMP and ATP production. PMID:27019222

  11. Mineralocorticoid and angiotensin II type 1 receptors in the subfornical organ mediate angiotensin II - induced hypothalamic reactive oxygen species and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Huang, Bing S; White, Roselyn A; Chen, Aidong; Ahmad, Monir; Leenen, Frans H H

    2016-08-04

    Activation of angiotensinergic pathways by central aldosterone (Aldo)-mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway plays a critical role in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension. The subfornical organ (SFO) contains both MR and angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R) and can relay the signals of circulating Ang II to downstream nuclei such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). In Wistar rats, subcutaneous (sc) infusion of Ang II at 500ng/min/kg for 1 or 2weeks increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) as measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining in a nucleus - specific pattern. Intra-SFO infusion of AAV-MR- or AT1aR-siRNA prevented the Ang II-induced increase in AT1R mRNA expression in the SFO and decreased MR mRNA. Both MR- and AT1aR-siRNA prevented increases in ROS in the PVN and RVLM. MR- but not AT1aR-siRNA in the SFO prevented the Ang II-induced ROS in the SON. Both MR- and AT1aR-siRNA in the SFO prevented most of the Ang II-induced hypertension as assessed by telemetry. These results indicate that Aldo-MR signaling in the SFO is needed for the activation of Ang II-AT1R-ROS signaling from the SFO to the PVN and RVLM. Activation of Aldo-MR signaling from the SFO to the SON may enhance AT1R dependent activation of pre-sympathetic neurons in the PVN. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural Basis for Selectivity and Diversity in Angiotensin II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Han, Gye Won; Batyuk, Alexander; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Kate L.; Patel, Nilkanth; Sadybekov, Anastasiia; Zamlynny, Beata; Rudd, Michael T.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Tolstikova, Alexandra; White, Thomas A.; Hunter, Mark S.; Weierstall, Uwe; Liu, Wei; Babaoglu, Kerim; Moore, Eric L.; Katz, Ryan D.; Shipman, Jennifer M.; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Sharma, Sujata; Sheth, Payal; Soisson, Stephen M.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Cherezov, Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptors, AT1R and AT2R, serve as key components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. While AT1R plays a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, the function of AT2R is enigmatic with a variety of reported effects. To elucidate the mechanisms for the functional diversity and ligand selectivity between these receptors, we report crystal structures of the human AT2R bound to an AT2R-selective and an AT1R/AT2R-dual ligand, respectively, capturing the receptor in an active-like conformation. Unexpectedly, helix VIII was found in a non-canonical position, stabilizing the active-like state, but at the same time preventing the recruitment of G proteins/β-arrestins, in agreement with the lack of signaling responses in standard cellular assays. Structure-activity relationship, docking and mutagenesis studies revealed the interactions critical for ligand binding and selectivity. Our results thus provide insights into the structural basis for distinct functions of the angiotensin receptors, and may guide the design of novel selective ligands. PMID:28379944

  13. Angiotensin II increases phosphodiesterase 5A expression in vascular smooth muscle cells: A mechanism by which angiotensin II antagonizes cGMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongsoo; Aizawa, Toru; Wei, Heng; Pi, Xinchun; Rybalkin, Sergei D.; Berk, Bradford C.; Yan, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and nitric oxide (NO)/natriuretic peptide (NP) signaling pathways mutually regulate each other. Imbalance of Ang II and NO/NP has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many vascular diseases. cGMP functions as a key mediator in the interaction between Ang II and NO/NP. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) is important in modulating cGMP signaling by hydrolyzing cGMP in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Therefore, we examined whether Ang II negatively modulates intracellular cGMP signaling in VSMC by regulating PDE5A. Ang II rapidly and transiently increased PDE5A mRNA levels in rat aortic VSMC. Upregulation of PDE5A mRNA was associated with a time-dependent increase of both PDE5 protein expression and activity. Increased PDE5A mRNA level was transcription-dependent and mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor. Ang II-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) was essential for Ang II-induced PDE5A upregulation. Pretreatment of VSMC with Ang II inhibited C-type NP (CNP) stimulated cGMP signaling, such as cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG)-mediated phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated-phosphoprotein (VASP). Ang II-mediated inhibition of PKG was blocked when PDE5 activity was decreased by selective PDE5 inhibitors, suggesting that upregulation of PDE5A expression is an important mechanism for Ang II to attenuate cGMP signaling. PDE5A may also play a critical role in the growth promoting effects of Ang II because inhibition of PDE5A activity significantly decreased Ang II-stimulated VSMC growth. These observations establish a new mechanism by which Ang II antagonizes cGMP signaling and stimulates VSMC growth. PMID:15623434

  14. RGS4 inhibits angiotensin II signaling and macrophage localization during renal reperfusion injury independent of vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Pang, Paul; Jin, Xiaohua; Proctor, Brandon M; Farley, Michelle; Roy, Nilay; Chin, Matthew S; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Vollmann, Elisabeth; Perro, Mario; Hoffman, Ryan J; Chung, Joseph; Chauhan, Nikita; Mistri, Murti; Muslin, Anthony J; Bonventre, Joseph V; Siedlecki, Andrew M

    2015-04-01

    Vascular inflammation is a major contributor to the severity of acute kidney injury. In the context of vasospasm-independent reperfusion injury we studied the potential anti-inflammatory role of the Gα-related RGS protein, RGS4. Transgenic RGS4 mice were resistant to 25 min injury, although post-ischemic renal arteriolar diameter was equal to the wild type early after injury. A 10 min unilateral injury was performed to study reperfusion without vasospasm. Eighteen hours after injury, blood flow was decreased in the inner cortex of wild-type mice with preservation of tubular architecture. Angiotensin II levels in the kidneys of wild-type and transgenic mice were elevated in a sub-vasoconstrictive range 12 and 18 h after injury. Angiotensin II stimulated pre-glomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to secrete the macrophage chemoattractant RANTES, a process decreased by angiotensin II R2 (AT2) inhibition. However, RANTES increased when RGS4 expression was suppressed implicating Gα protein activation in an AT2-RGS4-dependent pathway. RGS4 function, specific to VSMC, was tested in a conditional VSMC-specific RGS4 knockout showing high macrophage density by T2 MRI compared with transgenic and non-transgenic mice after the 10 min injury. Arteriolar diameter of this knockout was unchanged at successive time points after injury. Thus, RGS4 expression, specific to renal VSMC, inhibits angiotensin II-mediated cytokine signaling and macrophage recruitment during reperfusion, distinct from vasomotor regulation.

  15. Inhibition of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme, Angiotensin II Receptor Blocking, and Blood Pressure Lowering Bioactivity across Plant Families.

    PubMed

    Patten, Glen S; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, kidney disease, and stroke. Interest in medicinal or nutraceutical plant bioactives to reduce hypertension has increased dramatically. The main biological regulation of mammalian blood pressure is via the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The key enzyme is angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) that converts angiotensin I into the powerful vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II. Angiotensin II binds to its receptors (AT1) on smooth muscle cells of the arteriole vasculature causing vasoconstriction and elevation of blood pressure. This review focuses on the in vitro and in vivo reports of plant-derived extracts that inhibit ACE activity, block angiotensin II receptor binding and demonstrate hypotensive activity in animal or human studies. We describe 74 families of plants that exhibited significant ACE inhibitory activity and 16 plant families with potential AT1 receptor blocking activity, according to in vitro studies. From 43 plant families including some of those with in vitro bioactivity, the extracts from 73 plant species lowered blood pressure in various normotensive or hypertensive in vivo models by the oral route. Of these, 19 species from 15 families lowered human BP when administered orally. Some of the active plant extracts, isolated bioactives and BP-lowering mechanisms are discussed.

  16. Azilsartan: a newly approved angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sum

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a common chronic disease that leads to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Blood pressure control is essential to prevent end-organ complications, such as stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, or kidney disease. Azilsartan is the eighth angiotensin II receptor blocker approved for the management of hypertension, alone or in combination with other agents. At the approved dosage, it reduces systolic blood pressure by 12 to 15 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 7 to 8 mm Hg. A higher dose of azilsartan (80 mg) was superior to valsartan 320 mg or olmesartan 40 mg in lowering systolic blood pressure in short-term studies. Additional blood pressure reduction is expected when azilsartan is used adjunctively with a diuretic. However, the effects of azilsartan on cardiovascular morbidity or mortality are still lacking. Azilsartan is well tolerated; the most common side effects are headache and diarrhea. No cases of hyperkalemia have been reported in 6-week clinical trials. Worsening of renal function and hypotension should be monitored, particularly in those with baseline risk factors. It is unknown whether azilsartan would join angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and other angiotensin receptor blockers as the preferred hypertensive agents for end-organ protection. At this time, azilsartan should be considered as an alternative agent for mild-to-moderate hypertension, or as an adjunctive therapy when preferred agents fail to maintain optimal blood pressure control. It is also an option for those patients who have contraindications or cannot tolerate other antihypertensive agents, including dry cough induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

  17. Angiotensin II Signaling in Human Preadipose Cells: Participation of ERK1,2-Dependent Modulation of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Dünner, Natalia; Quezada, Carolina; Berndt, F. Andrés; Cánovas, José; Rojas, Cecilia V.

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system expressed in adipose tissue has been implicated in the modulation of adipocyte formation, glucose metabolism, triglyceride accumulation, lipolysis, and the onset of the adverse metabolic consequences of obesity. As we investigated angiotensin II signal transduction mechanisms in human preadipose cells, an interplay of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1,2) and Akt/PKB became evident. Angiotensin II caused attenuation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), at serine 473; the p-Akt/Akt ratio decreased to 0.5±0.2-fold the control value without angiotensin II (p<0.001). Here we report that the reduction of phosphorylated Akt associates with ERK1,2 activities. In the absence of angiotensin II, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 or PD98059 resulted in a 2.1±0.5 (p<0.001) and 1.4±0.2-fold (p<0.05) increase in the p-Akt/Akt ratio, respectively. In addition, partial knockdown of ERK1 protein expression by the short hairpin RNA technique also raised phosphorylated Akt in these cells (the p-Akt/Akt ratio was 1.5±0.1-fold the corresponding control; p<0.05). Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 prevented the reduction of p-Akt/Akt by angiotensin II. An analogous effect was found on the phosphorylation status of Akt downstream effectors, the forkhead box (Fox) proteins O1 and O4. Altogether, these results indicate that angiotensin II signaling in human preadipose cells involves an ERK1,2-dependent attenuation of Akt activity, whose impact on the biological functions under its regulation is not fully understood. PMID:24098385

  18. Acute effects of angiotensin II on myocardial performance.

    PubMed

    Broomé, M; Haney, M; Häggmark, S; Johansson, G; Aneman, A; Biber, B

    2001-10-01

    Specific angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors exist in many organs including peripheral blood vessels, cardiac myocytes and the central nervous system. This suggests multiple sites of actions for Ang II throughout the cardiovascular system. Cardiac effects of Ang II are not completely understood, though its prominent vasoconstrictor actions are well described. This study was designed to assess left ventricular function during administration of Ang II using relatively load-independent methods in a whole-animal model. Ang II was infused in incremental doses (0-200 microg x h(-1)) in anaesthetised instrumented pigs (n=10). Cardiac systolic and diastolic function were evaluated by analysis of the left ventricular pressure-volume relationship. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) increased dose-dependently with Ang II, while cardiac output (CO) remained unchanged. Systolic function indices, end-systolic elastance (Ees) and preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW), demonstrated dose-dependent increases. The diastolic function parameter tau (tau) did not change with increasing Ang II dose. Ang II infusion caused increases in contractility indices in anaesthetised pigs in the doses used in this study. The mechanisms for these systolic function effects may be a direct myocardial effect or modulated through changes in autonomic nervous system activity.

  19. Norepinephrine metabolism in neuronal cultures is increased by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Sumners, C.; Shalit, S.L.; Kalberg, C.J.; Raizada, M.K.

    1987-06-01

    In this study the authors have examined the actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) on catecholamine metabolism in neuronal brain cell cultures prepared from the hypothalamus and brain stem. Neuronal cultures prepared from the brains of 1-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit specific neuronal uptake mechanisms for both norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA), and also monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity. Separate neuronal uptake sites for NE and DA were identified by using specific neuronal uptake inhibitors for each amine. In previous studies, they determined that ANG II (10 nM-1 ..mu..M) stimulates increased neuronal (/sup 3/H)NE uptake by acting as specific receptors. They have confirmed these results here and in addition have shown that ANG II has not significant effects on neuronal (/sup 3/H)DA uptake. These results suggest that the actions of ANG II are restricted to the NE transporter in neuronal cultures. It is possible that ANG II stimulates the intraneuronal metabolism of at least part of the NE that is taken up, because the peptide stimulates MAO activity, an effect mediated by specific ANG II receptors. ANG II had no effect on COMT activity in neuronal cultures. Therefore, the use of neuronal cultures of hypothalamus and brain stem they have determined that ANG II can specifically alter NE metabolism in these areas, while apparently not altering DA metabolism.

  20. A Low-Protein Diet Enhances Angiotensin II Production in the Lung of Pregnant Rats but Not Nonpregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haijun; Tanchico, Daren Tubianosa; Yallampalli, Uma; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary angiotensin II production is enhanced in pregnant rats fed a low-protein (LP) diet. Here we assessed if LP diet induces elevations in angiotensin II production in nonpregnant rats and whether Ace expression and ACE activity in lungs are increased. Nonpregnant rats were fed a normal (CT) or LP diet for 8, 12, or 17 days and timed pregnant rats fed for 17 days from Day 3 of pregnancy. Plasma angiotensin II, expressions of Ace and Ace2, and activities of these proteins in lungs, kidneys, and plasma were measured. These parameters were compared among nonpregnant rats or between nonpregnant and pregnant rats fed different diets. Major findings are as follows: (1) plasma angiotensin II levels were slightly higher in the LP than CT group on Days 8 and 12 in nonpregnant rats; (2) expression of Ace and Ace2 and abundance and activities of ACE and ACE2 in lungs, kidneys, and plasma of nonpregnant rats were unchanged by LP diet except for minor changes; (3) the abundance and activities of ACE in lungs of pregnant rats fed LP diet were greater than nonpregnant rats, while those of ACE2 were decreased. These results indicate that LP diet-induced increase in pulmonary angiotensin II production depends on pregnancy. PMID:27195150

  1. Increased colonic mucosal angiotensin I and II concentrations in Crohn's colitis.

    PubMed

    Jaszewski, R; Tolia, V; Ehrinpreis, M N; Bodzin, J H; Peleman, R R; Korlipara, R; Weinstock, J V

    1990-06-01

    To define a potential role for the angiotensin system in Crohn's colitis, the colonic mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II were measured in endoscopic biopsy samples from patients with active Crohn's colitis (n = 20), ulcerative colitis (n = 13), other forms of colitis (n = 3), and normal controls (n = 17). Colonic mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II were greater in patients with Crohn's colitis than in normal subjects (p less than 0.001 and p less than 0.001, respectively). Mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II were also higher in Crohn's colitis than in ulcerative colitis (p less than 0.001 and p less than 0.001, respectively), and levels of angiotensin II were higher in Crohn's than in other forms of colitis (p = 0.014). Mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II correlated well with the degree of macroscopic inflammation in Crohn's colitis (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001 and r = 0.68, p less than 0.001, respectively). Mucosal levels of angiotensin I correlated fairly well with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (r = 0.46, p less than 0.05) while angiotensin II levels correlated poorly. These studies suggest that angiotensin I and II may have a role in the inflammation associated with Crohn's colitis.

  2. [Vasoprotective effects of statins and angiotensin II blockers in atherothrombosis].

    PubMed

    Egido, J; Ruiz-Ortega, M; Muñoz-García, B; Martín-Ventura, J L; Blanco-Colio, L M

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, including atherothrombosis, is the most frequent cause of mortality in the Western World. In the last years, major advances have been made in the pathogenesis of this disease. Currently, the drugs most widely used are the inhibitors of the HMG-CoA reductase (statins) and the antihypertensive drugs, mainly angiotensin II blockers. The first group has been shown to be effective on cardiovascular disease due to atherothrombosis, and the second group on hypertensive disease. Nevertheless, recent data suggest that these two situations can improve with the concomitant use of both drugs.

  3. Knockdown of mineralocorticoid or angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene expression in the paraventricular nucleus prevents angiotensin II hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aidong; Huang, Bing S; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ahmad, Monir; Leenen, Frans H H

    2014-01-01

    Circulating Ang II activates an aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) – angiotensin II (Ang II) – angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) pathway in the hypothalamus. To obtain insights into the actual neuronal projections involved, adeno-associated virus carrying small interfering RNA against either AT1aR (AAV-AT1aR-siRNA) or MR (AAV-MR-siRNA) were infused into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in Wistar rats. Intra-PVN infusion of AAV-AT1aR-siRNA or AAV-MR-siRNA decreased AT1R or MR expression in the PVN but not in the subfornical organ (SFO) or supraoptic nucleus (SON). Subcutaneous infusion of Ang II at 500 ng kg−1 min−1 for 2 weeks increased mean arterial pressure by 60–70 mmHg, and increased AT1R and MR expression in the SFO, SON and PVN. Intra-PVN AT1aR-siRNA prevented the Ang II-induced increase in AT1R but not MR expression in the PVN, and MR-siRNA prevented MR but not AT1R expression in the PVN. The increases in AT1R and MR expression in both the SFO and the SON were not changed by the two AAV-siRNAs. Specific knockdown of AT1R or MR in the PVN by AAV-siRNA each prevented most of the Ang II-induced hypertension. Prevention of the subcutaneous Ang II-induced increase in MR but not the increase in AT1R by knockdown of MR and vice versa suggests an independent regulation of MR and AT1R expression in the PVN. Both AT1R and MR activation in the PVN play a critical role in Ang II-induced hypertension in rats. PMID:24973408

  4. Regulation of glomerular heparanase expression by aldosterone, angiotensin II and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    van den Hoven, Mabel J; Waanders, Femke; Rops, Angelique L; Kramer, Andrea B; van Goor, Harry; Berden, Jo H; Navis, Gerjan; van der Vlag, Johan

    2009-09-01

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) provides renoprotection in adriamycin nephropathy (AN), along with a decrease in overexpression of glomerular heparanase. Angiotensin II (AngII) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to regulate heparanase expression in vivo. However, it is unknown whether this is also the case for aldosterone. Therefore, we further assessed the role of aldosterone, AngII and ROS in the regulation of glomerular heparanase expression. Six weeks after the induction of AN, rats were treated with vehicle (n = 8), lisinopril (75 mg/L, n = 10), spironolactone (3.3 mg/day, n = 12) or the combination of lisinopril and spironolactone (n = 14) for 12 weeks. Age-matched healthy rats served as controls (n = 6). After 18 weeks, renal heparanase and heparan sulfate (HS) expression were examined by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of aldosterone, AngII and ROS on heparanase expression in cultured podocytes was determined. Treatment with lisinopril, spironolactone or their combination significantly blunted the increased glomerular heparanase expression and restored the decreased HS expression in the GBM. Addition of aldosterone to cultured podocytes resulted in a significantly increased heparanase mRNA and protein expression, which could be inhibited by spironolactone. Heparanase mRNA and protein expression in podocytes were also significantly increased after stimulation with AngII or ROS. Our in vivo and in vitro results show that not only AngII and ROS, but also aldosterone is involved in the regulation of glomerular heparanase expression.

  5. Novel EGFR inhibitors attenuate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kesong; Tian, Xinqiao; Qian, Yuanyuan; Skibba, Melissa; Zou, Chunpeng; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Jingying; Xu, Zheng; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an important risk factor for heart failure. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this current study was to examine the role of EGFR in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we observed that both Ang II and EGF could increase the phospohorylation of EGFR and protein kinase B (AKT)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and then induce cell hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. Both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic silencing significantly reduced Ang II-induced EGFR signalling pathway activation, hypertrophic marker overexpression, and cell hypertrophy. In addition, our results showed that Ang II-induced EGFR activation is mediated by c-Src phosphorylation. In vivo, Ang II treatment significantly led to cardiac remodelling including cardiac hypertrophy, disorganization and fibrosis, accompanied by the activation of EGFR signalling pathway in the heart tissues, while all these molecular and pathological alterations were attenuated by the oral administration with EGFR inhibitors. In conclusion, the c-Src-dependent EGFR activation may play an important role in Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and inhibition of EGFR by specific molecules may be an effective strategy for the treatment of Ang II-associated cardiac diseases. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists and heart failure: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors remain the first-line option.

    PubMed

    2005-10-01

    (1) Some angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) reduce mortality in patients with heart failure (captopril, enalapril, ramipril and trandolapril), and in patients with recent myocardial infarction and heart failure or marked left ventricular dysfunction (captopril, ramipril and trandolapril). (2) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, otherwise known as angiotensin receptor blockers, have haemodynamic effects similar to ACE inhibitors, but differ in their mechanism of action and certain adverse effects. (3) Five clinical trials have evaluated angiotensin II receptor antagonists (candesartan, losartan and valsartan) in terms of their effect on mortality and on the risk of clinical deterioration in patients with symptomatic heart failure, but without severe renal failure, hyperkalemia or hypotension. In these trials, candesartan and valsartan were used at much higher doses than those recommended for the treatment of arterial hypertension. (4) In patients with heart failure who were not taking an angiotensin II receptor antagonist or an ACE inhibitor at enrollment, no significant difference was found between losartan and captopril in terms of mortality or the risk of clinical deterioration. (5) In patients with heart failure who had stopped taking an ACE inhibitor because of adverse effects, candesartan had no effect on mortality as compared with placebo, but it did reduce the risk of clinical deterioration (3 fewer hospitalisations per year per 100 patients). However, candesartan was associated with adverse effects such as renal failure and hyperkalemia, especially in patients who had experienced these same adverse effects while taking an ACE inhibitor. (6) In patients with heart failure who were already taking an ACE inhibitor, adjunctive candesartan or valsartan treatment did not influence mortality in comparison to the addition of a placebo. Adding candesartan or valsartan reduced the risk of hospitalisation (between 1 and 3 fewer hospitalisations

  7. Renal hemodynamic responses to increased renal venous pressure: role of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Kastner, P R; Hall, J E; Guyton, A C

    1982-09-01

    Studies were performed to quantitate the effects of progressive increases in renal venous pressure (RVP) on renin secretion (RS) and renal hemodynamics. RVP was raised in 10 mmHg increments to 50 mmHg. Renin secretion rate increased modestly as RVP was increased to 30 mmHg and then increased sharply after RVP exceeded 30 mmHg. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal blood flow (RBF), and filtration fraction (FF) did not change significantly when RVP was elevated to 50 mmHg. GFR and RBF were also measured after the renin-angiotension system (RAS) was blocked with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (CEI) SQ 14225. After a 60-min CEI infusion, RBF was elevated (32%), GFR was unchanged, FF was decreased, and total renal resistance (TRR) was decreased. As RVP was increased to 50 mmHg, GFR and FF decreased to 36.3 and 40.0% of control, respectively, RBF returned to a value not significantly different from control, and TRR decreased to 44.8% of control. The data indicate that the RAS plays an important role in preventing reductions in GFR during increased RVP because blockade of angiotensin II (ANG II) formation by the CEI results in marked decreases in GFR at high RVPs. The decreases in GFR after ANG II blockade and RVP elevation were not due to lack of renal vasodilation, since TRR was maintained below while RBF was maintained either above or at the pre-CEI levels.

  8. The role of the renal effects of angiotensin II in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Young, D B; Lohmeier, T E; Hall, J E; Declue, J E; Bengis, R G; Coleman, T G; Guyton, A C

    1980-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is involved in many forms of clinical and experimental hypertension. Although angiotensin II has powerful vasoconstrictor properties, it is doubtful that any substance can produce sustained hypertension solely by increasing total peripheral resistance. Since the authors have demonstrated previously that alterations in the kidney's ability to excrete sodium can affect long-term arterial blood pressure regulation, they investigated angiotensin's effect on renal function in several experimental models. The results of these studies clearly demonstrate that angiotensin has a powerful direct antinatriuretic effect, the magnitude of which is sufficient to cause marked hypertension at angiotensin concentrations well within the pathophysiological range.

  9. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α is critical for angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nayaab S; Song, Chi Young; Jennings, Brett L; Estes, Anne M; Fang, Xiao R; Bonventre, Joseph V; Malik, Kafait U

    2015-04-01

    Angiotensin II activates cytosolic phospholipase A(2)α (cPLA2α) and releases arachidonic acid from tissue phospholipids, which mediate or modulate ≥1 cardiovascular effects of angiotensin II and has been implicated in hypertension. Because arachidonic acid release is the rate limiting step in eicosanoid production, cPLA2α might play a central role in the development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of angiotensin II infusion for 13 days by micro-osmotic pumps on systolic blood pressure and associated pathogenesis in wild type (cPLA2α(+/+)) and cPLA2α(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II-induced increase in systolic blood pressure in cPLA2α(+/+) mice was abolished in cPLA2α(-/-) mice; increased systolic blood pressure was also abolished by the arachidonic acid metabolism inhibitor, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid in cPLA2α(+/+) mice. Angiotensin II in cPLA2α(+/+) mice increased cardiac cPLA2 activity and urinary eicosanoid excretion, decreased cardiac output, caused cardiovascular remodeling with endothelial dysfunction, and increased vascular reactivity in cPLA2α(+/+) mice; these changes were diminished in cPLA2α(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II also increased cardiac infiltration of F4/80(+) macrophages and CD3(+) T lymphocytes, cardiovascular oxidative stress, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers p58(IPK), and CHOP in cPLA2α(+/+) but not cPLA2α(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased cardiac activity of ERK1/2 and cSrc in cPLA2α(+/+) but not cPLA2α(-/-) mice. These data suggest that angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiological changes are mediated by cPLA2α activation, most likely through the release of arachidonic acid and generation of eicosanoids with predominant prohypertensive effects and activation of ≥1 signaling molecules, including ERK1/2 and cSrc. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Localized accumulation of angiotensin II and production of angiotensin-(1-7) in rat luteal cells and effects on steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, John R; Nemeth, Gabor; Yamada, Yuji; Naftolin, Frederick; Merino, Maricruz

    2006-08-01

    These studies aim to investigate subcellular distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) in rat luteal cells, identify other bioactive angiotensin peptides, and investigate a role for angiotensin peptides in luteal steroidogenesis. Confocal microscopy showed ANG II distributed within the cytoplasm and nuclei of luteal cells. HPLC analysis showed peaks that eluted with the same retention times as ANG-(1-7), ANG II, and ANG III. Their relative concentrations were ANG II >or= ANG-(1-7) > ANG III, and accumulation was modulated by quinapril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), Z-proprolinal (ZPP), an inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), and parachloromercurylsulfonic acid (PCMS), an inhibitor of sulfhydryl protease. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, did not affect peptide accumulation. Quinapril, ZPP, PCMS, and PMSF, as well as losartan and PD-123319, the angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonists, were used in progesterone production studies. ZPP significantly reduced luteinizing hormone (LH)-dependent progesterone production (P < 0.05). Quinapril plus ZPP had a greater inhibitory effect on LH-stimulated progesterone than either inhibitor alone, but this was not reversed by exogenous ANG II or ANG-(1-7). Both PCMS and PMSF acutely blocked LH-stimulated progesterone, and PCMS blocked LH-sensitive cAMP accumulation. Losartan inhibited progesterone production in permeabilized but not intact luteal cells and was reversed by ANG II. PD-123319 had no significant effect on luteal progesterone production in either intact or permeabilized cells. These data suggest that steroidogenesis may be modulated by angiotensin peptides that act in part through intracellular AT1 receptors.

  11. Angiotensin II causes cellular proliferation in infantile haemangioma via angiotensin II receptor 2 activation.

    PubMed

    Itinteang, Tinte; Marsh, Reginald; Davis, Paul Frank; Tan, Swee Thong

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the effect of the angiotensin peptides and their agonists and antagonists on cellular proliferation in proliferating infantile haemangioma (IH) in vitro explants. Proliferating IH samples from six patients were cultured in vitro in the presence of angiotensin I (ATI) alone, or AT1 and the ACE inhibitor, ramipril, or ATII alone, or ATII with the ATII receptor 1 (ATIIR1) blocker, losartan, or ATII with the ATIIR2 blocker, PD123319, or the ATIIR2 agonist, CGP42112. After 6 days in culture, the IH tissue pieces were harvested, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded. The effect of each treatment type on cellular proliferation was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining of these tissue pieces using the proliferation marker, Ki67. There was a significant increase in cellular proliferation in the ATI and ATII treated IH tissues compared with control samples. Their effect on cellular proliferation was reduced by adding ramipril and PD123319, respectively. CGP42112, but not losartan, significantly increased cellular proliferation. Our findings suggest a key regulatory role of ATI and ATII in promoting cellular proliferation in IH, and establish a role for ACE and ATIIR2 in the proliferation of this tumour. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. MiR-30-regulated autophagy mediates angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; Liu, Benrong; Wang, Li; Li, Aiqun; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group). Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene), and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  13. MiR-30-Regulated Autophagy Mediates Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; Liu, Benrong; Wang, Li; Li, Aiqun; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group). Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene), and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:23326547

  14. Dietary sodium deprivation evokes activation of brain regional neurons and down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin-convertion enzyme mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Lu, B; Yang, X J; Chen, K; Yang, D J; Yan, J Q

    2009-12-15

    Previous studies have indicated that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the induction of sodium appetite in rats and that different dietary sodium intakes influence the mRNA expression of central and peripheral RAAS components. To determine whether dietary sodium deprivation activates regional brain neurons related to sodium appetite, and changes their gene expression of RAAS components of rats, the present study examined the c-Fos expression after chronic exposure to low sodium diet, and determined the relationship between plasma and brain angiotensin I (ANG I), angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (ALD) levels and the sodium ingestive behavior variations, as well as the effects of prolonged dietary sodium deprivation on ANG II type 1 (AT1) and ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptors and angiotensin-convertion enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the involved brain regions using the method of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results showed that the Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) expression in forebrain areas such as subfornical organ (SFO), paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) all increased significantly and that the levels of ANG I, ANG II and ALD also increased in plasma and forebrain in rats fed with low sodium diet. In contrast, AT1, ACE mRNA in PVN, SON and OVLT decreased significantly in dietary sodium depleted rats, while AT2 mRNA expression did not change in the examined areas. These results suggest that many brain areas are activated by increased levels of plasma and/or brain ANG II and ALD, which underlies the elevated preference for hypertonic salt solution after prolonged exposure to low sodium diet, and that the regional AT1 and ACE mRNA are down-regulated after dietary sodium deprivation, which may be mediated by increased ANG II in plasma and/or brain tissue.

  15. Central Renin-Angiotensin System Activation and Inflammation Induced by High-Fat Diet Sensitize Angiotensin II-Elicited Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Thunhorst, Robert L; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Beltz, Terry G; Felder, Robert B; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has been shown to promote renin-angiotensin system activity and inflammation in the brain and to be accompanied by increased sympathetic activity and blood pressure. Our previous studies demonstrated that administration of a subpressor dose of angiotensin (Ang) II sensitizes subsequent Ang II-elicited hypertension. The present study tested whether high-fat diet (HFD) feeding also sensitizes the Ang II-elicited hypertensive response and whether HFD-induced sensitization is mediated by an increase in renin-angiotensin system activity and inflammatory mechanisms in the brain. HFD did not increase baseline blood pressure, but enhanced the hypertensive response to Ang II compared with a normal-fat diet. The sensitization produced by the HFD was abolished by concomitant central infusions of either a tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline, an Ang II type 1 receptor blocker, irbesartan, or an inhibitor of microglial activation, minocycline. Furthermore, central pretreatment with tumor necrosis factor-α mimicked the sensitizing action of a central subpressor dose of Ang II, whereas central pentoxifylline or minocycline abolished this Ang II-induced sensitization. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of lamina terminalis tissue indicated that HFD feeding, central tumor necrosis factor-α, or a central subpressor dose of Ang II upregulated mRNA expression of several components of the renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines, whereas inhibition of Ang II type 1 receptor and of inflammation reversed these changes. The results suggest that HFD-induced sensitization of Ang II-elicited hypertension is mediated by upregulation of the brain renin-angiotensin system and of central proinflammatory cytokines. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Purification of an angiotensin II binding protein by using antibodies to a peptide encoded by angiotensin II complementary RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, T.S.; Dion, L.D.; Bost, K.L.; Oparil, S.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    The authors have generated a monospecific antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded by an RNA complementary to the mRNA for angiotensin II (AII) and determined whether this antibody recognizes the AII receptor. They demonstrate that the antibody competes specifically with /sup 125/I-labeled AII for the same binding site on rat adrenal membranes. Furthermore, they show this antibody inhibits the secretion of aldosterone from cultured rat adrenal cells, suggesting that the antibody recognizes the biologically relevant AII receptor. Finally, they demonstrate that antibody to the complementary peptide can be used to immunoaffinity-purify a protein of M/sub r/ 66,000 that specifically binds radiolabeled AII.

  17. Ets-1 upregulation mediates angiotensin II-related cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guanghua; Han, Zhenhua; Meng, Zhe; Wei, Jin; Gao, Dengfeng; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    Ets-1, the prototypical member of the family of Ets transcription factors, has been shown to participate in tissue fibrotic remodeling. However, its role in cardiac fibrosis has not been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Ets-1 in profibrotic actions of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) and in the in vivo heart. In growth-arrested CFs, Ang II induced Ets-1 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with Ang II type 1 receptor blocker losartan, protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059, or c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 partly inhibited this induction accompanied with impaired cell proliferation and production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein, the two downstream targets of Ets-1. Knockdown of Ets-1 by siRNA significantly inhibited the inductive effects of Ang II on cell proliferation and expression of CTGF and PAI-1. Moreover, the levels of Ets-1, PAI-1 and CTGF protein were simultaneously upregulated in left ventricle of Ang II-infused rats in parallel with an increase in the activation of ERK and JNK. Our data suggest that Ets-1 may mediate Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic effects.

  18. Ets-1 upregulation mediates angiotensin II-related cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Guanghua; Han, Zhenhua; Meng, Zhe; Wei, Jin; Gao, Dengfeng; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    Ets-1, the prototypical member of the family of Ets transcription factors, has been shown to participate in tissue fibrotic remodeling. However, its role in cardiac fibrosis has not been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Ets-1 in profibrotic actions of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) and in the in vivo heart. In growth-arrested CFs, Ang II induced Ets-1 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with Ang II type 1 receptor blocker losartan, protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059, or c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 partly inhibited this induction accompanied with impaired cell proliferation and production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein, the two downstream targets of Ets-1. Knockdown of Ets-1 by siRNA significantly inhibited the inductive effects of Ang II on cell proliferation and expression of CTGF and PAI-1. Moreover, the levels of Ets-1, PAI-1 and CTGF protein were simultaneously upregulated in left ventricle of Ang II-infused rats in parallel with an increase in the activation of ERK and JNK. Our data suggest that Ets-1 may mediate Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic effects. PMID:26617730

  19. Hypotensive effect of angiotensin II after AT1-receptor blockade with losartan.

    PubMed

    Matys, T; Pawlak, R; Kucharewicz, I; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W

    2000-03-01

    Recent data suggest that hypotensive effect of losartan may not be attributed solely to AT1-receptor blockade, but also to excessive AT2 or other receptors stimulation by elevated angiotensin II and its derivative peptides. Therefore in the present study we examined the effect of angiotensin II on mean blood pressure after AT -receptor blockade with losartan. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetised and received injection of either losartan (30 mg/kg, 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or saline (the same volume and route) followed by bolus injection of angiotensin II (100, 300 or 1,000 ng/kg; 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or 1-hour infusion of angiotensin II (200 ng/kg/min; 2.5 ml/kg/h, i.v.). Control animals received saline instead. Angiotensin II, given either as the injection or the infusion, caused an evident increase in mean blood pressure (p ranged from 0.05 to 0.001 depending on the experimental group). Losartan caused a rapid drop in mean blood pressure and blunted the hypertensive effect of angiotensin II (p < 0.01). Moreover, in the losartan-pretreated animals the hypotensive phase was enhanced by the infusion, but not single injection of angiotensin II, which was most evident from the 30 th minute of observation (p < 0.05 vs control). In conclusion, hypotensive effect of losartan may be amplified by simultaneous increase in angiotensin II level, the situation observed during chronic AT1-receptor blockade.

  20. Effects of valsartan on angiotensin II-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Ohmori, K; Nozaki, S; Mizushige, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-11-01

    The migration as well as proliferation of coronary artery medial smooth muscle cells (SMC) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerosis. In the current study, we examined the effects of the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist valsartan on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced migration of cultured human coronary artery SMC using Boyden's chamber methods. Ang II significantly stimulated human coronary artery SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 10(-8) mol/l when cells of passage 4 to 6 were used. However, the migration response to Ang II was moderately decreased in cells of passage 10 to 12, and was markedly decreased in cells of passage 15 to 17, compared to that of passage 4 to 6. Ang II-induced migration was blocked by the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist valsartan in a concentration-dependent manner. By contrast, the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist PD 123319 did not affect Ang II-induced migration. Ang II modestly increased the cell number of human coronary artery SMC after a 24-h incubation. This increase in cell numbers was also clearly blocked by valsartan, but not by PD 123319. These results indicate that Ang II stimulates migration as well as proliferation via AT1 receptors in human coronary artery SMC when cells of passage 4 to 6 are used. Valsartan may prevent the progression of coronary atherosclerosis through an inhibition of Ang II-induced migration and proliferation in these cells, although in vivo evidence is lacking.

  1. Salt preference elicited by chronic intracerebroventricular angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Izumi, H; Nakamura, I

    1994-10-01

    1. Much more water was consumed than either 0.9% or 2.7% saline in response to various dipsogenic stimuli in untreated normal replete rats when they had free access to water, 0.9% and 2.7% saline. On the other hand, the rats drank more 0.9% saline than water and 2.7% saline when each solution is the sole drinking fluid offered. 2. A marked increase in preference for 0.9% saline was observed during the chronic i.c.v. injection of angiotensin II at a dose of 25 ng/hr for 7 consecutive days in the three bottle choice test. After the cessation of angiotensin II infusion, most rats (45 out of 50 rats) returned to drink much more water than 0.9% and 2.7% saline, similar to the drinking pattern of the 0.9% saline-treated control rats. However, some rats (5 out of 50 rats) still preferred 0.9% saline and this persisted for up to 3 months although these rats did not show a hypertensive state and an increase of plasma renin activity.

  2. Angiotensin-(1-7)-induced renal vasodilation in hypertensive humans is attenuated by low sodium intake and angiotensin II co-infusion.

    PubMed

    van Twist, Daan J L; Houben, Alfons J H M; de Haan, Michiel W; Mostard, Guy J M; Kroon, Abraham A; de Leeuw, Peter W

    2013-10-01

    Current evidence suggests that angiotensin-(1-7) plays an important role in the regulation of tissue blood flow. This evidence, however, is restricted to studies in animals and human forearm. Therefore, we studied the effects of intrarenal angiotensin-(1-7) infusion on renal blood flow in hypertensive humans. To assess the influence of renin-angiotensin system activity, sodium intake was varied and co-infusion with angiotensin II was performed in a subgroup. In 57 hypertensive patients who were scheduled for renal angiography, renal blood flow was measured ((133)Xenon washout method) before and during intrarenal infusion of angiotensin-(1-7) (3 incremental doses: 0.27, 0.9, and 2.7 ng/kg per minute). Patients were randomized into low or high sodium intake. These 2 groups of patients received angiotensin-(1-7), with or without intrarenal co-infusion of angiotensin II (0.3 ng/kg per minute). Angiotensin-(1-7) infusion resulted in intrarenal vasodilation in patients adhering to a sodium-rich diet. This vasodilatory effect of angiotensin-(1-7) was clearly attenuated by low sodium intake, angiotensin II co-infusion, or both. Regression analyses showed that the prevailing renin concentration was the only independent predictor of angiotensin-(1-7)-induced renal vasodilation. In conclusion, angiotensin-(1-7) induces renal vasodilation in hypertensive humans, but the effect of angiotensin-(1-7) is clearly attenuated by low sodium intake and co-infusion of angiotensin II. This supports the hypothesis that angiotensin-(1-7) induced renal vasodilation depends on the degree of renin-angiotensin-system activation.

  3. Angiotensin II regulates growth of the developing papillas ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Khalili, Ali; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that lack of angiotensin (ANG) II production in angiotensinogen (AGT)-deficient mice or pharmacologic antagonism of ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) impairs growth of the developing papillas ex vivo, thus contributing to the hypoplastic renal medulla phenotype observed in AGT- or AT1R-null mice. Papillas were dissected from Hoxb7GFP+ or AGT+/+, +/−, −/− mouse metanephroi on postnatal day P3 and grown in three-dimentional collagen matrix gels in the presence of media (control), ANG II (10−5 M), or the specific AT1R antagonist candesartan (10−6 M) for 24 h. Percent reduction in papillary length was attenuated in AGT+/+ and in AGT+/− compared with AGT−/− (−18.4 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, −22.8 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). ANG II blunted the decrease in papilla length observed in respective media-treated controls in Hoxb7GFP+ (−1.5 ± 0.3 vs. −10.0 ± 1.4%, P < 0.05) or AGT+/+, +/−, and −/− papillas (−12.8 ± 0.7 vs. −18.4 ± 1.3%, P < 0.05, −16.8 ± 1.1 vs. −23 ± 1.2%, P < 0.05; −26.2 ± 1.6 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). In contrast, percent decrease in the length of Hoxb7GFP+ papillas in the presence of the AT1R antagonist candesartan was higher compared with control (−24.3 ± 2.1 vs. −10.5 ± 1.8%, P < 0.05). The number of proliferating phospho-histone H3 (pH3)-positive collecting duct cells was lower, whereas the number of caspase 3-positive cells undergoing apoptosis was higher in candesartan- vs. media-treated papillas (pH3: 12 ± 1.4 vs. 21 ± 2.1, P < 0.01; caspase 3: 3.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.7 ± 0.2, P < 0.01). Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that AT1R signaling regulates the expression of genes implicated in morphogenesis of the renal medulla. We conclude that AT1R prevents shrinkage of the developing papillas observed ex vivo via control of Wnt7b, FGF7, β-catenin, calcineurin B1, and α3 integrin gene expression, collecting duct cell

  4. Age determines the magnitudes of angiotensin II-induced contractions, mRNA, and protein expression of angiotensin type 1 receptors in rat carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Vamos, Zoltan; Cseplo, Peter; Ivic, Ivan; Matics, Robert; Hamar, Janos; Koller, Akos

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that aging alters angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vasomotor responses and expression of vascular mRNA and protein angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R). Thus, carotid arteries were isolated from the following age groups of rats: 8 days, 2-9 months, 12-20 months, and 20-30 months, and their vasomotor responses were measured in a myograph after repeated administrations of Ang II. Vascular relative AT1R mRNA level was determined by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and the AT1R protein density was measured by Western blot. Contractions to the first administration of Ang II increased from 8 days to 6 months and then they decreased to 30 months. In general, second administration of Ang II elicited reduced contractions, but they also increased from 8 days until 2 months and then they decreased to 30 months. Similarly the AT1R mRNA level increased from 8 days to 12 months and then decreased to 30 months. Similarly the AT1R protein density increased from 8 days until 16 months and then they decreased to 30 months. The pattern of these changes correlated with functional vasomotor data. We conclude that aging (newborn to senescence) has substantial effects on Ang II-induced vasomotor responses and AT1R signaling suggesting the importance of genetic programs.

  5. Angiotensin II receptor blocker-based therapy in Japanese elderly, high-risk, hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Matsui, Kunihiko; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2012-10-01

    It is unknown whether high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy or angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker combination therapy is better in elderly hypertensive patients with high cardiovascular risk. The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of these treatments in elderly, high-risk Japanese hypertensive patients. The OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-end point study of 1164 hypertensive patients aged 65 to 84 years with type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension during treatment with olmesartan 20 mg/d were randomly assigned to receive 40 mg/d olmesartan (high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker) or a calcium channel blocker + 20 mg/d olmesartan (angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker). The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular events and noncardiovascular death. During a 3-year follow-up, blood pressure was significantly lower in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group than in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group. Mean blood pressure at 36 months was 135.0/74.3 mm Hg in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group and 132.6/72.6 mm Hg in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group. More primary end points occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group than in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group (58 vs 48 events, hazard ratio [HR], 1.31, 95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.92; P=.17). In patients with cardiovascular disease at baseline, more primary events occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group (HR, 1.63, P=.03); in contrast, fewer events were observed in the subgroup without cardiovascular disease (HR, 0.52, P=.14). This treatment-by-subgroup interaction was significant (P=.02). The angiotensin II receptor blocker and

  6. The angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis reduces myonuclear apoptosis during recovery from angiotensin II-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Carla; Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Simon, Felipe; Brandan, Enrique; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang (1-7)] is a peptide belonging to the non-classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Ang (1-7), through its receptor Mas, has an opposite action to angiotensin II (Ang II), the typical peptide of the classical RAS axis. Ang II produces skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterised by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is the decrease of the myofibrillar proteins produced by the activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP), evidenced by the increase in the expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases: atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. In addition, it has been described that Ang II also induces myonuclear apoptosis during muscle atrophy. We assessed the effects of Ang (1-7) and Mas participation on myonuclear apoptosis during skeletal muscle atrophy induced by Ang II. Our results show that Ang (1-7), through Mas, prevents the effects induced by Ang II in the diaphragm muscles and decreases several events associated with apoptosis in the diaphragm (increased apoptotic nuclei, increased expression of caspase-8 and caspase-9, increased caspase-3 activity and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio). Concomitantly, Ang (1-7) also attenuates the decrease in fibre diameter and muscle strength, and prevents the increase in atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 during the muscle wasting induced by Ang II. Interestingly, these effects of Ang (1-7) are dependent on the Mas receptor. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that Ang (1-7) prevents myonuclear apoptosis during the recovery of skeletal muscle atrophy induced by Ang II.

  7. Identification and characterization of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was demonstrated by radioligand binding. A single class of finding sites with a K/sub D/ of 0.7 nM was characterized. The use of radioligands also allows the localization of receptors by autoradiography. Autoradiography demonstrated that approximately 50% of the isolated cells bound angiotensin II. It was of interest to see if angiotensin II bound to a cell that possessed a certain phenotype. In order to evaluate this possibility a technique was developed that combined autoradiography and immunocytochemistry. Results indicated that angiotensin II binding sites were not localized preferentially to either norepinephrine or epinephrine cells. Binding of angiotensin II was associated with the release of intracellular catecholamine stores. Cells were pre-loaded with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and secretion was monitored by following radioactivity released into the supernatant. Alternatively, release of endogenous catecholamines was determined by fluorometric assay.

  8. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in brain and kidney: focus on cardiovascular implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative techniques of receptor autoradiography have been applied to localize (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in brain and kidney. High densities of autoradiographic grains, indicating the presence of angiotensin II receptors, have been localized to several rat brain nuclei including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, anterior pituitary, locus coeruleus and several hypothalamic nuclei. Cat thoracic spinal cord exhibited a high density of sites over the intermedio-lateral cell column. In sections of rat kidney, angiotensin II receptors were detected in the glomerulus, vasa recta and ureter. The cardiovascular implications of these results are apparent and relate angiotensin II to hypertensive mechanisms. Thus, angiotensin II represents an endocoid which is involved in control of blood pressure through its effects on peripheral organs as well as the central nervous system.

  9. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Renita E.; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics. PMID:26808388

  10. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Horton, Renita E; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L; Sheehy, Sean P; Pasqualini, Francesco S; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics.

  11. Brain-mediated dysregulation of the bone marrow activity in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jun, Joo Yun; Zubcevic, Jasenka; Qi, Yanfei; Afzal, Aqeela; Carvajal, Jessica Marulanda; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S; Grant, Maria B; Mocco, J; Raizada, Mohan K

    2012-11-01

    Oxidative stress in the brain is implicated in increased sympathetic drive, inflammatory status, and vascular dysfunctions, associated with development and establishment of hypertension. However, little is known about the mechanism of this impaired brain-vascular communication. Here, we tested the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress in the brain cardioregulatory areas, such as the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, is driven by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and leads to increased inflammatory cells (ICs) and decreased/dysfunctional endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), thereby compromising vasculature repair and accelerating hypertension. Chronic angiotensin II infusion resulted in elevated blood pressure and sympathetic vasomotor drive, decreased spontaneous baroreflex gain, and increased microglia activation in the paraventricular nucleus. This was associated with 46% decrease in bone marrow (BM)-derived EPCs and 250% increase in BM ICs, resulting in 5-fold decrease of EPC/IC ratio in the BM. Treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, a scavenger of mitochondrial O(2)(-·), intracerebroventricularly but not subcutaneously attenuated angiotensin II-induced hypertension, decreased activation of microglia in the paraventricular nucleus, and normalized EPCs/ICs. This functional communication between the brain and BM was confirmed by retrograde neuronal labeling from the BM with green fluorescent protein-tagged pseudorabies virus. Administration of green fluorescent protein-tagged pseudorabies virus into the BM resulted in predominant labeling of paraventricular nucleus neurons within 3 days, with some fluorescence in the nucleus tractus solitarius, the rostral ventrolateral medulla, and subfornical organ. Taken together, these data demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension and corrects the imbalance in EPCs/ICs in the BM. They suggest that an imbalance in

  12. Low-Salt Diet and Circadian Dysfunction Synergize to Induce Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J R; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A; Stepp, David W; Rudic, R Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in night-time blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and period isoform knockout (KO) mice (Per2-KO, Per2, 3-KO, and Per1, 2, 3-KO/Per triple KO [TKO] mice). On a normal diet, administration of angiotensin II caused nondipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform KO mice relative to WT mice. To study the endogenous effects of angiotensin II stimulation, we then administered a low-salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous angiotensin II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low-salt diet decreased blood pressure in wild-type mice. In contrast, Period isoform KO mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low-salt diet, because of an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic administration of low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform KO mice, which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered angiotensin 1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Angiotensin II Enhances Connecting Tubule Glomerular Feedback (CTGF)

    PubMed Central

    Ren, YiLin; D’Ambrosio, Martin A.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing Na delivery to epithelial Na channels (ENaC) in the connecting tubule (CNT) causes dilation of the afferent arteriole (Af-Art), a process we call CNT glomerular feedback (CTGF). Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates ENaC in the collecting duct via AT1 receptors. We hypothesized that Ang II in the CNT lumen enhances CTGF by activation of AT1 receptors, protein kinase C (PKC) and ENaC. Rabbit Af-Arts and their adherent CNT were microperfused and preconstricted with norepinephrine. Each experiment involved generating two consecutive concentration-response curves by increasing NaCl in the CNT lumen. During the control period, the maximum dilation of the Af-Art was 7.9 ± 0.4 μm, and the concentration of NaCl in the CNT needed to achieve half maximal response (EC50) was 34.7 ± 5.2 mmol/L. After adding Ang II (10−9 mol/L) to the CNT lumen, the maximal response was 9.5 ± 0.7 μm and the EC50 was 11.6 ± 1.3 mmol/L (P=0.01 vs. control). Losartan, an AT1 antagonist (10−6 mol/L) blocked the stimulatory effect of Ang II, PD123319, an AT2 antagonist (10−6 mol/L) did not. The PKC inhibitor staurosporine (10−8 mol/L) added to the CNT inhibited the stimulatory effect of Ang II. The ENaC inhibitor benzamil (10−6 mol/L) prevented both CTGF and its stimulation by Ang II. We concluded that Ang II in the CNT lumen enhances CTGF via activation of AT1, and that this effect requires activation of PKC and ENaC. Potentiation of CTGF by Ang II could help preserve glomerular filtration rate in the presence of renal vasoconstriction. PMID:20696981

  14. Deceleration by angiotensin II of the differentiation and bone formation of rat calvarial osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, H; Hiruma, Y; Inoue, A; Yamaguchi, A; Hirose, S

    1998-03-01

    We examined the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on the differentiation of rat calvarial osteoblastic cells and on the formation of bone by these cells. Northern blotting analysis revealed that Ang II inhibited the expression of mRNA for osteocalcin, which is a protein that is specifically expressed during maturation of osteoblastic cells. Ang II decreased the activity of alkaline phosphatase, a marker of osteoblastic differentiation, in the cells, acting via the type 1 (AT1) receptor. We used von Kossa staining to examine the formation of mineralized nodules by osteoblastic cells. Both the number and the total area of mineralized nodules were quantified and shown to be decreased by 10(-7) M Ang II. The accumulation of calcium in cells and the matrix layer was also decreased by Ang II. Binding analysis with subtype-specific antagonists revealed the presence of AT1 receptors for Ang II in this culture system. Ang II caused a marked increase in the rate of production of intracellular cAMP in this system. Our data suggest that Ang II might be intimately involved in osteoblastic metabolism through its interaction with the AT1 receptor.

  15. Angiotensin II activates endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase via AT1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Hirata, Y; Emori, T; Imai, T; Marumo, F

    1996-09-01

    To determine whether angiotensin (ANG) II, a vasoconstrictor hormone, activates constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) in endothelial cells (ECs), we investigated the cellular mechanism by which ANG II induces nitric oxide (NO) formation in cultured bovine ECs. ANG II rapidly (within 1 min) and dose-dependently (10(-9)-10(-6) M) increased nitrate/nitrite (NOx) production. This effect of ANG II was abolished by a NOS inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. An ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist (DuP 753), but not an ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist (PD 123177), dose-dependently inhibited ANG II-induced NOx production. A Ca(2+)-channel blocker (barnidipine) failed to affect ANG II-induced NOx production, whereas an intracellular Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA) and a calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) abolished NOx production induced by ANG II. A protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (H-7) and down-regulation of endogenous PKC after pretreatment with phorbol ester decreased NOx production stimulated by ANG II. ANG II transiently stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) formation, and increased cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations; these effects were blocked by DuP 753. Our data demonstrate that ANG II stimulates NO release by activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent cNOS via AT1 receptors in bovine ECs.

  16. Structural basis for selectivity and diversity in angiotensin II receptors

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haitao; Han, Gye Won; Batyuk, Alexander; ...

    2017-04-20

    The angiotensin II receptors AT1R and AT2R serve as key components of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system. AT1R has a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, but the function of AT2R is unclear and it has a variety of reported effects. To identify the mechanisms that underlie the differences in function and ligand selectivity between these receptors, here we report crystal structures of human AT2R bound to an AT2R-selective ligand and to an AT1R/AT2R dual ligand, capturing the receptor in an active-like conformation. Unexpectedly, helix VIII was found in a non-canonical position, stabilizing the active-like state, but at the samemore » time preventing the recruitment of G proteins or β-arrestins, in agreement with the lack of signalling responses in standard cellular assays. Structure–activity relationship, docking and mutagenesis studies revealed the crucial interactions for ligand binding and selectivity. Finally, our results thus provide insights into the structural basis of the distinct functions of the angiotensin receptors, and may guide the design of new selective ligands.« less

  17. Intracrine action of angiotensin II in the intact ventricle of the failing heart: angiotensin II changes cardiac excitability from within

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The influence of intracellular injection of angiotensin II (Ang II) on electrical properties of single right ventricular fibers from the failing heart of cardiomyopathic hamsters (TO2) was investigated in the intact ventricle of 8-month-old animals. Intracellular injection was performed using pressure pulses (40–70 psi) for short periods of time (20 ms) while recoding the action potential simultaneously from the same fiber. The results indicated that intracellular Ang II caused a hyperpolarization of 7.7 mV ± 4.3 mV (n = 39) (4 animals) (P < 0.05) followed by a small fall in membrane potential. The action potential duration was significantly increased at 50% and at 90% repolarization, and the refractoriness was significantly enhanced. The effect of intracellular Ang II on action potential duration was related to the inhibition of potassium conductance through PKC activation because Bis-1 (360 nM), a selective PKC inhibitor, abolished the effect of the peptide. Injections performed in different fibers of the same ventricle showed a variable effect of Ang II on action potential duration and generated spontaneous rhythmicity. The effect of intracellular Ang II on action potential duration and cardiac refractoriness remains for more than 1 h after interruption of the intracellular injection of the peptide. PMID:21744071

  18. Enhancement by exogenous and locally generated angiotensin II of purinergic neurotransmission via angiotensin type 1 receptor in the guinea-pig isolated mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Onaka, Uran; Fujii, Koji; Abe, Isao; Fujishima, Masatoshi

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin II is known to enhance sympathetic neurotransmission in the vasculature by increasing the release of noradrenaline, but little is known about the effect on the co-released transmitter, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP). In the present study we have examined the effect of angiotensin II on the excitatory junction potential (e.j.p.) elicited by repetitive field stimulation in the guinea-pig isolated mesenteric artery, to establish the angiotensin II receptor subtype involved in modulating the release of ATP and the role of the endothelium in converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II. Suramin (300 μM), a P2 purinoceptor antagonist, abolished both the e.j.ps and depolarizing response to α,β-methylene-ATP, a stable analogue of ATP, without affecting the resting membrane potential and noradrenaline-induced depolarization. Angiotensin II (0.1 μM) affected neither the resting membrane potential nor the amplitude of the first e.j.p., but increased the amplitudes of the subsequent e.j.ps. This enhancing effect of angiotensin II was abolished by CV-11974 (0.1 μM), an angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, but unaffected by PD 123319 (1 μM), an angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist, or CGP 42112A (1 μM), AT2 receptor ligand. Angiotensin I (0.1 μM) exerted a similar effect on e.j.ps to that of angiotensin II. CV-11974 (0.1 μM) or temocaprilat (10 μM), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, abolished the effect of angiotensin I. Removal of the endothelium did not alter the action of angiotensin I. The results of the present study indicate that the release of ATP from sympathetic nerves innervating the guinea-pig isolated mesenteric artery, as determined from the magnitude of the e.j.p., can be enhanced by angiotensin II via activation of prejunctional AT1 receptors. Qualitatively similar effects were observed with angiotensin I, which appears to be converted into angiotensin II by a subendothelial process

  19. Angiotensin II increases glomerular permeability by β-arrestin mediated nephrin endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Königshausen, Eva; Zierhut, Ulf M.; Ruetze, Martin; Potthoff, Sebastian A.; Stegbauer, Johannes; Woznowski, Magdalena; Quack, Ivo; Rump, Lars C.; Sellin, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Glomerular permeability and subsequent albuminuria are early clinical markers for glomerular injury in hypertensive nephropathy. Albuminuria predicts mortality and cardiovascular morbidity. AT1 receptor blockers protect from albuminuria, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A blood pressure independent, molecular mechanism for angiotensin II (Ang II) dependent albuminuria has long been postulated. Albuminuria results from a defective glomerular filter. Nephrin is a major structural component of the glomerular slit diaphragm and its endocytosis is mediated by β-arrestin2. Ang II stimulation increases nephrin-β-arrestin2 binding, nephrin endocytosis and glomerular permeability in mice. This Ang II effect is mediated by AT1-receptors. AT1-receptor mutants identified G-protein signaling to be essential for this Ang II effect. Gαq knockdown and phospholipase C inhibition block Ang II mediated enhanced nephrin endocytosis. Nephrin Y1217 is the critical residue controlling nephrin binding to β-arrestin under Ang II stimulation. Nephrin Y1217 also mediates cytoskeletal anchoring to actin via nck2. Ang II stimulation decreases nephrin nck2 binding. We conclude that Ang II weakens the structural integrity of the slit diaphragm by increased nephrin endocytosis and decreased nephrin binding to nck2, which leads to increased glomerular permeability. This novel molecular mechanism of Ang II supports the use of AT1-receptor blockers to prevent albuminuria even in normotensives. PMID:28004760

  20. Mechanism of pulmonary conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II in the dog.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oparil, S.; Tregear, G. W.; Koerner, T.; Barnes, B. A.; Haber, E.

    1971-01-01

    The conversion mechanism was studied in vivo in the pulmonary circulation of the intact anesthetized dog and in vitro in plasma by using L-Leu-angiotensin I, D-Leu-angiotensin I, and des-Leu-angiotensin I which had been synthesized by the solid-phase technique. The results obtained indicate that pulmonary conversion in vivo and plasma conversion in vitro occur via a dipeptidylcarboxypeptidase and that a D-amino acid at the C-terminus prevents conversion.

  1. Arsenic causes aortic dysfunction and systemic hypertension in rats: Augmentation of angiotensin II signaling.

    PubMed

    Waghe, Prashantkumar; Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Gupta, Priyanka; Kandasamy, Kannan; Choudhury, Soumen; Kutty, Harikumar Sankaran; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2015-07-25

    The groundwater pollutant arsenic can cause various cardiovascular disorders. Angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, plays an important role in vascular dysfunction by promoting changes in endothelial function, vascular reactivity, tissue remodeling and oxidative stress. We investigated whether modulation of angiotensin II signaling and redox homeostasis could be a mechanism contributing to arsenic-induced vascular disorder. Rats were exposed to arsenic at 25, 50 and 100ppm of sodium arsenite through drinking water consecutively for 90 days. Blood pressure was recorded weekly. On the 91st day, the rats were sacrificed for blood collection and isolation of thoracic aorta. Angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II levels were assessed in plasma. Aortic reactivity to angiotensin II was assessed in organ-bath system. Western blot of AT1 receptors and G protein (Gαq/11), ELISA of signal transducers of MAP kinase pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed in aorta. Arsenic caused concentration-dependent increase in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure from the 10th, 8th and 7th week onwards, respectively. Arsenic caused concentration-dependent enhancement of the angiotensin II-induced aortic contractile response. Arsenic also caused concentration-dependent increase in the plasma levels of angiotensin II and angiotensin converting enzyme and the expression of aortic AT1 receptor and Gαq/11 proteins. Arsenic increased aortic protein kinase C activity and the concentrations of protein tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Further, arsenic increased aortic mRNA expression of Nox2, Nox4 and p22phox, NADPH oxidase activity and ROS generation. The results suggest that arsenic-mediated enhancement of angiotensin II signaling could be an important mechanism in the arsenic-induced vascular disorder, where ROS could augment the angiotensin II signaling through activation

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers decrease the incidence of atrial fibrillation: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Xu, Jun-bo; Liu, Jian-xiong; He, Yong; Nie, Xiao-li; Li, Qiu; Hu, Yong-mei; Zhao, Si-qin; Wang, Mian; Zhang, Wen-yong; Liu, Xiao-rong; Wu, Tao; Arkin, Akram; Zhang, Ting-jie

    2011-07-01

    There is not a general agreement regarding antiarrhythmic effects on atrial fibrillation (AF) of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). This study was to assess whether ACEIs and ARBs could decrease the incidence of AF. Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were searched for trials reported from 1950 to May 2009. Search terms included 'randomized controlled trial (RCT), controlled clinical trials, random allocation' and medical subject headings that included all spellings of ACEIs and ARBs agents, 'atrial fibrillation' and 'atrial flutter'. Randomized, controlled human trials of ACEIs or ARBs reporting AF were included. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers using a predefined data extraction sheet, including study quality indicators. Meta-analysis and subgroup analyses were carried out with a random effects model. Twenty-one trials including 91,381 patients and 5730 AF events were identified. Overall, ACEIs/ARBs reduced the relative risk (c) of AF by 25%. In primary and secondary prevention, ACEIs/ARBs decreased the incidence of AF by 24% and 27%, respectively. Patients with hypertension (RR: 0·71, 95%CI: 0·54-0·92), patients with chronic heart failure (RR: 0·58, 95%CI: 0·39-0·87) and those with AF (RR: 0·71, 95%CI: 0·52-0·96) benefited from ACEIs/ARBs treatment. ACEIs/ARBs are effective for primary prevention and secondary prevention of AF. They decrease the incidence of AF especially in patients with hypertension, patients with chronic heart failure and those with AF. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  3. Captopril avoids hypertension, the increase in plasma angiotensin II but increases angiotensin 1-7 and angiotensin II-induced perfusion pressure in isolated kidney in SHR.

    PubMed

    Castro-Moreno, P; Pardo, J P; Hernández-Muñoz, R; López-Guerrero, J J; Del Valle-Mondragón, L; Pastelín-Hernández, G; Ibarra-Barajas, M; Villalobos-Molina, R

    2012-10-01

    We investigated captopril effects, an ACE inhibitor, on hypertension development, on Ang II and Ang-(1-7) plasma concentrations, on Ang II-induced contraction in isolated kidneys, and on kidney AT1R from spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Five weeks-old SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with captopril at 30 mg/kg/day, in drinking water for 2 or 14 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured, and isolated kidneys were tested for perfusion pressure and AT1R expression; while Ang II and Ang-(1-7) concentrations were determined in plasma. Captopril did not modify SBP in WKY rats and avoided its increase as SHR aged. Plasma Ang-II concentration was ∼4-5 folds higher in SHR rats, and captopril reduced it (P<0.05); while captopril increased Ang-(1-7) by ∼2 fold in all rat groups. Captopril increased Ang II-induced pressor response in kidneys of WKY and SHR rats, phenomenon not observed in kidneys stimulated with phenylephrine, a α₁-adrenoceptor agonist. Captopril did not modify AT1R in kidney cortex and medulla among rat strains and ages. Data indicate that captopril increased Ang II-induced kidney perfusion pressure but not AT₁R density in kidney of WKY and SHR rats, due to blockade of angiotensin II synthesis; however, ACE inhibitors may have other actions like activating signaling processes that could contribute to their diverse effects. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Control of glomerular filtration rate: role of intrarenally formed angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Kastner, P R; Hall, J E; Guyton, A C

    1984-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of intrarenally formed angiotensin II (ANG II) in controlling glomerular filtration rate (GFR) during reduction of renal artery pressure (RAP). The experimental design prevented renin released by the kidney from entering the systemic circulation and therefore prevented changes in circulating ANG II from influencing GFR control. In dogs with only a functional intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS), GFR and renal blood flow (RBF) were not significantly altered by RAP reduction to 70 mmHg. After blockade of intrarenal ANG II formation with SQ 14225, reduction of RAP to 70 mmHg decreased GFR and filtration fraction to 75.6 +/- 7.0 and 59.0 +/- 4.1% of control, respectively, while RBF remained at 129.3 +/- 8.8% of control. Calculated efferent arteriolar resistance decreased considerably more when RAP was reduced after SQ 14225, whereas preglomerular resistance decreased to about the same level as observed prior to SQ 14225 infusion. After return of endogenously produced ANG II by recirculation of the renal venous blood or after infusion of ANG II (following SQ 14225) at a rate that restored RBF to the control level (with RAP held at 70 mmHg in each case), GFR, filtration fraction, and calculated efferent resistance were restored to control levels, but preglomerular resistance did not change. These results suggest that intrarenal ANG II formation plays an important role in maintaining GFR during reductions in RAP by constricting efferent arterioles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Melatonin attenuates angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm through the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Zhang, Ya; Liu, Shanshan; Li, Hongxuan; Liu, Shangming; Wang, Jingjing; Qin, Xiaoteng; Jiang, Xiuxin; Yang, Jianmin; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Wencheng

    2017-02-04

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) affects more than 5% of the population in developed countries and the pharmacotherapies for AAA are limited. Here, we explored whether melatonin regulates the development of AAA. In smooth muscle cells, melatonin treatment decreases angiotensin II-induced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 expression. Human antigen R (HuR) could bind with the adenylateuridylate-rich elements of MMP2 and MMP9 mRNAs 3' untranslated region, resulting in the increased stability of MMP2 and MMP9 mRNAs. HuR is required for angiotensin II-induced MMP2 and MMP9 expression. Moreover, melatonin suppresses angiotensin II-induced HuR expression through inhibiting NF-κB signaling, leading to decreased MMP2 and MMP9 levels. Finally, melatonin attenuates the development of AAA in ApoE-/- mice infused with angiotensin II in vivo. These data support a role of HuR in the development of AAA and possible therapeutic roles for melatonin and/or HuR inhibition in AAA.

  6. Properly timed exposure to central ANG II prevents behavioral sensitization and changes in angiotensin receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Santollo, Jessica; Whalen, Philip E.; Speth, Robert C.; Clark, Stewart D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) is susceptible to rapid desensitization, but that more chronic treatments that stimulate ANG II lead to sensitization of several responses. It is unclear, however, if the processes of desensitization and sensitization interact. To test for differences in AT1R expression associated with single or repeated injections of ANG II, we measured AT1R mRNA in nuclei that control fluid intake of rats given ANG II either in a single injection or divided into three injections spaced 20 min apart. Rats given a single injection of ANG II had more AT1R mRNA in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the periventricular tissue surrounding the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) than did controls. The effect was not observed, however, when the same cumulative dose of ANG II was divided into multiple injections. Behavioral tests found that single daily injections of ANG II sensitized the dipsogenic response to ANG II, but a daily regimen of four injections did not cause sensitization. Analysis of 125I-Sar1-ANG II binding revealed a paradoxical decrease in binding in the caudal AV3V and dorsal median preoptic nucleus after 5 days of single daily injections of ANG II; however, this effect was absent in rats treated for 5 days with four daily ANG II injections. Taken together, these data suggest that a desensitizing treatment regimen prevents behavior- and receptor-level effects of repeated daily ANG II. PMID:25354729

  7. Regulation of Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Gene Expression in the Adrenal Medulla by Acute and Repeated Immobilization Stress

    PubMed Central

    Nostramo, Regina; Tillinger, Andrej; Saavedra, Juan M.; Kumar, Ashok; Pandey, Varunkumar; Serova, Lidia; Kvetnansky, Richard; Sabban, Esther L.

    2012-01-01

    While the Renin-Angiotensin System is important for adrenomedullary responses to stress, the involvement of specific angiotensin II receptor subtypes is unclear. We examined gene expression changes of angiotensin II type 1A (AT1A) and type 2 (AT2) receptors in rat adrenal medulla in response to immobilization stress (IMO). AT2 receptor mRNA levels decreased immediately after a single 2 h IMO. Repeated IMO also decreased AT2 receptor mRNA levels, but the decline was more transient. AT1A receptor mRNA levels were unaltered with either single or repeated IMO, although binding was increased following repeated IMO. These effects of stress on angiotensin II receptor expression may alter catecholamine biosynthesis, as tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine beta-hydroxylase mRNA levels in PC12 cells are decreased with angiotensin II treatment in the presence of ZD7155 (AT1 receptor antagonist), or with CGP42112 (AT2 receptor agonist) treatment. Involvement of stress-triggered activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) or sympatho-adrenal axis in AT2 receptor downregulation was examined. Cultured cells treated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone displayed a transcriptionally-mediated decrease in AT2 receptor mRNA levels. However, glucocorticoids are not required for the immediate stress-triggered decrease in AT2 receptor gene expression, as demonstrated in corticotropin-releasing hormone knockout (CRH KO) mice and hypophysectomized rats, although they can regulate basal gene expression. cAMP and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) also reduced AT2 receptor gene expression and may mediate this response. Overall, the effects of stress on adrenomedullary AT1A and AT2 receptor expression may contribute to allostatic changes, such as regulation of catecholamine biosynthesis. PMID:22911895

  8. Angiotensin II dependent cardiac remodeling in the eel Anguilla anguilla involves the NOS/NO system.

    PubMed

    Filice, Mariacristina; Amelio, Daniela; Garofalo, Filippo; David, Sabrina; Fucarino, Alberto; Jensen, Frank Bo; Imbrogno, Sandra; Cerra, Maria Carmela

    2017-05-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII), the principal effector of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS), plays an important role in controlling mammalian cardiac morpho-functional remodelling. In the eel Anguilla anguilla, one month administration of AngII improves cardiac performance and influences the expression and localization of molecules which regulate cell growth. To deeper investigate the morpho-functional chronic influences of AngII on the eel heart and the molecular mechanisms involved, freshwater eels (A. anguilla) were intraperitoneally injected for 2 months with AngII (1 nmol g BW(-1)). Then the isolated hearts were subjected to morphological and western blotting analyses, and nitrite measurements. If compared to control animals, the ventricle of AngII-treated hearts showed an increase in compacta thickness, vascularization, muscle mass and fibrosis. Structural changes were paralleled by a higher expression of AT2 receptor and a negative modulation of the ERK1-2 pathway, together with a decrease in nitrite concentration, indicative of a reduced Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS)-dependent NO production. Moreover, immunolocalization revealed, particularly on the endocardial endothelium (EE) of AngII-treated hearts, a significant reduction of phosphorylated NOS detected by peNOS antibody accompanied by an increased expression of the eNOS disabling protein NOSTRIN, and a decreased expression of the positive regulators of NOS activity, pAkt and Hsp90. On the whole, results suggest that, in the eel, AngII modulates cardiac morpho-functional plasticity by influencing the molecular mechanisms that control NOS activity and the ERK1-2 pathway.

  9. Inhibition of central angiotensin II enhances memory function and reduces oxidative stress status in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bild, Walther; Hritcu, Lucian; Stefanescu, Cristinel; Ciobica, Alin

    2013-06-03

    While it is now well established that the independent brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has some important central functions besides the vascular ones, the relevance of its main bioactive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) on the memory processes, as well as on oxidative stress status is not completely understood. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the effects of central Ang II administration, as well as the effects of Ang II inhibition with either AT1 and AT 2 receptor specific blockers (losartan and PD-123177, respectively) or an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (captopril). These effects were studied on the short-term memory (assessed through Y-maze) or long-term memory (as determined in passive avoidance) and on the oxidative stress status of the hippocampus. Our results demonstrate memory deficits induced by the administration of Ang II, as showed by the significant decrease of the spontaneous alternation in Y-maze (p=0.015) and latency-time in passive avoidance task (p=0.001) when compared to saline. On the other side, the administration of all the aforementioned Ang II blockers significantly improved the spontaneous alternation in Y-maze task, while losartan also increased the latency time as compared to saline in step-through passive avoidance (p=0.042). Also, increased oxidative stress status was induced in the hippocampus by the administration of Ang II, as demonstrated by increased levels of lipid peroxidation markers (malondialdehyde-MDA concentration) (p<0.0001) and a decrease in both antioxidant enzymes determined: superoxide dismutase-SOD (p<0.0001) and glutathione peroxidase-GPX (p=0.01), as compared to saline. Additionally, the administration of captopril resulted in an increase of both antioxidant enzymes and decreased levels of lipid peroxidation (p=0.001), while PD-123177 significantly decreased MDA concentration (p>0.0001) vs. saline. Moreover, significant correlations were found between all of the memory related

  10. Angiotensin II induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy probably through histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Yang, Shuang

    2009-09-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a pathophysiological role in the genesis of cardiac hypertrophy as a hypertrophic stimulus. But little is known about the terminal steps, in which Ang II reprograms cardiac gene expression. Histone deacetyltransferases (HDACs) are considered as the integrators of divergent stress-response pathways during heart remodeling. However, the exact role of HDACs in the hypertrophic process is not clear yet. Therefore, we studied the expression of HDAC2, one of Class I HDACs, and the effect of valproic acid (VPA), a nonspecific HDAC inhibitor, in the Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were prepared from 1-day-old Wistar rats and treated with Ang II. The mRNA levels of HDAC2 and beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC), a hypertrophic marker gene, were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The protein expression of HDAC2 and c-fos, an immediate early response gene, was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and the surface areas of cardiomyocytes were measured using Motic Images software. The expression levels of HDAC2 mRNA and protein were increased in a time-dependent manner during the hypertrophic process, accompanied with the increment of beta-MHC and c-fos proteins. Ang II also increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes by more than twofold. VPA significantly reversed these changes. These results suggest that Ang II may induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through HDACs in combination with c-fos and that VPA has the protective effect on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Thus, HDAC inhibition is a feasible therapeutic strategy that holds promise in the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy.

  11. Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1988-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

  12. Effects of angiotensin II on arginine-vasopressin in physiological and pathological situations in man.

    PubMed

    Padfield, P L; Morton, J J

    1977-08-01

    Studies were designed to determine whether angiotensin II has a direct stimulatory effect on arginine-vasopressin in man and to determine the role, if any, played by angiotensin II in the control of vasopressin release in physiological and pathological conditions. Acute infusion of angiotensin II in normal volunteers produced small but definite increases in plasma levels of arginine-vasopressin (5-4+/-0-3(S.E.M.) to 6-4+/-0-2 pg/ml) only when plasma angiotensin II levels were supraphysiological. Concurrent measurements of plasma arginine-vasopressin and angiotensin II were made during acute changes in fluid balance and posture in normal volunteers and in clinical conditions characterized by high plasma levels of angiotensin II (Addison's disease and Bartter's syndrome). The results of these studies allow us to conclude that there is little to suggest a direct effect of angiotensin II which is likely to be relevant to the normal physiological control of arginine-vasopressin in man.

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers reduced dementia risk in patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yi-Chun; Huang, Kuang-Wei; Yen, Der-Jen; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-10-01

    The effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) on dementia risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension remain unknown. We investigated the effects of ACEIs and ARBs on dementia risk in patients with type 2 DM and hypertension. We conducted a cohort study by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We included 2377 patients receiving ACEIs and 1780 patients receiving ARBs in the ACEI and ARB cohorts, respectively. We included a comparable number of patients not receiving ACEIs and ARBs as controls in the non-ACEI and non-ARB cohorts through propensity score matching. The effect of ACEIs and ARBs on dementia risk was estimated through multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression after adjustment for several confounding factors. During the 12-year follow-up period, compared with the non-ACEI cohort, all-cause dementia risk decreased by 26% in the ACEI cohort [hazard ratio (HR)=0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.56-0.96]. The all-cause dementia risk was nearly 40% lower in the ARB cohort than in the non-ARB cohort (HR=0.60, 95% CI=0.37-0.97). These drugs prevented the occurrence of vascular dementia (VD), however, this effect was nonsignificant for Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Treatment duration- and dosage-related protection effects on dementia occurrence were observed. ACEIs and ARBs may effectively prevent all-cause dementia, particularly VD, in patients with type 2 DM and hypertension. Moreover, compared with ACEIs, ARBs appear to be more advantageous in dementia prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II correlates with hemodynamic changes in human liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Walkíria Wingester; Ribeiro-Oliveira Jr, Antônio; Pereira, Regina Maria; da Cunha Ribeiro, Renata; Almeida, Jerusa; Nadu, Ana Paula; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To measure circulating angiotensins at different stages of human cirrhosis and to further evaluate a possible relationship between renin angiotensin system (RAS) components and hemodynamic changes. METHODS: Patients were allocated into 4 groups: mild-to-moderate liver disease (MLD), advanced liver disease (ALD), patients undergoing liver transplantation, and healthy controls. Blood was collected to determine plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin (Ang) I, Ang II, and Ang-(1-7) levels using radioimmunoassays. During liver transplantation, hemodynamic parameters were determined and blood was simultaneously obtained from the portal vein and radial artery in order to measure RAS components. RESULTS: PRA and angiotensins were elevated in ALD when compared to MLD and controls (P < 0.05). In contrast, Ang II was significantly reduced in MLD. Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios were increased in MLD when compared to controls and ALD. During transplantation, Ang II levels were lower and Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios were higher in the splanchnic circulation than in the peripheral circulation (0.52 ± 0.08 vs 0.38 ± 0.04, P < 0.02), whereas the peripheral circulating Ang II/Ang I ratio was elevated in comparison to splanchnic levels (0.18 ± 0.02 vs 0.13 ± 0.02, P < 0.04). Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios positively correlated with cardiac output (r = 0.66) and negatively correlated with systemic vascular resistance (r = -0.70). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the relationship between Ang-(1-7) and Ang II may play a role in the hemodynamic changes of human cirrhosis. PMID:19469002

  15. The Hippo pathway is controlled by Angiotensin II signaling and its reactivation induces apoptosis in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wennmann, D O; Vollenbröker, B; Eckart, A K; Bonse, J; Erdmann, F; Wolters, D A; Schenk, L K; Schulze, U; Kremerskothen, J; Weide, T; Pavenstädt, H

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo pathway fulfills a crucial function in controlling the balance between proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in cells. Recent studies showed that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) serve as upstream regulators of Hippo signaling, that either activate or inactivate the Hippo pathway via the large tumor suppressor kinase (LATS) and its substrate, the co-transcription factor Yes-associated protein (YAP). In this study, we focused on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), which belongs to the GPCR family and has an essential role in the control of blood pressure and water homeostasis. We found that Angiotensin II (Ang II) inactivates the pathway by decreasing the activity of LATS kinase; therefore, leading to an enhanced nuclear shuttling of unphosphorylated YAP in HEK293T cells. This shuttling of YAP is actin-dependent as disruption of the actin cytoskeleton inhibited dephosphorylation of LATS and YAP. Interestingly, in contrast to HEK293T cells, podocytes, which are a crucial component of the glomerular filtration barrier, display a predominant nuclear YAP localization in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, stimulation with Ang II did not alter Hippo pathway activity in podocytes, which show a deactivated pathway. Reactivation of the LATS kinase activity in podocytes resulted in an increased cytoplasmic YAP localization accompanied by a strong induction of apoptosis. Thus, our work indicates that the control of LATS activation and subsequent YAP localization is important for podocyte homeostasis and survival. PMID:25393475

  16. Angiotensin II and oxidative stress in Dahl Salt-sensitive rat with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Akihiro; Onozato, Maristela Lika; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Goto, Atsuo; Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2002-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species have an important pathogenic role in organ damage. We investigated the role of oxidative stress via nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase in the kidney of the Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats with heart failure (DSHF). Eleven-week-old DS rats fed an 8%-NaCl diet received either vehicle or imidapril (1 mg/kg per day) for 7 weeks. The renal expression of the NAD(P)H oxidase p47phox and endothelial NO synthase were evaluated. In DSHF rats, associated with increased renal angiotensin II, mRNA and protein expression of NAD(P)H oxidase p47phox were enhanced with an increase in renal lipid peroxidation production (0.33+/-0.03 versus 0.22+/-0.01 nmol/mg protein, P<0.05) and urinary excretion of hydrogen peroxide (26.9+/-6.6 versus 9.5+/-2.1 U/mg creatinine, P<0.01) compared with levels in Dahl salt-resistant rats. The endothelial NO synthase expression was decreased in the kidney. Treatment with imidapril reduced renal angiotensin II and NAD(P)H oxidase expression and the oxidative products (kidney lipid peroxidation product: 0.16+/-0.02, P<0.001; urinary hydrogen peroxide: 3.1+/-0.2, P<0.01 versus DSHF rats). Imidapril significantly decreased albuminuria and reduced glomerulosclerosis without changes in the blood pressure. In conclusion, DSHF rats showed increased oxidative stress in the kidney via NAD(P)H oxidase. Blockade of local angiotensin II with subpressor dose of imidapril inhibited NAD(P)H oxidase and prevented renal damage.

  17. Caveolae regulate vasoconstriction of conduit arteries to angiotensin II in hindlimb unweighted rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongchao; Bai, Yungang; Yu, Jinwen; Liu, Huan; Cheng, Yaoping; Liu, Yonghong; Xie, Xiaoping; Ma, Jin; Bao, Junxiang

    2015-10-15

    Weightlessness induces the functional remodelling of arteries, but the changes to angiotensin II (Ang II)-elicited vasoconstriction and the underlying mechanism have never been reported. Caveolae are invaginations of the cell membrane crucial for the contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells, so we investigated the adaptation of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction to simulated weightlessness and the role of caveolae in it. The 4 week hindlimb unweighted (HU) rat was used to simulate the effects of weightlessness. Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction was measured by isometric force recording. The morphology of caveolae was examined by transmission electron microscope. The binding of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 ) and caveolin-1 (cav-1) was examined by coimmunoprecipitation and Western blot. We found that the maximal developing force (E(max)) of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction was decreased in abdominal aorta by 30.6%, unchanged in thoracic aorta and increased in carotid artery by 17.9% after HU, while EC50 of the response was increased in all three arteries (P < 0.05). AT1 desensitization upon activation was significantly reduced by HU in all three arteries, as was the number of caveolae (P < 0.05). Furthermore, Ang II promoted the binding of AT1 and cav-1 significantly in control but not HU arteries. Both the number of caveolae and the binding of AT1 and cav-1 in HU arteries were restored by cholesterol pretreatment which also reinstated the change in EC50 as well as the level of AT1 desensitization. These results indicate that modified caveolae in vascular smooth muscle cells could interfere with the binding of AT1 and cav-1 mediating the adaptation of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction to HU. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  18. The synthetic triterpenoid, RTA405, increases glomerular filtration rate and reduces angiotensin II-induced contraction of glomerular mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yanfeng; Stidham, Rhesa; Bumeister, Ron; Trevino, Isaac; Winters, Ali; Sprouse, Marc; Ding, Min; Ferguson, Deborah A.; Meyer, Colin J.; Wigley, W. Christian; Ma, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Bardoxolone methyl, a synthetic triterpenoid, improves the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patients with chornic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes. Since the contractile activity of mesangial cells may influence glomerular filtration, we evaluated the effect of the synthetic triterpenoid RTA405 with structural similarity to bardoxolone methyl, on GFR in rats and on mesangial cell contractility in freshly isolated glomeruli. In rats, RTA 405 increased basal GFR, assessed by inulin clearance, and attenuated the angiotensin II-induced decline in GFR. RTA 405 increased the filtration fraction, but did not affect arterial blood pressure or renal plasma flow. Glomeruli from RTA 405-treated rats were resistant to angiotensin II-induced volume reduction ex vivo. In cultured mesangial cells, angiotensin II-stimulated contraction was attenuated by RTA 405, in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Further, Nrf2 targeted gene transcription (regulates antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytoprotective responses) in mesangial cells was associated with decreased basal and reduced angiotensin II-stimulated hydrogen peroxide and calcium ion levels. These mechanisms contribute to the GFR increase that occurs following treatment with RTA 405 in rats and may underlie the effect of bardoxolone methyl on the estimated GFR in patients. PMID:23235569

  19. Angiotensin-(1-7) Suppresses Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth and Angiogenesis via Complex Interactions of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor, Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor and Mas Receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Li, Bin; Wang, Ximing; Li, Guishuang; Shang, Rui; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Yuguo; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng; Hao, Panpan

    2015-07-27

    We recently confirmed that angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R) was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue using a murine hepatoma model. Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7) has been found beneficial in ameliorating lung cancer and prostate cancer. Which receptor of Ang-(1-7) is activated to mediate its effects is much speculated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Ang-(1-7) on hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as the probable mechanisms. H22 hepatoma-bearing mice were randomly divided into five groups for treatment: mock group, low-dose Ang-(1-7), high-dose Ang-(1-7), high-dose Ang-(1-7) + A779 and high-dose Ang-(1-7) + PD123319. Ang-(1-7) treatment inhibited tumor growth time- and dose-dependently by arresting tumor proliferation and promoting tumor apoptosis as well as inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. The effects of Ang-(1-7) on tumor proliferation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration with A779 or PD123319, whereas the effects on tumor angiogenesis were completely reversed by A779 but not by PD123319. Moreover, Ang-(1-7) downregulated AT1R mRNA, upregulated mRNA levels of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R) and Mas receptor (MasR) and p38-MAPK phosphorylation and suppressed H22 cell-endothelial cell communication. Thus, Ang-(1-7) administration suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via complex interactions of AT1R, AT2R and MasR and may provide a novel and promising approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Angiotensin-(1–7) Suppresses Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth and Angiogenesis via Complex Interactions of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor, Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor and Mas Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanping; Li, Bin; Wang, Ximing; Li, Guishuang; Shang, Rui; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Yuguo; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng; Hao, Panpan

    2015-01-01

    We recently confirmed that angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R) was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue using a murine hepatoma model. Angiotensin(Ang)-(1–7) has been found beneficial in ameliorating lung cancer and prostate cancer. Which receptor of Ang-(1–7) is activated to mediate its effects is much speculated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Ang-(1–7) on hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as the probable mechanisms. H22 hepatoma-bearing mice were randomly divided into five groups for treatment: mock group, low-dose Ang-(1–7), high-dose Ang-(1–7), high-dose Ang-(1–7) + A779 and high-dose Ang-(1–7) + PD123319. Ang-(1–7) treatment inhibited tumor growth time- and dose-dependently by arresting tumor proliferation and promoting tumor apoptosis as well as inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. The effects of Ang-(1–7) on tumor proliferation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration with A779 or PD123319, whereas the effects on tumor angiogenesis were completely reversed by A779 but not by PD123319. Moreover, Ang-(1–7) downregulated AT1R mRNA, upregulated mRNA levels of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R) and Mas receptor (MasR) and p38-MAPK phosphorylation and suppressed H22 cell–endothelial cell communication. Thus, Ang-(1–7) administration suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via complex interactions of AT1R, AT2R and MasR and may provide a novel and promising approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26225830

  1. Inhibition of Angiotensin II receptors during pregnancy induces malformations in developing rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Susana I; Seltzer, Alicia M; Fuentes, Lucia B; Forneris, Myriam L; Ciuffo, Gladys M

    2008-06-24

    Evidence suggests that Angiotensin II plays an important role in the complex process of renal organogenesis. Rat kidney organogenesis starts between E13-14 and lasts up to 2 weeks after birth. The present study demonstrates histologic modifications and changes in receptor localisation in animals born from mothers treated with Angiotensin II, Losartan or PD123319 (1.0 mg/kg/day) during late pregnancy. Angiotensin II-treated animals exhibited very well developed tubules in the renal medulla in coincidence with higher AT(1) binding. Control animals exhibited angiotensin AT(2) binding in the outer stripe of the outer medulla, while in the Angiotensin II-treated animals binding was observed to the inner stripe. In Angiotensin II-treated 1-week-old animals, the nephrogenic zone contained fewer immature structures, and more developed collecting tubules than control animals. Treatment with Losartan resulted in severe renal abnormalities. For newborn and 1-week-old animals, glomeruli exhibited altered shape and enlarged Bowman spaces, in concordance with a loss of [(125)I]Angiotensin II binding in the cortex. Blockade with PD123319 led to an enlarged nephrogenic zone with increased number of immature glomeruli, and less glomeruli in the juxtamedullary area. Autoradiography showed a considerable loss of AT(1) binding in the kidney cortex of PD123319-treated animals at both ages. The present results show for the first time histomorphological and receptor localisation alterations following treatment with low doses of Losartan and PD123319 during pregnancy. These observations confirm previous assumptions that in the developing kidney Angiotensin II exerts stimulatory effects through AT(1) receptors that might be counterbalanced by angiotensin AT(2) receptors.

  2. Angiotensin type 1a receptor deficiency decreases amyloid β-protein generation and ameliorates brain amyloid pathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Matsumoto, Yukino; Murakami, Saki; Sugakawa, Yusuke; Kami, Ayako; Tanabe, Chiaki; Maeda, Tomoji; Michikawa, Makoto; Komano, Hiroto; Zou, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by neuronal loss and cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) and lowering the generation of Aβ is a pivotal approach in the strategy of Alzheimer’s disease treatment. Midlife hypertension is a major risk factor for the future onset of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease and the use of some antihypertensive drugs may decrease the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. However, it is largely unknown how the blood pressure regulation system is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Here we found that the deficiency of angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1a), a key receptor for regulating blood pressure, significantly decreased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. The lack of AT1a inhibited the endocleavage of presenilin-1 (PS1), which is essential for γ-secretase complex formation and Aβ generation. Notably, the ligand of AT1a, angiotensin II, enhanced Aβ generation, PS1 endocleavage and γ-secretase complex formation. Our results suggest that AT1a activation is closely associated with Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation by regulating γ-secretase complex formation. Thus, removal of life style factors or stresses that stimulate AT1a to elevate blood pressure may decrease Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation, thereby preventing the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26154270

  3. Angiotensin II-Activated Protein Kinase D Mediates Acute Aldosterone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Brian A.; Olala, Lawrence; Arun, Senthil Nathan; Parker, Peter M.; George, Mariya V.; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin II (AngII)-aldosterone system can contribute to cardiovascular disease, such that an understanding of this system is critical. Diacylglycerol-sensitive serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) is activated by AngII in several systems, including the human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line NCI H295R, where this enzyme enhances chronic (24 hours) AngII-evoked aldosterone secretion. However, the role of PKD in acute AngII-elicited aldosterone secretion has not been previously examined. In primary cultures of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells, which secrete detectable quantities of aldosterone in response to secretagogues within minutes, PKD was activated in response to AngII, but not an elevated potassium concentration or adrenocorticotrophic hormone. This activation was time- and dose-dependent and occurred through the AT1, but not the AT2, receptor. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of constitutively-active PKD resulted in enhanced AngII-induced aldosterone secretion; whereas overexpression of a dominant-negative PKD construct decreased AngII-stimulated aldosterone secretion. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that PKD mediates acute AngII-induced aldosterone secretion. PMID:19961896

  4. Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II type I receptor gene polymorphisms with extreme obesity in Polish individuals.

    PubMed

    Pacholczyk, Marta; Ferenc, Tomasz; Kowalski, Jan; Adamczyk, Przemysław; Chojnowski, Jacek; Ponikowska, Irena

    2013-08-01

    There is strong evidence for the presence of a functional renin-angiotensin system in human adipose tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of polymorphic variants of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE I/D) and angiotensin II type I receptor gene (AGTR1 A1166C) with extreme obesity and obesity-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to examine their combined effect on extremely obese patients. Overall, no significant associations were detected between ACE and AGTR1 gene polymorphisms and extreme obesity. However, extremely obese patients with T2DM showed an increased frequency of ACE II genotype compared with controls (p<0.05) and with non-diabetic extremely obese patients (p<0.01). The results suggest that II genotype of ACE was a significant contributor to extreme obesity in AA homozygotes of AGTR1 gene, regardless of the presence of T2DM. Moreover, the analysis of genetic polymorphisms demonstrated that ACE II and AGTR1 AC genotypes were most frequently observed in patients with extreme obesity and T2DM. On the basis of our results, we suggest that ACE II homozygosity may be a significant predictor of extreme obesity and T2DM and that the interaction between ACE and AGTR1 genes may be considered a predisposing factor for extreme obesity and extreme obesity-associated T2DM development.

  5. Urinary angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 increases in diabetic nephropathy by angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker olmesartan.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masanori; Oikawa, Osamu; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Soma, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a member of the renin-angiotensin system that degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to the seven-amino acid peptide fragment Ang-(1-7). We evaluated the changes in urinary ACE2 levels in response to treatment with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker olmesartan in diabetes patients with nephropathy. This prospective, open-label, interventional study was conducted with 31 type 2 diabetes patients with nephropathy. After initial evaluation, patients received 20 mg/day olmesartan, which was increased to 40 mg/day over a 24-week period. In diabetes patients with chronic kidney disease, olmesartan significantly increased urinary ACE2 levels independently of blood pressure and plasma aldosterone levels and reduced albuminuria, urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), and plasma aldosterone levels. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that the change in urinary L-FABP levels was an independent predictor of increased urinary ACE2 levels. Olmesartan may have the unique effect of increasing urinary ACE2 levels. However, whether this contributes to olmesartan's renoprotective effect must be examined further. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Sex chromosome effects unmasked in angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Xie; Liu, Jun; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M.; Watkins, Rebecca; Arnold, Arthur P.; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Sex differences in mean arterial pressure (MAP) are reported in many experimental models of hypertension and are ascribed to gonadal sex based of studies showing gonadectomy and gonadal hormone replacement affect MAP. The interpretation of these studies, however, has been confounded by differences in the sex chromosome complement (XX vs. XY). To investigate the sex chromosome complement independently of gonadal sex, we used the four core genotype (FCG) mouse model in which gonadal sex is separated from the sex chromosome complement enabling comparisons among XX and XY females and XX and XY males. We found that in the gonadectomized (GDX) FCG, MAP after 2 weeks of angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (200 ng/kg/min) was greater in XX than XY [MAP (mm Hg): GDX-XX-Female, 148±4.5; GDX-XY-Female, 133±4.4; GDX-XX-Male, 149±9.4; GDX-XY-Male, 138±5.5; p<0.03, XX vs XY; n=8-9/grp]. In contrast, no sex chromosome effects (SCE) were found on heart rate (HR) body weight (BW) or plasma Ang II 2 weeks after Ang II infusion. This study suggests that in addition to effects of gonadal hormones on blood pressure, X- or Y-linked genes, parental imprinting or X mosaicism contribute to sex differences in hypertension. Furthermore, the finding that MAP was greater in XX mice compared to XY mice in the GDX state suggests adverse SCE encoded within the XX sex chromosome complement could contribute to hypertension in women with ovarian hormone deficiency such as postmenopausal women and women with premature ovarian failure. PMID:20231528

  7. Characterization of functional urotensin II receptors in human skeletal muscle myoblasts: comparison with angiotensin II receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jian-shen; Minor, Lisa K; Smith, Charles; Hu, Bing; Yang, Jing; Andrade-Gordon, Patricia; Damiano, Bruce

    2005-04-01

    The properties of urotensin II (U-II) receptor (UT receptor) and angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor (AT receptor) in primary human skeletal myoblasts (HSMM) and differentiated skeletal myotubes (HSMMT) were characterized. Radiolabeled U-II and ANG II bound specifically to HSMM with Kd's of 0.31 nM (2311 receptors/cell) and 0.61 nM (18,257 receptors/cell), respectively. The cyclic segment of U-II peptide, CFWKYC, was the minimal sequence required for binding, with the WKY residues essential. Inhibitor studies suggested AT1 is the predominant ANG II receptor. After radioligand binding, under conditions designed to minimize receptor internalization, half the bound U-II was resistant to acid washing suggesting that U-II binds tightly to its receptor in a quasi-irreversible fashion. The AT1 receptor-bound radioligand was completely removed under the same conditions. RT-PCR detected the expression of mRNAs for UT and AT1 receptors. Western blotting showed that U-II and ANG II signaled via ERK1/2 kinase. UT receptor was not lost upon differentiation into myotubes since both mRNA for UT receptor and U-II binding were still present. ANG II receptors were also present as shown by ANG II-induced calcium mobilization.

  8. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase prevents ROS-induced vascular contraction in angiotensin-II hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyehun; Tostes, Rita C; Webb, R Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is an enzyme that detoxifies aldehydes to carboxylic acids. ALDH2 deficiency is known to increase oxidative stress, which is the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and antioxidant defense activity. Increased ROS contribute to vascular dysfunction and structural remodeling in hypertension. We hypothesized that ALDH2 plays a protective role to reduce vascular contraction in angiotensin-II (AngII) hypertensive mice. Endothelium-denuded aortic rings from C57BL6 mice, treated with AngII (3.6 μg/kg/min, 14 days), were used to measure isometric force development. Rings treated with daidzin (10 μmol/L), an ALDH2 inhibitor, potentiated contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) in AngII mice. Tempol (1 mmol/L) and catalase (600 U/mL) attenuated the augmented contractile effect of daidzin. In normotensive mice, contraction to PE in the presence of the daidzin was not different from control, untreated values. AngII aortic rings transfected with ALDH2 recombinant protein decreased contractile responses to PE compared with control. These data suggest that ALDH2 reduces vascular contraction in AngII hypertensive mice. Because tempol and catalase blocked the contractile response of the ALDH2 inhibitor, ROS generation by AngII may be decreased by ALDH2, thereby preventing ROS-induced contraction.

  9. Activation of Central PPAR-γ Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg/min) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and angiotensin II type-1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  10. Activation of central PPAR-γ attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that the activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg per minute) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Endothelial AT₁ and AT₂ pathways in aortic responses to angiotensin II after stress and ethanol consumption in rats.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Rafaela de Fátima Ferreira; Chies, Agnaldo Bruno; Taipeiro, Elane de Fátima; Cordellini, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Stress and ethanol are important cardiovascular risk factors. Their vascular and blood pressure (BP) effects were evaluated alone and in combination. Adult male Wistar rats (8-10 per group) were separated into control, ethanol (ethanol 20% in drinking water for 6 weeks), stress (restraint 1 h/d 5 d/week for 6 weeks), and ethanol/stress (in combination) groups. Systolic BP was evaluated weekly. Concentration-response curves for contractile responses to angiotensin II in the absence and the presence of losartan (AT1-blocker), PD123-319 (AT2-blocker), L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), or indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) were obtained in isolated intact and endothelium-denuded aortas. Effective concentration 50% (EC50) and maximum response (MR) were compared among groups using MANOVA/Tukey tests. Stress and stress plus ethanol increased BP. Ethanol and stress, alone and in combination, did not alter angiotensin responses of intact aortas. PD123-319 decreased MR to angiotensin II in intact aortas from the ethanol and ethanol/stress groups relative to control in the presence of PD123-319. Losartan increased MR to angiotensin II in intact aortas from the stress and ethanol/stress groups relative to control in the presence of losartan. None of the protocols altered angiotensin responses of denuded aortas. Neither indomethacin nor L-NAME altered angiotensin responses of intact aortas from the experimental groups. Thus ethanol and ethanol plus stress may alter endothelial signaling via AT1-receptors, without changing systemic BP. Stress and stress plus ethanol may alter endothelial signaling via AT2-receptors, and thereby increase BP. Knowledge of such vascular changes induced by stress and/or ethanol may contribute to understanding adverse cardiovascular effects of stress and ethanol consumption in humans.

  12. [Effects of Rhein on the hypertrophy of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells induced by high glucose and angiotensin II in rats].

    PubMed

    Yu, De-Qian; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Xiao-Hong

    2010-04-01

    To explore the effect of Rhein on the hypertrophy of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells induced by high glucose and angiotensin II in rats. Studies were performed on anesthetized SD rats. Renal proximal tubular were gained by microdissection and cultured in RPMI-1640 medium. The cell types were identified by immunocytochemistry. The renal proximal tubular epithelial cells were incubated with high glucose (30 mmol/L) and angiotensin II (10(-7) mol/L) to induce the hypertrophy of cells. To observe the effect of Rhein on hypertrophy induced by high glucose and angiotensin II, renal proximal tubular epithelial cells were cultured with different concentrations of Rhein (30, 15, 5 mg/L) for 72 h, then cell size, 3H-leucine incorporation, and cellular protein content were detected to observe the changes. High glucose (30 mmol/L) and Ang II (10(-7) mol/L) induced hypertrophy of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells result in, cell size, 3H-leucine incorporation and cellular protein content increased significantly. On the contrary, Rhein inhibited the hypertrophy of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells induced by high glucose and Angiotensin II. Rhein 30 mg/L significantly decreased cell size, 3H-leucine incorporation and cellular protein content. Rhein 15 mg/L decreased 3H-leucine incorporation and cellular protein content. Rhein 5 mg/L decreased cellular protein content. Rhein can inhibit the hypertrophy of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells induced by high glucose and Angiotensin II in rats.

  13. An angiotensin II receptor antagonist suppresses running-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis in rat.

    PubMed

    Mukuda, Takao; Sugiyama, Hiroyuki

    2007-06-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is enhanced by voluntary running exercise in adult mammals. To elucidate the factors involved in this enhancement, we examined the effects of losartan, an antagonist of angiotensin II type 1 receptors, on the running-enhanced neurogenesis in the adult rat hippocampus. When losartan was administered orally via the drinking water, the running-enhanced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone was almost completely suppressed, indicating that this enhancement may be mediated by angiotensin II and its receptors.

  14. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P < 0.05). However, during both exercise bouts, there were no differences in CVC or sweating between the treatment sites (all P > 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P < 0.05). We show angiotensin II impairs cutaneous perfusion independent of oxidative stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D.; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P < 0.05). However, during both exercise bouts, there were no differences in CVC or sweating between the treatment sites (all P > 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P < 0.05). We show angiotensin II impairs cutaneous perfusion independent of oxidative stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. PMID:25767030

  16. Human adipose tissue cells keep tight control on the angiotensin II levels in their vicinity.

    PubMed

    Schling, Petra; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2002-12-13

    Human adipose tissue expresses all components necessary for the local production of angiotensin II, which has multiple functions in adipose tissue, ranging from regulation of local blood flow to complex influences on tissue homeostasis. Still the mechanisms controlling human adipose tissue angiotensin II concentrations are not yet known. We investigated whether angiotensin II is degraded by human primary cultured preadipocytes and adipocytes and which enzymes are responsible for its metabolism. Distinct but transient angiotensin II production was limited by degradation due to consecutive proteolytic cleavage by endopeptidase and aminopeptidase activities. The endopeptidase could be identified as neprilysin expressed on the surface of both preadipocytes and adipocytes. Degradation of angiotensin II was preceded by a lag phase that was considerably longer in preadipocytes. This time span could not be explained by an induction of neprilysin nor by an increase in its surface localization. Following the lag phase, adipocytes showed a higher degradation activity than preadipocytes as mirrored by increased neprilysin levels and activity measured in their membrane fractions. Our findings demonstrate that human preadipocytes and adipocytes differentially express functional neprilysin and aminopeptidase activity involved in the regulation of angiotensin II concentrations in human adipose tissue.

  17. Increased intracellular free calcium and sensitivity to angiotensin II in platelets of preeclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Haller, H; Oeney, T; Hauck, U; Distler, A; Philipp, T

    1989-04-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by a generalized vasoconstriction and increased vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II. Intracellular free calcium, implicated in vascular smooth muscle contraction, has been found to be elevated in platelets of other hypertensive disorders. We therefore measured intracellular free calcium concentrations by using the fluorescent probe quin-2 in platelets of six patients with preeclampsia and compared them to measurements in ten normotensive pregnant women and ten age-matched nonpregnant women. Intracellular free calcium was also determined in the preeclamptic women after delivery. We found that intracellular free calcium was slightly elevated in normal pregnancy (102 +/- 13 nmol/L v 87 +/- 17 nmol/L) but was markedly increased in preeclampsia (138 +/- 13 nmol/L, P less than .05). This increase disappeared six weeks after delivery (84 + 10 nmol/L, P less than .01). To investigate whether the increased intracellular free calcium was related to angiotensin II, the platelets were exposed to thrombin and angiotensin II in vitro. Exposure to thrombin and angiotensin II caused a dose-dependent increase in intracellular free calcium. The intracellular response to thrombin was not significantly different in the three groups. However, stimulation with angiotensin II revealed an increased response in intracellular free calcium in preeclampsia (P less than .05) that disappeared after delivery. Our findings show a sustained increase in platelet intracellular free calcium in preeclampsia and suggest a functional alteration of the angiotensin II receptor in this disease.

  18. Angiotensin II has acute effects on TRPC6 channels in podocytes of freshly isolated glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Palygin, Oleg; Chubinskiy-Nadezhdin, Vladislav; Negulyaev, Yuri A.; Ma, Rong; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A key role for podocytes in the pathogenesis of proteinuric renal diseases has been established. Angiotensin II causes depolarization and increased intracellular calcium concentration in podocytes; members of the cation TRPC channels family, particularly TRPC6, are proposed as proteins responsible for calcium flux. Angiotensin II evokes calcium transient through TRPC channels and mutations in the gene encoding the TRPC6 channel result in the development of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Here we examined the effects of angiotensin II on intracellular calcium ion levels and endogenous channels in intact podocytes of freshly isolated decapsulated mouse glomeruli. An ion channel with distinct TRPC6 properties was identified in wild type, but was absent in TRPC6 knockout mice. Single channel electrophysiological analysis found that angiotensin II acutely activated native TRPC-like channels in both podocytes of freshly isolated glomeruli and TRPC6 channels transiently overexpressed in CHO cells; the effect was mediated by changes in the channel open probability. Angiotensin II evoked intracellular calcium transients in the wild type podocytes, which was blunted in TRPC6 knockout glomeruli. Pan-TRPC inhibitors gadolinium and SKF 96365 reduced the response in wild type glomerular epithelial cells, whereas the transient in TRPC6 knockout animals was not affected. Thus, angiotensin II-dependent activation of TRPC6 channels in podocytes may have a significant role in the development of kidney diseases. PMID:24646854

  19. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene polymorphisms in generalized aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gürkan, Ali; Emingil, Gülnur; Saygan, Buket Han; Atilla, Gül; Köse, Timur; Baylas, Haluk; Berdeli, Afig

    2009-04-01

    Host response to periodontopathic microorganisms can be modulated by genetic factors. Accumulated evidence highlighted the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in inflammatory response thus potential implication of this molecular system in the pathogenesis of periodontitis can be suggested. The present study investigated common genetic variants of molecules within the RAS family namely angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) in relation to generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP). DNA was obtained from peripheral blood of 103 G-AgP patients and 100 periodontally healthy subjects. ACE I/D, AGT M235T and AT1R A1166C polymorphisms were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Chi-square, ANOVA and logistic regression were used in statistical analyses. Both ACE I/D and AT1R polymorphisms were similar in G-AgP and healthy groups (p>0.05). G-AgP subjects exhibited decreased AGT TT genotype and T allele frequency as compared to healthy subjects (p<0.05). The same trend was also observed in the nonsmoker subgroup regarding investigated RAS polymorphisms. Present findings suggest that AGT M235T TT genotype and T allele might be associated with decreased risk for G-AgP in Turkish population.

  20. Olmesartan Prevents Microalbuminuria in db/db Diabetic Mice Through Inhibition of Angiotensin II/p38/SIRT1-Induced Podocyte Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Junhui; Yang, Ming; Qi, Na; Mei, Shuqin; Chen, Jiejian; Song, Shuwei; Jing, Ying; Chen, Meihan; He, Liangliang; Sun, Lijun; Hu, Huimin; Li, Lin; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Wu, Ming; Mei, Changlin

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of the renin-angiotensin II system (RAS) prevents or delays albuminuria in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of the angiotensin receptor blocker olmesartan on albuminuria in a murine model of diabetic nephropathy. Male db/db diabetic mice were fed with placebo or 20 mg/kg olmesartan by daily gavage for 12 weeks. Conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes were treated with glucose, angiotensin II, olmesartan or p38 inhibitor s8307 in different experimental conditions after differentiation. Olmesartan reduced albuminuria in db/db mice without change in body weight and glycemia. The increase of apoptotic cells and decrease of podocytes in the diabetic glomerulus were prevented by olmesartan. Moreover, olmesartan restored silent mating type information regulation 1 (SIRT1) expression in diabetic glomeruli. Furthermore, olmesartan treatment suppressed p38 phosphorylation but did not restore adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in the diabetic glomerulus. In vitro study revealed that olmesartan prevented angiotensin II/p38/SIRT1 induced podocyte apoptosis, but it only slightly prevented high glucose/AMPK/SIRT1 induced podocyte apoptosis. In addition, the p38 inhibitor s8307 reversed SIRT1 expression and angiotensin II induced podocyte apoptosis. Olmesartan reduced albuminuria in diabetic nephropathy through inhibiting angiotensin II/p38/SIRT1 triggered podocyte apoptosis. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Angiotensin II natriuresis and anti-natriuresis: role of renal artery pressure in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Hall, J E; Montaini, J P; Guyton, A C

    1984-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of changes in renal artery pressure (RAP), renal haemodynamics, and tubular reabsorption in mediating the natriuretic and anti-natriuretic actions of angiotensin II (ANG II). In anaesthetized dogs, endogenous ANG II formation was blocked with SQ-14225 and ANG II was infused intravenously at rates of 5-1215 ng/kg/min while RAP was either servo-controlled at the normal level or permitted to increase. When RAP was servo-controlled to prevent a rise in RAP, ANG II infusion at all rates from 5-1215 ng/kg/min decreased urinary sodium excretion (INaV) and fractional sodium excretion (FENa), while increasing fractional reabsorption of lithium (FRLi), an index of proximal tubule fractional sodium reabsorption (FRDNa). When RAP was permitted to increase, ANG II infusion rates up to 45 ng/kg/min decreased UNaV, and FENam while increasing FRLi and FRDNa greater than However, at 135 ng/kg/min and above UNaV and FENE increased while FRLi and FRDNa decreased when RAP was allowed to rise, even though renal blood flow and filtration fraction were not substantially different from the values observed when RAP was servo-controlled. Filtered sodium load was slightly higher when RAP was permitted to increase during ANG II infusion, compared to the dogs in which RAP was servo-controlled, although the differences were not statistically significant. Thus, even very large doses of ANG II cause anti-natriuresis when RAP is prevented from increasing. The natriuretic effect of high doses of ANG II is caused by increased RAP which decreases fractional sodium reabsorption in proximal and distal tubules and causes slight increase in sodium delivery to the tubules.

  2. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumor phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Ham, Hwa-Yong; Kim, Yeon-Ja; Yun, Young-Jin; Kim, Min-Ju; Kwon, Min-Soo; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor microenvironments polarize neutrophils to protumoral phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate that the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumoral phenotype. The ACEis or AGTR1 antagonist enhanced hypersegmentation of human neutrophils and increased neutrophil cytotoxicity against tumor cells. This neutrophil hypersegmentation was dependent on the mTOR pathway. In a murine tumor model, ACEis and AGTR1 antagonist attenuated tumor growth and enhanced neutrophil hypersegmentation. ACEis inhibited tumor-induced polarization of neutrophils to a protumoral phenotype. Neutrophil depletion reduced the antitumor effect of ACEi. Together, these data suggest that the modulation of Ang II pathway attenuates tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils to an antitumoral phenotype. PMID:26942086

  3. Lysyl oxidase overexpression accelerates cardiac remodeling and aggravates angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Galán, María; Varona, Saray; Guadall, Anna; Orriols, Mar; Navas, Miquel; Aguiló, Silvia; de Diego, Alicia; Navarro, María A; García-Dorado, David; Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) controls matrix remodeling, a key process that underlies cardiovascular diseases and heart failure; however, a lack of suitable animal models has limited our knowledge with regard to the contribution of LOX to cardiac dysfunction. Here, we assessed the impact of LOX overexpression on ventricular function and cardiac hypertrophy in a transgenic LOX (TgLOX) mouse model with a strong cardiac expression of human LOX. TgLOX mice exhibited high expression of the transgene in cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts, which are associated with enhanced LOX activity and H2O2 production and with cardiofibroblast reprogramming. LOX overexpression promoted an age-associated concentric remodeling of the left ventricle and impaired diastolic function. Furthermore, LOX transgenesis aggravated angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction, which triggered a greater fibrotic response that was characterized by stronger collagen deposition and cross-linking and high expression of fibrotic markers. In addition, LOX transgenesis increased the Ang II-induced myocardial inflammatory infiltrate, exacerbated expression of proinflammatory markers, and decreased that of cardioprotective factors. Mechanistically, LOX overexpression enhanced oxidative stress and potentiated the Ang II-mediated cardiac activation of p38 MAPK while reducing AMPK activation. Our findings suggest that LOX induces an age-dependent disturbance of diastolic function and aggravates Ang II-induced hypertrophy, which provides novel insights into the role of LOX in cardiac performance.-Galán, M., Varona, S., Guadall, A., Orriols, M., Navas, M., Aguiló, S., de Diego, A., Navarro, M. A., García-Dorado, D., Rodríguez-Sinovas, A., Martínez-González, J., Rodriguez, C. Lysyl oxidase overexpression accelerates cardiac remodeling and aggravates angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy. © FASEB.

  4. Effect of exercise on plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin, angiotensin II and aldosterone in hypertensive and normotensive renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E B; Danielsen, H; Nielsen, A H; Knudsen, F; Jensen, T; Kornerup, H J; Madsen, M

    1986-04-01

    Plasma concentrations of angiotensin II (A II), aldosterone (Aldo) and arginine vasopressin (AVP), and serum osmolality (Sosm) were determined before and after gradually increasing exercise loads on a bicycle ergometer in 10 hypertensive (group I) and 10 normotensive renal transplant recipients (group II), and in 15 healthy control subjects (group III). Working capacity was reduced in groups I and II. The A II, Aldo, AVP, Sosm increased in all groups after exercise. The A II was higher in group I than II and the percentage changes were significantly lower in groups I and II than in group III. There were no significant differences in Aldo between the groups either before or after exercise. The AVP was the same in groups I and II, and AVP in these groups was higher than in group III. The Sosm and AVP were significantly correlated in all groups. Neither A II, Aldo nor AVP were significantly correlated to systolic blood pressure (BP). Alterations in AVP, but not in A II or Aldo, were correlated to the degree of exercise load. It can be concluded that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the osmoregulatory system are stimulated during exercise in renal transplant recipients. The A II is elevated in post-renal transplant hypertension, but the responsiveness is reduced in both hypertensive and normotensive recipients. The alterations in AVP are probably secondary to changes in Sosm, and the higher AVP levels in recipients could be due to a decreased responsiveness of the renal tubules to AVP. Our findings are in good agreement with the hypothesis that hypertension after renal transplantation is angiotensin II-dependent.

  5. Angiotensin II promotes iron accumulation and depresses PGI₂ and NO synthesis in endothelial cells: effects of losartan and propranolol analogs.

    PubMed

    Mak, I Tong; Landgraf, Kenneth M; Chmielinska, Joanna J; Weglicki, William B

    2012-10-01

    Angiotensin may promote endothelial dysfunction through iron accumulation. To research this, bovine endothelial cells (ECs) were incubated with iron (30 µmol·L⁻¹) with or without angiotensin II (100 nmol·L⁻¹). After incubation for 6 h, it was observed that the addition of angiotensin enhanced EC iron accumulation by 5.1-fold compared with a 1.8-fold increase for cells incubated with iron only. This enhanced iron uptake was attenuated by losartan (100 nmol·L⁻¹), d-propranolol (10 µmol·L⁻¹), 4-HO-propranolol (5 µmol·L⁻¹), and methylamine, but not by vitamin E or atenolol. After 6 h of incubation, angiotensin plus iron provoked intracellular oxidant formation (2'7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA) fluorescence) and elevated oxidized glutathione; significant loss of cell viability occurred at 48 h. Stimulated prostacyclin release decreased by 38% (6 h) and NO synthesis was reduced by 41% (24 h). Both oxidative events and functional impairment were substantially attenuated by losartan or d-propranolol. It is concluded that angiotensin promoted non-transferrin-bound iron uptake via AT-1 receptor activation, leading to EC oxidative functional impairment. The protective effects of d-propranolol and 4-HO-propranolol may be related to their lysosomotropic properties.

  6. Polymorphisms in angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin I-converting enzyme genes and breast cancer risk among Chinese women in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Van Den Berg, David; Lee, Hin-Peng; Yu, Mimi C

    2005-02-01

    Angiotensin II is converted from its precursor by angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and has been shown to mediate growth in breast cancer cell lines via ligand-induced activity through the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). Earlier we showed that women with the low activity genotype of the ACE gene have a statistically significantly ( approximately 50%) reduced breast cancer risk compared with those possessing the high activity ACE genotype. To further test the hypothesis that angiotensin II participates in breast carcinogenesis through AGTR1, we examined genetic polymorphisms in the 5'-region of the AGTR1 gene (A-168G, C-535T and T-825A) in relation to risk of breast cancer in 258 breast cancer cases and 670 female controls within the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Relative to the homozygotes, individual genotypes with one or two copies of the respective allelic variants (putative low risk genotypes) were each associated with an approximately 30% reduction in risk of breast cancer. Risk of breast cancer decreased with increasing number of low risk AGTR1 genotypes after adjustment for potential confounders. Relative to those carrying no low risk genotypes (homozygous for A, C and T alleles for the three polymorphisms, respectively), the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.84 (0.51-1.37) for women possessing one low risk genotype and 0.68 (0.46-1.01) for women possessing two or three low risk genotypes (P for trend = 0.05). When both AGTR1 and ACE gene polymorphisms were examined simultaneously, women possessing at least one AGTR1 low risk genotype in combination with the ACE low activity genotype had an odds ratio of 0.35 (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.62) compared with those possessing the ACE high activity genotype and no AGTR1 low risk genotype. Our findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the angiotensin II effect by blockade of ACE and/or AGTR1 could be potential targets for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  7. Angiotensin II-noradrenergic interactions in renovascular hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, J B; Robertson, D; Jackson, E K

    1987-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that interactions of endogenous angiotensin II (AII) with the noradrenergic neuroeffector junction are important in renin-dependent hypertension. In the in situ blood-perfused rat mesentery, in normal rats exogenous AII potentiated mesenteric vascular responses to periarterial (sympathetic) nerve stimulation (PNS) more than vascular responses to exogenous norepinephrine (NE). In 2-kidney-1-clip (2K-1C) rats with renovascular hypertension mesenteric vascular responses to PNS and NE were greater than in sham-operated rats, and renovascular hypertension mimicked the effects of exogenous AII with respect to enhancing responses to PNS more than responses to NE. In 2K-1C rats, but not in sham-operated rats, 1-Sar-8-Ile-AII markedly suppressed vascular responses to PNS, without influencing responses to NE. Finally, 1-Sar-8-Ile-AII attenuated sympathetic nerve stimulation-induced neuronal spillover of NE in 2K-1C rats, but not in sham-operated rats. These data indicate that renovascular hypertension enhances noradrenergic neurotransmission, and that this enhancement is mediated in part by AII-induced facilitation of NE release. PMID:3301900

  8. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  9. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, F A; Quirion, R; Saavedra, J M; Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1984-01-01

    The 125I-labeled agonist analog [1-sarcosine]-angiotensin II ( [Sar1]AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (Ka = 2 X 10(9) M-1) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6324205

  10. Inhibitory effect of resveratrol on angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tzu-Hurng; Liu, Ju-Chi; Lin, Heng; Shih, Neng-Lang; Chen, Yen-Ling; Huang, Meng-Ting; Chan, Paul; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Chen, Jin-Jer

    2004-02-01

    Resveratrol is proposed to account in part for the protective effect of red wine on the cardiovascular system. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a potent hypertrophic stimulus in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we determined the effect of resveratrol on Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were stimulated with Ang II, and [3H]leucine incorporation and beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MyHC) promoter activity were examined. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by a redox-sensitive fluorescent dye, 2' 7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation was examined by Western blotting. Resveratrol inhibited Ang II-increased intracellular ROS levels. Furthermore, resveratrol, as well as the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine, decreased Ang II- or H2O2-increased protein synthesis, beta-MyHC promoter activity, and ERK phosphorylation. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that resveratrol inhibits Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via attenuation of ROS generation.

  11. Pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II in female mice is enhanced with age: role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pressor response to angiotensin II (AngII) is attenuated in adult females as compared to males via an angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R)-dependent pathway. We hypothesized that adult female mice are protected against AngII-induced hypertension via an enhanced AT2R-mediated pathway and that in reproductively senescent females this pathway is no longer operative. Methods Mean arterial pressure was measured via telemetry in 4-month-old (adult) and 16-month-old (aged) and aged ovariectomized (aged-OVX) wild-type and AT2R knockout (AT2R-KO) female mice during baseline and 14-day infusion of vehicle (saline) or AngII (600 ng/kg/min s.c.). Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine renal gene expression of angiotensin receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in response to 14-day treatment with vehicle or AngII. Results Basal mean arterial pressure was similar between the groups. The pressor response to AngII was augmented in adult AT2R-KO compared to adult wild-type mice (29 ± 3 mmHg versus 10 ± 4 mmHg, respectively, on day 14 as compared to basal mean arterial pressure, P = 0.002). In wild-type mice, pressor responsiveness to AngII was augmented with age, such that the pressor response to AngII was similar between aged AT2R-KO and wild-type female mice (31 ± 4 mmHg versus 34 ± 3 mmHg, respectively, on day 14, P = 0.9). There were no significant differences in pressor responsiveness to AngII between aged and aged-OVX mice. Vehicle-treated aged wild-type mice had a lower renal AT2R/AT1R balance as compared to adult counterparts. In response to AngII, the renal AT2R/AT1R balance in aged wild-type females was greater than that observed in vehicle-treated aged wild-type females and adult wild-type females, yet the protective effects of AT2R activation were not restored. Conclusions The protective role of the AT2R depressor pathway is lost with age in female mice. Therefore

  12. Angiotensin 1-7 Receptor and Angiotensin II Receptor 2 Blockades Prevent the Increased Serum and Kidney Nitric Oxide Levels in Response to Angiotensin II Administration: Gender-Related Difference

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Tahereh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Background: The angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor 2 (AT2R) and angiotensin 1-7 receptor (masR) expression in the kidney are gender-related. We attempted to compare the response of nitric oxide (NO) production to Ang II administration, with and without AT2R and masR blockades, using A-779 and PD123319 in male and female rats. Methods: Anesthetized and catheterized male and female Wistar rats were subjected to one-hour continuous infusion of Ang II (~20 μg/kg/hour), with and without masR and AT2R blockades. The level of the NO metabolite (nitrite) was measured before and after the experiment in rat serum and in the homogenized kidney tissue. Results: The basal data indicated that no sex difference in the serum level of nitrite could be detected before Ang II infusion. However, administration of Ang II in male and female rats caused a gender difference in the nitrite level, which resulted in the serum level of the nitrite significantly increasing in males (P < 0.05) when compared with the females. In addition, masR blockade or co-blockade of masR and AT2R in male rats abolished the gender difference related to the effect of Ang II on nitrite production. In the presence of masR and AT2R, or when masR alone was blocked, the level of nitrite in the kidney, in response to the Ang II infusion was not significantly different between the two sexes. On the contrary, masR and AT2R co-blockades significantly decreased the kidney nitrite concentration response to Ang II administration in both male and female rats (P < 0.05), but no sex difference was detected. Conclusions: The renal vasculature of male rats may provide more response to Ang II administration-induced NO, which is dependent on masR and AT2R. During dual masR + AT2R blockades, the kidney NO formation wasreduced in a non-gender related manner. PMID:23626887

  13. Leptin Mediates High-Fat Diet Sensitization of Angiotensin II-Elicited Hypertension by Upregulating the Brain Renin-Angiotensin System and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Zhongming; Guo, Fang; Beltz, Terry G; Thunhorst, Robert L; Felder, Robert B; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is characterized by increased circulating levels of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin, which can increase sympathetic nerve activity and raise blood pressure. A previous study revealed that rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) have an enhanced hypertensive response to subsequent angiotensin II administration that is mediated at least, in part, by increased activity of brain renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines. This study tested whether leptin mediates this HFD-induced sensitization of angiotensin II-elicited hypertension by interacting with brain renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokine mechanisms. Rats fed an HFD for 3 weeks had significant increases in white adipose tissue mass, plasma leptin levels, and mRNA expression of leptin and its receptors in the lamina terminalis and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Central infusion of a leptin receptor antagonist during HFD feeding abolished HFD sensitization of angiotensin II-elicited hypertension. Furthermore, central infusion of leptin mimicked the sensitizing action of HFD. Concomitant central infusions of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist irbesartan, the tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis inhibitor pentoxifylline, or the inhibitor of microglial activation minocycline prevented the sensitization produced by central infusion of leptin. RT-PCR analysis indicated that either HFD or leptin administration upregulated mRNA expression of several components of the renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines in the lamina terminalis and paraventricular nucleus. The leptin antagonist and the inhibitors of angiotensin II type 1 receptor, tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis, and microglial activation all reversed the expression of these genes. The results suggest that HFD-induced sensitization of angiotensin II-elicited hypertension is mediated by leptin through upregulation of central renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines. © 2016 American Heart

  14. Repeated administration of angiotensin II reduces its dipsogenic effect without affecting saline intake

    PubMed Central

    Vento, Peter J.; Daniels, Derek

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) acts at central type I (AT1) receptors to increase intake of water and saline. In vitro studies demonstrated rapid desensitization of the AT1 receptor after AngII exposure and behavioural studies in rats suggest that exposure to AngII decreases the dipsogenic potency of subsequent AngII. Nevertheless, the effect of repeated AngII injections on saline intake remains untested and a reliable paradigm for examining this purported behavioural desensitization has not emerged from the literature. To address these issues, we established a reliable approach to study AngII-induced dipsetic desensitization and used this approach to test the requirement of central AT1 receptors and the specificity of the effect for water intake. Rats given a treatment regimen of three injections of AngII (300 ng, icv), each separated by 20 min, drank less water than control rats after a subsequent test injection of AngII. The effect was relatively short lasting, dependent on the dose and timing of AngII, and was almost completely blocked by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan. In further testing, when rats were given access to both water and 1.5% saline, animals that received an AngII treatment regimen drank less water than controls, but saline intake was unaffected. These data support previous suggestions that AngII-induced water and saline intakes are separable. Given the role of G protein uncoupling in desensitization of the AT1 receptor, these data are consistent with the emerging hypothesis that AT1 receptor G protein-dependent intracellular signalling pathways are more relevant for water, but not saline intake. PMID:20228119

  15. Angiotensin II attenuates synaptic GABA release and excites paraventricular-rostral ventrolateral medulla output neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Pei; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2005-06-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons regulate sympathetic outflow through projections to the spinal cord and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Although the PVN-RVLM pathway is important for the action of brain angiotensin II (Ang II) on autonomic control, the cellular mechanisms involved are not fully known. In this study, we examined the effect of Ang II on the excitability and synaptic inputs to RVLM-projecting PVN neurons. PVN neurons were retrogradely labeled by FluoSpheres injected into the RVLM of rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on labeled PVN neurons in brain slices. Ang II significantly increased the firing rate of PVN neurons from 3.63 +/- 0.65 to 6.10 +/- 0.75 Hz (P < 0.05, n = 9), and such an effect was eliminated by an AT(1) receptor antagonist, losartan. Furthermore, inclusion of a G protein inhibitor, guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate, in the pipette internal solution did not alter the excitatory effect of Ang II on labeled PVN neurons. Application of 0.5 to 5 microM Ang II significantly decreased the amplitude of evoked GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in a dose-dependent manner. Also, 2 microM Ang II significantly decreased the frequency of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) from 3.89 +/- 0.84 to 2.06 +/- 0.45 Hz (P < 0.05, n = 11), but did not change the amplitude and decay time constant of mIPSCs. By contrast, Ang II had no significant effect on glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents at the concentrations that inhibited IPSCs. In addition, Ang II failed to excite PVN neurons in the presence of bicuculline. Collectively, this study provides important new information that Ang II excites RVLM-projecting PVN neurons through attenuation of GABAergic synaptic inputs.

  16. Endogenous angiotensin II in the paraventricular nucleus regulates arterial pressure during hypotension in rat, a single-unit study.

    PubMed

    Khanmoradi, Mehrangiz; Nasimi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) controls cardiovascular regulation through vasopressin and sympathetic system. The PVN contains angiotensin II (AngII) and AngII receptors. We have already shown that microinjection of AngII into PVN produced a pressor response concomitant with an increase in firing rate of some PVN neurons. This study was performed to find if PVN AngII plays a regulatory function during hypotension. Hypovolemic-hypotension was induced and the possible role of the PVN AngII in returning arterial pressure toward normal was assessed by monitoring cardiovascular response and single-unit activity of the PVN neurons. Hemorrhage augmented the pressor, tachycardic and single-unit responses to AngII. After-hemorrhage injection of PD123319, an AT2 antagonist, into PVN resulted in a significant decrease in firing rate of some neurons, indicating that AngII was released into the PVN due to hemorrhage. Using single-unit recording, we found that PVN receives electrical signals from baroreceptors and from circulating AngII through circumventricular organs. In addition, by producing hemorrhagic-hypotension and bilateral blockade of AT2 receptors of the PVN, we found that AngII regulates arterial pressure toward normal during hypotension. So for the first time, it was verified that brain renin-angiotensin system is also a major regulatory system of the cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Dietary sodium intake regulates angiotensin II type 1, mineralocorticoid receptor, and associated signaling proteins in heart.

    PubMed

    Ricchiuti, Vincent; Lapointe, Nathalie; Pojoga, Luminita; Yao, Tham; Tran, Loc; Williams, Gordon H; Adler, Gail K

    2011-10-01

    Liberal or high-sodium (HS) intake, in conjunction with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increases cardiovascular (CV) damage. We tested the hypothesis that sodium intake regulates the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)R), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and associated signaling pathways in heart tissue from healthy rodents. HS (1.6% Na(+)) and low-sodium (LS; 0.02% Na(+)) rat chow was fed to male healthy Wistar rats (n=7 animals per group). Protein levels were assessed by western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis. Fractionation studies showed that MR, AT(1)R, caveolin-3 (CAV-3), and CAV-1 were located in both cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. In healthy rats, consumption of an LS versus a HS diet led to decreased cardiac levels of AT(1)R and MR. Decreased sodium intake was also associated with decreased cardiac levels of CAV-1 and CAV-3, decreased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R-CAV-3 and MR-CAV-3 complexes, but increased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R/MR complexes. Furthermore, decreased sodium intake was associated with decreased cardiac extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated ERK (pERK), and pERK/ERK ratio; increased cardiac striatin; decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (peNOS), but increased peNOS/eNOS ratio; and decreased cardiac plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Dietary sodium restriction has beneficial effects on the cardiac expression of factors associated with CV injury. These changes may play a role in the cardioprotective effects of dietary sodium restriction.

  18. Debate: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers--a gap in evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Ball, Stephen G; White, William B

    2003-05-22

    In this article, 2 leading physicians debate the strength of outcome data on the efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for reducing the incidence of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renovascular events. Dr. Stephen G. Ball notes that the efficacy of ACE inhibitors for reducing the risk for myocardial infarction independent of their effects on blood pressure is controversial. In the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) study, ramipril treatment in high-risk patients was associated with a 20% reduction in the risk for myocardial infarction; mean reduction in blood pressure was 3 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and 1 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure. The HOPE investigators propose that the 20% reduction was much greater than would be expected based on the observed blood pressure reduction. However, a meta-regression analysis of blood pressure reduction in >20 antihypertensive therapy outcome trials found that the reduction in myocardial infarction risk with ramipril observed in HOPE was consistent with the modest blood pressure reduction seen with that agent. Nevertheless, there are convincing data for prevention of myocardial infarction with ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure, including those with heart failure after myocardial infarction, as well as supportive evidence from studies in patients with diabetes mellitus and concomitant hypertension. On the other hand, Dr. William B. White takes the position that ARBs are well-tolerated antihypertensive agents that specifically antagonize the angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor and provide a more complete block of the pathologic effects of angiotensin II-which are mediated via the AT(1) receptor-than ACE inhibitors. The Evaluation of Losartan in the Elderly (ELITE) II study and the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial (ValHeFT) suggest that ARBs reduce the risk for mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. The Losartan

  19. The mechanistic basis for the disparate effects of angiotensin II on coronary collateral growth.

    PubMed

    Reed, Ryan; Kolz, Christopher; Potter, Barry; Rocic, Petra

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesize that controversial effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) are attributable to its regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent signaling. Coronary collateral growth (CCG) was stimulated in normal (WKY) and syndrome X (JCR) rats by transient/repetitive ischemia (RI). Blood flow was measured in the normal (NZ) and the collateral-dependent (CZ) zone. In WKY, RI increased CZ flow (0.84 mL/min/g), but RI+subpressor Ang II increased it more (1.24 mL/min/g). This was associated with transient p38 and sustained Akt activation. A hypertensive dose of Ang II decreased CZ flow (0.69 mL/min/g), which was associated with sustained p38 and transient Akt activation. AT1R blockade by candesartan abrogated CZ flow in WKY (0.58 mL/min/g), reduced myocardial superoxide, and blocked p38 and Akt activation. RI-induced CZ flow in JCR was significantly decreased compared with WKY (0.12 mL/min/g), associated with a large increase in superoxide and lack of p38 and Akt activation. CZ flow in JCR was partially restored by candesartan (0.45 mL/min/g), accompanied by reduction in superoxide and partial restoration of p38 and Akt activation. Ang II/AT1R blockade, at least in part, regulates CCG via generating optimal ROS amounts and activating redox-sensitive signaling.

  20. Serum levels of renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II in patients treated by surgical excision, propranolol and captopril for problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sulzberger, L; Baillie, R; Itinteang, T; de Jong, S; Marsh, R; Leadbitter, P; Tan, S T

    2016-03-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the biology of infantile haemangioma (IH) and its accelerated involution induced by β-blockers was first proposed in 2010. This led to the first clinical trial in 2012 using low-dose captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, demonstrating a similar response in these tumours. This study aimed to compare serial serum levels of the components of the RAS in patients before and after surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment for problematic proliferating IH. Patients with problematic proliferating IH underwent measurements of serum levels of plasma renin activity (PRA), ACE and angiotensin II (ATII) before, and 1-2 and 6 months following surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment. This study included 27 patients undergoing surgical excision (n = 8), propranolol (n = 11) and captopril (n = 8) treatment. Treatment with either surgical excision or propranolol resulted in significant decrease in the mean levels of PRA. Surgical excision or captopril treatment led to significant decline in the mean levels of ATII. All three treatment modalities had no significant effect on the mean levels of ACE. This study demonstrates the effect of surgical excision, propranolol and captopril treatment in lowering the levels of PRA and ATII, but not ACE, supporting a mechanistic role for the RAS in the biology of IH. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of angiotensin II-induced muscle wasting: potential therapeutic targets for cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Tabony, A Michael; Galvez, Sarah; Mitch, William E; Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2013-10-01

    Cachexia is a serious complication of many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many factors are involved in the development of cachexia, and there is increasing evidence that angiotensin II (Ang II), the main effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), plays an important role in this process. Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. In rodent models, an increase in systemic Ang II leads to weight loss through increased protein breakdown, reduced protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and decreased appetite. Ang II activates the ubiquitin-proteasome system via generation of reactive oxygen species and via inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and disrupts normal energy balance. Ang II also increases cytokines and circulating hormones such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A, glucocorticoids and myostatin, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II acts on hypothalamic neurons to regulate orexigenic/anorexigenic neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide-Y, orexin and corticotropin-releasing hormone, leading to reduced appetite. Also, Ang II may regulate skeletal muscle regenerative processes. Several clinical studies have indicated that blockade of Ang II signaling via ACE inhibitors or Ang II type 1 receptor blockers prevents weight loss and improves muscle strength. Thus the RAS is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with CHF and CKD. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  2. Circulating angiotensin II is associated with body fat accumulation and insulin resistance in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Atsuhito; Ohira, Masahiro; Endo, Kei; Koide, Nobukiyo; Oyama, Tomokazu; Murano, Takeyoshi; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Miyashita, Yoh; Shirai, Kohji

    2009-05-01

    Adipocytes express all components of the renin-angiotensin system, and the renin-angiotensin system is involved in obesity and insulin resistance. Circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) is detectable in blood, but its significance in human obesity remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate plasma Ang II in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and the change during weight loss. Fifty Japanese obese subjects with T2D (body weight, 75.0 +/- 14.1 kg; body mass index, 29.1 +/- 3.7 kg/m(2); visceral fat area [VFA], 169.3 +/- 54.3 cm(2); hemoglobin A(1c), 7.6% +/- 1.5%) were enrolled. The subjects were prescribed a diet of daily caloric intake of 20 kcal/kg for 24 weeks. Plasma Ang II was measured by radioimmunoassay. Leptin, adiponectin, and lipoprotein lipase mass in preheparin serum were also measured as adipocyte-derived factors. After 24 weeks of weight reduction diet, the mean body weight, VFA, and hemoglobin A(1c) decreased significantly by 2.3%, 7.0%, and 8.3%, respectively. The mean plasma Ang II decreased by 24% (P < .0001) and correlated with body weight both at baseline (r = 0.425, P = .0018) and at 24 weeks (r = 0.332, P = .0181). The change in Ang II correlated with changes in body weight (r = 0.335, P = .0167) and VFA (r = 0.329, P = .0191). The change in Ang II also correlated positively with change in leptin (r = 0.348, P = .0127) and tended to correlate negatively with change in lipoprotein lipase mass in preheparin serum (r = -0.260, P = .0683), which is a marker of insulin sensitivity. Plasma Ang II is associated with body weight, decreases during weight loss, and is associated with markers of insulin resistance in obese subjects with T2D.

  3. Neuroprotective effect of angiotensin II type 2 receptor during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chun-ye; Yin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) activation has been shown to protect against stroke, but its precise mechanism remains poorly understood. We investigated whether the protective effect of AT2R against ischemia/reperfusion injury is mediated by the suppression of immune and inflammatory responses. Rat models of middle cerebral artery occlusion were intraperitoneally injected with physiological saline, the AT2R agonist CGP42112 (1 mg/kg per day) or antagonist PD123319 (1 mg/kg per day). In the CGP42112 group, AT2R expression increased, the infarct area decreased, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α expression decreased, and interleukin-10 expression increased compared with the saline group. Antagonisin AT2R using PD123319 produced the opposite effects. These results indicate that AT2R activation suppresses immune and inflammatory responses, and protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27630693

  4. Effect of dietary fiber on the level of free angiotensin II receptor blocker in vitro.

    PubMed

    Iwazaki, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Tamezane, Yui; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakagawa, Minami; Imai, Kimie; Nakanishi, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs), such as losartan potassium (LO), candesartan (CA), and telmisartan (TE), and dietary fiber was studied as to the level of free ARB in vitro. When ARB was incubated with soluble (sodium alginate, pectin, and glucomannan) or insoluble (cellulose and chitosan) dietary fiber, the levels of free LO, TE, and CA decreased. This resulted only from mixing the dietary fiber with the ARBs and differed among the types of dietary fiber, and the pH and electrolytes in the mixture. The levels of free LO and TE tended to decrease with a higher concentration of sodium chloride in pH 1.2 fluid. These results suggest that it is important to pay attention to the possible interactions between ARBs and dietary fiber.

  5. Effect of Lysyl Oxidase Inhibition on Angiotensin II-Induced Arterial Hypertension, Remodeling, and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Eberson, Lance S.; Sanchez, Pablo A.; Majeed, Beenish A.; Tawinwung, Supannikar; Secomb, Timothy W.; Larson, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces altered vascular stiffness through responses including both structural and material remodeling. Concurrent with remodeling is the induction of the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) through which ECM proteins are cross-linked. The study objective was to determine the effect of LOX mediated cross-linking on vascular mechanical properties. Three-month old mice were chronically treated with Ang II with or without the LOX blocker, β -aminopropionitrile (BAPN), for 14 days. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) from Doppler measurements of the aortic flow wave was used to quantify in vivo vascular stiffness in terms of an effective Young’s modulus. The increase in effective Young’s modulus with Ang II administration was abolished with the addition of BAPN, suggesting that the material properties are a major controlling element in vascular stiffness. BAPN inhibited the Ang II induced collagen cross-link formation by 2-fold and PWV by 44% (P<0.05). Consistent with this observation, morphometric analysis showed that BAPN did not affect the Ang II mediated increase in medial thickness but significantly reduced the adventitial thickness. Since the hypertensive state contributes to the measured in vivo PWV stiffness, we removed the Ang II infusion pumps on Day 14 and achieved normal arterial blood pressures. With pump removal we observed a decrease of the PWV in the Ang II group to 25% above that of the control values (P=0.002), with a complete return to control values in the Ang II plus BAPN group. In conclusion, we have shown that the increase in vascular stiffness with 14 day Ang II administration results from a combination of hypertension-induced wall strain, adventitial wall thickening and Ang II mediated LOX ECM cross-linking, which is a major material source of vascular stiffening, and that the increased PWV was significantly inhibited with co-administration of BAPN. PMID:25875748

  6. [Angiotensin II inhibitors for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension].

    PubMed

    Brunner, H R; Gavras, H

    1976-12-11

    Specific antagonists of the renin angiotensin system have been used to investigate the role of this hormonal system in blood pressure homeostasis and in different types of experimental and clinical hypertension. Using this approach it was possible to show that renin via angiotensin participates actively in blood pressure maintenace, particularly following sodium depletion. Such antagonists, if available for oral administration and taken together with a diuretic, would be useful therapeutically.

  7. Potassium Supplementation Prevents Sodium Chloride Cotransporter Stimulation During Angiotensin II Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Veiras, Luciana C; Han, Jiyang; Ralph, Donna L; McDonough, Alicia A

    2016-10-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) hypertension increases distal tubule Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) abundance and phosphorylation (NCCp), as well as epithelial Na(+) channel abundance and activating cleavage. Acutely raising plasma [K(+)] by infusion or ingestion provokes a rapid decrease in NCCp that drives a compensatory kaliuresis. The first aim tested whether acutely raising plasma [K(+)] with a single 3-hour 2% potassium meal would lower NCCp in Sprague-Dawley rats after 14 days of AngII (400 ng/kg per minute). The potassium-rich meal neither decreased NCCp nor increased K(+) excretion. AngII-infused rats exhibited lower plasma [K(+)] versus controls (3.6±0.2 versus 4.5±0.1 mmol/L; P<0.05), suggesting that AngII-mediated epithelial Na(+) channel activation provokes K(+) depletion. The second aim tested whether doubling dietary potassium intake from 1% (A1K) to 2% (A2K) would prevent K(+) depletion during AngII infusion and, thus, prevent NCC accumulation. A2K-fed rats exhibited normal plasma [K(+)] and 2-fold higher K(+) excretion and plasma [aldosterone] versus A1K. In A1K rats, NCC, NCCpS71, and NCCpT53 abundance increased 1.5- to 3-fold versus controls (P<0.05). The rise in NCC and NCCp abundance was prevented in the A2K rats, yet blood pressure did not significantly decrease. Epithelial Na(+) channel subunit abundance and cleavage increased 1.5- to 3-fold in both A1K and A2K; ROMK (renal outer medulla K(+) channel abundance) abundance was unaffected by AngII or dietary K(+) In summary, the accumulation and phosphorylation of NCC seen during chronic AngII infusion hypertension is likely secondary to potassium deficiency driven by epithelial Na(+) channel stimulation. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. SIRT1 inhibits angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Huina; Chen, Houzao; Zheng, Wei; Lv, Xiang; Xu, Tingting; Wei, Yusheng; Liu, Depei; Liang, Chihchuan

    2011-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy as a critical event in the development of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Sirtuin (SIRT) 1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dependent deacetylase, has been demonstrated to exert protective effects in atherosclerosis by promoting endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and reducing macrophage foam cell formation, but its role in VSMC hypertrophy remains unknown. In this study, we tried to investigate the effect of SIRT1 on Ang II-induced VSMC hypertrophy. Results showed that adenoviral-mediated over-expression of SIRT1 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced VSMC hypertrophy, while knockdown of SIRT1 by RNAi resulted in an increased [(3)H]-leucine incorporation of VSMC. Accordingly, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression induced by Ang II was inhibited by SIRT1 in VSMCs. SIRT1 activator resveratrol decreased, whereas endogenous SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide increased Nox1 expression in A7r5 VSMCs. Furthermore, transcription factor GATA-6 was involved in the down-regulation of Nox1 expression by SIRT1. These results provide new insight into SIRT1's anti-atherogenic properties by suppressing Ang II-induced VSMC hypertrophy.

  9. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit platelet adhesion and aggregation by nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Leszek; Matys, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Buczko, Włodzimierz; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the process of nitric oxide (NO) release from platelets after stimulation with different angiotensin II type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonists and its effect on platelet adhesion and aggregation. Angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets was compared with that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by using a highly sensitive porphyrinic microsensor. In vitro and ex vivo effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on platelet adhesion to collagen and thromboxane A2 analog U46619-induced aggregation were evaluated. Losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan alone caused NO release from platelets and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.01 to 100 micro mol/L, which was attenuated by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists had more than 70% greater potency in NO release in platelets than in endothelial cells. The degree of inhibition of platelet adhesion (collagen-stimulated) and aggregation (U46619-stimulated) elicited by losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan, either in vitro or ex vivo, closely correlated with the NO levels produced by each of these drugs alone. The inhibiting effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on collagen-stimulated adhesion and U46619-stimulated aggregation of platelets were significantly reduced by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Neither the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319, the cyclooxygenase synthase inhibitor indomethacin, nor the selective thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist SQ29,548 had any effect on angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets and endothelial cells. The presented studies clearly indicate a crucial role of NO in the arterial antithrombotic effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists.

  10. Additional antihypertensive effect of magnesium supplementation with an angiotensin II receptor blocker in hypomagnesemic rats

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kyubok; Kim, Tae Hee; Kim, Yeong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Magnesium (Mg) is an essential element for vascular function and blood pressure regulation. Several studies have demonstrated that Mg concentration is inversely associated with blood pressure, and that Mg supplementation attenuates hypertension. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary Mg supplementation on the blood pressure effects of an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) in hypomagnesemic rats. Methods Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into Mg-deficient (n = 30), normal diet plus Mg (n = 10), and control groups (n = 10). Mg-free, high-Mg, and normal-Mg diets were respectively fed to the rats. After 14 weeks, 10 of the 30 Mg-deficient rats were treated with Mg, 10 Mg-deficient rats received an ARB, and 10 Mg-deficient rats received an ARB plus Mg for 4 weeks. Results Systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in the Mg-deficient rats than in the control rats at week 14. Hypomagnesemic rats exhibited decreased systolic blood pressure after treatment with Mg, and systolic blood pressure showed a greater decrease after ARB treatment. Treatment with the ARB/Mg combination resulted in the greatest decrease in systolic blood pressure. Mg deficiency did not affect the serum angiotensin II level, but did increase the serum aldosterone concentration. Concomitant Mg/ARB supplementation significantly decreased the elevated serum aldosterone level in hypomagnesemic rats. Kidney tissues of the hypomagnesemic rats revealed mild to moderate inflammatory infiltrates. Mg and/or ARB treatment did not reverse the inflammatory reaction in the kidneys of hypomagnesemic rats. Conclusions Concurrent dietary Mg supplementation can enhance ARB-induced blood pressure reduction in rats with hypomagnesemic hypertension. PMID:23526071

  11. Angiotensin II stimulates expression of the chemokine RANTES in rat glomerular endothelial cells. Role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, G; Ziyadeh, F N; Thaiss, F; Tomaszewski, J; Caron, R J; Wenzel, U; Zahner, G; Helmchen, U; Stahl, R A

    1997-01-01

    Glomerular influx of monocytes/macrophages (M/M) occurs in many immune- and non-immune-mediated renal diseases. The mechanisms targeting M/M into the glomerulus are incompletely understood, but may involve stimulated expression of chemokines. We investigated whether angiotensin II (ANG II) induces the chemokine RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells of the rat and in vivo. ANG II stimulated mRNA and protein expression of RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells. The ANG II-induced RANTES protein was chemotactic for human monocytes. Surprisingly, the ANG II-stimulated RANTES expression was transduced by AT2 receptors because the AT2 receptor antagonists PD 123177 and CGP-42112A, but not an AT1 receptor blocker, abolished the induced RANTES synthesis. Intraperitoneal infusion of ANG II (500 ng/h) into naive rats for 4 d significantly stimulated glomerular RANTES mRNA and protein expression compared with solvent-infused controls. Immunohistochemistry revealed induction of RANTES protein mainly in glomerular endothelial cells and small capillaries. Moreover, ANG II- infused animals exhibited an increase in glomerular ED-1- positive cells compared with controls. Oral treatment with PD 123177 (50 mg/liter drinking water) attenuated the glomerular M/M influx without normalizing the slightly elevated systolic blood pressure caused by ANG II infusion, suggesting that the effects on blood pressure and RANTES induction can be separated. We conclude that the vasoactive peptide ANG II may play an important role in glomerular chemotaxis of M/M through local induction of the chemokine RANTES. The observation that the ANG II- mediated induction of RANTES is transduced by AT2 receptors may influence the decision as to which substances might be used for the therapeutic interference with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:9276721

  12. Angiotensin II Stimulates H+-ATPase Activity in Intercalated Cells from Isolated Mouse Connecting Tubules and Cortical Collecting Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Carsten A.; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Uhlig, Ulrike; Giebisch, Gerhard H.; Breton, Sylvie; Brown, Dennis; Geibel, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Intercalated cells in the collecting duct system express V-type H+-ATPases which participate in acid extrusion, bicarbonate secretion, and chloride absorption depending on the specific subtype. The activity of H+-ATPases is regulated by acid-base status and several hormones, including angiotensin II and aldosterone. Angiotensin II stimulates chloride absorption mediated by pendrin in type B intercalated cells and this process is energized by the activity of H+-ATPases. Moreover, angiotensin II stimulates bicarbonate secretion by the connecting tubule (CNT) and early cortical collecting duct (CCD). In the present study we examined the effect of angiotensin II (10 nM) on H+-ATPase activity and localization in isolated mouse connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Angiotensin II stimulated Na+-independent intracellular pH recovery about 2-3 fold, and this was abolished by the specific H+-ATPase inhibitor concanamycin. The effect of angiotensin II was mediated through type 1 angiotensin II receptors (AT1-receptors) because it could be blocked by saralasin. Stimulation of H+-ATPase activity required an intact microtubular network - it was completely inhibited by colchicine. Immunocytochemistry of isolated CNT/CCDs incubated in vitro with angiotensin II suggests enhanced membrane associated staining of H+-ATPases in pendrin expressing intercalated cells. In summary, angiotensin II stimulates H+-ATPases in CNT/CCD intercalated cells, and may contribute to the regulation of chloride absorption and bicarbonate secretion in this nephron segment. PMID:22116365

  13. Running Exercise and Angiotensin II Type I Receptor Blocker Telmisartan Are Equally Effective in Preventing Angiotensin II-Mediated Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Maxime; Szostak, Justyna; Bouzourène, Karima; Aubert, Jean-François; Berthelot, Alain; Nussberger, Jürg; Laurant, Pascal; Mazzolai, Lucia

    2016-05-30

    The present study was conducted to directly compare the efficacy of running exercise and telmisartan treatment on angiotensin (Ang) II-mediated atherosclerosis and plaque vulnerability. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice with Ang II-mediated atherosclerosis (2-kidney, 1-clip [2K1C] renovascular hypertension model) were randomized into 3 groups: treadmill running exercise (RUN), telmisartan treatment (TEL), and sedentary untreated controls (SED) for 5 weeks. Atherosclerosis was assessed using histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Gene expression was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. TEL but not RUN mice significantly decreased (50%) atherosclerotic lesion size compared to SED. RUN and TEL promoted plaque stabilization to a similar degree in ApoE(-/-) 2K1C mice. However, plaque composition and vascular inflammatory markers were differently affected: RUN decreased plaque macrophage infiltration (35%), whereas TEL reduced lipid core size (88%); RUN significantly increased aortic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, -δ, and -γ expression, whereas TEL significantly modulated T-helper 1/T-helper 2 (Th1/Th2) aortic response toward an anti-inflammatory state (decreased aortic interleukin [IL] 2 to IL-10 and IL-2 to IL-13 expression ratios). Plaque smooth muscle cell content was similarly increased (128% and 141%, respectively). Aortic AT1 and AT2 receptor expression as well as aortic CD11c/CD206 and IL-1β/IL-1ra expression ratios were not significantly modulated by either RUN or TEL. Running exercise and telmisartan treatment are equally effective in preventing Ang II-mediated plaque vulnerability but through distinct cellular and molecular mechanisms. Our findings further support the use of exercise training and selective AT1 receptor blocker therapies for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease prevention. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Increasing brain angiotensin converting enzyme 2 activity decreases anxiety-like behavior in male mice by activating central Mas receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; de Kloet, Annette D; Pati, Dipanwita; Hiller, Helmut; Smith, Justin A; Pioquinto, David J; Ludin, Jacob A; Oh, S Paul; Katovich, Michael J; Frazier, Charles J; Raizada, Mohan K; Krause, Eric G

    2016-06-01

    Over-activation of the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) inhibits RAS activity by converting angiotensin-II, the effector peptide of RAS, to angiotensin-(1-7), which activates the Mas receptor (MasR). Whether increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety by stimulating central MasR is unknown. To test the hypothesis that increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety-like behavior via central MasR stimulation, we generated male mice overexpressing ACE2 (ACE2 KI mice) and wild type littermate controls (WT). ACE2 KI mice explored the open arms of the elevated plus maze (EPM) significantly more than WT, suggesting increasing ACE2 activity is anxiolytic. Central delivery of diminazene aceturate, an ACE2 activator, to C57BL/6 mice also reduced anxiety-like behavior in the EPM, but centrally administering ACE2 KI mice A-779, a MasR antagonist, abolished their anxiolytic phenotype, suggesting that ACE2 reduces anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR. To identify the brain circuits mediating these effects, we measured Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, subsequent to EPM exposure and found that ACE2 KI mice had decreased Fos in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis but had increased Fos in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Within the BLA, we determined that ∼62% of GABAergic neurons contained MasR mRNA and expression of MasR mRNA was upregulated by ACE2 overexpression, suggesting that ACE2 may influence GABA neurotransmission within the BLA via MasR activation. Indeed, ACE2 overexpression was associated with increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (indicative of presynaptic release of GABA) onto BLA pyramidal neurons and central infusion of A-779 eliminated this effect. Collectively, these results suggest that ACE2 may reduce anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR that facilitate GABA release onto pyramidal neurons within the

  15. Measurement of Cardiac Angiotensin II by Immunoassays, HPLC-Chip/Mass Spectrometry, and Functional Assays.

    PubMed

    De Mello, Walmor C; Gerena, Yamil

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms related to the effect of angiotensin II, its level on cardiac tissues, as well as its overexpression represent an important aspect of cardiovascular pharmacology and pathology. Severe alterations of cardiac functions are induced by hypertension including activation of circulating and local cardiac renin angiotensin systems. In this chapter, we are providing the methods and materials necessary for further investigation of this important topic.

  16. Perioperative management of patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers: a quality improvement audit.

    PubMed

    Vijay, A; Grover, A; Coulson, T G; Myles, P S

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients continuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers on the day of surgery are more likely to have significant intraoperative hypotension, higher rates of postoperative acute kidney injury, and lower incidences of postoperative atrial fibrillation. However, many of these studies were prone to bias and confounding, and questions remain over the validity of these outcomes. This observational, before-and-after quality improvement audit aimed to assess the effect of withholding these medications on the morning of surgery. We recruited 323 participants, with 83 (26%) having their preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) withheld on the day of surgery. There were only very small Spearman rank-order correlations between time since last dose of these medications (rho -0.12, P=0.057) and intraoperative and recovery room intravenous fluid administration (rho -0.11, P=0.042). There was no statistically significant difference between the continued or withheld groups in vasopressor (metaraminol use 3.5 [1.5-8.3] mg versus 3.5 [1.5-8.5] mg, P=0.67) or intravenous fluid administration (1000 ml [800-1500] ml versus 1000 [800-1500] ml, P=0.096), nor rates of postoperative acute kidney injury (13% vs 18%, P=0.25) or atrial fibrillation (15% versus 18%, P=0.71). This audit found no significant differences in measured outcomes between the continued or withheld ACEi/ARB groups. This finding should be interpreted with caution due to the possibility of confounding and an insufficient sample size. However, as the finding is in contrast to many previous studies, future prospective randomised clinical trials are required to answer this important question.

  17. Sex differences in the drinking response to angiotensin II (AngII): Effect of body weight.

    PubMed

    Santollo, Jessica; Torregrossa, Ann-Marie; Daniels, Derek

    2017-07-01

    Sex differences in fluid intake stimulated by angiotensin II (AngII) have been reported, but the direction of the differences is inconsistent. To resolve these discrepancies, we measured water intake by male and female rats given AngII. Males drank more than females, but when intake was normalized to body weight, the sex difference was reversed. Weight-matched males and females, however, had no difference in intake. Using a linear mixed model analysis, we found that intake was influenced by weight, sex, and AngII dose. We used linear regression to disentangle these effects further. Comparison of regression coefficients revealed sex and weight differences at high doses of AngII. Specifically, after 100ng AngII, weight was a predictor of intake in males, but not in females. Next, we tested for differences in AngII-induced intake in male and females allowed to drink both water and saline. Again, males drank more water than females, but females showed a stronger preference for saline. Drinking microstructure analysis suggested that these differences were mediated by postingestive signals and more bottle switches by the females. Finally, we probed for differences in the expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system in the brains of males and females and found sex differences in several genes in discrete brain regions. These results provide new information to help understand key sex differences in ingestive behaviors, and highlight the need for additional research to understand baseline sex differences, particularly in light of the new NIH initiative to balance sex in biomedical research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Advanced Glycation End Products Activate a Chymase-Dependent Angiotensin II Generating Pathway in Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Vijay; Wang, Wansheng; Huang, Xiao Ru; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Truong, Luan D.; Lan, Hui Y

    2006-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin II is a key mediator of diabetes-related vascular disease. It is now recognized that in addition to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), chymase is an important alternative angiotensin II generating enzyme in hypertension and diabetes. However, the mechanism of induction of chymase in diabetes remains unknown. Methods and Results: Here we report that chymase is upregulated in coronary and renal arteries in patients with diabetes by immunohistochemistry. Upregulation of vascular chymase is associated with deposition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), increase in expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), and activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase. In vitro, AGEs can induce chymase expression and chymase-dependent angiotensin II generation in human vascular smooth muscle cells via the RAGE-ERK1/2 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. This is confirmed by blockade of AGE-induced vascular chymase expression with a neutralizing RAGE antibody and an inhibitor to ERK1/2, and by overexpression of the dominant negative-ERK1/2. Compared to ACE, chymase contributes to the majority of angiotensin II production (more than 70%, p<0.01) in response to AGEs. Further more, AGE-induced Angiotensin II production is blocked by the anti-RAGE antibody and by inhibition of ERK1/2 MAP kinase activities. Conclusions: Advanced glycation end products, a hallmark of diabetes, induce chymase via the RAGE-ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. Chymase initiates an important alternative angiotensin II generating pathway in diabetes and may play a critical role in diabetic vascular disease. PMID:16520412

  19. Central renin-angiotensin system activation and inflammation induced by high fat diet sensitize angiotensin II-elicited hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Baojian; Thunhorst, Robert L.; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Beltz, Terry G.; Felder, Robert B.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has been shown to promote renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity and inflammation in the brain and to be accompanied by increased sympathetic activity and blood pressure (BP). Our previous studies demonstrated that administration of a subpressor dose of angiotensin (Ang) II sensitizes subsequent Ang II-elicited hypertension. The present study tested whether high fat diet (HFD) feeding also sensitizes the Ang II-elicited hypertensive response and whether HFD-induced sensitization is mediated by an increase in RAS activity and inflammatory mechanisms in the brain. HFD did not increase baseline BP, but enhanced the hypertensive response to Ang II compared to a normal fat diet. The sensitization produced by the HFD was abolished by concomitant central infusions of either a tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline, an Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) blocker, irbesartan or an inhibitor of microglial activation, minocycline. Furthermore, central pretreatment with TNF-α mimicked the sensitizing action of a central subpressor dose of Ang II, whereas central pentoxifylline or minocycline abolished this Ang II-induced sensitization. RT-PCR analysis of lamina terminalis tissue indicated that HFD feeding, central TNF-α or a central subpressor dose of Ang II upregulated mRNA expression of several components of the RAS and proinflammatory cytokines, whereas inhibition of AT1-R and of inflammation reversed these changes. The results suggest that HFD-induced sensitization of Ang II-elicited hypertension is mediated by upregulation of the brain RAS and of central proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26573717

  20. Characterization of angiotensin II binding sites in African Green monkey uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, E.P.; Wright, J.W.; Harding, J.W.

    1985-01-14

    The observation that there are significant differences in the concentration, affinity, and specificity of both central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral angiotensin receptors among several different mammalian species, including the African Green monkey, led to the detailed analysis of /sup 125/I-angiotensin II binding in the uterus of the African Green monkey. The B/sub max/ for angiotensin receptors in uterine tissue from this species is 56.6 +/- 8.7 fmole per mg protein. The K/sub d/ for angiotensin II is .601 +/- .108 mM. The specificity of the receptor is similar to that reported for the uterus of the rat and dog. These results indicate that the angiotensin II receptors, although nearly absent from the CNS of the African Green monkey, are found in the uterus and are very similar to uterine receptors previously characterized in the rat and dog and support the use of these species as appropriate models for studying the biochemistry of angiotensin binding in the uterus. 25 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  1. Angiotensin-II Induced Hypertension and Renovascular Remodeling in TIMP2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    PUSHPAKUMAR, Sathnur; KUNDU, Sourav; PRYOR, Tyranny; GIVVIMANI, Srikanth; LEDERER, Eleanor; TYAGI, Suresh C.; SEN, Utpal

    2014-01-01

    Sustained hypertension induces renovascular remodeling by altering extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are Zn-dependent enzymes that regulate ECM turnover in concert with their inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, TIMPs. Increased MMP-2 & -9 have been implicated in hypertensive complications; however, the contribution of individual MMPs/TIMPs in renal remodeling has not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of TIMP2 deficiency and thus MMP-2 on Ang-II induced renal remodeling. C57BL/6J (WT) and TIMP2 knockout mice were infused with Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) at 250 ng. kg-1. min-1 for 4 weeks. Blood pressure was measured weekly and end-point laser Doppler flowmetry was done to assess cortical blood flow. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for collagen and elastin analyses. The activity of MMP-9, and -2 was determined by Gelatin zymography. Ang-II induced similar elevation in mean blood pressure in TIMP2-/- and WT mice. In TIMP2-/- mice, Ang-II treatment was associated with a greater reduction in renal cortical blood flow and barium angiography demonstrated decreased vascular density compared to Ang-II treated WT mice. Peri-glomerular and vascular collagen deposition was increased and elastin content was decreased causing increased wall-to-lumen ratio in TIMP2-/- mice compared to WT mice receiving Ang-II. Ang-II increased the expression and activity of MMP-9 predominantly in TIMP2-/- mice than in WT mice. These results suggest that TIMP2 deficiency exacerbates renovascular remodeling in agonist induced hypertension by a mechanism which may, in part, be attributed to increased activity of MMP-9. PMID:24077247

  2. Evidence for extracellular, but not intracellular, generation of angiotensin II in the rat adrenal zona glomerulosa

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, H.; Khosla, M.C.; Bumpus, M.; Husain, A. )

    1988-11-01

    Based on the observation that high levels of renin and angiotensin II (Ang II) are found in the adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG), it has been postulated that Ang II is formed intracellularly by the renin-converting enzyme cascade in this tissue. To test this hypothesis, the authors examined renin-angiotensin system components in subcellular fractions of the rat adrenal ZG. Renin activity and immunoreactive-Ang II (IR-Ang II) were observed in vesicular fractions but were not colocalized. In addition, angiotensinogen, angiotensin I, and converting enzyme were not observed in the renin or IR-Ang II-containing vesicular fractions. These data do not support the hypothesis that Ang II is formed intracellularly within the renin-containing vesicles of the ZG. Rather, since modulatable renin release from adrenal ZG slices was observed and renin activity was found in dense vesicular fractions (33-39% sucrose), it is likely that Ang II formation in the ZG is extracellular and initiated by the release of vesicular renin. In ZG lysomal fractions {sup 125}I-labeled Ang II was degraded to {sup 125}I-labeled des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II. Since Ang II antibodies do not recognize des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II, these finding explain why IR-Ang II in the ZG is due predominantly to Ang II and not to its C-terminal immunoreactive fragments.

  3. Angiotensin II and NADPH oxidase increase ADMA in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zaiming; Teerlink, Tom; Griendling, Kathy; Aslam, Shakil; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2010-09-01

    Asymmetrical dimethylarginine inhibits nitric oxide synthase, cationic amino acid transport, and endothelial function. Patients with cardiovascular risk factors often have endothelial dysfunction associated with increased plasma asymmetrical dimethylarginine and markers of reactive oxygen species. We tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species, generated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, enhance cellular asymmetrical dimethylarginine. Incubation of rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells with angiotensin II doubled the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase but decreased the activities of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase by 35% and of cationic amino acid transport by 20% and doubled cellular (but not medium) asymmetrical dimethylarginine concentrations (P<0.01). This was blocked by tempol or candesartan. Cells stably transfected with p22(phox) had a 50% decreased protein expression and activity of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase despite increased promoter activity and mRNA. The decreased DDAH protein expression and the increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine concentration in p22(phox)-transfected cells were prevented by proteosomal inhibition. These cells had enhanced protein arginine methylation, a 2-fold increased expression of protein arginine methyltransferase-3 (P<0.05) and a 30% reduction in cationic amino acid transport activity (P<0.05). Asymmetrical dimethylarginine was increased from 6+/-1 to 16+/-3 micromol/L (P<0.005) in p22(phox)-transfected cells. Thus, angiotensin II increased cellular asymmetrical dimethylarginine via type 1 receptors and reactive oxygen species. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase increased cellular asymmetrical dimethylarginine by increasing enzymes that generate it, enhancing the degradation of enzymes that metabolize it, and reducing its cellular transport. This could underlie increases in cellular asymmetrical dimethylarginine during

  4. Direct stimulation of angiotensin II type 2 receptor initiated after stroke ameliorates ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Min, Li-Juan; Mogi, Masaki; Tsukuda, Kana; Jing, Fei; Ohshima, Kousei; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-No, Harumi; Wang, Xiao-Li; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Bai, Hui-Yu; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2014-08-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability; however, meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of blood pressure-lowering drugs in acute stroke has shown no definite evidence of a beneficial effect on functional outcome. Accumulating evidence suggests that angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade with angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor stimulation could contribute to protection against ischemic brain damage. We examined the possibility that direct AT2 receptor stimulation by compound 21 (C21) initiated even after stroke can prevent ischemic brain damage. Stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, and the area of cerebral infarction was measured by magnetic resonant imaging. C21 (10 µg/kg/day) treatment was initiated immediately after MCA occlusion by intraperitoneal injection followed by treatment with C21 once daily. We observed that ischemic area was enlarged in a time dependent fashion and decreased on day 5 after MCA occlusion. Treatment with C21 initiated after MCA occlusion significantly reduced the ischemic area, with improvement of neurological deficit in a time-dependent manner without affecting blood pressure. The decrease of cerebral blood flow after MCA occlusion was also ameliorated by C21 treatment. Moreover, treatment with C21 significantly attenuated superoxide anion production and expression of proinflammatory cytokines, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and tumor necrosis factor α. Interestingly, C21 administration significantly decreased blood-brain barrier permeability and cerebral edema on the ischemic side. These results provide new evidence that direct AT2 receptor stimulation with C21 is a novel therapeutic approach to prevent ischemic brain damage after acute stroke. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. BLOCKADE OF BRAIN ANGIOTENSIN II AT1 RECEPTORS AMELIORATES STRESS, ANXIETY, BRAIN INFLAMMATION AND ISCHEMIA: THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    SAAVEDRA, Juan M.; SÁNCHEZ-LEMUS, Enrique; BENICKY, Julius

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Poor adaptation to stress, alterations in cerebrovascular function and excessive brain inflammation play critical roles in the pathophysiology of many psychiatric and neurological disorders such as major depression, schizophrenia, post traumatic stress disorder, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and traumatic brain injury. Treatment for these highly prevalent and devastating conditions is at present very limited and many times inefficient, and the search for novel therapeutic options is of major importance. Recently, attention has been focused on the role of a brain regulatory peptide, Angiotensin II, and in the translational value of the blockade of its physiological AT1 receptors. In addition to its well-known cardiovascular effects, Angiotensin II, through AT1 receptor stimulation, is a pleiotropic brain modulatory factor involved in the control of the reaction to stress, in the regulation of cerebrovascular flow and the response to inflammation. Excessive brain AT1 receptor activity is associated with exaggerated sympathetic and hormonal response to stress, vulnerability to cerebrovascular ischemia and brain inflammation, processes leading to neuronal injury. In animal models, inhibition of brain AT1 receptor activity with systemically administered Angiotensin II receptor blockers is neuroprotective; it reduces exaggerated stress responses and anxiety, prevents stress-induced gastric ulcerations, decreases vulnerability to ischemia and stroke, reverses chronic cerebrovascular inflammation, and reduces acute inflammatory responses produced by bacterial endotoxin. These effects protect neurons from injury and contribute to increase the lifespan. Angiotensin II receptor blockers are compounds with a good margin of safety widely used in the treatment of hypertension and their anti-inflammatory and vascular protective effects contribute to reduce renal and cardiovascular failure. Inhibition of brain AT1 receptors in humans is also neuroprotective

  6. [Biphasic effect of angiotensin II on conditioned reflectory reaction patterns in albino rats].

    PubMed

    Hecht, K; Hecht, T; Poppei, M; Treptow, K; Choinowski, S; Nitschkoff, S

    1975-01-01

    40 male albino rats were used to investigate the influence of one single i. v. dose of 10 ng/kg Angiotensin II upon established and stabilized conditional-reflectory response pattern (two-dimensional conditional-reflectory decision process and periodicities of conditional-reflectory processes). At normotonous blood-pressure values, Angiotensin II exerted a biphasic action on the conditional-reflectory response pattern. In the first phase of action (up to 30 min after injection) there prevailed centralnervous inhibition processes, while the second phase of action (30-70 min after injection) was marked by a general centralnervous excitation, which is reflected by extremely short times of response, and a pronounced sensitivity to optic, acoustic and tactile stimuli. The decision capacity of the animals was considerably reduced in both phases. The periodicities of conditional-reflectory processes (duration of periods in the minute range) are strongly disturbed in the first phase of action, and tend to normal in the second phase. Furthermore, Angiotensin II was found to have a selective, hierarchically ordered influence with regard to the duration and intensity of action. Thus, the information processing activity of the CNS underwent most pronounced changes. The centralnervous regulatory functions were less affected; the blood pressure regulation showed little and transient influence by Angiotensin II. In the discussion, the neurotropic and algogenic action of Angiotensin II, and the relation of the octapeptide effect with pathogenetic mechanisms of experimental neurotically induced hypertonia are dealt with.

  7. Cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Brett L; Sahan-Firat, Seyhan; Estes, Anne M; Das, Kanak; Farjana, Nasreen; Fang, Xiao R; Gonzalez, Frank J; Malik, Kafait U

    2010-10-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of cardiovascular diseases, and angiotensin II is one of the major components of the mechanisms that contribute to the development of hypertension. However, the precise mechanisms for the development of hypertension are unknown. Our recent study showing that angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell growth depends on cytochrome P450 1B1 led us to investigate its contribution to hypertension caused by this peptide. Angiotensin II was infused via miniosmotic pump into rats (150 ng/kg per minute) or mice (1000 μg/kg per day) for 13 days resulting in increased blood pressure, increased cardiac and vascular hypertrophy, increased vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictor agents, increased vascular reactive oxygen species production, and endothelial dysfunction in both species. The increase in blood pressure and associated pathophysiological changes were minimized by the cytochrome P450 1B1 inhibitor 2,3',4,5'-tetramethoxystilbene in both species and was markedly reduced in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. These data suggest that cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated pathophysiological changes. Moreover, 2,3',4,5'-tetramethoxystilbene, which prevents both cytochrome P450 1B1-dependent and -independent components of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and inhibits associated pathophysiological changes could be clinically useful in the treatment of hypertension and associated cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases.

  8. CYTOCHROME P450 1B1 CONTRIBUTES TO ANGIOTENSIN II-INDUCED HYPERTENSION AND ASSOCIATED PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Brett L.; Sahan-Firat, Seyhan; Estes, Anne M.; Das, Kanak; Farjana, Nasreen; Fang, Xiao R.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Malik, Kafait U.

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of cardiovascular diseases, and angiotensin II is one of the major components of the mechanisms that contribute to the development of hypertension. However, the precise mechanisms for the development of hypertension are unknown. Our recent study that angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell growth is dependent on cytochrome P450 1B1 led us to investigate its contribution to hypertension caused by this peptide. Angiotensin II was infused via miniosmotic pump into rats (150 ng/kg/min) or mice (1000 μg/kg/day) for 13 days resulting in increased blood pressure, increased cardiac and vascular hypertrophy, increased vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictor agents, increased reactive oxygen species production, and endothelial dysfunction in both species. The increase in blood pressure and associated pathophysiological changes were minimized by the cytochrome P450 1B1 inhibitor, 2,3′,4,5′-tetramethoxystilbene in both species and was markedly reduced in Cyp1b1-/- mice. These data suggest that cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated pathophysiological changes. Moreover, 2,3′,4,5′-tetramethoxystilbene which prevents both cytochrome P450 1B1-dependent and independent components of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and inhibits associated pathophysiological changes could be clinically useful in the treatment of hypertension and associated cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. PMID:20805442

  9. Oxidative stress-mediated effects of angiotensin II in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hairuo; Gwathmey, Judith K; Xie, Lai-Hua

    2012-08-23

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), an endogenous peptide hormone, plays critical roles in the pathophysiological modulation of cardiovascular functions. Ang II is the principle effector of the renin-angiotensin system for maintaining homeostasis in the cardiovascular system, as well as a potent stimulator of NAD(P)H oxidase, which is the major source and primary trigger for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in various tissues. Recent accumulating evidence has demonstrated the importance of oxidative stress in Ang II-induced heart diseases. Here, we review the recent progress in the study on oxidative stress-mediated effects of Ang II in the cardiovascular system. In particular, the involvement of Ang II-induced ROS generation in arrhythmias, cell death/heart failure, ischemia/reperfusion injury, cardiac hypertrophy and hypertension are discussed. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is an important molecule linking Ang II, ROS and cardiovascular pathological conditions.

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of novel angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists as anti-hypertension drugs.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaolu; Zhu, Weibo; Zhang, Ruijing; Wen, Caihong; Wang, Li; Yan, Yijia; Tang, Hesheng; Chen, Zhilong

    2016-05-01

    Three new angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists, 1, 2 and 3 were designed, synthesized and evaluated. The AT1 receptor-binding assays in vitro showed that all the synthesized compounds had nanomolar affinity for the AT1 receptor. From which compound 3 was found to be the most potent ligands with an IC50 value of 2.67±0.23 nM. Biological evaluation in vivo revealed that all the compounds could cause significant decrease on MBP in a dose dependent manner in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and compound 3 especially showed an efficient and long-lasting effect in reducing blood pressure, whose maximal response lowered 41 mmHg of MBP at 10mg/kg and 62 mmHg at 15 mg/kg after oral administration, the significant anti-hypertensive effect lasted beyond 12 h, which is better than the reference compound losartan. The pharmacokinetic experiments showed that compound 3 could be absorbed efficiently and metabolized smoothly both in blood and in tissues in Wistar rats. The acute toxicity assay suggested that it has low toxicity with the LD50 value of 2974.35 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that compound 3 is a potent angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist which could be considered as a novel anti-hypertension candidate and deserved for further investigation.

  11. Angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan attenuates aortic stiffening and remodelling in STZ-diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevention or attenuation of diabetic vascular complications includes anti-hypertensive treatment with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors on account of their protective effects beyond blood pressure reduction. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), on blood pressure, aortic stiffening, and aortic remodelling in experimental type 1 diabetes in rats. Methods Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) (65 mg/kg) in male Wistar rats. One diabetic group was treated for 10 weeks with telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day p/o). Pressure-independent aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured under anaesthesia after intravenous infusion of phenylephrine and nitroglycerine. Aortic wall samples were collected for histomorphometrical analysis. Results Untreated diabetes imposed differential effects on aortic stiffening, as demonstrated by increased isobaric PWV over a range of high blood pressures, but not at lower blood pressures. This was associated with loss and disruption of elastin fibres and an increase in collagen fibres in the aortic media. Treatment with telmisartan decreased resting blood pressure, reduced aortic stiffness, and partially prevented the degradation of elastin network within the aortic wall. Conclusions Telmisartan improved the structural and functional indices of aortic stiffening induced by untreated STZ-diabetes, demonstrating the importance of ARBs in the therapeutic approach to diabetic vascular complications. PMID:24920962

  12. Calpain-10 Activity Underlies Angiotensin II-Induced Aldosterone Production in an Adrenal Glomerulosa Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Seremwe, Mutsa; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone is a steroid hormone important in the regulation of blood pressure. Aberrant production of aldosterone results in the development and progression of diseases including hypertension and congestive heart failure; therefore, a complete understanding of aldosterone production is important for developing more effective treatments. Angiotensin II (AngII) regulates steroidogenesis, in part through its ability to increase intracellular calcium levels. Calcium can activate calpains, proteases classified as typical or atypical based on the presence or absence of penta-EF-hands, which are involved in various cellular responses. We hypothesized that calpain, in particular calpain-10, is activated by AngII in adrenal glomerulosa cells and underlies aldosterone production. Our studies showed that pan-calpain inhibitors reduced AngII-induced aldosterone production in 2 adrenal glomerulosa cell models, primary bovine zona glomerulosa and human adrenocortical carcinoma (HAC15) cells, as well as CYP11B2 expression in the HAC15 cells. Although AngII induced calpain activation in these cells, typical calpain inhibitors had no effect on AngII-elicited aldosterone production, suggesting a lack of involvement of classical calpains in this process. However, an inhibitor of the atypical calpain, calpain-10, decreased AngII-induced aldosterone production. Consistent with this result, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of calpain-10 inhibited aldosterone production and CYP11B2 expression, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of calpain-10 resulted in increased AngII-induced aldosterone production. Our results indicate that AngII-induced activation of calpain-10 in glomerulosa cells underlies aldosterone production and identify calpain-10 or its downstream pathways as potential targets for the development of drug therapies for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:25836666

  13. Renal protection in chronic kidney disease: hypoxia-inducible factor activation vs. angiotensin II blockade

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Aihua; Arndt, Mary Ann K.; Satriano, Joseph; Singh, Prabhleen; Rieg, Timo; Thomson, Scott; Tang, Tong

    2010-01-01

    The 5/6th nephrectomy or ablation/infarction (A/I) preparation has been used as a classic model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We observed increased kidney oxygen consumption (QO2) and altered renal hemodynamics in the A/I kidney that were normalized after combined angiotensin II (ANG II) blockade. Studies suggest hypoxia inducible factor as a protective influence in A/I. We induced hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and HIF target proteins by two different methods, cobalt chloride (CoCl2) and dimethyloxalyglycine (DMOG), for the first week after creation of A/I and compared the metabolic and renal hemodynamic outcomes to combined ANG II blockade. We also examined the HIF target proteins expressed by using Western blots and real-time PCR. Treatment with DMOG, CoCl2, and ANG II blockade normalized kidney oxygen consumption factored by Na reabsorption and increased both renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. At 1 wk, CoCl2 and DMOG increased kidney expression of HIF by Western blot. In the untreated A/I kidney, VEGF, heme oxygenase-1, and GLUT1 were all modestly increased. Both ANG II blockade and CoCl2 therapy increased VEGF and GLUT1 but the cobalt markedly so. ANG II blockade decreased heme oxygenase-1 expression while CoCl2 increased it. By real-time PCR, erythropoietin and GLUT1 were only increased by CoCl2 therapy. Cell proliferation was modestly increased by ANG II blockade but markedly after cobalt therapy. Metabolic and hemodynamic abnormalities were corrected equally by ANG II blockade and HIF therapies. However, the molecular patterns differed significantly between ANG II blockade and cobalt therapy. HIF induction may prove to be protective in this model of CKD. PMID:20881034

  14. Nitrosonifedipine ameliorates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling via antioxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Takumi; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Imanishi, Masaki; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Fujii, Shoko; Tominaga, Erika; Tsuneishi, Teppei; Horinouchi, Yuya; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Tomita, Shuhei; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Minakuchi, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Nifedipine is unstable under light and decomposes to a stable nitroso analog, nitrosonifedipine (NO-NIF). The ability of NO-NIF to block calcium channels is quite weak compared with that of nifedipine. Recently, we have demonstrated that NO-NIF reacts with unsaturated fatty acid leading to generate NO-NIF radical, which acquires radical scavenging activity. However, the effects of NO-NIF on the pathogenesis related with oxidative stress, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of NO-NIF on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular remodeling. Ang II-induced thickening and fibrosis of aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF in mice. NO-NIF decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the aorta and urinary 8-hydroxy-20-deoxyguanosine. Ang II-stimulated mRNA expressions of p22(phox), CD68, F4/80, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and collagen I in the aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF. Moreover, NO-NIF inhibited Ang II-induced cell migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). NO-NIF reduced Ang II-induced ROS to the control level detected by dihydroethidium staining and lucigenin chemiluminescence assay in VSMCs. NO-NIF suppressed phosphorylations of Akt and epidermal growth factor receptor induced by Ang II. However, NO-NIF had no effects on intracellular Ca(2+) increase and protein kinase C-δ phosphorylation induced by Ang II in VSMCs. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra indicated the continuous generation of NO-NIF radical of reaction with cultured VSMCs. These findings suggest that NO-NIF improves Ang II-induced vascular remodeling via the attenuation of oxidative stress.

  15. Humid heat exposure induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes through the angiotensin II signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowu; Yuan, Binbin; Dong, Wenpeng; Yang, Bo; Yang, Yongchao; Lin, Xi; Gong, Gu

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to humid heat stress leads to the initiation of serious physiological dysfunction that may result in heat-related diseases, including heat stroke, heat cramp, heat exhaustion, and even death. Increasing evidences have shown that the humid heat stress-induced dysfunction of the cardiovascular system was accompanied with severe cardiomyocyte injury; however, the precise mechanism of heat stress-induced injury of cardiomyocyte remains unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that humid heat stress promoted oxidative stress through the activation of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiomyocytes. To test our hypothesis, we established mouse models of humid heat stress. Using the animal models, we found that Ang II levels in serum were significantly up-regulated and that the Ang II receptor AT1 was increased in cardiomyocytes. The antioxidant ability in plasma and heart tissues which was detected by the ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay was also decreased with the increased ROS production under humid heat stress, as was the expression of antioxidant genes (SOD2, HO-1, GPx). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Ang II receptor antagonist, valsartan, effectively relieved oxidative stress, blocked Ang II signaling pathway and suppressed cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by humid heat stress. In addition, overexpression of antioxidant genes reversed cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by Ang II. Overall, these results implied that humid heat stress increased oxidative stress and caused apoptosis of cardiomyocytes through the Ang II signaling pathway. Thus, targeting the Ang II signaling pathway may provide a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases caused by humid heat stress.

  16. Safflor yellow B suppresses angiotensin II-mediated human umbilical vein cell injury via regulation of Bcl-2/p22{sup phox} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chaoyun; He, Yanhao; Yang, Ming; Sun, Hongliu; Zhang, Shuping; Wang, Chunhua

    2013-11-15

    Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are derived from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Angiotensin II (Ang II) can cause endothelial dysfunction by promoting intracellular ROS generation. Safflor yellow B (SYB) effectively inhibits ROS generation by upregulating Bcl-2 expression. In this study, we examined the effects of SYB on Ang II-induced injury to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and elucidated the roles of NADPH oxidase and Bcl-2. We treated cultured HUVECs with Ang II, SYB, and Bcl-2 siRNA, and determined NADPH oxidase activity and ROS levels. Furthermore, cellular and mitochondrial physiological states were evaluated, and the expression levels of target proteins were analyzed. Ang II significantly enhanced intracellular ROS levels, caused mitochondrial membrane dysfunction, and decreased cell viability, leading to apoptosis. This was associated with increased expression of AT1R and p22{sup phox}, increased NADPH oxidase activity, and an increased ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, leading to decreases in antioxidant enzyme activities, which were further strengthened after blocking Bcl-2. Compared to Ang II treatment alone, co-treatment with SYB significantly reversed HUVEC injury. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SYB could significantly protect endothelial cells from Ang II-induced cell damage, and that it does so by upregulating Bcl-2 expression and inhibiting ROS generation. - Highlights: • Angiotensin II depresses mitochondria physiological function. • Angiotensin II activates NADPH oxidase via up-regulating expresion of p22{sup phox}. • Bcl-2 plays a pivotal role in improving mitochondria function and regulates ROS level. • Inhibitor of Bcl-2 promotes angiotensin II mediated HUVEC injury. • SYB attenuates angiotensin II mediated HUVEC injury via up regulating Bcl-2 expression.

  17. Enhanced angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and systemic reactivity to angiotensin II in normotensive rats exposed to a high-sodium diet

    PubMed Central

    Crestani, Sandra; Júnior, Arquimedes Gasparotto; Marques, Maria C.A.; Sullivan, Jennifer C.; Webb, R. Clinton; da Silva-Santos, J. Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    A high salt diet is associated with reduced activity of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). However, normotensive rats exposed to high sodium do not show changes in systemic arterial pressure. We hypothesized that, despite the reduced circulating amounts of angiotensin II induced by a high salt diet, the cardiovascular system’s reactivity to angiotensin II is increased in vivo, contributing to maintain arterial pressure at normal levels. Male Wistar rats received chow containing 0.27% (control), 2%, 4%, or 8% NaCl for six weeks. The high-sodium diet did not lead to changes in arterial pressure, although plasma levels of angiotensin II and aldosterone were reduced in the 4% and 8% NaCl groups. The 4% and 8% NaCl groups showed enhanced pressor responses to angiotensin I and II, accompanied by unchanged and increased angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, respectively. The 4% NaCl group showed increased expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptors and reduced expression of angiotensin II type 2 receptors in the aorta. In addition, the hypotensive effect of losartan was reduced in both 4% and 8% NaCl groups. In conclusion these results explain, at least in part, why the systemic arterial pressure is maintained at normal levels in non-salt sensitive and healthy rats exposed to a high salt diet, when the functionality of RAAS appears to be blunted, as well as suggest that angiotensin II has a crucial role in the vascular dysfunction associated with high salt intake, even in the absence of hypertension. PMID:24321189

  18. Interleukin-17A Regulates Renal Sodium Transporters and Renal Injury in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Norlander, Allison E; Saleh, Mohamed A; Kamat, Nikhil V; Ko, Benjamin; Gnecco, Juan; Zhu, Linjue; Dale, Bethany L; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Hoover, Robert S; McDonough, Alicia A; Madhur, Meena S

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin II-induced hypertension is associated with an increase in T-cell production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A). Recently, we reported that IL-17A(-/-) mice exhibit blunted hypertension, preserved natriuresis in response to a saline challenge, and decreased renal sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 expression after 2 weeks of angiotensin II infusion compared with wild-type mice. In the current study, we performed renal transporter profiling in mice deficient in IL-17A or the related isoform, IL-17F, after 4 weeks of Ang II infusion, the time when the blood pressure reduction in IL-17A(-/-) mice is most prominent. Deficiency of IL-17A abolished the activation of distal tubule transporters, specifically the sodium-chloride cotransporter and the epithelial sodium channel and protected mice from glomerular and tubular injury. In human proximal tubule (HK-2) cells, IL-17A increased sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 expression through a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1-dependent pathway. In mouse distal convoluted tubule cells, IL-17A increased sodium-chloride cotransporter activity in a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1/Nedd4-2-dependent pathway. In both cell types, acute treatment with IL-17A induced phosphorylation of serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 at serine 78, and treatment with a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 inhibitor blocked the effects of IL-17A on sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 and sodium-chloride cotransporter. Interestingly, both HK-2 and mouse distal convoluted tubule 15 cells produce endogenous IL-17A. IL17F had little or no effect on blood pressure or renal sodium transporter abundance. These studies provide a mechanistic link by which IL-17A modulates renal sodium transport and suggest that IL-17A inhibition may improve renal function in hypertension and other autoimmune disorders. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Renoprotective effect of contemporary blocking of angiotensin II and endothelin-1 in rats with membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Benigni, A; Corna, D; Maffi, R; Benedetti, G; Zoja, C; Remuzzi, G

    1998-08-01

    We previously showed that chronic administration of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor to rats with passive Heymann nephritis (PHN), a model of membranous nephropathy with proteinuria and increased renal synthesis of endothelin-1 (ET-1), reduces urinary proteins and partially limits the exaggerated ET-1 renal synthesis. Here we compared the effect of an ETA receptor antagonist and an ACE-inhibitor given as single therapies with a combination of the two drugs in uninephrectomized PHN rats. PHN was induced with a single i.v. injection of rabbit anti-Fx1A antibody in 40 male Sprague Dawley rats. To accelerate the onset of renal damage rats underwent uninephrectomy seven days later and were subsequently treated until eight months with the ETA receptor antagonist LU-135252 (50 mg/kg b.i.d. p.o.) or the ACE-inhibitor trandolapril (1 mg/kg in the drinking water) or the combination of the two drugs. Either LU-135252 or trandolapril given alone prevented the increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Combined therapy was even more effective than single drugs. While LU-135252 and trandolapril reduced proteinuria by 23 to 25%, the drug combination resulted in 45% lowering of urinary proteins. Serum creatinine was significantly decreased by the combination, but not by the single drugs. Glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage were more reduced by combined therapy than by LU-135252 or trandolapril alone. These data suggest that contemporary blocking angiotensin II (Ang II) and ET-1 in an accelerated model of PHN had an additive renoprotective effect than single blocking Ang II or ET-1 and would represent a therapeutic advantage for renal disease patients who do not completely respond to ACE inhibitors.

  20. Properties of angiotensin II receptors in glial cells from the adult corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Matute, C; Pulakat, L; Río, C; Valcárcel, C; Miledi, R

    1994-01-01

    The existence and the properties of angiotensin II receptors in the adult bovine and human corpus callosum (CC) were investigated by using Xenopus oocytes and primary glial cell cultures. In oocytes injected with CC mRNA, angiotensin II elicited oscillatory Cl- currents due to activation of the inositol phosphate/Ca(2+)-receptor-channel coupling system. The receptors expressed in oocytes and in CC cultures were pharmacologically similar to the AT1 receptor type as assayed by binding. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization studies in sections from CC and in glial cultures revealed that the receptors were molecularly related to the AT1 receptor and that they were present in astrocytes. In these cells, activation of the receptors with angiotensin II increased de novo DNA synthesis, promoted the release of aldosterone, and induced c-Fos expression. These findings indicate that CC astrocytes possess functional AT1 receptors that participate in various physiological processes. Images PMID:8170986

  1. Effect of des-aspartate-angiotensin I on the actions of angiotensin II in the isolated renal and mesenteric vasculature of hypertensive and STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dharmani, M; Mustafa, M R; Achike, F I; Sim, M K

    2005-07-15

    The present study investigated the action of des-aspartate-angiotensin I (DAA-I) on the pressor action of angiotensin II in the renal and mesenteric vasculature of WKY, SHR and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Angiotensin II-induced a dose-dependent pressor response in the renal vasculature. Compared to the WKY, the pressor response was enhanced in the SHR and reduced in the STZ-induced diabetic rat. DAA-I attenuated the angiotensin II pressor action in renal vasculature of WKY and SHR. The attenuation was observed for DAA-I concentration as low as 10(-18) M and was more prominent in SHR. However, the ability of DAA-I to reduce angiotensin II response was lost in the STZ-induced diabetic kidney. Instead, enhancement of angiotensin II pressor response was seen at the lower doses of the octapeptide. The effect of DAA-I was not inhibited by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist, and indomethacin, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor in both WKY and SHR, indicating that its action was not mediated by angiotensin AT2 receptor and prostaglandins. The pressor responses to angiotensin II in mesenteric vascular bed were also dose-dependent but smaller in magnitude compared to the renal vasculature. The responses were significantly smaller in SHR but no significant difference was observed between STZ-induced diabetic and WKY rat. Similarly, PD123319 and indomethacin had no effect on the action of DAA-I. The findings reiterate a regulatory role for DAA-I in vascular bed of the kidney and mesentery. By being active at circulating level, DAA-I subserves a physiological role. This function appears to be present in animals with diseased state of hypertension and diabetes. It is likely that DAA-I functions are modified to accommodate the ongoing vascular remodeling.

  2. Protective effect of angiotensin II-induced increase in nitric oxide in the renal medullary circulation.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Wu, F; Cowley, A W

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effect of intravenous infusion of subpressor doses of angiotensin (Ang II) on renal medullary blood flow (MBF), medullary partial oxygen pressure (PO2), and nitric oxide (NO) concentration under normal conditions and during reduction of the medullary nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in anesthetized rats. With laser Doppler flowmetry and polarographic measurement of PO2 with microelectrodes, Ang II (5 ng/kg per minute) did not alter renal cortical and medullary blood flows or medullary PO2. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) was infused into the renal medullary interstitial space at a dose of 1.4 microg/kg per minute, a dose that did not significantly alter basal levels of MBF or PO2. Intravenous infusion of Ang II at the same dose in the presence of L-NAME decreased MBF by 23% and medullary PO2 by 28%, but it had no effect on cortical blood flow or arterial blood pressure. An in vivo microdialysis-oxyhemoglobin NO trapping technique was used in other rats to determine tissue NO concentrations using the same protocol. Ang II infusion increased tissue NO concentrations by 85% in the renal cortex and 150% in the renal medulla. Renal medullary interstitial infusion of L-NAME (1.4 microg/kg per minute) reduced medullary NO concentrations and substantially blocked Ang II-induced increases in NO concentrations in the renal medulla, but not in the renal cortex. Tissue slices of the renal cortex and medulla were studied to determine the effects of Ang II and L-NAME on the nitrite/nitrate production. Ang II stimulated the nitrite/nitrate production predominately in the renal medulla, which was significantly attenuated by L-NAME. We conclude that small elevations of circulating Ang II levels increase medullary NO production and concentrations, which plays an important role in buffering the vasoconstrictor effects of this peptide and in maintaining a constancy of MBF.

  3. The antifibrotic agent pirfenidone inhibits angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Takanori; Yamashita, Naoto; Izumi, Yasukatsu; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Shiota, Masayuki; Hanatani, Akihisa; Shimada, Kenei; Muro, Takashi; Iwao, Hiroshi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Pirfenidone (5-methyl-1-phenyl-2-[(1)H]-pyridone) is an effective drug for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia that can prevent and reverse tissue fibrosis in several organs. Therefore, we investigated whether pirfenidone has a potential role in preventing angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. A cardiac hypertrophic mouse model was created using an Ang II infusion (200 ng kg(-1) min(-1)) in wild-type mice for 2 weeks. Mice were divided into the following three groups: a saline-infused (control) group, an Ang II infusion (vehicle) group and an Ang II infusion+pirfenidone-treated (PFD) group, which received pirfenidone (300 mg kg(-1) per day) by gastric gavage during the Ang II infusion. At 2 weeks, we assessed hemodynamics and cardiac function and investigated tissue fibrosis of the myocardium histologically and genetically. Blood pressure in the vehicle group was significantly increased compared to the control group. Although blood pressure was not different between the vehicle and PFD groups, heart weight was significantly decreased in the PFD group. Echocardiography revealed that left ventricular hypertrophy was significantly increased in the vehicle group vs. the control group. Interestingly, pirfenidone significantly inhibited this effect. Continuous infusion of Ang II increased the perivascular and interstitial tissue fibrosis, and pirfenidone inhibited these fibrotic changes. Pirfenidone also inhibited Ang II-induced hypertrophy. In the vehicle group, the mRNA expressions of atrial natriuretic peptide, brain natriuretic peptide and transforming growth factor-β1 were increased, which was significantly inhibited by pirfenidone. Furthermore, the expression of mineralocorticoid receptors was attenuated by pirfenidone. These results indicate that pirfenidone might be effective as an antifibrotic drug in the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy induced by hypertension.

  4. Angiotensin II limits NO production by upregulating arginase through a p38 MAPK - ATF-2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shatanawi, Alia; Lemtalsi, Tahira; Yao, Lin; Patel, Chintan; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Caldwell, R. William

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced vascular arginase activity can impair endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by decreasing L-arginine availability to endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase, thereby reducing NO production and uncoupling NOS function. Elevated angiotensin II (Ang II) is a key component of endothelial dysfunction in many cardiovascular diseases and has been linked to elevated arginase activity. In this study we explored the signaling pathway leading to increased arginase expression/activity in response to Ang II in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Our previous studies indicate involvement of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) in Ang II-induced arginase upregulation and reduced NO production. In this study, we further investigated the Ang II-transcriptional regulation of arginase 1 in endothelial cells. Our results indicate the involvement of ATF-2 transcription factor of the AP1 family in arginase 1 upregulation and in limiting NO production. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting ATF-2, we showed that this transcription factor is required for Ang II-induced arginase 1 gene upregulation and increased arginase 1 expression and activity, leading to reduced NO production. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay further confirmed the involvement of ATF-2. Moreover, our data indicate that p38 MAPK phosphorylates ATF-2 in response to Ang II. Collectively, our results indicate that Ang II increases endothelial arginase activity/expression through a p38 MAPK/ATF-2 pathway leading to reduced endothelial NO production. These signaling steps might be therapeutic targets for preventing vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with elevated arginase activity/expression. PMID:25446432

  5. Brain-Mediated Dysregulation of the Bone Marrow Activity in Angiotensin II-induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Joo Yun; Zubcevic, Jasenka; Qi, Yanfei; Afzal, Aqeela; Carvajal, Jessica Marulanda; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S; Grant, Maria B.; Mocco, J; Raizada, Mohan K

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the brain is implicated in increased sympathetic drive, inflammatory status and vascular dysfunctions, associated with development and establishment of hypertension. However, little is known about the mechanism of this impaired brain-vascular communication. Here, we tested the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress in the brain cardioregulatory areas, such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, is driven by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and leads to increased inflammatory cells (ICs) and decreased/dysfunctional endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), thereby compromising vasculature repair and accelerating hypertension. Chronic angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion resulted in elevated blood pressure and sympathetic vasomotor drive, decreased spontaneous baroreflex gain, and increased microglia activation in the PVN. This was associated with 46% decrease in BM EPCs and 250% increase in BM ICs, resulting in 5 fold decrease of EPCs/ICs ratio in the BM. Treatment with mitoTEMPO, a scavenger of mitochondrial O2−• intracerebroventricularly but not subcutaneously, attenuated Ang II-induced hypertension, decreased activation of microglia in the PVN, and normalized EPCs/ICs. This functional communication between the brain and BM was confirmed by retrograde neuronal labeling from the BM with GFP-tagged pseudorabies virus (PRV). Administration of GFP-PRV into the BM resulted in predominant labeling of PVN neurons within 3 days, with some fluorescence in the NTS, RVLM and SFO. Taken together, these data demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial ROS attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension and corrects the imbalance in EPCs/ICs in the BM. They suggest that an imbalance in vascular reparative and ICs may perpetuate vascular pathophysiology in this model of hypertension. PMID:23045460

  6. Role of Jagged1-Hey1 Signal in Angiotensin II-induced Impairment of Myocardial Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ai-Li; He, Tao; Shao, Yi-Bing; Chi, Yi-Fan; Dai, Hong-Yan; Wang, Yan; Xu, Li; Yang, Xuan; Ding, Hua-Min; Cai, Shang-Lang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a major contributor to the development of heart failure. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie this process remain elusive. Inadequate angiogenesis in the myocardium leads to a transition from cardiac hypertrophy to dysfunction, and our previous study showed that Ang II significantly impaired the angiogenesis response. The current study was designed to examine the role of Jagged1-Notch signaling in the effect of Ang II during impaired angiogenesis and cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Ang II was subcutaneously infused into 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice at a dose of 200 ng·kg−1·min−1 for 2 weeks using Alzet micro-osmotic pumps. N-[N-(3, 5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine tert-butyl ester (DAPT), a γ-secretase inhibitor, was injected subcutaneously during Ang II infusion at a dose of 10.0 mg·kg−1·d−1. Forty mice were divided into four groups (n = 10 per group): control group; Ang II group, treated with Ang II; DAPT group, treated with DAPT; and Ang II + DAPT group, treated with both Ang II and DAPT. At the end of experiments, myocardial (left ventricle [LV]) tissue from each experimental group was evaluated using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance test followed by the least significant difference method or independent samples t-test. Results: Ang II treatment significantly induced cardiac hypertrophy and impaired the angiogenesis response compared to controls, as shown by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemistry for CD31, a vascular marker (P < 0.05 for both). Meanwhile, Jagged1 protein was significantly increased, but gene expression for both Jag1 and Hey1 was decreased in the LV following Ang II treatment, compared to that in controls (relative ratio for Jag1 gene: 0.45 ± 0.13 vs. 0.84 ± 0.15; relative ratio for Hey1 gene: 0.51 ± 0.08 vs. 0.91 ± 0.09; P < 0

  7. Role of inflammation in the development of renal damage and dysfunction in Angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tang-Dong; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Yun-He; Shesely, Edward G.; Cavasin, Maria A.; Kuziel, William A.; Pagano, Patrick J.; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2008-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension is associated with an inflammatory response that may contribute to development of target organ damage. We tested the hypothesis that in Angiotensin II-induced hypertension, CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) activation plays an important role in development of renal fibrosis, damage and dysfunction by causing: a) oxidative stress, b) macrophage infiltration, and c) cell proliferation. To test this hypothesis we used CCR2 knockout mice (CCR2−/−). The natural ligand of CCR2 is monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a chemokine important for macrophage recruitment and activation. CCR2−/− and age-matched wild-type (CCR2+/+) C57BL/6J mice were infused continuously with either Ang II (5.2 ng/10 g/min) or vehicle via osmotic mini-pumps for 2 or 4 weeks. Ang II infusion caused similar increases in systolic blood pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy in both strains of mice. However, in CCR2−/− mice with Ang II-induced hypertension, oxidative stress, macrophage infiltration, albuminuria and renal damage were significantly decreased and glomerular filtration rate was significantly higher than in CCR2+/+ mice. We concluded that in Ang II-induced hypertension, CCR2 activation plays an important role in development of hypertensive nephropathy via increased oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:18541733

  8. pK(a) determination of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA II) by spectrofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, E; González, L; Alonso, R M; Jiménez, R M

    2001-10-01

    The acid-base equilibrium constants of a new family of antihypertensive drugs, the angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA II), Losartan, Irbesartan, Valsartan, Candesartan cilexetil, its metabolite Candesartan M1 and Telmisartan were determined by spectrofluorimetry. Relative fluorescent intensity (I(F,rel))-pH data were treated by graphical (derivatives and curve-fitting) and numerical methods (LETAGROP SPEFO). The resultant pK(a) values at an ionic strength of 0.5 M were (3.15+/-0.07) for Losartan, (4.70+/-0.06) for Irbesartan, (4.90+/-0.09) for Valsartan, (6.0+/-0.1) for Candesartan cilexetil, (3.9+/-0.1) for Candesartan M1, and (4.45+/-0.09) for Telmisartan.

  9. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition ameliorates angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and renal vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Manuel; Sivritas, Sema H; Mergia, Evanthia; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Yang, Guang; Hering, Lydia; Grave, Katharina; Hoch, Henning; Rump, Lars C; Stegbauer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Changes in renal hemodynamics have a major impact on blood pressure (BP). Angiotensin (Ang) II has been shown to induce vascular dysfunction by interacting with phosphodiesterase (PDE)1 and PDE5. The predominant PDE isoform responsible for renal vascular dysfunction in hypertension is unknown. Here, we measured the effects of PDE5 (sildenafil) or PDE1 (vinpocetine) inhibition on renal blood flow (RBF), BP, and renal vascular function in normotensive and hypertensive mice. During acute short-term Ang II infusion, sildenafil decreased BP and increased RBF in C57BL/6 (WT) mice. In contrast, vinpocetine showed no effect on RBF and BP. Additionally, renal cGMP levels were significantly increased after acute sildenafil but not after vinpocetine infusion, indicating a predominant role of PDE5 in renal vasculature. Furthermore, chronic Ang II infusion (500 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) increased BP and led to impaired NO-dependent vasodilation in kidneys of WT mice. Additional treatment with sildenafil (100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) attenuated Ang II-dependent hypertension and improved NO-mediated vasodilation. During chronic Ang II infusion, urinary nitrite excretion, a marker for renal NO generation, was increased in WT mice, whereas renal cGMP generation was decreased and restored after sildenafil treatment, suggesting a preserved cGMP signaling after PDE5 inhibition. To investigate the dependency of PDE5 effects on NO/cGMP signaling, we next analyzed eNOS-KO mice, a mouse model characterized by low vascular NO/cGMP levels. In eNOS-KO mice, chronic Ang II infusion increased BP but did not impair NO-mediated vasodilation. Moreover, sildenafil did not influence BP or vascular function in eNOS-KO mice. These results highlight PDE5 as a key regulator of renal hemodynamics in hypertension. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Impaired endothelial function and microvascular asymmetrical dimethylarginine in angiotensin II-infused rats: effects of tempol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Luo, Zaiming; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jose, Pedro A; Falck, John R; Welch, William J; Aslam, Shakil; Teerlink, Tom; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II causes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular risk. We investigated the hypothesis that Ang II increases microvascular reactive oxygen species and asymmetrical dimethylarginine and switches endothelial function from vasodilator to vasoconstrictor pathways. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent responses of mesenteric resistance arterioles were assessed in a myograph and vascular NO and reactive oxygen species by fluorescent probes in groups (n=6) of male rats infused for 14 days with Ang II (200 ng/kg per minute) or given a sham infusion. Additional groups of Ang or sham-infused rats were given oral Tempol (2 mmol · L(-1)). Ang II infusion increased mean blood pressure (119±5 versus 89±7 mm Hg; P<0.005) and plasma malondialdehyde (0.57±0.02 versus 0.37±0.05 μmol · L(-1); P<0.035) and decreased maximal endothelium-dependent relaxation (18±5% versus 54±6%; P<0.005) and hyperpolarizing (19±3% versus 29±3%; P<0.05) responses and NO activity (0.9±0.1 versus 1.6±0.2 U; P<0.01) yet enhanced endothelium-dependent contraction responses (23±5% versus 5±5%; P<0.05) and reactive oxygen species production (0.82±0.05 versus 0.15±0.03 U; P<0.01). Ang II decreased the expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2 and increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine in vessels (450±50 versus 260±35 pmol/mg of protein; P<0.01) but not plasma. Tempol prevented any significant changes with Ang II. In conclusion, Ang redirected endothelial responses from relaxation to contraction, reduced vascular NO, and increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine. These effects were dependent on reactive oxygen species and could, therefore, be targeted with effective antioxidant therapy.

  11. Increased Angiotensin II Sensitivity Contributes to Microvascular Dysfunction in Women Who Have Had Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Jandu, Sandeep; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Alexander, Lacy M

    2017-08-01

    Women who have had preeclampsia have increased cardiovascular disease risk; however, the mechanism(s) responsible for this association remain unclear. Microvascular damage sustained during a preeclamptic pregnancy may persist postpartum. The putative mechanisms mediating this dysfunction include a reduction in NO-dependent dilation and an increased sensitivity to angiotensin II. In this study, we evaluated endothelium-dependent dilation, angiotensin II sensitivity, and the therapeutic effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade (losartan) on endothelium-dependent dilation in vivo in the microvasculature of women with a history of preeclampsia (n=12) and control women who had a healthy pregnancy (n=12). We hypothesized that preeclampsia would have (1) reduced endothelium-dependent dilation, (2) reduced NO-mediated dilation, and (3) increased sensitivity to angiotensin II. We further hypothesized that localized losartan would increase endothelium-dependent vasodilation in preeclampsia. We assessed microvascular endothelium-dependent vasodilator function by measurement of cutaneous vascular conductance responses to graded infusion of acetylcholine (acetylcholine; 10(-7)-102 mmol/L) and a standardized local heating protocol in control sites and sites treated with 15 mmol/L L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester; NO-synthase inhibitor) or 43 µmol/L losartan. Further, we assessed microvascular vasoconstrictor sensitivity to angiotensin II (10(-20)-10(-4) mol/L). Preeclampsia had significantly reduced endothelium-dependent dilation (-0.3±0.5 versus -1.0±0.4 logEC50; P<0.001) and NO-dependent dilation (16±3% versus 39±6%; P=0.006). Preeclampsia also had augmented vasoconstrictor sensitivity to angiotensin II (-10.2±1.3 versus -8.3±0.5; P=0.006). Angiotensin II type I receptor inhibition augmented endothelium-dependent vasodilation and NO-dependent dilation in preeclampsia but had no effect in healthy pregnancy. These data suggest that women who have had

  12. Measurement and characterization of angiotensin peptides in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, K.; Ganten, D.; Unger, T.; Bayer, C.; Lang, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    We report a method for the extraction of angiotensin peptides from plasma with a mixture of acetone, 1 mol/L HCl, and water (40/1/5 by vol). The method is highly reproducible for the measurement of angiotensin I and angiotensin II in small sample volumes, with analytical recoveries of about 80% for both peptides. We investigated the influence of sample handling and found a standard procedure for blood collection, plasma preparation, and extraction was essential. The method was used to measure angiotensin I and II in rat and human plasma. In rat plasma, the mean (+/- SEM) concentrations of angiotensin I and angiotensin II were determined to be 67 (+/- 8) and 14 (+/- 1) pmol/L (n = 10), respectively. Neither angiotensin I nor angiotensin II was detectable 24 h after bilateral nephrectomy. Acute oral administration of the converting-enzyme inhibitor ramipril caused a significant increase of angiotensin I from 85 (+/- 6) to 257 (+/- 33) pmol/L (n = 10; P less than 0.001) and a significant decrease of angiotensin II from 12 (+/- 1) to 7 (+/- 0.4) pmol/L in rat plasma (n = 9; P less than 0.001). In human plasma, angiotensin I and angiotensin II values of 21 (+/- 1) and 6.6 (+/- 0.5) pmol/L (n = 10) were found. A single oral dose of the diuretic furosemide increased angiotensin I significantly from 21 (+/- 1) to 32 (+/- 1.7) pmol/L (n = 5); P less than 0.001), whereas angiotensin II remained unchanged, 6.6 (+/- 0.5) vs 6.4 (+/- 0.4) pmol/L (n = 5). Extracted peptides could be identified as (IIe5)-angiotensin I and (IIe5)-angiotensin II by HPLC in combination with specific radioimmunoassays for angiotensin I and angiotensin II.

  13. Gene polymorphisms of angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II type 1 receptor among chronic kidney disease patients in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Su, Sui-Lung; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Lee, Pong-Ying; Yang, Hsin-Yi; Kao, Sen-Yeong

    2012-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent in Taiwan and an increasing number of patients are affected, with a high risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and huge medical expenses. It has been predicted that the presence of hypertension increases with decreasing renal function due to a decrease in sodium excretion and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of genetic variants of the RAS gene on CKD. We performed a case control association study and genotyped 135 CKD patients and 270 healthy controls among Han Chinese in Taiwan. All subjects were genotyped for angiotensinogen (AGT-M235T, T174M, A-20C), angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE-A2350G) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1-A1166C, C573T, C-521T) polymorphisms of RAS genes by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Significant associations were observed in ACE-A2350G and AGTR1-C573T polymorphism between CKD patients and controls. In regard to ACE-A2350G, compared with the AA genotype the GG genotype protected against CKD (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.34; p = 0.01). In regard to AGTR1-C573T, the CT genotype was a risk for CKD compared with the CC genotype (adjusted OR = 1.82; p = 0.03). We conclude that ACE-A2350G and AGTR1-C573T polymorphisms are likely candidate determinants of CKD.

  14. Effect of angiotensin II and small GTPase Ras signaling pathway inhibition on early renal changes in a murine model of obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Peña, Ana B; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Docherty, Neil G; Arévalo, Miguel; Grande, María T; Eleno, Nélida; Pérez-Barriocanal, Fernando; López-Novoa, José M

    2014-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a major feature of chronic kidney disease. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in rodents leads to the development of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis consistent with histopathological changes observed in advanced chronic kidney disease in humans. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of inhibiting angiotensin II receptors or Ras activation on early renal fibrotic changes induced by UUO. Animals either received angiotensin II or underwent UUO. UUO animals received either losartan, atorvastatin, and farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI) L-744,832, or chaetomellic acid A (ChA). Levels of activated Ras, phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-Akt, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin were subsequently quantified in renal tissue by ELISA, Western blot, and/or immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that administration of angiotensin II induces activation of the small GTPase Ras/Erk/Akt signaling system, suggesting an involvement of angiotensin II in the early obstruction-induced activation of renal Ras. Furthermore, upstream inhibition of Ras signalling by blocking either angiotensin AT1 type receptor or by inhibiting Ras prenylation (atorvastatin, FTI o ChA) reduced the activation of the Ras/Erk/Akt signaling system and decreased the early fibrotic response in the obstructed kidney. This study points out that pharmacological inhibition of Ras activation may hold promise as a future strategy in the prevention of renal fibrosis.

  15. Effect of Angiotensin II and Small GTPase Ras Signaling Pathway Inhibition on Early Renal Changes in a Murine Model of Obstructive Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Peña, Ana B.; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Docherty, Neil G.; Arévalo, Miguel; Grande, María T.; Eleno, Nélida; Pérez-Barriocanal, Fernando; López-Novoa, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a major feature of chronic kidney disease. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in rodents leads to the development of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis consistent with histopathological changes observed in advanced chronic kidney disease in humans. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of inhibiting angiotensin II receptors or Ras activation on early renal fibrotic changes induced by UUO. Animals either received angiotensin II or underwent UUO. UUO animals received either losartan, atorvastatin, and farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI) L-744,832, or chaetomellic acid A (ChA). Levels of activated Ras, phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-Akt, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin were subsequently quantified in renal tissue by ELISA, Western blot, and/or immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that administration of angiotensin II induces activation of the small GTPase Ras/Erk/Akt signaling system, suggesting an involvement of angiotensin II in the early obstruction-induced activation of renal Ras. Furthermore, upstream inhibition of Ras signalling by blocking either angiotensin AT1 type receptor or by inhibiting Ras prenylation (atorvastatin, FTI o ChA) reduced the activation of the Ras/Erk/Akt signaling system and decreased the early fibrotic response in the obstructed kidney. This study points out that pharmacological inhibition of Ras activation may hold promise as a future strategy in the prevention of renal fibrosis. PMID:25101263

  16. Effects of angiotensin II on the pericyte-containing microvasculature of the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Hajime; Kobayashi, Masato; Li, Qing; Yamanishi, Shigeki; Katsumura, Kozo; Minami, Masahiro; Wu, David M; Puro, Donald G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms by which angiotensin II alters the physiology of the pericyte-containing microvasculature of the retina. Despite evidence that this vasoactive signal regulates capillary perfusion by inducing abluminal pericytes to contract and thereby microvascular lumens to constrict, little is known about the events linking angiotensin exposure with pericyte contraction. Here, using microvessels freshly isolated from the adult rat retina, we monitored pericyte currents via perforated-patch pipettes, measured pericyte calcium levels with fura-2 and visualized pericyte contractions and lumen constrictions by time-lapse photography. We found that angiotensin activates nonspecific cation (NSC) and calcium-activated chloride channels; the opening of these channels induces a depolarization that is sufficient to activate the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) expressed in the retinal microvasculature. Associated with these changes in ion channel activity, intracellular calcium levels rise, pericytes contract and microvascular lumens narrow. Our experiments revealed that an influx of calcium through the NSC channels is an essential step linking the activation of AT1 angiotensin receptors with pericyte contraction. Although not required in order for angiotensin to induce pericytes to contract, calcium entry via VDCCs serves to enhance the contractile response of these cells. In addition to activating nonspecific cation, calcium-activated chloride and voltage-dependent calcium channels, angiotensin II also causes the functional uncoupling of pericytes from their microvascular neighbours. This inhibition of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication suggests a previously unappreciated complexity in the spatiotemporal dynamics of the microvascular response to angiotensin II. PMID:15486015

  17. Angiotensin II-induced dilated cardiomyopathy in Balb/c but not C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hongmei; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Carretero, Oscar A; Nakagawa, Pablo; D'Ambrosio, Martin; Leung, Pablo; Xu, Jiang; Peterson, Edward L; González, Germán E; Harding, Pamela; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine

    2011-08-01

    Balb/c mice, which are T-helper lymphocyte 2 (Th2) responders, are highly susceptible to infectious and non-infectious heart diseases, whereas C57BL/6 mice (Th1 responders) are not. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is not only a vasopressor but also a pro-inflammatory factor that leads to cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction. We hypothesized that Ang II exacerbates cardiac damage in Balb/c but not in C57BL/6 mice even though both strains have a similar level of hypertension. Twelve-week-old male C57BL/6J and Balb/c mice received either vehicle or Ang II (1.4 mg kg(-1) day(-1), s.c. via osmotic minipump) for 8 weeks. At baseline, Balb/c mice exhibited the following: (1) a lower heart rate; (2) an enlarged left ventricular chamber; (3) a lower ejection fraction and shortening fraction; and (4) twice the left ventricular collagen deposition of age-matched C57BL/6J mice. Angiotensin II raised systolic blood pressure (to ∼150 mmHg) and induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in a similar manner in both strains. While C57BL/6J mice developed compensatory concentric hypertrophy and fibrosis in response to Ang II, Balb/c mice demonstrated severe left ventricular chamber dilatation, wall thinning and fibrosis, leading to congestive heart failure as evidenced by dramatically decreased ejection fraction and lung congestion (significant increase in lung weight), which are both characteristic of dilated cardiomyopathy. Our study suggests that the Th phenotype plays an active role in cardiac remodelling and function both in basal conditions and in hypertension. Angiotensin II-induced dilated cardiomyopathy in Balb/c mice is an ideal animal model for studying the impact of the adaptive immune system on cardiac remodelling and function and for testing strategies to prevent or treat hypertension-associated heart failure.

  18. Metformin inhibits angiotensin II-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jian; Zhang, Na; Hua, Ying; Wang, Bingjian; Ling, Lin; Ferro, Albert; Xu, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts is a critical event in the progression of cardiac fibrosis that leads to pathological cardiac remodeling. Metformin, an antidiabetic agent, exhibits a number of cardioprotective properties. However, much less is known regarding the effect of metformin on cardiac fibroblast differentiation. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effect of metformin on angiotensin (Ang) II-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and its underlying mechanism. Adult rat cardiac fibroblasts were stimulated with Ang II (100 nM) in the presence or absence of metformin (10-200 µM). Ang II stimulation induced the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, as indicated by increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen types I and III, and this effect of Ang II was inhibited by pretreatment of cardiac fibroblasts with metformin. Metformin also decreased Ang II-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in cardiac fibroblasts via inhibiting the activation of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway. Further experiments using PKC inhibitor calphostin C and NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin confirmed that inhibition of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway markedly attenuated Ang II-induced ROS generation and myofibroblast differentiation. These data indicate that metformin inhibits Ang II-induced myofibroblast differentiation by suppressing ROS generation via the inhibition of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway in adult rat cardiac fibroblasts. Our results provide new mechanistic insights regarding the cardioprotective effects of metformin and provide an efficient therapeutic strategy to attenuate cardiac fibrosis.

  19. 19-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and isoniazid protect against angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Elkhatali, Samya; El-Sherbeni, Ahmed A; Elshenawy, Osama H; Abdelhamid, Ghada; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2015-12-15

    We have recently demonstrated that 19-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (19-HETE) is the major subterminal-HETE formed in the heart tissue, and its formation was decreased during cardiac hypertrophy. In the current study, we examined whether 19-HETE confers cardioprotection against angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. The effect of Ang II, with and without 19-HETE (20 μM), on the development of cellular hypertrophy in cardiomyocyte RL-14 cells was assessed by real-time PCR. Also, cardiac hypertrophy was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by Ang II, and the effect of increasing 19-HETE by isoniazid (INH; 200mg/kg/day) was assessed by heart weight and echocardiography. Also, alterations in cardiac cytochrome P450 (CYP) and their associated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites were determined by real-time PCR, Western blotting and liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry. Our results demonstrated that 19-HETE conferred a cardioprotective effect against Ang II-induced cellular hypertrophy in vitro, as indicated by the significant reduction in β/α-myosin heavy chain ratio. In vivo, INH improved heart dimensions, and reversed the increase in heart weight to tibia length ratio caused by Ang II. We found a significant increase in cardiac 19-HETE, as well as a significant reduction in AA and its metabolite, 20-HETE. In conclusion, 19-HETE, incubated with cardiomyocytes in vitro or induced in the heart by INH in vivo, provides cardioprotection against Ang II-induced hypertrophy. This further confirms the role of CYP, and their associated AA metabolites in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of angiotensin II-mediated AMPK inactivation on obesity-related salt-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Deji, Naoko; Kume, Shinji; Araki, Shin-ichi; Isshiki, Keiji; Araki, Hisazumi; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Tanaka, Yuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2012-02-17

    Salt-sensitive hypertension is a characteristic of the metabolic syndrome. Given the links to cardiovascular events, the mechanisms underlying sodium metabolism may represent an important therapeutic target for this disorder. Angiotensin II (AII) is a key peptide underlying sodium retention. However, 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has also been reported to participate in the regulation of ion transport. In this study we examined the relationship between AII and AMPK on the development of hypertension in two salt-sensitive mouse models. In the first model, the mice were maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks, in order to develop features similar to the metabolic syndrome, including salt-sensitive hypertension. HFD-induced obese mice showed elevated systolic blood pressure and lower sodium excretion in response to salt loading, along with an increase in AII contents and inactivation of AMPK in the kidney, which were significantly improved by the treatment of an angiotensin II antagonist, losartan, for 2 weeks. To clarify the effects of AII, a second group of mice was infused with AII via an osmotic pump, which led to higher systolic blood pressure, and decreases in urinary sodium excretion and the expression of AMPK, in a manner similar to those observed in the HFD mice. However, treatment with an AMPK activator, metformin, improved the changes induced by the AII, suggesting that AII induced sodium retention works by acting on AMPK activity. Finally, we evaluated the changes in salt-sensitivity by performing 2-week salt loading experiments with or without metformin. AII infusion elevated blood pressure by salt loading but metformin prevented it. These findings indicate that AII suppresses AMPK activity in the kidney, leading to sodium retention and enhanced salt-sensitivity, and that AMPK activation may represent a new therapeutic target for obesity-related salt-sensitive hypertension. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protective effects of coenzyme Q10 against angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Tokai, Emi; Suzuki, Takashi; Seki, Takayuki; Okubo, Kyosuke; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Koya, Sakuji; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2013-02-15

    Angiotensin II is the major effector in the renin-angiotensin system, and angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are profoundly implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an antioxidant reagent, coenzyme Q10, on angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to assess its potential usefulness for antioxidant therapy. Treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 (1-10μM) increased its intracellular levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Coenzyme Q10 (10μM) prevented the actions of angiotensin II (100nM): overproduction of reactive oxygen species, increases in expression of p22(phox) and Nox2 subunits of NADPH oxidase, and inhibition of insulin-induced nitric oxide production. In addition, coenzyme Q10 prevented angiotensin II-induced upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and inhibited their adhesion to U937 monocytic cells. Moreover, treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 effectively ameliorated angiotensin II-induced increases in expression of Nox2 subunit of NADPH oxidase, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. These results provide the first in vitro evidence that coenzyme Q10 is an efficient antioxidant reagent to improve angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, possibly relevant to the causes of cardiovascular disease.

  2. Sex differences in the development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Pamidimukkala, Jaya; Hay, Meredith

    2005-05-01

    Sex has an important influence on blood pressure (BP) regulation. There is increasing evidence that sex hormones interfere with the renin-angiotensin system. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine whether there are sex differences in the development of ANG II-induced hypertension in conscious male and female mice. We used telemetry implants to measure aortic BP and heart rate (HR) in conscious, freely moving animals. ANG II (800 ng.kg(-1).min(-1)) was delivered via an osmotic pump implanted subcutaneously. Our results showed baseline BP in male and female mice to be similar. Chronic systemic infusion of ANG II induced a greater increase in BP in male (35.1 +/- 5.7 mmHg) than in female mice (7.2 +/- 2.0 mmHg). Gonadectomy attenuated ANG II-induced hypertension in male mice (15.2 +/- 2.4 mmHg) and augmented it in female mice (23.1 +/- 1.0 mmHg). Baseline HR was significantly higher in females relative to males (630.1 +/- 7.9 vs. 544.8 +/- 16.2 beats/min). In females, ANG II infusion significantly decreased HR. However, the increase in BP with ANG II did not result in the expected decrease in HR in either intact male or gonadectomized mice. Moreover, the slope of the baroreflex bradycardia to phenylephrine was blunted in males (-5.6 +/- 0.3 to -2.9 +/- 0.5) but not in females (-6.5 +/- 0.5 to -5.6 +/- 0.3) during infusion of ANG II, suggesting that, in male mice, infusion of ANG II results in a resetting of the baroreflex control of HR. Ganglionic blockade resulted in greater reduction in BP on day 7 after ANG II infusion in males compared with females (-61.0 +/- 8.9 vs. -36.6 +/- 6.6 mmHg), suggesting an increased contribution of sympathetic nerve activity in arterial BP maintenance in male mice. Together, these data indicate that there are sex differences in the development of chronic ANG II-induced hypertension in conscious mice and that females may be protected from the increases in BP induced by ANG II.

  3. Candesartan cilexetil protects against loss of autoregulatory efficiency in angiotensin II-infused rats.

    PubMed

    Inscho, E W; Imig, J D; Deichmann, P C; Cook, A K

    1999-01-01

    Renal autoregulatory efficiency is compromised in angiotensin-II (AngII)-dependent Goldblatt hypertension. The current studies were performed to assess renal autoregulatory capability in AngII-infused hypertensive rats and to determine the effect of chronic candesartan cilexetil treatment on autoregulatory behavior. Rats received chronic infusion of AngII (60 ng/min) or vehicle via an osmotic minipump implanted subcutaneously in the dorsum of the neck. Selected rats received the novel AT1 receptor blocker candesartan cilexetil (1.0 mg/kg per d) in the drinking water. Systolic BP averaged 118+/-1 mmHg (n=34) before pump implantation. Chronic AngII infusion for 6 d increased arterial pressure to 151+/-4 mmHg. Candesartan cilexetil administration prevented the AngII-dependent increase in systolic BP. Microvascular autoregulation experiments were performed in vitro using the blood-perfused juxtamedullary nephron technique combined with videomicroscopy. Renal perfusion pressure was set at 100 mmHg during the control period before being decreased to 65 mmHg. Afferent arteriolar diameter was measured continuously as the perfusion pressure was increased from 65 mmHg to 170 mmHg in 15-mmHg increments. Afferent arteriolar diameter in sham-treated rats was 120% of control at a perfusion pressure of 65 mmHg and decreased to 76% of the control diameter at 170 mmHg (n=6). This behavior is consistent with normal autoregulatory behavior. Arterioles from rats receiving chronic infusion of AngII exhibited compromised renal microvascular autoregulatory efficiency. Afferent arteriolar diameter in AngII-treated kidneys varied from 103 to 100% (n=6) of the control diameter over the same pressure range of 65 to 170 mmHg. This blunting of autoregulatory behavior was prevented by AT1 receptor blockade. In animals receiving AngII + candesartan cilexetil, stepwise changes in perfusion pressure elicited changes in afferent arteriolar diameter between 120 and 84% after 6 d of treatment (n=6

  4. Elastase-2, an angiotensin II-generating enzyme, contributes to increased Ang II in resistance arteries of mice with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Becari, Christiane; Silva, Marcondes A B; Durand, Marina T; Prado, Cibele M; Oliveira, Eduardo B; Ribeiro, Mauricio S; Salgado, Helio C; Salgado, Maria Cristina O; Tostes, Rita C

    2017-02-21

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), whose generation largely depends on angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, mediates most of the renin-angiotensin-system effects. Elastase-2 (ELA-2), a chymotrypsin-serine protease elastase family member 2A, alternatively generates Ang II in rat arteries. Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to intense RAS activation, but mechanisms involved on Ang II-generation in resistance arteries are unknown. We hypothesized that ELA-2 contributes to vascular Ang II generation and to cardiac damage in mice submitted to MI. Concentration-effect curves to Ang I and Ang II were performed in mesenteric resistance arteries from male wild type (WT) and ELA-2 knockout (ELA-2KO) mice submitted to left anterior descending coronary artery ligation (myocardial infarction, MI). MI size was similar in WT (29.5 ± 9 %) and ELA-2KO (32 ± 4%) mice. Ejection fraction and fractional shortening after MI similarly decreased in both strains. However, MI decreased stroke volume and cardiac output in WT, but not in ELA-2KO mice. Ang I-induced contractions increased in WT mice submitted to MI (MI-WT) compared to Sham-WT mice. No differences were observed in Ang I reactivity between arteries from Sham-ELA-2KO and ELA-2KO submitted to MI (MI-ELA-2KO). Ang I contractions increased in arteries from MI-WT vs. MI-ELA-2KO mice. Chymostatin attenuated Ang I-induced vascular contractions in WT mice (P < 0.05), but did not affect Ang I responses in ELA-2KO arteries. These results provide the first evidence that ELA-2 contributes to increased Ang II formation in resistance arteries and modulates cardiac function after MI, implicating ELA-2 as a key player in ACE-independent dysregulation of the RAS.

  5. Protection of protease-activated receptor 2 mediated vasodilatation against angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Under conditions of cardiovascular dysfunction, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) agonists maintain vasodilatation activity, which has been attributed to increased cyclooxygenase-2, nitric oxide synthase and calcium-activated potassium channel (SK3.1) activities. Protease-activated receptor 2 agonist mediated vasodilatation is unknown under conditions of dysfunction caused by angiotensin II. The main purpose of our study was to determine whether PAR2-induced vasodilatation of resistance arteries was attenuated by prolonged angiotensin II treatment in mice. We compared the vasodilatation of resistance-type arteries (mesenteric) from angiotensin II-treated PAR2 wild-type mice (WT) induced by PAR2 agonist 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fly) to the responses obtained in controls (saline treatment). We also investigated arterial vasodilatation in angiotensin II-treated PAR2 deficient (PAR2-/-) mice. Results 2fly-induced relaxations of untreated arteries from angiotensin II-treated WT were not different than saline-treated WT. Treatment of arteries with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and SK3.1 inhibitor (L-NAME + TRAM-34) blocked 2fly in angiotensin II-treated WT. Protein and mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 were increased, and cyclooxygenase activity increased the sensitivity of arteries to 2fly in only angiotensin II-treated WT. These protective vasodilatation mechanisms were selective for 2fly compared with acetylcholine- and nitroprusside-induced relaxations which were attenuated by angiotensin II; PAR2-/- were protected against this attenuation of nitroprusside. Conclusions PAR2-mediated vasodilatation of resistance type arteries is protected against the negative effects of angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction in mice. In conditions of endothelial dysfunction, angiotensin II induction of cyclooxygenases increases sensitivity to PAR2 agonist and the preserved vasodilatation mechanism involves activation of SK3.1. PMID:21955547

  6. CCR2 mediates the uptake of bone marrow-derived fibroblast precursors in angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Lin, Song-Chang; Chen, Jiyuan; Miao, Yuanxin; Taffet, George E.; Entman, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II plays an important role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that bone marrow-derived fibroblast precursors are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Since bone marrow-derived fibroblast precursors express chemokine receptor, CCR2, we tested the hypothesis that CCR2 mediates the recruitment of fibroblast precursors into the heart, causing angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibrosis. Wild-type and CCR2 knockout mice were infused with angiotensin II at 1,500 ng·kg−1·min−1. Angiotensin II treatment resulted in elevated blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy that were not significantly different between wild-type and CCR2 knockout mice. Angiotensin II treatment of wild-type mice caused prominent cardiac fibrosis and accumulation of bone marrow-derived fibroblast precursors expressing the hematopoietic markers, CD34 and CD45, and the mesenchymal marker, collagen I. However, angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibrosis and accumulation of bone marrow-derived fibroblast precursors in the heart were abrogated in CCR2 knockout mice. Furthermore, angiotensin II treatment of wild-type mice increased the levels of collagen I, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin in the heart, whereas these changes were not observed in the heart of angiotensin II-treated CCR2 knockout mice. Functional studies revealed that the reduction of cardiac fibrosis led to an impairment of cardiac systolic function and left ventricular dilatation in angiotensin II-treated CCR2 knockout mice. Our data demonstrate that CCR2 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibrosis through regulation of bone marrow-derived fibroblast precursors. PMID:21572015

  7. Effects of angiotensin II and ionomycin on fluid and bicarbonate absorption in the rat proximal tubule

    SciTech Connect

    Chatsudthipong, V.; Chan, Y.L.

    1986-03-01

    Microperfusion of proximal convoluted tubule(PCT) and peritubular capillaries was performed to examine the effects of angiotensin II(Ang II) and ionomycin on fluid and bicarbonate absorption. Bicarbonate was determined by microcalorimetry and C-14 inulin was used as a volume marker. The rates of bicarbonate absorption (JHCO/sub 3/) was 143 peq/min x mm and fluid absorption(Jv) was 2.70 nl/min x mm, when PCT and capillary perfusate contained normal Ringer solution. Addition of Ang II (10/sup -6/M) to the capillary perfusate caused reductions of JHCO/sub 3/ and Jv by 35%. A similar effect was observed when ionomycin was added to the capillary perfusate. Ang II antagonist, (Sar/sup 1/, Ile/sup 8/)-Angiotensin II(10/sup -6/M), completely blocked the inhibitory effect of Ang II on Jv and JHCO/sub 3/. Removal of calcium from both luminal and capillary perfusate did not change the effect of Ang II on Jv and JHCO/sub 3/. Our results indicate that Ang II inhibits the sodium-hydrogen exchanger in the proximal tubule via interacting with angiotensin receptor. The mechanism of Ang II action may involve mobilization of intracellular calcium.

  8. Angiotensin II Facilitates Fibrogenic Effect of TGF-β1 through Enhancing the Down-Regulation of BAMBI Caused by LPS: A New Pro-Fibrotic Mechanism of Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-Lan; Zhao, Xu-Wen; Luo, Hai-Hua; Li, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II has progressively been considered to play an important role in the development of liver fibrosis, although the mechanism isn't fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible pro-fibrotic mechanism, by which angiotensin II would enhance the pro-fibrotic effect of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) through up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and enhancing down-regulation of TGF-β1 inhibitory pseudo-receptor—BAMBI caused by LPS in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Firstly, the synergistic effects of angiotensin II, TGF-β1 and LPS on collagen 1α production were confirmed in vitro by ELISA, in which angiotensin II, LPS and TGF-β1 were treated sequentially, and in vivo by immunofluorescence, in the experiments single or multiple intra-peritoneally implanted osmotic mini-pumps administrating angiotensin II or LPS combined with intra-peritoneal injections of TGF-β1 were used. We also found that only LPS and TGF-β1 weren't enough to induce obvious fibrogenesis without angiotensin II. Secondly, to identify the reason of why angiotensin II is so important, the minute level of TLR4 in activated HSCs - T6 and primary quiescent HSCs of rat, up-regulation of TLR4 by angiotensin II and blockage by different angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) blockers in HSCs were assayed by western blotting in vitro and immunofluorescence in vivo. Finally, BAMBI expression level, which is regulated by LPS-TLR4 pathway, was detected by qRT-PCR and results showed angiotensin II enhanced the down-regulation of BAMBI mRNA caused by LPS in vitro and in vivo, and TLR4 neutralization antibody blocked this interactive effect. These data demonstrated that angiotensin II enhances LPS-TLR4 pathway signaling and further down-regulates expression of BAMBI through up-regulation of TLR4, which results in facilitation of pro-fibrotic activity of TGF-β1. Angiotensin II, LPS and TGF-β1 act synergistically during hepatic fibrogenesis, showing

  9. Role of p47phox in Vascular Oxidative Stress and Hypertension Caused by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Landmesser, Ulf; Cai, Hua; Dikalov, Sergey; McCann, Louise; Hwang, Jinah; Jo, Hanjoong; Holland, Steven M.; Harrison, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension caused by angiotensin II is dependent on vascular superoxide (O2·–) production. The nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase is a major source of vascular O2·– and is activated by angiotensin II in vitro. However, its role in angiotensin II–induced hypertension in vivo is less clear. In the present studies, we used mice deficient in p47phox, a cytosolic subunit of the NADPH oxidase, to study the role of this enzyme system in vivo. In vivo, angiotensin II infusion (0.7 mg/kg per day for 7 days) increased systolic blood pressure from 105±2 to 151±6 mm Hg and increased vascular O2·– formation 2- to 3-fold in wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, in p47phox−/− mice the hypertensive response to angiotensin II infusion (122±4 mm Hg; P<0.05) was markedly blunted, and there was no increase of vascular O2·– production. In situ staining for O2·– using dihydroethidium revealed a marked increase of O2·–production in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells of angiotensin II–treated WT mice, but not in those of p47phox−/− mice. To directly examine the role of the NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial production of O2·–, endothelial cells from WT and p47phox−/− mice were cultured. Western blotting confirmed the absence of p47phox in p47phox−/− mice. Angiotensin II increased O2·– production in endothelial cells from WT mice, but not in those from p47phox−/− mice, as determined by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These results suggest a pivotal role of the NAD(P)H oxidase and its subunit p47phox in the vascular oxidant stress and the blood pressure response to angiotensin II in vivo. PMID:12364355

  10. Angiotensin II stimulates superoxide production by nitric oxide synthase in thick ascending limbs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Vicente, Agustin; Saikumar, Jagannath H; Massey, Katherine J; Hong, Nancy J; Dominici, Fernando P; Carretero, Oscar A; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2016-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) causes nitric oxide synthase (NOS) to become a source of superoxide (O2 (-)) via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent process in endothelial cells. Ang II stimulates both NO and O2 (-) production in thick ascending limbs. We hypothesized that Ang II causes O2 (-) production by NOS in thick ascending limbs via a PKC-dependent mechanism. NO production was measured in isolated rat thick ascending limbs using DAF-FM, whereas O2 (-) was measured in thick ascending limb suspensions using the lucigenin assay. Consistent stimulation of NO was observed with 1 nmol/L Ang II (P < 0.001; n = 9). This concentration of Ang II-stimulated O2 (-) production by 50% (1.77 ± 0.26 vs. 2.62 ± 0.36 relative lights units (RLU)/s/μg protein; P < 0.04; n = 5). In the presence of the NOS inhibitor L-NAME, Ang II-stimulated O2 (-) decreased from 2.02 ± 0.29 to 1.10 ± 0.11 RLU/s/μg protein (P < 0.01; n = 8). L-arginine alone did not change Ang II-stimulated O2 (-) (2.34 ± 0.22 vs. 2.29 ± 0.29 RLU/s/μg protein; n = 5). In the presence of Ang II plus the PKC α/β1 inhibitor Gö 6976, L-NAME had no effect on O2 (-) production (0.78 ± 0.23 vs. 0.62 ± 0.11 RLU/s/μg protein; n = 7). In the presence of Ang II plus apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, L-NAME did not change O2 (-) (0.59 ± 0.04 vs. 0.61 ± ×0.08 RLU/s/μg protein; n = 5). We conclude that: (1) Ang II causes NOS to produce O2 (-) in thick ascending limbs via a PKC- and NADPH oxidase-dependent process; and (2) the effect of Ang II is not due to limited substrate.

  11. Effects of angiotensin II type I receptor blocker losartan on orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Moura, Adriana Pedrosa; Montalvany-Antonucci, Carina Cristina; Taddei, Silvana Rodrigues de Albuquerque; Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins; Biguetti, Cláudia Cristina; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermayer; Ferreira, Anderson José; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Andrade, Ildeu

    2016-03-01

    Drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are widely used for treating hypertension, heart and kidney failure, and the harmful effects of diabetes. Components of the RAS have been identified in various organs, but little is known of their effects on bone remodeling. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the blockage of the RAS influences strain-induced bone remodeling in a model of orthodontic tooth movement. An orthodontic appliance was placed in C57BL6/J mice that were randomly divided into 2 groups: vehicle-treated mice (VH) and mice treated with losartan (an angiotensin II receptor blocker). Orthodontic tooth movement and the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells were determined by histopathologic analysis. The expression of mediators involved in bone remodeling was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Blood pressure was measured before and during the experimental period. Orthodontic tooth movement and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells were significantly reduced in the losartan group compared with the VH group. mRNA levels of osteoclast markers (RANK, RANKL, cathepsin K, and metalloproteinase 13) were lower in the losartan mice than in the VH group, whereas the expressions of osteoblast markers and negative regulators of bone resorption (periostin, dentin matrix protein, alkaline phosphatase, collagen 1A1, semaphorin 3A3, metalloproteinase 2, and osteoprotegerin) were higher in the VH group. Blockage of the RAS system decreases osteoclast differentiation and activity and, consequently, results in decreased strain-induced bone remodeling in orthodontic tooth movement. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct Activation of ENaC by Angiotensin II: Recent Advances and New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the principal effector of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). It initiates myriad processes in multiple organs integrated to increase circulating volume and elevate systemic blood pressure. In the kidney, Ang II stimulates renal tubular water and salt reabsorption causing antinatriuresis and antidiuresis. Activation of RAAS is known to enhance activity of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. In addition to its well described stimulatory actions on aldosterone secretion, Ang II is also capable to directly increase ENaC activity. In this brief review, we discuss recent findings about non-classical Ang II actions on ENaC and speculate about its relevance for renal sodium handling. PMID:23180052

  13. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers suppress the cell proliferation effects of angiotensin II in breast cancer cells by inhibiting AT1R signaling.

    PubMed

    Du, Ning; Feng, Jiang; Hu, Li-Juan; Sun, Xin; Sun, Hai-Bing; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Yi-Ping; Ren, Hong

    2012-06-01

    Chronic stress and a high-fat diet are well-documented risk factors associated with the renin-angiotensin system in the development of breast cancer. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a novel component of the renin-angiotensin system. Several recent studies have focused on the function of AT1R in cell proliferation during cancer development. Thus, we hypothesized that angiotensin II (Ang Ⅱ) can promote proliferation of breast cancer via activated AT1R; the activation of AT1R may play an important role in promoting breast cancer growth, and AT1R blocker (ARB) may suppress the promotional effect on proliferation by antagonizing AT1R. The expression level of AT1R was found to be significantly upregulated in breast cancer cells by immunohistochemistry, but no correlation between AT1R expression and ER/PR/Her-2 expression was observed. The AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cell line exhibited high expression of AT1R protein, and we generated the AT1R(-)-MCF-7 cell line using RNA interference. ARBs, and in particular irbesartan, effectively inhibited the effects of Ang II on cell proliferation, cell cycle development and downstream AT1R signaling events, including the activation of the Ras-Raf-MAPK pathway and the transcription factors NF-κB and CREB. Irbesartan also significantly altered p53, PCNA and cyclin D1 expression, which was also influenced by activated AT1R in AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cells. These results suggest that ARBs may be useful as a novel preventive and therapeutic strategy for treating breast cancer.

  14. Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation and Angiotensin II Sensitivity in Experimental Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Wiegman, Marjon J.; Plösch, Torsten; Zeeman, Gerda G.; van Buiten, Azuwerus; Henning, Robert H.; Buikema, Hendrik; Faas, Marijke M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We investigated endothelial dysfunction and the role of angiotensin (Ang)-II type I (AT1-R) and type II (AT2-R) receptor in the changes in the Ang-II sensitivity in experimental preeclampsia in the rat. Methods Aortic rings were isolated from low dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infused pregnant rats (experimental preeclampsia; n=9), saline-infused pregnant rats (n=8), and saline (n=8) and LPS (n=8) infused non-pregnant rats. Endothelium-dependent acetylcholine--mediated relaxation was studied in phenylephrine-preconstricted aortic rings in the presence of vehicle, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and/or indomethacin. To evaluate the role for AT1-R and AT2-R in Ang-II sensitivity, full concentration response curves were obtained for Ang-II in the presence of losartan or PD123319. mRNA expression of the AT1-R and AT2-R, eNOS and iNOS, COX1 and COX2 in aorta were evaluated using real-time RT-PCR. Results The role of vasodilator prostaglandins in the aorta was increased and the role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor and response of the AT1-R and AT2-R to Ang-II was decreased in pregnant saline infused rats as compared with non-pregnant rats. These changes were not observed during preeclampsia. Conclusion Pregnancy induced adaptations in endothelial function, which were not observed in the rat model for preeclampsia. This role of lack of pregnancy induced endothelial adaptation in the pathophysiology of experimental preeclampsia needs further investigation. PMID:24223202

  15. Dual blockade of aldosterone and angiotensin II additively suppresses TGF-beta and NADPH oxidase in the hypertensive kidney.

    PubMed

    Onozato, Maristela Lika; Tojo, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Goto, Atsuo; Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2007-05-01

    Angiotensin II blockade and spironolactone effectively reduces proteinuria in humans. To clarify the mechanisms of the beneficial effect of blockade of both aldosterone and angiotensin II, we associated the aldosterone antagonist eplerenone to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and examined the effect on renal transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta expression and oxidative stress by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase in the Dahl salt-sensitive rat with heart failure (DSHF). Dahl salt-resistant control rats and DSHF rats were fed with 8% NaCl diet and at 11 weeks the DSHF rats were treated with vehicle, eplerenone (Epl), trandolapril or a combination of both drugs for 7 weeks. DSHF rats showed increased NADPH oxidase and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) resulting in increased oxidative stress. ACEI and Epl reduced NADPH oxidase showing an additive effect in their combination; ACEI increased manganese SOD (MnSOD) and Epl increased MnSOD, copper-zinc SOD and catalase, resulting in the lowest levels of oxidative stress with the combination therapy. Glomerulosclerosis and proteinuria were increased in the DSHF rats, and Epl suppressed them more effectively than ACEI to levels not different from the combination of both, showing a positive correlation with NADPH oxidase expression and TGF-beta. Renal TGF-beta was specifically suppressed with Epl The association of Epl to ACEI is beneficial due to further reduction of NADPH oxidase and specific inhibition of TGF-beta resulting in improvement of renal damage.

  16. Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nur77 Inhibits Angiotensin II-Induced Vascular Remodeling via Downregulation of β-Catenin.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingli; Cai, Zhaohua; Chu, Shichun; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Xiaolei; Hu, Liuhua; Yi, Jing; Shen, Linghong; He, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the predominant effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system. Ang II contributes to vascular remodeling in many cardiovascular diseases (eg, hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis, and aneurysm). Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 has a crucial role in the functional regulation of vascular cells. The objective of this study was to define the specific role of Nur77 in Ang II-induced vascular remodeling. Nur77 expression was initially found to be elevated in medial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of thoracic aortas from mice continuously infused with Ang II for 2 weeks using a subcutaneous osmotic minipump. Cellular studies revealed that Nur77 expression was upregulated by Ang II via the MAPK/PKA-CREB signaling pathway. Ang II-induced proliferation, migration, and phenotypic switching were significantly enhanced in VSMCs isolated from Nur77(-/-) mice compared with wild-type VSMCs. Consistent with the role in VSMCs, we found that compared with wild-type mice, Nur77(-/-) mice had elevated aortic medial areas and luminal diameters, more severe elastin disruption and collagen deposition, increased VSMC proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase production, and decreased VSMC-specific genes SM-22α and α-actin expression, after 2 weeks of exogenous Ang II administration. The results of additional experiments suggested that Nur77 suppressed Ang II-induced β-catenin signaling pathway activation by promoting β-catenin degradation and inhibiting its transcriptional activity. Our findings indicated that Nur77 is a critical negative regulator of Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation, migration, and phenotypic switching via the downregulation of β-catenin activity. Nur77 may reduce Ang II-induced vascular remodeling involved in many cardiovascular diseases. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Limiting angiotensin II signaling with a cell penetrating peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of the angiotensin II type I receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Mierke, Dale; Berg, Eric; Shia, Michael; Fishman, Jordan; Sallum, Christine; Polgar, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A cell-penetrating peptide consisting of the second intracellular loop (IC2) of the Angiotensin II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1) linked to the HIV transactivating regulatory protein (TAT) domain was used to identify the role of this motif for intracellular signal transduction. HEK-293 cells stably transfected with AT1R cDNA and primary cultures of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressing endogenous AT1 receptor were exposed to the cell-penetrating peptide construct and the effect on angiotensin II signaling determined. The AT1 IC2 peptide effectively inhibited AngII stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover and calcium influx. It also limited the activation of Akt/PKB as determined by an inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 and completely abolished the AngII dependent activation of the transcriptional factor NFκB. In contrast, the AT1 IC2 peptide had no effect on AngII/AT1 receptor activation of ERK. These results illustrate the potential of using cell penetrating peptides to both delineate receptor-mediated signal transduction as well as to selectively regulate G protein coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20492449

  18. Angiotensin II Levels in Gingival Tissues from Healthy Individuals, Patients with Nifedipine Induced Gingival Overgrowth and Non Responders on Nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Anitha; Balaji, Thodur Madapusi

    2015-01-01

    Context The Renin Angiotensin system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Drug Induced Gingival Overgrowth (DIGO), a fibrotic condition, caused by Phenytoin, Nifedipine and Cyclosporine. Aim This study quantified Angiotensin II levels in gingival tissue samples obtained from healthy individuals, patients on Nifedipine manifesting/not manifesting drug induced gingival overgrowth. Materials and Methods Gingival tissue samples were obtained from healthy individuals (n=24), patients on nifidipine manifesting gingival overgrowth (n= 18) and patients on nifidipine not manifesting gingival overgrowth (n=8). Angiotensin II levels were estimated in the samples using a commercially available ELISA kit. Results Angiotensin II levels were significantly elevated in patients on Nifedipine manifesting gingival overgrowth compared to the other 2 groups (p<0.01). Conclusion The results of the study give an insight into the role played by Angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of drug induced gingival overgrowth. PMID:26436057

  19. Radioligand binding assays: application of [(125)I]angiotensin II receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Leifert, Wayne R; Bucco, Olgatina; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Patten, Glen S

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is an octapeptide hormone with a key role in blood pressure regulation. AngII increases blood pressure by stimulating G protein-coupled receptors in vascular smooth muscle. AngII receptors are therefore an important target in patients with high blood pressure. Strategies to lower high blood pressure (hypertension) include the use of drugs that compete for AngII at the angiotensin II Type 1 receptors (ATR) using ATR antagonists (e.g., irbesartan, valsartan, and losartan). This chapter will demonstrate the subtype specificity of ATR binding and we discuss some of the key experiments that are necessary in optimizing some of the parameters for GPCR screening. The latter protocols include saturation binding to determine K (d) and B (max), as well as competition/inhibition experiments to determine the IC(50) of binding. For these experiments we have used rat liver membranes which express ATR (type 1a) in relatively abundant amounts. Additionally, rat liver membrane preparations can be easily prepared in "bulk," frozen away for extended periods (up to 1 year) and used when necessary with no loss of receptor binding activity using the radiolabeled angiotensin II analogue, [(125)I][Sar(1),I le(8)]AngII.

  20. Alterations in Responses to Bradykinin, Angiotensin I, and Angiotensin II During the Induction Phase of One-Kidney, One-Wrapped Hypertension and Associated Arterial Disease in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Wallace G.; Donohue, John A.; Duket, Lea H.

    1980-01-01

    During the induction phase of low-renin, one-kidney, one-wrapped hypertension in rabbits,serum angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity is depressed and correlates inversely with the degree of necrotic arterial disease that develops. Responses to the vasoactive polypeptides, bradykinin (BK), angiotensin I (AI), angiotensin II (AII), the ACE blocker teprotide, and the AII antagonist 1-sar-8-ile AII were studied. Responses to BK, AII, and AI showed significant changes in both magnitude and duration (recovery time). Recovery time for depressor responses to BK in hypertensive rabbits was approximately three times that in the control period. One-wrapped, two-kidney control rabbits without hypertension-associated arterial disease showed no change in BK recovery time, although serum ACE activity was significantly depressed. In the experimental period BK recovery time correlated directly with the degree of arterial disease and indirectly with the final serum ACE activity. Duration of the pressor responses after AII correlated directly with the degree of arterial disease and indirectly with final serum ACE activity. In untreated hypertensive rabbits the percentage of increases in blood pressure after AI relative to control animals were decreased, and for all hypertensive rabbits' the increase in blood pressure correlated directly with the final serum ACE activity. Long-term treatment with teprotide moderated the hypertension but had little effect on serum ACE activity or the responses to BK, AII, and AI. Short-term infusions of 1-sar-8-ile AII and teprotide caused significant decreases in blood pressure in both the control and experimental periods, although no change in response to either polypeptide occurred. These studies support other evidence that pressor components of the renin-angiotensin system do not sustain the elevation of blood pressure in this form of experimental hypertension. Alterations in response patterns following AII and AI suggest that a

  1. Kallikrein generates angiotensin II but not bradykinin in the plasma of the urodele, Amphiuma tridactylum.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J M; Yano, K

    1995-03-01

    Incubation of heat-denatured plasma from the urodele, Amphiuma tridactylum (three-toed amphiuma) or from the anurans Rana ridibunda (European green frog) and Rana catesbeiana (American bullfrog) with either glass beads, porcine pancreatic kallikrein or trypsin did not generate bradykinin-like immunoreactivity. However, peptides were generated in kallikrein-treated amphiuma plasma that contracted vascular rings from the bullfrog systemic arch and had a spasmogenic action on the bullfrog urinary bladder. These peptides which were not generated in trypsin-treated plasma, were purified to homogeneity by reverse-phase HPLC and their primary structures established as: Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Val-His-Pro-Phe ([Asp1,Val5]angiotensin II) and Asn-Arg-Val-Tyr-Val-His-Pro-Phe ([Asn1,Val5]angiotensin II). Incubation of synthetic [Asn1,Val5]angiotensin II with amphiuma plasma resulted in deamidation to [Asp1,Val5]angiotensin II. The data suggest, therefore that amphiuma plasma contains an L-asparagine amidohydrolase (asparaginase), as previously described for the eel. Although bradykinin-related peptides have been isolated from frog skin, this study provides evidence tha the kallikrein-kinin system may be absent from the blood of amphibia.

  2. The role of IL-6 in the physiologic versus hypertensive blood pressure actions of angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Manhiani, M Marlina; Seth, Dale M; Banes-Berceli, Amy K L; Satou, Ryosuke; Navar, L Gabriel; Brands, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a critical physiologic regulator of volume homeostasis and mean arterial pressure (MAP), yet it also is known to induce immune mechanisms that contribute to hypertension. This study determined the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the physiologic effect of AngII to maintain normal MAP during low-salt (LS) intake, and whether hypertension induced by plasma AngII concentrations measured during LS diet required IL-6. IL-6 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were placed on LS diet for 7 days, and MAP was measured 19 h/day with telemetry. MAP was not affected by LS in either group, averaging 101 ± 4 and 100 ± 4 mmHg in WT and KO mice, respectively, over the last 3 days. Seven days of ACEI decreased MAP ∼25 mmHg in both groups. In other KO and WT mice, AngII was infused at 200 ng/kg per minute to approximate plasma AngII levels during LS. Surgical reduction of kidney mass and high-salt diet were used to amplify the blood pressure effect. The increase in MAP after 7 days was not different, averaging 20 ± 5 and 22 ± 6 mmHg in WT and KO mice, respectively. Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducer of activated transcription (STAT3) phosphorylation were not affected by LS, but were increased by AngII infusion at 200 and 800 ng/kg per minute. These data suggest that physiologic levels of AngII do not activate or require IL-6 to affect blood pressure significantly, whether AngII is maintaining blood pressure on LS diet or causing blood pressure to increase. JAK2/STAT3 activation, however, is tightly associated with AngII hypertension, even when caused by physiologic levels of AngII. PMID:26486161

  3. Altered Systemic Hemodynamic & Baroreflex Response to Angiotensin II in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Hossam I.; Raj, Satish R.; Diedrich, André; Black, Bonnie K.; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Dupont, William D.; Williams, Gordon H.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by excessive orthostatic tachycardia and significant functional disability. We have previously found that POTS patients had increases in plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) twice as high as normal subjects despite normal blood pressures. In this study we assess systemic and renal hemodynamic and functional responses to Ang II infusion in patients with POTS compared with healthy controls. Methods and Results Following a 3 day sodium controlled diet, we infused Ang II (3 ng/kg/min) for 1 hour in POTS patients (n=15) and healthy controls (n=13) in the supine position. All study subjects were females with normal blood pressure (BP). Ages were similar for POTS and control subjects (30±2 [mean±SEM] vs. 26±1 years; P=0.11). We measured the changes from baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal plasma flow (RPF), plasma renin activity (PRA), aldosterone, urine sodium and baroreflex sensitivity in both groups. In response to Ang II infusion, POTS patients had a blunted increase compared with control subjects in MAP (10±1 mmHg vs. 14±1 mmHg; P=0.01), and diastolic BP (9±1 mmHg vs. 13±1 mmHg; P=0.01), but not systolic BP (13±2 mmHg vs. 15±2 mmHg; P=0.40). Renal plasma flow (RPF) decreased similarly with Ang II infusion in POTS patients and controls (−166±20 vs. −181±17 mL/min/1.73 kg/m2; P=0.58). Post-infusion, the decrease in PRA (−0.9±0.2 vs. −0.6±0.2 ng/mL/h; P=0.43) and the increase in aldosterone (17±1 vs. 15±2 pg/ml; P=0.34) were similar in POTS and controls. The decrease in urine sodium excretion was similar in both POTS and controls (−49±12 vs. −60±16 mEq/g Cr; P=0.55). The spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity at baseline was significantly lower in POTS compared to healthy controls (10.1±1.2 vs. 16.8±1.5 ms/mmHg, P=0.003) and it was further reduced with Ang II infusion. Conclusions Patients with POTS have blunted vasopressor response to Ang II and impaired baroreflex function

  4. Impact of Angiotensin I-converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Type-1 Receptor Blockers on Survival of Patients with NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lili; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Ling; Wan, Huanying; Gao, Beili; Feng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type-1 receptor blockers (ARBs) can decrease tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis and inhibit metastasis. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are found in approximately 30% of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in East Asia and in 10–15% of such patients in Western countries. We retrospectively identified 228 patients with histologically confirmed advanced NSCLC and 73 patients with early stage disease; 103 of these patients took antihypertensive drugs, and 112 received treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There was a significant difference in progression-free survival after first-line therapy (PFS1) between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. For the patients treated with TKIs, there was a significant difference in PFS but not in overall survival (OS) between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. For the patients with advanced NSCLC, there was a significant difference in PFS1 between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. ACEI/ARB in combination with standard chemotherapy or TKIs had a positive effect on PFS1 or OS, regardless of whether the lung cancer was in the early or advanced stage. PMID:26883083

  5. Inhibitory effects of losartan and azelnidipine on augmentation of blood pressure variability induced by angiotensin II in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danfeng; Kawagoe, Yukiko; Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kato, Johji

    2017-07-05

    Increased blood pressure variability has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recently we reported that continuous infusion of angiotensin II not only elevated blood pressure level, but also increased blood pressure variability in a manner assumed to be independent of blood pressure elevation in rats. In the present study, the effects of the angiotensin type I receptor blocker losartan and the calcium channel blocker azelnidipine on angiotensin II-induced blood pressure variability were examined and compared with that of the vasodilator hydralazine in rats. Nine-week-old male Wistar rats were subcutaneously infused with 240 pmol/kg/min angiotensin II for two weeks without or with oral administration of losartan, azelnidipine, or hydralazine. Blood pressure variability was evaluated using a coefficient of variation of blood pressure recorded every 15min under an unrestrained condition via an abdominal aortic catheter by a radiotelemetry system. Treatment with losartan suppressed both blood pressure elevation and augmentation of systolic blood pressure variability in rats infused with angiotensin II at 7 and 14 days. Azelnidipine also inhibited angiotensin II-induced blood pressure elevation and augmentation of blood pressure variability; meanwhile, hydralazine attenuated the pressor effect of angiotensin II, but had no effect on blood pressure variability. In conclusion, angiotensin II augmented blood pressure variability in an angiotensin type 1 receptor-dependent manner, and azelnidipine suppressed angiotensin II-induced augmentation of blood pressure variability, an effect mediated by the mechanism independent of the blood pressure-lowering action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transdermal delivery of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and others for management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ahad, Abdul; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah Mohammed; Al-Jenoobi, Fahad Ibrahim; Aqil, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) are some of the most commonly prescribed medications for hypertension. Most of all conventional dosage forms of ARBs and ACEIs undergo extensive first-pass metabolism, which significantly reduces bioavailability. Majority of ARBs and ACEIs are inherently short acting due to a rapid elimination half-life. In addition, oral dosage forms of ARBs and ACEIs have many high incidences of adverse effects due to variable absorption profiles, higher frequency of administration and poor patient compliance. Many attempts have been made globally at the laboratory level to investigate the skin permeation and to develop transdermal therapeutic systems of various ARBs, ACEIs and other anti-hypertensives, to circumvent the drawbacks associated with their conventional dosage form. This manuscript presents an outline of the transdermal research specifically in the area of ARBs, ACEIs and other anti-hypertensives reported in various pharmaceutical journals. The transdermal delivery has gained a significant importance for systemic treatment as it is able to avoid first-pass metabolism and major fluctuations of plasma levels typical of repeated oral administration. As we can experience from this review article that transdermal delivery of different ARBs and ACEIs improves bioavailability as well as patient compliance by many folds. In fact, the rationale development of some newer ARBs, ACEIs and other anti-hypertensives transdermal systems will provide new ways of treatment, circumventing current limitations for conventional dosage forms.

  7. Renoprotective Effect of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers in Diabetic Patients with Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Feng-Yi; Lin, Fang-Ju; Ou, Huang-Tz; Huang, Shih-Hui; Wang, Chi-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Limited evidence exists on the choice of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) in diabetic patients with nephropathy. We aim to assess the renal effectiveness and safety of these drugs among diabetic nephropathy patients. This retrospective cohort study was conducted with diabetic nephropathy patients who initiated ACEI or ARB monotherapy. The primary outcome was a composite of end stage of renal disease and renal transplantation, and the secondary outcome was all-cause mortality. The safety endpoint was hyperkalemia. Three thousand seven hundred and thirty-nine ACEI users and 3,316 ARB users were identified. ARBs seemed to be inferior to ACEIs given their poorer renal outcome (HR 1.31; 95% CI, 1.15-1.50) and higher risk of hyperkalemia (HR 1.17; 95% CI, 1.04-1.32). Among the four ACEIs compared, captopril was an inferior treatment choice given its poorer renal outcomes (HR 1.42; 95% CI, 1.05-1.93) and higher mortality rate (HR 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01-1.55). Irbesartan appeared to be a poorer treatment choice among the three ARBs compared, given its inferior renal protective effect (HR 1.35; 95% CI, 1.03-1.78). Our findings suggest ACEIs as a relatively more renoprotective and safer treatment as compared to ARBs. Captopril and irbesartan may be inferior to the other ACEIs and ARBs respectively. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Reactive oxygen species mediate angiotensin II-induced transcytosis of low-density lipoprotein across endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Fang; Cui, Jun; Zheng, Tao; Jin, Si

    2017-01-01

    The retention of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles to subendothelial spaces through transcytosis across the endothelium is the initial step of atherosclerosis (AS). Angiotensin II (Ang II), as the principal effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), is implicated in several important steps of AS development. However, whether or not Ang II can directly exert a pro-atherogenic effect by promoting LDL transcytosis across endothelial barriers, has not been defined. In the present study, we found that Ang II upregulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in endothelial cells (ECs) by measuring fluorescence of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (DCF-DA). Based on our transcytosis model, we observed that Ang II significantly accelerated LDL transcytosis, whereas transcytosis inhibitor methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and ROS inhibitor dithiothreitol (DTT), markedly blocked the Ang II-stimulated increase in LDL transcytosis. Confocal imaging analysis revealed that both LDL uptake by cells and LDL retention in human umbilical venous walls were highly elevated after Ang II exposure, while MβCD and DTT significantly inhibited the effects of Ang II. What is more, proteins involved in caveolae-mediated transcytosis, including LDL receptor (LDLR), caveolin-1 and cavin-1, were associated with Ang II-induced LDL transcytosis across the ECs. Nevertheless, this process was independent of clathrin in our study. Of note, ROS inhibitor, DTT, markedly decreased the expression levels of those proteins. Consequently, ROS are critical mediators in Ang II-induced LDL transcytosis. Hopefully, these findings will provide novel insight into the crosstalk between dyslipidemia and RAS in atherogenesis. PMID:28204818

  9. Use of Antihypertensive Drugs and Ischemic Stroke Severity - Is There a Role for Angiotensin-II?

    PubMed

    Hwong, Wen Yea; Bots, Michiel L; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Spiering, Wilko; Kappelle, L Jaap; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    The increase in angiotensin II (Ang II) formation by selected antihypertensive drugs is said to exhibit neuroprotective properties, but this translation into improvement in clinical outcomes has been inconclusive. We undertook a study to investigate the relationship between types of antihypertensive drugs used prior to a stroke event and ischemic stroke severity. We hypothesized that use of antihypertensive drugs that increase Ang II formation (Ang II increasers) would reduce ischemic stroke severity when compared to antihypertensive drugs that suppress Ang II formation (Ang II suppressors). From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we included hypertensive patients with first ischemic stroke who presented within 48 hours from ictus. Antihypertensive drugs were divided into Ang II increasers (angiotensin-I receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and diuretics) and Ang II suppressors (angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and beta blockers). We evaluated stroke severity during admission with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We performed a multivariable logistic regression with the score being dichotomized at 15. Scores of less than 15 were categorized as less severe stroke. A total of 710 patients were included. ACEIs was the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive drug in patients using Ang II suppressors (74%) and CCBs, in patients prescribed with Ang II increasers at 77%. There was no significant difference in the severity of ischemic stroke between patients who were using Ang II increasers in comparison to patients with Ang II suppressors (OR: 1.32, 95%CI: 0.83-2.10, p = 0.24). In our study, we found that use of antihypertensive drugs that increase Ang II formation was not associated with less severe ischemic stroke as compared to use of antihypertensive drugs that suppress Ang II formation.

  10. Effects of ACE inhibitors on cardiac angiotensin II and aldosterone in humans: "Relevance of lipophilicity and affinity for ACE".

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Marcel; Coletta, Elizabeth; White, Roselyn; Davies, Ross; Haddad, Haissam; Leenen, Frans H H

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors differ in their lipophilic/hydrophilic index that determines their tissue bioavailability and affinity to ACE, which may result in major differences in the degree of blockade of cardiac ACE. We evaluated the hypothesis that in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and activated cardiac renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), lipophilic ACE inhibitors with high affinity for ACE (perindopril and quinapril) will cause marked blockade of cardiac angiotensin (Ang) II and aldosterone generation, but not a hydrophilic ACE inhibitor with low affinity for ACE (lisinopril). Patients were randomized to receive perindopril (8 mg/day), quinapril (40 mg/day), or lisinopril (20 mg/day) for 3-4 weeks before cardiac catheterization. The coronary sinus-aortic root gradients for Ang I and II, and aldosterone were determined. A total of 19 patients completed the study. Compared to a healthy control group, all three ACE inhibitors decreased circulating Ang II and aldosterone to a similar extent. There were only minor differences between the three ACE inhibitors for the Ang II gradient between the coronary sinus and aortic root. The gradient for aldosterone tended to be positive in the quinapril group and absent/negative in the lisinopril and perindopril groups. Despite the lowest pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), gradients between the coronary sinus and aortic root for Ang II and aldosterone were actually the highest in the quinapril group. These findings do not support the concept that a hydrophilic ACE inhibitor is less effective in blocking the cardiac RAAS as compared to lipophilic ACE inhibitors.

  11. Angiotensin II, independent of plasma renin activity, contributes to the hypertension of autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Okamoto, Luis E; Gamboa, Alfredo; Shibao, Cyndya; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo

    2013-03-01

    At least half of primary autonomic failure patients exhibit supine hypertension, despite profound impairments in sympathetic activity. Although the mechanisms underlying this hypertension are unknown, plasma renin activity is often undetectable, suggesting renin-angiotensin (Ang) pathways are not involved. However, because aldosterone levels are preserved, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II is intact and contributes to the hypertension of autonomic failure. Indeed, circulating Ang II was paradoxically increased in hypertensive autonomic failure patients (52±5 pg/mL, n=11) compared with matched healthy controls (27±4 pg/mL, n=10; P=0.002), despite similarly low renin activity (0.19±0.06 versus 0.34±0.13 ng/mL per hour, respectively; P=0.449). To determine the contribution of Ang II to supine hypertension in these patients, we administered the AT(1) receptor blocker losartan (50 mg) at bedtime in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (n=11). Losartan maximally reduced systolic blood pressure by 32±11 mm Hg at 6 hours after administration (P<0.05), decreased nocturnal urinary sodium excretion (P=0.0461), and did not worsen morning orthostatic tolerance. In contrast, there was no effect of captopril on supine blood pressure in a subset of these patients. These findings suggest that Ang II formation in autonomic failure is independent of plasma renin activity, and perhaps Ang-converting enzyme. Furthermore, these studies suggest that elevations in Ang II contribute to the hypertension of autonomic failure, and provide rationale for the use of AT(1) receptor blockers for treatment of these patients.

  12. TRPM8 downregulation by angiotensin II in vascular smooth muscle cells is involved in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang; Ni, Min; Zhang, Jing-Ming; Li, Dong-Jie; Shen, Fu-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced injury of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) serves an important role in hypertension and other cardiovascular disorders. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) is a thermally‑regulated Ca2+‑permeable channel that is activated by reduced body temperature. Although several recent studies have revealed the regulatory effect of TRPM8 in vascular tone and hypertension, the precise role of TRPM8 in dysfunction of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by Ang II remains elusive. In the present study, the possible function of TRPM8 in Ang II‑induced VSMCs malfunction in vivo and in vitro was investigated. In the aortae from rats that had undergone a two‑kidney one‑clip operation, which is a widely‑used renovascular hypertension model, the mRNA and protein levels of TRPM8 were reduced. In addition, exogenous Ang II treatment decreased TRPM8 mRNA and protein expression levels in primary cultures of rat VSMCs. TRPM8 activation by menthol, a pharmacological agonist, in VSMCs, significantly attenuated the Ang II‑induced increase in reactive oxygen species and H2O2 production. In addition, TRPM8 activation reduced the Ang II‑induced upregulation of NADPH oxidase (NOX) 1 and NOX4 in VSMCs. Furthermore, TRPM8 activation relieved the Ang II‑induced activation of ras homolog gene family, member A‑rho associated protein kinase 2 and janus kinase 2 signaling pathways in VSMCs. In conclusion, the results presented in the current study indicated that TRPM8 downregulation by Ang II in VSMCs may be involved in hypertension.

  13. Intrarenal angiotensin II and its contribution to the genesis of chronic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Navar, L Gabriel; Prieto, Minolfa C; Satou, Ryousuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    The increased activity of intrarenal renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in a setting of elevated arterial pressure elicits renal vasoconstriction, increased sodium reabsorption, proliferation, fibrosis and renal injury. Increases in intrarenal and interstitial angiotensin (Ang) II levels are due to increased AT1 receptor mediated Ang II uptake and stimulation of renal angiotensinogen (AGT) mRNA and protein expression. Augmented proximal tubule AGT production increases tubular AGT secretion and spillover of AGT into the distal nephron and urine. Increased renin formation by principal cells of the collecting ducts forms Ang I from AGT thus increasing Ang II. The catalytic actions of renin and prorenin are enhanced by prorenin receptors (PRRs) on the intercalated cells. The resultant increased intrarenal Ang II levels contribute to the genesis of chronic hypertension. PMID:21339086

  14. Determinants and Changes Associated with Aldosterone Breakthrough after Angiotensin II Receptor Blockade in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Overt Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Moranne, Olivier; Bakris, George; Fafin, Coraline; Favre, Guillaume; Pradier, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system decreases proteinuria and slows estimated GFR decline in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with overt nephropathy. Serum aldosterone levels may increase during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade. The determinants and consequences of this aldosterone breakthrough remain unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study examined the incidence, determinants, and changes associated with aldosterone breakthrough in a posthoc analysis of a randomized study that compared the effect of two angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with overt nephropathy. Results Of 567 of 860 participants included in this posthoc analysis, 28% of participants developed aldosterone breakthrough, which was defined by an increase greater than 10% over baseline values of serum aldosterone levels after 1 year of angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment. Factors independently associated with aldosterone breakthrough at 1 year were lower serum aldosterone and potassium levels at baseline, higher decreases in sodium intake, systolic BP, and estimated GFR from baseline to 1 year, and use of losartan versus telmisartan. Aldosterone breakthrough at 6 months was not sustained at 1 year in 69% of cases, and it did not predict estimated GFR decrease and proteinuria increase between 6 months and 1 year. Conclusions Aldosterone breakthrough is a frequent event 1 year after initiating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade, particularly in participants exposed to intensive lowering of BP with sodium depletion and short-acting angiotensin II receptor blockers. Short-term serum aldosterone level increases at 6 months are not associated with negative kidney outcomes between 6 months and 1 year. PMID:23929924

  15. Changes in blood pressure and dipsogenic responsiveness to angiotensin II during chronic exposure of rats to cold.

    PubMed

    Fregly, M J; Shechtman, O; van Bergen, P; Reeber, C; Papanek, P E

    1991-04-01

    Hypertension accompanies chronic exposure of rats to cold (5-6 degrees C). Systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures become elevated, and hypertrophy of the heart occurs. A previous study from this laboratory suggested that the renin-angiotensin system may play a role. The present study was carried out to assess this further. Thus, in addition to measurement of systolic blood pressure at intervals during exposure to cold, plasma renin activity and the dipsogenic responsiveness to acute administration of angiotensin II were also measured to assess the functional status of the renin-angiotensin system. The results showed a significant (p less than 0.05) increase in systolic blood pressure during the third week of exposure to cold. In contrast, plasma renin activity (PRA) increased within the first week of exposure to cold, and declined thereafter to reach the level of the control by the third week of exposure to cold. By the fourth week, PRA decreased to a level significantly (p less than 0.05) below that of the control group. The responsiveness to acute administration of angiotensin II (AII), as assessed by the drinking response, increased significantly (p less than 0.05) by the third week of exposure to cold and remained significantly elevated during the fourth week. There was a significant (p less than 0.01) direct relationship between dipsogenic responsiveness to AII and blood pressure in the cold-treated (r = .57), but not the control group (r = .12). There was also a significant (r = -.91) indirect linear relationship between PRA and dipsogenic responsiveness to AII. Cold-treated rats had significant increases in urinary norepinephrine output and weights of heart, kidneys, adrenals, and brown adipose tissue characteristic of rats acclimated to cold.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Different reactivity to angiotensin II of peripheral and renal arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats: effect of acute and chronic angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidi, E.; Hollenberg, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    We assessed renal blood flow and pressor responses to graded angiotensin II doses in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats ingesting a diet containing 1.6% sodium basally and after acute and chronic angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with captopril. In the basal state the pressor response to angiotensin II was enhanced (P<0.0005) and the renal vascular response was blunted (P<0.005) in SHR compared with WKY rats. After acute captopril administration the pressor response was enhanced in both strains, and the difference between them was maintained, while the renal vascular response was enhanced in both, but more in SHR, so that the renal vascular response in the SHR became larger than in WKY (P<0.0001). Chronic captopril treatment blunted both pressor and renal responses in WKY rats, but only the pressor response in SHR. The renal vessels of SHR seem to be different from those of WKY rats in reaction to exogenous angiotensin II, and in response to both acute administration of captopril (probably acting through blockade of angiotensin II production) and chronic administration of captopril (probably acting mainly through accumulation of kinin or production of prostaglandins).

  17. Angiotensin II induced proteolytic cleavage of myocardial ACE2 is mediated by TACE/ADAM-17: a positive feedback mechanism in the RAS.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Clarke, Nicola; Wang, Zuocheng; Fan, Dong; Parajuli, Nirmal; Basu, Ratnadeep; Putko, Brendan; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Turner, Anthony J; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is a key negative regulator of the renin-angiotensin system where it metabolizes angiotensin (Ang) II into Ang 1-7. We hypothesize that Ang II suppresses ACE2 by increasing TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) activity and ACE2 cleavage. Ang II infusion (1.5 mg/kg/day) in wild-type mice for 2 weeks resulted in substantial decrease in myocardial ACE2 protein levels and activity with corresponding increase in plasma ACE2 activity, prevented by AT1R blockade. Ang II resulted in AT1R-mediated increase in myocardial TACE expression and activity, and membrane translocation of TACE. Ang II treatment in Huh7 cells exhibited AT1R-dependent metalloproteinase mediated shedding of ACE2 while transfection with siTACE prevented shedding of ACE2; cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of TACE also prevented shedding of ACE2. Reactive oxygen species played a key role since p47(phox)KO mice were resistant to Ang II-induced TACE phosphorylation and activation with preservation of myocardial ACE2 which dampened Ang II-induced cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy. In conclusion, Ang II induces ACE2 shedding by promoting TACE activity as a positive feedback mechanism whereby Ang II facilitates the loss of its negative regulator, ACE2. In HF, elevated plasma ACE2 activity likely represents loss of the protective effects of ACE2 in the heart. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Life and death in the microcirculation: a role for angiotensin II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, A. S.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Angiotensin II (ANGII) plays a critical role in the maintenance of the microcirculation and in the anatomical loss of microvessels (rarefaction) that occurs in low renin forms of hypertension and in animals fed a high-salt diet. Elevations in sodium intake can trigger a series of hemodynamic and hormonal responses culminating in a substantial rarefaction of small arterioles and capillaries in both normal and reduced renal mass hypertensive rats. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry, Northern blot, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of microdissected blood vessels were used to localize ANGII receptors in the microcirculation. Chronic infusion of ANGII and other physiologic and pharmacologic manipulations of the reninangiotensin system in rats was combined with morphologic and mathematical analysis of the network architecture. RESULTS: We have shown that rarefaction of the microcirculation can cause an increase in total peripheral resistance, reduced tissue perfusion, decreased oxygen delivery, and impaired organ function. Although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood, a number of key observations point to a role for the renin-angiotensin system in this effect. First, ANGII infused systemically at subpressor levels, or locally into the skeletal muscle interstitium, can induce significant microvessel growth. Second, localization of ANGII receptor proteins by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting and RNA localization by RT-PCR confirm the presence of AT1 receptors, which are growth-stimulatory, and AT2 receptors, which are growth-inhibitory in the microcirculation. Third, maintenance of ANGII at normal levels during periods of hypertension or high-salt diet completely eliminates rarefaction. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that ANGII acting through AT1- and AT2-receptor mechanisms modulate vessel density during high-salt diet and hypertension.

  19. Antiangiogenic effect of angiotensin II type 2 receptor in ischemia-induced angiogenesis in mice hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Tamarat, Radia; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Icchiki, Toshihiro; Ebrahimian, Teni; Iglarz, Marc; Besnard, Sandrine; Duriez, Micheline; Inagami, Tadashi; Lévy, Bernard I

    2002-05-31

    This study examined the potential role of angiotensin type 2 (AT(2)) receptor on angiogenesis in a model of surgically induced hindlimb ischemia. Ischemia was produced by femoral artery ligature in both wild-type and AT(2) gene-deleted mice (Agtr2(-)/Y). After 28 days, angiogenesis was quantitated by microangiography, capillary density measurement, and laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), Bax, and Bcl-2 were determined by Western blot analysis in hindlimbs. The AT(2) mRNA level (assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR) was increased in the ischemic hindlimb of wild-type mice. Angiographic vessel density and laser Doppler perfusion data showed significant improvement in ischemic/nonischemic leg ratio, 1.9- and 1.7-fold, respectively, in Agtr2(-)/Y mice compared with controls. In ischemic leg of Agtr2(-)/Y mice, revascularization was associated with an increase in the antiapoptotic protein content, Bcl-2 (211% of basal), and a decrease (60% of basal) in the number of cell death, determined by TUNEL method. Angiotensin II treatment (0.3 mg/kg per day) raised angiogenic score, blood perfusion, and both VEGF and eNOS protein content in ischemic leg of wild-type control but did not modulate the enhanced angiogenic response observed in untreated Agtr2(-)/Y mice. Finally, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that VEGF was mainly localized to myocyte, whereas eNOS-positive staining was mainly observed in the capillary of ischemic leg of both wild-type and AT(2)-deficient mice. This study demonstrates for the first time that the AT(2) receptor subtype may negatively modulate ischemia-induced angiogenesis through an activation of the apoptotic process.

  20. Life and death in the microcirculation: a role for angiotensin II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, A. S.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Angiotensin II (ANGII) plays a critical role in the maintenance of the microcirculation and in the anatomical loss of microvessels (rarefaction) that occurs in low renin forms of hypertension and in animals fed a high-salt diet. Elevations in sodium intake can trigger a series of hemodynamic and hormonal responses culminating in a substantial rarefaction of small arterioles and capillaries in both normal and reduced renal mass hypertensive rats. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry, Northern blot, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of microdissected blood vessels were used to localize ANGII receptors in the microcirculation. Chronic infusion of ANGII and other physiologic and pharmacologic manipulations of the reninangiotensin system in rats was combined with morphologic and mathematical analysis of the network architecture. RESULTS: We have shown that rarefaction of the microcirculation can cause an increase in total peripheral resistance, reduced tissue perfusion, decreased oxygen delivery, and impaired organ function. Although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood, a number of key observations point to a role for the renin-angiotensin system in this effect. First, ANGII infused systemically at subpressor levels, or locally into the skeletal muscle interstitium, can induce significant microvessel growth. Second, localization of ANGII receptor proteins by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting and RNA localization by RT-PCR confirm the presence of AT1 receptors, which are growth-stimulatory, and AT2 receptors, which are growth-inhibitory in the microcirculation. Third, maintenance of ANGII at normal levels during periods of hypertension or high-salt diet completely eliminates rarefaction. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that ANGII acting through AT1- and AT2-receptor mechanisms modulate vessel density during high-salt diet and hypertension.

  1. Gestational therapy with an angiotensin II receptor antagonist and transient renal failure in a premature infant.

    PubMed

    Bass, J Kirk; Faix, Roger G

    2006-07-01

    The fetotoxic effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors when used during the second half of pregnancy are well known. The more recently developed angiotensin II receptor antagonists appear to yield similar fetal abnormalities. We report a premature infant born to a 41-year-old mother with a long history of infertility who had received losartan therapy for hypertension throughout an undetected pregnancy. Ultrasound examination 2 days prior to delivery identified a single fetus at 29 weeks gestation, anhydramnios, and an empty fetal bladder. The neonatal course was complicated by oliguria, hyperkalemia, marked renal dysfunction, respiratory failure, joint contractures, and a large anterior fontanelle with widely separated sutures. Hypotension (mean arterial pressure<25 torr) on day 1 responded to volume expansion, dopamine, and hydrocortisone. Serum creatinine reached a maximum of 2.7 mg/dL on day 6 and decreased to 0.4 by day 56. No formal urinalysis was performed, but the urine was reported to be visually clear throughout the course. Although a renal ultrasound on day 2 was normal, a follow-up study at 7 months revealed bilateral generalized parenchymal echogenicity, consistent with medical renal disease. Since then, weight and length have been at the 5th percentile or less, with apparent renal tubular acidosis necessitating the addition of sodium citrate supplements. This case emphasizes the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for potential pregnancy when contemplating the use of a drug of this class, and considering serial testing for pregnancy when using such drugs, even in patients with a longstanding history of infertility.

  2. Central angiotensin II stimulates cutaneous water intake behavior via an angiotensin II type-1 receptor pathway in the Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Sho; Konno, Norifumi; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2010-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates oral water intake by causing thirst in all terrestrial vertebrates except anurans. Anuran amphibians do not drink orally but absorb water osmotically through ventral skin. In this study, we examined the role of Ang II on the regulation of water-absorption behavior in the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). In fully hydrated frogs, intracerebroventricular (ICV) and intralymphatic sac (ILS) injection of Ang II significantly extended the residence time of water in a dose-dependent manner. Ang II-dependent water uptake was inhibited by ICV pretreatment with an angiotensin II type-1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonist but not a type-2 (AT(2)) receptor antagonist. These results suggest that Ang II stimulates water-absorption behavior in the tree frog via an AT(1)-like but not AT(2)-like receptor. We then cloned and characterized cDNA of the tree frog AT(1) receptor from the brain. The tree frog AT(1) receptor cDNA encodes a 361 amino acid residue protein, which is 87% identical to the toad (Bufo marinus) AT(1) receptor and exhibits the functional characteristics of an Ang II receptor. AT(1) receptor mRNAs were found to be present in a number of tissues including brain (especially in the diencephalon), lung, large intestine, kidney and ventral pelvic skin. When tree frogs were exposed to dehydrating conditions, AT(1) receptor mRNA significantly increased in the diencephalon and the rhombencephalon. These data suggest that central Ang II may control water intake behavior via an AT(1) receptor on the diencephalon and rhombencephalon in anuran amphibians and may have implications for water consumption in vertebrates.

  3. Chymase-dependent production of angiotensin II: an old enzyme in old hearts.

    PubMed

    Froogh, Ghezal; Pinto, John T; Le, Yicong; Kandhi, Sharath; Aleligne, Yeabsra; Huang, An; Sun, Dong

    2017-02-01

    Age-dependent alteration of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and generation of angiotensin II (Ang II) are well documented. By contrast, RAS-independent generation of Ang II in aging and its responses to exercise have not been explored. To this end, we examined the effects of chymase, a secretory serine protease, on the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-independent conversion of Ang I to Ang II. We hypothesized that age-dependent alteration of cardiac Ang II formation is chymase dependent in nature and is prevented by exercise training. Experiments were conducted on hearts isolated from young (3 mo), aged sedentary (24 mo), and aged rats chronically exercised on a treadmill. In the presence of low Ang I levels and downregulation of ACE expression/activity, cardiac Ang II levels were significantly higher in aged than young rats, suggesting an ACE-independent response. Aged hearts also displayed significantly increased chymase expression and activity, as well as upregulation of tryptase, a biological marker of mast cells, confirming a mast cell-sourced increase in chymase. Coincidently, cardiac superoxide produced from NADPH oxidase (Nox) was significantly enhanced in aged rats and was normalized by exercise. Conversely, a significant reduction in cardiac expression of ACE2 followed by lower Ang 1-7 levels and downregulation of the Mas receptor (binding protein of Ang 1-7) in aged rats were completely reversed by exercise. In conclusion, local formation of Ang II is increased in aged hearts, and chymase is primarily responsible for this increase. Chronic exercise is able to normalize the age-dependent alterations via compromising chymase/Ang II/angiotensin type 1 receptor/Nox actions while promoting ACE2/Ang 1-7/MasR signaling.

  4. Control of Adipogenesis by the Autocrine Interplays between Angiotensin 1–7/Mas Receptor and Angiotensin II/AT1 Receptor Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Than, Aung; Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing; Chen, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII), a peptide hormone released by adipocytes, can be catabolized by adipose angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to form Ang(1–7). Co-expression of AngII receptors (AT1 and AT2) and Ang(1–7) receptors (Mas) in adipocytes implies the autocrine regulation of the local angiotensin system upon adipocyte functions, through yet unknown interactive mechanisms. In the present study, we reveal the adipogenic effects of Ang(1–7) through activation of Mas receptor and its subtle interplays with the antiadipogenic AngII-AT1 signaling pathways. Specifically, in human and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, Ang(1–7)-Mas signaling promotes adipogenesis via activation of PI3K/Akt and inhibition of MAPK kinase/ERK pathways, and Ang(1–7)-Mas antagonizes the antiadipogenic effect of AngII-AT1 by inhibiting the AngII-AT1-triggered MAPK kinase/ERK pathway. The autocrine regulation of the AngII/AT1-ACE2-Ang(1–7)/Mas axis upon adipogenesis has also been revealed. This study suggests the importance of the local regulation of the delicately balanced angiotensin system upon adipogenesis and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for obesity and related metabolic disorders. PMID:23592774

  5. Angiotensin II impairs endothelial progenitor cell number and function in vitro and in vivo: implications for vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Endtmann, Cathleen; Ebrahimian, Talin; Czech, Thomas; Arfa, Omar; Laufs, Ulrich; Fritz, Mathias; Wassmann, Kerstin; Werner, Nikos; Petoumenos, Vasileios; Nickenig, Georg; Wassmann, Sven

    2011-09-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to endothelial regeneration. Angiotensin II (Ang II) through Ang II type 1 receptor (AT(1)-R) activation plays an important role in vascular damage. The effect of Ang II on EPCs and the involved molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Stimulation with Ang II decreased the number of cultured human early outgrowth EPCs, which express both AT(1)-R and Ang II type 2 receptor, mediated through AT(1)-R activation and induction of oxidative stress. Ang II redox-dependently induced EPC apoptosis through increased apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation; decreased Bcl-2 and increased Bax expression; and activation of caspase 3 but had no effect on the low cell proliferation. In addition, Ang II impaired colony-forming and migratory capacities of early outgrowth EPCs. Ang II infusion diminished numbers and functional capacities of EPCs in wild-type (WT) but not AT(1)a-R knockout mice (AT(1)a(-/-)). Reendothelialization after focal carotid endothelial injury was decreased during Ang II infusion. Salvage of reendothelialization by intravenous application of spleen-derived progenitor cells into Ang II-treated WT mice was pronounced with AT(1)a(-/-) cells compared with WT cells, and transfusion of Ang II-pretreated WT cells into WT mice without Ang II infusion was associated with less reendothelialization. Transplantation of AT(1)a(-/-) bone marrow reduced atherosclerosis development in cholesterol-fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice compared with transplantation of apolipoprotein E-deficient or WT bone marrow. Randomized treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease with the AT(1)-R blocker telmisartan significantly increased the number of circulating CD34/KDR-positive EPCs. Ang II through AT(1)-R activation, oxidative stress, and redox-sensitive apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1-dependent proapoptotic pathways impairs EPCs in

  6. Angiotensin I- and II- and norepinephrine-mediated pressor responses in an ancient holostean fish, the bowfin (Amia calva).

    PubMed

    Butler, D G; Oudit, G Y; Cadinouche, M Z

    1995-06-01

    Dorsal aortic blood pressure (PSYS, systolic; PDIAS, diastolic; and PDA, mean) and heart rate (HR) were measured in resting freshwater bowfins (n = 6), Amia calva L., before and after i.v. injections of 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 ng.kg-1 of synthetic [Asn1, Val5]-angiotensin II (ANG II). Baseline PSYS, PDIAS, and PDA were 27.7 +/- 2.8, 22.4 +/- 1.8, and 24.5 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively. Bowfins were only moderately responsive to ANG II in a stepwise manner and the increase in blood pressure became significant only at the two highest doses; lower doses tended only to increase arterial pressure. Pressor responses due to 200 and 500 ng.kg-1 decayed over a greater time period compared with other doses. alpha-Adrenergic blockade abolished 70% of the ANG II-mediated pressor responses. Eel, salmon, and goosefish angiotensin I (ANG I; 500 ng.kg-1) elicited similar vasopressor responses (magnitude and time course) which were eliminated by prior angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition (captopril; 2-10 mg.kg-1). Bullfrog ANG I evoked a pressor effect, only at a higher dose (5000 ng.kg-1). Consecutive norepinephrine (NE) injections (100, 200, 500, and 1000 ng.kg-1) increased PSYS, PDIAS, and PDA in a dose-dependent manner which was dependent on alpha-adrenoceptors since phentolamine (1-3 mg.kg-1) abolished 80% of the pressor action of NE. PSYS was elevated by 100 ng.kg-1 of NE but PDIAS and PDA were significantly increased only at 200 ng.kg-1 ANG II and NE had no measurable chronotropic effect and resting HR (27.2 +/- 0.8 beats.min-1) was unchanged. Captopril and phentolamine treatments produced rapid hypotension and bradycardia (25-30%) which lasted from 15 to 30 and 20 to 40 min, respectively. The rising and decreasing phases of the NE-mediated pressor responses had shorter durations than ANG II effects. Tachyphylaxis occurred with the high doses of ANG II and NE. The data show that in the ancient bowfin, which evidently lacks renal juxtaglomerular cells, the cardiovascular

  7. New probes for angiotensin II receptors. Synthesis, radioiodination and biological properties of biotinylated and haptenated angiotensin derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnafous, J C; Tence, M; Seyer, R; Marie, J; Aumelas, A; Jard, S

    1988-01-01

    The present work delineates the basis for chemical modifications which can be introduced on the angiotensin II (AII) molecule to design probes suitable for indirect affinity techniques, especially for receptor purification. Using the solid-phase synthesis strategy, biotin or dinitrophenyl moieties have been added at the N-terminus of AII, with aminohexanoic acid as spacer arm. The resulting probes, (6-biotinylamido)hexanoyl-AII (Bio-Ahx-AII) and dinitrophenylaminohexanoyl-AII (Dnp-Ahx-AII), were prepared in their monoiodinated and highly labelled radioiodinated forms, with possible sulphoxidation of biotin. In addition to their ability to interact with streptavidin and anti-Dnp antibodies respectively, the two ligands displayed almost unchanged affinities for hepatic AII receptors as compared with AII. Bio-Ahx-AII and Dnp-Ahx-AII behaved as agonists on several AII-sensitive systems. The potential applications of these probes, receptor purification, cell labelling and sorting and histochemical receptor visualization, are discussed. PMID:3415650

  8. New probes for angiotensin II receptors. Synthesis, radioiodination and biological properties of biotinylated and haptenated angiotensin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bonnafous, J C; Tence, M; Seyer, R; Marie, J; Aumelas, A; Jard, S

    1988-05-01

    The present work delineates the basis for chemical modifications which can be introduced on the angiotensin II (AII) molecule to design probes suitable for indirect affinity techniques, especially for receptor purification. Using the solid-phase synthesis strategy, biotin or dinitrophenyl moieties have been added at the N-terminus of AII, with aminohexanoic acid as spacer arm. The resulting probes, (6-biotinylamido)hexanoyl-AII (Bio-Ahx-AII) and dinitrophenylaminohexanoyl-AII (Dnp-Ahx-AII), were prepared in their monoiodinated and highly labelled radioiodinated forms, with possible sulphoxidation of biotin. In addition to their ability to interact with streptavidin and anti-Dnp antibodies respectively, the two ligands displayed almost unchanged affinities for hepatic AII receptors as compared with AII. Bio-Ahx-AII and Dnp-Ahx-AII behaved as agonists on several AII-sensitive systems. The potential applications of these probes, receptor purification, cell labelling and sorting and histochemical receptor visualization, are discussed.

  9. A Fluorometric Method of Measuring Carboxypeptidase Activities for Angiotensin II and Apelin-13

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pan; Wysocki, Jan; Serfozo, Peter; Ye, Minghao; Souma, Tomokazu; Batlle, Daniel; Jin, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Degradation of the biologically potent octapeptide angiotensin Ang II-(1-8) is mediated by the activities of several peptidases. The conversion of Ang II to the septapeptide Ang-(1-7) is of particular interest as the latter also confers organ protection. The conversion is catalyzed by angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and other enzymes that selectively cleave the peptide bond between the proline and the phenylalanine at the carboxyl terminus of Ang II. The contribution of various enzyme activities that collectively lead to the formation of Ang-(1-7) from Ang II, in both normal conditions and in disease states, remains only partially understood. This is largely due to the lack of a reliable and sensitive method to detect these converting activities in complex samples, such as blood and tissues. Here, we report a fluorometric method to measure carboxypeptidase activities that cleave the proline-phenylalanine dipeptide bond in Ang II. This method is also suitable for measuring the conversion of apelin-13. The assay detects the release of phenylalanine amino acid in a reaction with the yeast enzyme of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL). When used in cell and mouse organs, the assay can robustly measure endogenous Ang II and apelin-13-converting activities involved in the renin-angiotensin and the apelinergic systems, respectively. PMID:28378780

  10. Urinary angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in hypertensive patients may be increased by olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    PubMed

    Furuhashi, Masato; Moniwa, Norihito; Mita, Tomohiro; Fuseya, Takahiro; Ishimura, Shutaro; Ohno, Kohei; Shibata, Satoru; Tanaka, Marenao; Watanabe, Yuki; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Hideaki; Takizawa, Hideki; Saitoh, Shigeyuki; Ura, Nobuyuki; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Miura, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is highly expressed in the kidney and converts angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1-7), a renoprotective peptide. Urinary ACE2 has been shown to be elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the effects of antihypertensive agents on urinary ACE2 remain unclear. Of participants in the Tanno-Sobetsu cohort study in 2011 (n = 617), subjects on no medication (n = 101) and hypertensive patients treated with antihypertensive agents, including the calcium channel blockers amlodipine and long-acting nifedipine; the ACE inhibitor enalapril; and the Ang II receptor blockers losartan, candesartan, valsartan, telmisartan, and olmesartan, for more than 1 year (n = 100) were enrolled, and urinary ACE2 level was measured. Glucose and hemoglobin A1c were significantly higher in patients treated with enalapril, telmisartan or olmesartan than in the control subjects. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) was significantly higher in patients treated with enalapril than in the control subjects. Urinary ACE2 level was higher in the olmesartan-treated group, but not the other treatment groups, than in the control group. Urinary ACE2 level was positively correlated with systolic blood pressure (r = 0.211; P = 0.003), UACR (r = 0.367; P < 0.001), and estimated salt intake (r = 0.260; P < 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis after adjustment of age, sex, and the correlated indices showed that the use of olmesartan was an independent predictor of urinary ACE2 level. In contrast with other antihypertensive drugs, olmesartan may uniquely increase urinary ACE2 level, which could potentially offer additional renoprotective effects. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor-α produced in the kidney contributes to angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiandong; Patel, Mehul B; Griffiths, Robert; Mao, Alice; Song, Young-soo; Karlovich, Norah S; Sparks, Matthew A; Jin, Huixia; Wu, Min; Lin, Eugene E; Crowley, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Immune system activation contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the resulting progression of chronic kidney disease. In this regard, we recently identified a role for proinflammatory Th1 T-lymphocyte responses in hypertensive kidney injury. Because Th1 cells generate interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), we hypothesized that interferon-γ and TNF-α propagate renal damage during hypertension induced by activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Therefore, after confirming that mice genetically deficient of Th1 immunity were protected from kidney glomerular injury despite a preserved hypertensive response, we subjected mice lacking interferon-γ or TNF-α to our model of hypertensive chronic kidney disease. Interferon deficiency had no impact on blood pressure elevation or urinary albumin excretion during chronic angiotensin II infusion. By contrast, TNF-deficient (knockout) mice had blunted hypertensive responses and reduced end-organ damage in our model. As angiotensin II-infused TNF knockout mice had exaggerated endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the kidney and enhanced nitric oxide bioavailability, we examined the actions of TNF-α generated from renal parenchymal cells in hypertension by transplanting wild-type or TNF knockout kidneys into wild-type recipients before the induction of hypertension. Transplant recipients lacking TNF solely in the kidney had blunted hypertensive responses to angiotensin II and augmented renal endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, confirming a role for kidney-derived TNF-α to promote angiotensin II-induced blood pressure elevation by limiting renal nitric oxide generation.

  12. Enhancement of Adipocyte Browning by Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Tsukuda, Kana; Mogi, Masaki; Iwanami, Jun; Kanno, Harumi; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Higaki, Akinori; Yamauchi, Toshifumi; Min, Li-Juan; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has been highlighted as a new possible therapeutic target for obesity, diabetes and lipid metabolic disorders, because WAT browning could increase energy expenditure and reduce adiposity. The new clusters of adipocytes that emerge with WAT browning have been named ‘beige’ or ‘brite’ adipocytes. Recent reports have indicated that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a role in various aspects of adipose tissue physiology and dysfunction. The biological effects of angiotensin II, a major component of RAS, are mediated by two receptor subtypes, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and type 2 receptor (AT2R). However, the functional roles of angiotensin II receptor subtypes in WAT browning have not been defined. Therefore, we examined whether deletion of angiotensin II receptor subtypes (AT1aR and AT2R) may affect white-to-beige fat conversion in vivo. AT1a receptor knockout (AT1aKO) mice exhibited increased appearance of multilocular lipid droplets and upregulation of thermogenic gene expression in inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) compared to wild-type (WT) mice. AT2 receptor-deleted mice did not show miniaturization of lipid droplets or alteration of thermogenic gene expression levels in iWAT. An in vitro experiment using adipose tissue-derived stem cells showed that deletion of the AT1a receptor resulted in suppression of adipocyte differentiation, with reduction in expression of thermogenic genes. These results indicate that deletion of the AT1a receptor might have some effects on the process of browning of WAT and that blockade of the AT1 receptor could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:27992452

  13. Angiopoietin-2 attenuates angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongyou; Moran, Corey S.; Trollope, Alexandra F.; Woodward, Lynn; Kinobe, Robert; Rush, Catherine M.; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and inflammation are implicated in aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis and regulated by angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2). The effect of Angpt2 administration on experimental aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis was examined. Six-month-old male apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE−/−) mice were infused with angiotensin II (AngII) and administered subcutaneous human Fc-protein (control) or recombinant Angpt2 (rAngpt2) over 14 days. Administration of rAngpt2 significantly inhibited AngII-induced aortic dilatation and rupture of the suprarenal aorta (SRA), and development of atherosclerosis within the aortic arch. These effects were blood pressure and plasma lipoprotein independent and associated with Tie2 activation and down-regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) within the SRA. Plasma concentrations of MCP-1 and interleukin-6 were significantly lower in mice receiving rAngpt2. Immunostaining for the monocyte/macrophage marker MOMA-2 and the angiogenesis marker CD31 within the SRA were less in mice receiving rAngpt2 than controls. The percentage of inflammatory (Ly6Chi) monocytes within the bone marrow was increased while that in peripheral blood was decreased by rAngpt2 administration. In conclusion, administration of rAngpt2 attenuated angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice associated with reduced aortic inflammation and angiogenesis. Up-regulation of Angpt2 may have potential therapeutic value in patients with aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis. PMID:27767064

  14. Effects of a changeover from other angiotensin II receptor blockers to olmesartan on left ventricular hypertrophy in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Shimoura, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Matsumoto, Kensuke; Mochizuki, Yasuhide; Hatani, Yutaka; Hatazawa, Keiko; Matsuzoe, Hiroki; Ooka, Junichi; Sano, Hiroyuki; Sawa, Takuma; Motoji, Yoshiki; Ryo-Koriyama, Keiko; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2017-05-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent cardiovascular risk factor for heart failure (HF) patients. The renin-angiotensin system plays a key role in LVH, and since olmesartan increases plasma angiotensin-(1-7) through an increase in angiotensin-converting enzyme-related carboxypeptidase (ACE2) expression, it was hypothesized to reduce LVH, unlike other angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). The objective of this study was therefore to investigate the effects of a changeover from other ARBs to olmesartan on LVH in HF patients. Participants enrolled in this prospective trial were 64 outpatients with stable HF who had received ARBs other than olmesartan for more than 1 year (age: 59 ± 13 years). Transthoracic echocardiography and laboratory tests were performed before and 6 months after administration of olmesartan. Other drugs were not changed during follow-up. The primary end point was defined as a change in LV mass index (LVMI) from baseline up to 6 months after administration of olmesartan. No significant changes were observed in blood pressures and heart rate after administration of olmesartan. LVMI showed a significant decrease from 119 ± 38 to 110 ± 24 g/m(2) (p = 0.007) 6 months after administration of olmesartan, and further decreased from 110 ± 24 to 103 ± 35 g/m(2) (p = 0.0003) after 12 months. Moreover, this reduction tended to be more prominent in patients with LVH. In conclusions, LVH in HF patients was reduced by the changeover to olmesartan. This finding may well have clinical implications for better management of HF patients.

  15. Gamma Delta T Cells Mediate Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Vascular Injury.

    PubMed

    Caillon, Antoine; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Fraulob-Aquino, Julio C; Huo, Ku-Geng; Barhoumi, Tlili; Ouerd, Sofiane; Sinnaeve, Peter R; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2017-03-22

    Background -Innate antigen-presenting cells and adaptive immune T cells have been implicated in the development of hypertension. However, the T-lymphocyte subsets involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension remain unclear. A small subset of "innate-like" T cells expressing the γδ T cell receptor (TCR) rather than the αβ TCR could play a role in the initiation of the immune response in hypertension. We aimed to determine whether angiotensin (Ang) II caused kinetic changes in γδ T cells, whether deficiency in γδ T cells blunted Ang II-induced hypertension, vascular injury and T-cell activation, and whether γδ T cells are associated with human hypertension. Methods -Male C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and Tcrδ(-/-) mice, which are devoid of γδ T cells, or WT mice injected IP with control isotype IgG or γδ T cell-depleting antibodies, were infused or not with Ang II for 3, 7 or 14 days. T cell profiling was determined by flow cytometry, systolic blood pressure (SBP) by telemetry and mesentery artery endothelial function by pressurized myography. TCR γ constant region gene expression levels and clinical data of a whole blood gene expression microarray study including normotensive and hypertensive subjects were used to demonstrate an association between γδ T cells and SBP. Results -Seven- and 14-day Ang II infusion increased γδ T cell numbers and activation in the spleen of WT mice (P<0.05). Fourteen days of Ang II infusion increased SBP (P<0.01) and decreased mesenteric artery endothelial function (P<0.01) in WT mice, both of which were abrogated in Tcrδ(-/-) mice (P<0.01). Anti-TCR γδ antibody-induced γδ T cell depletion blunted Ang II-induced SBP rise and endothelial dysfunction (P<0.05), compared to isotype antibody-treated Ang II-infused mice. Ang II-induced T cell activation in the spleen and perivascular adipose tissue was blunted in Tcrδ(-/-) mice (P<0.01). In humans, the association between SBP and γδ T cells was demonstrated by a

  16. Preparation and one-step purification of mono-125I-angiotensin II for radioligand binding assays

    SciTech Connect

    Speth, R.C.; Husain, A.

    1984-04-01

    A one-step purification of mono-/sup 125/I-angiotensin II prepared by the chloramine T procedure is described. The purification is effected on a cellulose cation exchange column with isocratic elution by 50 mM sodium acetate, pH 5.0. The purity of the mono-/sup 125/I-angiotensin II was determined by thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, enzymatic digestion, radioreceptor assay, and radioimmunoassay. Preparation and purification of mono-/sup 125/I-angiotensin II by this procedure offers significant advantages over existing methods for its preparation in terms of purity, simplicity, efficiency, and cost.

  17. Long-Term Reduction of High Blood Pressure by Angiotensin II DNA Vaccine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Nakagami, Futoshi; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Kyutoku, Mariko; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-07-01

    Recent research on vaccination has extended its scope from infectious diseases to chronic diseases, including Alzheimer disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The aim of this study was to design DNA vaccines for high blood pressure and eventually develop human vaccine therapy to treat hypertension. Plasmid vector encoding hepatitis B core-angiotensin II (Ang II) fusion protein was injected into spontaneously hypertensive rats using needleless injection system. Anti-Ang II antibody was successfully produced in hepatitis B core-Ang II group, and antibody response against Ang II was sustained for at least 6 months. Systolic blood pressure was consistently lower in hepatitis B core-Ang II group after immunization, whereas blood pressure reduction was continued for at least 6 months. Perivascular fibrosis in heart tissue was also significantly decreased in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. Survival rate was significantly improved in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. This study demonstrated that Ang II DNA vaccine to spontaneously hypertensive rats significantly lowered high blood pressure for at least 6 months. In addition, Ang II DNA vaccines induced an adequate humoral immune response while avoiding the activation of self-reactive T cells, assessed by ELISPOT assay. Future development of DNA vaccine to treat hypertension may provide a new therapeutic option to treat hypertension.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in bone marrow-derived cells prevents acute cardiac inflammation and injury in response to angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Li, T-T; Jia, L-X; Zhang, W-M; Li, X-Y; Zhang, J; Li, Y-L; Li, H-H; Qi, Y-F; Du, J

    2016-06-09

    Inflammation plays an important role in hypertensive cardiac injury. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway is involved in the inflammatory response. However, the role of ER stress in elevated angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac injury remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress in Ang II-induced hypertensive cardiac injury. Transcriptome analysis and quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ang II infusion in mice increased ER stress-related genes expression in the heart. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency, a key mediator of ER stress, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, especially neutrophils, the production of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines in Ang II-infused mouse hearts. CHOP deficiency increased Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic injury: (1) Masson trichrome staining showed increased fibrotic areas, (2) immunohistochemistry staining showed increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor β1 and (3) quantitative real-time PCR showed increased expression of collagen in CHOP-deficient mouse heart. Bone marrow transplantation experiments indicated that CHOP deficiency in bone marrow cells was responsible for Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic injury. Moreover, TUNEL staining and flow cytometry revealed that CHOP deficiency decreased neutrophil apoptosis in response to Ang II. Taken together, our study demonstrated that hypertension induced ER stress after Ang II infusion. ER stress in bone marrow-derived cells protected acute cardiac inflammation and injury in response to Ang II.

  19. Simultaneous determination of hydrochlorothiazide and several angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hillaert, S; Van den Bossche, W

    2003-02-26

    We have investigated the capability of the capillary zone electrophoretic (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatographic (MEKC) methods to simultaneously separate hydrochlorothiazide and six angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists (ARA-IIs): candesartan, eprosartan mesylate, irbesartan, losartan potassium, telmisartan, and valsartan. The CZE and MEKC methods are suitable for the qualitative and quantitative determination of combined HCT/ARA-IIs in pharmaceutical formulations. Depending on the ARA-II, at least one of the two methods can be used for each combination. The two methods have been validated in terms of their linearity of response, reproducibility, and accuracy.

  20. A low salt diet and circadian dysfunction synergize to induce angiotensin II-dependent hypertension in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J.R.; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A.; Stepp, David W.; Rudic, R. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in nighttime blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and Period isoform knockout mice (Per2-KO, Per2,3-KO and Per1,2,3-KO/PerTKO mice). On a normal diet, administration of Ang II caused caused non-dipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform knockout mice. To study the endogenous effects of Ang II stimulation, we then administered a low salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous Ang II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low salt diet decreased blood pressure in WT mice. In contrast, Period isoform knockout mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low salt diet, due to an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform knockout mice which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered AT1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension. PMID:26781276

  1. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and PKC-{alpha} are involved in the inhibitory effects of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngiotensinII subtype AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, on AngiotensinII-induced vascular contraction in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Wang Wei; Wang Qiujuan Wu Jinhui; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming

    2007-12-07

    The vasoactive peptide AngiotensinII (AngII) is an important factor in the cardiovascular system, exerting most of its effects through AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}). Ib, a new nonpeptide AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, has been observed to play a positive role in the treatment of hypertension in preclinical tests. In this study, the inhibitory effects of Ib on AngII-induced vascular contraction in vitro were investigated, and its molecular mechanisms were further explored. In endothelium-denuded aortic rings from rabbits, Ib produced a rightward shift in the concentration-response curve for AngII with a decrease in the maximal contractile response and the pD{sub 2}{sup '} was 7.29. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was inhibited by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. Ib could inhibit both AngII-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization from internal stores and Ca{sup 2+} influx. Moreover, the translocation of PKC-{alpha} stimulated by AngII was inhibited by Ib. Thus, the inhibitory effects of Ib might be related with the depression on AngII-induced increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and translocation of PKC-{alpha} through blocking AT{sub 1} receptors.

  2. Central actions of angiotensin II on spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity in the trout Onc orhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Lancien, Frédéric; Le Mével, Jean-Claude

    2007-02-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the central action of native angiotensin II (ANG II) on the spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in unanesthetized trout. The animals were equipped with two subcutaneous electrocardiographic (ECG) electrodes, a dorsal aorta catheter and an intracerebroventricular (ICV) cannula which was inserted within the third ventricle of the brain. The ECG and the systolic blood pressure (SBP) signals were recorded during a pre-injection period of 5 min and during five post-injection periods of 5 min. All injections were made at the fifth minute of the test. The time-series were processed with a sequence technique in order to detect the sequences of three or more consecutive increases in the SBP pulse, or three or more decreases in the SBP pulse correlated respectively with one delay beat increase of the RR interval of the ECG signal or shortening of this interval. The slope of the average regression line between the SBP and the RR intervals for each type of sequence was taken as a measure of the spontaneous BRS. Compared with pre-injection values, the ICV injection of vehicle (0.5 microl) had no effect on heart rate (HR), SBP, the total number of positive or negative sequences or on the spontaneous BRS during the post-injection periods. By contrast, ANG II at doses of 5 and 50 pmol increased HR but only 50 pmol ANG II elevated SBP. For all doses, ANG II depressed the spontaneous BRS, but the peptide had no effect upon the number of each baroreflex sequences. Intra-arterial injections of atropine dramatically reduced the number of positive and negative baroreflex sequences and decreased the sensitivity of the few remaining sequences, suggesting that the autonomic control of the cardiac BRS was solely due to vagal parasympathetic control. In atropinized trout the ICV injection of 5 pmol ANG II had no effect upon HR, SBP and the baroreflex parameters. This study determines for the first time the spontaneous BRS in a non

  3. Angiotensin-(1-7) Decreases Cell Growth and Angiogenesis of Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Pei, Nana; Wan, Renqiang; Chen, Xinglu; Li, Andrew; Zhang, Yanling; Li, Jinlong; Du, Hongyan; Chen, Baihong; Wei, Wenjin; Qi, Yanfei; Zhang, Yi; Katovich, Michael J; Sumners, Colin; Zheng, Haifa; Li, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] is an endogenous, heptapeptide hormone acting through the Mas receptor (MasR), with antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties. Recent studies have shown that Ang-(1-7) has an antiproliferative action on lung adenocarcinoma cells and prostate cancer cells. In this study, we report that MasR levels were significantly upregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) specimens and NPC cell lines. Viral vector-mediated expression of Ang-(1-7) dramatically suppressed NPC cell proliferation and migration in vitro. These effects were completely blocked by the specific Ang-(1-7) receptor antagonist A-779, suggesting that they are mediated by the Ang-(1-7) receptor Mas. In this study, Ang-(1-7) not only caused a significant reduction in the growth of human nasopharyngeal xenografts, but also markedly decreased vessel density, suggesting that the heptapeptide inhibits angiogenesis to reduce tumor size. Mechanistic investigations revealed that Ang-(1-7) inhibited the expression of the proangiogenic factors VEGF and PlGF. Taken together, the data suggest that upregulation of MasR could be used as a diagnostic marker of NPC and Ang-(1-7) may be a novel therapeutic agent for nasopharyngeal cancer therapy because it exerts significant antiangiogenic activity.

  4. The renal and vascular effects of central angiotensin II and atrial natriuretic factor in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Barazanji, K A; Balment, R J

    1990-01-01

    1. The interaction between atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and angiotensin II (Ang II) within the brain to influence renal function and blood pressure was studied in Inactin-anaesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. 2. Central infusion of ANF produced a diuresis which was associated with a significant decrease in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) level. There was no change in sodium excretion rate over the 80 min of intracerebroventricular ANF infusion and ANF produced no detectable change in mean arterial blood pressure. 3. Central Ang II administration produced a significant decrease in urine flow, which was associated with elevated plasma AVP, an increase in sodium excretion and a rise in mean arterial blood pressure. 4. Combined ANF and Ang II infusion produced an antidiuresis, which was associated with increased plasma AVP concentration. Both the natriuretic and vasopressor actions of central Ang II were abolished when ANF was co-administered. 5. It is concluded that ANF and Ang II interact centrally; ANF antagonizes the pressor and natriuretic effects but not the antidiuretic effects of central Ang II. These data suggest the possibility of distinct and separate sites within the brain through which Ang II influences vasopressin release and renal sodium handling and elevates blood pressure. PMID:2143782

  5. Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Mereena; Vijayakumar, Anupama; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; James, Jackson; Shivakumar, K

    2016-01-01

    Delineation of mechanisms underlying the regulation of fibrosis-related genes in the heart is an important clinical goal as cardiac fibrosis is a major cause of myocardial dysfunction. This study probed the regulation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene expression and the regulatory links between Angiotensin II, DDR2 and collagen in Angiotensin II-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed that Angiotensin II enhances DDR2 mRNA and protein expression in rat cardiac fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species induction. NF-κB activation, demonstrated by gel shift assay, abolition of DDR2 expression upon NF-κB inhibition, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed transcriptional control of DDR2 by NF-κB in Angiotensin II-treated cells. Inhibitors of Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C prevented Angiotensin II-dependent p38 MAPK phosphorylation that in turn blocked NF-κB activation. Angiotensin II also enhanced collagen gene expression. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of Angiotensin II on DDR2 and collagen were inter-dependent as siRNA-mediated