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Sample records for decreased renal 11beta-hsd-2

  1. Low-Level Laser Therapy Decreases Renal Interstitial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Fabiana Aparecida Mayrink; Moraes, Ana Carolina Meneghin; Paiva, Amanda Povoa; Schinzel, Vânia; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Semedo, Patricia; Castoldi, Angêla; Cenedeze, Marcos Antonio; Oliveira, Roberto Sotto-Maior Fortes; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Background data: Regardless of the etiology, CKD involves progressive widespread tissue fibrosis, tubular atrophy, and loss of kidney function. This process also occurs in kidney allograft. At present, effective therapies for this condition are lacking. We investigated the effects of LLLT on the interstitial fibrosis that occurs after experimental UUO in rats. Methods: The occluded kidney of half of the 32 Wistar rats that underwent UUO received a single intraoperative dose of LLLT (AlGaAs laser, 780 nm, 22.5 J/cm2, 30 mW, 0.75 W/cm2, 30 sec on each of nine points). After 14 days, renal fibrosis was assessed by Sirius red staining under polarized light. Immunohistochemical analyses quantitated the renal tissue cells that expressed fibroblast (FSP-1) and myofibroblast (α-SMA) markers. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and Smad3. Results: The UUO and LLLT animals had less fibrosis than the UUO animals, as well having decreased expression inflammatory and pro-fibrotic markers. Conclusions: For the first time, we showed that LLLT had a protective effect regarding renal interstitial fibrosis. It is conceivable that by attenuating inflammation, LLLT can prevent tubular activation and transdifferentiation, which are the two processes that mainly drive the renal fibrosis of the UUO model. PMID:23134313

  2. Diabetes-Induced Decrease in Renal Oxygen Tension: Effects of an Altered Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Fredrik; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Fasching, Angelica; Hansell, Peter; Liss, Per

    During conditions with experimental diabetes mellitus, it is evident that several alterations in renal oxygen metabolism occur, including increased mitochondrial respiration and increased lactate accumulation in the renal tissue. Consequently, these alterations will contribute to decrease the interstitial pO2, preferentially in the renal medulla of animals with sustained long-term hyperglycemia.

  3. Is decreased diameter of renal pelvis in prone position an indicator of successful pyeloplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gyanendra; Sharma, Anshu; Leung, Vivian Yee-Fong; Chu, Winnie Chiu-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients who had undergone pyeloplasty for pelviureteric junction obstruction, by measuring the anteroposterior diameter (APD) of the renal pelvis in supine and prone positions, and determine whether a decrease in APD in prone position can exclude obstruction in dilated renal system. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 to December 2013, patients who had undergone pyeloplasty were evaluated by ultrasound in two centers. The difference of APD of the renal pelvis in supine and prone positions was obtained. Correlation was made with the pre- and post-pyeloplasty renal function by radionuclide renogram. Results: There were 42 patients (31 males, 11 females; age range 5 months to 18 years). Residual hydronephrosis was detected in 41 patients of whom 35 patients (85%) showed decrease in APD by >10% in prone position. These patients and the one without hydronephrosis showed either no deterioration or improvement in renal function. Six patients (15%) showed either no change or increase in APD in prone position. Three patients (7.5%) were confirmed to have decrease in renal function indicating obstruction. Three patients (7.5%) showed no deterioration of renal function, but sluggish drainage on radionuclide renogram. Conclusion: Demonstration of decreased APD of renal pelvis in prone position by ultrasound is useful to differentiate obstructed from non-obstructed dilated renal system, and it correctly identified 85% candidates with successful pyeloplasty. In patients with no decrease or increase in APD at prone position, further follow-up is recommended to rule out obstruction. PMID:27081219

  4. Decreased renal uptake of (99m)Tc-DMSA in patients with tubular proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Hee; Lee, So Hee; Choi, Hyun Jin; Kang, Hee Gyung; Oh, So Won; Lee, Dong Soo; Ha, Il Soo; Choi, Yong; Cheong, Hae Il

    2009-11-01

    Although technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid ((99m)Tc-DMSA) renal scans are widely used to evaluate renal tubular mass function, the mechanism by which renal uptake of DMSA occurs is still the subject of debate. Patients with various proximal tubular disorders show markedly decreased renal DMSA uptake, even when there is normal creatinine clearance. We measured the renal uptake of (99m)Tc-DMSA 3 h after its injection in 13 patients with Dent disease or Lowe syndrome, both of which are typical proximal tubular disorders with defective megalin and cubilin-mediated endocytosis. Serial images of three patients were also obtained at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h post-injection. The correlations between renal uptake of (99m)Tc-DMSA and creatinine clearance and the degrees of acidemia and tubular proteinuria were then evaluated. The renal uptake of (99m)Tc-DMSA was markedly decreased in all patients, and the decreased uptake was detected in all serial images. In contrast, bladder radioactivity was higher than normal in all of the serial images when compared to renal radioactivity. Additionally, the uptake of (99m)Tc-DMSA was inversely proportional to the amount of urine beta(2)-microglobulin. These results strongly suggest that DMSA is filtered in the glomeruli and subsequently undergoes megalin- and cubilin-mediated endocytosis in the proximal tubules.

  5. 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II in the human endometrium: localization and activity during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Smith, R E; Salamonsen, L A; Komesaroff, P A; Li, K X; Myles, K M; Lawrence, M; Krozowski, Z

    1997-12-01

    The 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II enzyme (11 beta HSD2) is a potent inactivator of glucocorticoids and is present in high amounts in the placental syncytiotrophoblast and sodium-transporting epithelia. Placental 11 beta HSD2 is thought to protect the fetus from high circulating levels of maternal glucocorticoids, whereas the renal enzyme is important in conferring aldosterone specificity on the mineralocorticoid receptor. An isoform of 11 beta HSD (11 beta HSD1) is also present in a wide range of tissues, but usually acts as an oxoreductase, converting the biologically inactive cortisone to cortisol. In the present study we have used an immunopurified antibody to the carboxy-terminus of human 11 beta HSD2 (HUH23) to demonstrate localization of the enzyme in luminal and glandular epithelia of human endometrium. In some specimens staining was uniformly distributed, but in others there was clear evidence of heterogeneity both between and within epithelia. Although 11 beta HSD2 was found mainly in the cytoplasm, some cells showed evidence of nuclear staining only. Western blot analysis showed a band at 41 kDa in endometrium and myometrium, confirming the presence of 11 beta HSD2. Measurement of activity throughout the menstrual cycle showed that mean levels (+/- SEM) of activity were 156 +/- 17 and 6.1 +/- 1.1 pmol product/min.g homogenate protein for 11 beta HSD2 and 11 beta HSD1, respectively. Patients taking combined estrogen/progesterone contraceptives had significantly lower activities of both enzymes (76 +/- 19 and 1.9 +/- 0.4; both P < 0.01) compared with the control group. 11 beta HSD2 activity was significantly higher in the secretory than in the proliferative phase of the cycle in controls (193 +/- 22 vs. 120 +/- 23; P < 0.05). All groups contained outliers with elevated enzyme activities, with some patients displaying 11 beta HSD2 levels comparable to those observed in human kidney (> 1000 pmol/min.g). Further analysis showed that there was a

  6. Exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II decrease renal cortical oxygen tension in conscious rats by limiting renal blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Emans, Tonja W.; Janssen, Ben J.; Pinkham, Maximilian I.; Ow, Connie P. C.; Evans, Roger G.; Joles, Jaap A.; Malpas, Simon C.; Krediet, C. T. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Key points Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of hypoxia in the initiation and progression of renal disease remains rudimentary.We have developed a method that allows wireless measurement of renal tissue oxygen tension in unrestrained rats.This method provides stable and continuous measurements of cortical tissue oxygen tension (PO2) for more than 2 weeks and can reproducibly detect acute changes in cortical oxygenation.Exogenous angiotensin‐II reduced renal cortical tissue PO2 more than equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine, probably because it reduced renal oxygen delivery more than did phenylephrine.Activation of the endogenous renin–angiotensin system in transgenic Cyp1a1Ren2 rats reduced cortical tissue PO2; in this model renal hypoxia precedes the development of structural pathology and can be reversed acutely by an angiotensin‐II receptor type 1 antagonist.Angiotensin‐II promotes renal hypoxia, which may in turn contribute to its pathological effects during development of chronic kidney disease. Abstract We hypothesised that both exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II (AngII) can decrease the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in the renal cortex of unrestrained rats, which might in turn contribute to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Rats were instrumented with telemeters equipped with a carbon paste electrode for continuous measurement of renal cortical tissue PO2. The method reproducibly detected acute changes in cortical oxygenation induced by systemic hyperoxia and hypoxia. In conscious rats, renal cortical PO2 was dose‐dependently reduced by intravenous AngII. Reductions in PO2 were significantly greater than those induced by equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine. In anaesthetised rats, renal oxygen consumption was not affected, and filtration fraction was increased only in the AngII infused animals. Oxygen delivery decreased by 50% after infusion of AngII and renal blood flow (RBF) fell by 3.3 ml min−1

  7. Cadmium reduces 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 activity and expression in human placental trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kaiping; Julan, Laura; Rubio, Fran; Sharma, Anju; Guan, Haiyan

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium, a common environmental pollutant and a major constituent of tobacco smoke, has been identified as a new class of endocrine disruptors with a wide range of detrimental effects on mammalian reproduction. During human pregnancy, maternal cadmium exposure, via the environment and/or cigarette smoking, leads to fetal growth restriction (FGR), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Although a substantial amount of evidence suggests that cadmium may affect fetal growth indirectly via the placenta, the molecular targets remain to be identified. Given that reduced placental 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11 beta-HSD2, encoded by HSD11B2 gene) is causally linked to FGR, the present study was undertaken to examine the hypothesis that cadmium induces FGR in part by targeting placental HSD11B2. Using cultured human trophoblast cells as a model system, we showed that cadmium exposure resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in 11 beta-HSD2 activity, such that an 80% reduction was observed after 24-h treatment at 1 microM. It also led to a similar decrease in levels of 11 beta-HSD2 protein and mRNA, suggesting that cadmium reduced 11 beta-HSD2 expression. Furthermore, cadmium diminished HSD11B2 promoter activity, indicative of repression of HSD11B2 gene transcription. In addition, the effect of cadmium was highly specific, in that other divalent metals (Zn(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+)) as well as nicotine and cotinine (a major metabolite of nicotine) did not alter 11 beta-HSD2 activity. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that cadmium reduces human placental 11 beta-HSD2 expression and activity by suppressing HSD11B2 gene transcription. Thus the present study identifies placental 11 beta-HSD2 as a novel molecular target of cadmium. It also reveals a molecular mechanism by which this endocrine disruptor may affect human placental function and, consequently, fetal growth and development.

  8. Renal dysfunction and the associated decrease in survival after elective endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Zarkowsky, Devin S.; Hicks, Caitlin W.; Bostock, Ian C.; Stone, David H.; Eslami, Mohammad; Goodney, Philip P.

    2016-01-01

    demonstrated nonsignificant correlation between contrast material volume and postoperative renal dysfunction. Conclusions Any renal dysfunction developing after elective EVAR is associated with decreased estimated long-term survival. Protecting renal function with a rational dosing metric for contrast material linked to preoperative eGFR may better guide treatment. PMID:27478004

  9. Hyperlipidemia-Associated Renal Damage Decreases Klotho Expression in Kidneys from ApoE Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Cristina; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Buendía, Irene; Gómez-Guerrero, Carmen; Blanco, Julia; Mas, Sebastian; Egido, Jesús; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Ortiz, Alberto; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background Klotho is a renal protein with anti-aging properties that is downregulated in conditions related to kidney injury. Hyperlipidemia accelerates the progression of renal damage, but the mechanisms of the deleterious effects of hyperlipidemia remain unclear. Methods We evaluated whether hyperlipidemia modulates Klotho expression in kidneys from C57BL/6 and hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE KO) mice fed with a normal chow diet (ND) or a Western-type high cholesterol-fat diet (HC) for 5 to 10 weeks, respectively. Results In ApoE KO mice, the HC diet increased serum and renal cholesterol levels, kidney injury severity, kidney macrophage infiltration and inflammatory chemokine expression. A significant reduction in Klotho mRNA and protein expression was observed in kidneys from hypercholesteromic ApoE KO mice fed a HC diet as compared with controls, both at 5 and 10 weeks. In order to study the mechanism involved in Klotho down-regulation, murine tubular epithelial cells were treated with ox-LDL. Oxidized-LDL were effectively uptaken by tubular cells and decreased both Klotho mRNA and protein expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in these cells. Finally, NF-κB and ERK inhibitors prevented ox-LDL-induced Klotho downregulation. Conclusion Our results suggest that hyperlipidemia-associated kidney injury decreases renal expression of Klotho. Therefore, Klotho could be a key element explaining the relationship between hyperlipidemia and aging with renal disease. PMID:24386260

  10. Decreased Renal Function Is a Risk Factor for Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in Korean Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Bo Hyon; Chon, Seung Joo; Cho, Si Hyun; Choi, Young Sik; Lee, Byung Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Decreased renal function is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Our study was planned to verify the association of decreased renal function and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 251 Korean postmenopausal women who visited the health promotion center for a routine health checkup. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was used to show renal function, which was estimated by calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) and the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) formulas. Coronary atherosclerosis was assessed by 64-row multidetector computed tomography. Results Women with reduced eGFR (< 60 mL/minute/1.73 m2) had significantly higher brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) than women with normal eGFR (≥ 60 mL/minute/1.73 m2). The eGFR was negatively correlated with baPWV (r = -0.352, P < 0.001), significantly. The eGFR was lower in women with coronary atherosclerosis than in normal control women, markedly. Reduced eGFR was significantly associated with the presence of coronary atherosclerosis (odds ratio [OR] = 7.528, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.728-20.772, P < 0.001). Conclusions Decreased eGFR was closely associated with increased arterial stiffness and coronary atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Evaluating subclinical atherosclerosis by screening the renal function in postmenopausal women may be helpful screening high risk group and considering starting menopausal hormone therapy before atherosclerosis development. PMID:28119897

  11. In vivo swine kidney viscoelasticity during acute gradual decrease in renal blood flow: pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew; Kinnick, Randall; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study kidney mechanical properties and have demonstrated that the kidney elastic modulus increases with disease state. However, studies in swine suggests that kidney elastic modulus is also affected by hemodynamic variables. A newly emerging method called Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) offers a tool to determine renal elasticity and viscosity in vivo. The purpose of this study is directed toward evaluating the feasibility of SDUV for in vivo measurements of healthy swine kidney during acute gradual decease of renal blood flow. In this study in vivo SDUV measurements were made on a group of 5 normal swine kidneys at baseline renal blood flow (RBF) and 25, 50, 75 and 100% decrease in RBF. The shear elastic modulus at full baseline was 7.04 ± 0.92 kPa and 3.48 ± 0.20 kPa at 100% decrease in RBF. The viscosity did not change between baseline (2.23 ± 0.33 Pa·s) and 100% decrease in RBF (2.03 ± 0.32 Pa·s). The data from this study indicates that other variables such as local blood flow, pressure and volume as well as method accuracy need to be measured to illustrate the relationship between shear elasticity and viscosity associated with acute kidney processes. PMID:24533039

  12. Aldosterone-reversible decrease in the density of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in the rat after adrenalectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Skolnick, P.

    1987-03-01

    A statistically significant decrease in the density of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors was observed in renal membranes of rats beginning 2 weeks after adrenalectomy when compared with sham-operated controls. This decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density was manifest as a decrease in the maximum binding of two ligands, (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 and (/sup 3/H)PK 11195, without accompanying changes in their Kd for this site. Similar changes were not seen in another aldosterone-sensitive organ, the submandibular salivary gland. The decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density observed in adrenalectomized rat renal membranes was restored to control levels after 1 week of aldosterone administration using a dose (12.5 micrograms/kg/day) that had no effect on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density in sham-operated animals. In contrast, dexamethasone administration (50 micrograms/kg/day, 1 week) had no effect on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density when administered to either adrenalectomized or sham-operated rats. Further, adrenal demedullation had no effect on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density or affinity. The decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density was localized to the renal cortex and the outer stripe of the medulla by gross dissection of renal slices and renal tissue section autoradiography. The specific effect of adrenalectomy on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density, the lack of direct effect of aldosterone on (/sup 3/H) Ro 5-4864 binding and the localization of the change in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density to the renal cortex and outer stripe suggest that these changes may reflect an adaptation of the renal nephron (possibly the distal convoluted tubule, intermediate tubule and/or the collecting duct) to the loss of mineralocorticoid hormones.

  13. Renal Denervation in a Real Life Setting: A Gradual Decrease in Home Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Beeftink, Martine M. A.; Spiering, Wilko; Bots, Michiel L.; Verloop, Willemien L.; De Jager, Rosa L.; Sanders, Margreet F.; Vonken, Evert-jan; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Voskuil, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the blood pressure dynamics after renal denervation through monthly home blood pressure measurements throughout the first 12 months. Methods A cohort of 70 patients performed highly standardized monthly home blood pressure monitoring during the first year after denervation according to the European Society of Hypertension guidelines. At baseline and 12 months follow-up, office and ambulatory blood pressure as well as routine physical and laboratory assessment was performed. Results Home blood pressure decreased with a rate of 0.53 mmHg/month (95% CI 0.20 to 0.86) systolic and 0.26 mmHg/month (95% CI 0.08 to 0.44) diastolic throughout 12 months of follow-up, while the use of antihypertensive medication remained stable (+0.03 daily defined doses/month, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.08). On average, a 12 month reduction of 8.1 mmHg (95% CI 4.2 to 12.0) was achieved in home systolic blood pressure, 9.3 mmHg (95% CI -14.2 to -4.4) as measured by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and 15.9 mmHg (95% CI -23.8 to -7.9) on office measurements. Conclusion Blood pressure reduction after renal denervation occurs as a gradual decrease that extends to at least one-year follow-up. Home monitoring seems a suitable alternative for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring after renal denervation. PMID:27631608

  14. Decreased Expression of SRSF2 Splicing Factor Inhibits Apoptotic Pathways in Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kędzierska, Hanna; Popławski, Piotr; Hoser, Grażyna; Rybicka, Beata; Rodzik, Katarzyna; Sokół, Elżbieta; Bogusławska, Joanna; Tański, Zbigniew; Fogtman, Anna; Koblowska, Marta; Piekiełko-Witkowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Serine and arginine rich splicing factor 2(SRSF2) belongs to the serine/arginine (SR)-rich family of proteins that regulate alternative splicing. Previous studies suggested that SRSF2 can contribute to carcinogenic processes. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype of kidney cancer, highly aggressive and difficult to treat, mainly due to resistance to apoptosis. In this study we hypothesized that SRSF2 contributes to the regulation of apoptosis in ccRCC. Using tissue samples obtained from ccRCC patients, as well as independent validation on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data, we demonstrate for the first time that expression of SRSF2 is decreased in ccRCC tumours when compared to non-tumorous control tissues. Furthermore, by employing a panel of ccRCC-derived cell lines with silenced SRSF2 expression and qPCR arrays we show that SRSF2 contributes not only to splicing patterns but also to expression of multiple apoptotic genes, including new SRSF2 targets: DIABLO, BIRC5/survivin, TRAIL, BIM, MCL1, TNFRSF9, TNFRSF1B, CRADD, BCL2L2, BCL2A1, and TP53. We also identified a new splice variant of CFLAR, an inhibitor of caspase activity. These changes culminate in diminished caspase-9 activity and inhibition of apoptosis. In summary, we show for the first time that decreased expression of SRSF2 in ccRCC contributes to protection of cancer cells viability. PMID:27690003

  15. Interleukin-1 decreases renal sodium reabsorption: possible mechanism of endotoxin-induced natriuresis

    SciTech Connect

    Caverzasio, J.; Rizzoli, R.; Dayer, J.M.; Bonjour, J.P.

    1987-05-01

    Administration of pyrogen or endotoxins such as Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide can elicit a marked increase in urinary sodium excretion. This response occurs without any elevation in the filtered load of sodium and it does not appear to be prostaglandin mediated. The various effects produced by endotoxins appear to have interleukin-1 as a common mediator. In the present work, the authors have studied whether human recombinant interleukin-1..beta.. (hrIL-1) could affect the renal handling of sodium and thus, could be implicated in natriuretic response to pyrogens or endotoxins. They observed that hrIL-1 intravenously injected into conscious rats provokes a marked increase in sodium excretion. This natriuretic response was not associated with any increase in glomerular filtration rate (clearance of (/sup 3/H)inulin), nor was it accompanied by significant changes in the urinary excretion of potassium, calcium, or inorganic phosphate. The only concomitant alteration was a decrease in urinary pH. Pretreatment with indomethacin abolished the effect of hrIL-1 on urinary pH but did not modify the natriuretic response. In conclusion, hrIL-1 elicits a selective decrease in tubular sodium reabsorption, which does not appear to involve a change in prostaglandin synthesis. This observation strongly suggests that interleukin-1 could be a key mediator in endotoxin-induced natriuresis.

  16. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  17. Decreased expression of Dkk1 and Dkk3 in human clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chang-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Yang, Bin; Geng, Jiang; Peng, Bo; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2014-06-01

    The expression patterns of the Dickkopf (Dkk) family of proteins varies in different cancers. In the present study, the expression levels of Dkk1 and Dkk3 were investigated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues. Dkk1 and Dkk3 serum levels were also examined in patients with ccRCC, and the association between clinicopathological features and Dkk levels was investigated. Serum Dkk1 and Dkk3 were quantified using ELISA in 64 patients with ccRCC and in 30 healthy individuals (controls). The expression levels of Dkk1 and Dkk3 were analyzed in tumor and adjacent normal tissues obtained from patients with ccRCC (n=20) using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The mean serum levels of Dkk1 and Dkk3 in the patients with ccRCC were significantly lower than those in the healthy controls. Furthermore, the serum Dkk1 levels were significantly lower at higher tumor‑node‑metastasis stages and tumor grades. qPCR, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed a significant decrease in the Dkk1 and Dkk3 mRNA and protein levels in the tumor tissues compared with the adjacent normal tissues. Consequently, Dkk1 and Dkk3 may present a novel molecular target for the diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of ccRCC.

  18. Prophylactic furosemide infusion decreasing early major postoperative renal dysfunction in on-pump adult cardiac surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Solmaz; Bavil, Fariba Mirzaei; Bilehjani, Eissa; Abolhasani, Sona; Mirinazhad, Moussa; Naghipour, Bahman

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute renal dysfunction is a common complication of cardiac surgery. Furosemide is used in prevention, or treatment, of acute renal dysfunction. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of intra- and early postoperative furosemide infusion on preventing acute renal dysfunction in elective adult cardiac surgery. Methods Eighty-one patients, candidates of elective cardiac surgery, were enrolled in this study in either the furosemide (n=41) or placebo (n=40) group. Furosemide (2 mg/h) or 0.9% saline was administered and continued up to 12 hours postoperatively. We measured serum creatinine (Scr) at preoperative and on the second and fifth postoperative days. Then calculated estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at these times. An increase in Scr of >0.5 mg/dL and/or >25%–50%, compared to preoperative values, was considered as acute kidney injury (AKI). In contrast, an increase in Scr by >50% and/or the need for hemodialysis was regarded as acute renal failure (ARF). At the end we compared the AKI or ARF incidence between the two groups. Results On the second and fifth postoperative days, Scr was lower, and the eGFR was higher in the furosemide group. AKI incidence was similar in the two groups (11 vs 12 cases; P-value 0.622); however, ARF rate was lower in furosemide group (1 vs 6 cases; P-value 0.044). During the study period, Scr was more stable in the furosemide group, however in the placebo group, Scr initially increased and then decreased to its preoperative value after a few days. Conclusion This study showed that intra- and early postoperative furosemide infusion has a renal protective effect in adult cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Although this protective effect cannot be discovered in mild renal dysfunctions, it apparently reduces the rate of the more severe renal dysfunctions. A more multidisciplinary strategy may be needed in reducing the milder renal damage. PMID:28176949

  19. Renal Damage in Obstructive Nephropathy Is Decreased in Skp2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sayuri; Fukasawa, Hirotaka; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Uchida, Chiharu; Hattori, Takayuki; Isobe, Tomoyasu; Oda, Toshiaki; Misaki, Taro; Ohashi, Naro; Nakayama, Keiko; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Hishida, Akira; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 mediated by SCF-Skp2 ubiquitin ligase is involved in cell cycle regulation. Proliferation of tubular cells is a characteristic feature in obstructed kidneys of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Comparing Skp2+/+ mice with Skp2−/− mice, we investigated the involvement of Skp2, a component of SCF-Skp2 ubiquitin ligase for p27, in the progression of renal lesions in unilateral ureteral obstructed kidneys. mRNA expression of Skp2 was markedly increased in the obstructed kidneys from Skp2+/+ mice and peaked 3 days after unilateral ureteral obstruction. Renal atrophy, tubular dilatation, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and increases in α-smooth muscle actin expression, the number of tubular cells, and proliferating tubular cells positive for Ki67 were observed in the obstructed kidneys from Skp2+/+ mice; however, these findings were significantly attenuated in Skp2−/− mice. The p27 protein level was increased in the obstructed kidneys but was significantly greater in Skp2−/− mice. The number of Ki67-positive p27-negative cells was lower in obstructed kidneys from Skp2−/− mice than Skp2+/+ mice, whereas that of Ki67-negative p27-positive cells was greater in Skp2−/− mice. These findings suggest that p27 accumulation, which results from SCF-Skp2 ubiquitin ligase deficiency in Skp2−/− mice, is involved in the amelioration of renal damage induced by obstructive nephropathy. PMID:17620370

  20. Disruption of prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 impairs urinary concentration via decreasing aquaporin 2 in renal collecting ducts

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Cao, Rong; Du, Shengnan; Jia, Xiao; Zheng, Senfeng; Huang, Shizheng; Han, Qifei; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Miao, Yifei; Kang, Jihong; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Guan, Youfei

    2015-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin is a systemic effector in urinary concentration. However, increasing evidence suggests that other locally produced factors may also play an important role in the regulation of water reabsorption in renal collecting ducts. Recently, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor EP4 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. To evaluate the role of EP4 in regulating water homeostasis, mice with renal tubule-specific knockout of EP4 (Ksp-EP4−/−) and collecting duct-specific knockout of EP4 (AQP2-EP4−/−) were generated using the Cre-loxP recombination system. Urine concentrating defect was observed in both Ksp-EP4−/− and AQP2-EP4−/− mice. Decreased aquaporin 2 (AQP2) abundance and apical membrane targeting in renal collecting ducts were evident in Ksp-EP4−/− mice. In vitro studies demonstrated that AQP2 mRNA and protein levels were significantly up-regulated in mouse primary inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells after pharmacological activation or adenovirus-mediated overexpression of EP4 in a cAMP/cAMP-response element binding protein-dependent manner. In addition, EP4 activation or overexpression also increased AQP2 membrane accumulation in a mouse IMCD cell line (IMCD3) stably transfected with the AQP2 gene, mainly through the cAMP/protein kinase A and extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways. In summary, the EP4 receptor in renal collecting ducts plays an important role in regulating urinary concentration under physiological conditions. The ability of EP4 to promote AQP2 membrane targeting and increase AQP2 abundance makes it a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of clinical disorders including acquired and congenital diabetes insipidus. PMID:26100911

  1. The nephroprotection exerted by curcumin in maleate-induced renal damage is associated with decreased mitochondrial fission and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Del Carmen Cárdenas-Aguayo, María; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Tapia, Edilia; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Reyes, José L; Arreola-Mendoza, Laura; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-11-12

    We have previously reported that the antioxidant curcumin exerts nephroprotection in maleate-induced renal damage, a model associated with oxidative stress. However, the mechanisms involved in curcumin protective effect were not explored, to assess this issue, curcumin was administered daily by gavage (150 mg/kg) five days before a single maleate (400 mg/kg)-injection. Curcumin prevented maleate-induced proteinuria, increased heat shock protein of 72 KDa (Hsp72) expression, and decreased plasma glutathione peroxidase activity. Maleate-induced oxidative stress by increasing the nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4 (NOX4) and mitochondrial complex I-dependent superoxide anion (O2 •(-) ) production, formation of malondialdehyde (MDA)- and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT)-protein adducts and protein carbonylation and decreased GSH/GSSG ratio. Curcumin treatment ameliorated all the above-described changes. The maleate-induced epithelial damage, evaluated by claudin-2 and occludin expressions, was ameliorated by curcumin. It was found that maleate-induced oxidative stress promoted mitochondrial fission, evaluated by dynamin-related protein (Drp) 1 and fission (Fis) 1 expressions and by electron-microscopy, and autophagy, evaluated by phospho-threonine 389 from p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p-Thr 389 p70S6K), beclin 1, microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 phosphatidylethanolamine conjugate (LC3-II), autophagy-related gene 5 and 12 (Atg5-Atg12) complex, p62, and lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP)-2 expressions in isolated proximal tubules and by electron-microscopy and LC-3 immunolabelling. Curcumin treatment ameliorated these changes. Moreover, curcumin alone induced autophagy in proximal tubules. These data suggest that the nephroprotective effect exerted by curcumin in maleate-induced renal damage is associated with decreased mitochondrial fission and autophagy. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):686-702, 2016.

  2. Polydatin ameliorates renal ischemia/reperfusion injury by decreasing apoptosis and oxidative stress through activating sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiu-Hong; Liu, Hong-Bao; Wang, Jian-Bo

    2016-10-01

    Polydatin, a glucoside of resveratrol, recently has been demonstrated possibly to exert its biological effects by targeting sonic hedgehog (Shh). However, whether Shh signaling pathway is involved in the therapeutic effects of polydatin for renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury has not been evaluated. Our results showed that I/R induced the secretion of Shh, upregulated Patched and Smoothened, and enhanced the nuclear translocation and target gene transcription of Glioblastoma 1 in renal I/R injury models, which were further upregulated after the administration of polydatin significantly and in turn exerted prominent nephroprotective effects against cell apoptosis and oxidative stress. The treatment with cyclopamine (a specific inhibitor of Smoothened) or 5E1 (an anti-Shh antibody) not only markedly inhibited the activation of the Shh pathway, but also dramatically suppressed the nephroprotective effects of polydatin above-mentioned. These results advance our knowledge that polydatin can provide protection for kidneys against I/R injury by enhancing antioxidant capacity and decreasing cell apoptosis through activating Shh signaling pathway.

  3. Inhibition of COX 1 and 2 prior to Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Decreases the Development of Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Feitoza, Carla Q; Gonçalves, Giselle M; Semedo, Patrícia; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Pinheiro, Hélady S; Beraldo, Felipe Caetano; dos Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão; de Paula A Teixeira, Vicente; dos Reis, Marlene A; Mazzali, Marilda; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels O S

    2008-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) contributes to the development of chronic interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy in renal allograft patients. Cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2 actively participate in acute ischemic injury by activating endothelial cells and inducing oxidative stress. Furthermore, blockade of COX 1 and 2 has been associated with organ improvement after ischemic damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of COX 1 and 2 in the development of fibrosis by performing a COX 1 and 2 blockade immediately before IRI. We subjected C57Bl/6 male mice to 60 min of unilateral renal pedicle occlusion. Prior to surgery mice were either treated with indomethacin (IMT) at days –1 and 0 or were untreated. Blood and kidney samples were collected 6 wks after IRI. Kidney samples were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for expression of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), osteopontin (OPN), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), vimentin, connective-tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I, and bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7). To assess tissue fibrosis we performed morphometric analyses and Sirius red staining. We also performed immunohistochemical analysis of anti-actin smooth muscle. Renal function did not significantly differ between groups. Animals pretreated with IMT showed significantly less interstitial fibrosis than nontreated animals. Gene transcript analyses showed decreased expression of TGF-β, MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-1-β, vimentin, collagen I, CTGF, and IL-10 mRNA (all P < 0.05). Moreover, HO-1 mRNA was increased in animals pretreated with IMT (P < 0.05). Conversely, IMT treatment decreased osteopontin expression and enhanced BMP-7 expression, although these levels did not reach statistical significance when compared with control expression levels. The blockade of COX 1 and 2 resulted in less tissue fibrosis, which

  4. Calcium Dobesilate Prevents Diabetic Kidney Disease by Decreasing Bim and Inhibiting Apoptosis of Renal Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tian; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Xiao-Qian; Shang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Zhong-Wen; Liao, Lin; Dong, Jian-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Apoptosis of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) plays a vital role in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Calcium dobesilate is a vascular protective compound used for treatment of diabetic retinopathy and chronic venous insufficiency. The aim of this study was to determine whether calcium dobesilate can protect PTECs from glucose-induced apoptosis and the potential mechanism of this effect. It is indicated that high glucose promoted abnormal apoptosis of HK2 cells, which was inhibited by treatment of calcium dobesilate, while Bim expression decreased in response to calcium dobesilate in high-glucose-treated HK2 cells. These findings confirmed the therapeutic effects of calcium dobesilate on DKD and emphasized the importance of it as a potentially crucial drug in treatment of DKD.

  5. In-line Filtration Decreases Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Renal and Hematologic Dysfunction in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Michael; Dziuba, Friederike; Jack, Thomas; Köditz, Harald; Kaussen, Torsten; Bertram, Harald; Beerbaum, Philipp; Boehne, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) frequently leads to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) with concomitant organ malfunction. Infused particles may exacerbate inflammatory syndromes since they activate the coagulation cascade and alter inflammatory response or microvascular perfusion. In a randomized, controlled, prospective trial, we have previously shown that particle-retentive in-line filtration prevented major complications in critically ill children. Now, we investigated the effect of in-line filtration on major complications in the subgroup of cardiac patients. Children admitted to tertiary pediatric intensive care unit were randomized to either control or filter group obtaining in-line filtration throughout complete infusion therapy. Risk differences and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) of several complications such as SIRS, sepsis, mortality, various organ failure and dysfunction were compared between both groups using the Wald method. 305 children (n = 150 control, n = 155 filter group) with cardiac diseases were finally analyzed. The majority was admitted after cardiac surgery with CPB. Risk of SIRS (-11.3 %; 95 % CI -21.8 to -0.5 %), renal (-10.0 %; 95 % CI -17.0 to -3.0 %) and hematologic (-8.1 %; 95 % CI -14.2 to -0.2 %) dysfunction were significantly decreased within the filter group. No risk differences were demonstrated for occurrence of sepsis, any other organ failure or dysfunctions between both groups. Infused particles might aggravate a systemic hypercoagulability and inflammation with subsequent organ malfunction in pediatric cardiac intensive care patients. Particle-retentive in-line filtration might be effective in preventing SIRS and maintaining renal and hematologic function. In-line filtration offers a novel therapeutic option to decrease morbidity in cardiac intensive care.

  6. Compromised Diet Quality is Associated with Decreased Renal Function in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyerang; Lim, Hyunjung; Choue, Ryowon

    2014-07-01

    Nutritional status of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is important since it affects growth and development. This study was to investigate overall diet quality measured by nutrient intake adequacy, nutrient density, and several dietary habits in children with CKD and its relationship with clinical parameters according to glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Assessment of nutritional status and diet quality was conducted in nineteen children with CKD. Average Z-scores of height, weight and body mass index (BMI) in the participants were less than standard growth rate. Nutritional status, such as Z-scores of height (p < 0.05) and serum total protein (p < 0.05), were significantly lower in the children with GFR < 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) compared to those with GFR ≥ 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Nutrition adequacy ratio of energy, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, folate, iron, and zinc and overall diet quality were significantly poorer in the children with GFR < 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Poorer appetite and avoidance of food were observed in the children with higher blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Intakes of iron, zinc, thiamin, niacin, and vitamin B6 were positively correlated with GFR. Intakes of calcium, potassium and folate were positively correlated with BUN, while protein intakes were negatively correlated. Overall nutrient intakes were inadequate and diet quality was decreased as kidney function was decreased. Dietary habit and appetite were also related with kidney function in this study subjects. Systemic efforts of nutritional intervention are imperative to prevent deteriorating growth and development and improve the nutritional status in children with CKD.

  7. The association of geographic atrophy and decreased renal function in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Leisy, H B; Rastogi, A; Guevara, G; Ahmad, M; Smith, R T

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of the study was to investigate the association between area and presence of geographic atrophy (GA) and renal function, as measured by glomerular filtration rate (GFR).Patients and methodsWe retrospectively identified patients aged 50-90 years who were assigned an ICD-9 diagnosis code for age-related macular generation (AMD) between January 2012 and January 2016. Patients met inclusion criteria if they had at least one macular spectral domain optical coherence tomography volume scan, one provider note, and one GFR value in the electronic medical record. Images were evaluated for the presence of GA, area of GA, drusen, and subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) and for subfoveal choroidal thickness (CTh) by standard criteria. Imaging findings were correlated with the most recent GFR from the patient's chart.ResultsWe identified 107 patients who met our inclusion criteria (mean age=74 years, range 50-90 years). Overall, we found a significant correlation between the presence of GA and reduced GFR (P=0.002), which was maintained even after accounting for age and other confounders. No association between GFR and GA area was found. CTh was significantly lower in patients with GA (P=0.038) and those with decreased GFR (P=0.004). Within the SDD-positive population, GA was associated with reduced GFR (P=0.007) but only trended toward significance after controlling for age.ConclusionOur study findings demonstrate an association between impaired renal function and the presence, but not area, of GA within an AMD population. These findings may shed light on common pathogenic mechanisms for these two diseases.

  8. Decreased TCL6 expression is associated with poor prognosis in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guohai; Zhang, Hailiang; Sun, Fukang; Ye, Dingwei

    2017-01-01

    One-third of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients present with metastasis at the time of diagnosis. The prognosis of these patients is poor. To identify potential prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for ccRCC, we re-evaluated published long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expression profiling data from the Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress database. We found that five lncRNAs were differentially expressed in ccRCC and adjacent tissues. These lncRNAs were assessed in an independent cohort of 71 paired patient samples using real-time PCR. Differences in expression of three of the lncRNAs (ENSG00000177133, TCL6, and ENSG00000244020) were validated in this analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that low expression of ENSG00000177133 and TCL6 was associated with a poor prognosis. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses demonstrated that TCL6 but not ENSG00000177133 expression was an independent predictor of ccRCC aggressiveness and had hazard ratios predictive of clinical outcome. TCL6 expression was negatively correlated with pTNM stage. Overexpression of TCL6 in 786-O and Caki-1 ccRCC cells decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis compared to controls. Our results indicate that lncRNA expression is altered in ccRCC and that decreased TCL6 expression may be an independent adverse prognostic factor in ccRCC patients. PMID:27494890

  9. Decreased Expression of Inhibitor of Caspase-Activated DNase (ICAD) in Renal Cell Carcinoma – Tissue Microarray of Human Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rajandram, Retnagowri; Razack, Azad H. A.; Ng, Keng Lim

    2016-01-01

    Although primary localised tumours of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can be treated relatively successfully with surgery, metastatic RCC has poor prognosis because of late diagnosis and resistance to therapies. In the present study, we were interested in profiling the protein expression of “inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase” (ICAD), an apoptosis inhibitor, in kidney cancer and its paired normal kidney. Immunohistochemistry with automated batch staining and morphometry using digital pathology were used to compare ICAD in 121 RCC specimens with their paired normal kidney tissue. Tissue microarray of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue was used. Intensity and localisation of ICAD were compared between normal and cancer samples, and against grading within the cancers. The results demonstrated that, in this cohort, ICAD was highly expressed in the proximal tubular epithelium of normal kidney, and significantly decreased in clear cell RCC tissue (p < 0.05) as well as other subtypes of RCC (p < 0.01) compared with normal kidney. There was a tendency towards nuclear localisation of ICAD in clear cell RCC, but not in other subtypes of RCC. No significant association was found between ICAD intensity and grade of RCC. In summary, down-regulation of ICAD occurs in RCC. ICAD normally inhibits DNA fragmentation and apoptosis; thus, its down-regulation was unexpected in a cancer known for its resistance to apoptosis. However, these RCC samples were from primary, not metastatic, RCC sites, and down-regulated ICAD may be part of a progressive pathway that promotes RCC metastasis.

  10. Diclofenac toxicity in Gyps vulture is associated with decreased uric acid excretion and not renal portal vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Swan, G E

    2009-04-01

    Diclofenac (DF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is largely regarded as one of the most devastating environmental toxicant in recent times, after accidental exposure via their food-chain lead to massive mortalities in three vulture species on the Asian subcontinent. Although the use of diclofenac was recently banned on the Indian subcontinent, following the favourable safety profile of meloxicam, its mechanism of toxicity remains unknown. In an attempt to establish this mechanism, we test three hypotheses using models established from either the domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus) or the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus). We demonstrate that both DF and meloxicam are toxic to renal tubular epithelial (RTE) cells following 12 h of exposure, due to an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which could be temporarily ameliorated by pre-incubation with uric acid (UA). When cultures were incubated with either drug for only 2 h, meloxicam showed no toxicity in contrast to diclofenac. In both cases no increase in ROS production was evident. In addition, diclofenac decreased the transport of uric acid, by interfering with the p-amino-hippuric acid (PAH) channel. We conclude that vulture susceptibility to diclofenac results from a combination of an increased ROS, interference with UA transport and the duration of exposure.

  11. New-onset microalbuminuria following allogeneic myeloablative SCT is a sign of near-term decrease in renal function.

    PubMed

    Morito, T; Ando, M; Kobayashi, T; Kakihana, K; Ohashi, K; Akiyama, H; Tsuchiya, K; Nitta, K; Sakamaki, H

    2013-07-01

    The emergence of microalbuminuria following conditioning chemotherapy may predict the development of renal dysfunction. To confirm this, a 1-year retrospective cohort study was conducted in 31 myeloablative allogeneic SCT patients who received five consecutive measurements of albuminuria before conditioning therapy and on days 0, 7, 14 and 28 following SCT. The cohort had neither microalbuminuria nor renal dysfunction at baseline. Microalbuminuria was defined as an albumin-creatinine (Cr) ratio over 30 mg/g, and renal dysfunction was as an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Cumulative incidence of renal dysfunction over time was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to examine an association of de novo microalbuminuria with the incidence of renal dysfunction. In all, 16 patients (52%) developed microalbuminuria that was positive at least two times among the four measurements after SCT. The actuarial occurrence of chronic kidney disease was significantly higher in patients who developed microalbuminuria than in those who did not. Incidence of microalbuminuria had a significant risk of subsequent renal dysfunction (hazard ratio (95% confidence interval), 7.3 (1.2-140)). In conclusion, de novo microalbuminuria following conditioning therapy is a warning of near-term loss of renal function.

  12. Risk Factors Associated with Decreased Renal Function after Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy: A Multivariate Analysis of a Single Surgeon Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jinwook; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Kim, Young-Kug; Hong, Bumsik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy is a minimally invasive procedure for living kidney donation. The surgeon operative volume is associated with postoperative morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the risk factors associated with decreased renal function after hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy performed by a single experienced surgeon. Methods: We included living renal donors who underwent hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy by a single experienced surgeon between 2006 and 2013. Decreased renal function was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 on postoperative day 4. The donors were categorized into groups with postoperative eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the risk factors associated with decreased renal function after hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy. The hospital stay duration, intensive care unit admission rate, and eGFR at postoperative year 1 were evaluated. Results: Of 643 patients, 166 (25.8%) exhibited a postoperative eGFR of < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the risk factors for decreased renal function were age [odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 1.062 (1.035-1.089), P < 0.001], male sex [odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 3.436 (2.123-5.561), P < 0.001], body mass index (BMI) [odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 1.093 (1.016-1.177), P = 0.018], and preoperative eGFR [odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 0.902 (0.881-0.924), P < 0.001]. There were no significant differences in postoperative hospital stay duration and intensive care unit admission rate between the two groups. In addition, 383 of 643 donors were analyzed at postoperative year 1. Sixty donors consisting of 14 (5.0%) from the group of 279 donors in eGFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, and 46 (44.2%) from the group of 104 donors in eGFR < 60 mL/min/1

  13. SGLT2 Expression is increased in Human Diabetic Nephropathy: SGLT2 Inhibition Decreases Renal Lipid Accumulation, Inflammation and the Development of Nephropathy in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxin X; Levi, Jonathan; Luo, Yuhuan; Myakala, Komuraiah; Herman-Edelstein, Michal; Qiu, Liru; Wang, Dong; Peng, Yingqiong; Grenz, Almut; Lucia, Scott; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; D'Agati, Vivette D; Koepsell, Hermann; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Rosenberg, Avi; Levi, Moshe

    2017-02-14

    There is very limited human renal sodium gradient dependent glucose transporter protein SGLT2 mRNA and protein expression data reported in the literature. Aim 1 of this study was to determine SGLT2 mRNA and protein levels in human and animal models of diabetic nephropathy. We have found that the expression of SGLT2 mRNA and protein is increased in renal biopsies from human subjects with diabetic nephropathy. This is in contrast to db-db mice which had no changes in renal SGLT-2 protein expression. Furthermore, the effect of SGLT2 inhibition on renal lipid content and inflammation is not known. Aim 2 of this study was to determine the potential mechanisms of beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibition in progression of diabetic renal disease. We treated db/db mice with a selective SGLT2 inhibitor JNJ 39933673. We found that SGLT2 inhibition caused marked decreases in systolic blood pressure, kidney weight/body weight ratio, urinary albumin and urinary thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS). SGLT2 inhibition prevented renal lipid accumulation via inhibition of ChREBP-β, LPK, SCD-1 and DGAT1, key transcriptional factors and enzymes that mediate fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis. SGLT2 inhibition also prevented inflammation via inhibition of CD68 macrophage accumulation, and expression of p65, TLR4, MCP-1 and OPN. These effects were associated with reduced mesangial expansion, accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and type IV collagen, and loss of podocyte markers WT1 and synaptopodin, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy. In summary, our study showed that SGLT2 inhibition modulates renal lipid metabolism and inflammation and prevents the development of nephropathy in db/db mice.

  14. Acute renal failure induced by markedly decreased appetite secondary to a depressive episode after discontinuation of long-term lithium therapy in an elderly patient with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Okada, Akira

    2014-05-16

    Some elderly patients on chronic lithium therapy for bipolar disorder and their doctors may be faced with a therapeutic dilemma over whether or not to continue prescribing/taking lithium given their increased risk of reduced renal function. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who discontinued lithium therapy due to increased risk factors for renal injury. After discontinuation, she experienced markedly decreased appetite secondary to a depressive episode, and developed acute renal failure, which subsequently progressed to a more advanced stage of chronic kidney disease. This case suggests that extreme care must be taken to prevent the recurrence of depression in elderly patients with bipolar disorder who discontinue lithium therapy, even when they had been emotionally stable for a long time while receiving lithium. Medications other than lithium for bipolar disorder may be needed at the time lithium therapy is discontinued.

  15. Low-flow CO2 removal integrated into a renal-replacement circuit can reduce acidosis and decrease vasopressor requirements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lung-protective ventilation in patients with ARDS and multiorgan failure, including renal failure, is often paralleled with a combined respiratory and metabolic acidosis. We assessed the effectiveness of a hollow-fiber gas exchanger integrated into a conventional renal-replacement circuit on CO2 removal, acidosis, and hemodynamics. Methods In ten ventilated critically ill patients with ARDS and AKI undergoing renal- and respiratory-replacement therapy, effects of low-flow CO2 removal on respiratory acidosis compensation were tested by using a hollow-fiber gas exchanger added to the renal-replacement circuit. This was an observational study on safety, CO2-removal capacity, effects on pH, ventilator settings, and hemodynamics. Results CO2 elimination in the low-flow circuit was safe and was well tolerated by all patients. After 4 hours of treatment, a mean reduction of 17.3 mm Hg (−28.1%) pCO2 was observed, in line with an increase in pH. In hemodynamically instable patients, low-flow CO2 elimination was paralleled by hemodynamic improvement, with an average reduction of vasopressors of 65% in five of six catecholamine-dependent patients during the first 24 hours. Conclusions Because no further catheters are needed, besides those for renal replacement, the implementation of a hollow-fiber gas exchanger in a renal circuit could be an attractive therapeutic tool with only a little additional trauma for patients with mild to moderate ARDS undergoing invasive ventilation with concomitant respiratory acidosis, as long as no severe oxygenation defects indicate ECMO therapy. PMID:23883472

  16. Effects of Decreased Vitamin D and Accumulated Uremic Toxin on Human CYP3A4 Activity in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Nagano, Yui; Hosoda, Satomi; Shiraishi, Asuka; Miyoshi, Ayaka; Hiraoka, Shima; Furukubo, Taku; Izumi, Satoshi; Yamakawa, Tomoyuki; Minegaki, Tetsuya; Nishiguchi, Kohshi

    2013-01-01

    In patients with end-stage renal disease, not only renal clearance but also hepatic clearance is known to be impaired. For instance, the concentration of erythromycin, a substrate of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), has been reported to be elevated in patients with end-stage renal disease. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the reason for the decrease in hepatic clearance in patients with end-stage renal disease. Deproteinized pooled sera were used to assess the effects of low-molecular-weight uremic toxins on CYP3A4 activity in human liver microsomes and human LS180 cells. Four uremic toxins (3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropanoic acid, hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and 3-indoxyl sulfate) present at high concentrations in uremic serum were also studied. Simultaneous treatment of uremic serum (less than 10%) or uremic toxins did not affect testosterone 6β-hydroxylation in human liver microsomes. On the other hand, pretreatment of each serum activates CYP3A4 in LS180 cells, and the increased CYP3A4 activity in uremic serum-treated cells was smaller than normal serum-treated cells. In addition, CYP3A4 and CYP24A1 mRNA levels also increased in LS180 cells exposed to normal serum, and this effect was reduced in uremic serum-treated cells and in cells exposed to uremic serum added to normal serum. Furthermore, addition of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to uremic serum partially restored the serum effect on CYP3A4 expression. The present study suggests that the decrease of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and the accumulation of uremic toxins contributed to the decreased hepatic clearance of CYP3A4 substrates in patients with end-stage renal disease. PMID:23965431

  17. A forskolin derivative, colforsin daropate hydrochloride, inhibits the decrease in cortical renal blood flow induced by noradrenaline or angiotensin II in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Junichi; Minami, Kouichiro; Segawa, Kayoko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Shiraishi, Munehiro; Yamamoto, Chikako; Sata, Takeyoshi; Sung-Teh, Kim; Shigematsu, Akio

    2004-01-01

    A forskolin derivative, colforsin daropate hydrochloride (CDH), acts directly on adenylate cyclase to increase the intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels which produce a positive inotropic effect and a lower blood pressure. However, little is known about the effects of CDH on the renal function. We used laser Doppler flowmetry to measure the cortical renal blood flow (RBF) in male Wistar rats given a continuous intravenous infusion of CDH and evaluated the effects of CDH on the noradrenaline (NA) and angiotensin II (AngII) induced increases in blood pressure and reductions in RBF. Continuous intravenous administration of CDH at 0.25 microg/kg/min did not affect the mean arterial pressure (MAP), but increased heart rate and RBF. Continuous intravenous administration of CDH at high doses (0.5-0.75 microg/kg/min) decreased the MAP, with little effect on the RBF. The administration of exogenous NA (1.7 microg/kg) increased the MAP and decreased the RBF. However, a bolus injection of NA did not decrease the RBF during continuous intravenous administration of CDH, and CDH did not affect the NA-induced increase in MAP. The administration of exogenous AngII (100 ng/kg) increased MAP and decreased RBF and heart rate, but a bolus injection of AngII did not decrease RBF during continuous intravenous administration of CDH. These results suggest that CDH plays a protective role against the pressor effects and the decrease in RBF induced by NA or AngII.

  18. A multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programme safely decreases the duration of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescription in Singaporean adult renal patients.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yiying; Shek, Pui Ying; Teo, Isabelle; Tang, Sarah S L; Lee, Winnie; Liew, Yi Xin; Chlebicki, Piotr; Kwa, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease have increased risk of infections. Thus, physicians may favour prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic use. Studies focused on antimicrobial stewardship programmes (ASPs) in renal patients are currently lacking. Here we describe the role of a multidisciplinary ASP and the impact of ASP interventions in renal patients. A multidisciplinary ASP was initiated at a tertiary hospital in Singapore. Patients prescribed broad-spectrum parenteral antibiotics were identified daily and were subjected to prospective review with immediate concurrent feedback. ASP data from January 2010 to December 2011 were analysed for all renal patients. Outcome measures included the duration and appropriateness of antibiotics, intervention acceptance rates, cost savings and safety outcomes. A total of 2084 antibiotic courses were reviewed, of which 24% were inappropriate, with meropenem most commonly prescribed inappropriately (31.0%). The commonest reasons for inappropriate use were wrong choice (51.0%) and wrong duration (21.4%). In total, 634 recommendations were made, with high acceptance rates (73.3%). Recommendations to discontinue antibiotics (33.4%) and to optimise doses (17.2%) comprised the bulk of ASP work. A mean reduction of -1.28 days of antibiotic use was observed among patients with interventions accepted versus those rejected (P<0.001), with direct cost savings of SGD$90,045. No difference in 30-day mortality (P=0.91) was observed between the accepted and rejected intervention groups. In conclusion, a multidisciplinary ASP resulted in a shorter duration of antibiotic use without compromising safety in renal patients. Continued effort is needed to produce a long-term impact on antibiotic prescription and resistance.

  19. Site-Specific Radioiodination of HER2-Targeting Affibody Molecules using 4-Iodophenethylmaleimide Decreases Renal Uptake of Radioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Joanna; Nordeman, Patrik; Honarvar, Hadis; Altai, Mohamed; Orlova, Anna; Larhed, Mats; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small scaffold-based affinity proteins with promising properties as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. However, a high reabsorption of radiolabeled Affibody molecules in kidneys is an issue. We have shown that the use of 125I-3-iodo-((4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl)maleimide (IHPEM) for site-specific labeling of cysteine-containing Affibody molecules provides high tumor uptake but low radioactivity retention in kidneys. We hypothesized that the use of 4-iodophenethylmaleimide (IPEM) would further reduce renal retention of radioactivity because of higher lipophilicity of radiometabolites. An anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) Affibody molecule (ZHER2:2395) was labeled using 125I-IPEM with an overall yield of 45±3 %. 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 bound specifically to HER2-expressing human ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV-3 cell line). In NMRI mice, the renal uptake of 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 (24±2 and 5.7±0.3 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively) was significantly lower than uptake of 125I-IHPEM-ZHER2:2395 (50±8 and 12±2 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively). In conclusion, the use of a more lipophilic linker for the radioiodination of Affibody molecules reduces renal radioactivity. PMID:25969816

  20. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonist improve vascular function and decrease renal injury in hypertensive obese rats.

    PubMed

    Imig, John D; Walsh, Katie A; Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Nagasawa, Tasuku; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Shaw, Sean M; Hammock, Bruce D

    2012-12-01

    Cardiometabolic syndrome occurs with obesity and consists of pathophysiological factors that increase the risk for cardiovascular events. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition (sEHi) is a novel therapeutic approach that exerts renal and cardiovascular protection. Although sEHi as a therapeutic approach is promising, it could be more effective for the treatment of cardiometabolic syndrome when combined with peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists. We hypothesized that the PPARγ agonist, rosiglitazone in combination with a sEHi (tAUCB) will provide synergistic actions to decrease blood pressure, improve vascular function, decrease inflammation, and prevent renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive obese rats (SHROB). SHROB were treated with rosiglitazone, tAUCB or the combination of tAUCB and rosiglitazone for four-weeks and compared with spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Blood pressure increased in SHROB (164 ± 7 mmHg) and decreased 10 mmHg when treated with rosiglitazone, tAUCB, or tAUCB and rosiglitazone. Mesenteric artery dilation to the K(ATP) channel opener pinacidil was attenuated in SHROB (E(Max) = 77 ± 7%), compared with WKY (E(Max) = 115 ± 19) and SHR (E(Max) = 93 ± 12%). Vasodilation to pinacidil was improved by rosiglitazone (E(Max) = 92 ± 14%) but not tAUCB. Renal macrophage infiltration increased in SHROB and significantly decreased with rosiglitazone or tAUCB and rosiglitazone treatment. Albuminuria was increased in SHROB (90 ± 20 mg/d) and was significantly decreased by the combination of tAUCB and rosiglitazone (37 ± 9 mg/d). Glomerular injury in SHROB was also significantly decreased by tAUCB and rosiglitazone. These results indicate that even though sEHi or PPARγ agonist have benefits when used individually, the combination is more beneficial for the multidisease features in cardiometabolic syndrome.

  1. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonist improve vascular function and decrease renal injury in hypertensive obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Imig, John D; Walsh, Katie A; Khan, Md Abdul Hye; Nagasawa, Tasuku; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Shaw, Sean M; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Cardiometabolic syndrome occurs with obesity and consists of pathophysiological factors that increase the risk for cardiovascular events. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition (sEHi) is a novel therapeutic approach that exerts renal and cardiovascular protection. Although sEHi as a therapeutic approach is promising, it could be more effective for the treatment of cardiometabolic syndrome when combined with peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists. We hypothesized that the PPARγ agonist, rosiglitazone in combination with a sEHi (tAUCB) will provide synergistic actions to decrease blood pressure, improve vascular function, decrease inflammation, and prevent renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive obese rats (SHROB). SHROB were treated with rosiglitazone, tAUCB or the combination of tAUCB and rosiglitazone for four-weeks and compared with spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar–Kyoto (WKY) rats. Blood pressure increased in SHROB (164 ±7 mmHg) and decreased 10 mmHg when treated with rosiglitazone, tAUCB, or tAUCB and rosiglitazone. Mesenteric artery dilation to the KATP channel opener pinacidil was attenuated in SHROB (EMax = 77 ±7%), compared with WKY (EMax = 115 ±19) and SHR (EMax = 93 ±12%). Vasodilation to pinacidil was improved by rosiglitazone (EMax = 92 ±14%) but not tAUCB. Renal macrophage infiltration increased in SHROB and significantly decreased with rosiglitazone or tAUCB and rosiglitazone treatment. Albuminuria was increased in SHROB (90 ±20 mg/d) and was significantly decreased by the combination of tAUCB and rosiglitazone (37 ±9 mg/d). Glomerular injury in SHROB was also significantly decreased by tAUCB and rosiglitazone. These results indicate that even though sEHi or PPARγ agonist have benefits when used individually, the combination is more beneficial for the multidisease features in cardiometabolic syndrome. PMID:23354399

  2. Diphenyl diselenide, a simple organoselenium compound, decreases methylmercury-induced cerebral, hepatic and renal oxidative stress and mercury deposition in adult mice.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Andressa Sausen; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Rotta, Mariana dos Santos; Bohrer, Denise; Mörschbächer, Vanessa; Puntel, Robson Luís; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2009-04-06

    Oxidative stress has been pointed out as an important molecular mechanism in methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication. At low doses, diphenyl diselenide ((PhSe)2), a structurally simple organoselenium compound, has been shown to possess antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. Here we have examined the possible in vivo protective effect of diphenyl diselenide against the potential pro-oxidative effects of MeHg in mouse liver, kidney, cerebrum and cerebellum. The effects of MeHg exposure (2 mg/(kg day) of methylmercury chloride 10 ml/kg, p.o.), as well as the possible antagonist effect of diphenyl diselenide (1 and 0.4 mg/(kg day); s.c.) on body weight gain and on hepatic, cerebellar, cerebral and renal levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), non-protein thiols (NPSH), ascorbic acid content, mercury concentrations and activities of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were evaluated after 35 days of treatment. MeHg caused an increase in TBARS and decreased NPSH levels in all tissues. MeHg also induced a decrease in hepatic ascorbic acid content and in renal GPx and CAT activities. Diphenyl diselenide (1 mg/kg) conferred protection against MeHg-induced hepatic and renal lipid peroxidation and at both doses prevented the reduction in hepatic NPSH levels. Diphenyl diselenide also conferred a partial protection against MeHg-induced oxidative stress (TBARS and NPSH) in liver and cerebellum. Of particular importance, diphenyl diselenide decreased the deposition of Hg in cerebrum, cerebellum, kidney and liver. The present results indicate that diphenyl diselenide can protect against some toxic effects of MeHg in mice. This protection may be related to its antioxidant properties and its ability to reduce Hg body burden. We posit that formation of a selenol intermediate, which possesses high nucleophilicity and high affinity for MeHg, accounts for the ability of diphenyl diselenide to ameliorate Me

  3. A human novel gene DERPC on 16q22.1 inhibits prostate tumor cell growth and its expression is decreased in prostate and renal tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mei; Ma, Lanfeng; Xu, Linda; Li, Jia; Zhang, Wei; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Makarem, Mazen; Sesterhenn, Isabell; Zhang, Mei; Blanchette-Mackie, E. Joan; Moul, Judd; Srivastava, Shiv; Zou, Zhiqiang

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deletion of chromosome 16q is frequently associated with diverse tumors. Numerous studies strongly suggest the presence of one or more tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 16q22 to 16qter including the widely studied cadherin gene family. However, the specific tumor suppressor genes residing in this region need better definition and characterization. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Standard molecular biology approaches have been used to clone and characterize the DERPC cDNA and its protein product on chromosome 16q22.1. Northern blotting was used to define the expression pattern in a multiple human tissue blots. DERPC expression was examined in multi-tumor array (Clontech, CA, USA) dot blot as well as in laser capture microdissection (LCM) derived prostate cancer (CaP) specimens by quantitative RT-PCR. Western blot analysis and a fluorescent microscopy were used to characterize the molecular size and the cellular location of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged DERPC fusion proteins. A colony formation assay was conducted to determine the effects of DERPC expression on tumor cell growth. RESULTS: A novel gene DERPC (Decreased Expression in Renal and Prostate Cancer) was identified and characterized. DERPC encoded a strong basic, proline- and glycine-rich nuclear protein. DERPC was ubiquitously expressed, with abundant expression in kidney, skeletal muscle, testis, liver, ovary, and heart and moderate expression in prostate. DERPC expression was reduced in renal (67%) and prostate tumors (33%). Expression of DERPC has inhibitory potential on CaP cell growth. Further, overexpression of DERPC in LNCaP cells caused alterations of nuclear morphology. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that decreased expression of DERPC may be implicated in tumorigenesis of renal and CaPs. PMID:12477976

  4. Decreased expression of the Ets family transcription factor Fli-1 markedly prolongs survival and significantly reduces renal disease in MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian K; Gallant, Sarah; Molano, Ivan; Moussa, Omar M; Ruiz, Phillip; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; Watson, Dennis K; Gilkeson, Gary

    2004-11-15

    Increased Fli-1 mRNA is present in PBLs from systemic lupus erythematosus patients, and transgenic overexpression of Fli-1 in normal mice leads to a lupus-like disease. We report in this study that MRL/lpr mice, an animal model of systemic lupus erythematosus, have increased splenic expression of Fli-1 protein compared with BALB/c mice. Using mice with targeted gene disruption, we examined the effect of reduced Fli-1 expression on disease development in MRL/lpr mice. Complete knockout of Fli-1 is lethal in utero. Fli-1 protein expression in heterozygous MRL/lpr (Fli-1(+/-)) mice was reduced by 50% compared with wild-type MRL/lpr (Fli-1(+/+)) mice. Fli-1(+/-) MRL/lpr mice had significantly decreased serum levels of total IgG and anti-dsDNA Abs as disease progressed. Fli-1(+/-) MRL/lpr mice had significantly increased splenic CD8(+) and naive T cells compared with Fli-1(+/+) MRL/lpr mice. Both in vivo and in vitro production of MCP-1 were significantly decreased in Fli-1(+/-) MRL/lpr mice. The Fli-1(+/-) mice had markedly decreased proteinuria and significantly lower pathologic renal scores. At 48 wk of age, survival was significantly increased in the Fli-1(+/-) MRL/lpr mice, as 100% of Fli-1(+/-) MRL/lpr mice were alive, in contrast to only 27% of Fli-1(+/+) mice. These findings indicate that Fli-1 expression is important in lupus-like disease development, and that modulation of Fli-1 expression profoundly decreases renal disease and improves survival in MRL/lpr mice.

  5. Type 2 Diabetes, Diabetes Genetic Score and Risk of Decreased Renal Function and Albuminuria: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Bi, Yufang; Huang, Ya; Xie, Lan; Hao, Mingli; Zhao, Zhiyun; Xu, Yu; Lu, Jieli; Chen, Yuhong; Sun, Yimin; Qi, Lu; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a risk factor for dysregulation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria. However, whether the association is causal remains unestablished. Research Design and Methods We performed a Mendelian Randomization (MR) analysis in 11,502 participants aged 40 and above, from a well-defined community in Shanghai during 2011–2013, to explore the causal association between T2D and decreased estimated GFR (eGFR) and increased urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (uACR). We genotyped 34 established T2D common variants in East Asians, and created a T2D-genetic risk score (GRS). We defined decreased eGFR as eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73 m2 and increased uACR as uACR ≥ 30 mg/g. We used the T2D_GRS as the instrumental variable (IV) to quantify the causal effect of T2D on decreased eGFR and increased uACR. Results Each 1-standard deviation (SD, 3.90 points) increment in T2D_GRS was associated with decreased eGFR: odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01, 1.30). In the MR analysis, we demonstrated a causal relationship between genetically determined T2D and decreased eGFR (OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.88, P = 0.0003). When grouping the genetic loci according to their relations with either insulin secretion (IS) or insulin resistance (IR), we found both IS_GRS and IR_GRS were significantly related to decreased eGFR (both P < 0.02). In addition, T2D_GRS and IS_GRS were significantly associated with Log-uACR (both P = 0.04). Conclusion Our results provide novel evidence for a causal association between T2D and decreased eGFR by using MR approach in a Chinese population. PMID:27211558

  6. Mitochondrial Fission Increases Apoptosis and Decreases Autophagy in Renal Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells Treated with High Glucose.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Chin; Chiu, Chien-Hua; Chen, Jin-Bor; Chen, Chiu-Hua; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of mitochondrial morphogenesis changes on apoptosis and autophagy of high-glucose-treated proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK2). Cell viability, apoptosis, and mitochondrial morphogenesis were examined using crystal violet, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL), and mitotracker staining, respectively. High glucose inhibited cell viability and induced mitochondrial fission in HK2 cells. After depleting mitofusin 1 (MFN1), the MFN1(-) HK2 cells (fission type) became more susceptible to high-glucose-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial fragmentation observed by TUNEL and mitotracker assays. In siMFN2 HK2 cells (fission type), mitochondria were highly fragmented (>80% fission rate) with or without high-glucose treatment; however, siFIS1 (mitochondrial fission protein 1) HK2 cells (fusion type) exhibited little fragmentation (<13%). High-glucose treatment induced autophagy, characterized by the formation of autophagosome and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) B-II, as observed by transmission electron microscopy and western blotting, respectively. LC3B-II levels decreased in both MFN1(-) and siMFN2 HK2 cells, but increased in siFIS1 HK2 cells. Moreover, autophagy displays a protective role against high-glucose-induced cell death based on cotreatment with autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine and chloroquine). Mitochondrial fission may increase apoptosis and decrease autophagy of high-glucose-treated HK2 cells.

  7. Inhibition of coagulation proteases Xa and IIa decreases ischemia-reperfusion injuries in a preclinical renal transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Tillet, Solenne; Giraud, Sébastien; Kerforne, Thomas; Saint-Yves, Thibaut; Joffrion, Sandrine; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Cau, Jerôme; Mauco, Gérard; Petitou, Maurice; Hauet, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    Coagulation is an important pathway in the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion injuries. In particular, deceased after circulatory death (DCD) donors undergo a no-flow period, a strong activator of coagulation. Hence, therapies influencing the coagulation cascade must be developed. We evaluated the effect of a new highly specific and effective anti-Xa/IIa molecule, with an integrated innovative antidote site (EP217609), in a porcine preclinical model mimicking injuries observed in DCD donor kidney transplantation. Kidneys were clamped for 60 minutes (warm ischemia), then flushed and preserved for 24 hours at 4°C in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution (supplemented or not). EP217609-supplemented UW solution (UW-EP), compared with unfractionated heparin-supplemented UW solution (UW-UFH) or UW alone (UW). A mechanistic investigation was conducted in vitro: addition of EP217609 to endothelial cells during hypoxia at 4°C in the UW solution inhibited thrombin generation during reoxygenation at 37°C in human plasma and reduced tumor necrosis factor alpha, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 messenger RNA cell expressions. In vivo, function recovery was markedly improved in the UW-EP group. Interestingly, levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes (reflecting thrombin generation) were reduced 60 minutes after reperfusion in the UW-EP group. In addition, 3 months after transplantation, lower fibrosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, inflammation, and leukocyte infiltration were observed. Using this new dual anticoagulant, anti-Xa/IIa activity during kidney flush and preservation is protected by reducing thrombin generation at revascularization, improving early function recovery, and decreasing chronic lesions. Such an easy-to-deploy clinical strategy could improve marginal graft outcome.

  8. Acute inhibition of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus decreases renal sympathetic nerve activity and arterial blood pressure in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Keith, Kimberly J; Toney, Glenn M

    2004-04-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether sympathetic outflow and arterial blood pressure in water-deprived rats are dependent on the ongoing neuronal activity of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and heart rate were recorded in urethane-alpha-chloralose-anesthetized rats that were deprived of water but not food for 48 h before experiments. Acute inhibition of the PVN by bilateral microinjection of the GABA(A) agonist muscimol (100 pmol/side) significantly decreased RSNA in water-deprived rats (-26.7 +/- 4.7%, n = 7) but was without effect in control rats (1.3 +/- 6.3%, n = 7). Similarly, injection of muscimol produced a greater decrease in MAP in water-deprived rats than in control rats (-46 +/- 3 vs. -16 +/- 3 mmHg, respectively), although baseline MAP was not different between groups (105 +/- 4 vs. 107 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively). Neither bilateral microinjection of isotonic saline vehicle (100 nl/side) into the PVN nor muscimol (100 pmol/side) outside the PVN altered RSNA or MAP in either group. In addition, ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium (30 mg/kg i.v.) significantly decreased MAP in both groups; however, the decrease in MAP was significantly greater in water-deprived rats than in control rats (62 +/- 2 vs. 48 +/- 2 mmHg, respectively). Collectively, these findings suggest that sympathetic outflow contributes more to the maintenance of blood pressure in the water-deprived rat, and this depends, at least partly, on the ongoing activity of PVN neurons.

  9. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... an artery by a blood clot Renal artery stenosis Renal cell cancer Angiomyolipomas (noncancerous tumors of the ...

  10. MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy increases the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zibing; Liu, Yuqing; Zhang, Yong; Shang, Yiman; Gao, Quanli

    2016-01-26

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising cancer treatment, but its efficacy is restricted by various factors, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In this study, we determine whether chemotherapeutic drugs that reduce MDSC levels enhance the efficacy of CIK cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Fifty-three patients were included in this study; 17 were diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC), 10 with advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), and 26 with metastatic melanoma (MM). These patients were divided into two groups: CIK cell therapy alone and CIK cell therapy combined with chemotherapy. Combining CIK cell therapy and chemotherapy increased 1-year survival rates and median survival times in MRCC and PC patients, but not in MM patients. The disease control rate did not differ between treatment groups for MRCC or MM patients, but was higher in PC patients receiving combined treatment than CIK cell treatment alone. These data suggest that addition of MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy to CIK cell therapy improves survival in MRCC and PC patients.

  11. Tumour suppressor microRNA-584 directly targets oncogene Rock-1 and decreases invasion ability in human clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, K; Hirata, H; Shahryari, V; Chen, Y; Zaman, M S; Singh, K; Tabatabai, Z L; Hinoda, Y; Dahiya, R

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to identify new tumour suppressor microRNAs (miRs) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), carry out functional analysis of their suppressive role and identify their specific target genes. Methods: To explore suppressor miRs in RCC, miR microarray and real-time PCR were performed using HK-2 and A-498 cells. Cell viability, invasion and wound healing assays were carried out for functional analysis after miR transfection. To determine target genes of miR, we used messenger RNA (mRNA) microarray and target scan algorithms to identify target oncogenes. A 3′UTR luciferase assay was also performed. Protein expression of target genes in ccRCC tissues was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and was compared with miR-584 expression in ccRCC tissues. Results: Expression of miR-584 in RCC (A-498 and 769-P) cells was downregulated compared with HK-2 cells. Transfection of miR-584 dramatically decreased cell motility. The ROCK-1 mRNA was inhibited by miR-584 and predicted to be target gene. The miR-584 decreased 3′UTR luciferase activity of ROCK-1 and ROCK-1 protein expression. Low expression of miR-584 in ccRCC tissues was correlated with high expression of ROCK-1 protein. The knockdown of ROCK-1 by siRNA inhibited cell motility. Conclusion: miR-584 is a new tumour suppressor miR in ccRCC and inhibits cell motility through downregulation of ROCK-1. PMID:21119662

  12. SIRT1 overexpression decreases cisplatin-induced acetylation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit and cytotoxicity in renal proximal tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yu Jin; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Ae Sin; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Lee, Sang Yong; Han, Myung Kwan; Kim, Duk Hoon; Kim, Won

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cisplatin increases acetylation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit in HK2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 overexpression decreases cisplatin-induced p65 acetylation and -cytotoxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resveratrol decreased cisplatin-induced cell viability through deacetylation of p65. -- Abstract: As the increased acetylation of p65 is linked to nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activation, the regulation of p65 acetylation can be a potential target for the treatment of inflammatory injury. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is an important issue in chemotherapy of cancer patients. SIRT1, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +})-dependent protein deacetylase, has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes such as inflammatory injury and the control of multidrug resistance in cancer. However, there is no report on the effect of SIRT1 overexpression on cisplatin-induced acetylation of p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B and cell injury. To investigate the effect of SIRT1 in on cisplatin-induced acetylation of p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B and cell injury, HK2 cells were exposed with SIRT1 overexpression, LacZ adenovirus or dominant negative adenovirus after treatment with cisplatin. While protein expression of SIRT1 was decreased by cisplatin treatment compared with control buffer treatment, acetylation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit was significantly increased after treatment with cisplatin. Overexpression of SIRT1 ameliorated the increased acetylation of p65 of NF-{kappa}B during cisplatin treatment and cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. Further, treatment of cisplatin-treated HK2 cells with resveratrol, a SIRT1 activator, also decreased acetylation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit and cisplatin-induced increase of the cell viability in HK2 cells. Our findings suggests that the regulation of acetylation of p65 of NF-{kappa}B through SIRT1 can be a possible target to attenuate cisplatin-induced renal cell damage.

  13. Gastrin decreases Na+,K+-ATPase activity via a PI 3-kinase- and PKC-dependent pathway in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianbing; Konkalmatt, Prasad R; Yang, Yu; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-04-01

    The natriuretic effect of gastrin suggests a role in the coordinated regulation of sodium balance by the gastrointestinal tract and the kidney. The renal molecular targets and signal transduction pathways for such an effect of gastrin are largely unknown. Recently, we reported that gastrin induces NHE3 phosphorylation and internalization via phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and PKCα. In this study, we show that gastrin induced the phosphorylation of human Na(+),K(+)-ATPase at serine 16, resulting in its endocytosis via Rab5 and Rab7 endosomes. The gastrin-stimulated phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was dependent on PI 3-kinase because the phosphorylation was blocked by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. The phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was also blocked by chelerythrine, a pan-PKC inhibitor, Gö-6976, a conventional PKC (cPKC) inhibitor, and BAPTA-AM, an intracellular calcium chelator, suggesting the importance of cPKC and intracellular calcium in the gastrin signaling pathway. The gastrin-mediated phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was also inhibited by U-73122, a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor. These results suggest that gastrin regulates sodium hydrogen exchanger and pump in renal proximal tubule cells at the apical and basolateral membranes.

  14. Proteomic profile of primary isolated rat mesangial cells in high-glucose culture condition and decreased expression of PSMA6 in renal cortex of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Zhang, Haojun; Dong, Xi; Burczynski, Frank J; Choy, Patrick; Yang, Fang; Liu, Hui; Li, Ping; Gong, Yuewen

    2010-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most important complications of diabetic patients and is characterized histologically by an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) protein in the glomerular mesangium. Therefore, mesangial cells likely play an important role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we employed proteomic techniques to investigate the protein profile of rat mesangial cells under high-glucose culture conditions. Primary isolated rat glomerular mesangial cells were cultured under different concentrations of glucose (5.4 mmol.L-1 for normal control and 30 mmol.L-1 for high glucose) for 0, 8, 16, and 72 h, as well as for 25 days. Cellular total proteins were isolated from these cells and employed for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption - ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and some of these proteins were documented in rat models of diabetes by Western blot. Rat mesangial cells were successfully isolated in the laboratory and their proliferation rates were significantly inhibited by high glucose. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analyses revealed 28 differentially expressed protein spots between the normal and high-glucose groups. After MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, all 28 protein spots were successfully identified with the peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) method. Representatively, SOD1, PCBP1 and PSMA6 were validated by Western blot analysis following protein extractions from the normal and high-glucose groups. Abundance of these proteins was consistent with that found in 2-DE. Moreover, expression of SOD1, PCBP1, and PSMA6 in renal cortex was further examined in two rat models of diabetes (streptozotocin-induced and spontaneous OLETF diabetic models). Abundance of SOD1 and PCBP1 proteins did not show any significant difference between normal control and diabetic rats. However, abundance of the PSMA6 protein was significantly

  15. Therapeutic effects of renal denervation on renal failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is increased in both patients and experimental animals with renal failure. The kidney is a richly innervated organ and has both efferent and afferent nerves. Renal denervation shows protective effects against renal failure in both animals and humans. The underlying mechanisms include a decrease in blood pressure, a decrease in renal efferent SNA, a decrease in central SNA and sympathetic outflow, and downregulation of the reninangiotensin system. It has been demonstrated that re-innervation occurs within weeks after renal denervation in animals but that no functional re-innervation occurs in humans for over two years after denervation. Renal denervation might not be renal protective in some situations including bile duct ligation-induced renal failure and ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. Catheter-based renal denervation has been applied to patients with both early and end stage renal failure and the published results so far suggest that this procedure is safe and effective at decreasing blood pressure. The effectiveness of renal denervation in improving renal function in patients with renal failure needs to be further investigated.

  16. Effective plasma volume in cirrhosis with ascites. Evidence that a decreased value does not account for renal sodium retention, a spontaneous reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and a fall in GFR during drug-induced diuresis

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Fred L.; Ito, Sosuke; Reynolds, Telfer B.

    1969-01-01

    A reduction in effective (nonportal) plasma volume is considered the basis for renal sodium retention, a spontaneous reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and a fall in GFR occurring during drug-induced diuresis in patients with cirrhosis and ascites. In the present study the concept of a reduced effective plasma volume in cirrhosis is challenged by two lines of evidence, even though effective plasma volume itself could not be measured. (a) Total plasma volume failed to rise in 10 patients with the spontaneous loss of ascites, the appearance of sodium in the urine, and a rise in GFR. Portal pressure remained constant in these patients as ascites left, suggesting that effective plasma volume had not increased while portal plasma volume decreased. (b) Reduction of GFR could not be prevented in five patients with cirrhosis and ascites while total plasma volume was prevented from falling with albumin infusions during drug-induced diuresis. Reduction of GFR during drug-induced diuresis in 15 patients with cirrhosis and ascites was completely reversed with saline infusion despite continued diuresis with the identical drugs, excluding drug nephrotoxicity as the cause for the reduced GFR. The ascites of cirrhosis might no longer be regarded as a cause of effective plasma volume contraction, stimulating renal sodium retention and a reduction in GFR. More likely, this form of ascites is a result of plasma volume expansion and sodium retention. The causes for renal sodium retention and a spontaneous reduction in GFR remain unknown. The cause for a fall in GFR during drug-induced diuresis also remains unknown, but effective plasma volume contraction and drug nephrotoxicity seem excluded. Images PMID:5771197

  17. From Pre-Existing Renal Failure to Perioperative Renal Protection: The Anesthesiologist’s Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Huti, Gentian; Sula, Hektor; Baftiu, Nehat; Kaci, Myzafer; Bodeci, Artan; Pesha, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-existing renal dysfunction presents specific features that anesthesiologists must deal with. Anesthesia and renal function are connected and can interfere with each other. Induced hypotension anesthesia and the toxic effects of anesthetic drugs can further deteriorate renal function. Evidence Acquisition Decreased renal function can prolong anesthetic drug effects by decreased elimination of these drugs. Anesthesia can deteriorate renal function and decreased renal function can interfere with drug elimination leading to their prolonged effect. The anesthesiologist must understand all the physiological aspects of the patient, renal protection, and the relationships between anesthetic drugs and renal function. This review article aims to summarize these aspects. Results Perioperative renal failure and renal protection is a crucial moment in clinical practice of every anesthesiologist. Conclusions Good knowledges for renal function remain a hallmark of daily practice of the anesthesiologist, considering renal function as an important determinant factor in anesthesia practice. PMID:27642570

  18. Haemostatic aspects of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, P J; Schmidt, E B; Knudsen, F; Nielsen, A H; Kristensen, S D; Dyerberg, J; Kornerup, H J

    1988-01-01

    Platelet function and protein C activity and antigen level was studied in 31 renal transplant recipients and 10 healthy controls. The patients were divided into three groups: (I) cyclosporin treated, (II) azathioprine treated, and (III) azathioprine treated patients with chronic rejection. The platelet function in the renal transplant patients was normal and there was no difference between groups I and II. The specific activity of protein C was decreased in patients after renal transplantation and decreasing protein C activity and progressive renal failure was found to be positively correlated in the azathioprine treated groups.

  19. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  20. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  1. Ankyrin is the major oxidised protein in erythrocyte membranes from end-stage renal disease patients on chronic haemodialysis and oxidation is decreased by dialysis and vitamin C supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ruskovska, T; Bennett, S J; Brown, C R; Dimitrov, S; Kamcev, N; Griffiths, H R

    2015-02-01

    Chronically haemodialysed end-stage renal disease patients are at high risk of morbidity arising from complications of dialysis, the underlying pathology that has led to renal disease and the complex pathology of chronic kidney disease. Anaemia is commonplace and its origins are multifactorial, involving reduced renal erythropoietin production, accumulation of uremic toxins and an increase in erythrocyte fragility. Oxidative damage is a common risk factor in renal disease and its co-morbidities and is known to cause erythrocyte fragility. Therefore, we have investigated the hypothesis that specific erythrocyte membrane proteins are more oxidised in end-stage renal disease patients and that vitamin C supplementation can ameliorate membrane protein oxidation. Eleven patients and 15 control subjects were recruited to the study. Patients were supplemented with 2 × 500 mg vitamin C per day for 4 weeks. Erythrocyte membrane proteins were prepared pre- and post-vitamin C supplementation for determination of protein oxidation. Total protein carbonyls were reduced by vitamin C supplementation but not by dialysis when investigated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Using a western blot to detect oxidised proteins, one protein band, later identified as containing ankyrin, was found to be oxidised in patients but not controls and was reduced significantly by 60% in all patients after dialysis and by 20% after vitamin C treatment pre-dialysis. Ankyrin oxidation analysis may be useful in a stratified medicines approach as a possible marker to identify requirements for intervention in dialysis patients.

  2. Appetite - decreased

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Ovarian cancer Stomach cancer Pancreatic cancer Other causes of decreased appetite include: Chronic liver disease Chronic kidney disease Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Dementia Heart failure ...

  3. Renal Stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Renal stones are never convenient, but they are a particular concern for astronauts who have limited access to treatment during flight. Researchers are examining how earthbound preventions for renal stone formation work in flight, ensuring missions are not ended prematurely due to this medical condition. The micrograph shows calcium oxalate crystals in urine. These small crystals can develop to form renal stones. Principal Investigator: Dr. Peggy Whitson, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  4. Renal infarction secondary to ketamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Li; Chen, Jin-Li; Cha, Tai-Lung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Tang, Shou-Hung; Tsao, Chih-Wei; Meng, En

    2013-07-01

    Renal infarction is an uncommon condition that resulted from inadequate perfusion of the kidney and is easily missed diagnosed due to its nonspecific clinical presentations. Major risk factors for renal infarction are atrial fibrillation, previous embolism, and ischemic and valvular heart disease. Progressive decrease in renal function or even death can occur if renal infarction is not diagnosed accurately and promptly. Ketamine abuse may cause variable urinary tract injury. However, renal infarction caused by ketamine abuse has never been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of renal infarction following nasal insufflation of ketamine.

  5. Renal papillary necrosis and pyelonephritis accompanying fenoprofen therapy.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Lange, R K; Kantrow, C M

    1979-10-26

    Renal papillary necrosis occurred after fenoprofen calcium administration in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and urinary tract infection. Possible mechanisms of renal damage may be hypersensitivity, decreased blood flow, and decreased production of a prostaglandin E-like substance.

  6. Renal physiology of nocturia.

    PubMed

    Verbalis, Joseph G

    2014-04-01

    Renal function, diurnal fluctuations in arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion, sex, and advanced age affect urine formation and may contribute to nocturia. Renal effects of AVP are mediated by AVP V2 receptors in the kidney collecting duct. Changes in AVP concentration have the greatest relative effects on urine volume when AVP levels are low; therefore small changes can have a large effect on renal water excretion. AVP is the major regulator of water excretion by the kidneys, and AVP levels have been shown to affect nocturnal voiding. Results of several studies show that patients with nocturia had no significant variation in plasma AVP, whereas patients without nocturia had significant diurnal variation in plasma AVP. The V2 receptor gene is located on the X chromosome, which has important sex-specific consequences. For example, mutations in the V2 gene can cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, predominantly in men. Age-related changes in water metabolism are associated with overall body composition, kidney, and brain. Older people generally experience decreased extracellular fluid and plasma volume, which leads to increased adverse consequences from net body water gain or loss. Renal function declines with age, and the ability to concentrate urine and conserve sodium is reduced in the elderly. Thirst perception is also decreased in the elderly, who, compared with younger people, tend to hypersecrete AVP in response to higher plasma osmolality, possibly resulting in hyponatremia. These aspects of renal physiology should be considered when antidiuretic drugs are prescribed for the treatment of nocturia.

  7. Diagnostic value of routine bone scintigraphy renal imaging in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chancellor, M.B.; Konnak, J.W.; Grossman, H.B.

    1989-05-01

    Technetium-99m-phosphate compounds used in bone scanning are excreted by the kidney, and excellent renal images can be obtained on routine bone scintigrams. The preoperative bone scans of 49 patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma between 1981 and 1985 were reviewed for renal imaging. Ninety-four percent of the patients had abnormal bone scan renal images (82% had focal decreased uptake, and 12% had focal increased uptake). Six percent of the renal images were symmetrical bilaterally. When bone scans are employed in the postoperative follow-up of patients with renal cancer, they can be used to assess the status of the remaining kidney.

  8. Hypogonadism and renal failure: An update.

    PubMed

    Thirumavalavan, Nannan; Wilken, Nathan A; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of both hypogonadism and renal failure is increasing. Hypogonadism in men with renal failure carries with it significant morbidity, including anemia and premature cardiovascular disease. It remains unclear whether testosterone therapy can affect the morbidity and mortality associated with renal failure. As such, in this review, we sought to evaluate the current literature addressing hypogonadism and testosterone replacement, specifically in men with renal failure. The articles chosen for this review were selected by performing a broad search using Pubmed, Embase and Scopus including the terms hypogonadism and renal failure from 1990 to the present. This review is based on both primary sources as well as review articles. Hypogonadism in renal failure has a multifactorial etiology, including co-morbid conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, old age and obesity. Renal failure can lead to decreased luteinizing hormone production and decreased prolactin clearance that could impair testosterone production. Given the increasing prevalence of hypogonadism and the potential morbidity associated with hypogonadism in men with renal failure, careful evaluation of serum testosterone would be valuable. Testosterone replacement therapy should be considered in men with symptomatic hypogonadism and renal failure, and may ameliorate some of the morbidity associated with renal failure. Patients with all stages of renal disease are at an increased risk of hypogonadism that could be associated with significant morbidity. Testosterone replacement therapy may reduce some of the morbidity of renal failure, although it carries risk.

  9. Renal Scintigraphy

    MedlinePlus

    ... size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Renal Scintigraphy Sponsored by ...

  10. Substitution of the Lys linker with the β-Ala linker dramatically decreased the renal uptake of 99mTc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides.

    PubMed

    Flook, Adam M; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the substitution of the Lys linker with the β-Ala could reduce the renal uptake of (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RSD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (1) {c[Arg-Ser-Asp-dTyr-Asp]-β-Ala-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2}, RTD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (2), RVD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (3), RAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (4), NAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (5), and EAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (6) peptides were synthesized and evaluated for their melanocortin 1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution of their (99m)Tc-conjugates were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The substitution of the Lys linker with β-Ala linker dramatically reduced the renal uptake of all six (99m)Tc-peptides. (99m)Tc-4 exhibited the highest melanoma uptake (15.66 ± 6.19% ID/g) and the lowest kidney uptake (20.18 ± 3.86% ID/g) among these (99m)Tc-peptides at 2 h postinjection. The B16/F1 melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT using (99m)Tc-4 as an imaging probe.

  11. Arterial spasm during renal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Beinart, C.; Sos, T.A.; Saddekni, S.; Weiner, M.A.; Sniderman, K.W.

    1983-10-01

    Spasm of the renal arteries during transluminal angioplasty is a well-documented phenomenon with serious potential sequelae, particularly in young patients with fibromusclar dysplasia. The authors report their experience in 98 cases (105 arteries). Tolazoline, lidocaine, nitrates (or calcium blockers, if available), and heparin should be administered either directly into the renal artery or systemically prior to angioplasty to decrease the incidence and severity of spasm.

  12. [Renal function study assessed by 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy before and after PNL].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, M; Hioki, T; Okuno, T; Sugimura, Y; Yamakawa, K; Yanagawa, M; Tajima, K; Tochigi, H; Kawamura, J

    1990-01-01

    99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy was carried out in 54 patients with unilateral renal stones before and after PNL. Four to 8 weeks after PNL the DMSA renal uptake significantly decreased to 17.2 +/- 6.0% from 18.2 +/- 6.7% before PNL. DMSA renal uptake did not change in the contralateral side. Since in some patients changes in the DMSA renal uptake of 5-7% were observed after PNL not only in the PNL side but also in the contralateral side, the renal function was assessed by the formula: DMSA renal uptake in the PNL side/DMSA renal uptake in the contralateral side, and the change of this ratio was evaluated in 44 patients, in whom the renal DMSA uptake in the PNL side was less than two times that in the contralateral side. The DMSA renal uptake ratio decreased to 95.6 +/- 8.7% from the base line 4-8 weeks after PNL. This change was statistically significant. Some functional risks such as massive bleeding with PNL, the fever after PNL and the number of nephrostomy tract did not affect the decrease in the renal function. In 29 patients in whom renal function was reevaluated one year after PNL, the DMSA renal uptake ratio significantly decreased to 94.2 +/- 9.6% from the base line 4-8 weeks after PNL. But the ratio significantly improved to 99.6 +/- 11.6% about one year after PNL. In two patients with a cold area on the renal image, the renal function of the operated side still remained at about 80% levels from the base line even one year after PNL.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Renal Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... as “simple” cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and contain water-like fluid. Renal cysts are fairly common in ... simple kidney cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and only water-like fluid inside. They are fairly common in ...

  14. Management of renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Peco-Antic, Amira

    2005-01-01

    Normochromic normocytic anemia is common in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) when their glomerular filtration rate is below 35 ml/min/1.73 m2 BSA, but it may develop earlier in some forms of renal disease. An inadequate erythropoiesis due to insufficient erythropoietin synthesis in the kidneys is the main cause of renal anemia. Other reasons include reduced red blood cell lifespan, chronic blood loss, iron deficiency, inhibitors of erythropoiesis, and malnutrition. The presence of anemia contributes to many of the symptoms of uremia, including decreased appetite, decreased energy, poor cardiac function, and poor school performance. Therefore, correction of anemia dramatically improves the life of the child with CRF. Presently, the goal of anemia management is to maintain hematocrit concentrations at 33% to 36% and a hemoglobin concentration of at least 11 g/L. This can be accomplished by intravenous or subcutaneous administration of recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO, 100-300 U/kg/week) and iron preparations. If adequate iron stores cannot be maintained with oral therapy (2-3, max 6 mg/kg/day), intravenous iron should be administered. In order to optimize anemia management in children with CRF, future research should be concentrated on the normalization of hemoglobin early in the course of CRF, and the long-term effects on the child's development.

  15. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, D.; Granger, J.P.; Knox, F.G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, (/sup 3/H)NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine.

  16. A re-appraisal of volume status and renal function impairment in chronic heart failure: combined effects of pre-renal failure and venous congestion on renal function.

    PubMed

    Sinkeler, Steef J; Damman, Kevin; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-03-01

    The association between cardiac failure and renal function impairment has gained wide recognition over the last decade. Both structural damage in the form of systemic atherosclerosis and (patho) physiological hemodynamic changes may explain this association. As regards hemodynamic factors, renal impairment in chronic heart failure is traditionally assumed to be mainly due to a decrease in cardiac output and a subsequent decrease in renal perfusion. This will lead to a decrease in glomerular filtration rate and a compensatory increase in tubular sodium retention. The latter is a physiological renal response aimed at retaining fluids in order to increase cardiac filling pressure and thus renal perfusion. In heart failure, however, larger increases in cardiac filling pressure are needed to restore renal perfusion and thus more volume retention. In this concept, in chronic heart failure, an equilibrium exists where a certain degree of congestion is the price to be paid to maintain adequate renal perfusion and function. Recently, this hypothesis was challenged by new studies, wherein it was found that the association between right-sided cardiac filling pressures and renal function is bimodal, with worse renal function at the highest filling pressures, reflecting a severely congested state. Renal hemodynamic studies suggest that congestion negatively affects renal function in particular in patients in whom renal perfusion is also compromised. Thus, an interplay between cardiac forward failure and backward failure is involved in the renal function impairment in the congestive state, presumably along with other factors. Only few data are available on the impact of intervention in volume status on the cardio-renal interaction. Sparse data in cardiac patients as well as evidence from cohorts with primary renal disease suggest that specific targeting of volume overload may be beneficial for long-term outcome, in spite of a certain further decrease in renal function, at least

  17. Renal angiography with iohexol and metrizoate

    SciTech Connect

    Toernquist, C.; Holtaes, S.

    1984-02-01

    The nephrotoxicity of the ionic contrast medium metrizoate was compared with that of nonionic iohexol when used for renal angiography. Fifteen patients who underwent renal angiography with metrizoate and 15 with iohexol were studied. Serum creatinine level, Cr-51-EDTA clearance, and urine albumin level were recorded before and after angiography. Metrizoate affected renal function, as indicated both by a transient decrease in glomerular filtration rate and by a transient albuminuria. Renal function was unaffected by iohexol. Furthermore, iohexol produced less subjective discomfort than metrizoate. There appeared to be no difference in the quality of the angiograms obtained with the two media.

  18. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Martha S; Poole, Judith H

    2002-03-01

    Anatomic and physiologic adaptations within the renal system during pregnancy are significant. Alterations are seen in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, resulting in changes in normal renal laboratory values. When these normal renal adaptations are coupled with pregnancy-induced complications or preexisting renal dysfunction, the woman may demonstrate a reduction of renal function leading to an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. This article will review normal pregnancy adaptations of the renal system and discuss common pregnancy-related renal complications.

  19. Vasopressin, Sepsis, and Renal Perfusion - A VASST Deficit in Our Understanding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    JUN 2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vasopressin, Sepsis, and Renal PerfusionâA VASST Deficit in Our...vasoconstric- tion within the renal vascular bed as evidenced by decreased renal blood flow (RBF) in vivo and increased renal vascular perfusion...decrease in renal per- fusion could potentially result in acute kidney injury (AKI), a syndrome that has been associated with increased mortality in the

  20. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  1. [Inherited tubular renal acidosis].

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Hassan; Hayek, Donia; Nasr, Dhekra; Daudon, Michel; Fadhel Najjar, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a tubulopathy characterized by metabolic acidosis with normal anion gap secondary to abnormalities of renal acidification. RTA can be classified into four main subtypes: distal RTA, proximal RTA, combined proximal and distal RTA, and hyperkalemic RTA. Distal RTA (type 1) is caused by the defect of H(+) secretion in the distal tubules and is characterized by the inability to acidify the urine below pH 5.5 during systemic acidemia. Proximal RTA (type 2) is caused by an impairment of bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubules and characterized by a decreased renal bicarbonate threshold. Combined proximal and distal RTA (type 3) secondary to a reduction in tubular reclamation of bicarbonate and an inability to acidify the urine in the face of severe acidemia. Hyperkalemic RTA (type 4) may occur as a result of aldosterone deficiency or tubular insensitivity to aldosterone. Clinicians should be alert to the presence of RTA in patients with an unexplained normal anion gap acidosis, hypokalemia, recurrent nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. The mainstay of treatment of RTA remains alkali replacement.

  2. Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 overexpressed mesenchymal stem cells transplantation, improves renal function, decreases injuries markers and increases repair markers in glycerol-induced Acute kidney injury rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhaleh, Fateme; Amiri, Fatemeh; Mohammadzadeh-Vardin, Mohammad; Bahadori, Marzie; Harati, Mitra Dehghan; Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Saki, Sasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Recently cell therapy is a promising therapeutic modality for many types of disease including acute kidney injury (AKI). Due to the unique biological properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are attractive cells in this regard. This study aims to transplant MSCs equipped with nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in rat experimental models of acute kidney and evaluate regeneration potential of injured kidney especially expression of injury and repaired biomarkers. Materials and methods: Nrf2 was overexpressed in bone marrow-derived MSCs by pcDNA.3.1 plasmid. AKI was induced using glycerol in rat models. The regenerative potential of Nrf2-overexpressed MSCs was evaluated in AKI-Induced animal models using biochemical and histological methods after transplantation. Expression of repaired genes, AQP1 and CK-18, as well as injury markers, Kim-1 and Cystatin C, was also assayed in engrafted kidney sections. Results: Our results revealed that transplantation of Nrf2-overexpressed MSCs into AKI-induced rats decreased blood urea nitrogen and creatinine and ameliorated kidney regeneration throughout 14 days. Upregulation of repaired markers and downregulation of injury markers were considerable 14 days after transplantation. Conclusions: Overexpression of Nrf2 in MSCs suggests a new strategy to increase efficiency of MSC-based cell therapy in AKI. PMID:27114803

  3. Renal abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ataga, K I; Orringer, E P

    2000-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia and the related hemoglobinopathies are associated with a large spectrum of renal abnormalities. The patients have impaired urinary concentrating ability, defects in urinary acidification and potassium excretion, and supranormal proximal tubular function. The latter is manifest by increased secretion of creatinine and by reabsorption of phosphorus and beta(2)-microglobulin. Young patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have supranormal renal hemodynamics with elevations in both effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These parameters decrease with age as well as following the administration of prostaglandin inhibitors. Proteinuria, a common finding in adults with sickle cell disease, may progress to the nephrotic syndrome. Proteinuria, hypertension, and increasing anemia predict end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While ESRD can be managed by dialysis and/or renal transplantation, there may be an increased rate of complications in renal transplant recipients with SCD. Hematuria is seen in individuals with all of the SCDs as well as with sickle cell trait. In most cases the etiology of the hematuria turns out to be benign. However, there does appear to be an increased association between SCD and renal medullary carcinoma. Therefore, those SCD patients who present with hematuria should initially undergo a thorough evaluation in order to exclude this aggressive neoplasm. Papillary necrosis may occur due to medullary ischemia and infarction. Erythropoietin levels are usually lower than expected for their degree of anemia and decrease further as renal function deteriorates. An abnormal balance of renal prostaglandins may be responsible for some of the changes in sickle cell nephropathy. Acute renal failure is a component of the acute multiorgan failure syndrome (MOFS). Finally, progression of sickle cell nephropathy to ESRD may be slowed by adequate control of hypertension and proteinuria. However, the prevention of the

  4. Renal Function and Hematology in Rats with Congenital Renal Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hidenori; Amakasu, Kohei; Tochigi, Yuki; Katayama, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2016-02-01

    Renal hypoplasia due to a congenitally reduced number of nephrons progresses to chronic kidney disease and may cause renal anemia, given that the kidneys are a major source of erythropoietin in adults. Hypoplastic kidney (HPK) rats have only about 20% of the normal number of nephrons and develop CKD. This study assessed the renal function and hematologic changes in HPK rats from 70 to 210 d of age. HPK rats demonstrated deterioration of renal excretory function, slightly macrocytic erythropenia at all days examined, age-related increases in splenic hemosiderosis accompanied by a tendency toward increased hemolysis, normal plasma erythropoietin levels associated with increased hepatic and decreased renal erythropoietin production, and maintenance of the response for erythropoietin production to hypoxic conditions, with increased interstitial fibrosis at 140 d of age. These results indicate that increases in splenic hemosiderosis and the membrane fragility of RBC might be associated with erythropenia and that hepatic production of erythropoietin might contribute to maintaining the blood Hgb concentration in HPK rats.

  5. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  6. Renal secondary hyperparathyroidism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Stillion, Jenefer R; Ritt, Michelle G

    2009-06-01

    The parathyroid glands secrete parathyroid hormone (PTH), which is important for maintaining calcium homeostasis. Parathyroid gland hyperplasia and subsequent hyperparathyroidism can occur secondary to chronic renal failure in dogs, resulting in significant alterations in calcium metabolism. Renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is a complex, multifactorial syndrome that involves changes in circulating levels of calcium, PTH, phosphorus, and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (calcitriol). An increased PTH level can have deleterious effects, including soft tissue mineralization, fibrous osteodystrophy, bone marrow suppression, urolithiasis, and neuropathy. Dietary phosphorus restriction, intestinal phosphate binders, and calcitriol supplementation may slow the progression of renal disease and decrease PTH concentrations in animals with secondary hyperparathyroidism; however, the prognosis for these animals is guarded to poor.

  7. [Update in continuous renal replacement techniques].

    PubMed

    Romero-García, M; de la Cueva-Ariza, L; Delgado-Hito, P

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure affects 25% of patients hospitalized in intensive care units. Despite technological advances, the mortality of these patients is still high due to its associated complications. Continuous renal replacement techniques are one of the treatments for acute renal failure because they make it possible to treat the complications and decrease mortality. The nurse's knowledge and skills regarding these techniques will be decisive for the success of the therapy. Consequently, the nurse's experience and training are key components. The objective of this article is to update the knowledge on continuous renal replacement techniques. Keeping this in mind, a review has been made of the physical and chemical principles such as diffusion and convection, among others. A description of the different continuous renal replacement techniques, a presentation of the main vascular access, and a description of the nursing cares and complications related to techniques used have also been provided.

  8. Mechanisms responsible for decreased glomerular filtration in hibernation and hypothermia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.; Jones, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, red blood cell and plasma volumes, and relative distribution of cardiac output were made on hibernating and hypothermic adult male and female golden hamsters weighing 120-140 g to study the mechanisms underlying the elimination or marked depression of renal function in hibernation and hypothermia. The results suggest that the elimination or marked depression in renal function reported in hibernation and hypothermia may partly be explained by alterations in cardiovascular system function. Renal perfusion pressure which decreases nearly 60% in both hibernation and hypothermia and a decrease in plasma volume of roughly 35% in the hypothermic animal might both be expected to markedly alter glomerular function.

  9. Renal disease in pregnancy ambulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Sharon T

    2012-09-01

    Acute and chronic renal disease will complicate prenatal care. Normal physiological changes during pregnancy make the urinary tract system more vulnerable to infectious complications or worsening of preexisting disease. Much of the focus of prenatal care includes screening for these concerns both at the onset of prenatal care and through the pregnancy and postpartum course. With careful and attentive care, the pregnancy outcome for women with significant renal disease has improved and the occurrence of renal injury or obstetric complications due to infectious insults has decreased. This manuscript reviews the current ambulatory prenatal care as it relates to the urinary tract in pregnancy.

  10. PROGRESSIVE RENAL VASCULAR PROLIFERATION AND INJURY IN OBESE ZUCKER RATS

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, Radu; Chade, Alejandro R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Obesity, an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease, may induce renal injury by promoting inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines can induce neovascularization in different organs, including the kidneys. However, whether obesity triggers renal neovascularization and, if so, its effect on renal function has never been investigated. Methods Blood pressure, proteinuria and glomerular-filtration-rate (GFR) were measured in-vivo. Renal microvascular (MV) architecture was studied by 3D micro-CT in lean and obese Zucker rats (LZR and OZR, n=7/group) at 12, 22, and 32 weeks of age. Renal inflammation was assessed by quantifying interleukin (IL)-6, tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-alpha, and ED-1 expression, as renal fibrosis in trichrome-stained cross-sections. Results Mild inflammation and lower GFR was only observed in younger OZR, without renal fibrosis or changes in MV density. Interestingly, renal MV density increased in OZR at 32 weeks of age, accompanied by pronounced increase in renal IL-6 and TNF-alpha, ED-1+ cells, proteinuria, decreased GFR, and fibrosis. Conclusion This study shows increased renal cortical vascularization in experimental obesity, suggesting neovascularization as an evolving process as obesity progresses. Increased renal vascularization, possibly triggered by inflammation, may reflect an initially compensatory mechanism in obesity. However, increased inflammation and inflammatory-induced neovascularization may further promote renal injury as obesity advances. PMID:20536738

  11. [Oligomeganephronic renal hypoplasia complicated by glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Kan'shina, N F; Rykov, V A; Lakhno, P A

    1990-01-01

    Clinico-anatomical data of a rare condition congenital oligomeganephronic renal hypoplasia with a glomerulonephritis as a complication are available for a 13-year-old girl who died of chronic renal failure. Large aglomerular zones consisting of primitive canaliculi in a loose stroma were observed in kidneys that were decreased in size. The glomeruli were few in number, some of them of a large size (2-2.5-fold), firmly attached to the capsule, with pronounced extracapillary proliferation.

  12. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  13. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  14. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  15. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Review Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  16. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Lucas, M J

    2001-09-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue a pregnancy are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Risk is inversely related to the degree of renal insufficiency. Pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract can temporarily increase renal function compromise, such as nephrosis, but most often results in no net increase in dysfunction. Common complications of pregnancy--such as hypertension and hypovolemia--can be associated with acute renal injury or aggravation of pre-existing disease.

  17. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  18. Evaluation of reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis and renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Little, Stephen B; Jones, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    MR urography has the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the relationship between reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis, vesicoureteric reflux and renal dysplasia. MR urography utilizes multiple parameters to assess both renal anatomy and function and provides a more complete characterization of acquired and congenital disease. Pyelonephritis and renal scarring can be distinguished by assessing the parenchymal contours and signal intensity. Characteristic imaging features of renal dysplasia include small size, subcortical cysts, disorganized architecture, decreased and patchy contrast enhancement as well as a dysmorphic pelvicalyceal system. Because of its ability to subdivide and categorize this heterogeneous group of disorders, it seems inevitable that MR urography will replace DMSA renal scintigraphy as the gold standard for assessment of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. MR urography will contribute to our understanding of renal dysplasia and its relationship to reflux nephropathy.

  19. Renal Tubular Acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Renal Tubular Acidosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Renal Tubular Acidosis Print A A A What's in ... Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Acidosis tubular renal Each time our internal organs do something, such ...

  20. [Idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Bennani, S; Ait Bolbarod, A; el Mrini, M; Kadiri, R; Benjelloun, S

    1996-06-01

    The authors report a case of idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula. The diagnosis was established angiographically in a 24 year old man presenting gross hematuria. Embolization of the fistula was performed. Efficiency of this treatment was appreciated clinically and by duplex renal ultrasonography. The characteristics of renal arteriovenous fistulas are reviewed.

  1. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  2. [Membranous nephritis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Robles, N R; Gómez Campdera, F; Anaya, F; Niembro, E; Junco, E; Valderrábano, F

    1991-02-01

    8 cases of membranous glomerulonephritis (MG) after renal transplants (RT) are presented; one being a recurrence of the original disease and the other 7 due to a different cause of renal insufficiency. The total incidence of MG after transplantation was 1.63%; 1.39% being the incidence of MG of new cases. Only 1 patient showed decrease of renal function and in this case the MG was accompanied by chronic rejection lesions. There was no sign of neoplasias nor drugs producing MG. As far as chronic infections are concerned, only one patient showed B antigen and it was not observed during the immunofluorescent test in the biopsy. 6 patients had urological complications after the renal transplant (3 cases of urinary fistula; 2 cases of obstructive uropathy; 1 case of short ureter). 2 patients experienced the start of hemodialysis due to focal and segmentary glomerulosclerosis. The beginning of proteinuria commences between 2 and 23 months after the RT (median 13,0 +/- 7,5 moths); with a range of between 2.0 and 12.0 gr/day (median: 6.8 +/- 3,2 Z gr/day), this being nephrotic in 4 cases. Proteinuria improved 1 case, and persisted in the other patients at the same level registered previous to the diagnosis. MG is a non-frequent complication or RT and is usually benign. Patients with post-transplant urologic complications could be considered to have a higher risk of developing a MG "de novo".

  3. Renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    González, J; Esteban, M; Andrés, G; Linares, E; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2014-01-01

    A renal artery aneurysm is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal artery. Although rare, the diagnosis and incidence of this entity have been steadily increasing due to the routine use of cross-sectional imaging. In certain cases, renal artery aneurysms may be clinically important and potentially lethal. However, knowledge of their occurrence, their natural history, and their prognosis with or without treatment is still limited. This article aims to review the recent literature concerning renal artery aneurysms, with special consideration given to physiopathology, indications for treatment, different technical options, post-procedure complications and treatment outcomes.

  4. [Influences of renal stone surgeries on renal function--evaluation of renal function with 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Y

    1991-10-01

    From 1984 to 1990, 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy was performed before and after nephrolithotomy (15 cases), pyelolithotomy (15 cases), percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL: 15 cases) and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL: 16 cases, 17 kidneys) in order to evaluate of influences of renal stone surgeries on split renal function. DMSA renal uptake change ratio of treated kidneys of nephrolithotomy (-24.94 +/- 5.60%) was significantly lower than that of PNL (-0.06 +/- 3.92%), pyelolithotomy (-4.08 +/- 4.79%) (p less than 0.01) and ESWL (-7.72 +/- 3.87%) (p less than 0.05). The average change ratios of contralateral kidneys were as follows: PNL 4.80 +/- 4.21% nephrolithotomy 4.67 +/- 4.73%, pyelolithotomy -1.46 +/- 5.39% and ESWL -2.02 +/- 4.44%. One to 3 weeks after PNL, the cold area on the renal image was found in 10 (66.7%) of 15 cases. In cases of ESWL, DMSA renal uptake decreased even 4-10 weeks (mean 7 weeks) after treatment. In conclusion, possivility of deterioration of renal function after ESWL was suggested.

  5. Lupus nephritis and renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Germain, S; Nelson-Piercy, C

    2006-01-01

    Management of pregnant women with renal disease involves awareness of, and allowance for, physiological changes including decreased serum creatinine and increased proteinuria. For women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), pregnancy increases likelihood of flare. These can occur at any stage, and are more difficult to diagnose, as symptoms overlap those of normal pregnancy. Renal involvement is no more common in pregnancy. Worsening proteinuria may be lupus flare but differential includes pre-eclampsia. In women with chronic renal disease, pregnancy may accelerate decline in renal function and worsen hypertension and proteinuria, with increased risk of maternal (eg, pre-eclampsia) and fetal (eg, IUGR, IUD) complications, strongly correlating with degree of renal impairment peri-conception. Pregnancy success rate varies from 20% to 95% depending on base-line creatinine. Best outcome is obtained if disease was quiescent for >6 months pre-conception. Women on dialysis or with renal transplants can achieve successful pregnancy but have higher maternal and fetal complication rates. Acute on chronic renal failure can develop secondary to complications such as HELLP and AFLP. Management needs to be by a multidisciplinary team involving physicians and obstetricians, ideally beginning with pre-pregnancy counselling. Treatment of flares includes corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, azothioprine, NSAIDs and MME Blood pressure is controlled with methyldopa, nifedipine or hydralazine.

  6. Perirenal effusion in dogs and cats with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Andrew; O'Brien, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Perirenal fluid accumulation has been described as an ultrasonographic feature of urine leakage, hemorrhage, abscessation, or neoplasia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to report perirenal effusion as an additional ultrasonographic finding in canine and feline patients with acute renal failure. The causes of acute renal failure in 18 patients included nephrotoxicity (4), leptospirosis (3), ureteral obstruction (2), renal lymphoma (2), ureteronephrolithiasis (2), prostatic urethral obstruction (1) and interstitial nephritis and ureteritis (1). An underlying cause was not identified in three patients. The sonographic finding of perirenal fluid was bilateral in 15 patients. Unilateral perirenal fluid was identified ipsilateral to the site of ureteric obstruction in two patients. Large effusions extended into the caudal retroperitoneal space. Additional sonographic findings suggestive of renal parenchymal disease included mild (5), moderate (5) or severe (2) pyelectasia, increased renal echogenicity (11), increased (9) or decreased renal size (2) and ureteral and/or renal calculi (3). There did not appear to be an association between the volume of perirenal fluid and the severity of renal dysfunction. All patients with large effusions underwent euthanasia. Perirenal fluid developing in acute renal failure is thought to be an ultrafiltrate associated with tubular back-leak into the renal interstitium that overwhelms lymphatic drainage within the perirenal and retroperitoneal connective tissues although obstruction to urine flow may also play a role. Localized perirenal retroperitoneal free fluid may be a useful ultrasonographic feature to assist with the characterization of, and determination of prognosis in, patients with suspected renal disease.

  7. Early postnatal hyperalimentation impairs renal function via SOCS-3 mediated renal postreceptor leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Alcazar, Miguel Angel Alejandre; Boehler, Eva; Rother, Eva; Amann, Kerstin; Vohlen, Christina; von Hörsten, Stephan; Plank, Christian; Dötsch, Jörg

    2012-03-01

    Early postnatal hyperalimentation has long-term implications for obesity and developing renal disease. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 3 inhibits phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 and ERK1/2 and thereby plays a pivotal role in mediating leptin resistance. In addition, SOCS-3 is induced by both leptin and inflammatory cytokines. However, little is known about the intrinsic-renal leptin synthesis and function. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate the implications of early postnatal hyperalimentation on renal function and on the intrinsic-renal leptin signaling. Early postnatal hyperalimentation in Wistar rats during lactation was induced by litter size reduction at birth (LSR) either to LSR10 or LSR6, compared with home cage control male rats. Assessment of renal function at postnatal day 70 revealed decreased glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria after LSR6. In line with this impairment of renal function, renal inflammation and expression as well as deposition of extracellular matrix molecules, such as collagen I, were increased. Furthermore, renal expression of leptin and IL-6 was up-regulated subsequent to LSR6. Interestingly, the phosphorylation of Stat3 and ERK1/2 in the kidney, however, was decreased after LSR6, indicating postreceptor leptin resistance. In accordance, neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression was down-regulated; moreover, SOCS-3 protein expression, a mediator of postreceptor leptin resistance, was strongly elevated and colocalized with NPY. Thus, our findings not only demonstrate impaired renal function and profibrotic processes but also provide compelling evidence of a SOCS-3-mediated intrinsic renal leptin resistance and concomitant up-regulated NPY expression as an underlying mechanism.

  8. Comparison of renal ultrasonography and dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy in febrile urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Ayazi, Parviz; Mahyar, Abolfazl; Noroozian, Elham; Esmailzadehha, Neda; Barikani, Ameneh

    2015-12-01

    Accurate and early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of patient with urinary tract infection (UTI) are essential for the prevention or restriction of permanent damage to the kidneys in children. The aim of this study was to compare renal ultrasonography (US) and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scan in the diagnosis of patients with febrile urinary tract infection. This study involved the medical records of children with febrile urinary tract infection who were admitted to the children's hospital in Qazvin, Iran. Pyelonephritis was diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms, laboratory tests and abnormal DMSA renal scans. The criteria for abnormality of renal US were an increase or a decrease in diffuse or focal parenchymal echogenicity, loss of corticomedullary differentiation, kidney position irregularities, parenchymal reduction and increased kidney size. Of the 100 study patients, 23% had an abnormal US and 46% had an abnormal DMSA renal scan. Of the latter patients, 15 had concurrent abnormal US (P value ≤ 0.03, concordance rate: 18%). Renal US had a sensitivity of 32%, specificity of 85%, positive predictive value of 65% and negative predictive value of 60%. Of the 77 patients with normal US, 31 (40.2%) had an abnormal DMSA renal scan. Despite the benefits and accessibility of renal US, its value in the diagnosis of pyelonephritis is limited.

  9. Effects of radiofrequency ablation on individual renal function: assessment by technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Takashi; Sato, Shuhei; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Mimura, Hidefumi; Yasui, Kotaro; Gobara, Hideo; Saika, Takashi; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2006-04-01

    We quantitatively evaluated total and individual renal function by technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (Tc-99m MAG3) renal scintigraphy before and after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal tumors. Eleven patients who underwent Tc-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy 1 week before and after RFA were evaluated (7 men and 4 women; age range: 23-83 years; mean age: 60.6 years). Five patients had solitary kidneys, and five had normally or minimally functioning contralateral kidneys. One patient had a renal cell carcinoma in the contralateral kidney. One patient with a solitary kidney underwent RFA a second time for a residual tumor. In patients with a solitary kidney, MAG3 clearance decreased after 5 of 6 RFAs, and in patients with a normally functioning contralateral kidney, MAG3 clearance decreased after 4 of 5 RFAs, but no significant differences were observed between before and after treatments. In addition to the total MAG3 clearance, the split MAG3 clearance was evaluated in patients with a normally functioning contralateral kidney. MAG3 clearance decreased in 4 of 5 treated kidneys, while it adversely increased in the contralateral kidneys after 4 of 5 RFAs. No significant differences, however, were observed between before and after treatments. The results of our study revealed no significant differences in sCr, BUN, CCr, or MAG3 clearance between pre- and post-RFA values. These results support data regarding the functional impact and safety of renal RFA in published reports. We evaluated total and individual renal function quantitatively using Tc-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy before and after treatment. This scintigraphy was very useful in assessing the effects of RFA on renal function.

  10. Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Artery Function in Humans: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Doltra, Adelina; Hartmann, Arthur; Stawowy, Philipp; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kuehne, Titus; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Gebker, Rolf; Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Esler, Murray; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of RD on renal artery wall function non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Methods and Results 32 patients undergoing RD were included. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance of the renal arteries was performed before RD and after 6-month. We quantified the vessel sharpness of both renal arteries using a quantitative analysis tool (Soap-Bubble®). In 17 patients we assessed the maximal and minimal cross-sectional area of both arteries, peak velocity, mean flow, and renal artery distensibility. In a subset of patients wall shear stress was assessed with computational flow dynamics. Neither renal artery sharpness nor renal artery distensibility differed significantly. A significant increase in minimal and maximal areas (by 25.3%, p = 0.008, and 24.6%, p = 0.007, respectively), peak velocity (by 16.9%, p = 0.021), and mean flow (by 22.4%, p = 0.007) was observed after RD. Wall shear stress significantly decreased (by 25%, p = 0.029). These effects were observed in blood pressure responders and non-responders. Conclusions RD is not associated with adverse effects at renal artery level, and leads to an increase in cross-sectional areas, velocity and flow and a decrease in wall shear stress. PMID:27003912

  11. Renal scintiscanning. A review

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E. Rhys

    1970-01-01

    Renal scintiscanning is a simple investigation that does not require special preparation and is well tolerated by patients. Radiopharmaceuticals used in linear scanning are accumulated in the renal cortex. This accumulation is diminished: (a) when the cortex is destroyed, e.g. by pyelonephritis, injury, etc.; and (b) when the amount available to the cortex is reduced, e.g. by ischaemia. The scintigram depicts the kidneys unimpeded by bowel contents, gives a qualitative assessment of renal function and shows the distribution of zones of normal function. Recent technical improvements show great promise in deriving a quantitative measure of renal function in some circumstances. The location of normally functioning cortex is often important in the management of renal diseases and the value of scintiscanning is then considerable. It is occasionally useful in planning surgery. The anatomy of the renal collecting system can be shown only by urography. High dose techniques achieve this even in the face of renal failure, and scintiscanning has few indications in investigating lesions that distort the renal anatomy, e.g. tumours and cysts. Renal scintiscanning is a very valuable additional method to urography, arteriography and renography in investigation of renal disorders. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4905447

  12. Renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Macedo, E; Bouchard, J; Mehta, R L

    2009-09-01

    Renal replacement therapy became a common clinical tool to treat patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) since the 1960s. During this time dialytic options have expanded considerably; biocompatible membranes, bicarbonate dialysate and dialysis machines with volumetric ultrafiltration control have improved the treatment for acute kidney injury. Along with advances in methods of intermittent hemodialysis, continuous renal replacement therapies have gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of dialysis-requiring AKI. However, many of the fundamental aspects of the renal replacement treatment such as indication, timing of dialytic intervention, and choice of dialysis modality are still controversial and may influence AKI patient's outcomes. This review outlines current concepts in the use of dialysis techniques for AKI and suggests an approach for selecting the optimal method of renal replacement therapy.

  13. Mechanism of postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in the anesthetized dog.

    PubMed Central

    Katholi, R E; Oparil, S; Urthaler, F; James, T N

    1979-01-01

    The mechanism of postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction was studied in 28 dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (30 mg/kg i.v.). Rapid atrial or ventricular pacing or induction of atrial fibrilation were used to produce at least 20% prompt decrease in cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Return to control cardiac output and blood pressure occurred within 3 minutes after cessation of the arrhythmia, but renal blood flow remained significantly decreased (26%) with gradual recovery by 17.7 +/- 6.6 min. Infusion of phentolamine (0.25 mg/min) into the renal artery, intravenous hexamethonium (l mg/kg), adrenal demedullation, or cooling the cervical vagi prevented postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. In contrast, renal denervation, intravenous bretylium (10 mg/kg), intravenous atropine (0.5 mg/kg) or intrarenal SQ 20881 (0.20 mg/min) has no effect on postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. Intravenous propranolol (0.5 mg/kg) intensified postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. These data suggested that the postarrhythmic renal vasoconstrictive response required intact vagi and was due to alpha adrenergic stimulation by adrenal catecholamines. However, femoral arterial catecholamine levels were not elevated above control during postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. We therefore sought local vascular pathways by which catecholamines might reach the kidneys. An adrenorenal vascular network was found in each dog. Collection of catecholamines from these vessels during postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in six dogs revealed catecholamine concentrations threefold higher than simultaneously collected femoral arterial catecholamines levels. Because ligation of these vessels abolished postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in each dog, we conclude that postarrhythmic renal vasconstriction is due to adrenal catecholamines reaching the kidneys through an adreno-renal vascular network and that the response requires intact vagi. Images PMID:447852

  14. Renal hemodynamic responses to increased renal venous pressure: role of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Kastner, P R; Hall, J E; Guyton, A C

    1982-09-01

    Studies were performed to quantitate the effects of progressive increases in renal venous pressure (RVP) on renin secretion (RS) and renal hemodynamics. RVP was raised in 10 mmHg increments to 50 mmHg. Renin secretion rate increased modestly as RVP was increased to 30 mmHg and then increased sharply after RVP exceeded 30 mmHg. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal blood flow (RBF), and filtration fraction (FF) did not change significantly when RVP was elevated to 50 mmHg. GFR and RBF were also measured after the renin-angiotension system (RAS) was blocked with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (CEI) SQ 14225. After a 60-min CEI infusion, RBF was elevated (32%), GFR was unchanged, FF was decreased, and total renal resistance (TRR) was decreased. As RVP was increased to 50 mmHg, GFR and FF decreased to 36.3 and 40.0% of control, respectively, RBF returned to a value not significantly different from control, and TRR decreased to 44.8% of control. The data indicate that the RAS plays an important role in preventing reductions in GFR during increased RVP because blockade of angiotensin II (ANG II) formation by the CEI results in marked decreases in GFR at high RVPs. The decreases in GFR after ANG II blockade and RVP elevation were not due to lack of renal vasodilation, since TRR was maintained below while RBF was maintained either above or at the pre-CEI levels.

  15. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  16. Calbindins decreased after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergeev, I. N.; Rhoten, W. B.; Carney, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of the body to microgravity during space flight causes a series of well-documented changes in Ca2+ metabolism, yet the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these changes are poorly understood. Calbindins, vitamin D-dependent Ca2+ binding proteins, are believed to have a significant role in maintaining cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. In this study, we used biochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to analyze the expression of calbindin-D28k and calbindin-D9k in kidneys, small intestine, and pancreas of rats flown for 9 d aboard the space shuttle. The effects of microgravity on calbindins in rats from space were compared with synchronous Animal Enclosure Module controls, modeled weightlessness animals (tail suspension), and their controls. Exposure to microgravity resulted in a significant and sustained decrease in calbindin-D28k content in the kidney and calbindin-D9k in the small intestine of flight animals, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Modeled weightlessness animals exhibited a similar decrease in calbindins by ELISA. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) in combination with quantitative computer image analysis was used to measure in situ the expression of calbindins in the kidney and the small intestine, and the expression of insulin in pancreas. There was a large decrease of immunoreactivity in renal distal tubular cell-associated calbindin-D28k and in intestinal absorptive cell-associated calbindin-D9k of space flight and modeled weightlessness animals compared with matched controls. No consistent difference in pancreatic insulin immunoreactivity between space flight, modeled weightlessness, and controls was observed. Regression analysis of results obtained by quantitative ICC and ELISA for space flight, modeled weightlessness animals, and their controls demonstrated a significant correlation. These findings after a short-term exposure to microgravity or modeled weightlessness suggest that a decreased expression of calbindins

  17. Multimarker assessment for the prediction of renal function improvement after percutaneous revascularization for renal artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Sasan; Zeller, Thomas; Breidthardt, Tobias; Kaech, Max; Boeddinghaus, Jasper; Puelacher, Christian; Nestelberger, Thomas; Aschwanden, Markus; Mueller, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying patients likely to have improved renal function after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty and stenting (PTRA) for renal artery stenosis (RAS) is challenging. The purpose of this study was to use a comprehensive multimarker assessment to identify those patients who would benefit most from correction of RAS. Methods In 127 patients with RAS and decreased renal function and/or hypertension referred for PTRA, quantification of hemodynamic cardiac stress using B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), renal function using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), parenchymal renal damage using resistance index (RI), and systemic inflammation using C-reactive protein (CRP) were performed before intervention. Results Predefined renal function improvement (increase in eGFR ≥10%) at 6 months occurred in 37% of patients. Prognostic accuracy as quantified by the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve for the ability of BNP, eGFR, RI and CRP to predict renal function improvement were 0.59 (95% CI, 0.48–0.70), 0.71 (95% CI, 0.61–0.81), 0.52 (95% CI, 0.41–0.65), and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.44–0.68), respectively. None of the possible combinations increased the accuracy provided by eGFR (lower eGFR indicated a higher likelihood for eGFR improvement after PTRA, P=ns for all). In the subgroup of 56 patients with pre-interventional eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, similar findings were obtained. Conclusions Quantification of renal function, but not any other pathophysiologic signal, provides at least moderate accuracy in the identification of patients with RAS in whom PTRA will improve renal function. PMID:27280085

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Aggravates Renal Injury through Cytokines and Direct Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Songhui; Hu, Lijuan; Zhong, Lin; Guo, Yannan; Dong, Liqun; Jia, Ruizhen; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between renal injury and reinfection that is caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and to analyze the mechanism of renal injury. Rats were repeatedly infected with RSV on days 4, 8, 14, and 28, then sacrificed and examined on day 56 after the primary infection. Renal injury was examined by transmission electron microscopy and histopathology. The F protein of RSV was detected in the renal tissue by indirect immunofluorescence. Proteinuria and urinary glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), serum levels of albumin, urea nitrogen, and creatinine, secretion of cytokines, T lymphocyte population and subsets, and dendritic cell (DC) activation state were examined. The results showed that renal injury was more serious in the reinfection group than in the primary infection group. At a higher infection dose, 6 × 106 PFU, the renal injury was more severe, accompanied by higher levels of proteinuria and urinary GAGs excretion, and lower levels of serum albumin. Podocyte foot effacement was more extensive, and hyperplasia of mesangial cells and proliferation of mesangial matrix were observed. The maturation state of DCs was specific, compared with the primary infection. There was also a decrease in the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T lymphocytes, due to an increase in the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes and a decrease in the percentage of CD4+ T lymphocytes, and a dramatic increase in the levels of IL-6 and IL-17. In terms of the different reinfection times, the day 14 reinfection group yielded the most serious renal injury and the most significant change in immune function. RSV F protein was still expressed in the glomeruli 56 days after RSV infection. Altogether, these results reveal that RSV infection could aggravate renal injury, which might be due to direct renal injury caused by RSV and the inflammatory lesions caused by the anti-virus response induced by RSV. PMID:27747195

  19. Jade-1, a candidate renal tumor suppressor that promotes apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mina I; Foy, Rebecca L; Chitalia, Vipul C; Zhao, Jin; Panchenko, Maria V; Wang, Hongmei; Cohen, Herbert T

    2005-08-02

    Medical therapies are lacking for advanced renal cancer, so there is a great need to understand its pathogenesis. Most renal cancers have defects in the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor pVHL. The mechanism by which pVHL protein functions in renal tumor suppression remains unclear. Jade-1 is a short-lived, kidney-enriched transcription factor that is stabilized by direct interaction with pVHL. Loss of Jade-1 stabilization by pVHL correlates with renal cancer risk, making the relationship between Jade-1 and renal cancer compelling. We report that Jade-1 expression was barely detectable in all tested renal cancer cell lines, regardless of VHL status. Strikingly, proteasome inhibitor treatment increased endogenous Jade-1 expression up to 10-fold. Jade-1 inhibited renal cancer cell growth, colony formation, and tumor formation in nude mice. Intriguingly, Jade-1 also affected the pattern of cell growth in monolayer culture and 3D culture. Jade-1 increased apoptosis by 40-50% and decreased levels of antiapoptotic Bcl-2. Antisense Jade-1-expressing cells confirmed these results. Therefore, Jade-1 may suppress renal cancer cell growth in part by increasing apoptosis. Jade-1 may represent a proapoptotic barrier to proliferation that must be overcome generally in renal cancer, perhaps initially by pVHL inactivation and subsequently by increased proteasomal activity. Therefore, Jade-1 may be a renal tumor suppressor.

  20. Effect of tolazoline on renal function in newborn puppies.

    PubMed

    John, E G; Bhat, R; Assadi, F K; Vidyasagar, D; Fornell, L

    1986-01-01

    Tolazoline is used in pulmonary hypertension and hypoperfusion syndrome during the neonatal period. Some of the side effects of tolazoline are hypotension, bleeding disorders and renal dysfunction. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of hypoxia and tolazoline on renal function in newborn puppies. The data in normal animals administered tolazoline alone did not reveal any statistically significant changes in blood pressure or in renal function. In the hypoxia group changes in renal function were noticed in spite of normal blood pressure. When tolazoline was administered to the hypoxic animals, a marked decrease in blood pressure resulted. Indeed, changes in renal function were more profound in the hypoxic animals receiving tolazoline than in hypoxic animals not receiving tolazoline, even though some of the renal functional values did not reach statistical significance.

  1. Renal pelvis or ureter cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer ... Cancer can grow in the urine collection system, but it is uncommon. Renal pelvis and ureter cancers ...

  2. Evidence of a heterogeneous tissue oxygenation: renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in a large animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Huffman, Scott W.; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Gage, Frederick A.; Levin, Ira W.; Elster, Eric A.

    2013-03-01

    Renal ischemia that occurs intraoperatively during procedures requiring clamping of the renal artery (such as renal procurement for transplantation and partial nephrectomy for renal cancer) is known to have a significant impact on the viability of that kidney. To better understand the dynamics of intraoperative renal ischemia and recovery of renal oxygenation during reperfusion, a visible reflectance imaging system (VRIS) was developed to measure renal oxygenation during renal artery clamping in both cooled and warm porcine kidneys. For all kidneys, normothermic and hypothermic, visible reflectance imaging demonstrated a spatially distinct decrease in the relative oxy-hemoglobin concentration (%HbO2) of the superior pole of the kidney compared to the middle or inferior pole. Mean relative oxy-hemoglobin concentrations decrease more significantly during ischemia for normothermic kidneys compared to hypothermic kidneys. VRIS may be broadly applicable to provide an indicator of organ ischemia during open and laparoscopic procedures.

  3. Renal amyloidosis in a drug abuser.

    PubMed

    Tan, A U; Cohen, A H; Levine, B S

    1995-03-01

    Drug abusers, particularly those who inject drugs s.c. ("skin popping"), may develop amyloidosis. Chronic infections are thought to play a pathogenetic role in this setting. A patient is presented who had a history of "skin popping" cocaine and heroin and developed nephrotic syndrome, with an elevated serum creatinine and a creatinine clearance of 61 mL/min. Renal biopsy demonstrated amyloidosis. Treatment with colchicine was initiated, and proteinuria decreased to near normal levels after 12 months. Concomitant with the decrease in proteinuria, creatinine clearance improved, although a repeat renal biopsy failed to show any significant improvement in amyloid burden. These observations suggest that colchicine may be a useful treatment in reversing the proteinuria of renal amyloidosis associated with drug abuse. Furthermore, clinical improvement may occur before any demonstrable regression in the amyloidosis.

  4. Renal outcome of children with unilateral renal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Çağla Serpil; Torun Bayram, Meral

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate associated urological anomalies and renal outcome in children with unilateral renal agenesis (URA). Medical records of 51 cases of URA followed at Şanlıurfa Children 's Hospital between January 2009 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. In all patients, diagnosis was made by abdominal ultrasound (US) and confirmed by a radionuclide scan. The children were between 3 months and 17 years of age (median age: 5 years). There were 31 males (60.8%) and 20 females (39.2%). In 33 patients (67.3%), the left kidney was absent. Urological anomalies were found in 12/51 patients (23.5%), including ureterovesical junction obstruction in 4 (7.8%), bladder dysfunction in 2 (3.9%), and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), ureteropelvic junction obstruction, ureterovesical and ureteropelvic junction obstruction, duplicated collecting system plus grade IV VUR, ectopic kidney plus grade V VUR, and ectopic kidney in 1 patient (2%) each. Chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) developed in 5/51 patients (9.8%) (stage III in 3 patients and stage IV in 2), 4 of whom had additional urological anomaly; in the remaining 1 patient, a 17-year-old female, imaging studies were normal except for a small and hyperechogenic solitary kidney determined on US. A total of 3 patients (5.8%) developed hypertension, and all except one had an associated urological anomaly. Proteinuria was seen in 2 patients (3.8%) with stage IV CRI, one of whom was also hypertensive. In conclusion, urological anomalies usually accompany URA and should be followed closely to decrease the risk of renal failure.

  5. Safety and efficacy of carbon dioxide and intravascular ultrasound-guided stenting for renal artery stenosis in patients with chronic renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Daizo; Fujii, Kenichi; Fukunaga, Masashi; Fukuda, Nobuhisa; Masuyama, Tohru; Ohkubo, Nobukazu; Kato, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the feasibility, safety, and mid-term outcomes of renal artery stenting using carbon dioxide (CO₂) digital subtraction angiography and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for patients with renal insufficiency and significant atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS). Eighteen consecutive patients with chronic renal insufficiency underwent renal artery stenting under the guidance of CO₂ angiography and IVUS without contrast media. Renal function and blood pressure were assessed pre- and postintervention. A total of 27 de novo RAS in 18 patients (15 males; mean age: 72 ± 9 years) with renal insufficiency were treated by renal artery stenting with the combined use of the CO₂ angiography and IVUS without any procedural complications. Although the mean serum creatinine concentration preprocedure and 6 months after treatment did not change (2.7 ± 1.0-2.4 ± 1.1 mg/dL), blood pressure significantly decreased 6 months after stenting (158 ± 10-147 ± 11 mm Hg, P < .01).

  6. Renal ornithine decarboxylase activity, polyamines, and compensatory renal hypertrophy in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, M.H.; Etheredge, S.B.; Lin, Shanyan; Ribstein, J.; Marton, L.J. Univ. of California, San Francisco )

    1988-08-01

    The authors determined the role of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in compensatory renal hypertrophy (CRH) by relating renal ODC activity and polyamine content to kidney size, expressed as a percent of body weight, 1 wk after unilateral nephrectomy (UN). In normal rats, renal ODC activity increased after UN; 1 wk later the remaining kidney weight had increased. Renal concentration of putrescine, the product of ODC's decarboxylation of ornithine, was increased 3, 8, and 48 h after UN, but concentrations of polyamines synthesized later in the pathway, spermidine and spermine, were not appreciably affected. Pretreatment with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ODC inhibited both base-line renal ODC activity and putrescine concentration as well as increases stimulated by UN, although concentrations of spermidine and spermine were not decreased. In hypophysectomized rats, both increased renal ODC activity and CRH occurred as well, indicating that these two consequences of UN do not require intact pituitary function. Thus stimulation of renal ODC activity and putrescine content do not appear critical to the process of CRH after UN.

  7. 11-Beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 expression in white adipose tissue is strongly correlated with adiposity.

    PubMed

    Milagro, Fermin I; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2007-04-01

    Glucocorticoid action within the cells is regulated by the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression and two enzymes, 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11betaHSD1), which converts inactive to active glucocorticoids, and 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11betaHSD2), which regulates the access of active glucocorticoids to the receptor by converting cortisol/corticosterone to the glucocorticoid-inactive form cortisone/dehydrocorticosterone. Male Wistar rats developed obesity by being fed a high-fat diet for 56 days, and GR, 11betaHSD1 and 11betaHSD2 gene expression were compared with control-diet fed animals. Gene expression analysis of 11betaHSD1, 11betaHSD2 and GR were performed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipose tissue. High-fat fed animals overexpressed 11betaHSD2 in subcutaneous but not in retroperitoneal fat. Interestingly, mRNA levels strongly correlated in both tissues with different parameters related to obesity, such as body weight, adiposity and insulin resistance, suggesting that this gene is a reliable marker of adiposity in this rat model of obesity. Thus, 11betaHSD2 is expressed in adipose tissue by both adipocytes and stromal-vascular cells, which suggests that this enzyme may play an important role in preventing fat accumulation in adipose tissue.

  8. Rapid loss of renal parenchyma after acute obstruction.

    PubMed

    Parvex, P; Pippi-Salle, J L; Goodyer, P R

    2001-12-01

    Urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is a frequent cause of renal failure in the pediatric population. We report a patient with type I/I cystinuria, followed prospectively from birth with yearly ultrasonography, who developed acute UTO due to a cystine stone at 10 years of age. In animal models of UTO, acute obstruction produces rapid loss of renal parenchyma secondary to apoptosis of tubular cells. Since we had prospectively obtained serial ultrasonographic measurements of renal growth, we were able to document sudden decrease in kidney size and function following UTO, suggesting that programmed cell death may similarly have caused the rapid irreversible loss of renal parenchyma in our patient. Despite surgical relief of the obstruction, kidney size decreased for at least 3-4 months. We speculate that anti-apoptotic drugs might be considered as a therapeutic strategy to protect ongoing renal parenchyma loss in UTO.

  9. Renal blood flow in man with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    London, G M; Safar, M E; Marchais, S

    1986-01-01

    Abnormalities in renal blood flow in man with sustained essential hypertension are reviewed with emphasis on four points: renal blood flow is decreased not only per unit square meter but also as a fraction of cardiac output, a result which is not observed in other organs, the relationship between cardiac output and renal blood flow is reset, so that restriction of arteriolar renal vessels is dominantly preglomerular in origin, the renal abnormalities may be reversed by alpha-blockade, suggesting an important contribution of the autonomic nervous system, and, finally, the normal sodium balance in steady-state conditions is achieved through adaptive mechanisms involving the venous system and resulting in decreased venous compliance and increased postglomerular and venous hydrostatic pressures.

  10. Atheroembolic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro

    2010-05-08

    Atheroembolic renal disease develops when atheromatous aortic plaques rupture, releasing cholesterol crystals into the small renal arteries. Embolisation often affects other organs, such as the skin, gastrointestinal system, and brain. Although the disease can develop spontaneously, it usually develops after vascular surgery, catheterisation, or anticoagulation. The systemic nature of atheroembolism makes diagnosis difficult. The classic triad of a precipitating event, acute or subacute renal failure, and skin lesions, are strongly suggestive of the disorder. Eosinophilia further supports the diagnosis, usually confirmed by biopsy of an affected organ or by the fundoscopic finding of cholesterol crystals in the retinal circulation. Renal and patient prognosis are poor. Treatment is mostly preventive, based on avoidance of further precipitating factors, and symptomatic, aimed to the optimum treatment of hypertension and cardiac and renal failure. Statins, which stabilise atherosclerotic plaques, should be offered to all patients. Steroids might have a role in acute or subacute progressive forms with systemic inflammation.

  11. [Sarcoidosis : Renal manifestations].

    PubMed

    Löffler, C; Bergner, R

    2017-04-12

    Renal involvement in sarcoidosis is much more common than generally assumed from old epidemiological studies and is often only detected when actively searched for. Many patients with renal sarcoidosis present with no or only few symptoms. The diagnostic work-up of sarcoidosis should always include a possible renal involvement. In cases of impaired renal function, proteinuria or a pathological urine sediment, a renal biopsy specimen should be obtained to assess the type, severity and prognosis of the kidney disease. Treatment is primarily based on the use of corticosteroids. Steroid-sparing agents, such as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and infliximab can be applied; however, the evidence for efficacy of these therapies is mostly based on case series and expert opinions. Discontinuation of immunosuppression therapy bears a high risk of relapse.

  12. Renal Function Outcomes for Multifocal Renal Neoplasms Managed by Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Pushpender Allen, Brian C. Chen, Michael Y. Childs, David D. Kota, Gopi Zagoria, Ronald J.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate renal function changes related to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms. Methods: This is an institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective study of all patients treated with computed tomography guided RFA for multifocal renal neoplasms at one institution. Fifty-seven subjects, mean age 70 (range 37-88) years, underwent RFA of 169 renal neoplasms (average size 2.0 cm). Subjects had between 2 and 8 (mean 2.96) neoplasms ablated. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was measured before and after RFA. Complications related to RFA were recorded. Results: eGFR decreased on average of 4.4 % per tumor treated and 6.7 % per ablation session (average 1.76 tumors treated per session). For subjects with the largest neoplasm measuring >3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 14.5 % during the course of their treatment. If the largest neoplasm measured 2-3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 7.7 %, and if the largest neoplasm measured <2 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 3.8 %. Subjects with reduced baseline renal function were more likely to have a greater decline in eGFR after RFA. There was a minor complication rate of 6.3 % (6 of 96 sessions), none of which required treatment, and a major complication rate of 4.2 % (4 of 96 sessions). Conclusion: RFA for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms results in mild decline of renal function.

  13. Schur monotone decreasing sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Rasul; Saburov, Mansoor; Saburov, Khikmat

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce Schur monotone decreasing sequences in an n-dimensional space by considering a majorization pre-order. By means of down arrow mappings, we study omega limiting points of bounded Schur monotone decreasing sequences. We provide convergence criteria for such kinds of sequences. We prove that a Cesaro mean (or an arithmetic mean) of any bounded Schur monotone decreasing sequences converges to a unique limiting point.

  14. Selective renal vasodilation and active renal artery perfusion improve renal function in dogs with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, K; Shimizu, J; Yi, G H; Gu, A; Wang, J; Keren, G; Burkhoff, D

    2001-09-01

    Renal failure is common in heart failure due to renovascular constriction and hypotension. We tested whether selective pharmacological renal artery vasodilation and active renal artery perfusion (ARP) could improve renal function without adverse effects on systemic blood pressure in a canine model of acute heart failure (AHF). AHF was induced by coronary microembolization in 16 adult mongrel dogs. In five dogs, selective intrarenal (IR) papaverine (1, 2, and 4 mg/min) was administered into the left renal artery. In six dogs, ARP was performed in the left renal artery to normalize mean renal arterial pressure followed by administration of IR papaverine (2 mg/min). In five dogs, ARP plus intravenous furosemide was tested. Urine output (UO) and cortical renal blood flow decreased during AHF and were restored by 2 mg/min IR papaverine (UO: baseline 4.2 +/- 0.6, AHF 1.6 +/- 1.3, IR papaverine 5.8 +/- 1.1 ml/15 min; cortical blood flow: baseline 4.3 +/- 0.2, AHF 2.4 +/- 0.6, IR papaverine 4.2 +/- 1.2 ml/min/g) with no significant change in aortic pressure. ARP also increased urine output and cortical renal blood flow (UO: baseline 5.0 +/- 1.1, AHF 0.5 +/- 0.4, ARP 3.8 +/- 3.1 ml/15 min; cortical blood flow: baseline 4.0 +/- 0.5, AHF 2.0 +/- 0.8, ARP 3.52 +/- 1.1 ml/min/g). A combination of these methods in AHF further increased urine output to twice the normal baseline (10.5 +/- 7.5 ml/15 min). Addition of furosemide synergistically increased UO above that achieved with ARP alone (5.5 +/- 2.6 versus 40.3 +/- 24.7 ml/15 min, p = 0.03). In conclusion, ARP and selective renal vasodilation may effectively promote salt and water excretion in the setting of heart failure, particularly when systemic blood pressure is low.

  15. [The role of percutaneous renal biopsy in kidney transplant].

    PubMed

    Manfro, R C; Lee, J Y; Lewgoy, J; Edelweiss, M I; Gonçalves, L F; Prompt, C A

    1994-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is an useful tool for diagnostic and therapeutic orientation in renal transplantation. PURPOSE--To evaluate the current role of PRB in post-transplant acute renal dysfunction (ARD) of renal allografts. METHODS--Sixty-five renal transplant patients were submitted to 95 valid renal biopsies with no major complications. RESULTS--There was disagreement between the clinical and the pathological diagnosis in 28 occasions (29.5%). In 36 cases (37.9%) the results of the pathological examination led to a modification in patient's management. These modifications were most commonly the avoidance or witholding of a steroid pulse (8 cases); nephrectomy of the renal allograft (8 cases); witholding or decrease of cyclosporine dosage (6 cases); giving a steroid pulse (5 cases) and giving antibiotics to treat acute pyelonephritis in 4 cases. The use of kidneys from cadaveric donors was significantly associated with an increased number of biopsies (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION--These results demonstrate that even though several less invasive procedures are currently employed, renal biopsy is still an indispensable method to the management of ARD in renal transplant patients.

  16. Complications of renal transplantation: evaluation with US and radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Brown, E D; Chen, M Y; Wolfman, N T; Ott, D J; Watson, N E

    2000-01-01

    Following renal transplantation, patients are often evaluated with ultrasonography (US) or radionuclide imaging to assess renal function and the presence of possible complications. Both modalities are inexpensive, noninvasive, and nonnephrotoxic. A basic understanding of the surgical techniques commonly used for renal transplantation is useful when imaging these patients in order to recognize complications and to direct further imaging or intervention. The most frequent complications of renal transplantation include perinephric fluid collections; decreased renal function; and abnormalities of the vasculature, collecting system, and renal parenchyma. Perinephric fluid collections are common following transplantation, and their clinical significance depends on the type, location, size, and growth of the fluid collection, features that are well-evaluated with US. Causes of diminished renal function include acute tubular necrosis, rejection, and toxicity from medications. Radionuclide imaging is the most useful modality for assessing renal function. Vascular complications of transplantation include occlusion or stenosis of the arterial or venous supply, arteriovenous fistulas, and pseudoaneurysms. Although the standard for evaluating these vascular complications is angiography, US is an excellent noninvasive method for screening. Other transplant complications such as abnormalities of the collecting system and renal parenchyma are well-evaluated with both radionuclide imaging and US.

  17. Late renal dysfunction in adult survivors of bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.A.; Cohen, E.P.; Barber-Derus, S.W.; Murray, K.J.; Ash, R.C.; Casper, J.T.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Until recently long-term renal toxicity has not been considered a major late complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Late renal dysfunction has been described in a pediatric population status post-BMT which was attributable to the radiation in the preparatory regimen. A thorough review of adults with this type of late renal dysfunction has not previously been described. Fourteen of 103 evaluable adult patients undergoing allogeneic (96) or autologous (7) bone marrow transplantation, predominantly for leukemia and lymphomas, at the Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI) have had a syndrome of renal insufficiency characterized by increased serum creatinine, decreased glomerular filtration rate, anemia, and hypertension. This syndrome developed at a median of 9 months (range, 4.5 to 26 months) posttransplantation in the absence of specific identifiable causes. The cumulative probability of having this renal dysfunction is 20% at 1 year. Renal biopsies performed on seven of these cases showed the endothelium widely separated from the basement membrane, extreme thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, and microthrombi. Previous chemotherapy, antibiotics, and antifungals as well as cyclosporin may add to and possibly potentiate a primary chemoradiation marrow transplant renal injury, but this clinical syndrome is most analogous to clinical and experimental models of radiation nephritis. This late marrow transplant-associated nephritis should be recognized as a potentially limiting factor in the use of some intensive chemoradiation conditioning regimens used for BMT. Some selective attenuation of the radiation to the kidneys may decrease the incidence of this renal dysfunction.

  18. Renal Hypoxia and Dysoxia After Reperfusion of the Ischemic Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Matthieu; Mik, Egbert G; Johannes, Tanja; Payen, Didier; Ince, Can

    2008-01-01

    Ischemia is the most common cause of acute renal failure. Ischemic-induced renal tissue hypoxia is thought to be a major component in the development of acute renal failure in promoting the initial tubular damage. Renal oxygenation originates from a balance between oxygen supply and consumption. Recent investigations have provided new insights into alterations in oxygenation pathways in the ischemic kidney. These findings have identified a central role of microvascular dysfunction related to an imbalance between vasoconstrictors and vasodilators, endothelial damage and endothelium–leukocyte interactions, leading to decreased renal oxygen supply. Reduced microcirculatory oxygen supply may be associated with altered cellular oxygen consumption (dysoxia), because of mitochondrial dysfunction and activity of alternative oxygen-consuming pathways. Alterations in oxygen utilization and/or supply might therefore contribute to the occurrence of organ dysfunction. This view places oxygen pathways’ alterations as a potential central player in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury. Both in regulation of oxygen supply and consumption, nitric oxide seems to play a pivotal role. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that, following acute ischemic renal injury, persistent tissue hypoxia contributes to the development of chronic renal dysfunction. Adaptative mechanisms to renal hypoxia may be ineffective in more severe cases and lead to the development of chronic renal failure following ischemia-reperfusion. This paper is aimed at reviewing the current insights into oxygen transport pathways, from oxygen supply to oxygen consumption in the kidney and from the adaptation mechanisms to renal hypoxia. Their role in the development of ischemia-induced renal damage and ischemic acute renal failure are discussed. PMID:18488066

  19. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  20. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way

  1. Renal oncocytoma: new observations

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, M.J.; Hartman, D.S.; Friedman, A.C.; Sherman, J.L.; Lautin, E.M.; Pyatt, R.S.; Ho, C.K.; Csere, R.; Fromowitz, F.B.

    1984-10-01

    Renal oncocytomas are uncommon, benign tumors that can be treated by local incision or heminephrectomy; their preoperative differentiation from renal cell carcinoma, treated by radical nephrectomy, would be invaluable. A particularly important finding, a central scar, not stressed in previous reports, is frequently demonstrated by CT examination. The authors evaluated radiographic studies of 18 pathologically confirmed cases of oncocytoma and compared findings with results of CT, sonography, and angiogrpahy studies of 18 renal cell carcinoma cases. Oncocytomas can be suggested if a stellate scar is identified within an otherwise homogeneous tumor on ultrasound (US) and CT; if the mass appears homogeneous but no scar is present, angiography should be performed.

  2. Homocysteine as a predictive biomarker in early diagnosis of renal failure susceptibility and prognostic diagnosis for end stages renal disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hatem K; El-Sayed, Mohamed-I Kotb; Leheta, Ola F

    2016-09-01

    Glomerular filtration rate and/or creatinine are not accurate methods for renal failure prediction. This study tested homocysteine (Hcy) as a predictive and prognostic marker for end stage renal disease (ESRD). In total, 176 subjects were recruited and divided into: healthy normal group (108 subjects); mild-to-moderate impaired renal function group (21 patients); severe impaired renal function group (7 patients); and chronic renal failure group (40 patients) who were on regular hemodialysis. Blood samples were collected, and serum was separated for analysis of total Hcy, creatinine, high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), serum albumin, and calcium. Data showed that Hcy level was significantly increased from normal-to-mild impairment then significantly decreases from mild impairment until the patient reaches severe impairment while showing significant elevation in the last stage of chronic renal disease. Creatinine level was increased in all stages of kidney impairment in comparison with control. CRP level was showing significant elevation in the last stage. A significant decrease in both albumin and calcium was occurred in all stages of renal impairment. We conclude Hcy in combination with CRP, creatinine, albumin, and calcium can be used as a prognostic marker for ESRD and an early diagnostic marker for the risk of renal failure.

  3. Renal scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Daniel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is performed commonly in dogs and cats and has been used in a variety of other species. In a 2012 survey of the members of the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, 95% of the respondents indicated they perform renal scintigraphy in their practice. Renal scintigraphy is primarily used to assess renal function and to evaluate postrenal obstruction. This article reviews how renal scintigraphy is used in veterinary medicine and describes the methods of analysis. Species variation is also discussed.

  4. Endothelial Dysfunction in Renal Failure: Current Update.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Miroslav; Stojanovic, Marko; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is principally characterized by impaired endothelium- dependent transduction mechanisms related to vascular relaxation, as an outcome of decreased release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors, mainly nitric oxide, as well as augmented oxidative stress, increased inflammation and predominance of vascular action produced by endothelium-derived contracting factors. Current data strongly suggest that pathological development of different types of kidney impairment with further progression to renal failure includes notable vascular changes associated with endothelial dysfunction. In accordance, this scientific field represents an advancing area of investigation, involving different biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction linked to renal impairment, as well as clinical findings with new information that can provide a more comprehensive understanding of the role of endothelial dysfunction in kidney disease. With regards to quoted facts, the aim of this article was to review the latest data related to endothelial dysfunction and renal failure by selection of relevant articles released from 2010 to 2015.

  5. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF.

  6. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Alicia M.; Pellegrino, Peter R.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF. PMID:26300788

  7. Systemic arterial and venous determinants of renal hemodynamics in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braam, Branko; Cupples, William A; Joles, Jaap A; Gaillard, Carlo

    2012-03-01

    Heart and kidney interactions are fascinating, in the sense that failure of the one organ strongly affects the function of the other. In this review paper, we analyze how principal driving forces for glomerular filtration and renal blood flow are changed in heart failure. Moreover, renal autoregulation and modulation of neurohumoral factors, which can both have repercussions on renal function, are analyzed. Two paradigms seem to apply. One is that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), and extracellular volume control are the three main determinants of renal function in heart failure. The other is that the classical paradigm to analyze renal dysfunction that is widely applied in nephrology also applies to the pathophysiology of heart failure: pre-renal, intra-renal, and post-renal alterations together determine glomerular filtration. At variance with the classical paradigm is that the most important post-renal factor in heart failure seems renal venous hypertension that, by increasing renal tubular pressure, decreases GFR. When different pharmacological strategies to inhibit the RAS and SNS and to assist renal volume control are considered, there is a painful lack in knowledge about how widely applied drugs affect primary driving forces for ultrafiltration, renal autoregulation, and neurohumoral control. We call for more clinical physiological studies.

  8. Renal and perirenal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.E.; Andriole, V.T.

    1987-12-01

    Our knowledge of the spectrum of renal abscesses has increased as a result of more sensitive radiologic techniques. The classification of intrarenal abscess now includes acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute multifocal bacterial nephritis, as well as the previously recognized renal cortical abscess, renal corticomedullary abscess, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. In general, the clinical presentation of these entities does not differentiate them; various radiographic studies can distinguish them, however. The intrarenal abscess is usually treated successfully with antibiotic therapy alone. Antistaphylococcal therapy is indicated for the renal cortical abscess, whereas therapy directed against the common gram-negative uropathogens is indicated for most of the other entities. The perinephric abscess is often an elusive diagnosis, has a more serious prognosis, and is more difficult to treat. Drainage of the abscess and sometimes partial or complete nephrectomy are required for resolution. 73 references.

  9. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ureters. Causes Renal papillary necrosis often occurs with analgesic nephropathy . This is damage to one or both ... Treatment depends on the cause. For example, if analgesic nephropathy is the cause, your doctor will recommend ...

  10. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Krapf R, Seldin DW, Alpern RJ. Clinical syndromes of metabolic acidosis. In: Alpern RJ, Caplan M, Moe OW, ... 529. Read More Distal renal tubular acidosis Fanconi syndrome Low potassium level Metabolic acidosis Osteomalacia Respiratory acidosis Rickets Review Date 10/ ...

  11. Renal primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bartholow, Tanner; Parwani, Anil

    2012-06-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors exist as a part of the Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor family. These tumors most commonly arise in the chest wall and paraspinal regions; cases with a renal origin are rare entities, but have become increasingly reported in recent years. Although such cases occur across a wide age distribution, the average age for a patient with a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor is the mid- to late 20s, with both males and females susceptible. Histologically, these tumors are characterized by pseudorosettes. Immunohistochemically, CD99 is an important diagnostic marker. Clinically, these are aggressive tumors, with an average 5-year disease-free survival rate of only 45% to 55%. Given that renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor bears many similarities to other renal tumors, it is important to review the histologic features, immunostaining profile, and genetic abnormalities that can be used for its correct diagnosis.

  12. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better with treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of distal renal tubular acidosis. Get medical help right away if you develop emergency symptoms ...

  13. Renal dysfunction in patients with thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charles T; Johnson, Valerie L; Kim, Hae-Young; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Vogiatzi, Maria G; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Fung, Ellen; Oliveri, Nancy; Kirby, Melanie; Giardina, Patricia J

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of thalassaemia on the kidney. Characterization of underlying renal function abnormalities in thalassaemia is timely because the newer iron chelator, deferasirox, can be nephrotoxic. We aimed to determine the prevalence and correlates of renal abnormalities in thalassaemia patients, treated before deferasirox was widely available, using 24-h collections of urine. We calculated creatinine clearance and urine calcium-to-creatinine ratio and measured urinary β(2) -microglobulin, albumin, and protein. We used multivariate modelling to identify clinical, therapeutic, and laboratory predictors of renal dysfunction. One-third of thalassaemia patients who were not regularly transfused had abnormally high creatinine clearance. Regular transfusions were associated with a decrease in clearance (P = 0·004). Almost one-third of patients with thalassaemia had hypercalciuria, and regular transfusions were associated with an increase in the frequency and degree of hypercalciuria (P < 0·0001). Albuminuria was found in over half of patients, but was not consistently associated with transfusion therapy. In summary, renal hyperfiltration, hypercalciuria, and albuminuria are common in thalassaemia. Higher transfusion intensity is associated with lower creatinine clearance but more frequent hypercalciuria. The transfusion effect needs to be better understood. Awareness of underlying renal dysfunction in thalassaemia can inform decisions now about the use and monitoring of iron chelation.

  14. Renal function in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burlet, A; Drukker, A; Guignard, J P

    1999-01-01

    We performed renal function tests in 18 young patients, 1.8-14.6 years of age, with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). Glomerular filtration rate was normal (116 +/- 4.5 ml/min/1.73 m2), and renal plasma flow was decreased (410 +/- 25 ml/min/1.73 m2) with a rise in the filtration fraction (29 +/- 1.1%). The suggested pathophysiologic explanation of these findings is that the blood hyperviscosity seen in patients with CCHD causes an overall increase in renal vascular resistance with a rise in intraglomerular blood pressure. Despite a sluggish flow of blood in the glomerular capillary bed, the effective filtration pressure was adjusted to conserve the glomerular filtration rate. In addition to these renal hemodynamic parameters, we also studied renal acidification and tubular sodium and water handling during a forced water diuresis. Our data indicate that children with CCHD have a mild to moderate normal ion gap metabolic acidosis due to a low proximal tubular threshold for bicarbonate. Proximal tubular sodium and water reabsorption under these conditions were somewhat increased, though not significantly, probably due to intrarenal hydrostatic forces, in particular the rise in the oncotic pressure in the postglomerular capillaries in patients with high hematocrit values. The distal tubular functions such as sodium handling and acidification were not affected.

  15. The renal effects of NSAIDs in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Amy L; Grauer, Gregory F

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life for dogs with osteoarthritis can often be improved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); however, the number of adverse drug events associated with NSAID use reported to the Federal Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine is higher than that for any other companion animal drug. Of those events, adverse renal reactions are the second most reported. NSAIDs produce pharmacologic effects via inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), which decreases production of prostanoids. Prostaglandins are synthesized by both the COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes in the healthy kidney and influence renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, renin release, and Na excretion. There are important species differences in the renal expression of COX-1 and COX-2. For example, dogs have higher basal levels of COX-2 expression in the kidney compared with humans. In addition, in dogs with chronic kidney disease, an increase in COX-2 expression occurs and synthesis of prostaglandins shifts to the COX-2 pathway. For those reasons, NSAIDs that target COX-2 may be expected to adversely affect renal function in dogs, especially dogs with chronic kidney disease. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the literature to report the renal effects of NSAIDs in dogs.

  16. 'Transcollateral' Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S. Swamy, Ajay

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  17. Renal pathology in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Peernel

    2006-01-01

    The class of Reptilia varies widely. Both the gross morphology and microscopic anatomy of the kidneys are specific for each species. In each species of reptile, the physiology of the renal system has adapted to the specific conditions of life, including, among other factors, the type of food, environmental temperature, and the availability of water. The pathology of the kidneys in reptiles has been poorly studied, but in recent years a number of investigators have specifically studied reptilian renal pathology.

  18. [Imaging renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bazan, F; Busto, M

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the eighth most common malignancy in adults and the most common malignancy in the kidney. It is thus a very common disease for radiologists. This review aims to provide a general overview of the imaging techniques used to diagnose, characterize, and help plan the treatment of renal cell carcinoma as well as to review basic aspects related to staging, imaging-guided percutaneous treatment, and follow-up in the most common clinical scenarios.

  19. Stratospheric ozone is decreasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1988-03-01

    The recent discovery that chlorofluorocarbons create the Antarctic ozone hole every October through reactions mediated by ice particles formed at the lowest temperatures of the stratosphere is discussed. A large-scale reanalysis of measurements reveals that protective stratospheric ozone has decreased during the past 17 yrs with some decreases greatly exceeding predictions. It is noted that standard models did not, and still do not, include the ice in their reaction schemes. A tendency toward larger losses at higher colder latitudes is seen.

  20. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration.

  1. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  2. Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Marc; Moshfegh, Amiel; Talenfeld, Adam; Del Pizzo, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    In light of evidence linking radical nephrectomy and consequent suboptimal renal function to adverse cardiovascular events and increased mortality, research into nephron-sparing techniques for renal masses widely expanded in the past two decades. The American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines now explicitly list partial nephrectomy as the standard of care for the management of T1a renal tumors. Because of the increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, up to 70% of newly detected renal masses are stage T1a, making them more amenable to minimally invasive nephron-sparing therapies including laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy and ablative therapies. Cryosurgery has emerged as a leading option for renal ablation, and compared with surgical techniques it offers benefits in preserving renal function with fewer complications, shorter hospitalization times, and allows for quicker convalescence. A mature dataset exists at this time, with intermediate and long-term follow-up data available. Cryosurgical recommendations as a first-line therapy are made at this time in limited populations, including elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, and those with a solitary kidney. As more data emerge on oncologic efficacy, and technical experience and the technology continue to improve, the application of this modality will likely be extended in future treatment guidelines. PMID:24596441

  3. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  4. Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Sourianarayanane, Achuthan; Thandassery, Ragesh B

    2016-06-01

    The development of decompensation in patients with cirrhosis is associated with increased mortality. Renal function gradually deteriorates with significant hemodynamic changes associated with decompensated liver disease, but may also rapidly decrease in response to precipitating events. Newer definitions of renal dysfunction may result in early diagnosis, this along with the use of sensitive markers helps in accurate determination of renal function in cirrhosis. Although renal dysfunction progresses slowly in cirrhotic patients, it is associated with increased mortality. Prompt intervention with appropriate management reduces the risk of renal dysfunction, as well as improving survival and quality of life. Appropriate management may include the removal of precipitating causes and use of pharmacological agents supporting circulatory dysfunction. Outcomes following treatment of this condition remain a major concern, especially in patients who develop hepatorenal syndrome. Transplantation of the liver or kidney and liver may be the only option when other modalities of treatment fail. Early transplantation may benefit these patients.

  5. Renal blood flow in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Langenberg, Christoph; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive; Wan, Li; Egi, Moritoki; Morgera, Stanislao

    2005-01-01

    Introduction To assess changes in renal blood flow (RBF) in human and experimental sepsis, and to identify determinants of RBF. Method Using specific search terms we systematically interrogated two electronic reference libraries to identify experimental and human studies of sepsis and septic acute renal failure in which RBF was measured. In the retrieved studies, we assessed the influence of various factors on RBF during sepsis using statistical methods. Results We found no human studies in which RBF was measured with suitably accurate direct methods. Where it was measured in humans with sepsis, however, RBF was increased compared with normal. Of the 159 animal studies identified, 99 reported decreased RBF and 60 reported unchanged or increased RBF. The size of animal, technique of measurement, duration of measurement, method of induction of sepsis, and fluid administration had no effect on RBF. In contrast, on univariate analysis, state of consciousness of animals (P = 0.005), recovery after surgery (P < 0.001), haemodynamic pattern (hypodynamic or hyperdynamic state; P < 0.001) and cardiac output (P < 0.001) influenced RBF. However, multivariate analysis showed that only cardiac output remained an independent determinant of RBF (P < 0.001). Conclusion The impact of sepsis on RBF in humans is unknown. In experimental sepsis, RBF was reported to be decreased in two-thirds of studies (62 %) and unchanged or increased in one-third (38%). On univariate analysis, several factors not directly related to sepsis appear to influence RBF. However, multivariate analysis suggests that cardiac output has a dominant effect on RBF during sepsis, such that, in the presence of a decreased cardiac output, RBF is typically decreased, whereas in the presence of a preserved or increased cardiac output RBF is typically maintained or increased. PMID:16137349

  6. Decreasing strabismus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arora, A; Williams, B; Arora, A K; McNamara, R; Yates, J; Fielder, A

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether there has been a consistent change across countries and healthcare systems in the frequency of strabismus surgery in children over the past decade. Methods: Retrospective analysis of data on all strabismus surgery performed in NHS hospitals in England and Wales, on children aged 0–16 years between 1989 and 2000, and between 1994 and 2000 in Ontario (Canada) hospitals. These were compared with published data for Scotland, 1989–2000. Results: Between 1989 and 1999–2000 the number of strabismus procedures performed on children, 0–16 years, in England decreased by 41.2% from 15 083 to 8869. Combined medial rectus recession with lateral rectus resection decreased from 5538 to 3013 (45.6%) in the same period. Bimedial recessions increased from 489 to 762, oblique tenotomies from 43 to 121, and the use of adjustable sutures from 29 to 44, in 2000. In Ontario, operations for squint decreased from 2280 to 1685 (26.1%) among 0–16 year olds between 1994 and 2000. Conclusion: The clinical impression of decrease in the frequency of paediatric strabismus surgery is confirmed. In the authors’ opinion this cannot be fully explained by a decrease in births or by the method of healthcare funding. Two factors that might have contributed are better conservative strabismus management and increased subspecialisation that has improved the quality of surgery and the need for re-operation. This finding has a significant impact upon surgical services and also on the training of ophthalmologists. PMID:15774914

  7. Predictors of renal and patient outcomes in atheroembolic renal disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro; Pola, Alessandra; Guerini, Simona; Zubani, Roberto; Movilli, Ezio; Savoldi, Silvana; Malberti, Fabio; Maiorca, Rosario

    2003-06-01

    Atheroembolic renal disease (AERD) is part of a multisystemic disease accompanied by high cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Interrelationships between traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, vascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and markers of clinical severity of the disease in determining outcome remain poorly understood. Patients with AERD presenting to a single center between 1996 and 2002 were followed-up with prospective collection of clinical and biochemical data. The major outcomes included end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Ninety-five patients were identified (81 male). AERD was iatrogenic in 87%. Mean age was 71.4 yr. Twenty-three patients (24%) developed ESRD; 36 patients (37.9%) died. Cox regression analysis showed that significant independent predictors of ESRD were long-standing hypertension (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1; P < 0.001) and preexisting chronic renal impairment (HR = 2.12; P = 0.02); use of statins was independently associated with decreased risk of ESRD (HR = 0.02; P = 0.003). Age (HR = 1.09; P = 0.009), diabetes (HR = 2.55; P = 0.034), and ESRD (HR = 2.21; P = 0.029) were independent risk factors for patient mortality; male gender was independently associated with decreased risk of death (HR = 0.27; P = 0.007). Cardiovascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and clinical severity of AERD had no prognostic impact on renal and patient survival. It is concluded that AERD has a strong clinical impact on patient and renal survival. The study clearly shows the importance of preexisting chronic renal impairment in determining both renal and patient outcome, this latter being mediated by the development of ESRD. The protective effect of statins on the development of ESRD should be evaluated in a prospective study.

  8. Boldine Prevents Renal Alterations in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Salinas, Romina; Vielma, Alejandra Z.; Arismendi, Marlene N.; Boric, Mauricio P.; Sáez, Juan C.; Velarde, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy alters both structure and function of the kidney. These alterations are associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species, matrix proteins, and proinflammatory molecules. Inflammation decreases gap junctional communication and increases hemichannel activity leading to increased membrane permeability and altering tissue homeostasis. Since current treatments for diabetic nephropathy do not prevent renal damage, we postulated an alternative treatment with boldine, an alkaloid obtained from boldo with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hypoglycemic effects. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control rats were treated or not treated with boldine (50 mg/Kg/day) for ten weeks. In addition, mesangial cells were cultured under control conditions or in high glucose concentration plus proinflammatory cytokines, with or without boldine (100 µmol/L). Boldine treatment in diabetic animals prevented the increase in glycemia, blood pressure, renal thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the urinary protein/creatinine ratio. Boldine also reduced alterations in matrix proteins and markers of renal damage. In mesangial cells, boldine prevented the increase in oxidative stress, the decrease in gap junctional communication, and the increase in cell permeability due to connexin hemichannel activity induced by high glucose and proinflammatory cytokines but did not block gap junction channels. Thus boldine prevented both renal and cellular alterations and could be useful for preventing tissue damage in diabetic subjects. PMID:24416726

  9. Renal cortical pyruvate depletion during AKI.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Becker, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediary in energy metabolism and can exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the fate of pyruvate during AKI remains unknown. Here, we assessed renal cortical pyruvate and its major determinants (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pyruvate dehydrogenase [PDH], and H2O2 levels) in mice subjected to unilateral ischemia (15-60 minutes; 0-18 hours of vascular reflow) or glycerol-induced ARF. The fate of postischemic lactate, which can be converted back to pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase, was also addressed. Ischemia and glycerol each induced persistent pyruvate depletion. During ischemia, decreasing pyruvate levels correlated with increasing lactate levels. During early reperfusion, pyruvate levels remained depressed, but lactate levels fell below control levels, likely as a result of rapid renal lactate efflux. During late reperfusion and glycerol-induced AKI, pyruvate depletion corresponded with increased gluconeogenesis (pyruvate consumption). This finding was underscored by observations that pyruvate injection increased renal cortical glucose content in AKI but not normal kidneys. AKI decreased PDH levels, potentially limiting pyruvate to acetyl CoA conversion. Notably, pyruvate therapy mitigated the severity of AKI. This renoprotection corresponded with increases in cytoprotective heme oxygenase 1 and IL-10 mRNAs, selective reductions in proinflammatory mRNAs (e.g., MCP-1 and TNF-α), and improved tissue ATP levels. Paradoxically, pyruvate increased cortical H2O2 levels. We conclude that AKI induces a profound and persistent depletion of renal cortical pyruvate, which may induce additional injury.

  10. Estimation of pressure gradients at renal artery stenoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Peter J.; Cebral, Juan R.; Weaver, Ashley; Lutz, Robert J.; Vasbinder, G. Boudewijn C.

    2003-05-01

    Atherosclerotic disease of the renal artery can reduce the blood flow leading to renovascular hypertension and ischemic nephopathy. The kidney responds to a decrease in blood flow by activation of the renin-angiotensin system that increases blood pressure and can result in severe hypertension. Percutaneous translumenal angioplasty (PTA) may be indicated for treatment of renovascular hypertension (RVH). However, direct measurement of renal artery caliber and degree of stenosis has only moderate specificity for detection of RVH. A confounding factor in assessment of the proximal renal artery is that diffuse atherosclerotic disease of the distal branches of the renal artery can produce the same effect on blood-flow as atherosclerotic disease of the proximal renal artery. A methodology is proposed for estimation of pressure gradients at renal artery stenoses from magnetic resonance imaging that could improve the evaluation of renal artery disease. In the proposed methodology, pressure gradients are estimated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Realistic CFD models are constructed from images of vessel shape and measurements of blood-flow rates which are available from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging respectively. CFD measurement of renal artery pressure gradients has been validated in a physical flow-through model.

  11. Management of renal arterial injuries secondary to penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Dart, C H; Braitman, H E; Larlarb, S

    1979-07-01

    Renal vascular injuries are found relatively frequently after non-penetrating abdominal trauma. Penetrating renal arterial lesions occur much less frequently, involving less than 5 per cent of all penetrating arterial injuries. The association of bowel and other organ injuries makes diagnosis and treatment somewhat complex. Four cases of penetrating renal arterial injuries were seen from January 1972 to June 1976. All patients had multiple bowel lacerations. All arrived in the emergency room in hypovolemic shock. Two patients were resuscitated and successfully treated. Three patients had complete transections and 1 had major branch transection. Two patients had an associated parenchymal lesion. One patient had a through-and-through ureteropelvic injury. Preoperative arteriography was not done because of vascular instability. Renal arterial injuries were suspected by loss of psoas shadow on abdominal x-rays and by retroperitoneal hematomas. Retroperitoneal hematomas were explored to eliminate the possibility of renal injury. Both of the patients operated upon attained good renal function after surgical repairs. Postoperative renal scans and arteriograms showed initially decreased function, which returned toward normal. Repair of renal arterial lesions is possible with good functional result. Preoperative arteriography, renographic scan or excretory urography is not justified routinely because of the seriousness of commonly associated injuries.

  12. Renal dysfunction and coronary disease: a high-risk combination.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney dysfunction is recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and complicates strategies and treatment. Therefore, it is important for cardiologists not only to detect and measure potential kidney dysfunction, but also to know the mechanisms by which the heart and kidney interact, and recognize that in cases of acute coronary syndrome, the presence of renal dysfunction increases the risk of death. The detection and classification of kidney dysfunction into 5 stages is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The presence of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, inflammation, activation of the renin-angiotensin system and specific calcifications are the main mechanisms by which renal dysfunction can induce or compound cardiovascular disease. The magnitude of renal dysfunction is related to the cardiovascular risk; a linear relation links the extent of GFR decrease and the risk of cardiovascular events. Renal dysfunction and acute coronary syndromes are a dangerous combination: more common comorbidities, more frequent contraindications for effective drugs and higher numbers of drug-related adverse events such as bleeding partially explain the higher mortality in patients with renal dysfunction. In addition, despite higher risk, patients with renal dysfunction often receive fewer guideline-recommended treatments even in the absence of contraindications. Renal dysfunction induces and promotes atherosclerosis by various pathophysiologic pathways and is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors and underuse of appropriate therapy. Therefore, the assessment of renal function is an important step in the risk evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

  13. Update on Renal Mass Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Haifler, Miki; Kutikov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Renal masses are diagnosed with an increasing frequency. However, a significant proportion of these masses are benign, and the majority of malignant tumors are biologically indolent. Furthermore, renal tumors are often harbored by the elderly and comorbid patients. As such, matching of renal tumor biology to appropriate treatment intensity is an urgent clinical need. Renal mass biopsy is currently a very useful clinical tool that can assist with critical clinical decision-making in patients with renal mass. Yet, renal mass biopsy is associated with limitations and, as such, may not be appropriate for all patients.

  14. Malignant renal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Thomas Ray; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Renal malignancies are common in children. While the majority of malignant renal masses are secondary to Wilms tumor, it can be challenging to distinguish from more aggressive renal masses. For suspicious renal lesions, it is crucial to ensure prompt diagnosis in order to select the appropriate surgical procedure and treatment. This review article will discuss the common differential diagnosis that can be encountered when evaluating a suspicious renal mass in the pediatric population. This includes clear cell sarcoma of the kidney, malignant rhabdoid tumor, renal medullary carcinoma and lymphoma. PMID:28326263

  15. Renal Cortical Lactate Dehydrogenase: A Useful, Accurate, Quantitative Marker of In Vivo Tubular Injury and Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zager, Richard A.; Johnson, Ali C. M.; Becker, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Studies of experimental acute kidney injury (AKI) are critically dependent on having precise methods for assessing the extent of tubular cell death. However, the most widely used techniques either provide indirect assessments (e.g., BUN, creatinine), suffer from the need for semi-quantitative grading (renal histology), or reflect the status of residual viable, not the number of lost, renal tubular cells (e.g., NGAL content). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release is a highly reliable test for assessing degrees of in vitro cell death. However, its utility as an in vivo AKI marker has not been defined. Towards this end, CD-1 mice were subjected to graded renal ischemia (0, 15, 22, 30, 40, or 60 min) or to nephrotoxic (glycerol; maleate) AKI. Sham operated mice, or mice with AKI in the absence of acute tubular necrosis (ureteral obstruction; endotoxemia), served as negative controls. Renal cortical LDH or NGAL levels were assayed 2 or 24 hrs later. Ischemic, glycerol, and maleate-induced AKI were each associated with striking, steep, inverse correlations (r, −0.89) between renal injury severity and renal LDH content. With severe AKI, >65% LDH declines were observed. Corresponding prompt plasma and urinary LDH increases were observed. These observations, coupled with the maintenance of normal cortical LDH mRNA levels, indicated the renal LDH efflux, not decreased LDH synthesis, caused the falling cortical LDH levels. Renal LDH content was well maintained with sham surgery, ureteral obstruction or endotoxemic AKI. In contrast to LDH, renal cortical NGAL levels did not correlate with AKI severity. In sum, the above results indicate that renal cortical LDH assay is a highly accurate quantitative technique for gauging the extent of experimental acute ischemic and toxic renal injury. That it avoids the limitations of more traditional AKI markers implies great potential utility in experimental studies that require precise quantitation of tubule cell death. PMID:23825563

  16. Antenatal diagnosis of congenital renal malformations using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, K P; Merchant, R H; Gondhalekar, A; Lulla, C P; Mehta, A A; Mehta, K P

    1998-08-01

    Our objectives were to determine the accuracy of antenatal sonography for the detection of congenital renal malformations and to characterize the type of malformations, seen in a 3-year prospective study at a university-affiliated maternity hospital. Participants were 31,217 pregnant women, during the study period, and subjects were 65 fetuses in whom renal malformations were detected on antenatal ultrasound. Pelvic ultrasound scans were performed at least once between 20 and 37 weeks' gestation on all pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of the hospital for the detection of renal malformations. Fetal urinary sampling, diversion procedures, or termination of pregnancy were carried out as required in those detected to have renal anomalies. Postnatal diagnosis was confirmed by sonography or autopsy. Diagnostic procedures and renal surgery were performed postnatally if indicated. Sixty-five fetuses (0.2 per cent) were diagnosed to have congenital renal malformation antenatally at a mean gestational age of 28.4 weeks. A dilated urinary system was seen in 39, cystic renal disease in 15, agenesis/hypoplasia in six, combined lesions in four, and a horseshoe kidney in one. Oligohydramnios was noted in 20 (31 per cent) pregnancies. Multiple congenital malformations associated with renal anomalies were detected in 12 pregnancies. Termination was carried out at 20 weeks in two pregnancies for lethal malformations; fetal urinary sampling was done in two fetuses with obstructed uropathy, and a vesicoamniotic shunt inserted in one. Postnatal ultrasound confirmed a dilated urinary system in 32, cystic renal dysplasia in 15, renal aplasia/hypoplasia in five, combined lesions in six, and a horseshoe and an ectopic kidney in one each. Five infants were found to be normal. There were seven stillbirths and seven neonatal deaths. Radionuclide scans showed obstruction in nine, decreased renal function in six, and absent renal functions in 10 infants. Micturating

  17. Heparanase expression and glycosaminoglycans profile in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Batista, Lucas Teixeira E Aguiar; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Machado, Leopoldo Ruiz; Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Martins, João Roberto Maciel; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2012-11-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of renal cell carcinogenesis could contribute to a decrease in the mortality rate of this disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and heparanase expression in renal cell carcinoma. The study included 24 patients submitted to nephrectomy with confirmed pathological diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. The majority of the samples (87.5%) were classified in the initial stage of renal cell carcinoma (clinical stages I and II). Heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans were identified and quantified by agarose gel electrophoresis of renal cell carcinoma samples or non-neoplastic tissues obtained from the same patients (control group). The sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid were analyzed in urine samples of the patients before and after surgery. The data showed a significant statistical increase in chondroitin sulfate, and a decrease in heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate present in neoplastic tissues compared with non-neoplastic tissues. Higher heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the neoplastic tissues was also shown, compared with the non-neoplastic tissues. The urine glycosaminoglycans profile showed no significant difference between renal cell carcinoma and control samples. Extracellular matrix changes observed in the present study clarify that heparanase is possibly involved with heparan sulfate turnover, and that heparanase and the glycosaminoglycans can modulate initial events of renal cell carcinoma development.

  18. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.S.; Passmore, J.C.; Hartupee, D.A.; Baker, C.H. )

    1990-06-01

    The role of prostaglandins in the distribution of total renal blood flow (TRBF) between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments was investigated in anesthetized mongrel dogs. Renal blood flow distribution was assessed by the xenon 133 freeze-dissection technique and by rubidium 86 extraction after ibuprofen treatment. Ibuprofen (13 mg/kg) significantly decreased TRBF by 16.3% +/- 1.2% (mean +/- SEM electromagnetic flow probe; p less than 0.005), but did not alter blood flows to the outer cortex (3.7 vs 4.3 ml/min per gram), the inner cortex (2.6 vs 2.7 ml/min per gram), and the other medulla (1.5 vs 1.5 ml/min per gram), which suggests a decrease in nonnutrient flow. In a separate group of animals the effect of reduced blood flow on the nutrient and nonnutrient components was determined by mechanically reducing renal arterial blood flow by 48%. Unlike the ibuprofen group, nutrient blood flows were proportionally reduced with the mechanical decrease in TRBF in the outer cortex (1.9 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), the inner cortex (1.4 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), and the outer medulla (0.8 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.01). These results indicate no shift between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flows of the left kidney were also determined by 86Rb extraction. After ibuprofen treatment, nonextracted 86Rb decreased to 12.1% from the control value of 15.6% (p less than 0.05). Mechanical reduction of TRBF did not significantly decrease the proportion of unextracted 86Rb (18.7%).

  19. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease.

  20. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  1. Cigarette smoking: an important renal risk factor – far beyond carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Orth, SR

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that smoking has a negative impact on renal function, being one of the most important remediable renal risk factors. It has been clearly shown that the risk for high-normal urinary albumin excretion and microalbuminuria is increased in smoking compared to non-smoking subjects of the general population. Data from the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT) indicate that at least in males, smoking increases the risk to reach end-stage renal failure. Smoking is particularly "nephrotoxic" in older subjects, subjects with essential hypertension and patients with preexisting renal disease. Of interest, the magnitude of the adverse renal effect of smoking seems to be independent of the underlying renal disease. Death-censored renal graft survival is decreased in smokers, indicating that smoking also damages the renal transplant. Cessation of smoking has been show to reduce the rate of progression of renal failure both in patients with renal disease or a renal transplant. The mechanisms of smoking-induced renal damage are only partly understood and comprise acute hemodynamic (e.g., increase in blood pressure and presumably intraglomerular pressure) and chronic effects (e.g., endothelial cell dysfunction). Renal failure per se leads to an increased cardiovascular risk. The latter is further aggravated by smoking. Particularly survival of smokers with diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis is abysmal. In the present review article the current state of knowledge about the renal risks of smoking is reviewed. It is the aim of the article to point out that smoking not only increases the risk of renal cell carcinoma or uroepithelial cell carcinoma, but also the risk of a faster decline of renal function. The latter is a relatively new negative aspect which has not been widely recognized. PMID:19570254

  2. Cigarette smoking: an important renal risk factor – far beyond carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Orth, SR

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that smoking has a negative impact on renal function, being one of the most important remediable renal risk factors. It has been clearly shown that the risk for high-normal urinary albumin excretion and microalbuminuria is increased in smoking compared to non-smoking subjects of the general population. Data from the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT) indicate that at least in males, smoking increases the risk to reach end-stage renal failure. Smoking is particularly "nephrotoxic" in older subjects, subjects with essential hypertension and patients with preexisting renal disease. Of interest, the magnitude of the adverse renal effect of smoking seems to be independent of the underlying renal disease. Death-censored renal graft survival is decreased in smokers, indicating that smoking also damages the renal transplant. Cessation of smoking has been show to reduce the rate of progression of renal failure both in patients with renal disease or a renal transplant. The mechanisms of smoking-induced renal damage are only partly understood and comprise acute hemodynamic (e.g., increase in blood pressure and presumably intraglomerular pressure) and chronic effects (e.g., endothelial cell dysfunction). Renal failure per se leads to an increased cardiovascular risk. The latter is further aggravated by smoking. Particularly survival of smokers with diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis is abysmal. In the present review article the current state of knowledge about the renal risks of smoking is reviewed. It is the aim of the article to point out that smoking not only increases the risk of renal cell carcinoma or uroepithelial cell carcinoma, but also the risk of a faster decline of renal function. The latter is a relatively new negative aspect which has not been widely recognized.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: renal hypouricemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions renal hypouricemia renal hypouricemia Enable ...

  4. Indapamide is superior to thiazide in the preservation of renal function in patients with renal insufficiency and systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Madkour, H; Gadallah, M; Riveline, B; Plante, G E; Massry, S G

    1996-02-22

    The long-term effects of indapamide or hydrochlorothiazide on blood presssure and renal function were examined in patents with impaired renal function and moderate hypertension. Both drugs controlled hypertension and blood pressure remained normal during the 2 years of the study. Despite this comparable control of hypertension, indapamide therapy was associated with a 28.5 +/- 4.4% increase in creatinine clearance, whereas treatment with hydrochlorothiazide was associated with a 17.4 +/- 3.0% decrease in creatinine clearance. The results of the study indicate that indapamide is superior to hydrochlorothiazide in the treatment of patients with impaired renal function and moderate hypertension.

  5. Bone remodeling after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Rojas, Eudocia; Carlini, Raul G; Suniaga, Orlando; Weisinger, José R

    2003-06-01

    Several studies have indicated that bone alterations after transplantation are heterogeneous. Short-term studies after transplantation have shown that many patients exhibit a pattern consistent with adynamic bone disease. In contrast, patients with long-term renal transplantation show a more heterogeneous picture. Thus, while adynamic bone disease has also been described in these patients, most studies show decreased bone formation and prolonged mineralization lag-time faced with persisting bone resorption, and even clear evidence of generalized or focal osteomalacia in many patients. Thus, the main alterations in bone remodeling are a decrease in bone formation and mineralization up against persistent bone resorption, suggesting defective osteoblast function, decreased osteoblastogenesis, or increased osteoblast death rates. Indeed, recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that there is an early decrease in osteoblast number and surfaces, as well as in reduced bone formation rate and delayed mineralization after transplantation. These alterations are associated with an early increase in osteoblast apoptosis that correlates with low levels of serum phosphorus. These changes were more frequently observed in patients with low turnover bone disease. In contrast, PTH seemed to preserve osteoblast survival. The mechanisms of hypophosphatemia in these patients appear to be independent of PTH, suggesting that other phosphaturic factors may play a role. However, further studies are needed to determine the nature of a phosphaturic factor and its relationship to the alterations of bone remodeling after transplantation.

  6. Renal Artery Stent Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy P.; Cooper, Christopher J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Pencina, Karol M.; Jamerson, Kenneth; Tuttle, Katherine R.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; D’Agostino, Ralph; Massaro, Joseph; Henrich, William; Dworkin, Lance D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multiple randomized clinical trials comparing renal artery stent placement plus medical therapy with medical therapy alone have not shown any benefit of stent placement. However, debate continues whether patients with extreme pressure gradients, stenosis severity, or baseline blood pressure benefit from stent revascularization. OBJECTIVES The study sought to test the hypothesis that pressure gradients, stenosis severity, and/or baseline blood pressure affects outcomes after renal artery stent placement. METHODS Using data from 947 patients with a history of hypertension or chronic kidney disease from the largest randomized trial of renal artery stent placement, the CORAL (Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions) study, we performed exploratory analyses to determine if subsets of patients experienced better outcomes after stent placement than the overall cohort. We examined baseline stenosis severity, systolic blood pressure, and translesion pressure gradient (peak systolic and mean) and performed interaction tests and Cox proportional hazards analyses for the occurrence of the primary endpoint through all follow-up, to examine the effect of these variables on outcomes by treatment group. RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in outcomes based on the examined variables nor were there any consistent nonsignificant trends. CONCLUSIONS Based on data from the CORAL randomized trial, there is no evidence of a significant treatment effect of the renal artery stent procedure compared with medical therapy alone based on stenosis severity, level of systolic blood pressure elevation, or according to the magnitude of the transstenotic pressure gradient. (Benefits of Medical Therapy Plus Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions [CORAL]; NCT00081731) PMID:26653621

  7. [Renal duplex: clinical usefulness].

    PubMed

    Miralles, M; Giménez, A; Cairols, M A; Riambau, V; Sáez, A

    1993-01-01

    It is the purpose of this report to focus attention on the clinical usefulness of Renal Duplex for the diagnosis of patients with vasculo-renal diseases in terms of: 1. Accuracy of Duplex/Angiography in the measurement of the renal stenosis degree. 2. Correlationship between Duplex ans Isotopic Renogram with respect to the study of the parenchyma's perfusion. 3. The effect of the inhibitors of the conversor enzyme (Captopril) on the Doppler signal of the parenchyma, comparing it with the results from the captopril test about the peripheral plasmatic renin activity and the isotopic renogram, in patients with vasculo-renal HTA. Results obtains by Duplex and Angiography were compared in 92 renal arteries from 46 patients. For both technics, three degrees of stenosis were established: 0-59%, 60-99% and occlusion. The Duplex technique identified 49/54 stenosis < 60%, 28/33 stenosis > 60% and 5/5 occlusions (Kappa 0.8). Sensibility and specificity of Duplex for the diagnosis of stenosis > 60% were, respectively, 89.5% and 90.7%; with an exactness of 90.2%. The angiographies showed stenosis > 60% in 23 patients with HTA (diastolic pressures > 100 mmHg). In all of the patients, a measurement of the plasmatic renin activity, an isotopic renogram and a Doppler of the interlobar arteries basal and post-captopril, were performed. The correlationship between Duplex and isotopic renogram with respect to the measurement of the relative renal perfusion was statistically significant (r = 0.91; p < 0.0001). The captopril test for renin and isotopic renogram were positives for 5 patients (4 with unilateral stenosis an 1 with bilateral stenosis). All of them showed severe stenosis (> 80%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Renal adaptation during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Jani, Alkesh; Martin, Sandra L; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L

    2013-12-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation.

  9. Amphibian renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Todd R

    2006-01-01

    Amphibians by nature have an intimate connection with the aquatic environment at some stage of development and fight an osmotic battle due to the influx of water. Many amphibians have acquired a more terrestrial existence at later stages of development and consequently have physiologic adaptations to conserve moisture. Renal adaptations have allowed amphibians successfully to bridge the gap between aqueous and terrestrial habitats. The kidneys, skin,and, in many amphibian species, the urinary bladder play key roles in fluid homeostasis. Renal impairment may be responsible for the clinical manifestation of disease, morbidity, and mortality.

  10. Hypothyroid acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Birewar, Sonali; Oppenheimer, Mark; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-03-01

    Muscular disorders and even hypothyroid myopathy with elevated muscle enzymes are commonly seen in hypothyroidism. In this paper, we report a case of acute renal failure in a 35-year old male patient with myalgia. His serum creatinine reached a level of 2.4 mg/dl. Later, his myalgia was found to be due to hypothyroidism with TSH of over 500 uiv/ml. With thyroid replacement therapy, myalgia and his serum creatinine stabilized and subsequently improved. Hypothyroidism, although rare, has been reported as a definite and authentic cause of rhabdomyolysis. As a result, hypothyroidism must be considered in patients presenting with acute renal failure and elevated muscle enzymes.

  11. Renal Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Balofsky, Ari; Fedarau, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure during pregnancy affects both mother and fetus, and may be related to preexisting disease or develop secondary to diseases of pregnancy. Causes include hypovolemia, sepsis, shock, preeclampsia, thrombotic microangiopathies, and renal obstruction. Treatment focuses on supportive measures, while pharmacologic treatment is viewed as second-line therapy, and is more useful in mitigating harmful effects than treating the underlying cause. When supportive measures and pharmacotherapy prove inadequate, dialysis may be required, with the goal being to prolong pregnancy until delivery is feasible. Outcomes and recommendations depend primarily on the underlying cause.

  12. Obesity and renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gati, Asma; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Marrakchi, Raja; El Gaaied, Amel; Kourda, Nadia; Derouiche, Amine; Chebil, Mohamed; Caignard, Anne; Perier, Aurélie

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies link obesity, as measured by increased body mass index (BMI) to the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as well as to the cancer-related mortality of RCC patients. RCC is the third cancer most robustly associated with increased BMI. Understanding the role of the adipose tissue in renal carcinogenesis is therefore of major importance for the development of novel paradigms of RCC prevention and treatment. Here, we discuss the current knowledge on the impact of obesity on the development and progression of RCC as well as the role of adipose tissue-derived hormones (adipokines) in the conflict between growing tumors and the immune system. PMID:24804162

  13. Renal lithiasis and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Grases, Felix; Costa-Bauza, Antonia; Prieto, Rafel M

    2006-01-01

    Renal lithiasis is a multifactorial disease. An important number of etiologic factors can be adequately modified trough diet, since it must be considered that the urine composition is directly related to diet. In fact, the change of inappropriate habitual diet patterns should be the main measure to prevent kidney stones. In this paper, the relation between different dietary factors (liquid intake, pH, calcium, phosphate, oxalate, citrate, phytate, urate and vitamins) and each type of renal stone (calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary, calcium oxalate monohydrate unattached, calcium oxalate dihydrate, calcium oxalate dihydrate/hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, struvite infectious, brushite, uric acid, calcium oxalate/uric acid and cystine) is discussed. PMID:16956397

  14. Renal adaptation during hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sandra L.; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation. PMID:24049148

  15. Occupational exposure to lead: effects on renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, C.D.; Hanenson, I.B.; Lerner, S.; Hammond, P.B.; Pesce, A.J.; Pollak, V.E.

    1980-10-01

    Although nephrotoxicity is common following exposure to lead, the dose-response relationship in adults with occupational exposure is not well understood because information is lacking on early nephrotoxic effects. By the time serum urea nitrogen and creatinine levels are elevated, renal damage may be advanced and not fully reversible. Detailed investigations of renal glomerular and tubular function were performed in six adults with occupational exposure to lead. In all patients, the serum creatinine and urea nitrogen concentrations were within the normal range. GFR was decreased in all but two. Glucose reabsorptive capacity (TmG) was decreased in all, and this decrease was disproportionately greater than expected from the reduced GFR in all but one. Normal values for renal plasma flow (RFP) were observed in four of the six, and for rho-aminohippurate (PAH) secretory capacity (TmPAh) in all but one. Bicarbonate reabsorptive capacity (TmHCO3) and urinary excretion of beta2-microglobulin were normal in all. Routine clinical laboratory tests are insensitive for the detection of early renal effects of heavy metal exposure. Measurements of renal tubular reabsorptive capacity for glucose appears to be a sensitive method for the early detection of renal effect of lead.

  16. [Renal markers and predictors, and renal and cardiovascular risk factors].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Andrade, C

    2002-01-01

    prediction. And also, its possible association nexuses, its injuring mechanisms, and the characterization of the new "emergent" renal and cardiovascular risk's markers and factors. 4. The impact on the possibility to treat the end stage renal disease with effective and prolonged procedures, by hemodialisis or kidney transplantation, has been occurred. The affected population's survival with the adequacy renal-sustitution treatment, and the possibility of indefinite duration of its treatment, has also impacted on the public health, and its resources, in an evident way. Simultaneously to increase of the incidence in the population, the electivity for the treatment has been enlarged and extended increasing it exponentially. These facts are documented here, and are defined the characteristics of the factors and markers of risk, of renal and cardiovascular diseases. The defined factors are valued to mark, so far as with the well-known evidence is possible, the prediction and the progression of the renal and cardiovascular functional deterioration: The hypertension, cardiovascular remodeling, the arterial stiffness, the heart rate, the sympathetic activation, the modification of the physiological response of the target organ to the overcharge, the metabolic syndrome, the obesity, the insulin resistance, the altered lipid profile, and metabolism of the fatty acids, the salt-sensibility, the decrease of the renal functional reserve, the glomerular hyperfiltration, the absence of the arterial pressure nocturnal descent, the abnormal excretion of proteins for the urine, the phenomenon induced by dysfunctions of the clotting, superoxide production, growth factors, the production of chronic inflammation and its markers, the factors of the glomerulosclerosis progression, the hyperuricemic status, the endothelial dysfunction and others, are evaluated. As well as their association among them and with other factors of risk not changeable like the age, and in turn, with other acquired

  17. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Suppresses Renal Crystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yasui, Takahiro; Naiki, Taku; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Ando, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Kentaro; Kawai, Noriyasu; Tozawa, Keiichi; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported evidence suggesting that migrating macrophages (Mϕs) eliminate renal crystals in hyperoxaluric mice. Mϕs can be inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2), and colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) mediates polarization to the M2Mϕ phenotype. M2Mϕs promote renal tissue repair and regeneration, but it is not clear whether these cells are involved in suppressing renal crystal formation. We investigated the role of M2Mϕs in renal crystal formation during hyperoxaluria using CSF-1–deficient mice, which lack M2Mϕs. Compared with wild-type mice, CSF-1–deficient mice had significantly higher amounts of renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Treatment with recombinant human CSF-1 increased the expression of M2-related genes and markedly decreased the number of renal crystals in both CSF-1–deficient and wild-type mice. Flow cytometry of sorted renal Mϕs showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in a smaller population of CD11b+F4/80+CD163+CD206hi cells, which represent M2-like Mϕs. Additionally, transfusion of M2Mϕs into CSF-1–deficient mice suppressed renal crystal deposition. In vitro phagocytosis assays with calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals showed a higher rate of crystal phagocytosis by M2-polarized Mϕs than M1-polarized Mϕs or renal tubular cells. Gene array profiling showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in disordered M2- and stone-related gene expressions. Collectively, our results provide compelling evidence for a suppressive role of CSF-1 signaling in renal crystal formation. PMID:24578130

  18. Physiology of the Renal Interstitium

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long overlooked as the virtual compartment and then strictly characterized through descriptive morphologic analysis, the renal interstitium has finally been associated with function. With identification of interstitial renin- and erythropoietin-producing cells, the most prominent endocrine functions of the kidney have now been attributed to the renal interstitium. This article reviews the functional role of renal interstitium. PMID:25813241

  19. Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Renal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bindroo, Sandiya; Varshney, Neha; Mittal, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma of the kidney is a rare entity with less than one hundred cases reported so far. It was previously considered to have some similarities to various other renal cancers although this tumor has distinct macroscopic, microscopic and immuno-histochemical features. It is now a well-established entity in renal neoplastic pathology and has been recognized as a distinct entity in the 2012 Vancouver classification of renal tumors. This review aims to give an overview of tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma after extensive literature search using PubMed and CrossRef.

  20. Renal diagnosis without renal biopsy. Nephritis and sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D; Shires, M; Davison, A M

    2001-06-01

    Two examples of hereditary nephropathy within the context of clinical syndromes are described. Emphasis is put on the ability to make a renal diagnosis without renal biopsy and the benefits of screening relatives once a diagnosis is achieved. A variant of Alport's syndrome with associated macrothrombocytic thrombocytopenia, known as Epstein's syndrome, is reported. In addition siblings with Alström's syndrome characterized by pigmentary retinal degeneration (causing blindness in early childhood), progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive renal failure are reported. Both cases had previously presented for non-renal pathology in advance of the onset of symptomatic renal failure and may have benefited from appropriate screening.

  1. Histological Characterisation of Small Renal Masses and Incidence of Silent Renal Masses

    PubMed Central

    Almenar Medina, Sergio; Calatrava Fons, Ana

    2008-01-01

    With the introduction of sonographic and CT examinations, the number of small renal masses detected has increased. Benign neoplastic lesions are usually smaller than 4 cm in size, whilst the most common types of renal cell carcinomas have a mean size greater than that, but we must not forget that a significant number of small masses are renal cell carcinomas; even though the rate of benign cases increases as the diameter of the lesions decreases, therefore, size itself cannot be used to rule out a diagnostic of malignancy and often image characteristics are not enough to predict the nature of the lesion with certainty. In this case, histological confirmation must be recommended. Ideally, the histological study must be conducted on the surgical specimen, even though biopsy can be an option in selected cases. PMID:19009035

  2. Diet and renal stone formation.

    PubMed

    Trinchieri, A

    2013-02-01

    The relationship between diet and the formation of renal stones is demonstrated, but restrictive diets do not take into account the complexity of metabolism and the complex mechanisms that regulate the saturation and crystallization processes in the urine. The restriction of dietary calcium can reduce the urinary excretion of calcium but severe dietary restriction of calcium causes hyperoxaluria and a progressive loss of bone mineral component. Furthermore urinary calcium excretion is influenced by other nutrients than calcium as sodium, potassium, protein and refined carbohydrates. Up to 40% of the daily excretion of oxalate in the urine is from dietary source, but oxalate absorption in the intestine depends linearly on the concomitant dietary intake of calcium and is influenced by the bacterial degradation by several bacterial species of intestinal flora. A more rational approach should be based on the cumulative effects of foods and different dietary patterns on urinary saturation rather than on the effect of single nutrients. A diet based on a adequate intake of calcium (1000-1200 mg per day) and containment of animal protein and salt can decrease significantly urinary supersaturation for calcium oxalate and reduce the relative risk of stone recurrence in hypercalciuric renal stone formers. The DASH-style diet that is high in fruits and vegetables, moderate in low-fat dairy products and low in animal proteins and salt is associated with a lower relative supersaturation for calcium oxalate and a marked decrease in risk of incident stone formation. All the diets above mentioned have as a common characteristic the reduction of the potential acid load of the diet that can be correlated with a higher risk of recurrent nephrolithiasis, because the acid load of diet is inversely related to urinary citrate excretion. The restriction of protein and salt with an adequate calcium intake seem to be advisable but should be implemented with the advice to increase the intake

  3. Effect of Cuscuta chinensis on renal function in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sun; Lee, Yun Jung; Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, An Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2011-01-01

    The kidneys play a central role in regulating water, ion composition and excretion of metabolic waste products in the urine. Cuscuta chinensis has been known as an important traditional Oriental medicine for the treatment of liver and kidney disorders. Thus, we studied whether an aqueous extract of Cuscuta chinensis (ACC) seeds has an effect on renal function parameters in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute renal failure (ARF) rats. Administration of 250 mg/kg/day ACC showed that renal functional parameters including urinary excretion rate, osmolality, Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), creatinine clearance, solute-free water reabsorption were significantly recovered in ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF. Periodic acid Schiff staining showed that administration of ACC improved tubular damage in ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF. In immunoblot and immunohistological examinations, ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF decreased the expressions of water channel AQP 2, 3 and sodium potassium pump Na,K-ATPase in the renal medulla. However, administration of ACC markedly incremented AQP 2, 3 and Na,K-ATPase expressions. Therefore, these data indicate that administration of ACC ameliorates regulation of the urine concentration and renal functions in rats with ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF.

  4. Combination of tadalafil and diltiazem attenuates renal ischemia reperfusion-induced acute renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Sisi, Alaa E; Sokar, Samia S; Abu-Risha, Sally E; Ibrahim, Hanaa A

    2016-12-01

    Life threatening conditions characterized by renal ischemia/reperfusion (RIR) such as kidney transplantation, partial nephrectomy, renal artery angioplasty, cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic bypass surgery, continue to be among the most frequent causes of acute renal failure. The current study investigated the possible protective effects of tadalafil alone and in combination with diltiazem in experimentally-induced renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. Possible underlying mechanisms were also investigated such as oxidative stress and inflammation. Rats were divided into sham-operated and I/R-operated groups. Anesthetized rats (urethane 1.3g/kg) were subjected to bilateral ischemia for 30min by occlusion of renal pedicles, then reperfused for 6h. Rats in the vehicle I/R group showed a significant (p˂0.05) increase in kidney malondialdehyde (MDA) content; myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity; TNF-α and IL-1β contents. In addition significant (p˂0.05) increase in intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1) content, BUN and creatinine levels, along with significant decrease in kidney superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. In addition, marked diffuse histopathological damage and severe cytoplasmic staining of caspase-3 were detected. Pretreatment with combination of tadalafil (5mg/kg bdwt) and diltiazem (5mg/kg bdwt) resulted in reversal of the increased biochemical parameters investigated. Also, histopathological examination revealed partial return to normal cellular architecture. In conclusion, pretreatment with tadalafil and diltiazem combination protected against RIR injury.

  5. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero G in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Four rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast, five of the seven remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted and their urinary flow rate. Potassium excretion increased. End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause in the rat a decrease in distal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis. The adequacy of other nonatrial volume control mechanisms in regulating renal salt and water conservation in opposition to the studied atrial-renal (Henry-Gauer) reflex of thoracic vascular distension is confirmed.

  6. Angiotensin II Blockade and Renal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Current national guidelines have recommended the use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, including angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), in preference to other antihypertensive agents for treating hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the mechanisms underlying the renoprotective effects of ARBs are multiple and complex. Blood pressure reduction by systemic vasodilation with an ARB contributes to its beneficial effects in treating kidney disease. Furthermore, ARB-induced renal vasodilation results in an increase in renal blood flow, leading to improvement of renal ischemia and hypoxia. ARBs are also effective in reducing urinary albumin excretion through a reduction in intraglomerular pressure and the protection of glomerular endothelium and/or podocyte injuries. In addition to blocking angiotensin II-induced renal cell and tissue injuries, ARBs can decrease intrarenal angiotensin II levels by reducing proximal tubular angiotensinogen and production of collecting duct renin, as well as angiotensin II accumulation in the kidney. In this review, we will briefly summarize our current understanding of the pharmacological effects of an ARB in the kidney. We will also discuss the possible mechanisms responsible for the renoprotective effects of ARBs on type 2 diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23176216

  7. Short-term Safety and Efficiency of Cryoablation for Renal Sympathetic Denervation in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Meng; Shen, Li; Wu, Yi-Zhe; Yao, Zhi-Feng; Yin, Jia-Sheng; Chen, Jia-Hui; Jia, Jian-Guo; Qiao, Ling-Juan; Liu, Peng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Renal sympathetic nerves are involved in the reflective activation of the sympathetic nervous system in circulatory control. Catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) ameliorated treatment-resistant hypertension safely, but 10%–20% of treated patients are nonresponders to radiofrequency denervation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and efficiency of cryoablation for sympathetic denervation in a swine model and to explore a new way of RDN. Methods: Seven swines randomly assigned to two groups: Renal cryoablation (CR) group and control group. The control group underwent renal angiogram only. The CR group underwent renal angiogram plus bilateral renal cryoablation. Renal angiograms via femoral were performed before denervation, after denervation and prior to the sacrifice to access the diameter of renal arterial and the pressure of aorta abdominalis. Euthanasia of the swine was performed on 28-day to access norepinephrine (NE) changes of the renal cortex and the changes of renal nerves. Results: Cryoablation did not induce severe complications at any time point. There was no significant change in diameter of renal artery. CR reduced systolic blood pressure (BP) from 145.50 ± 9.95 mmHg at baseline to 119.00 ± 14.09 mmHg. There was a slight but insignificant decrease in diastolic BP. The main nerve changes at 28-day consisted of necrosis with perineurial fibrosis at the site of CR exposure in conjunction with the nerve vacuolation. Compared with the control group, renal tissue NE of CR group decreased by 89.85%. Conclusions: Percutaneous catheter-based cryoablation of the renal artery is safe. CR could effectively reduce NE storing in the renal cortex, and the efficiency could be maintained 28-day at least. PMID:25758274

  8. Effect of chronic renal medullary nitric oxide inhibition on blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Mattson, D L; Lu, S; Nakanishi, K; Papanek, P E; Cowley, A W

    1994-05-01

    The effects of chronic nitric oxide inhibition in the renal medulla on renal cortical and medullary blood flow, sodium balance, and blood pressure were evaluated in conscious uninephrectomized Sprague-Dawley rats. During a 5-day renal medullary interstitial infusion of the nitric oxide inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 120 micrograms/h) in saline (0.5 ml/min), renal medullary blood flow was selectively decreased by 30% after 2 h and was maintained at that level for the entire infusion. The decrease in medullary blood flow was associated with sodium retention and increased blood pressure. After the cessation of L-NAME infusion, medullary blood flow returned to control, and the sodium balance became negative as blood pressure returned to baseline. These data indicate that renal medullary nitric oxide plays an important role in the regulation of renal blood flow, sodium excretion, and blood pressure.

  9. LITHIUM AND RENAL FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, N.; Trivedi, J.K.; Sethi, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Thirty patients of affective disorder who were on lithium for a year and thirty patients on antidepressant were studied in detail for renal functions. Our observation is that lithium therapy does not lead to any deterioration in kidney functions. The results are discussed. PMID:21927211

  10. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the ureter (s) or a tube connected to an external drainage bag. Both options are used to unblock the ureters in order to allow proper urine flow from the kidneys if this has been identified as the cause for the renal failure. Surgical treatment such as a urinary stent or ...

  11. Management of Renal Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Ismail; Can Sener, Nevzat; Firat, Hacer; Yeşil, Süleyman; Zengin, Kürşad; Yalcınkaya, Fatih; Imamoglu, Abdurrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Renal cysts have a high prevalence in the general population, and their estimated incidence increases with age. Renal cyst aspiration (usually with sclerotherapy) or open/laparoscopic decortication is a generally effective and safe method in the treatment of symptomatic simple renal cysts. The success rates of laparoscopic decortication and percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy were compared to assist in the decision making for the procedure. Methods: A total of 184 patients with symptomatic simple renal cysts were treated with either laparoscopic decortication in 149 cases or percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy in 35 cases. The follow-up period was approximately 35 months, and the symptomatic and radiologic success rates of the 2 techniques were compared retrospectively. Results: Laparoscopic decortication was found to have high success rates, a low recurrence rate, and minimal morbidity. Percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy is an outpatient procedure with a minimally higher recurrence rate. Conclusion: When a symptomatic cyst is encountered and treatment of the cyst is indicated, laparoscopic decortication is a more efficient method that offers better results than percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy. PMID:25848184

  12. A huge bladder calculus causing acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Komeya, Mitsuru; Sahoda, Tamami; Sugiura, Shinpei; Sawada, Takuto; Kitami, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    A 81-year-old male was referred to our emergency outpatient unit due to acute renal failure. The level of serum creatinine was 276 μmol/l. A CT scan showed bilateral hydronephroureter, large bladder stone (7 cm × 6 cm × 6 cm) and bladder wall thickness. He was diagnosed as post renal failure due to bilateral hydronephroureter. Large bladder stone is thought to be the cause of bilateral hydronephroureter and renal failure. To improve renal failure, we performed open cystolithotomy and urethral catheterization. Three days after the surgery, the level of serum creatinine decreased to 224 μmol/l. He was discharged from our hospital with uneventful course. Bladder calculus is thought to be a rare cause of renal failure. We summarize the characteristics of bladder calculus causing renal failure. We should keep that long-term pyuria and urinary symptom, and repeated urinary tract infection can cause huge bladder calculus and renal failure in mind.

  13. Trace elements in renal disease and hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Suwabe, Akira; Sera, Koichiro

    2002-04-01

    A number of considerations suggest that trace element disturbances might occur in patients with renal disease and in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Using particle induced X-ray emission, we demonstrated the relations between serum concentration, urinary excretion of the trace elements and creatinine clearance (Ccr) in randomized 50 patients. To estimate the effects of HD, we also observed the changes of these elements in serum and dialysis fluids during HD. Urinary silicon excretion decreased, and serum silicon concentration increased as Ccr decreased, with significant correlation ( r=0.702, p<0.001 and r=0.676, p<0.0001, respectively). We also observed the increase of serum silicon, and the decrease of silicon in dialysis fluids during HD. These results suggested that reduced renal function and also dialysis contributed to silicon accumulation. Although serum selenium decreased significantly according to Ccr decrease ( r=0.452, p<0.01), we could detect no change in urinary selenium excretion and no transfer during HD. Serum bromine and urinary excretion of bromine did not correlate to Ccr. However we observed a bromine transfer from the serum to the dialysis fluid that contributed to the serum bromine decrease in HD patients.

  14. Does Lower Limb Exercise Worsen Renal Artery Hemodynamics in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Xu, Zaipin; Deng, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) and renal complications emerge in some patients after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to treat abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA). The mechanisms for the causes of these problems are not clear. We hypothesized that for EVAR patients, lower limb exercise could negatively influence the physiology of the renal artery and the renal function, by decreasing the blood flow velocity and changing the hemodynamics in the renal arteries. To evaluate this hypothesis, pre- and post-operative models of the abdominal aorta were reconstructed based on CT images. The hemodynamic environment was numerically simulated under rest and lower limb exercise conditions. The results revealed that in the renal arteries, lower limb exercise decreased the wall shear stress (WSS), increased the oscillatory shear index (OSI) and increased the relative residence time (RRT). EVAR further enhanced these effects. Because these parameters are related to artery stenosis and atherosclerosis, this preliminary study concluded that lower limb exercise may increase the potential risk of inducing renal artery stenosis and renal complications for AAA patients. This finding could help elucidate the mechanism of renal artery stenosis and renal complications after EVAR and warn us to reconsider the management and nursing care of AAA patients. PMID:25946196

  15. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Susan M; Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Gilstrap, Larry C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome in women with chronic renal disease. Our search of the literature did not reveal any randomized clinical trials or meta-analyses. The available information is derived from opinion, reviews, retrospective series, and limited observational series. It appears that chronic renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, occurring in 0.03-0.12% of all pregnancies from two U.S. population-based and registry studies. Maternal complications associated with chronic renal disease include preeclampsia, worsening renal function, preterm delivery, anemia, chronic hypertension, and cesarean delivery. The live birth rate in women with chronic renal disease ranges between 64% and 98% depending on the severity of renal insufficiency and presence of hypertension. Significant proteinuria may be an indicator of underlying renal insufficiency. Management of pregnant women with underlying renal disease should ideally entail a multidisciplinary approach at a tertiary center and include a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist. Such women should receive counseling regarding the pregnancy outcomes in association with maternal chronic renal disease and the effect of pregnancy on renal function, especially within the ensuing 5 years postpartum. These women will require frequent visits and monitoring of renal function during pregnancy. Women whose renal disease is further complicated by hypertension should be counseled regarding the increased risk of adverse outcome and need for blood pressure control. Some antihypertensives, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, should be avoided during pregnancy, if possible, because of the potential for both teratogenic (hypocalvaria) and fetal effects (renal failure, oliguria, and demise).

  16. Renal impairment and worsening of renal function in acute heart failure: can new therapies help? The potential role of serelaxin.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and an important prognostic factor for adverse outcomes. Worsening of renal function occurs in 30-50% of patients hospitalised for AHF, and is associated with increased mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased risk of readmission. Likely mechanisms involved in the decrease in renal function include impaired haemodynamics and activation of neurohormonal factors, such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system and the arginine-vasopressin system. Additionally, many drugs currently used to treat AHF have a detrimental effect on renal function. Therefore, pharmacotherapy for AHF should carefully take into account any potential complications related to renal function. Serelaxin, currently in clinical development for the treatment of AHF is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2, identical in structure to the naturally occurring human relaxin-2 peptide hormone that mediates cardiac and renal adaptations during pregnancy. Data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate a potentially beneficial effect of serelaxin on kidney function. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of impairment of renal function in AHF, and the potential benefits of new therapies, such as serelaxin, in this context.

  17. Resistive index as a predictor of renal progression in patients with moderate renal dysfunction regardless of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor antagonist medication

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Su Mi; Son, Young Ki; Kim, Seong Eun; An, Won Suk

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that a higher resistive index (RI) on renal duplex ultrasonography was related with renal progression and acute kidney injury, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) using an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor antagonist (ARB). We evaluated whether a RI value is a predictive factor for renal progression regardless of ACEI or ARB medication in patients with moderate renal dysfunction. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 119 patients with moderate renal dysfunction that had been evaluated with renal duplex ultrasonography from February 2011 to April 2015. Moderate renal dysfunction was defined as a stage 3 to 4 CKD. Renal progression was defined as a doubling of the baseline serum creatinine (sCr), a decrease of baseline glomerular filtration rate by > 50%, or initiation of renal replacement therapy. Results The mean age was 64.7 ± 11.0 years and sCr level was 2.1 ± 1.2 mg/dL. The RI ≥ 0.79 group showed a higher incidence of renal progression (P = 0.004, log-rank test) compared with the RI < 0.79 group, irrespective of ACEI or ARB usage. In the Cox proportional hazard model, RI ≥ 0.79 was an independent prognostic factor after adjusting for age, sex, diabetes mellitus, sCr, proteinuria, and use of ACEI or ARB (hazard ratio, 4.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–22.53; P = 0.043). Conclusion RI ≥ 0.79 on the renal duplex ultrasonography can be a helpful predictor for renal progression in patients with moderate renal dysfunction, regardless of their ACEI or ARB usage.

  18. Human placental lactogen decreases regional blood flow in anesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Grossini, E; Molinari, C; Battaglia, A; Mary, D A S G; Ribichini, F; Surico, N; Vacca, G

    2006-01-01

    In 22 pigs anesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone, changes in blood flow caused by infusion of human placental lactogen into the left renal, external iliac, and anterior descending coronary arteries were assessed using electromagnetic flowmeters. In 17 pigs, infusion of human placental lactogen whilst keeping the heart rate and arterial pressure constant decreased coronary, renal and iliac flow. In 5 additional pigs, increasing the dose of human placental lactogen produced a dose-related decrease in regional blood flow. The mechanisms of the above response were studied in 15 of the 17 pigs by repeating the experiment of infusion. The human placental lactogen-induced decrease in regional blood flow was not affected by blockade of cholinergic receptors (5 pigs) or of alpha-adrenergic receptors (5 pigs), but it was abolished by blockade of beta2-adrenergic receptors (5 pigs). The present study showed that intra-arterial infusion of human placental lactogen primarily decreased coronary, renal and iliac blood flow. The mechanism of this response was shown to be due to the inhibition of a vasodilatory beta2-adrenergic receptor-mediated effect.

  19. Galacto‐oligosaccharides attenuate renal injury with microbiota modification

    PubMed Central

    Furuse, Satoshi U.; Ohse, Takamoto; Jo‐Watanabe, Airi; Shigehisa, Akira; Kawakami, Koji; Matsuki, Takahiro; Chonan, Osamu; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2014-01-01

    Abstracts Tubulointerstitial injury is central to the progression of end‐stage renal disease. Recent studies have revealed that one of the most investigated uremic toxins, indoxyl sulfate (IS), caused tubulointerstitial injury through oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Because indole, the precursor of IS, is synthesized from dietary tryptophan by the gut microbiota, we hypothesized that the intervention targeting the gut microbiota in kidney disease with galacto‐oligosaccharides (GOS) would attenuate renal injury. After 2 weeks of GOS administration for 5/6 nephrectomized (Nx) or sham‐operated (Sham) rats, cecal indole and serum IS were measured, renal injury was evaluated, and the effects of GOS on the gut microbiota were examined using pyrosequencing methods. Cecal indole and serum IS were significantly decreased and renal injury was improved with decreased infiltrating macrophages in GOS‐treated Nx rats. The expression levels of ER stress markers and apoptosis were significantly increased in the Nx rats and decreased with GOS. The microbiota analysis indicated that GOS significantly increased three bacterial families and decreased five families in the Nx rats. In addition, the analysis also revealed that the bacterial family Clostridiaceae was significantly increased in the Nx rats compared with the Sham rats and decreased with GOS. Taken altogether, our data show that GOS decreased cecal indole and serum IS, attenuated renal injury, and modified the gut microbiota in the Nx rats, and that the gut microbiota were altered in kidney disease. GOS could be a novel therapeutic agent to protect against renal injury. PMID:24994892

  20. [Tuberculosis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Anna; Dyła, Tomasz; Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2009-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients carry a relatively high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). In most cases, active TB is the result of reactivation of a latent infection and is located in the lungs. In these patients, clinical presentation of TB can often be atypical and there is a high risk of dissemination and high mortality rates. Therefore, the use of invasive procedures for proper diagnosis is recommended, as well as anti-tuberculosis therapy instituted whenever there is a strong suspicion of TB on clinical grounds, even without microbiological evidence. The treatment of active TB in renal transplant recipients should be the same as in the general population. To avoid graft rejection, blood levels of calcineurin inhibitors should be monitored closely. Prophylaxis is recommended for high-risk patients.

  1. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively.

  2. Renal stones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Norma; DasGupta, Ranan

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of renal stones during pregnancy is a complex problem. Risks to the fetus from ionising radiation and interventional procedures need to be balanced with optimising clinical care for the mother. Management of such patients requires a clear understanding of available options, with a multidisciplinary team approach. In this review, we discuss the role of different diagnostic tests including ultrasound, magnetic resonance urography, and computerized tomography. We also provide an update on recent developments in the treatment of renal stones during pregnancy. Expectant management remains first-line treatment. Where definitive treatment of the stone is required, new evidence suggests that ureteroscopic stone removal may be equally safe, and possibly better than traditional temporising procedures. PMID:27512433

  3. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  4. Effect of 2'-phosphophloretin on renal function in chronic renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Peerce, B E; Weaver, L; Clarke, R D

    2004-07-01

    Hyperhosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism are common and severe complications of chronic renal failure. Therapies to reduce serum phosphate have been shown to reduce serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and slow the progression of renal failure. The effect of the inhibitor of intestinal phosphate absorption, 2'-phosphophloretin (2'-PP), on serum and urine chemistry, renal histology, and cardiac structure in the uremic rat model of renal failure, 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 NX), was examined. The effect of 2'-PP on serum phosphate, serum PTH, serum total Ca(2+), and ionized Ca(2+), Ca(2+) x P(i) product, urine protein, urine osmolality, and creatinine clearance in 5/6 NX rats was examined. Uremic rats in chronic renal failure were gavaged daily with 25 microM 2'-PP. Over the course of a 5-wk experiment, serum chemistry in untreated uremic rats, 2'-PP-treated uremic rats, and age-matched control rats with normal renal function was determined twice a week. Urine creatinine, urine osmolality, urine phosphate, and urine protein were determined once a week from 24-h collections. 2'-PP reduced serum phosphate 40 +/- 3% compared with a 17% increase in untreated uremic control rats. 2'-PP did not alter total serum Ca(2+). During 5-wk experiments, serum PTH increased 65 +/- 25% in untreated uremic rats and decreased 70 +/- 7% in uremic rats treated with 25 microM 2'-PP. Creatinine clearance decreased 20% in untreated uremic rats compared with a 100% increase in 2'-PP-treated uremic rats. Urine protein decreased and urine osmolality increased in uremic rats treated with 2'-PP. The mechanism of the effect of 2'-PP on serum phosphate was inhibition of intestinal phosphate absorption. 2-PP inhibited intestinal phosphate absorption 50% without altering dietary protein absorption or intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. Over the course of the 5-wk treatment with 2'-PP, uremic animals treated with 2'-PP had a 2-4% weight gain/wk, similar to the weight gain seen in age-matched control rats

  5. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero g or space, in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast 5 of the 7 remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted (C sub Na/GFR, p .05) and their urinary flow rate (V, p .05). Potassium excretion increased (U sub k V, p .05). End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause, in rats, a decrease in distal tubular sodium, water and potassium reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis.

  6. [Giant renal angiomyolipoma].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Fernández, G; Mansilla Roselló, A; Rubio Gil, F; Martínez Domínguez, A P; Villar Del Moral, J; Ferrón Orihuela, A

    2003-06-01

    We present a case report of a renal angiomyolipoma with the special feature of its big size at the moment of the diagnosis. It is appreciated an important alteration of the kidney morphology and the repercussion produced in the rest of the abdominal organs. Due to this an exeresis with nefrectomy is performed. We do a bibliographic review and we analyzed the relevant aspects of this tumour.

  7. Renal phosphate handling: Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Bhadauria, Dharmendra

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus is a common anion. It plays an important role in energy generation. Renal phosphate handling is regulated by three organs parathyroid, kidney and bone through feedback loops. These counter regulatory loops also regulate intestinal absorption and thus maintain serum phosphorus concentration in physiologic range. The parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, Fibrogenic growth factor 23 (FGF23) and klotho coreceptor are the key regulators of phosphorus balance in body. PMID:23961477

  8. Renal artery aneurysm mimicking renal calculus with hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanwen; Meng, Hongzhou; Cao, Min; Shen, Baihua

    2013-06-01

    A 51-year-old woman was found to have a left renal calculus with hydronephrosis. She underwent unsuccessful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, leading to the recommendation that percutaneous lithotomy was necessary to remove the renal calculus. In view of the unusual shape of the calculus and absence of abnormalities in urine sediment, preoperative computed tomography and renal angiography were performed, which instead showed a calcified left renal artery aneurysm. Subsequent efforts to perform an aneurysmectomy also failed, eventually necessitating left nephrectomy. This case illustrates the pitfalls in the diagnosis of a renal artery aneurysm, which is a relatively common condition that may have unusual presentations. Hence, it is suggested that the possibility of a renal artery aneurysm be considered in the differential diagnosis when one detects a renal calculus with an unusual appearance. In addition, we propose that 3-dimensional reconstruction computed tomography be performed before considering surgical options for such renal calculi to rule out the possibility of a renal artery aneurysm.

  9. Renal functional outcomes after surgery for renal cortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Julia B.; DeCastro, G. Joel; McKiernan, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, radical nephrectomy represented the gold standard for the treatment of small (≤ 4cm) as well as larger renal masses. Recently, for small renal masses, the risk of ensuing chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease has largely favored nephron-sparing surgical techniques, mainly partial nephrectomy. In this review, we surveyed the literature on renal functional outcomes after partial nephrectomy for renal tumors. The largest randomized control trial comparing radical and partial nephrectomy failed to show a survival benefit for partial nephrectomy. With regards to overall survival, surgically induced chronic kidney disease (GFR < 60 ml/min/ 1.73m2) caused by nephrectomy might not be as deleterious as medically induced chronic kidney disease. In evaluating patients who underwent donor nephrectomy, transplant literature further validates that surgically induced reductions in GFR may not affect patient survival, unlike medically induced GFR declines. Yet, because patients who present with a renal mass tend to be elderly with multiple comorbidities, many develop a mixed picture of medically, and surgically-induced renal disease after extirpative renal surgery. In this population, we believe that nephron sparing surgery optimizes oncological control while protecting renal function.

  10. Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  11. [Primary renal angiosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Costero-Barrios, Cesáreo B; Oros-Ovalle, Cuauhtémoc

    2004-01-01

    The twenty-fourth case of primary renal angiosarcoma is described, according to the available international literature, this present in a 71-year-old male, a mechanic by trade, without carcinogenic antecedents. Hematuria, pain in flank, and left-side tumoral mass of approximately 20 cm in diameter located in kidney by computerized axial tomography (CT) constituted manifestations. A left nefrectomy was performed. No metastasis was found. The tumor replaced 4/5 of the organ and weighed 1145 g. It showed angiomatous structure with atypical proliferation of endothelial cells in a sinusoldal trauma and anastomosatic vascular channels that invaded neighboring parenchymal and capsule. Tymorous cells were positive for CD31 and CD34 and negative for cytokeratins, S100 and HMB 45 proteins. The patient was subjected to treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy (lineal accelerator), but 12 months after surgery he presented retroperitonal tumoral relapse and hepatic metastasis. Diagnostic differentiation with benign vascular tumors is pointed out, as well as carcinomas and sarcomas that showed an outstanding angiomatous component, both primary and/or secondary. Primary renal angiosarcoma exposes the multiplicity of localizations that it is capable of with a tumor of this type, as well as renal parenquimatous capacity to be the seat of a great variety of neoplasias.

  12. Renal sympathetic nerve, blood flow, and epithelial transport responses to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thad E

    2017-05-01

    Thermal stress is a profound sympathetic stress in humans; kidney responses involve altered renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renal blood flow, and renal epithelial transport. During mild cold stress, RSNA spectral power but not total activity is altered, renal blood flow is maintained or decreased, and epithelial transport is altered consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with central volume loaded state. Hypothermia decreases RSNA, renal blood flow, and epithelial transport. During mild heat stress, RSNA is increased, renal blood flow is decreased, and epithelial transport is increased consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with a central volume unloaded state. Hyperthermia extends these directional changes, until heat illness results. Because kidney responses are very difficult to study in humans in vivo, this review describes and qualitatively evaluates an in vivo human skin model of sympathetically regulated epithelial tissue compared to that of the nephron. This model utilizes skin responses to thermal stress, involving 1) increased skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), decreased skin blood flow, and suppressed eccrine epithelial transport during cold stress; and 2) increased SSNA, skin blood flow, and eccrine epithelial transport during heat stress. This model appears to mimic aspects of the renal responses. Investigations of skin responses, which parallel certain renal responses, may aid understanding of epithelial-sympathetic nervous system interactions during cold and heat stress.

  13. Wnt antagonist gene polymorphisms and renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Nakajima, Koichi; Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Yamamura, Soichiro; Kawakami, Kazumori; Suehiro, Yutaka; Tabatabai, Z. Laura; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Epigenetic silencing of several Wnt pathway related genes has been reported in renal cancer. Except for the TCF4 gene, there are no reports regarding Wnt pathway gene polymorphisms in renal cancer. Therefore, we hypothesized that the polymorphisms in Wnt signaling genes may be risk factors for renal cancer. Experimental Design A total of 210 patients (145 male and 65 female) with pathologically confirmed renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and 200 age- and sex-matched control individuals were enrolled in this study. We genotyped 14 SNPs in six genes including DKK2 (rs17037102, rs419558, rs447372), DKK3 (rs3206824, rs11022095, rs1472189, rs7396187, rs2291599), DKK4 (rs2073664), sFRP4 (rs1802073, rs1802074), SMAD7 (rs12953717), DAAM2 (rs6937133, rs2504106) using PCR-RFLP and direct sequencing in RCC and age-matched healthy subjects. We also tested the relationship between these polymorphisms and clinicopathologic data including gender, grade, tumor stage, lymph-node involvement, distant metastasis, and overall survival. Results A significant decrease in the frequency of the G/A+A/A genotypes in the DKK3 codon335 rs3206824 was observed in RCC patients compared with controls. The frequency of the rs3206824 (G/A) A- rs7396187 (G/C) C haplotype was significantly lower in RCC compared with other haplotypes. We also found that DKK3 rs1472189 C/T is associated with distant metastasis and furthermore, DKK2 rs17037102 G homozygous patients had a decreased risk for death by multivariate Cox regression analysis. Conclusions This is the first report documenting that DKK3 polymorphisms are associated with RCC and that the DKK2 rs17037102 polymorphism may be a predictor for survival in RCC patients after radical nephrectomy. PMID:19562778

  14. Does Secondary Renal Osteopathy Exist in Companion Animals?

    PubMed

    Segev, Gilad; Meltzer, Hagar; Shipov, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Secondary renal hyperparathyroidism is an inevitable consequence of chronic kidney disease. In human patients, the disease is associated with decreased bone quality and increased fracture risk. Recent evidence suggests that bone quality is also decreased in companion animals, more pronouncedly in cats compared with dogs, likely because of a longer disease course. The clinical significance of these findings is yet to be determined. However, clinicians should keep in mind that animals with chronic kidney disease have decreased bone quality and increased fracture risk.

  15. Radionuclide evaluation of renal function.

    PubMed

    Bueschen, A J; Witten, D M

    1979-06-01

    The renal scintillation camera study and the excretory urogram should be considered to be complementary studies. The renal scintillation camera study provides an accurate evaluation of changes in total, differential, and segmental renal function but affords only a gross assessment of anatomic changes. The excretory urogram provides superior information about renal anatomic changes but only inferior information about functional changes of the kidney. The advantages of a renal scintillation camera study with regard to the patient are that it is done in a state of normal hydration, it requires no bowel preparation, it is not associated with allergic reactions, it provides a low radiation exposure, and it is a noninvasive procedure for differential renal function which requires no ureteral catheters.

  16. Scintigraphic imaging in renal infections.

    PubMed

    Rossleigh, M A

    2009-02-01

    The scintigraphic imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of renal infections is renal cortical scintigraphy utilizing [(99m)Tc]dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). This technique is able to demonstrate upper tract involvement with infection and to assess for the presence of renal cortical scarring following a urinary tract infection (UTI). There are recent publications advocating its use to determine which patients need to proceed to further investigation with cystography. It is also being utilized in the evaluation of different treatment regimes used in patients with UTI. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and leukocyte scanning have only a minor role in the diagnosis of renal infection. Their main application is in the diagnosis of renal cyst infections in patients with polycystic renal disease.

  17. Renal Stone Risk During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    1999-01-01

    Space flight produces a number of metabolic and physiological changes in the crewmembers exposed to microgravity. Following launch, body fluid volumes, electrolyte levels, and bone and muscle undergo changes as the human body adapts to the weightless environment. Changes in the urinary chemical composition may lead to the potentially serious consequences of renal stone formation. Previous data collected immediately after space flight indicate changes in the urine chemistry favoring an increased risk of calcium oxalate and uric acid stone formation (n = 323). During short term Shuttle space flights, the changes observed include increased urinary calcium and decreased urine volume, pH and citrate resulting in a greater risk for calcium oxalate and brushite stone formation (n = 6). Results from long duration Shuttle/Mir missions (n = 9) followed a similar trend and demonstrated decreased fluid intake and urine volume and increased urinary calcium resulting in a urinary environment saturated with the calcium stone-forming salts. The increased risk occurs rapidly upon exposure to microgravity, continues throughout the space flight and following landing. Dietary factors, especially fluid intake, or pharmacologic intervention can significantly influence the urinary chemical composition. Increasing fluid intake to produce a daily urine output of 2 liters/day may allow the excess salts in the urine to remain in solution, crystals formation will not occur and a renal stone will not develop. Results from long duration crewmembers (n = 2) who had urine volumes greater than 2.5 L/day minimized their risk of renal stone formation. Also, comparisons of stone-forming risk in short duration crewmembers clearly identified greater risk in those who produced less than 2 liters of urine/day. However, hydration and increased urine output does not correct the underlying calcium excretion due to bone loss and only treats the symptoms and not the cause of the increased urinary salts

  18. Multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, G.; Glass, T.A.; D'Souza, V.J.; Formanek, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Renal oncocytoma, although rare, is being diagnosed more frequently, and criteria to differentiate it from other tumors have been described. Multiple oncocytomas have been reported, but an association between multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma in the same kidney has not been described. The authors report a case with two oncocytomas and a renal carcinoma in the right kidney as well as a right adrenal adenoma.

  19. Renal Denervation Findings on Cardiac and Renal Fibrosis in Rats with Isoproterenol Induced Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Kai; Wang, Shengchan; Lu, Dasheng; Li, Zhenzhen; Geng, Jie; Fang, Ping; Wang, Ying; Shan, Qijun

    2015-12-01

    Cardio-renal fibrosis plays key roles in heart failure and chronic kidney disease. We sought to determine the effects of renal denervation (RDN) on cardiac and renal fibrosis in rats with isoproterenol induced cardiomyopathy. Sixty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to Control (n = 10) and isoproterenol (ISO)-induced cardiomyopathy group (n = 50). At week 5, 31 survival ISO-induced cardiomyopathy rats were randomized to RDN (n = 15) and Sham group (n = 16). Compared with Control group, ejection fraction was decreased, diastolic interventricular septal thickness and left atrial dimension were increased in ISO-induced cardiomyopathy group at 5 week. After 10 weeks, cardio-renal pathophysiologic results demonstrated that the collagen volume fraction of left atrio-ventricular and kidney tissues reduced significantly in RDN group compared with Sham group. Moreover the pro-fibrosis factors (TGF-β1, MMP2 and Collagen I), inflammatory cytokines (CRP and TNF-α), and collagen synthesis biomarkers (PICP, PINP and PIIINP) concentration significantly decreased in RDN group. Compared with Sham group, RDN group showed that release of noradrenaline and aldosterone were reduced, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin II (Ang II)/angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R) axis was downregulated. Meanwhile, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin-1-7 (Ang-(1-7))/mas receptor (Mas-R) axis was upregulated. RDN inhibits cardio-renal fibrogenesis through multiple pathways, including reducing SNS over-activity, rebalancing RAAS axis.

  20. Renal Denervation Findings on Cardiac and Renal Fibrosis in Rats with Isoproterenol Induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Kai; Wang, Shengchan; Lu, Dasheng; Li, Zhenzhen; Geng, Jie; Fang, Ping; Wang, Ying; Shan, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Cardio-renal fibrosis plays key roles in heart failure and chronic kidney disease. We sought to determine the effects of renal denervation (RDN) on cardiac and renal fibrosis in rats with isoproterenol induced cardiomyopathy. Sixty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to Control (n = 10) and isoproterenol (ISO)-induced cardiomyopathy group (n = 50). At week 5, 31 survival ISO-induced cardiomyopathy rats were randomized to RDN (n = 15) and Sham group (n = 16). Compared with Control group, ejection fraction was decreased, diastolic interventricular septal thickness and left atrial dimension were increased in ISO-induced cardiomyopathy group at 5 week. After 10 weeks, cardio-renal pathophysiologic results demonstrated that the collagen volume fraction of left atrio-ventricular and kidney tissues reduced significantly in RDN group compared with Sham group. Moreover the pro-fibrosis factors (TGF-β1, MMP2 and Collagen I), inflammatory cytokines (CRP and TNF-α), and collagen synthesis biomarkers (PICP, PINP and PIIINP) concentration significantly decreased in RDN group. Compared with Sham group, RDN group showed that release of noradrenaline and aldosterone were reduced, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin II (Ang II)/angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R) axis was downregulated. Meanwhile, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin-1-7 (Ang-(1-7))/mas receptor (Mas-R) axis was upregulated. RDN inhibits cardio-renal fibrogenesis through multiple pathways, including reducing SNS over-activity, rebalancing RAAS axis. PMID:26689945

  1. The future of renal denervation.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray; Guo, Ling

    2017-05-01

    The rationale for the renal denervation treatment of severe, drug-resistant essential hypertension remains valid, but the field is now at a procedural watershed. With the commonly flawed procedures of the past, most notably in the Symplicity HTN-3 trial, which typically directed ablating energy into the proximal renal arteries, coupled with the absence of testing for achieved denervation, who could guess which of the past negative renal denervation trials, if any, are valid? But renal denervation procedures will now be different in two important ways. First, energy will be directed into the distal renal arteries and renal artery branches, where the renal nerves lie closest to the artery lumen. The need for this change is emphatic and unequivocal. Second, the number of energy point applications will be increased to 12-16 bilaterally. This is required because local perivascular anatomy distorts energy flow, making it unpredictable, so that multiple overlapping energy doses are needed. Applying these principles in experimental animals achieves near-total renal sympathetic nerve ablation, and lowers blood pressure. The "smart" renal denervation trials of the future will include a sham procedure and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure endpoints, but more important than these, which in comparison is clinical trialist "tinkering", will be the procedural revolution in ablative energy delivery.

  2. Solid renal masses in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Mahesh Kumar; Sureka, Binit

    2016-01-01

    With the ever increasing trend of using cross-section imaging in today's era, incidental detection of small solid renal masses has dramatically multiplied. Coincidentally, the number of asymptomatic benign lesions being detected has also increased. The role of radiologists is not only to identify these lesions, but also go a one step further and accurately characterize various renal masses. Earlier detection of small renal cell carcinomas means identifying at the initial stage which has an impact on prognosis, patient management and healthcare costs. In this review article we share our experience with the typical and atypical solid renal masses encountered in adults in routine daily practice. PMID:28104933

  3. Computed tomography of renal oncocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Huntrakoon, M.

    1983-10-01

    Renal oncocytoma is a relatively rare tumor that has an excellent prognosis and usually may be treated adequately by local resection. Preoperative differentiation from renal cell carcinoma, which requires radical nephrectomy, is thus of importance. The computed tomographic (CT) and pathologic features of three incidentally-detected renal oncocytomas were compared with those of six renal cell carcinomas of comparable size. Renal cell carcinoma appears on CT as a solid mass that generally has an indistinct interface with normal renal parenchyma, a lobulated contour, and a nonhomogeneous pattern of contrast enhancement. These features correlate with the pathologic findings of an irregular tumor margin and the frequent presence of tumor hemorrhage and necrosis. Oncocytoma, on the other hand, generally has a distinct margin, a smooth contour, and a homogeneous appearance on contrast-enhanced CT scans. These findings correlate with a smooth tumor margin and absence of tumor hemorrhage and necrosis on pathologic examination. These features are not pathognomonic of oncocytoma, as angiographic evidence suggests that renal cell carcinoma may show both distinct margination and a homogeneous blush in 6% of cases. However, their demonstration by CT should alert radiologists and surgeons to the possibility that a renal mass may be an oncocytoma. Such a presumptive diagnosis then can lead to a surgical approach that allows for renal-conserving surgery.

  4. Image-Guided Renal Intervention.

    PubMed

    Frey, Gregory T; Sella, David M; Atwell, Thomas D

    2015-09-01

    The role of interventional radiology in the management of renal malignancy has expanded in the past 2 decades, largely because of the efficacy of image-guided ablation in treating renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Clinical guidelines now incorporate ablation into standardized RCC management algorithms. Importantly, both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have shown long-term durability in the definitive treatment of RCC, and early outcomes following microwave ablation are equally promising. While selective renal artery embolization has a role in the palliation of select patients with RCC, it can also be used to minimize complications in the ablation of larger renal masses.

  5. Renal handling of matrix Gla-protein in humans with moderate to severe hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rennenberg, Roger J M W; Schurgers, Leon J; Vermeer, Cees; Scholte, Jan B J; Houben, Alphons J H M; de Leeuw, Peter W; Kroon, Abraham A

    2008-09-01

    Vascular calcifications are common among patients with hypertension. The vitamin K-dependent protein matrix Gla-protein plays an important role in preventing arterial calcification. Since a decrease in renal clearance is a prevalent clinical problem in patients with hypertension, we aimed to study the renal clearance of matrix Gla-protein from the circulation in these patients having a wide range of creatinine clearances. Ninety moderate to severe hypertensive patients who were scheduled for renal angiography were enrolled in the study. In these patients, renal arterial and renal venous blood was sampled prior to the administration of contrast material in order to determine the total renal and single kidney clearance of matrix Gla-protein. The average renal fractional extraction of matrix Gla-protein was 12.8%. There was no significant correlation between creatinine clearance (range 26-154) and renal fractional extraction of matrix Gla-protein in this population. The extraction of matrix Gla-protein was not influenced by the presence of a renal artery stenosis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the kidney is able to extract matrix Gla-protein from the plasma at a constant level of 12.8%, independent of renal function in hypertensive subjects.

  6. Resveratrol ameliorates renal injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats by inhibiting renal micro-inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hai-Yan; Yuan, Li; Cao, Ying-Jie; Fan, Ya-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Lan; Huang, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Micro-inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenol with anti-fibrosis activity in hypertensive renal damage model. In SHR renal damage model, RSV treatment blunted the increase in urine albumin excretion, urinary β2-microglobulin (β2-MG), attenuated the decrease in creatinine clearance rate (CCR). The glomerular sclerosis index (1.54±0.33 compared with 0.36±0.07) and tubulointerstitial fibrosis (1.57±0.31 compared with 0.19±0.04) were significantly higher in SHRs compared with Wistar Kyoto rats (WKYs), which were significantly lower by RSV treatment. The increases in mesangium accumulation and the expression of renal collagen type I (Col I), fibronectin (Fn), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in SHR were also reduced by RSV treatment. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) expression was increased in the cytoplasm and nuclei of the SHR kidneys, which was significantly decreased by RSV treatment. Furthermore, the protein level of IκB-α significantly decreased in the kidneys of the SHR when compared with the WKYs. RSV treatment partially restored the decreased IκB-α level. In SHR kidney, increased expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) were observed. These changes were attenuated by RSV treatment. No changes in blood pressure were detected between SHR group and SHR + RSV group. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that RSV treatment may significantly attenuate renal damage in the SHR model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The renal protective effect is associated with inhibition of IL-6, ICAM-1 and MCP-1 expression via the regulation of the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which suggesting that micro-inflammation may be a potential therapeutic target of hypertensive

  7. Rapidly progressive renal failure due to chronic lymphocytic leukemia - Response to chlorambucil

    PubMed Central

    Junglee, N. A.; Shrikanth, S.; Seale, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia tends to follow an indolent course and despite infiltration of leukemic cells in numerous organs, resultant target organ damage is uncommon. We present a case of an 83-year-old Caucasian lady who presented with rapidly worsening renal impairment over a several month period with a serum creatinine peak of 2.82 mg/dl. Despite numerous investigations an immediate cause was not apparent. A renal biopsy was therefore conducted which revealed dense infiltration of the interstitium with small lymphocytic lymphoma. Given her age and frailty she was treated with single alkylating agent chemotherapy (chlorambucil). This resulted in a marked decrease in lymphocyte count and resolution of renal impairment close to her previous baseline level. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature to demonstrate a marked resolution in renal impairment with chlorambucil alone. We also highlight the value of renal biopsy in identifying a rare cause of renal impairment. PMID:23087560

  8. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: renal coloboma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions renal coloboma syndrome renal coloboma syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Renal coloboma syndrome (also known as papillorenal syndrome) is ...

  10. Renal cirsoid arteriovenous malformation masquerading as neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K; George, D

    1988-12-01

    A woman with renal colic and microscopic hematuria had filling defects in the left renal collecting system detected on excretory urography. A nephrectomy, performed because of suspected malignancy, might have been averted by renal angiography.

  11. [Renal side effects of long-term lithium therapy].

    PubMed

    Ibbeken, C; Becker, J U; Baumgärtel, M W

    2012-01-01

    Lithium is widely used in the treatment of bipolar disorders. Long-term administration of lithium often leads to side effects concerning the subjects: nephrology, endocrinology and surgery. This review emphasizes nephrotoxicity.Lithium treatment may disturb responsiveness to antidiuretic hormone (ADH), causing a nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Furthermore long-term lithium therapy may trigger hyperparathyreoidism with hypercalcemia and chronic interstitial nephritis with development of microcysts. Long-term patients have an increased risk to develop impaired renal function. Lithium-induced endstage renal disease is rare. Termination of lithium treatment may decrease the risk of progression.To ensure security of lithium treatment regular controls of urine osmolarity, lithium-, creatinine- , thyroid stimulating hormone- and calcium-levels are essential. Patients with decreased renal function should be referred to a specialist early.

  12. LMWH in cancer patients with renal impairment - better than warfarin?

    PubMed

    Bauersachs, Rupert M

    2016-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the leading causes of death in cancer patients, which are known to have a 5- to 7-fold increased risk for VTE. The anticoagulant treatment of VTE in cancer patients is less effective with a three-fold increased risk of VTE recurrence compared to non-cancer patients, and it is less safe with more than double rates of major bleeding. Compared to vitamin-K antagonists (VKA), long-term secondary prevention with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent VTE in cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), and therefore, current international guidelines recommend the use of LMWH over VKA. With increasing age, cancer prevalence and VTE incidence increase while renal function decreases. Anti-cancer treatment may impair renal function additionally. Therefore, renal insufficiency is a frequent challenge in CAT patients, which is associated with a higher risk of both bleeding and recurrent VTE. Both VKA and LMWH may be associated with less efficacy and higher bleeding risk in renal insufficiency. Unfortunately, there is a lack of prospective data on renal insufficiency and CAT. A recent sub-analysis from a large randomized controlled trial shows that the bleeding risk in patients with severe renal insufficiency in CAT is not elevated with the use of LMWH compared to VKA while efficacy is maintained. In addition, LMWH treatment has several practical advantages over VKA, particularly in patients with CAT while they are receiving anti-cancer treatment.

  13. Adrenal medullary regulation of rat renal cortical adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, P.R.; Guarnaccia, M.M.; Izzo, J.L. Jr. )

    1987-11-01

    The role of the adrenal medulla in the regulation of renal cortical adrenergic receptors was investigated in renal cortical particular fractions from control rats and rats 6 wk after adrenal demedullation. The specific binding of ({sup 3}H)prazosin, ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine, and ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol were used to quantitate {alpha}{sub 1}-, {alpha}{sub 2}-, and {beta}-adrenergic receptors, respectively. Adrenal demedullation increased the concentration of all three groups of renal adrenergic receptors; maximal number of binding sites (B{sub max}, per milligram membrane protein) for {alpha}{sub 1}-, and {alpha}{sub 2}-, and {beta}-adrenergic receptors were increased by 22, 18.5, and 25%, respectively. No differences were found in the equilibrium dissociation constants (K{sub D}) for any of the radioligands. Plasma corticosterone and plasma and renal norepinephrine levels were unchanged, whereas plasma epinephrine was decreased 72% by adrenal demedullation, renal cortical epinephrine was not detectable in control or demedullated animals. The results suggest that, in the physiological state, the adrenal medulla modulates the number of renal cortical adrenergic receptors, presumably through the actions of a circulating factor such as epinephrine.

  14. Altered glutamyl-aminopeptidase activity and expression in renal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in the knowledge of renal neoplasms have demonstrated the implication of several proteases in their genesis, growth and dissemination. Glutamyl-aminopeptidase (GAP) (EC. 3.4.11.7) is a zinc metallopeptidase with angiotensinase activity highly expressed in kidney tissues and its expression and activity have been associated wtih tumour development. Methods In this prospective study, GAP spectrofluorometric activity and immunohistochemical expression were analysed in clear-cell (CCRCC), papillary (PRCC) and chromophobe (ChRCC) renal cell carcinomas, and in renal oncocytoma (RO). Data obtained in tumour tissue were compared with those from the surrounding uninvolved kidney tissue. In CCRCC, classic pathological parameters such as grade, stage and tumour size were stratified following GAP data and analyzed for 5-year survival. Results GAP activity in both the membrane-bound and soluble fractions was sharply decreased and its immunohistochemical expression showed mild staining in the four histological types of renal tumours. Soluble and membrane-bound GAP activities correlated with tumour grade and size in CCRCCs. Conclusions This study suggests a role for GAP in the neoplastic development of renal tumours and provides additional data for considering the activity and expression of this enzyme of interest in the diagnosis and prognosis of renal neoplasms. PMID:24885240

  15. Review of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-02-01

    Chronic renal failure patients receiving hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis often encounter gastrointestinal troubles over their long treatment period. Helicobacter pylori infection has close association with development of peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma, and is thought to be one of the major risk factors for gastrointestinal troubles in dialysis patients. However, it is unclear whether H. pylori infection is directly associated with progression of renal dysfunction and prognosis of chronic renal failure patients. Recent consensus shows that the prevalence of H. pylori infection in chronic renal failure patients is significantly lower than in subjects with normal renal function. In the natural history of H. pylori infection in hemodialysis patients, the prevalence of infection decreases as dialysis periods progressed, in particular within the first four years after the start of treatment. However, the chance of natural eradication becomes rare for patients receiving dialysis treatment for a long time. Moreover, chronic renal failure patients with H. pylori infection have a higher incidence of gastroduodenal diseases, and therefore, are recommended to receive eradication therapies, especially for those receiving treatment for a long time and with higher risks of complication. Intensive endoscopic check-ups for the prevention of gastrointestinal events and the discovery of peptic ulcer and neoplastic diseases at an early phase may be required.

  16. Mechanisms of renal hyporesponsiveness to BNP in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel E; Feridooni, Tiam; Hotchkiss, Adam; Kruzliak, Peter; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-06-01

    The B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a member of the family of vasoactive peptides, is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory peptide that contributes to blood pressure and volume homeostasis. These attributes make BNP an ideal drug that could aid in diuresing a fluid-overloaded patient who had poor or worsening renal function. Despite the potential benefits of BNP, accumulating evidence suggests that simply increasing the amount of circulating BNP does not necessarily increase natriuresis in patients with heart failure (HF). Moreover, despite high BNP levels, natriuresis falls when HF progresses from a compensated to a decompensated state, suggesting the emergence of renal resistance to BNP. Although likely multifactorial, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain renal hyporesponsiveness in HF, including, but not limited to, decreased renal BNP availability, down-regulation of natriuretic peptide receptors, and altered BNP intracellular signal transduction pathways. Thus, a better understanding of renal hyporesponsiveness in HF is required to devise strategies to develop novel agents and technologies that directly restore renal BNP efficiency. It is hoped that development of these new therapeutic approaches will serve to limit sodium retention in patients with HF, which may ultimately delay the progression to overt HF.

  17. Delayed rupture of renal artery after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Puijlaert, C.B.A.J.; Mali, W.P.; Rosenbusch, G.; van Straalen, A.M.; Klinge, J.; Feldberg, M.A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Two cases are reported in which rupture of the renal artery occurred many hours after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Delayed rupture can be recognized by the angiographic appearance and by the presence of persistent flank pain. The typical angiographic finding is a poorly defined zone of contrast medium at the site of perforation.

  18. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  19. Essential but differential role for CXCR4 and CXCR7 in the therapeutic homing of human renal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Ronconi, Elisa; Lazzeri, Elena; Sagrinati, Costanza; Ballerini, Lara; Angelotti, Maria Lucia; Parente, Eliana; Mancina, Rosa; Netti, Giuseppe Stefano; Becherucci, Francesca; Gacci, Mauro; Carini, Marco; Gesualdo, Loreto; Rotondi, Mario; Maggi, Enrico; Lasagni, Laura; Serio, Mario; Romagnani, Sergio; Romagnani, Paola

    2008-02-18

    Recently, we have identified a population of renal progenitor cells in human kidneys showing regenerative potential for injured renal tissue of SCID mice. We demonstrate here that among all known chemokine receptors, human renal progenitor cells exhibit high expression of both stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7. In SCID mice with acute renal failure (ARF), SDF-1 was strongly up-regulated in resident cells surrounding necrotic areas. In the same mice, intravenously injected renal stem/progenitor cells engrafted into injured renal tissue decreased the severity of ARF and prevented renal fibrosis. These beneficial effects were abolished by blocking either CXCR4 or CXCR7, which dramatically reduced the number of engrafting renal progenitor cells. However, although SDF-1-induced migration of renal progenitor cells was only abolished by an anti-CXCR4 antibody, transendothelial migration required the activity of both CXCR4 and CXCR7, with CXCR7 being essential for renal progenitor cell adhesion to endothelial cells. Moreover, CXCR7 but not CXCR4 was responsible for the SDF-1-induced renal progenitor cell survival. Collectively, these findings suggest that CXCR4 and CXCR7 play an essential, but differential, role in the therapeutic homing of human renal progenitor cells in ARF, with important implications for the development of stem cell-based therapies.

  20. RENAL MICROVASCULAR DISEASE DETERMINES THE RESPONSES TO REVASCULARIZATION IN EXPERIMENTAL RENOVASCULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Chade, Alejandro R.; Kelsen, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Background Percutaneous trasluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) is the most frequent therapeutic approach to resolve renal artery stenosis (RAS). However, renal function recovers in only 30% of the cases. The causes of these poor outcomes are still unknown. We hypothesize that preserving the renal microcirculation distal to RAS will improve the responses to PTRA. Methods and Results RAS was induced in 28 pigs. In 14, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-165 was infused intra-renally (RAS+VEGF, 0.05 µg/kg). Single-kidney function was assessed in all pigs in vivo using ultra-fast CT after 6 weeks. Half of the RAS/RAS+VEGF completed their observation, and the other half underwent PTRA, VEGF was repeated, and CT studies repeated 4 weeks later. Pigs were then euthanized, the stenotic kidney removed, renal microvascular (MV) architecture reconstructed ex-vivo using 3D micro-CT, and renal fibrosis quantified. Degree of RAS and hypertension were similar in RAS and RAS+VEGF. Renal function and MV density were decreased in RAS but improved in RAS+VEGF. PTRA largely resolved RAS, but the improvements of hypertension and renal function were greater in RAS+VEGF+PTRA than in RAS+PTRA, accompanied by a 34% increase in MV density and decreased fibrosis. Conclusion Preservation of the MV architecture and function in the stenotic kidney improved the responses to PTRA, indicating that renal MV integrity plays a role in determining the responses to PTRA. This study indicates that damage and early loss of renal MV is an important determinant of the progression of renal injury in RAS and instigates often irreversible damage. PMID:20587789

  1. Renal cyst puncture studies.

    PubMed

    Lang, E K

    1987-02-01

    The edict to contain costs and meet goals imposed by DRG remuneration policies mandates the work-up of asymptomatic renal mass lesions on an outpatient basis. This proved feasible in 98 per cent of patients. The vast majority of such mass lesions (82 to 90 per cent) is diagnosed with acceptable confidence by computed tomography and sonography alone. For a shrinking group of such patients, yet still 16 to 18 per cent, guided percutaneous aspiration biopsy is necessary to affirm the diagnosis. However, this technique has been refined during recent years to incorporate the use of thin needle equipment and can now be performed on an outpatient basis without significant risk of morbidity. For diagnosing hyperdense inflammatory and infected renal cysts, guided percutaneous aspiration is recommended as the most effective method. This procedure should take precedence over surgical exploration because it can diagnose and provide pertinent bacteriologic information that may determine the course of therapy. In many instances inflammatory cysts or even silent renal abscesses are diagnosed by a percutaneous aspiration technique that is then expanded to serve therapeutic purposes such as percutaneous drainage. Even these procedures can be performed safely on an outpatient basis provided the patient is followed closely. Because complications of percutaneous aspiration procedures are extremely rare, the procedure can be used safely on an outpatient basis. The impact of magnetic resonance imaging on the diagnosis of asymptomatic space-occupying lesions of the kidney is as yet not fully determined; however, this method appears promising for diagnosing some of the refractory lesions such as hemorrhagic cysts, aneurysms, or arteriovenous malformations.

  2. Acute Renal Failure in the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Khan, Owais A; Hageman, Joseph R; Clardy, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in a neonate is a serious condition that impacts 8% to 24% of hospitalized neonates. There is a need for prompt evaluation and treatment to avoid additional complications. In this review, a neonate was found to have renal failure associated with renal vein thrombosis. There are varying etiologies of ARF. Causes of ARF are typically divided into three subsets: pre-renal, renal or intrinsic, and post-renal. Treatment of ARF varies based on the cause. Renal vein thrombosis is an interesting cause of renal or intrinsic ARF and can be serious, often leading to a need for dialysis.

  3. Variable responses of regional renal oxygenation and perfusion to vasoactive agents in awake sheep.

    PubMed

    Calzavacca, Paolo; Evans, Roger G; Bailey, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2015-11-15

    Vasoactive agents are used in critical care to optimize circulatory function, but their effects on renal tissue oxygenation in the absence of anesthesia remain largely unknown. Therefore, we assessed the effects of multiple vasoactive agents on regional kidney oxygenation in awake sheep. Sheep were surgically instrumented with pulmonary and renal artery flow probes, and combination fiber-optic probes, in the renal cortex and medulla, comprising a fluorescence optode to measure tissue Po2 and a laser-Doppler probe to assess tissue perfusion. Carotid arterial and renal venous cannulas enabled measurement of arterial pressure and total renal oxygen delivery and consumption. Norepinephrine (0.1 or 0.8 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) dose-dependently reduced cortical and medullary laser Doppler flux (LDF) and Po2 without significantly altering renal blood flow (RBF), or renal oxygen delivery or consumption. Angiotensin II (9.8 ± 2.1 μg/h) reduced RBF by 21%, renal oxygen delivery by 28%, oxygen consumption by 18%, and medullary Po2 by 38%, but did not significantly alter cortical Po2 or cortical or medullary LDF. Arginine vasopressin (3.3 ± 0.5 μg/h) caused similar decreases in RBF and renal oxygen delivery, but did not significantly alter renal oxygen consumption or cortical or medullary LDF or Po2. Captopril had no observable effects on cortical or medullary LDF or Po2, at a dose that increased renal oxygen delivery by 24%, but did not significantly alter renal oxygen consumption. We conclude that vasoactive agents have diverse effects on regional kidney oxygenation in awake sheep that are not predictable from their effects on LDF, RBF, or total renal oxygen delivery and consumption.

  4. Parathyroid function in uremic children during periods of renal insufficiency, hemodialysis, and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gruskin, A B; Root, A W; Duckett, G E; Baluarte, H J

    1976-11-01

    Function of the parathyroid gland was evaluated in children with renal insufficiency prior to and after imitation of hemodialysis, and again following renal transplantation. Serum levels of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone responded appropriately to increases or decreases of serum calcium concentrations in the three groups. Functional and histologic studies in the children with renal insufficiency demonstrated the cause of their elevated circulating levels of iPTH to be diffuse parathyroid hyperplasia. During hemodialysis, the serum concentration of calcium rose and that of iPTH decreased, when the calcium gradient between the dialysate and the blood favored movement of calcium into the body. During treatment with prednisolone (20 mg/kg intravenously) for reversal of renal transplant rejection, the serum concentration of calcium decreased and that of iPTH increased. These observations suggest that autonomy of the parathyroid gland rarely occurs in children with renal insufficiency, and that hemodialysis using a dialysate with a high concentration of calcium might assist in retarding the progression of renal osteodystrophy. Furthermore, if hyperparathyroidism contributes in part to growth failure in children with chronic renal disease, steroid-induced changes in cirulating iPTH following renal transplantation may inhibit growth.

  5. Autopsy Renal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2014-09-01

    We provide an overview of assessment of the kidneys at autopsy, with special considerations for pediatric versus adult kidneys. We describe the approach to gross examination, tissue allocation when needed for additional studies of potential medical renal disease, the spectrum of congenital abnormalities of the kidneys and urinary tract, and approach to cystic diseases of the kidney. We also discuss common lesions seen at autopsy, including acute tubular injury, ischemic versus toxic contributions to this injury, interstitial nephritis, and common vascular diseases. Infections commonly involve the kidney at autopsy, and the key features and differential diagnoses are also discussed.

  6. [Tubular renal acidosis].

    PubMed

    Seidowsky, A; Moulonguet-Doleris, L; Hanslik, T; Yattara, H; Ayari, H; Rouveix, E; Massy, Z A; Prinseau, J

    2014-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTAs) are a group of metabolic disorders characterized by metabolic acidosis with normal plasma anion gap. There are three main forms of RTA: a proximal RTA called type II and a distal RTA (type I and IV). The RTA type II is a consequence of the inability of the proximal tubule to reabsorb bicarbonate. The distal RTA is associated with the inability to excrete the daily acid load and may be associated with hyperkalaemia (type IV) or hypokalemia (type I). The most common etiology of RTA type IV is the hypoaldosteronism. The RTAs can be complicated by nephrocalcinosis and obstructive nephrolithiasis. Alkalinization is the cornerstone of treatment.

  7. Ifosfamide induced renal rickets.

    PubMed

    Lionel, Arul P; Chinnaswamy, Girish; John, Rikki R; Mathai, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Ifosfamide is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent in children. The authors report a 4-y-old boy who developed proximal renal tubulopathy with florid rickets a year after completion of ifosfamide therapy for Ewing's sarcoma. After initiation of treatment, there was complete healing of rickets and he did not need supplements beyond 18 mo. Growth monitoring and musculoskeletal system examination is important in all children who have received ifosfamide therapy. Routine monitoring for nephrotoxicity during and after ifosfamide therapy helps in early identification and intervention.

  8. Renal handling and acute urinary electrolyte effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics: use of a solitary renal autotransplant in the conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W M; McDougall, J; Potocnik, S; Wright, R D; Whitworth, J A

    1983-01-17

    Renal handling of the aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamicin and tobramycin were studied before and after one hour of constant intravenous infusions adjusted to maintain a concentration of 15 micrograms/mL. A solitary renal autotransplant model in four conscious volume replete 40 Kg sheep was used. This unique surgical preparation allows sampling of renal arterial and renal venous blood as well as urine drained through an exteriorized parotid-ureteral fistula. This surgical preparation has considerable potential in renal pharmacology since it uses a conscious, large animal. Baseline studies in this preparation demonstrated normal, 51CrEDTA and 125 I PAH, clearances which were unaffected by the drugs. Aminoglycoside binding to pooled sheep sera was 11% at physiologic PH, calcium and magnesium concentrations. A-V difference was 1.3 +/- .3 micrograms/mL and extraction by the kidney was 9 +/- 3.2% with no differences between gentamicin and tobramycin. Clearance of gentamicin was 84% and tobramycin 86% of GFR. There was no evidence of tubular injury as evidenced by unchanged urinary beta-2 microglobulin excretion. Serum Na, K, Ca and Mg did not change over the course of the study. Both drugs caused a prompt decrease in absolute and fractional sodium excretion while only gentamicin produced a kaliuresis. Early aminoglycoside effects on electrolyte balance may be an eventual determinant of nephrotoxic potential rather than differences in renal drug handling.

  9. Mechanisms of hypertension in renal radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Juncos, L.; Cornejo, J.C.; Cejas, H.; Broglia, C. )

    1990-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the role played by renal functional and structural changes in the development of radiation-induced hypertension. Four groups of rats were studied: (1) left kidney radiated, (2) sham procedure, (3) uninephrectomy followed 3 weeks later by radiation of the contralateral kidney, and (4) uninephrectomy followed by sham procedure 3 weeks later. All radiated rats became hypertensive at 12 weeks (p less than 0.05) and had higher protein excretion (p less than 0.05). In the presence of an intact contralateral kidney, radiation causes mild-to-moderate histological abnormalities, and therefore, creatinine clearance and water and sodium handling do not change. Plasma renin activity increased in this group (p less than 0.05). Radiated uninephrectomized rats showed decreased creatinine clearance (p less than 0.05), but renin activity remained unchanged. These rats developed severe histological abnormalities in glomeruli, interstitia, tubuli, and vessels resulting in increased sodium and water output. The average of individual tubular and interstitial scores correlated significantly with both water intake and output but not with sodium excretion. These studies suggest that in the presence of an intact kidney, renin is an important determinant in the development or maintenance of radiation hypertension, whereas in the absence of the contralateral kidney, severe histological changes and renal failure are prominent despite increased water intake and output. The more severe glomerular sclerosis and proteinuria in the latter model could be related to diminished renal mass.

  10. Pregnancy in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hladunewich, Michelle; Hercz, Adam Engel; Keunen, Johannes; Chan, Christopher; Pierratos, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The ovulatory menstrual cycle is known to be affected on multiple levels in women with advanced renal disease. Menstrual irregularities, sexual dysfunction, and infertility worsen in parallel with the renal disease. Pregnancy in women with ESRD on dialysis is therefore uncommon. Furthermore, when pregnancy does occur, it can prove hazardous to both mother and baby owing to a multitude of potential complications including accelerated hypertension and preeclampsia, poor fetal growth, anemia, and polyhydramnios. Data are emerging, however, to suggest that pregnancy while on intensified renal replacement regimens may result in better pregnancy outcomes, and emerging trends include the decreased rate of therapeutic abortions probably reflecting a change in counseling practices over time. Nevertheless, a pregnant woman on intensive dialysis requires meticulous follow-up by a dedicated team including nephrology, obstetrics, and a full multidisciplinary staff. In this article, we will address fertility issues in young women with ESRD, review pregnancy outcomes in women on both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, and provide suggestions for the management of the pregnant women on intensive hemodialysis.

  11. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  12. Renal tubular epithelium-targeted peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ maintains the epithelial phenotype and antagonizes renal fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Guixia; Xu, Ying; Bai, Mi; Zhang, Yue; Jia, Zhanjun; Huang, Songming; Zhang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that loss of the renal tubular epithelial phenotype plays an important role in the pathogenesis of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Systemic activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) has been shown to be protective against renal fibrosis, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. The present study aimed to define the role of renal tubular epithelium-targeted PPAR-γ in protection of the epithelial phenotype and the antagonism of renal fibrosis and to define the underlying mechanisms. In response to TGF-β1 challenge, PPAR-γ expression and activity in the renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTECs) were significantly reduced, and the reduction was accompanied by decreased E-cadherin and elevated α-SMA, indicating a loss of the epithelial phenotype. Oxidative stress induced by TGF-β1 was shown to be attributed to the alteration of the epithelial phenotype and PPAR-γ inhibition. Activation of PPAR-γ by its agonists of rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2 or genetic overexpression of PPAR-γ prevented the loss of the epithelial phenotype induced by TGF-β1 in line with the inhibition of oxidative stress. To explore the role of PPAR-γ in renal tubular epithelial in antagonizing fibrogenesis, PPAR-γ was specifically deleted from RPTECs in mice. Following unilateral ureteral obstruction, the fibrosis was markedly deteriorated in mice with PPAR-γ invalidation in RPTECs. Treatment with rosiglitazone attenuated tubulointerstitial fibrosis and epithelial phenotype transition in WT but not proximal tubule PPAR-γ KO mice. Taken together, these findings identified an important role of renal tubular epithelium-targeted PPAR-γ in maintaining the normal epithelial phenotype and opposing fibrogenesis, possibly via antagonizing oxidative stress. PMID:27602490

  13. Paricalcitol for Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Trillini, Matias; Cortinovis, Monica; Ruggenenti, Piero; Reyes Loaeza, Jorge; Courville, Karen; Ferrer-Siles, Claudia; Prandini, Silvia; Gaspari, Flavio; Cannata, Antonio; Villa, Alessandro; Perna, Annalisa; Gotti, Eliana; Caruso, Maria Rosa; Martinetti, Davide; Perico, Norberto

    2015-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism contributes to post-transplant CKD mineral and bone disorder. Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, decreased serum parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. This single-center, prospective, randomized, crossover, open-label study compared the effect of 6-month treatment with paricalcitol (1 μg/d for 3 months and then uptitrated to 2 µg/d if tolerated) or nonparicalcitol therapy on serum parathyroid hormone levels (primary outcome), mineral metabolism, and proteinuria in 43 consenting recipients of renal transplants with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Participants were randomized 1:1 according to a computer-generated sequence. Compared with baseline, median (interquartile range) serum parathyroid hormone levels significantly declined on paricalcitol from 115.6 (94.8–152.0) to 63.3 (52.0–79.7) pg/ml (P<0.001) but not on nonparicalcitol therapy. At 6 months, levels significantly differed between treatments (P<0.001 by analysis of covariance). Serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin decreased on paricalcitol therapy only and significantly differed between treatments at 6 months (P<0.001 for all comparisons). At 6 months, urinary deoxypyridinoline-to-creatinine ratio and 24-hour proteinuria level decreased only on paricalcitol (P<0.05). L3 and L4 vertebral mineral bone density, assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorption, significantly improved with paricalcitol at 6 months (P<0.05 for both densities). Paricalcitol was well tolerated. Overall, 6-month paricalcitol supplementation reduced parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria, attenuated bone remodeling and mineral loss, and reduced eGFR in renal transplant recipients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Long-term studies are needed to monitor directly measured GFR, ensure that the bone remodeling and mineral effects are sustained, and determine if the reduction in proteinuria improves renal and

  14. [Pediatric renal transplant in Japan].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kazuharu

    2010-09-01

    Transplantation is the optimal renal replacement therapy for children with end-stage renal disease. Compared with dialysis, successful transplantation in children and adolescents not only ameliorates uremic symptoms but also allows for significant improvement of delayed growth, sexual maturation, and psychosocial functioning. The child with a well-functioning kidney can enjoy a quality of life that cannot be achieved with dialysis therapy. The 5- and 10-year patient/graft survival rate in transplant recipients are 97.9/88.8% and 96.2%/79.4% based on Japanese Renal Transplant Registry Society data. This article reviews recent reports of pediatric renal transplantation including ABO-incompatible and preemptive renal transplantation in Japan.

  15. Renal denervation and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Kindermann, Ingrid; Linz, Dominik; Ukena, Christian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2014-06-01

    Renal denervation has been developed in order to lower systolic blood pressure in resistant hypertension by a reduction in renal afferent and efferent sympathetic nerve activity. In heart failure sympathetic activation, in particular, renal norepinephrine release is closely associated with morbidity and mortality. Initial studies have shown that renal denervation is able to reduce not only blood pressure but also heart rate, and is associated with a reduction in myocardial hypertrophy, improved glucose tolerance, and ameliorated microalbuminuria. Since some experimental and observational data suggest an antiarrhythmic effect, it is possible that renal denervation might also play a therapeutic role in arrhythmias often occurring in chronic heart failure. The first proof-of-concept studies are planned to evaluate the clinical effect of this pathophysiologically plausible method, which might be able to change clinical practice.

  16. Development of the renal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Sequeira Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel

    2011-12-01

    The kidney is a highly vascularized organ that normally receives a fifth of the cardiac output. The unique spatial arrangement of the kidney vasculature with each nephron is crucial for the regulation of renal blood flow, GFR, urine concentration, and other specialized kidney functions. Thus, the proper and timely assembly of kidney vessels with their respective nephrons is a crucial morphogenetic event leading to the formation of a functioning kidney necessary for independent extrauterine life. Mechanisms that govern the development of the kidney vasculature are poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the anatomical development, embryological origin, lineage relationships, and key regulators of the kidney arterioles and postglomerular circulation. Because renal disease is associated with deterioration of the kidney microvasculature and/or the reenactment of embryonic pathways, understanding the morphogenetic events and processes that maintain the renal vasculature may open new avenues for the preservation of renal structure and function and prevent the progression of renal disease.

  17. Imbalance in sex hormone levels exacerbates diabetic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Wells, Corinne C; Garman, Joseph H; Asico, Laureano; Escano, Crisanto S; Maric, Christine

    2008-04-01

    Studies suggest that the presence of testosterone exacerbates, whereas the absence of testosterone attenuates, the development of nondiabetic renal disease. However, the effects of the absence of testosterone in diabetic renal disease have not been studied. The study was performed in male Sprague-Dawley nondiabetic, streptozotocin-induced diabetic, and streptozotocin-induced castrated rats (n=10 to 11 per group) for 14 weeks. Diabetes was associated with the following increases: 3.2-fold in urine albumin excretion, 6.3-fold in glomerulosclerosis, 6.0-fold in tubulointerstitial fibrosis, 1.6-fold in collagen type I, 1.2-fold in collagen type IV, 1.3-fold in transforming growth factor-beta protein expression, and 32.7-fold in CD68-positive cell abundance. Diabetes was also associated with a 1.3-fold decrease in matrix metalloproteinase protein expression and activity. Castration further exacerbated all of these parameters. Diabetes was also associated with a 4.7-fold decrease in plasma testosterone, 2.9-fold increase in estradiol, and 2.1-fold decrease in plasma progesterone levels. Castration further decreased plasma testosterone levels but had no additional effects on plasma estradiol and progesterone. These data suggest that diabetes is associated with abnormal sex hormone levels that correlate with the progression of diabetic renal disease. Most importantly, our results suggest an important role for sex hormones in the pathophysiology of diabetic renal complications.

  18. Renal allograft rejection: sonography and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Cohen, W.N.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 30 renal allograft patients who had sonographic B scanning and radionuclide studies of the transplant was studied as to whether: (1) the allograft rejection was associated with any consistent and reliable sonographic features and (2) the sonograms complemented the radionuclide studies. Focal areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistent sonographic finding in chymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistens sonographic finding in allograft rejection. This was observed in most of the patients exhibiting moderate or severe rejection, but was frequently absent with mild rejection. Areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were not seen during episodes of acute tubular necrosis. Therefore, sonography showing zones of decreased parenchymal echogenicity was complementary to radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of allograft rejection versus acute tubular necrosis. Corticomedullary demarcation was difficult to interpret because of technical variables, and was inconsistently related to rejection in this series.

  19. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care.

  20. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care. PMID:27891093

  1. Unfused renal ectopia: a rare form of congenital renal anomaly.

    PubMed

    Nursal, Gül Nihal; Büyükdereli, Gülgün

    2005-09-01

    Unfused crossed renal ectopia observed 1 in 75,000 autopsies is a rare congenital anomaly. Typically one kidney is located in the proximity of the other kidney, and the ureter of the anatomically anomalous kidney crosses the midline to insert to the bladder in its normal anatomic position. Although renal function is usually not affected, the condition is generally accompanied by other congenital anomalies. In this case report, static and dynamic scintigraphic images of two patients with unfused crossed renal ectopia are presented. Besides properties of imaging modalities, clinical features are discussed in light of the available literature.

  2. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of faldaprevir in patients with renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fenglei; Moschetti, Viktoria; Lang, Benjamin; Halabi, Atef; Petersen-Sylla, Marc; Yong, Chan-Loi; Elgadi, Mabrouk

    2015-01-01

    Faldaprevir is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitor with negligible urinary excretion. We assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of a single oral dose of faldaprevir (480 mg) in 32 HCV-negative subjects with renal impairment or normal renal function. Compared with subjects with normal renal function, the adjusted geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals in parentheses) for overall exposure area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) were 113.6% (41.6 to 310.2%), 178.3% (85.2 to 373.0%), and 169.2% (73.2 to 391.2%) for subjects with mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment, respectively. Overall, 5/8 (63%) subjects with normal renal function and 20/24 (83%) subjects with renal impairment reported adverse events, with gastrointestinal events being the most common. No severe or serious adverse events or deaths were reported. These results suggest that moderate or severe renal impairment can result in a modest increase in faldaprevir exposure. The increase in exposure may be related to decrease in the activity of the liver uptake transporter OATP1B1 as a result of renal impairment. Given this relatively slight increase in exposure, a dose adjustment in HCV patients with renal impairment is not warranted. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01957657.).

  3. Effect of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium management in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, V E; Wilson, D M; Burnett, J C; Johnson, C M; Offord, K P

    1991-10-01

    We compared the tubular transport of sodium and the erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity in hypertensive patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and in normotensive control subjects. In addition, we assessed the effects of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion in hypertensive patients with ADPKD to provide information on mechanisms responsible for the increased renal vascular resistance and filtration fraction and the adjustment of the pressure-natriuresis relationship during saline expansion, observed in patients with ADPKD, hypertension, and preserved renal function. In comparison with normotensive control subjects, the hypertensive patients with ADPKD had lower renal plasma flows, higher renal vascular resistances and filtration fractions, and similar proximal and distal fractional reabsorptions of sodium. The administration of enalapril resulted in significant increases in the renal plasma flow and significant reductions in mean arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance, and filtration fraction, but the glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged. Despite the significant reduction in mean arterial pressure during inhibition of converting enzyme, the distal fractional reabsorption of sodium decreased while the total fractional excretion of sodium remained unchanged or increased slightly. No significant differences were detected between the normotensive control subjects and the hypertensive patients with ADPKD in erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone concentration, or atrial natriuretic factor. These results suggest that the renal renin-angiotensin system plays a central role in the alterations in renal hemodynamics and sodium management associated with the development of hypertension in ADPKD.

  4. Effect of chronic antioxidant therapy with superoxide dismutase-mimetic drug, tempol, on progression of renal disease in rats with renal mass reduction.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Yasmir; Ferrebuz, Atilio; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play a major role in the progression of renal damage and antioxidants are potentially useful therapeutic options in chronic renal disease. We investigated if treatment with tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic that has beneficial effects in several experimental models of hypertension and acute kidney injury, ameliorates the chronic renal damage resulting in renal mass reduction. Rats with surgical 5/6 nephrectomy were randomly assigned to receive no treatment (CRF group, n = 10) or tempol, 1 mmol/l in the drinking water (CRF-tempol group, n = 10). Sham-operated rats (n = 10) served as controls. All rats were followed for 12 weeks post-nephrectomy. Tempol treatment reduced plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and halved the number of superoxide-positive cells in the remnant kidney; however, the number of hydrogen peroxide-positive cells increased and the overall renal oxidative stress (MDA and nitrotyrosine abundance) and inflammation (interstitial p65 NF-kappaB, macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration) were unchanged. Proteinuria, renal function and glomerular and tubulointerstitial damage in the remnant kidney were similar in the CRF and CRF-tempol groups. In conclusion, tempol administration, at the dose used in these studies, decreased plasma MDA and heightened superoxide dismutation in the kidney, but was incapable of reducing renal oxidative stress or improving renal function or structure in the remnant kidney model.

  5. Antifibrotic effects of KS370G, a caffeamide derivative, in renal ischemia-reperfusion injured mice and renal tubular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Sung-Ting; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Su, Ming-Jai

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a main cause of end-stage renal disease. Clinically, there are no beneficial treatments that can effectively reverse the progressive loss of renal functions. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester is a natural phenolic antifibrotic agent, but rapid decomposition by an esterase leads to its low bioavailability. In this study, we evaluated the effects of KS370G, a caffeic acid phenylethyl amide, on murine renal fibrosis induced by unilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and in TGF-β1 stimulated renal tubular epithelial cells (NRK52E and HK-2). In the animal model, renal fibrosis was evaluated at 14 days post-operation. Immediately following the operation, KS370G (10 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage once a day. Our results show that KS370G markedly attenuates collagen deposition and inhibits an IRI-induced increase of fibronectin, vimentin, α-SMA and TGF-β1 expression and plasma TGF-β1 levels in the mouse kidney. Furthermore, KS370G reverses TGF-β1-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and upregulation of α-SMA and also decreases the expression of fibronectin, collagen I and PAI-1 and inhibits TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3. These findings show the beneficial effects of KS370G on renal fibrosis in vivo and in vitro with the possible mechanism being the inhibition of the Smad2/3 signaling pathway. PMID:25056456

  6. The metabolic syndrome induces early changes in the swine renal medullary mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Eirin, Alfonso; Woollard, John R; Ferguson, Christopher M; Jordan, Kyra L; Tang, Hui; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2017-03-11

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with nutrient surplus and kidney hyperfiltration, accelerating chronic renal failure. Mitochondria can be overwhelmed by substrate excess, leading to inefficient energy production and thereby tissue hypoxia. Mitochondrial dysfunction is emerging as an important determinant of renal damage, but whether it contributes to MetS-induced renal injury remains unknown. We hypothesized that early MetS induces kidney mitochondrial abnormalities and dysfunction, which would be notable in the vulnerable renal medulla. Pigs were studied after 16 weeks of diet-induced MetS, MetS treated for the last 4 weeks with the mitochondria-targeted peptide elamipretide (0.1 mg/kg SC q.d), and Lean controls (n = 7 each). Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and oxygenation were measured in-vivo, whereas cortical and medullary mitochondrial structure and function and renal injurious pathways were studied ex-vivo. Blood pressure was slightly elevated in MetS pigs, and their renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate were elevated. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that this was associated with medullary hypoxia, whereas cortical oxygenation remained intact. MetS decreased renal content of the inner mitochondrial membrane cardiolipin, particularly the tetra-linoleoyl (C18:2) cardiolipin species, and altered mitochondrial morphology and function, particularly in the medullary thick ascending limb. MetS also increased renal cytochrome-c-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress, and tubular injury. Chronic mitoprotection restored mitochondrial structure, ATP synthesis, and antioxidant defenses and decreased mitochondrial oxidative stress, medullary hypoxia, and renal injury. These findings implicate medullary mitochondrial damage in renal injury in experimental MetS, and position the mitochondria as a therapeutic target.

  7. Renal involvement in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sciascia, Savino; Cuadrado, Maria José; Khamashta, Munther; Roccatello, Dario

    2014-05-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease defined by the presence of arterial or venous thrombotic events and/or pregnancy morbidity in patients who test positive for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs). APS can be isolated (known as primary APS) or associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; known as secondary APS). The kidney is a major target organ in APS and renal thrombosis can occur at any level within the vasculature of the kidney (renal arteries, intrarenal arteries, glomerular capillaries and renal veins); events reflect the site and size of the involved vessels. Histological findings vary widely, including ischaemic glomeruli and thrombotic lesions without glomerular or arterial immune deposits on immunofluorescence. Renal prognosis is affected by the presence of aPLs in patients with lupus nephritis and can be poor. In patients with SLE and aPLs, biopsy should be performed because inflammatory and thrombotic lesions require different therapeutic approaches. Renal involvement in patients with definite APS is treated by anticoagulation with long-term warfarin. The range of renal manifestations associated with APS is broadening and, therefore, aPLs have increasing relevance in end-stage renal disease, transplantation and pregnancy.

  8. Malignancy and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramon

    2003-01-01

    Increased incidence of cancer at various sites is observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Certain malignant diseases, such as lymphomas and carcinomas of the kidney, prostate, liver and uterus, show an enhanced prevalence compared with the general population. In particular, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) shows an excess incidence in ESRD patients. A multitude of factors, directly or indirectly associated with the renal disease and the treatment regimens, may contribute to the increased tumor formation in these patients. Patients undergoing renal replacement therapy (RRT) are prone to develop acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may subsequently lead to the development of RCC. In pre-dialysis patients with coexistent renal disease, as in dialysis and transplant patients, the presence of ACKD may predispose to RCC. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse, are additional risk factors for malignancy. Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the follow-up. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Finally, previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and post-malignancy screening.

  9. Ameliorative Effect of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin and Ischemic Preconditioning on Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshiekh, Mohammed; Kadkhodaee, Mehri; Seifi, Behjat; Ranjbaran, Mina; Ahghari, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is one of the most common causes of renal dysfunction. There is increasing evidence about the role of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these injuries and endogenous antioxidants seem to have an important role in decreasing the renal tissue injury. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on renal IR injury. Materials and Methods: Twenty four male Wistar rats were allocated into four experimental groups: sham-operated, IR, EPO + IR, and IPC + IR. Rats were underwent 50 minutes bilateral ischemia followed by 24 hours reperfusion. Erythropoietin (5000 IU/kg, i.p) was administered 30 minutes before onset of ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning was performed by three cycles of 3 minutes ischemia followed by 3 minutes reperfusion. Plasma concentrations of urea and creatinine were measured. Kidney samples were taken for reactive oxidative species (ROS) measurement including superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione (GSH) contents, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Results: Compared to the sham group, IR led to renal dysfunction as evidenced by significantly higher plasma urea and creatinine. Treatment with EPO or IPC decreased urea, creatinine, and renal MDA levels and increased SOD activity and GSH contents in the kidney. Conclusions: Pretreatment with EPO and application of IPC significantly ameliorated the renal injury induced by bilateral renal IR. However, both treatments attenuated renal dysfunction and oxidative stress in kidney tissues. There were no significant differences between pretreatment with EPO or application of IPC. PMID:26866008

  10. Diannexin protects against renal ischemia reperfusion injury and targets phosphatidylserines in ischemic tissue.

    PubMed

    Wever, Kimberley E; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Frielink, Cathelijne; Boerman, Otto C; Scheffer, Gert J; Allison, Anthony; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Rongen, Gerard A

    2011-01-01

    Renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) frequently complicates shock, renal transplantation and cardiac and aortic surgery, and has prognostic significance. The translocation of phosphatidylserines to cell surfaces is an important pro-inflammatory signal for cell-stress after IRI. We hypothesized that shielding of exposed phosphatidylserines by the annexin A5 (ANXA5) homodimer Diannexin protects against renal IRI. Protective effects of Diannexin on the kidney were studied in a mouse model of mild renal IRI. Diannexin treatment before renal IRI decreased proximal tubule damage and leukocyte influx, decreased transcription and expression of renal injury markers Neutrophil Gelatinase Associated Lipocalin and Kidney Injury Molecule-1 and improved renal function. A mouse model of ischemic hind limb exercise was used to assess Diannexin biodistribution and targeting. When comparing its biodistribution and elimination to ANXA5, Diannexin was found to have a distinct distribution pattern and longer blood half-life. Diannexin targeted specifically to the ischemic muscle and its affinity exceeded that of ANXA5. Targeting of both proteins was inhibited by pre-treatment with unlabeled ANXA5, suggesting that Diannexin targets specifically to ischemic tissues via phosphatidylserine-binding. This study emphasizes the importance of phosphatidylserine translocation in the pathophysiology of IRI. We show for the first time that Diannexin protects against renal IRI, making it a promising therapeutic tool to prevent IRI in a clinical setting. Our results indicate that Diannexin is a potential new imaging agent for the study of phosphatidylserine-exposing organs in vivo.

  11. The role of renal hemodynamics in the antihypertensive action of mepirodipine, a new calcium antagonist.

    PubMed

    Noda, H; Fujita, T; Ogata, E

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the role of regional hemodynamics in the anti-hypertensive effect of mepirodipine, a new dihydropyridine-derivative calcium antagonist, we measured systemic, renal, hepatic, and forearm hemodynamics in 10 patients with essential hypertension treated with mepirodipine (15 mg/day) for 4 weeks. After the administration of mepirodipine, a significant decline in mean blood pressure (-13.8 +/- 2.3%, p less than 0.01) accompanied by a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (-21.1 +/- 2.6%, p less than 0.01) was observed. Although forearm vascular resistance did not change significantly, both renal (-19.2 +/- 6.7%, p less than 0.01) and hepatic vascular resistance (-17.6 +/- 3.8%, p less than 0.01) decreased considerably. The decrements of mean blood pressure with mepirodipine did not correlate with those of hepatic or forearm vascular resistance but correlated positively with those of renal vascular resistance (r = 0.699, p less than 0.05). Moreover, the increment of renal blood flow with mepirodipine was negatively correlated with the pretreatment level of renal blood flow (r = -0.670, p less than 0.05); renal blood flow increased to a greater extent in patients with lower pretreatment renal blood flow. These findings suggest that the oral administration of mepirodipine in patients with essential hypertension can produce selective vasodilation in the renal vasculature, which may play an important role in the relatively long-term antihypertensive effect of this drug.

  12. Effects of combined carotid chemoreceptor and atrial receptor stimulation on renal blood flow in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Kappagoda, C T; Karim, F; Mackay, D

    1983-01-01

    In dogs anaesthetized with chloralose and artificially ventilated, carotid chemoreceptors were stimulated by changing the perfusate of the vascularly isolated carotid bifurcations from arterial to venous blood. Left atrial receptors were stimulated by distending balloons in two pulmonary vein-left atrial junctions and in this left atrial appendage. The left renal blood flow was measured by an electromagnetic flow meter at a constant systemic (renal) arterial pressure in preparations in which heart rate changes were prevented by administration of propranolol hydrochloride (0.5 mg kg-1) and atropine sulphate (0.4 mg kg-1). Muscular movement was prevented by gallamine triethiodide (0.2 mg kg-1). Stimulation of left atrial receptors resulted in a significant increase (P less than 0.001) in renal blood flow of 5.6 +/- 0.88 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass from a control of 223 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass. The responses were abolished by cooling the cervical vagus nerves to 6-8 degrees C. Stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors, by perfusion of the carotid bifurcations by venous blood, caused a decrease in renal blood flow of 20 +/- 6.9 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass from 224 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass. Stimulation of left atrial receptors during venous perfusion of carotid chemoreceptors resulted in an increase in renal blood flow of 10.9 +/- 1.82 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass from 208 ml min-1 100 g-1 renal mass. These results show that atrial receptors and chemoreceptors can interact in their effects on renal blood flow. PMID:6410054

  13. Effects of renal function on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lesinurad in adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Michael; Valdez, Shakti; Zhou, Dongmei; Kerr, Bradley; Lee, Caroline A; Shen, Zancong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor approved for the treatment of gout in combination with a xanthine oxidase inhibitor (XOI) in patients who have not achieved target serum uric acid (sUA) levels with an XOI alone. Most people with gout have chronic kidney disease. The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad were assessed in subjects with impaired renal function. Methods Two Phase I, multicenter, open-label, single-dose studies enrolled subjects with normal renal function (estimated creatinine clearance [eCrCl] >90 mL/min; N=12) or mild (eCrCl 60–89 mL/min; N=8), moderate (eCrCl 30–59 mL/min; N=16), or severe (eCrCl <30 mL/min; N=6) renal impairment. Subjects were given a single oral lesinurad dose of 200 mg (N=24) or 400 mg (N=18). Blood and urine samples were analyzed for plasma lesinurad concentrations and serum and urine uric acid concentrations. Safety was assessed by adverse events and laboratory data. Results Mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment increased lesinurad plasma area under the plasma concentration–time curve by 34%, 54%–65%, and 102%, respectively. Lesinurad plasma Cmax was unaffected by renal function status. Lower renal clearance and urinary excretion of lesinurad were associated with the degree of renal impairment. The sUA-lowering effect of a single dose of lesinurad was similar between mild renal impairment and normal function, reduced in moderate impairment, and greatly diminished in severe impairment. Lesinurad increased urinary urate excretion in normal function and mild renal impairment; the increase was less with moderate or severe renal impairment. Lesinurad was well tolerated by all subjects. Conclusion Lesinurad exposure increased with decreasing renal function; however, the effects of lesinurad on sUA were attenuated in moderate to severe renal impairment. PMID:27843295

  14. GSPE Inhibits HMGB1 Release, Attenuating Renal IR-Induced Acute Renal Injury and Chronic Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Juan; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Conghui; Zhang, Chunxiu; Li, Yueqiang; Zhang, Ying; Chang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Qiaodan; Yao, Ying; Liu, Yanyan; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanindin extract (GSPE) is a polyphenolic bioflavonoid derived from grape seeds and has been widely studied for its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities. HMGB1 is a newly discovered danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) that has potent proinflammatory effects once released by necrotic cells. However, the effect of GSPE on the HMGB1, and the relationship of those two with acute kidney injury and chronic kidney fibrosis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the impact of GSPE on acute kidney injury and chronic fibrosis. C57bl/6 mice were subjected to bilateral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and unilateral I/R with or without GSPE administration. After bilateral I/R, mice administered GSPE had a marked improvement in renal function (BUN and Cr), decreased pathological damage and reduced inflammation. In unilateral I/R, mice subjected GSPE showed reduced tubulointerstitial fibrosis and decreased inflammatory reaction. The renoprotection of GSPE on both models was associated with the inhibition of HMGB1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and release, which can amplify the inflammation through binding to its downstream receptor TLR4 and facilitated P65 transcription. Thus, we have reason to believe that GSPE could be a good alternative therapy for the prevention and treatment of IR-induced renal injury and fibrosis in clinical practice. PMID:27690015

  15. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  16. [Travel and renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Lavelle, O; Berland, Y

    1997-01-01

    Traveling can be dangerous for subjects with kidney insufficiency. Water loss or septic episodes can further increase renal dysfunction. Poor diet can lead to hyperkaliemia. Immunosuppression not only enhances the risk of infection but also complicates administration of live vaccines. Some antimalarial drugs are contraindicated (e.g. mefloquine) and others must be used with precaution. Prior to departure persons requiring hemodialysis should book sessions at centers listed in specialized guidebooks. In addition to infection, risks for hemodialysis patients include thrombosis of the arteriovenous fistula in case of dehydration or hypotension. In subjects with transplanted kidney, the risk of rejection can be enhanced either by poor compliance with immunodepressor treatment or by vaccination-induced antigenic stimulation. Pre-travel evaluation is necessary to determine metabolic, nutritional, and immune status. Subjects with kidney insufficiency and transplanted kidneys should be informed of the dangers and appropriate action in case of trouble.

  17. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  18. Renal dysplasia in Beagle dogs: four cases.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Marc C; Shoieb, Ahmed M; Shirai, Norimitsu; Boucher, Germaine G; Brodie, Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Anomalies of renal development comprise abnormalities in the amount of renal tissue (agenesis and hypoplasia); anomalies of renal position, form, and orientation; and renal dysplasia. There are previous reports of canine renal dysplasia in different breeds but none in the Beagle breed. This is the first report of renal dysplasia in this breed of dog. Morphologic descriptions of the range of microscopic features observed in four cases of renal dysplasia from preclinical studies in laboratory Beagle dogs are presented (including persistent primitive mesenchyme, persistence of metanephric ducts, asynchronous differentiation of nephrons, and atypical tubular epithelium), along with a basis for the classification of the lesion.

  19. Management of renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Podymow, Tiina; August, Phyllis; Akbari, Ayub

    2010-06-01

    Although renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, it poses considerable risk to maternal and fetal health. This article discusses renal physiology and assessment of renal function in pregnancy and the effect of pregnancy on renal disease in patients with diabetes, lupus, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and chronic pyelonephritis. Renal diseases occasionally present for the first time in pregnancy, and diagnoses of glomerulonephritis, acute tubular necrosis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are described. Finally, therapy of end-stage renal disease in pregnancy, dialysis, and renal transplantation are reviewed.

  20. Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Talwalkar, Yeshawant B.; Harner, Marvin H.; Musgrave, James E.; Lawson, Russell K.; Campbell, Robert A.

    1975-01-01

    Thirty-one children received 38 kidney transplants from 22 live and 16 cadaver donors. Among the 31 patients, 25 received one transplant each, 5 received two transplants each and 1 received three transplants. Peritoneal or hemodialysis (or both) was carried out in 22 patients, with an average dialytic maintenance of 12 weeks before transplantation. Posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy included prednisone and azathioprine. Antilymphocyte globulin was administered to 33 recipients as adjunctive immunosuppressive therapy. At present, 23 patients have functioning allografts, 3 are on hemodialysis and 5 are dead. Of 22 live kidney transplants, 18 are presently functioning two months to 14 years after transplantation with an average of 36 months. Of 16 cadaver kidney transplants, 5 are presently functioning 9 to 57 months after transplantation with an average of 32 months. Actuarial live donor allograft survival for one year was 76 percent, for two years was 66 percent and for three years was 64 percent. Cadaver allograft survival was 50 percent, 40 percent and 40 percent, respectively. Complications were urologic and infection related. Of nine recipients with sustained hypertension, in six the condition was due to chronic rejection, while in one it was due to recurrence of the original disease in the allograft. Linear growth was measured in 15 children who were less than 14 years of age at the time of transplantation and in whom allografts survived more than one year. Maximum average linear growth velocity occurred during the first year after transplantation. Our experience indicates pediatric renal transplantation can be successfully used in the treatment of terminal renal failure. PMID:1098288

  1. Renal Cancer in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    González León, Tania; Morera Pérez, Maricela

    2016-01-01

    The increase of the aging population corresponds with the rise of renal cancer in elderly patients. The distinction between functional and chronological age, quality of life, and survival estimate are important issues, among others, that should be considered in the management of renal cancer in elderly patients. We made this review with the purpose of synthesizing the most updated criteria regarding indications and outcomes of the different therapeutic options in the management of elderly patients with renal cancer, beginning from the physiologic considerations that characterize them, their capacity to tolerate different therapeutic possibilities, and the prognosis of the patients' risks and comorbidity assessment.

  2. Imaging of Solid Renal Masses.

    PubMed

    Kay, Fernando U; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Detection of solid renal masses has increased, although it has not resulted in significant mortality reduction from renal cell carcinoma. Efforts for improved lesion characterization have been pursued and incorporated in management algorithms, in order to distinguish clinically significant tumors from favorable or benign conditions. Concurrently, imaging methods have produced evidence supporting their role as useful tools not only in lesion detection but also characterization. In addition, newer modalities, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, and advanced applications of MR imaging, are being investigated. This article reviews the current role of different imaging methods in the characterization of solid renal masses.

  3. Effect of volume expansion on renal citrate and ammonia metabolism in KCl-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, S; Zett, B; Anderson, B; Fraley, D S

    1975-01-01

    When rats with desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-induced potassium chloride deficiency are given sodium chloride there is simultaneously a partial correction of metabolic alkalosis and a marked reduction in urinary citrate excretion and renal citrate content. To examine DOCA's role in this phenomenon and to determine how sodium chloride alters renal metabolism, rats were made KC1 deficient using furosemide and a KC1-deficient diet. Renal citrate and ammonia metabolism were then studied after chronic oral sodium chloride administration or acute volume expansion with isotonic mannitol. Although both maneuvers partially corrected metabolic alkalosis, sodium chloride raised serum chloride concentration while mannitol significantly decreased it. Urinary citrate excretion decreased to 10% of control in rats given NaCl and to 50% of control in rats infused with mannitol. The filtered load of citrate was constant or increased indicating increased tubular citrate reabsorption. Renal cortical citrate content also decreased approximately 50%. Renal cortical slices from KCl-deficient rats incubated in low or normal chloride media produced equal amounts of 14CO2 from (1, 5-14C) citrate. In addition, urinary ammonia excretion increased by over 300% in both groups. This occurred in the mannitol group despite increased urinary pH and flow rate indicating a rise in renal ammonia production. It seems that neither DOCA nor an increase in serum chloride concentration explains the experimental results. Rather, it appears that volume expansion is responsible for increased renal tubular citrate reabsorption and renal ammonia production. As these renal metabolic responses ordinarily occur in response to acidosis, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that volume expansion reduces renal cell pH in 3KCl-deficient rats. PMID:239022

  4. Effect of chronic accumulation of aluminum on renal function, cortical renal oxidative stress and cortical renal organic anion transport in rats.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, Stella T; Gionotti, Marisa; Millen, Néstor; Elías, María Mónica

    2003-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the nephrotoxicity of aluminum lactate administered for 3 months (0.57 mg/100 g bodyweight aluminum, i.p., three times per week) to male Wistar rats. Renal function was studied after 6 weeks of treatment (urine was obtained from rats in metabolic cages) and at the end of the treatment using clearance techniques. Another group of rats was used as kidneys donors at the end of treatment. The renal cortex was separated and homogenized to determine glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. Renal cortex slices were also used to study the p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) accumulation during steady-state conditions and the kinetics of uptake process. Clearance results, at the end of the treatment, indicated that renal functions in treated-rats were not different from those measured in control rats, although the renal concentration parameters differ when they were measured in treated rats after 24 h of food and water deprivation. Balances of water and sodium were also modified at both 1.5 and 3 months of treatment. The activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP) relative to inulin excreted in urine was significantly impaired: controls 2.2+/-0.6 IUI/mg, Al-treated 5.1+/-0.5 IU/mg, P<0.05. These data indicated that proximal tubular cells were loosing apical brush border membranes. Data obtained in cortex homogenates indicated that both GSH and GST activity were significantly decreased, and a significant increase of LPO was noted simultaneously in Al-treated rats. Renal accumulation of PAH, estimated as slice-to-medium ratio, decreased significantly in the Al-treated rats: control rats 3.06+/-0.02 ( n=12), Al-treated rats 2.26+/-0.04 ( n=12), P<0.0001. The maximal rate of uptake was also diminished in treated rats, while the apparent affinity remained unchanged. All these results indicate that aluminum accumulation in renal tissue affects cellular metabolism, promotes oxidative stress and

  5. [Ibopamine--acute hemodynamic, renal and neurohumoral effects].

    PubMed

    Wehling, M; Theisen, K

    1991-01-01

    Ibopamine (IP) is a novel dopamine analogue for which beneficial effects have been shown in chronic heart failure. Hemodynamic effects of the substance include an increase in cardiac output and a decrease in the peripheral resistance. Aside from these hemodynamic effects, changes in renal (increased diuresis) and neurohumoral parameters (decreased plasma renin activity, aldosterone, norepinephrine, increased ANF and cGMP) have been found. The renal effects may originate from three independent mechanisms: 1) direct impact of improved hemodynamic parameters on the renal perfusion; 2) the improved cardiac performance results in a reduction of compensatory hormonal adaptations, such as the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-axis or the sympathetic system; 3) direct effects on the intrarenal hemodynamic and glomerular/tubular functions induced by stimulation of renal dopaminergic receptors. The continued decrease of the plasma renin activity by 35% results in a reduction of the plasma levels of angiotensin II and aldosterone. Additionally, an increase in plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and its second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) was observed after ibopamine, which could contribute to the diuretic action of the drug. These findings underline the importance of extrarenal effects of a drug in the treatment of heart failure, this may essentially contribute to the improvement of cardiac performance, independent of positive inotropy.

  6. Pre-terminal renal insufficiency in a patient with enteric hyperoxaluria: effect of medical management on renal function.

    PubMed

    Pipeleers, L; Wissing, K M; Pirson, Y; Cosyns, J P; Geers, C; Tielemans, C

    2012-01-01

    Enteric hyperoxaluria causes tubular deposition calcium oxalate crystals and severe chronic interstitial nephritis. We describe a patient with pre-terminal renal failure due to oxalate nephropathy after ileal resection. Increased oral hydration, low oxalate diet, and oral calcium carbonate and potassium citrate supplements resulted in a significant improvement of renal function. During the three-year follow-up, urinary oxalate concentration was repeatedly reduced below the crystallization threshold and serum creatinine decreased from 4.5 to 1.7 mg/dL. This case illustrates the benefit of combining and optimizing dietary and medical management in enteric hyperoxaluria, even in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

  7. Nurse Practitioner Care Improves Renal Outcome in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    van Zuilen, Arjan D.; van den Brand, Jan A.J.G.; Bots, Michiel L.; van Buren, Marjolijn; ten Dam, Marc A.G.J.; Kaasjager, Karin A.H.; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W.J.; Sluiter, Henk E.; van de Ven, Peter J.G.; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment goals for patients with CKD are often unrealized for many reasons, but support by nurse practitioners may improve risk factor levels in these patients. Here, we analyzed renal endpoints of the Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study after extended follow-up to determine whether strict implementation of current CKD guidelines through the aid of nurse practitioners improves renal outcome. In total, 788 patients with moderate to severe CKD were randomized to receive nurse practitioner support added to physician care (intervention group) or physician care alone (control group). Median follow-up was 5.7 years. Renal outcome was a secondary endpoint of the MASTERPLAN study. We used a composite renal endpoint of death, ESRD, and 50% increase in serum creatinine. Event rates were compared with adjustment for baseline serum creatinine concentration and changes in estimated GFR were determined. During the randomized phase, there were small but significant differences between the groups in BP, proteinuria, LDL cholesterol, and use of aspirin, statins, active vitamin D, and antihypertensive medications, in favor of the intervention group. The intervention reduced the incidence of the composite renal endpoint by 20% (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.98; P=0.03). In the intervention group, the decrease in estimated GFR was 0.45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year less than in the control group (P=0.01). In conclusion, additional support by nurse practitioners attenuated the decline of kidney function and improved renal outcome in patients with CKD. PMID:24158983

  8. Mechanisms of portal hypertension-induced alterations in renal hemodynamics, renal water excretion, and renin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R J; Cronin, R E; McDonald, K M; Schrier, R W

    1976-01-01

    Clinical states with portal venous hypertension are frequently associated with impairment in renal hemodynamics and water excretion, as well as increased renin secretion. In the present investigation, portal venous pressure (PVP) was increased in anesthetized dogs undergoing a water diuresis. Renal arterial pressure was maintained constant in all studies. As PVP was increased from 6 to 20 mm Hg, decreases in cardiac output (2.5-2.0 liter/min, P less than 0.05) and mean arterial pressure (140-131 mm Hg, P less than 0.05) were observed. Increases in PVP were also associated with decreases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR, 40-31 ml/min, P less than 0.001), renal blood flow (RBF, 276-193 ml/min, P less than 0.001), and increases in renin secretion (232-939 U/min, P less than 0.025) in innervated kidneys. No significant change in either GFR or RBF and a decrease in renin secretion occurred with increases in PVP in denervated kidneys. To dissociate the changes in cardiac output and mean arterial pressure induced by increase PVP from the observed decreases in GFR and RBF, studies were performed on animals undergoing constriction of the thoracic inferior vena cava. In these studies, similar decreases in cardiac output and mean arterial pressure were not associated with significant changes in GFR or RBF. Increases in PVP also were associated with an antidiuresis as urine osmolality increased from 101 to 446 mosmol/kg H2O (P less than 0.001). This antidiuresis was significantly blunted but not abolished by acute hypophysectomy. In hypophysectomized animals, changes in free water clearance and urine flow were linearly correlated as PVP was increased. These studies indicate that increases in PVP result in decreases in GFR and RBF and increases in renin secretion mediated by increased renal adrenergic tone. Increased PVP is also associated with antidiuresis; this antidiuresis is mediated both by vasopressin release and by diminished tubular fluid delivery to the distal

  9. An unusual cause of acute renal failure: renal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ozaltin, Fatih; Yalçin, Bilgehan; Orhan, Diclehan; Sari, Neriman; Caglar, Melda; Besbas, Nesrin; Bakkaloglu, Aysin

    2004-08-01

    Renal involvement is a common finding in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Acute renal failure at initial presentation due to lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys has been described infrequently. We report a 17-year-old male who presented with acute renal failure due to massive lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys, which necessitated hemodialysis. The diagnosis of B-cell NHL was established by tru-cut biopsy of the kidneys and the patient had an excellent response to high-dose chemotherapy with no major complication. The presence of extrarenal involvement in the testes and the retroperitoneal lymph nodes made the diagnosis of primary renal lymphoma debatable. However, considering the delay in diagnosis and the high proliferative rate of B-cell NHL, we might postulate that the disease had originated primarily in the kidneys. We recommend that in NHL cases with severe renal involvement, full-dose chemotherapy should be instituted with meticulous clinical and laboratory follow-up in order to improve clinical and renal failure status rapidly and to avoid further dissemination of NHL.

  10. [Spontaneous renal artery dissection with renal infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oki, Takashi; Adachi, Hiroyuki; Tahara, Hideo; Kino, Sigeo

    2011-11-01

    A 58-year-old woman visited our hospital with nausea and right flank pain. At first abdominal ultrasonography was performed, suggesting a right renal infarction. Computed tomography (CT) study of the abdomen with intravenous contrast was performed to determine the cause of the symptoms. The scan revealed poor enhancement in the lower half of the right kidney. She was diagnosed with a right renal infarction. She was initially treated with anticoagulant therapy, but 5 days later, she complained of nausea. This time, CT demonstrated exacerbation of a right renal infarction with renal artery dissection. Based on this finding, we performed a right nephrectomy. The result of pathology was segmental arterial mediolysis. She was discharged 12 days after the surgery and is doing well at 6 months after discharge. Spontaneous renal artery dissection is a rare disease. It constitutes approximately 0.05% of arteriographic dissections. In addition, spontaneous renal artery dissection shows nonspecific symptoms. Together, these two factors may cause a delay in diagnosis.

  11. Renal oxygenation in acute renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Amany; Ho, Julie; Ow, Connie P C; Eppel, Gabriela A; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Schlaich, Markus P; Evans, Roger G

    2014-05-01

    Tissue hypoxia has been demonstrated, in both the renal cortex and medulla, during the acute phase of reperfusion after ischemia induced by occlusion of the aorta upstream from the kidney. However, there are also recent clinical observations indicating relatively well preserved oxygenation in the nonfunctional transplanted kidney. To test whether severe acute kidney injury can occur in the absence of widespread renal tissue hypoxia, we measured cortical and inner medullary tissue Po2 as well as total renal O2 delivery (Do2) and O2 consumption (Vo2) during the first 2 h of reperfusion after 60 min of occlusion of the renal artery in anesthetized rats. To perform this experiment, we used a new method for measuring kidney Do2 and Vo2 that relies on implantation of fluorescence optodes in the femoral artery and renal vein. We were unable to detect reductions in renal cortical or inner medullary tissue Po2 during reperfusion after ischemia localized to the kidney. This is likely explained by the observation that Vo2 (-57%) was reduced by at least as much as Do2 (-45%), due to a large reduction in glomerular filtration (-94%). However, localized tissue hypoxia, as evidence by pimonidazole adduct immunohistochemistry, was detected in kidneys subjected to ischemia and reperfusion, particularly in, but not exclusive to, the outer medulla. Thus, cellular hypoxia, particularly in the outer medulla, may still be present during reperfusion even when reductions in tissue Po2 are not detected in the cortex or inner medulla.

  12. A Renal Olfactory Receptor Aids in Kidney Glucose Handling

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Blythe D.; Cheval, Lydie; Peterlin, Zita; Firestein, Stuart; Koepsell, Hermann; Doucet, Alain; Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are G protein-coupled receptors which serve important sensory functions beyond their role as odorant detectors in the olfactory epithelium. Here we describe a novel role for one of these ORs, Olfr1393, as a regulator of renal glucose handling. Olfr1393 is specifically expressed in the kidney proximal tubule, which is the site of renal glucose reabsorption. Olfr1393 knockout mice exhibit urinary glucose wasting and improved glucose tolerance, despite euglycemia and normal insulin levels. Consistent with this phenotype, Olfr1393 knockout mice have a significant decrease in luminal expression of Sglt1, a key renal glucose transporter, uncovering a novel regulatory pathway involving Olfr1393 and Sglt1. In addition, by utilizing a large scale screen of over 1400 chemicals we reveal the ligand profile of Olfr1393 for the first time, offering new insight into potential pathways of physiological regulation for this novel signaling pathway. PMID:27739476

  13. Treatment of renal failure from diabetic nephropathy with cadaveric homograft

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, Claude; Laplante, Louis

    1973-01-01

    We report two patients with terminal renal failure secondary to diabetic nephropathy treated with cadaveric kidney transplantation. Neither of these patients had peripheral vascular disease or peripheral neuropathy. There was a proliferative diabetic retinopathy with hemorrhages and exudates in one patient and only background diabetic changes in the ocular fundi of the other; there have been no significant changes in visual acuity or retinopathy in either patient following the transplantation. Both have good kidney function after 8 and 15 months and are completely rehabilitated. The requirement for insulin decreased in both patients during the period of renal insufficiency and increased following transplantation; this seemed to be related to the large dose of steroids given because now that a maintenance level of steroids has been established, both patients require the same dosage of insulin as they did before the onset of renal insufficiency. PMID:4574972

  14. Beneficial effects of soy protein consumption for renal function.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James W

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in dietary protein intake have an important role in prevention and management of several forms of kidney disease. Using soy protein instead of animal protein reduces development of kidney disease in animals. Reducing protein intake preserves kidney function in persons with early diabetic kidney disease. Our clinical observations led us to the soy-protein hypothesis that "substitution of soy protein for animal protein results in less hyperfiltration and glomerular hypertension with resulting protection from diabetic nephropathy." These components of soy protein may lead to the benefits: specific peptides, amino acids, and isoflavones. Substituting soy protein for animal protein usually decreases hyperfiltration in diabetic subjects and may reduce urine albumin excretion. Limited data are available on effects of soy peptides, isoflavones, and other soy components on renal function on renal function in diabetes. Further studies are required to discern the specific benefits of soy protein and its components on renal function in diabetic subjects.

  15. [Tripeptides slow down aging process in renal cell culture].

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaia, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Poliakova, V O; Durnova, A O; Nichik, T E; Kvetnoĭ, I M; D'iakonov, M M; Iakutseni, P P

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of geroprotective effect of peptides AED and EDL was studied in ageing renal cell culture. Peptide AED and EDL increase cell proliferation, decreasing expression of marker of aging p16, p21, p53 and increasing expression of SIRT-6 in young and aged renal cell culture. The reduction of SIRT-6 synthesis in cell is one of the causes of cell senescence. On the basis of experimental data models of interaction of peptides with various sites of DNA were constructed. Both peptides form most energetically favorable complexes with d(ATATATATAT)2 sequences in minor groove of DNA. It is shown that interaction of peptides AED and EDL with DNA is the cause of gene expression, encoded marker of ageing in renal cells.

  16. Protein restriction and malnutrition in renal disease: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Maroni, B J

    1997-01-01

    The protein and energy requirements of chronic renal failure (CRF) patients are similar to normal subjects and evidence indicates that both nephrotic and nonnephrotic CRF patients can activate normal homeostatic responses allowing them to achieve a neutral nitrogen balance when dietary protein intake is restricted. The benefits of low-protein (and phosphorus) diets (LPDs) include the amelioration of uremia symptoms and some of its metabolic complications and possibly a slowing of the rate of progression of renal failure. When LPDs are prescribed, patients should be monitored to assess dietary compliance and to ensure nutritional adequacy. Recent evidence that the protein intake of patients with progressive CRF decreases when they consume unrestricted diets should not be interpreted as an argument against the use of LPDs. Rather, it is a persuasive argument to restrict dietary protein intake in order to minimize complications of renal failure while maintaining nutritional status.

  17. Changes in renal hemodynamics and renin release caused by increased plasma oncotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Guyton, A C

    1976-11-01

    The effect of increased plasma oncotic pressure on renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), electrolyte excretion, and renin secretion rate (RSR) was studied in dogs anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. Renal artery infusions of hyperoncotic dextran or human serum albumin raised renal venous colloid osmotic pressure an average of 7.3 and 10.1 mmHg, respectively, and caused small but consistent increases in RBF, large increases in RSR, marked decreases in urine flow rate and electrolyte excretion, with either no change or small decreases in GFR, and no change in renal artery pressure. Renal vasodilation was confined primarily to afferent arterioles and was not measureable until approximately 45 s after the start of infusions. The renal responses to increased plasma oncotic pressure appeared to be an autoregulatory phenomenon, consistent with a tubular mechanism dependent on an altered distal tubular fluid flow and/or composition. The increased renin release during increased plasma oncotic pressure is not compatible with a renal baroreceptor mechanism that responds to decreases in afferent arteriolar pressure because calculated glomerular pressure increased during albumin and dextran infusions.

  18. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    SciTech Connect

    Cristescu, Mircea; Abel, E. Jason; Wells, Shane Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Hedican, Sean P.; Lubner, Megan G. Hinshaw, J. Louis Brace, Christopher L. Lee, Fred T.

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs.

  19. Pregnancy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Karin M; Wu, Danny; Ebcioglu, Zeynep

    2007-12-01

    Women with renal disease face increasing infertility and high-risk pregnancy as they approach end-stage renal disease due to uremia. Renal transplantation has provided these patients the ability to return to a better quality of life, and for a number of women who are of child bearing age with renal disease, it has restored their fertility and provided the opportunity to have children. But, although fertility is restored, pregnancy in these women still harbors risk to the mother, graft, and fetus. Selected patients who have stable graft function can have successful pregnancies under the supervision of a multidisciplinary team involving maternal fetal medicine specialists and transplant nephrologists. Careful observation and management are required to optimize outcome for mother and fetus.

  20. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  1. Drugs in pregnancy. Renal disease.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J E; Maclean, D; Pattison, J M

    2001-12-01

    The management of pregnant women with renal impairment presents a major challenge to obstetricians, nephrologists, and ultimately paediatricians. As renal failure progresses there is an increase in both maternal and fetal complications. Often these women have intercurrent medical conditions and, prior to conception, are receiving a broad range of prescribed medications. A successful obstetric outcome relies upon careful pre-pregnancy counselling and planning, obsessive monitoring during pregnancy, and close liaison between different specialist teams. Experience is mounting in the management of pregnant transplant recipients, but the introduction of newer immunosuppressive agents which have great promise in prolonging graft survival present new problems for those recipients of a kidney transplant who are planning to conceive. We review drug prescription for pregnant patients with renal impairment, end-stage renal failure, or a kidney transplant.

  2. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD.

  3. Renal Expression of FGF23 in Progressive Renal Disease of Diabetes and the Effect of Ace Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Benigni, Ariela; Corna, Daniela; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Gaspari, Flavio; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic hormone mainly produced by bone that acts in the kidney through FGF receptors and Klotho. Here we investigated whether the kidney was an additional source of FGF23 during renal disease using a model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Renal expression of FGF23 and Klotho was assessed in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and control lean rats at 2, 4, 6, 8 months of age. To evaluate whether the renoprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor in this model was associated with changes in FGF23 and Klotho, ZDF rats received ramipril from 4, when proteinuric, to 8 months of age. FGF23 mRNA was not detectable in the kidney of lean rats, nor of ZDF rats at 2 months of age. FGF23 became measurable in the kidney of diabetic rats at 4 months and significantly increased thereafter. FGF23 protein localized in proximal and distal tubules. Renal Klotho mRNA and protein decreased during time in ZDF rats. As renal disease progressed, serum phosphate levels increased in parallel with decline of fractional phosphorus excretion. Ramipril limited proteinuria and renal injury, attenuated renal FGF23 upregulation and ameliorated Klotho expression. Ramipril normalized serum phosphate levels and tended to increase fractional phosphorus excretion. These data indicate that during progressive renal disease the kidney is a site of FGF23 production which is limited by ACE inhibition. Interfering pharmacologically with the delicate balance of FGF23 and phosphorus in diabetes may have implications in clinics. PMID:23967103

  4. Renal Atrophy Secondary to Chemoradiotherapy of Abdominal Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Gary Y.; May, Kilian Salerno; Iyer, Renuka V.; Chandrasekhar, Rameela M.A.; Wilding, Gregory E.; McCloskey, Susan A.; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Yendamuri, Saikrishna S.; Gibbs, John F.; Fakih, Marwan; Thomas, Charles R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive of renal atrophy after chemoradiotherapy of gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods and Materials: Patients who received chemotherapy and abdominal radiotherapy (RT) between 2002 and 2008 were identified for this study evaluating change in kidney size and function after RT. Imaging and biochemical data were obtained before and after RT in 6-month intervals. Kidney size was defined by craniocaudal measurement on CT images. The primarily irradiated kidney (PK) was defined as the kidney that received the greater mean kidney dose. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to predict risk for renal atrophy. Results: Of 130 patients, median age was 64 years, and 51.5% were male. Most primary disease sites were pancreas and periampullary tumors (77.7%). Median follow-up was 9.4 months. Creatinine clearance declined 20.89%, and size of the PK decreased 4.67% 1 year after completion of chemoradiation. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-PK was not seen. Percentage volumes of the PK receiving {>=}10 Gy (V{sub 10}), 15 Gy (V{sub 15}), and 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) were significantly associated with renal atrophy 1 year after RT (p = 0.0030, 0.0029, and 0.0028, respectively). Areas under the ROC curves for V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} to predict >5% decrease in PK size were 0.760, 0.760, and 0.762, respectively. Conclusions: Significant detriments in PK size and renal function were seen after abdominal RT. The V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} were predictive of risk for PK atrophy 1 year after RT. Analyses suggest the association of lower-dose renal irradiation with subsequent development of renal atrophy.

  5. Effect of renal function on risedronate pharmacokinetics after a single oral dose

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, D Y; St Peter, J V; Eusebio, R A; Pallone, K A; Kelly, S C; Russell, D A; Nesbitt, J D; Thompson, G A; Powell, J H

    2000-01-01

    Aims To determine the relationship between risedronate pharmacokinetics and renal function. Methods Risedronate was administered to adult men and women (n = 21) with various degrees of renal function (creatinine clearance 15–126 ml min−1) as a single oral dose of 30 mg. Serum samples were obtained for 72 h after dosing, and urine samples were collected for 72 h after dosing and then periodically for 6 weeks. Risedronate concentrations were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Risedronate serum concentration-time and urinary excretion rate-time profiles were analysed simultaneously using nonlinear regression. Results Renal clearance and volume of distribution were linearly related to creatinine clearance (r2 = 0.854, P < 0.001; and r2 = 0.317, P < 0.01, respectively). Decreases in predicted renal clearance and volume of distribution of 82 and 69%, respectively, were observed when creatinine clearance decreased from 120 to 20 ml min−1. A 64% decrease in predicted oral clearance was observed when creatinine clearance decreased from 120 to 20 ml min−1 (P = 0.064). Iohexol clearance, a predictor of renal function, produced similar results to those observed with creatinine clearance. Risedronate was well tolerated by the study population. Conclusions Risedronate renal clearance was significantly related to a decrease in renal function. There was a consistent reduction in oral clearance with a decrease in creatinine clearance. However, based on the regression analysis, generally no dosage adjustment appears to be necessary for most patients with mild or moderate renal impairment (creatinine clearance > 20 ml min−1). PMID:10718776

  6. [Heterolateral renal dystopia (2 cases)].

    PubMed

    Anastasov, G; Peneva, S; Mushmov, D; Salambashev, L

    1982-01-01

    The authors observed two cases with crossed renal dystopia, to which venous urography, renal scintigraphy, echographic and gamma-chamber investigations were performed. The venous urography, in case of the appropriate symptomatics, is stressed to be able to establish the presence of heterolateral dystopia by as far as the distributional function of the anomaly is concerned--the gamma-chamber investigation is with the highest information value.

  7. Malignant tumours after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, D; Reinke, P; Kirchner, S; Schnorr, D; Lindeke, A; Loening, S A

    1996-10-01

    In 1243 patients after renal transplantation, 39 malignant tumours were detected in 37 patients. The average latency period between transplantation and tumour disease was 72 months. Tumours included 8 malignant lymphomas, 7 dermatomas and 24 visceral tumours. The patients who developed a tumour had received fewer blood transfusions before transplantation than a tumour-free control group of 60 patients with renal transplants. Rejection crises occurred in a significantly smaller number of tumour patients compared with the control group.

  8. Renal ammonia metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2013-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4(+) and 2 HCO3(-) for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3(-)-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4(+) trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4(+)-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K(+), and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis.

  9. Expression and actions of heme oxygenase in the renal medulla of rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Billington, H; Su, N; Cowley, A W

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the heme oxygenase (HO) product, carbon monoxide (CO), induces vasodilation and that inhibition of HO produces a sustained hypertension in rats. Given the importance of renal medullary blood flow (MBF) in the long-term control of arterial blood pressure, we hypothesized that the HO/CO system may play an important role in maintaining the constancy of blood flow to the renal medulla, which in turn contributes to the antihypertensive effects of the renal medulla. To test this hypothesis, we first determined the expression of 2 isoforms of HO (HO-1 and HO-2) in the different kidney regions. By Northern blot analyses, the abundance of both isozyme mRNAs was found highest in the renal inner medulla and lowest in the renal cortex. The transcripts for HO-1 in the renal outer medulla and inner medulla were 2.5 and 3.7 times that expressed in the renal cortex and those for HO-2 in the outer medulla and inner medulla were 1.3 and 1.6 times that expressed in the renal cortex, respectively. Western blot analyses of both enzymes showed the same expression pattern in these kidney regions as the mRNAs. To determine the role that HO plays in the control of renal MBF, we examined the effect of the HO inhibitor zinc deuteroporphyrin 2,4-bis glycol (ZnDPBG) on cortical blood flow and MBF in anesthetized rats. ZnDPBG was given by renal medullary interstitial infusion, and cortical blood flow and MBF were measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Renal medullary interstitial infusion of ZnDPBG at a dose of 60 nmol/kg per minute produced a 31% decrease in MBF over a period of 60 minutes as measured by laser Doppler flow signal (0.62+/-0.02 vs 0.43+/-0.04 V in control vs ZnDPBG). With the use of an in vivo microdialysis technique, ZnDPBG was found to significantly reduce renal medullary cGMP concentrations when infused into the renal medullary interstitial space. These results suggest that both HO-1 and HO-2 are highly expressed in the renal medulla, that HO and

  10. Preoperative evaluation of renal artery in patients with renal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangsong; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Jianfeng; Huang, Jiwei; Kong, Wen; Chen, Yonghui; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the feasibility of the noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA) to evaluate renal arteries before partial nephrectomy (PN). Retrospective analyzed 479 patients who underwent renal surgery between January 2013 and December 2015 with NCE-MRA or computed tomographic angiography (CTA) renal artery image reconstruction preoperative in our department. The renal artery reconstruction score (RARS) was based on the level of artery visualization in a 4-class criterion, and the R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score (R.E.N.A.L), arterial based complexity (ABC) were also analyzed. Of the 479 patients, the overall-lever RARS was 3.62, and the average in 2 groups was no significant difference (NCE-MRA vs CTA, P = 0.072). The performance of NCE-MRA in PN group was similar with CTA. Further comparison demonstrated that the efficiency of NCE-MRA in moderate- or low-degree tumor according to the R.E.N.A.L and ABC complexity less than 3S was equal to CTA. However, high degree (P < 0.001), 3S (P = 0.027), or 3H (P < 0.001) would affect the imaging of renal artery. Intragroup analysis showed that tumor complexity such as max tumor size (r = −o.351, P < 0.001), R.E.N.A.L (r = −0.439, P < 0.001), and ABC (r = −0.619, P < 0.001) were closely correlated with the NCE-MRA performance. The images of 2 sides of the kidney were compared in single person as well, which was meaningful for NCE-MRA patients only (NCE-MRA, P < 0.001; CTA, P = 0.182). The renal artery reconstruction performed by NCE-MRA is feasible and has a similar achievement in the PN potential recipients, with a lower side effect, and meets the requirements for making surgical decision. It has a broad application prospect in clinical practice; however, it still needs to further improve the ability in more complex tumors. PMID:27759632

  11. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  12. Gadobutrol in Renally Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Michaely, Henrik J.; Aschauer, Manuela; Deutschmann, Hannes; Bongartz, Georg; Gutberlet, Matthias; Woitek, Ramona; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Kucharczyk, Walter; Hammerstingl, Renate; De Cobelli, Francesco; Rosenberg, Martin; Balzer, Thomas; Endrikat, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the potential risk of gadobutrol-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Materials and Methods We performed a prospective, international, multicenter, open-label study in 55 centers. Patients with moderate to severe renal impairment scheduled for any gadobutrol-enhanced MRI were included. All patients received a single intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight. The primary target variable was the number of patients who develop NSF within a 2-year follow-up period. Results A total of 908 patients were enrolled, including 586 with moderate and 284 with severe renal impairment who are at highest risk for developing NSF. The mean time since renal disease diagnosis was 1.83 and 5.49 years in the moderate and severe renal impairment cohort, respectively. Overall, 184 patients (20.3%) underwent further contrast-enhanced MRI with other gadolinium-based contrast agents within the 2-year follow-up. No patient developed symptoms conclusive of NSF. Conclusions No safety concerns with gadobutrol in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment were identified. There were no NSF cases. PMID:27529464

  13. Renal radiopharmaceuticals--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, L.R.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Noninvasive radionuclide procedures in the evaluation of renal disease have been accepted increasingly as effective and valuable alternatives to older clinical methods. The development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals labeled with high photon intensity radionuclides and with /sup 99m/Tc in particular has stimulated this modality during the last few years. Currently several nearly ideal agents are available for anatomical and functional studies of kidney imparting very low absorbed radiation doses. These include /sup 99m/Tc-GHA and /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA for renal morphology and differential function evaluation, /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA for GFR and /sup 123/I orthoiodohippurate for ERPF measurements. A suitable agent as a replacement for the latter labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is actively being sought. Computer-assisted processing of dynamic renal function studies enables the observer to obtain a wealth of information related to the renal extraction, uptake, parenchymal transit and pelvic transit parameters of the agent administered into the bloodstream. Each of these parameters either globally or differentially contributes to a detailed evaluation of renal disease states. Several of these procedures have been validated against classical techniques clinically but more detailed information is being sought with the recently introduced radiopharmaceuticals. With the detailed validation and increasing recognition of the clinical utility of several of the radionuclidic procedures at many centers, it is hoped that radionuclide assessment of renal disorders ultimately will be made available routinely at all medical facilities.

  14. Periconceptional undernutrition and being a twin each alter kidney development in the sheep fetus during early gestation.

    PubMed

    MacLaughlin, Severence M; Walker, Simon K; Kleemann, David O; Tosh, Darran N; McMillen, I Caroline

    2010-03-01

    Adaptive growth responses of the embryo and fetus to nutritional restraint are important in ensuring early survival, but they are implicated in the programming of hypertension. It has been demonstrated that kidney growth and nephrogenesis are each regulated by intrarenal factors, including the insulin-like growth factors, glucocorticoids, and the renin-angiotensin system. Therefore, we have investigated the impact of periconceptional undernutrition (PCUN; from approximately 6 wk before to 7 days after conception) in singleton (control, n = 18; PCUN, n = 16) and twin pregnancies (control, n = 6; PCUN, n = 5) on the renal mRNA expression of 11beta- hydroxysteroid dehydrogensase type 1 and type 2 (11beta-HSD-1 and -2), the glucocorticoid (GR), and mineralocorticoid receptors, angiotensinogen, angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R), IGF-1 and IGF-2, and IGF1R and IGF2R at approximately 55 days gestation. There was no effect of PCUN or fetal number on fetal weight on relative kidney weight at approximately day 55 of gestation. There was an inverse relationship between the relative weight of the fetal kidney at approximately day 55 and maternal weight loss during the periconceptional period in fetuses exposed to PCUN. Exposure to PCUN resulted in a higher expression of IGF1 in the fetal kidney in singleton and twin pregnancies. Being a twin resulted in higher intrarenal expression of IGF-1 and IGF-2, GR, angiotensinogen, AT1R, and AT2R mRNA at 55 days gestation. Renal 11beta-HSD-2 mRNA expression was higher in PCUN singletons, but not PCUN twins, compared with controls. Thus, there may be an adaptive response in the kidney to the early environment of a twin pregnancy, which precedes the fetal growth restriction that occurs later in pregnancy. The kidney of the twin fetus exposed to periconceptional undernutrition may also be less protected from the consequences of glucocorticoid exposure.

  15. Renal haemodynamics after chronic treatment with labetalol and properanolol

    PubMed Central

    Malini, P. L.; Strocchi, E.; Negroni, S.; Ambrosioni, E.; Magnani, B.

    1982-01-01

    1 Effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured in two groups of 12 patients both at rest and during sub-maximal cycloergometer exercise while on placebo and after 3 months of treatment with either labetalol or propranolol. 2 ERPF increased and renal vascular resistance decreased both at rest and during exercise after labetalol treatment, compared with placebo; the opposite was observed after propranolol treatment. 3 GFR increased after labetalol and decreased after propranolol both at rest and during exercise, compared with placebo, but these changes were not statistically significant. 4 Labetalol and propranolol resulted in the same decrease in blood pressure and a comparable incidence of side effects. PMID:7093095

  16. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wehler, Thomas C.; Graf, Claudine; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Brenner, Walburgis; Schadt, Jörg; Gockel, Ines; Berger, Martin R.; Thüroff, Joachim W.; Galle, Peter R.; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P = .039), tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005), and low hemoglobin (P = .039). In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19266088

  17. [Morbidity and mortality of acute renal failure in neonatal period (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Simón, J; Mendizábal, S; Zamora, I; Roques, V; Orive, B

    1979-04-01

    A retrospective study of 35 newborn with acute renal failure is presented. The main causes of renal failure were neonatal hypoxia by asfixia or hemorrhagic shock (eight), congenital malformations (two) and hypertonic dehydration (25). Mortality rate was 22% including two neonates with severe congenital malformations. Sepsis was considered as the main complicating factor and often as inducer of renal failure. It was present on 55% of cases and on 75% of the deceased newborn. Cerebral injury was frequent but a follow-up study is necessary to establish the rate of neurologic sequelae. Early diagnosis and treatment of renal failure will decrease complications with improvement in prognosis. Etiological analysis of neonatal renal failure shows the need of a better health education of people and also medical control of pregnancy and perinatal period.

  18. Renal insufficiency and anticancer drugs in elderly cancer patients: a subgroup analysis of the IRMA study.

    PubMed

    Launay-Vacher, Vincent; Spano, Jean-Philippe; Janus, Nicolas; Gligorov, Joseph; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Oudard, Stéphane; Pourrat, Xavier; Morere, Jean-François; Beuzeboc, Philippe; Deray, Gilbert

    2009-05-01

    The Renal Insufficiency and Anticancer Medications (IRMA) study is a French national, observational study which demonstrated the high prevalence of abnormal renal function in a population of 4684 solid tumor patients. Among them, 50-60% had decreased renal function, and 80% were treated with anticancer drugs that either necessitated dosage adjustment in case of renal insufficiency (RI) or were potentially nephrotoxic drugs. Since elderly patients are well-known to have reduced renal function, either due to physiological aging or their disease/medication history, a subgroup analysis of this particular population of patients was performed. In 1553 IRMA patients whose age was > or =65 years, the prevalence of RI was very high in spite of normal serum creatinine values in most cases. Anticancer drugs used may be nephrotoxic or need dosage adjustment in a high number of cases.

  19. [Role of renal inflammation in the physiopathology of salt-sensitive hypertension].

    PubMed

    Castro Torres, Yaniel; Santos Portela, Alejandro Emilio; Garrido Bősze, Ildiko María

    2014-01-01

    Salt-sensitive hypertension is produced by a decrease in salt renal excretion after a salt overload. Over the last few years, a new theory has been developed to explain this condition based on renal tissue inflammation. This process begins with free radicals production in renal tissue due to oxidative metabolism. Then they favor a renal inflammation mechanism with T-lymphocytes infiltration and other immune cells. Essentially, T-lymphocytes determine an increase in angiotensin ii production which raises sodium and water retention. Association among autoimmune diseases and hypertension may be explained, in part, by the relationship between salt-sensitive hypertension and renal inflammation. The use of antioxidant drugs and the development of new medicaments may be a choice for treating patients affected with this condition.

  20. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Najarian, J S; Frey, D J; Matas, A J; Gillingham, K J; So, S S; Cook, M; Chavers, B; Mauer, S M; Nevins, T E

    1990-01-01

    The timing of renal transplantation in infants is controversial. Between 1965 and 1989, 79 transplants in 75 infants less than 2 years old were performed: 23 who were 12 months or younger, 52 who were older than 12 months; 63 donors were living related, 1 was living unrelated, and 15 were cadaver donors; 75 were primary transplants and 4 were retransplants. Infants were considered for transplantation when they were on, or about to begin, dialysis. All had intra-abdominal transplants with arterial anastomosis to the distal aorta. Sixty-four per cent are alive with functioning grafts. The most frequent etiologies of renal failure were hypoplasia (32%) and obstructive uropathy (20%); oxalosis was the etiology in 11%. Since 1983 patient survival has been 95% and 91% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival has been 86% and 73% at 1 and 5 years. For cyclosporine immunosuppressed patients, patient survival is 100% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival is 96% and 82% at 1 and 5 years. There was no difference in outcome between infants who were 12 months or younger versus those who were aged 12 to 24 months; similarly there was no difference between infants and older children. Sixteen (21%) patients died: 5 after operation from coagulopathy (1) and infection (4); and 11 late from postsplenectomy sepsis (4), recurrent oxalosis (3), infection (2), and other causes (2). Routine splenectomy is no longer done. There has not been a death from infection in patients transplanted since 1983. Rejection was the most common cause of graft loss (in 15 patients); other causes included death (with function) (7), recurrent oxalosis (3), and technical complications (3). Overall 52% of patients have not had a rejection episode; mean creatinine level in patients with functioning grafts is 0.8 +/- 0.2 mg/dL. Common postoperative problems include fever, atelectasis, and ileus. At the time of their transplants, the infants were small for age; but with a successful transplant, their growth, head

  1. Renal failure in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Almueilo, Samir H

    2015-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is encountered in 20-25% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) at the time of diagnosis. There is often a precipitating event. Several biochemical and clinical correlations with renal failure in MM have been reported. Renal failure in MM is associated with worse outcome of the disease. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 64 patients with MM admitted to our institution during the period January 1992 to December 2012. Abnormal renal function was observed in 24 (37.5%) patients and 17 (26.6%) of them had renal failure; 14 of the 17 (82.4%) of patients with renal failure had Stage III MM. Urine Bence- Jones protein was positive in ten (58.8%) patients with renal failure versus ten (21.3%) patients without renal failure (P = 0.004). Potential precipitating factors of renal failure were determined in nine patients. Renal function normalized in 11 patients with simple measures, while six patients required hemodialysis; one remained dialysis dependent till time of death. Early mortality occurred in five (29.4%) patients with renal failure as compared with two (4.3%) patients in the group without renal failure (P = 0.005). In conclusion, renal failure is associated with a higher tumor burden and Bence-Jones proteinuria in patients with MM. It is reversible in the majority of patients; however, early mortality tends to be higher in patients with persistent renal failure.

  2. Renal tissue damage induced by focused shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioritani, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Kambe, K.; Taguchi, K.; Saitoh, T.; Shirai, S.; Orikasa, S.; Takayama, K.; Lush, P. A.

    1990-07-01

    Biological evidence of renal arterial wall damage induced by the microjet due to shock wave-cavitation bubble interaction was demonstrated in living dog kidneys. We also intended to clarify the mechanism of renal tissue damage and the effects of different conditions of shock wave exposure (peak pressure of focused area, number of shots, exposure rate) on the renal tissue damage in comparison to stone disintegration. Disruption of arterial wall was the most remarkable histological change in the focused area of the kidneys. This lesion appeared as if the wall had been punctured by a needle. Large hematoma formation in the renal parenchym, and interstitial hemorrhage seemed to be the results of the arterial lesion. This arterial disorder also led to ischemic necrosis of the tubules surrounding the hematoma. Micro-angiographic examination of extracted kidneys also proved such arterial puncture lesions and ischemic lesions. The number of shots required for model stone disintegration was not inversely proportional to peak pressure. It decreased markedly when peak pressure was above 700 bar. Similarly thenumber of shots for hematoma formation was not inversely proportional to peak pressure, however, this decreased markedly above 500 bar. These results suggested that a hematoma could be formed under a lower peak pressure than that required for stone disintegration.

  3. Bone Density and Cortical Structure after Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Anniek M.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Shults, Justine; Zemel, Babette S.; Wetzsteon, Rachel J.; Foster, Bethany J.; Strife, C. Frederic; Foerster, Debbie L.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of renal transplantation on trabecular and cortical bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical structure is unknown. We obtained quantitative computed tomography scans of the tibia in pediatric renal transplant recipients at transplantation and 3, 6, and 12 months; 58 recipients completed at least two visits. We used more than 700 reference participants to generate Z-scores for trabecular BMD, cortical BMD, section modulus (a summary measure of cortical dimensions and strength), and muscle and fat area. At baseline, compared with reference participants, renal transplant recipients had significantly lower mean section modulus and muscle area; trabecular BMD was significantly greater than reference participants only in transplant recipients younger than 13 years. After transplantation, trabecular BMD decreased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure. Cortical BMD increased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure and greater decreases in parathyroid hormone levels. Muscle and fat area both increased significantly, but section modulus did not improve. At 12 months, transplantation associated with significantly lower section modulus and greater fat area compared with reference participants. Muscle area and cortical BMD did not differ significantly between transplant recipients and reference participants. Trabecular BMD was no longer significantly elevated in younger recipients and was low in older recipients. Pediatric renal transplant associated with persistent deficits in section modulus, despite recovery of muscle, and low trabecular BMD in older recipients. Future studies should determine the implications of these data on fracture risk and identify strategies to improve bone density and structure. PMID:22282589

  4. [Renal Epidemiology and Information Network: 2006 annual report].

    PubMed

    Couchoud, Cécile; Lassalle, Mathilde; Stengel, Bénédicte; Jacquelinet, Christian

    2008-07-01

    In 2006, 6,509 patients with end-stage renal disease living in 16 regions covering 48(M) inhabitants (79% of the French population), started renal replacement therapy (dialysis or preemptive graft): median age was 71 years; 3% had a preemptive graft. The overall crude annual incidence rate of renal replacement therapy for end-stage renal disease was 137 per million population (pmp) in 16 regions that met exhaustivity, with significant differences in sex and age-adjusted incidence across regions (107 to 179 pmh). At initiation, more than one patient out of two had at least one cardiovascular disease and 37% diabetes (88% Type 2 non-insulin-dependent diabetes). On December 31, 2006, 25,774 patients living in these 16 regions were on dialysis: median age was 69.5 years. On December 31, 19,491 patients were living with a functioning graft: median age was 53 years. The overall crude prevalence rate of dialysis was 536 pmp in 15 regions. The overall crude prevalence rate of renal graft was 409 pmp in 15 regions. The overall crude prevalence rate of renal replacement therapy for end-stage renal disease was 945 pmp in 15 regions, with significant differences in age-adjusted prevalence across regions (765 to 1061 pmh). In the 2002-06 cohort of 18,264 incident patients, the overall one-year survival rate was 82%, 72% at 2 years and 63% at 3 years. Survival decreased with age, but remained above 50% at 2 years in patients older than 75 at RRT initiation. Among the 6,321 new patients starting dialysis in 2006 in the 16 regions, 6% had a BMI lower than 18.5 kg/m(2) and 17% a BMI higher than 30. At initiation, 62% had a haemoglobin value lower than 11g/l and 9% an albumin value lower than 25g/l. The first haemodialysis was started in emergency in 30% of the patients and with a catheter in 48%. On December 31, 2006, 8% treated in the dialysis units of the 16 regions received peritoneal dialysis, of which 38% were treated with automated peritoneal dialysis. 95% of the patients on

  5. Renal distribution volumes of indocyanine green, ( 51 Cr)EDTA, and 24 Na in man during acute renal failure after shock. Implications for the pathogenesis of anuria.

    PubMed

    Reubi, F C; Vorburger, C; Tuckman, J

    1973-02-01

    The mechanism responsible for the anuria in acute renal failure after shock is still controversial. Suppressed glomerular filtration and/or tubular back-diffusion of the filtrate are major possible causes. In the present investigation, seven patients with acute anuria, three of these seven again in the polyuric phase, six patients with moderate renal impairment, four patients with chronic renal failure, and eight subjects with normal renal function were studied by a multiple indicator-dilution method in which the total renal blood flow and renal distribution volumes of indocyanine green, [(51)Cr]EDTA, and (24)Na were determined. In normal subjects the average values for one kidney were 582 ml/min, 42 ml, 92 ml, and 139 ml, respectively. The measurements in the patients with moderate renal impairment were similar to those in the normal subjects, but were decreased in chronic renal failure. In acute anuria, the average values were 269 ml/min, 40 ml, 101 ml, and 114 ml and the kidney volume, estimated radiographically, was increased by 40%. When expressed as milliliters per milliliters kidney, the average distribution volume of (24)Na was decreased from 0.64 to 0.38. This decrease is consistent with the hypothesis that suppressed filtration is largely responsible for the anuria and that back-diffusion is, at most, a contributory factor. The apparent contradiction between the relatively well-preserved total blood flow and the suppressed filtration may be due to a combination of afferent vasoconstriction and efferent vasodilatation. This view is supported by the observation that low filtration fractions were found in clearance measurements performed during the polyuric phase.

  6. Renal Distribution Volumes of Indocyanine Green, [51Cr]EDTA, and 24Na in Man during Acute Renal Failure after Shock. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PATHOGENESIS OF ANURIA

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, F. C.; Vorburger, C.; Tuckman, J.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the anuria in acute renal failure after shock is still controversial. Suppressed glomerular filtration and/or tubular back-diffusion of the filtrate are major possible causes. In the present investigation, seven patients with acute anuria, three of these seven again in the polyuric phase, six patients with moderate renal impairment, four patients with chronic renal failure, and eight subjects with normal renal function were studied by a multiple indicator-dilution method in which the total renal blood flow and renal distribution volumes of indocyanine green, [51Cr]EDTA, and 24Na were determined. In normal subjects the average values for one kidney were 582 ml/min, 42 ml, 92 ml, and 139 ml, respectively. The measurements in the patients with moderate renal impairment were similar to those in the normal subjects, but were decreased in chronic renal failure. In acute anuria, the average values were 269 ml/min, 40 ml, 101 ml, and 114 ml and the kidney volume, estimated radiographically, was increased by 40%. When expressed as milliliters per milliliters kidney, the average distribution volume of 24Na was decreased from 0.64 to 0.38. This decrease is consistent with the hypothesis that suppressed filtration is largely responsible for the anuria and that back-diffusion is, at most, a contributory factor. The apparent contradiction between the relatively well-preserved total blood flow and the suppressed filtration may be due to a combination of afferent vasoconstriction and efferent vasodilatation. This view is supported by the observation that low filtration fractions were found in clearance measurements performed during the polyuric phase. PMID:4630601

  7. Comparison of the Protective Effects of Erythropoietin and Melatonin on Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Banaei, Shokofeh; Ahmadiasl, Nasser; Alihemmati, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) contributes to the development of acute renal failure (ARF). Oxygen free radicals are considered to be the principal components involved in the pathophysiological tissue alterations observed during renal IR. Objectives In this study, we compared the effects of melatonin (MEL) and erythropoietin (EPO), both known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents, on IR-induced renal injury in rats. Materials and Methods Wistar albino rats were unilaterally nephrectomized and then subjected to 45 minutes of renal pedicle occlusion followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. MEL (10 mg/kg, i.p) and EPO (5000 U/kg, i.p) were administered prior to the onset of ischemia. After 24 hours of reperfusion and following decapitation, blood samples were collected for the determination of the hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) levels. Additionally, renal samples were taken for histological evaluation. Results Ischemia-reperfusion significantly decreased the observed Hb and Hct values. The histopathological findings in the IR group confirmed that there was an increase in the hyaline cast and thickening of the Bowman capsule basement membrane. Treatment with EPO or MEL significantly increased the Hb and Hct values. In the MEL + IR group, the histopathological changes were lower than those found in the EPO + IR group. Conclusions Treatment with EPO and MEL had a beneficial effect on renal IR injury. The results may also indicate that MEL protects against morphological damage better than EPO in renal IR injury. PMID:27921018

  8. [Renal dysfunction in heart failure and hypervolumenia : Importance of congestion and backward failure].

    PubMed

    Druml, W

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, renal dysfunction in congestive heart failure (cardiorenal syndrome type 1) has been attributed to reduced cardiac output and low mean arterial perfusion pressure, which elicit a series of neurohumoral activations resulting in increased renal vascular resistance and decreased renal function.During the last decade, several studies have shown that the extent of renal dysfunction is not so closely associated with indices of forward failure-such as the cardiac index or mean arterial pressure-but rather with indicators of congestion, such as left ventricular enddiasystolic pressure or central venous pressure (CVP), which are indicators of backward failure. The impact of backward failure on renal function is not confined to an elevation of CVP, the renal drainage pressure, but includes a broad spectrum of mechanisms. Involved are the organ systems right heart, lung, the liver, the proinflammatory signals originating from the intestines, but also renal interstitial edema (renal compartment syndrome) and the intraabdominal pressure.The therapeutic measures must focus on the modulation of the preload adapted to the specific situation of an individual patient. This includes diuretics aiming at different segments of the tubulus system including antagonists of aldosteron and ADH, extracorporeal fluid elimination by ultrafiltration or peritoneal dialysis.

  9. Protective Effects of Luteolin on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Renal Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shao-bin; Yan, Hao; Ma, Jing; Sun, Qiang; Shen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Sepsis can cause serious acute kidney injury in bacterium-infected patients, especially in intensive care patients. Luteolin, a bioactive flavonoid, has renal protection and anti-inflammatory effects. This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of luteolin in attenuating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced renal injury. Material/Methods ICR mice were treated with LPS (25 mg/kg) with or without luteolin pre-treatment (40 mg/kg for three days). The renal function, histological changes, degree of oxidative stress, and tubular apoptosis in these mice were examined. The effects of luteolin on LPS-induced expression of renal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), NF-κB, MCP-1, ICAM-1, and cleaved caspase-3 were evaluated. Results LPS resulted in rapid renal damage of mice, increased level of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and serum creatinine (Scr), tubular necrosis, and increased oxidative stress, whereas luteolin pre-treatment could attenuate this renal damage and improve the renal functions significantly. Treatment with LPS increased TNF-α, NF-κB, IL-1β, cleaved caspase-3, MCP-1, and ICAM-1 expression, while these disturbed expressions were reversed by luteolin pre-treatment. Conclusions These results indicate that luteolin ameliorates LPS-mediated nephrotoxicity via improving renal oxidant status, decreasing NF-κB activation and inflammatory and apoptosis factors, and then disturbing the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. PMID:28029146

  10. A Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein Antagonist Is Down-Regulated in Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blish, Kimberly Rose; Wang, Wei; Willingham, Mark C.; Du, Wei; Birse, Charles E.; Krishnan, Surekha R.; Brown, Julie C.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Garvin, A. Julian; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Torti, Frank M.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed expression of candidate genes encoding cell surface or secreted proteins in normal kidney and kidney cancer. This screen identified a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist, SOSTDC1 (sclerostin domain–containing-1) as down-regulated in kidney tumors. To confirm screening results, we probed cDNA dot blots with SOSTDC1. The SOSTDC1 message was decreased in 20/20 kidney tumors compared with normal kidney tissue. Immunohistochemistry confirmed significant decrease of SOSTDC1 protein in clear cell renal carcinomas relative to normal proximal renal tubule cells (p < 0.001). Expression of SOSTDC1 was not decreased in papillary and chromophobe kidney tumors. SOSTDC1 was abundantly expressed in podocytes, distal tubules, and transitional epithelia of the normal kidney. Transfection experiments demonstrated that SOSTDC1 is secreted and binds to neighboring cells and/or the extracellular matrix. SOSTDC1 suppresses both BMP-7–induced phosphorylation of R-Smads-1, -5, and -8 and Wnt-3a signaling. Restoration of SOSTDC1 in renal clear carcinoma cells profoundly suppresses proliferation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SOSTDC1 is expressed in the human kidney and decreased in renal clear cell carcinoma. Because SOSTDC1 suppresses proliferation of renal carcinoma cells, restoration of SOSTDC1 signaling may represent a novel target in treatment of renal clear cell carcinoma. PMID:18032587

  11. Fluoride-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lantz, O; Jouvin, M H; De Vernejoul, M C; Druet, P

    1987-08-01

    Renal fluoride toxicity in human beings is difficult to assess in the literature. Although experimental studies and research on methoxyflurane toxicity have shown frank renal damage, observations of renal insufficiency related to chronic fluoride exposure are scarce. We report a case of fluoride intoxication related to potomania of Vichy water, a highly mineralized water containing 8.5 mg/L of fluoride. Features of fluoride osteosclerosis were prominent and end-stage renal failure was present. The young age of the patient, the long duration of high fluoride intake, and the absence of other cause of renal insufficiency suggest a causal relationship between fluoride intoxication and renal failure.

  12. Diffuse FDG renal uptake in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Navalkissoor, Shaunak; Szyszko, Teresa; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Nunan, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    In patients presenting with acute renal failure and known/suspected lymphoma, the diagnosis of diffuse renal involvement is important, as there is potential for rapid resolution with chemotherapy. Although FDG is excreted through the kidneys and focal renal disease may be difficult to identify, diffuse renal FDG is more easily recognized and is always abnormal. We report a patient presenting with acute renal failure and suspected lymphoma. F-18 FDG PET/CT study demonstrated diffuse increased FDG uptake in bilaterally enlarged kidneys. Following 1 cycle of chemotherapy, the renal function normalized. An interim F-18 FDG PET/CT demonstrated normal size and FDG uptake within both kidneys.

  13. The scintigraphic pattern of renal angiomyolipoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jaikishen, P.; Oster, Z.H.; Atkins, H.L. )

    1990-03-01

    The patterns of renal and gallium scintigraphy in a patient with renal angiomyolipoma are presented. Renal study with Tc-99m DTPA demonstrated a photopenic area in the flow and delayed images. Ga-67 citrate imaging did not show any evidence of increased activity. Although this pattern is also seen in renal cysts, scintigraphy seems to be valuable in the evaluation of angiomyolipoma. It helps differentiate it from renal carcinoma or renal abscess (which may be gallium avid), especially when the tumor is characterized by a paucity of adipose tissue and complicated by hemorrhage, in which case CT and ultrasonographic patterns are not diagnostic.

  14. Ghrelin Protects against Renal Damages Induced by Angiotensin-II via an Antioxidative Stress Mechanism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Keiko; Wakino, Shu; Minakuchi, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Hosoya, Koji; Komatsu, Motoaki; Kaneko, Yuka; Shinozuka, Keisuke; Washida, Naoki; Kanda, Takeshi; Tokuyama, Hirobumi; Hayashi, Koichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    We explored the renal protective effects by a gut peptide, Ghrelin. Daily peritoneal injection with Ghrelin ameliorated renal damages in continuously angiotensin II (AngII)-infused C57BL/6 mice as assessed by urinary excretion of protein and renal tubular markers. AngII-induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and senescent changes were attenuated by Ghrelin. Ghrelin also inhibited AngII-induced upregulations of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), ameliorating renal fibrotic changes. These effects were accompanied by concomitant increase in mitochondria uncoupling protein, UCP2 as well as in a key regulator of mitochondria biosynthesis, PGC1α. In renal proximal cell line, HK-2 cells, Ghrelin reduced mitochondria membrane potential and mitochondria-derived ROS. The transfection of UCP2 siRNA abolished the decrease in mitochondria-derived ROS by Ghrelin. Ghrelin ameliorated AngII-induced renal tubular cell senescent changes and AngII-induced TGF-β and PAI-1 expressions. Finally, Ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)-null mice exhibited an increase in tubular damages, renal ROS levels, renal senescent changes and fibrosis complicated with renal dysfunction. GHSR-null mice harbored elongated mitochondria in the proximal tubules. In conclusion, Ghrelin suppressed AngII-induced renal damages through its UCP2 dependent anti-oxidative stress effect and mitochondria maintenance. Ghrelin/GHSR pathway played an important role in the maintenance of ROS levels in the kidney. PMID:24747517

  15. Successful Treatment of Resistant Hypertension by Means of Chronic Renal Artery Occlusion Revascularization in a Fragile Patient

    PubMed Central

    Spezia, Laura; Perandini, Simone; Augelli, Raffaele; Puppini, Giovanni; Montemezzi, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Renal artery stenosis is a common cause of secondary hypertension refractory to medical therapy. Percutaneous angioplasty along with metallic stent placement has been described as an effective treatment for revascularization of the renal artery. Case Report A 54-year-old woman affected by paranoid schizophrenia with a history of hypertension and chronic renal failure due to renal artery occlusion was treated by endovascular recanalization and stent placement that resulted in improvement of renal function and control of hypertension. Laboratory studies 4 months after the revascularization revealed blood creatinine decrease gradually from 8.57 mg/dL to 3 mg/dL. Conclusions Revascularization with stenting has proven to be a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of total renal artery occlusion which also led to a significant relief at a psychological level. PMID:27882189

  16. Plasma heme-induced renal toxicity is related to a capillary rarefaction

    PubMed Central

    Tabibzadeh, Nahid; Estournet, Céline; Placier, Sandrine; Perez, Joëlle; Bilbault, Héloïse; Girshovich, Alexis; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Jouanneau, Chantal; Letavernier, Emmanuel; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Lionnet, François; Haymann, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Severe hypertension can lead to malignant hypertension (MH) with renal thrombotic microangiopathy and hemolysis. The role of plasma heme release in this setting is unknown. We aimed at evaluating the effect of a mild plasma heme increase by hemin administration in angiotensin II (AngII)-mediated hypertensive rats. Prevalence of MH and blood pressure values were similar in AngII and AngII + hemin groups. MH rats displayed a decreased renal blood flow (RBF), increased renal vascular resistances (RVR), and increased aorta and interlobar arteries remodeling with a severe renal microcirculation assessed by peritubular capillaries (PTC) rarefaction. Hemin-treated rats with or without AngII displayed also a decreased RBF and increased RVR explained only by PCT rarefaction. In AngII rats, RBF was similar to controls (with increased RVR). PTC density appeared strongly correlated to tubular damage score (rho = −0.65, p < 0.0001) and also renal Heme Oygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA (rho = −0.67, p < 0.0001). HO-1 was expressed in PTC and renal tubules in MH rats, but only in PTC in other groups. In conclusion, though increased plasma heme does not play a role in triggering or aggravating MH, heme release appears as a relevant toxic mediator leading to renal impairment, primarily through PTC endothelial dysfunction rather than direct tubular toxicity. PMID:28071761

  17. Evidence that sodium deprivation influences vitamin D dependent rat renal calcium binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Pansini, A.R.; Christakos, S.

    1983-10-01

    In order to provide some insight concerning the role of renal calcium binding protein (CaBP) in the functioning of the mammalian kidney, the response of renal CaBP to dietary alterations was examined. Three week old rats were fed diets deficient in calcium, phosphorus or sodium supplemented with vitamin D for a four week period. The specific activity of renal CaBP in the 28,000 M/sub r/ region was found to increase four fold in rats fed the low phosphorus diet and two fold in rats fed the low calcium diet when compared to rats fed the control diet. Renal CaBP/mg protein from rats fed the low sodium diet decreased 50% from the control values. Changes in renal CaBP were confirmed by polyacrylamide gel analysis of the 28,000 M/sub r/ fraction by densitometric tracing using a purified CaBP marker. The greater response to dietary phosphorus restriction suggests that renal CaBP may be regulated by a mechanism different from that of intestinal CaBP. The decrease in renal CaBP in rats fed the low sodium diet suggests for the first time that sodium is required for vitamin D dependent distal tubular calcium transport processes.

  18. Human renal allograft blood flow and early renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C B; Etheredge, E E

    1977-01-01

    Renal allograft blood flow (RBF) was measured at operation by electromagnetic flow meter and probes in 45 patients (34 cadaver donors and 11 living related donors). Mean RBF in 26 patients without acute tubular necrosis (ATN), was 412 +/- 80 ml/min and in 19 patients with ATN, 270 +/- 100 ml/min (p less than .001). Only two of 24 transplants (8%) with RBF greater than 350 ml/min had ATN; whereas, 17 of 21 transplants (81 per cent) with RBF less than 350 ml/min had ATN (p less than .001). In cadaver donor transplants, RBF did not correlate with duration of ATN, warm ischemia time, total ischemia time, pulsatile perfusion time or renal vascular resistance during perfusion. Measurement of renal allograft blood flow can predict presence or absence of postoperative ATN in 87% of patients. PMID:335986

  19. [Renal osteodystrophy Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Messa, P

    2003-01-01

    Renal ostedystrophy (ROD) is a major long-term complication in uremic patients. Bone histomorphometry still remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of ROD. However, the low acceptance grade by patients makes bone biopsy a rarely performed and not easily repeatable investigation. No other instrumental assessment has been proved as yet to have sufficient sensitivity for ROD diagnosis. Many biochemical markers have been proposed for a diagnostic role, but few have a real predictive diagnostic value. Serum intact PTH (i-PTH) levels are thought to represent a good predictor of bone lesions. However, although a i-PTH level greater than 450 pg/mL and lower than 120 pg/mL may well predict high and low bone turnover disease respectively, in the wide range of values defined by the above border levels i-PTH does not have a predictive role for ROD. There is as yet no definite proof that the recently developed PTH assays might increase their diagnostic sensitivity. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a more reliable index of bone turnover than i-PTH levels. With regards to Al overload, given that an iron overburden is excluded, serum Al levels lower than 30 ug/L are seldom associated with increased Al deposition; conversely, levels above 60 mg/L are highly diagnostic for Al overload. In the latter condition, a DFO test is recommended. The main goals of ROD treatment are a) to maintain serum i-PTH levels between 120 and 150 pg/mL; b) to bring the phosphate (Pi) concentration under 5.5 mg/dL, Ca concentration between 9.2 and 10.4 mg/dL, and the Ca x Pi product under 55 mg/dL; c) to bring Al concentration under 20 ug/L; and d) to target serum bicarbonate levels between 20 and 24 mmol/L. The main therapeutic approaches include: Dietary Pi intake control (< 1200 mg/day). Intestinal phosphate binding using calcium salts and sevelamer. Calcium salts must be used at a dosage that avoids Ca overload (< 23 g/day). If Pi control is not reached, Mg and Al salts may be added at a dose lower

  20. Renal transplantation in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, S A H; Naqvi, S A A; Zafar, M N

    2002-01-01

    The economic indicators of Pakistan show that the GNP is dollar 70 billion and foreign exchange reserves stand at dollar 8.0 billion and foreign debt at more than dollar 36 billion. Against this backdrop, the government is unlikely to provide state-of-the-art facilities for management of end-stage organ failure. The unequal distribution of wealth leaves more than 40% below the poverty line. Economic solutions are based on temporary fixes where foreign aid and loans keeps the government machinery operational. Many of the basic health measures such as immunization are also foreign funded. Under such a scenario, local philanthropy has come to play a vital role. SIUT developed a model based on self-help--a model based on a community-government partnership, where the doctor plays the pivotal role and the beneficiary is the patient. SIUT acquired funds by developing a community-government partnership. The government fulfills about 40% of the total budget and the rest comes from the community as donations. The scheme has been extremely successful in providing free medical care and renal support to thousands of patients. It has been sustained over the past 15 years through complete transparency, public audit and accountability. These confidence-building means stimulate the community to come forward and donate money, equipment and medicines. The goal of transplantation is to provide organs to all with long-term survival of the graft. The emerging challenges to achieve this goal and efforts that can be made to increase and sustain transplant activity in Pakistan require a concerted effort on the part of the government, society and the medical profession.

  1. An incidental detection of aortic aneurysm on Tc-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Sadic, Murat; Demirel, Koray; Koca, Gökhan; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    A 71-year-old man with newly diagnosed hypertension was referred for Technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (Tc-99m MAG3) renal scintigraphy to evaluate the recent onset of impairment in renal functions. Dynamic imaging revealed activity flow which was suspicious for aortic aneurysm (AA) with a concurrent decrease in left renal blood flow. CT angiography of the thoracoabdominal aorta confirmed that this area corresponded to AA. The purpose of this report was to present the first case of incidental detection of AA on Tc-99m MAG3 scintigraphy and highlight the importance of correlative imaging for the diagnosis of abnormal radioactivity accumulation in the region of vascular structures.

  2. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  3. Renal Vascular Structure and Rarefaction

    PubMed Central

    Chade, Alejandro R.

    2014-01-01

    An intact microcirculation is vital for diffusion of oxygen and nutrients and for removal of toxins of every organ and system in the human body. The functional and/or anatomical loss of microvessels is known as rarefaction, which can compromise the normal organ function and have been suggested as a possible starting point of several diseases. The purpose of this overview is to discuss the potential underlying mechanisms leading to renal microvascular rarefaction, and the potential consequences on renal function and on the progression of renal damage. Although the kidney is a special organ that receives much more blood than its metabolic needs, experimental and clinical evidence indicates that renal microvascular rarefaction is associated to prevalent cardiovascular diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and atherosclerosis, either as cause or consequence. On the other hand, emerging experimental evidence using progenitor cells or angiogenic cytokines supports the feasibility of therapeutic interventions capable of modifying the progressive nature of microvascular rarefaction in the kidney. This overview will also attempt to discuss the potential renoprotective mechanisms of the therapeutic targeting of the renal microcirculation. PMID:23720331

  4. DA-1229, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor, protects against renal injury by preventing podocyte damage in an animal model of progressive renal injury.

    PubMed

    Eun Lee, Jee; Kim, Jung Eun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Song, Hye Kyoung; Ghee, Jung Yeon; Kang, Young Sun; Min, Hye Sook; Kim, Hyun Wook; Cha, Jin Joo; Han, Jee Young; Han, Sang Youb; Cha, Dae Ryong

    2016-05-01

    Although dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) inhibitors are known to have renoprotective effects, the mechanism underlying these effects has remained elusive. Here we investigated the effects of DA-1229, a novel DPPIV inhibitor, in two animal models of renal injury including db/db mice and the adriamycin nephropathy rodent model of chronic renal disease characterized by podocyte injury. For both models, DA-1229 was administered at 300 mg/kg/day. DPPIV activity in the kidney was significantly higher in diabetic mice compared with their nondiabetic controls. Although DA-1229 did not affect glycemic control or insulin resistance, DA-1229 did improve lipid profiles, albuminuria and renal fibrosis. Moreover, DA-1229 treatment resulted in decreased urinary excretion of nephrin, decreased circulating and kidney DPPIV activity, and decreased macrophage infiltration in the kidney. In adriamycin-treated mice, DPPIV activity in the kidney and urinary nephrin loss were both increased, whereas glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations were unchanged. Moreover, DA-1229 treatment significantly improved proteinuria, renal fibrosis and inflammation associated with decreased urinary nephrin loss, and kidney DPP4 activity. In cultured podocytes, DA-1229 restored the high glucose/angiotensin II-induced increase of DPPIV activity and preserved the nephrin levels in podocytes. These findings suggest that activation of DPPIV in the kidney has a role in the progression of renal disease, and that DA-1229 may exert its renoprotective effects by preventing podocyte injury.

  5. [ADPKD: predictors of Renal Disease progression].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Dallera, Nadia; Saletti, Arianna; Terlizzi, Vincenzo; Izzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Factors predicting rapid progression of kidney disease in ADPKD can be divided into genetic (non-modifiable) and clinical (modifiable) risk factors. Patients harbouring PKD1 mutations, in particular if truncating, have a more severe form of ADPKD. Clinical risk factors include decrease in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow at a young age; high total kidney volume; hypertension and urological complications <35 years; albuminuria/proteinuria. The renal disease is also more severe in males and in subjects with family history of ESRD <55 years. In recent years, two models for predicting progression in ADPKD have been published: the Mayo model, based on height-adjusted TKV, age and eGFR, and the Brest model, based on PKD gene mutation type, gender, and early onset of hypertension and urological complications. With the emergence of new disease-modifying therapies, prediction tools are essential. However, the high variability in ADPKD makes the predicting models difficult to apply on an individual patient basis. Thus, the above-mentioned predicting models should be viewed as complimentary to clinical evaluation and follow-up. In the future, an individual risk score linking genetic, imaging and clinical data might prove the most accurate way of predicting long-term outcome.

  6. Erdosteine against acetaminophen induced renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Isik, Bunyamin; Bayrak, Reyhan; Akcay, Ali; Sogut, Sadik

    2006-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) induced toxicities have been a major problem in clinical practice. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate a possible protective role of erdosteine, a mucolytic agent having antioxidant properties via its active metabolites, on APAP induced renal damage in rats. Female Wistar Albino rats were divided into groups including control, erdosteine (150 mg/kg, oral), APAP (1 g/kg, oral) APAP+erdosteine (150 mg/kg, oral) and APAP+erdosteine (300 mg/kg, oral). APAP treatment caused lipid peroxidation as well as high NO level in renal tissue. Also, APAP treated rats had decreased activities of CAT and GSH-Px, but not SOD. In addition, tubular epithelial degeneration, vacuolization and cell desquamation were clearly observed in the APAP treated rats. The cellular debris in the proximal tubules and cortical interstitial congestions were prominent in the kidneys of APAP treated rats. BUN and creatinine levels were increased after APAP administration. All these pathological changes were reversed after erdosteine treatments. Erdosteine treated APAP groups showed milder tubular degeneration, epithelial vacuolization in the proximal tubules, lesser cellular desquamation and better morphology when compared with APAP groups. In conclusion, erdosteine may be a choice of preventive treatment against APAP induced nephrotoxicity.

  7. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  8. Renal lesions in leprosy amongst north Indian patients.

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, K. S.; Damle, P. B.; Kaur, S.; Sharma, B. K.; Kumar, B.; Sakhuja, V.; Nath, I. V.; Datta, B. N.

    1983-01-01

    Sixty consecutive patients with leprosy were investigated for renal involvement. Clinically overt renal disease was present in 4 patients; 3 presented with a nephrotic state and one patient with progressive renal failure. Urinalysis showed daily protein loss ranging from 0.4 to 8.9 g in 8 patients and microscopic haematuria in 4 cases. Elevated levels of blood urea and creatinine were seen only in one patient with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis. Of the 36 patients in whom distal tubular functions were evaluated, concentration and/or acidification defects were detected in 9 patients (25%). Renal histology revealed no abnormality in any of these patients. Serum C3 levels were decreased in 5 patients with lepromatous leprosy and 3 patients with borderline leprosy. Histological evidence of renal involvement was detected in 9 patients (15%). Amyloid deposits were seen in 3 (5%) patients of whom 2 had lepromatous leprosy and one had tuberculoid leprosy with chronic trophic ulcers. Mesangial proliferative lesions were seen in 5 (8.3%) and diffuse proliferative lesions (with crescents in more than 70% of glomeruli) in one patient. All of them had lepromatous leprosy. Three of the 5 patients with mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis had erythema nodosum leprosum at the time of biopsy. Immunofluorescence studies revealed granular deposits of IgA, IgM and C3 in one patient with mesangial proliferation and IgA/IgM with or without C3 in 3 more patients in whom renal histology was normal. Glomerulonephritis associated with leprosy appears to be immune mediated but confirmation requires identification of lepra antigen in the glomerular immune complex deposits. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6647188

  9. Renal Vasoconstriction Occurs Early During Shockwave Lithotripsy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, Ryan S.; Sorensen, Mathew D.; Paun, Marla; Dunmire, Barbrina; Liu, Ziyue; Bailey, Michael; Harper, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: In animal models, pretreatment with low-energy shock waves and a pause decreased renal injury from shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). This is associated with an increase in perioperative renal resistive index (RI). A perioperative rise is not seen without the protective protocol, which suggests that renal vasoconstriction during SWL plays a role in protecting the kidney from injury. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether there is an increase in renal RI during SWL in humans. Materials and Methods: Subjects were prospectively recruited from two hospitals. All subjects received an initial 250 shocks at low setting, followed by a 2-minute pause. Treatment power was then increased. Measurements of the renal RI were taken before start of procedure, at 250, after 750, after 1500 shocks, and at the end of the procedure. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare RIs at the different time points. Results: Fifteen patients were enrolled. Average treatment time was 46 ± 8 minutes. Average RI at pretreatment, after 250, after 750, after 1500 shocks, and post-treatment was 0.67 ± 0.06, 0.69 ± 0.08, 0.71 ± 0.07, 0.73 ± 0.07, and 0.74 ± 0.06, respectively. In adjusted analyses, RI was significantly increased after 750 shocks compared with pretreatment (p = 0.05). Conclusion: Renal RI increases early during SWL in humans with the protective protocol. Monitoring for a rise in RI during SWL is feasible and may provide real-time feedback as to when the kidney is protected. PMID:26239232

  10. Prospective evaluation of aggressive medical therapy for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, with renal artery stenting reserved for previously injured heart, brain, or kidney.

    PubMed

    Hanzel, George; Balon, Helena; Wong, Oliver; Soffer, Daniel; Lee, Daniel Taehee; Safian, Robert David

    2005-11-01

    Sixty-six patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) and serum creatinine < or =2.0 mg/dl were treated with antihypertensive therapy, a statin, and aspirin. Renal stenting was reserved for patients with injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys. The primary end point was stenotic kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 21 months; secondary end points included major adverse clinical events, serum creatinine, total GFR, and blood pressure (BP). After baseline evaluation, 26 of 66 patients underwent renal stenting because of injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys. After 21 months, 6 medical patients required renal stenting, and 5 patients experienced late clinical events (2 medical patients, 3 stent patients). There was no difference in final BP between groups. Whereas medical patients experienced 6% and 8% decreases in total and stenotic kidney GFR, stent patients experienced 7% and 11% increases in total kidney (p = 0.006) and stenotic kidney (p = 0.02) GFR. There was no difference in final serum creatinine. In conclusion, patients with atherosclerotic RAS and baseline creatinine < or =2.0 mg/dl can be safely managed with aggressive medical therapy, with a small decrease in GFR. For patients who develop injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys, renal artery stenting may further reduce hypertension and improve renal function.

  11. N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline attenuates renal injury and dysfunction in hypertensive rats with reduced renal mass: council for high blood pressure research.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tang-Dong; Yang, Xiao-Ping; D'Ambrosio, Martin; Zhang, Yanlu; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; Carretero, Oscar A

    2010-02-01

    N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) is a naturally occurring peptide of which the plasma concentration is increased 4- to 5-fold by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. We reported previously that, in models of both hypertension and postmyocardial infarction, Ac-SDKP reduces cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. However, it is unknown whether Ac-SDKP can prevent or reverse renal injury and dysfunction in hypertension. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that, in rats with 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx)-induced hypertension, Ac-SDKP reduces renal damage, albuminuria, and dysfunction by decreasing inflammatory cell infiltration and renal fibrosis and by increasing nephrin protein. Ac-SDKP (800 microg/kg per day, SC via osmotic minipump) or vehicle was either started 7 days before 5/6Nx (prevention) and continued for 3 weeks or started 3 weeks after 5/6Nx (reversal) and continued for another 3 weeks. Rats with 5/6Nx developed high blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy, albuminuria, decreased glomerular filtration rate, and increased macrophage infiltration (inflammation) and renal collagen content (fibrosis). Ac-SDKP did not affect blood pressure or left ventricular hypertrophy in either group; however, it significantly reduced albuminuria, renal inflammation, and fibrosis and improved glomerular filtration rate in both prevention and reversal groups. Moreover, slit diaphragm nephrin protein expression in the glomerular filtration barrier was significantly decreased in hypertensive rats. This effect was partially prevented or reversed by Ac-SDKP. We concluded that Ac-SDKP greatly attenuates albuminuria and renal fibrosis and improves renal function in rats with 5/6Nx. These effects may be related to decreased inflammation (macrophages) and increased nephrin protein.

  12. Tc-99m glucoheptonate scintigraphy in a case of renal vein thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sfakianakis, G.N.; Zilleruelo, G.; Thompson, T.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Strauss, J.

    1985-02-01

    Tc-99m glucoheptonate flow and static studies with computer-assisted analysis provided specific diagnostic information in unilateral renal vein thrombosis complicating a case of nephrotic syndrome. Decreased flow with congestion, a large kidney with parenchymal thickening, pelvocalyceal thinning, good function, and no obstruction in the proper clinical settings indicated the diagnosis of a chronic form of renal vein thrombosis with compensating collateralization. The differential diagnosis is discussed.

  13. Mice rescued from severe malaria are protected against renal injury during a second kidney insult.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Thiago P; Silva, Leandro S; Takiya, Christina M; Souza, Mariana C; Henriques, Maria G; Pinheiro, Ana Acacia S; Caruso-Neves, Celso

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a worldwide disease that leads to 1 million deaths per year. Plasmodium falciparum is the species responsible for the most severe form of malaria leading to different complications. Beyond the development of cerebral malaria, impairment of renal function is a mortality indicator in infected patients. Treatment with antimalarial drugs can increase survival, however the long-term effects of malaria on renal disease, even after treatment with antimalarials, are unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of antimalarial drug treatment on renal function in a murine model of severe malaria and then evaluate kidney susceptibility to a second renal insult. Initially, mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA achieved 20% parasitemia on day 5 post infection, which was completely abolished after treatment with 25 mg/kg artesunate and 40 mg/kg mefloquine. The treatment also decreased plasma creatinine levels by 43% and partially reversed the reduction in the glomerular filtration rate induced by infection. The urinary protein/creatinine ratio, collagen deposition, and size of the interstitial space decreased by 75%, 40%, and 20%, respectively, with drugs compared with untreated infected animals. In infected-treated mice that underwent a second renal insult, the plasma creatinine level decreased by 60% and the glomerular filtration rate increased compared with infected animals treated only with antimalarials. The number of glomerular cells, collagen deposition and the size of the interstitial space decreased by 20%, 39.4%, and 41.3%, respectively, in the infected group that underwent a second renal insult compared with the infected-treated groups. These functional and structural data show that renal injury observed in a murine model of severe malaria is partially reversed after antimalarial drug treatment, making the kidney less susceptible to a second renal insult.

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Prevented the Progression of Renovascular Hypertension, Improved Renal Function and Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Sales, Elizabeth B.; Maquigussa, Edgar; Semedo, Patricia; Pereira, Luciana G.; Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Câmara, Niels O.; Bergamaschi, Cassia T.; Campos, Ruy R.; Boim, Mirian A.

    2013-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension induced by 2 Kidney-1 Clip (2K-1C) is a renin-angiotensin-system (RAS)-dependent model, leading to renal vascular rarefaction and renal failure. RAS inhibitors are not able to reduce arterial pressure (AP) and/or preserve the renal function, and thus, alternative therapies are needed. Three weeks after left renal artery occlusion, fluorescently tagged mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) (2×105 cells/animal) were injected weekly into the tail vein in 2K-1C hypertensive rats. Flow cytometry showed labeled MSC in the cortex and medulla of the clipped kidney. MSC prevented a further increase in the AP, significantly reduced proteinuria and decreased sympathetic hyperactivity in 2K-1C rats. Renal function parameters were unchanged, except for an increase in urinary volume observed in 2K-1C rats, which was not corrected by MSC. The treatment improved the morphology and decreased the fibrotic areas in the clipped kidney and also significantly reduced renal vascular rarefaction typical of 2K-1C model. Expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α angiotensinogen, ACE, and Ang II receptor AT1 were elevated, whereas AT2 levels were decreased in the medulla of the clipped kidney. MSC normalized these expression levels. In conclusion, MSC therapy in the 2K-1C model (i) prevented the progressive increase of AP, (ii) improved renal morphology and microvascular rarefaction, (iii) reduced fibrosis, proteinuria and inflammatory cytokines, (iv) suppressed the intrarenal RAS, iv) decreased sympathetic hyperactivity in anesthetized animals and v) MSC were detected at the CNS suggesting that the cells crossed the blood-brain barrier. This therapy may be a promising strategy to treat renovascular hypertension and its renal consequences in the near future. PMID:24223811

  15. Mice Rescued from Severe Malaria Are Protected against Renal Injury during a Second Kidney Insult

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Thiago P.; Silva, Leandro S.; Takiya, Christina M.; Souza, Mariana C.; Henriques, Maria G.; Pinheiro, Ana Acacia S.; Caruso-Neves, Celso

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a worldwide disease that leads to 1 million deaths per year. Plasmodium falciparum is the species responsible for the most severe form of malaria leading to different complications. Beyond the development of cerebral malaria, impairment of renal function is a mortality indicator in infected patients. Treatment with antimalarial drugs can increase survival, however the long-term effects of malaria on renal disease, even after treatment with antimalarials, are unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of antimalarial drug treatment on renal function in a murine model of severe malaria and then evaluate kidney susceptibility to a second renal insult. Initially, mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA achieved 20% parasitemia on day 5 post infection, which was completely abolished after treatment with 25 mg/kg artesunate and 40 mg/kg mefloquine. The treatment also decreased plasma creatinine levels by 43% and partially reversed the reduction in the glomerular filtration rate induced by infection. The urinary protein/creatinine ratio, collagen deposition, and size of the interstitial space decreased by 75%, 40%, and 20%, respectively, with drugs compared with untreated infected animals. In infected-treated mice that underwent a second renal insult, the plasma creatinine level decreased by 60% and the glomerular filtration rate increased compared with infected animals treated only with antimalarials. The number of glomerular cells, collagen deposition and the size of the interstitial space decreased by 20%, 39.4%, and 41.3%, respectively, in the infected group that underwent a second renal insult compared with the infected-treated groups. These functional and structural data show that renal injury observed in a murine model of severe malaria is partially reversed after antimalarial drug treatment, making the kidney less susceptible to a second renal insult. PMID:24736406

  16. Paraneoplastic Cough and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A case of patient with intractable cough due to renal cell carcinoma is reported. The discussion reviews the literature regarding this unusual paraneoplastic manifestation of renal malignancy. PMID:27445553

  17. [Scintigraphic assessment of function in renal dystopia].

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, S

    1998-06-01

    In patients with renal dystopia radionuclide urography in commonly used technique may yield inaccurate results concerning split renal function. In a case of unilateral pelvic kidney a simple strategy to avoid this methodical error is demonstrated.

  18. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  19. Renal tubular function in hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    van 't Hoff, W.; Bicknell, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    Renal tubular function was assessed in a group of patients with mild hyperparathyroidism before and after a mean period of 2.7 years conservative management. It was also assessed, before and after a mean of 3.3 years following surgery in a group of patients with initially higher plasma calcium concentration. Mean maximum urine osmolality was within the accepted range as was the maximum urine plasma hydrogen ion gradient in both groups at the time of diagnosis. No significant change in renal tubular function was observed in either group over the periods of this study. Although deterioration after a long period cannot be excluded, we do not consider that regular assessment of renal tubular function is necessary in the conservative management of primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:2616415

  20. Antiphospholipid syndrome in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Thomas D; Crosthwaite, Amy; Chow, Kevin; Finlay, Moira J; Better, Nathan; Hughes, Peter D; Cohney, Solomon J

    2014-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) may occur in isolation or in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with the potential to cause renal failure via several distinct pathologies. Renal transplantation in the presence of APS carries a risk of early graft loss from arterial or venous thrombosis, or thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Whilst perioperative anticoagulation reduces the risk of large vessel thrombosis, it may result in significant haemorrhage, and its efficacy in preventing post-transplant TMA is uncertain. Here, we report a patient with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) due to lupus nephritis and APS, in whom allograft TMA developed soon after transplantation despite partial anticoagulation. TMA resolved with plasma exchange-based therapy albeit with some irreversible graft damage and renal impairment. We discuss the differential diagnosis of post-transplant TMA, and current treatment options.

  1. Sorafenib in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Ehsan Taghizadeh; bin-Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim; Javar, Hamid Akbari; Kadivar, Ali; Sabeti, Bahare

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is among most important causes of death in recent decades. Whoever the renal cell carcinoma incidence is low but it seems it is more complicated than the other cancers in terms of pathophysiology and treatments. The purpose of this work is to provide an overview and also deeper insight to renal cell carcinoma and the steps which have been taken to reach more specific treatment and target therapy, in this type of cancer by developing most effective agents such as Sorafenib. To achieve this goal hundreds of research paper and published work has been overviewed and due to limitation of space in a paper just focus in most important points on renal cell carcinoma, treatment of RCC and clinical development of Sorafenib. The information presented this paper shows the advanced of human knowledge to provide more efficient drug in treatment of some complicated cancer such as RCC in promising much better future to fight killing disease.

  2. Idiopathic Renal Infarction Mimicking Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Francesco; Scarano, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Renal infarction is a rare cause of referral to the emergency department, with very low estimated incidence (0.004%–0.007%). Usually, it manifests in patients aged 60–70 with risk factors for thromboembolism, mostly related to heart disease, atrial fibrillation in particular. We report a case of idiopathic segmental renal infarction in a 38-year-old patient, presenting with acute abdominal pain with no previous known history or risk factors for thromboembolic diseases. Because of its aspecific clinical presentation, this condition can mimic more frequent pathologies including pyelonephritis, nephrolithiasis, or as in our case appendicitis. Here we highlight the extremely ambiguous presentation of renal infarct and the importance for clinicians to be aware of this condition, particularly in patients without clear risk factors, as it usually has a good prognosis after appropriate anticoagulant therapy. PMID:28203466

  3. Primary renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Goel, V; Talwar, V; Dodagoudar, C; Singh, S; Sharma, A; Patnaik, N

    2015-01-01

    Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the kidney is a rare entity. Very few cases of primary renal PNET have been reported to date. Most literature about rPNET is isolated case reports. We report a case of rPNET in a 39-year-old male with a pre-operative diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma with renal vein thrombosis. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy with thrombolectomy, and histopathological examination revealed a highly aggressive tumor composed of monotonous sheets of round cells. Tumor cells were positive for CD 99 and FLI-1, hence confirming the diagnosis of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor. Post-surgery, patient was given VAC/IE-based adjuvant chemotherapy. In view of highly aggressive nature of this tumor, prompt diagnosis and imparting effective chemotherapy regimen to the patient is required, and it is important to differentiate PNET from other small round-cell tumors because of different therapeutic approach.

  4. Solar-wind velocity decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geranios, A.

    1980-08-01

    A model is developed to account for the solar wind electron and proton temperature decreases observed following the passage of an interplanetary shock wave and during the velocity decrease of a solar wind stream. The equations of mass and energy conservation are solved for a fully ionized, electrically neutral plasma expanding radially and spherically symmetrically, taking into account the heat flux from the solor corona to the plasma along the open magnetic field lines, and the electron thermal conductivity. An analytical relationship between the temperature and the velocity of the solar wind plasma is obtained which is found to be in agreement with experimental measurements made by the Vela 5 and 6 and IMP 6 satellites from August 1969-May 1974. It is thus proposed that the observed low plasma temperatures are due to the fact that the temperature decrease of the expanding plasma exceeds the heat gain due to thermal conduction from the corona.

  5. Relationship between urinary prostaglandin E2 and F2 alpha excretion and plasma arginine vasopressin during renal concentrating and diluting tests in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E B; Christensen, P; Danielsen, H; Eiskjaer, H; Jespersen, B; Knudsen, F; Kornerup, H J; Leyssac, P P; Nielsen, A H; Sørensen, S S

    1987-10-01

    Urinary excretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) and plasma concentration of arginine vasopressin (AVP) were determined during urinary concentrating and diluting tests in renal transplant recipients and control subjects. During the concentrating test PGE2 and PGF2 alpha remained unchanged in the renal transplant recipients, whereas both PGE2 and PGF2 alpha were significantly reduced in the control subjects. During the diluting test PGE2 and PGF2 alpha increased in both groups but, contrary to PGF2 alpha, PGE2 was significantly higher in all periods in the transplant recipients compared to the controls. However, the prostaglandin excretion rates per kidney were significantly higher in the renal transplant recipients than control subjects, for all periods during both the concentrating and the diluting test. Arginine vasopressin was significantly higher in renal transplant recipients than control subjects during basal conditions, increased to a significantly higher level in the transplant recipients after thirst, but was reduced to the same levels in the two groups during the diluting test. It is concluded that the increased excretion of prostaglandins in renal transplant recipients may be a compensatory phenomenon representing an adaptation to a reduced renal mass in order to maintain adequate renal water excretion. Although a direct relationship between the prostaglandin excretions of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha and AVP does not seem to exist, it is possible that the higher prostaglandin excretion in the renal transplant recipients may be a counterbalancing mechanism to the higher AVP level, which most likely is secondary to a decreased responsiveness to vasopressin of the renal collecting ducts in the transplanted kidney.

  6. Delineating the Role of Various Factors in Renal Disposition of Digoxin through Application of Physiologically Based Kidney Model to Renal Impairment Populations

    PubMed Central

    Scotcher, Daniel; Jones, Christopher R.; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Development of submodels of organs within physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) principles and beyond simple perfusion limitations may be challenging because of underdeveloped in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approaches or lack of suitable clinical data for model refinement. However, advantage of such models in predicting clinical observations in divergent patient groups is now commonly acknowledged. Mechanistic understanding of altered renal secretion in renal impairment is one area that may benefit from such models, despite knowledge gaps in renal pathophysiology. In the current study, a PBPK kidney model was developed for digoxin, accounting for the roles of organic anion transporting peptide 4C1 (OATP4C1) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in its tubular secretion, with the aim to investigate the impact of age and renal impairment (moderate to severe) on renal drug disposition. Initial PBPK simulations based on changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) underestimated the observed reduction in digoxin renal excretion clearance (CLR) in subjects with moderately impaired renal function relative to healthy. Reduction in either proximal tubule cell number or the OATP4C1 abundance in the mechanistic kidney model successfully predicted 59% decrease in digoxin CLR, in particular when these changes were proportional to reduction in GFR. In contrast, predicted proximal tubule concentration of digoxin was only sensitive to changes in the transporter expression/ million proximal tubule cells. Based on the mechanistic modeling, reduced proximal tubule cellularity and OATP4C1 abundance, and inhibition of OATP4C1-mediated transport, are proposed as possible causes of reduced digoxin renal secretion in renally impaired patients. PMID:28057840

  7. Renal masses presenting 25 and 50 years following blunt renal trauma.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, R S; Issa, M M; Kabalin, J N; Terris, M K

    1998-10-01

    The long-term consequences of blunt renal trauma are not well described. We report on 2 patients with a history of blunt renal trauma who presented with radiographically detected renal masses suspicious for renal tumor. Both patients suffered blows to the kidney during boxing matches followed by flank pain and hematuria. The injuries occurred 25 and 50 years prior to the detection of renal masses. Subsequent nephrectomy and histopathological evaluation revealed benign dystrophic renal tissue. These presentations represent probable long-term sequelae of blunt renal trauma.

  8. Integrated imaging of neonatal renal masses.

    PubMed

    Kirks, D R; Rosenberg, E R; Johnson, D G; King, L R

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-three neonatal renal masses were evaluated during a 2-year interval. The final diagnoses in these 33 patients were hydronephrosis [14], multicystic dysplastic kidney [10], renal vein thrombosis [3], obstructed upper pole duplication [2], polycystic kidney disease [2], nephroblastomatosis [1], and mesoblastic nephroma [1]. We recommend an integrated imaging approach that utilizes sonography to clarify anatomy and renal scintigraphy or excretory urography to determine renal function.

  9. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease.

  10. [Rare renal anomalies in childhood].

    PubMed

    Arambasić, Jadranka; Puseljić, Silvija; Angebrandt, Snjezana; Puseljić, Ivo

    2003-01-01

    Three patients with megacalycosis, a rare ren anomaly which includes dilatation of all ren calices, are presented. The symptoms of acute uroinfection were present in all three patients. The patients underwent clinical observation, laboratory testing, and renal ultrasound. Ultrasound revealed unilateral hydronephrosis in all three patients. Additional examinations included static and dynamic renal scintigraphy, voiding cystourethrography, and intravenous urography which pointed to unilateral megacalycosis. The symptoms of acute uroinfection were probably triggered by urinary stasis in dilated calices. Surgical intervention is not indicated in megacalycosis. The increasing incidence of uroinfection, urolithiasis and hematuria imposed the need of continuous follow-up in these patients.

  11. Diagnostic management of renal colic.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, C; Salvador, R; Artigas, J M

    2015-01-01

    Renal colic is a common reason for presentation to emergency departments, and imaging has become fundamental for the diagnosis and clinical management of this condition. Ultrasonography and particularly noncontrast computed tomography have good diagnostic performance in diagnosing renal colic. Radiologic management will depend on the tools available at the center and on the characteristics of the patient. It is essential to use computed tomography techniques that minimize radiation and to use alternatives like ultrasonography in pregnant patients and children. In this article, we review the epidemiology, clinical and radiologic presentations, and clinical management of ureteral lithiasis.

  12. Imaging of Renal Medullary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Faiella, Eliodoro; Santucci, Domiziana; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Nezzo, Marco; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Grasso, Rosario Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is a rare, highly aggressive tumor recognized as an independent pathological entity. African-descent adolescents and young adults with sickle cell hemoglobinopathy are the most affected groups. This rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma has its own morphogenetic and pathological characteristics. The major clinical manifestations include gross hematuria, abdominal or flank pain, and weight loss. The prognosis is very poor, with 95% of cases diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. In this review, we summarize the morphologic and dynamic characteristics of RMC under various imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance. Differential diagnosis and management strategies are also discussed.

  13. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Manuel de Sousa; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Oliveira, Eduardo Infante de; Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne de

    2015-02-01

    There is a marked contrast between the high prevalence of hypertension and the low rates of adequate control. A subset of patients with suboptimal blood pressure control have drug-resistant hypertension, in the pathophysiology of which chronic sympathetic hyperactivation is significantly involved. Sympathetic renal denervation has recently emerged as a device-based treatment for resistant hypertension. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovascular disease are reviewed, focusing on resistant hypertension and the role of sympathetic renal denervation. An update on experimental and clinical results is provided, along with potential future indications for this device-based technique in other cardiovascular diseases.

  14. [Managing focal incidental renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, C; Paño, B; Sebastià, C

    2016-01-01

    Incidental renal lesions are relatively common in daily radiological practice. It is important to know the different diagnostic possibilities for incidentally detected lesions, depending on whether they are cystic or solid. The management of cystic lesions is guided by the Bosniak classification. In solid lesions, the goal is to differentiate between renal cancer and benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. Radiologists need to know the recommendations for the management of these lesions and the usefulness of the different imaging techniques and interventional procedures in function of the characteristics of the incidental lesion and the patient's life expectancy.

  15. Uric Acid and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2006-01-01

    The interrelationship between uric acid and renal disease is reviewed in a historical context. Four phases can be distinguished--the descriptions of uric acid stones and gravel in the eighteenth century, of chronically scarred kidneys containing urate crystals in the nineteenth, the appearance of the syndrome of acute urate nephropathy following tumour lysis in the mid twentieth century, and finally the realization that soluble urate affects both systemic and glomerular blood vessels, and may play a role in both hypertension and chronic renal damage.

  16. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 mediates compensatory renal hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinxian; Chen, Jianchun; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2015-03-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying renal hypertrophy and progressive nephron damage remains poorly understood. Here we generated congenic ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) knock-in mice expressing nonphosphorylatable rpS6 and found that uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy was significantly blunted in these knock-in mice. Uninephrectomy-induced increases in cyclin D1 and decreases in cyclin E in the remaining kidney were attenuated in the knock-in mice compared with their wild-type littermates. Uninephrectomy induced rpS6 phosphorylation in the wild-type mice; however, no rpS6 phosphorylation was detected in uninephrectomized or sham-operated knock-in mice. Nonetheless, uninephrectomy stimulated comparable 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in both knock-in and wild-type mice, indicating that mTORC1 was still activated in the knock-in mice. Moreover, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin prevented both rpS6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, significantly blunted uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy in wild-type mice, but did not prevent residual renal hypertrophy despite inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in uninephrectomized knock-in mice. Thus, both genetic and pharmacological approaches unequivocally demonstrate that phosphorylated rpS6 is a downstream effector of the mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway mediating renal hypertrophy. Hence, rpS6 phosphorylation facilitates the increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in cyclin E1 that underlie the hypertrophic nature of uninephrectomy-induced kidney growth.

  17. Protective effect of angiotensin II-induced increase in nitric oxide in the renal medullary circulation.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Wu, F; Cowley, A W

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effect of intravenous infusion of subpressor doses of angiotensin (Ang II) on renal medullary blood flow (MBF), medullary partial oxygen pressure (PO2), and nitric oxide (NO) concentration under normal conditions and during reduction of the medullary nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in anesthetized rats. With laser Doppler flowmetry and polarographic measurement of PO2 with microelectrodes, Ang II (5 ng/kg per minute) did not alter renal cortical and medullary blood flows or medullary PO2. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) was infused into the renal medullary interstitial space at a dose of 1.4 microg/kg per minute, a dose that did not significantly alter basal levels of MBF or PO2. Intravenous infusion of Ang II at the same dose in the presence of L-NAME decreased MBF by 23% and medullary PO2 by 28%, but it had no effect on cortical blood flow or arterial blood pressure. An in vivo microdialysis-oxyhemoglobin NO trapping technique was used in other rats to determine tissue NO concentrations using the same protocol. Ang II infusion increased tissue NO concentrations by 85% in the renal cortex and 150% in the renal medulla. Renal medullary interstitial infusion of L-NAME (1.4 microg/kg per minute) reduced medullary NO concentrations and substantially blocked Ang II-induced increases in NO concentrations in the renal medulla, but not in the renal cortex. Tissue slices of the renal cortex and medulla were studied to determine the effects of Ang II and L-NAME on the nitrite/nitrate production. Ang II stimulated the nitrite/nitrate production predominately in the renal medulla, which was significantly attenuated by L-NAME. We conclude that small elevations of circulating Ang II levels increase medullary NO production and concentrations, which plays an important role in buffering the vasoconstrictor effects of this peptide and in maintaining a constancy of MBF.

  18. Impact of pregnancy on underlying renal disease.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Normal pregnancy involves marked renal vasodilation and large increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Studies in rats reveal that the gestational renal vasodilation is achieved by parallel reductions in tone in afferent and efferent arterioles so GFR rises without a change in glomerular blood pressure. There is some evidence from animal studies that increased renal generation of nitric oxide (NO) may be involved. Although chronic renal vasodilation has been implicated in causing progression of renal disease in nonpregnant states by glomerular hypertension, there are no long-term deleterious effects of pregnancies on the kidney when maternal renal function is normal because glomerular blood pressure remains normal. When maternal renal function is compromised before conception, there are no long-term adverse effects on renal function in most types of renal disease, providing that the GFR is well maintained before conception. When serum creatinine exceeds approximately 1.4 mg/dL, pregnancy may accelerate the renal disease increases and when serum creatinine >2 mg/dL, the chances are greater than 1 in 3 that pregnancy will hasten the progression of the renal disease. The available animal studies suggest that glomerular hypertension does not occur despite diverse injuries. Thus, the mechanisms of the adverse interaction between pregnancy and underlying renal disease remain unknown.

  19. Mechanism of renal effects of intracerebroventricular histamine in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kook, Y J; Kim, K K; Yang, D K; Ahn, D S; Choi, B K

    1988-01-01

    Histamine, when given intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), has been reported to produce antidiuresis in the rabbit. In this study it was attempted to elucidate the mechanism involved in the effect. Histamine (H), 100 micrograms/kg i.c.v., produced antidiuresis with decreases in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate in urethane-anesthetized rabbits. With larger doses, a tendency towards increased electrolyte excretion was noted in spite of decreased filtration. In the denervated kidney, marked diuresis and natriuresis were observed following i.c.v. H, whereas the contralateral innervated kidney responded with typical antidiuresis. Reserpinized rabbits also responded with marked natriuresis to i.c.v. H. Diphenhydramine (D), 250 micrograms/kg i.c.v., increased urine flow rate, sodium and potassium excretion, along with increase in renal perfusion. With 750 micrograms/kg i.c.v., marked natriuresis was observed in spite of decreased filtration. When H was given after D (250 micrograms/kg) the antidiuresis was completely abolished, and diuresis became more prominent. Cimetidine, 250 micrograms/kg i.c.v., elicited antidiuresis with decreases in renal hemodynamics, the pretreatment with cimetidine did not influence the antidiuresis by H and no natriuresis was noted. The present study suggests that histamine, given i.c.v., influences renal function in dual ways, i.e., antidiuresis by increasing the sympathetic tone to the kidney and diuresis due to some humoral natriuretic factor, the latter becoming apparent only when the former influence has been removed, and further suggests that H1-receptors might be involved in the nerve-mediated antidiuresis, whereas H2-receptors might mediate the humorally induced natriuresis and diuresis.

  20. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition ameliorates angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and renal vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Manuel; Sivritas, Sema H; Mergia, Evanthia; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Yang, Guang; Hering, Lydia; Grave, Katharina; Hoch, Henning; Rump, Lars C; Stegbauer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Changes in renal hemodynamics have a major impact on blood pressure (BP). Angiotensin (Ang) II has been shown to induce vascular dysfunction by interacting with phosphodiesterase (PDE)1 and PDE5. The predominant PDE isoform responsible for renal vascular dysfunction in hypertension is unknown. Here, we measured the effects of PDE5 (sildenafil) or PDE1 (vinpocetine) inhibition on renal blood flow (RBF), BP, and renal vascular function in normotensive and hypertensive mice. During acute short-term Ang II infusion, sildenafil decreased BP and increased RBF in C57BL/6 (WT) mice. In contrast, vinpocetine showed no effect on RBF and BP. Additionally, renal cGMP levels were significantly increased after acute sildenafil but not after vinpocetine infusion, indicating a predominant role of PDE5 in renal vasculature. Furthermore, chronic Ang II infusion (500 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) increased BP and led to impaired NO-dependent vasodilation in kidneys of WT mice. Additional treatment with sildenafil (100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) attenuated Ang II-dependent hypertension and improved NO-mediated vasodilation. During chronic Ang II infusion, urinary nitrite excretion, a marker for renal NO generation, was increased in WT mice, whereas renal cGMP generation was decreased and restored after sildenafil treatment, suggesting a preserved cGMP signaling after PDE5 inhibition. To investigate the dependency of PDE5 effects on NO/cGMP signaling, we next analyzed eNOS-KO mice, a mouse model characterized by low vascular NO/cGMP levels. In eNOS-KO mice, chronic Ang II infusion increased BP but did not impair NO-mediated vasodilation. Moreover, sildenafil did not influence BP or vascular function in eNOS-KO mice. These results highlight PDE5 as a key regulator of renal hemodynamics in hypertension.

  1. Inhibition of human and rat 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 by 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiangdong; Vicker, Nigel; Lawrence, Harshani; Smith, Andrew; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2007-05-01

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) plays an important role in regulating the cortisol availability to bind to corticosteroid receptors within specific tissue. Recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of metabolic syndrome indicate that elevation of cortisol levels within specific tissues through the action of 11beta-HSD1 could contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. Therefore, selective inhibitors of 11beta-HSD1 have been investigated as potential treatments for metabolic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 2 or obesity. Here we report the discovery and synthesis of some 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (18beta-GA) derivatives (2-5) and their inhibitory activities against rat hepatic11beta-HSD1 and rat renal 11beta-HSD2. Once the selectivity over the rat type 2 enzyme was established, these compounds' ability to inhibit human 11beta-HSD1 was also evaluated using both radioimmunoassay (RIA) and homogeneous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) methods. The 11-modified 18beta-GA derivatives 2 and 3 with apparent selectivity for rat 11beta-HSD1 showed a high percentage inhibition for human microsomal 11beta-HSD1 at 10 microM and exhibited IC50 values of 400 and 1100 nM, respectively. The side chain modified 18beta-GA derivatives 4 and 5, although showing selectivity for rat 11beta-HSD1 inhibited human microsomal 11beta-HSD1 with IC50 values in the low micromolar range.

  2. Inhibition of renal alkaline phosphatase by cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Khodai, Somayeh; Aminnaseri, Somayeh; Minoui, Saeed; Sobhani-Damavadifar, Zahra; Alavi, Sana; Osmani, Raheleh; Ahmadi, Shiva

    2011-08-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) belongs to hydrolase group of enzymes. It is responsible for removing phosphate groups from many types of molecules, including nucleotides and proteins. Cimetidine (trade name Tagamet) is an antagonist of histamine H2-receptor that inhibits the production of gastric acid. Cimetidine is used for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. In this study the inhibitory effect of cimetidine on mouse renal ALP activity was investigated. Our results showed that cimetidine can inhibit ALP by uncompetitive inhibition. In the absence of inhibitor the V(max) and K(m) of the enzyme were found to be 13.7 mmol/mg prot.min and 0.25 mM, respectively. Both the Vmax and Km of the enzyme decreased with increasing cimetidine concentrations (0- 1.2 mM). The Ki and IC(50) of cimetidine were determined to be about 0.5 mM and 0.52 mM, respectively.

  3. Automated renal histopathology: digital extraction and quantification of renal pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarder, Pinaki; Ginley, Brandon; Tomaszewski, John E.

    2016-03-01

    The branch of pathology concerned with excess blood serum proteins being excreted in the urine pays particular attention to the glomerulus, a small intertwined bunch of capillaries located at the beginning of the nephron. Normal glomeruli allow moderate amount of blood proteins to be filtered; proteinuric glomeruli allow large amount of blood proteins to be filtered. Diagnosis of proteinuric diseases requires time intensive manual examination of the structural compartments of the glomerulus from renal biopsies. Pathological examination includes cellularity of individual compartments, Bowman's and luminal space segmentation, cellular morphology, glomerular volume, capillary morphology, and more. Long examination times may lead to increased diagnosis time and/or lead to reduced precision of the diagnostic process. Automatic quantification holds strong potential to reduce renal diagnostic time. We have developed a computational pipeline capable of automatically segmenting relevant features from renal biopsies. Our method first segments glomerular compartments from renal biopsies by isolating regions with high nuclear density. Gabor texture segmentation is used to accurately define glomerular boundaries. Bowman's and luminal spaces are segmented using morphological operators. Nuclei structures are segmented using color deconvolution, morphological processing, and bottleneck detection. Average computation time of feature extraction for a typical biopsy, comprising of ~12 glomeruli, is ˜69 s using an Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4790 CPU, and is ~65X faster than manual processing. Using images from rat renal tissue samples, automatic glomerular structural feature estimation was reproducibly demonstrated for 15 biopsy images, which contained 148 individual glomeruli images. The proposed method holds immense potential to enhance information available while making clinical diagnoses.

  4. Renal functional reserve and renal recovery after acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aashish; Mucino, Marìa Jimena; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Renal functional reserve (RFR) represents the capacity of the kidney to increase glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in response to certain physiological or pathological stimuli or conditions. Once baseline GFR is determined, RFR can be assessed clinically after an oral protein load or intravenous amino acid infusion. In clinical practice, baseline GFR displays variable levels due to diet or other factors. RFR is the difference between peak 'stress' GFR induced by the test (p.o. or i.v.) and the baseline GFR. In clinical scenarios where hyperfiltration is present (high baseline GFR due to pregnancy, hypertension or diabetic nephropathy, in solitary kidney or kidney donors), RFR may be fully or partially used to achieve normal or supranormal renal function. Since commonly used renal function markers, such as GFR, may remain within normal ranges until 50% of nephrons are lost or in patients with a single remnant kidney, the RFR test may represent a sensitive and early way to assess the functional decline in the kidney. RFR assessment may become an important tool to evaluate the ability of the kidney to recover completely or partially after a kidney attack. In case of healing with a defect and progressive fibrosis, recovery may appear complete clinically, but a reduced RFR may be a sign of a maladaptive repair or subclinical loss of renal mass. Thus, a reduction in RFR may represent the equivalent of renal frailty or susceptibility to insults. The main aim of this article is to review the concept of RFR, its utility in different clinical scenarios, and future perspective for its use.

  5. Renal haemodynamics and plasma renin in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E B; Kornerup, H J

    1976-05-01

    1. Blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) were measured in twenty-three patients with essential hypertension and in twenty-one control subjects. Plasma renin concentration was measured in all the hypertensive patients and in fifteen control subjects. 2. GFR and RPF were similar in the hypertensive group and in the control group, whereas the renal vascular resistance was significantly higher in the hypertensive patients. GFR and RPF decreased with increasing blood pressure in both groups. Increasing age induced a further reduction in GFR and RPF in the control subjects but not in the hypertensive patients. 3. Plasma renin concentration in the hypertensive group did not differ from that in the control subjects. The concentration was not correlated to age in either the hypertensive or normal group. 4. Plasma renin index was positively correlated to GFR and RPF and inversely correlated to filtration fraction and renal vascular resistance. 5. It is concluded that GFR and RPF depend on blood pressure in both hypertensive patients and normotensive control subjects. In contrast to the control group, the age effect was negligible in the hypertensive group. It is suggested that renin release depends on changes in renal vascular resistance in the arterioles at the glomerulus and the results support the baroreceptor theory of renin release.

  6. Impairment of cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Raine, A E; Seymour, A M; Roberts, A F; Radda, G K; Ledingham, J G

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure in the rat (5/6 nephrectomy) have been investigated by means of an isolated perfused working heart preparation and an isometric Langendorff preparation using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR). 4 wk after nephrectomy cardiac output of isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) at all levels of preload and afterload in the renal failure groups than in the pair-fed sham operated control group. In control hearts, cardiac output increased with increases in perfusate calcium from 0.73 to 5.61 mmol/liter whereas uremic hearts failed in high calcium perfusate. Collection of 31P NMR spectra from hearts of renal failure and control animals during 30 min normoxic Langendorff perfusion showed that basal phosphocreatine was reduced by 32% to 4.7 mumol/g wet wt (P < 0.01) and the phosphocreatine to ATP ratio was reduced by 32% (P < 0.01) in uremic hearts. During low flow ischemia, there was a substantial decrease in phosphocreatine in the uremic hearts and an accompanying marked increase in release of inosine into the coronary effluent (14.9 vs 6.1 microM, P < 0.01). We conclude that cardiac function is impaired in experimental renal failure, in association with abnormal cardiac energetics and increased susceptibility to ischemic damage. Disordered myocardial calcium utilization may contribute to these derangements. PMID:8254048

  7. Growth and development alter susceptibility to acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Naito, Masayo; Lund, Steve R; Kim, Nayeon; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2008-09-01

    Many of the studies of acute renal injury have been conducted in young mice usually during their rapid growth phase; yet, the impact of age or growth stage on the degree of injury is unknown. To address this issue, we studied three forms of injury (endotoxemic-, glycerol-, and maleate-induced) in mice ranging in age from adolescence (3 weeks) to maturity (16 weeks). The severity of injury within each model significantly correlated with weight and age. We also noticed a progressive age-dependent reduction in renal cholesterol content, a potential injury modifier. As the animals grew and aged they also exhibited stepwise decrements in the mRNAs of HMG CoA reductase and the low density lipoprotein receptor, two key cholesterol homeostatic genes. This was paralleled by decreased amounts of RNA polymerase II and the transcription factor SREBP1/2 at the reductase and lipoprotein receptor gene loci as measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our study shows that the early phase of mouse growth can profoundly alter renal susceptibility to diverse forms of experimental acute renal injury.

  8. Renal stem cell reprogramming: Prospects in regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Elvin E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising future enterprise for renal replacement in patients with acute and chronic kidney disease, conditions which affect millions worldwide and currently require patients to undergo lifelong medical treatments through dialysis and/or organ transplant. Reprogramming differentiated renal cells harvested from the patient back into a pluripotent state would decrease the risk of tissue rejection and provide a virtually unlimited supply of cells for regenerative medicine treatments, making it an exciting area of current research in nephrology. Among the major hurdles that need to be overcome before stem cell therapy for the kidney can be applied in a clinical setting are ensuring the fidelity and relative safety of the reprogrammed cells, as well as achieving feasible efficiency in the reprogramming processes that are utilized. Further, improved knowledge about the genetic control of renal lineage development is vital to identifying predictable and efficient reprogramming approaches, such as the expression of key modulators or the regulation of gene activity through small molecule mimetics. Here, we discuss several recent advances in induced pluripotent stem cell technologies. We also explore strategies that have been successful in renal progenitor generation, and explore what these methods might mean for the development of cell-based regenerative therapies for kidney disease. PMID:25258667

  9. Psychological distress in patients presenting for initial renal transplant evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Kristin K; Bonfiglio, Diane B V

    2011-09-01

    The comorbidity of psychological disorders with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) presents challenges for renal transplantation, including increased likelihood of medication noncompliance and poorer quality of life. Estimates of rates and severity of affective and anxiety disorders have varied significantly across studies of renal transplant patients, possibly due in part to variation in the methodology and timing of evaluations. To this point, few researchers have examined the psychological condition of patients who are newly referred for renal transplantation. This study examined rates of psychological distress using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in a sample of 518 ESRD patients at the specific time point of first contact with the transplant center. In this sample, 15.1% of patients endorsed symptoms consistent with a depressive condition and 7.6% of patients endorsed an anxiety condition. These rates were lower than expected, which may be due to decreased distress in this sample, selection biases, or underreporting of symptoms due to patients' motivation to present themselves positively.

  10. Chemical Renal Denervation in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Consigny, Paul M. Davalian, Dariush; Donn, Rosy Hu, Jie; Rieser, Matthew Stolarik, DeAnne

    2013-12-03

    Introduction: The recent success of renal denervation in lowering blood pressure in drug-resistant hypertensive patients has stimulated interest in developing novel approaches to renal denervation including local drug/chemical delivery. The purpose of this study was to develop a rat model in which depletion of renal norepinephrine (NE) could be used to determine the efficacy of renal denervation after the delivery of a chemical to the periadventitial space of the renal artery. Methods: Renal denervation was performed on a single renal artery of 90 rats (n = 6 rats/group). The first study determined the time course of renal denervation after surgical stripping of a renal artery plus the topical application of phenol in alcohol. The second study determined the efficacy of periadventitial delivery of hypertonic saline, guanethidine, and salicylic acid. The final study determined the dose–response relationship for paclitaxel. In all studies, renal NE content was determined by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results: Renal NE was depleted 3 and 7 days after surgical denervation. Renal NE was also depleted by periadventitial delivery of all agents tested (hypertonic saline, salicylic acid, guanethidine, and paclitaxel). A dose response was observed after the application of 150 μL of 10{sup −5} M through 10{sup −2} M paclitaxel. Conclusion: We developed a rat model in which depletion of renal NE was used to determine the efficacy of renal denervation after perivascular renal artery drug/chemical delivery. We validated this model by demonstrating the efficacy of the neurotoxic agents hypertonic saline, salicylic acid, and guanethidine and increasing doses of paclitaxel.

  11. Blood pressure control, proteinuria and renal outcome in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ruilope, L M; Campo, C; Rodicio, J L

    1998-03-01

    The presence of proteinuria has been shown to be an excellent predictor for a worse outcome of renal function. Both proteinuria and arterial hypertension often coexist in the same patient, and therapy must be directed at decreasing protein excretion in the urine as well as lowering the blood pressure. Any antihypertensive agent has the capacity to lower proteinuria simply by lowering blood pressure. Furthermore, the antiproteinuric capacity of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors can be equalized by other agents or their combination, provided that the fall in blood pressure is great enough. For this reason studies are needed in which the strict control of arterial hypertension combined with a decrease in proteinuria are considered.

  12. Role of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and angiotensin(1-7) in 17beta-oestradiol regulation of renal pathology in renal wrap hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Menini, Stefano; Zheng, Wei; Pesce, Carlo; Wu, Xie; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2008-05-01

    17beta-Oestradiol (E2)-mediated inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) protects the E2-replete kidney from the progression of hypertensive renal disease. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of ACE, counters the actions of ACE by catalysing the conversion of angiotensin II (Ang II) to angiotensin(1-7) [Ang(1-7)]. We investigated E2 regulation of ACE2 in the renal wrap (RW) model of hypertension in rats. After 6 weeks on a high-sodium diet (4% NaCl), the activity of ACE2 was reduced in the renal cortex by 31%, which was mirrored by similar decreases in ACE2 protein (30%) and mRNA expression (36%) in the ovariectomized RW rat (RW-OVX); E2 replacement prevented these effects. The RW-OVX rats exhibited greater renal injury, including 1.7-fold more tubulointerstitial fibrosis and 1.6-fold more glomerulosclerosis than E2-replete females (RW-Intact and RW-OVX+E2). Angiotensin(1-7) infusion prevented these exacerbating effects of ovariectomy on renal pathology; no differences in indicators of renal injury were observed between RW-OVX-Ang(1-7) and RW-Intact rats. These renal protective effects of Ang(1-7) infusion were not attributable to increased ACE2 activity or to changes in heart rate or body weight, since these parameters were unchanged by Ang(1-7) infusion. Furthermore, Ang(1-7) infusion did not attenuate renal injury by reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP), since infusion of the peptide did not lower MAP but rather caused a slight increase during a 6 week chronic treatment for Ang(1-7). These results suggest that E2-mediated upregulation of renal ACE2 and the consequent increased Ang(1-7) production contribute to E2-mediated protection from hypertensive renal disease. These findings have implications for E2-deficient women with hypertensive renal disease and suggest that therapeutics targeted towards increasing ACE2 activity and Ang(1-7) levels will be renal protective.

  13. [Renal complications due to desensitization].

    PubMed

    Drouet, M; Sabbah, A; Bonneau, J C; Le Sellin, J

    1986-04-01

    Two observations with induction of renal complications during immunotherapy are reported. For the first patient proteinuria and infections complications happened immediately after a rush immunotherapy with Yellow Jacket Venom Extract. For the second patient an "half-rush" immunotherapy with light doses of phleole extract (cumulative dose: 7 PNU) induced an immediate reaction with rhinitis, conjunctivitis and after 24 hours a macroscopic hematuria.

  14. Renal replacement therapy in yemen.

    PubMed

    Sheiban, A K; Yehia, A; Mohamed, Y A; Hajar, A R

    1996-01-01

    In this report we present the current status of dialysis and transplantation in Yemen. The reported incidence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in one region of Yemen was estimated as 385 per million population (PMP) per year. The total population of Yemen is also estimated as 16,000,000. Peritoneal dialysis was started in 1980, while hemodialysis was started in 1981. At present there are around 36 hemodialysis machines distributed in the large cities of Yemen. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis is commonly used; however, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis has been out of practice since 1992. Renal transplantation has not yet been started in Yemen; however, at present there are 327 transplant patients being followed up in it. The majority of patients had their grafts from living non related donors abroad. In our experience, such transplantations were associated with high morbidity and mortality, in addition to acquisition of serious, potentially lethal extra-renal medical problems. We believe that there is a wide shortage of renal services in Yemen. Establishing a National Kidney Foundation to organize these services may be helpful.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Yi-Jing; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2011-01-01

    Both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are major global health issues. Current clinical markers used to reflect renal injury include albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Given the same eGFR level, urine albumin might be a better risk marker to predict progression of CKD and future development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Serum Cystatin C is emerging as a new biomarker for early detection of renal injury associated with MetS and cardiovascular risk. In addition to each component, MetS per se influences the incidence and prognosis of renal injury and the odds ratios increased with the increase in the number of metabolic abnormalities. Hyperinsulinemia, activation of rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increase of oxidative stress, and inflammatory cytokines are proposed to be the plausible biological link between MetS and CKD. Weight control, stick control of blood pressure, glucose, and lipids disorders may lead to lessening renal injury and even the subsequent CVD. PMID:21461396

  16. Renal function in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dabla, Pradeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. Cardiovascular and renal complications share common risk factors such as blood pressure, blood lipids, and glycemic control. Thus, chronic kidney disease may predict cardiovascular disease in the general population. The impact of diabetes on renal impairment changes with increasing age. Serum markers of glomerular filtration rate and microalbuminuria identify renal impairment in different segments of the diabetic population, indicating that serum markers as well as microalbuminuria tests should be used in screening for nephropathy in diabetic older people. The American Diabetes Association and the National Institutes of Health recommend Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated from serum creatinine at least once a year in all people with diabetes for detection of kidney dysfunction. eGFR remains an independent and significant predictor after adjustment for conventional risk factors including age, sex, duration of diabetes, smoking, obesity, blood pressure, and glycemic and lipid control, as well as presence of diabetic retinopathy. Cystatin-C (Cys C) may in future be the preferred marker of diabetic nephropathy due differences in measurements of serum creatinine by various methods. The appropriate reference limit for Cys C in geriatric clinical practice must be defined by further research. Various studies have shown the importance of measurement of albuminuria, eGFR, serum creatinine and hemoglobin level to further enhance the prediction of end stage renal disease. PMID:21537427

  17. Emphysema in the renal allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.L.; Sullivan, B.M.; Fluornoy, J.G.; Gerza, C.

    1985-04-01

    Two diabetic patients in whom emphysematous pyelonephritis developed after renal transplantation are described. Clinical recognition of this unusual and serious infection is masked by the effects of immunosuppression. Abdominal radiographic, ultrasound, and computed tomography findings are discussed. The clinical presentation includes urinary tract infection, sepsis, and acute tubular malfunction of the allograft in insulin-dependent diabetics.

  18. Acute leukaemia following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Subar, M; Gucalp, R; Benstein, J; Williams, G; Wiernik, P H

    1996-03-01

    Four renal transplant patients on immunosuppressive therapy who presented with acute myeloid leukaemia are described. In two cases, azathioprine may have played an important role as a cofactor in leukaemogenesis. In a third case, the alkylating agent cyclophosphamide may have contributed. All patients were treated for leukaemia with full doses of cytotoxic chemotherapy and, in each case, a functioning renal allograft was preserved throughout the treatment despite attenuation of immunosuppressive therapy. Three patients achieved complete remission. Of the three, one is surviving at 2 years and two expired during the pancytopenic phase of their treatment with no active leukaemia present, and with intact renal function. As increasing expertise in the field of organ transplantation allows patients to survive longer, such patients' exposure to immunosuppressive and potentially leukaemogenic drugs is prolonged. The risk of secondary neoplasia has been previously documented in this population. Two of the four cases reported here suffered from polycystic kidney disease as their underlying condition. While this report suggests that the leukaemias are related to renal transplantation, we cannot rule out an association with the underlying disease which led to the transplant. This report further suggests that the leukaemia that develops in such patients may respond to standard therapy, and that such treatment does not compromise the transplanted kidney.

  19. Fibrate therapy and renal function.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2009-09-01

    Fibrates are a class of lipid-lowering medications primarily used as second-line agents behind statins. The adverse-effect profile of fibrates has been marked by a puzzling yet reversible rise in serum creatinine values with their use. It is not known whether this finding represents a true change in renal function. One proposed explanation for this phenomenon is that fibrates increase the production of creatinine, in which case a rise in serum creatinine values would not represent a true deterioration in renal function. An alternative theory is that fibrates reduce the production of vasodilatory prostaglandins, which would lead to a true change in renal function in patients who experience a rise in serum creatinine values. Routine serum creatinine monitoring is advisable in fibrate-treated patients, particularly in those with preexisting renal disease. A 30% increase in serum creatinine values in the absence of other causes of serum creatinine change warrants discontinuation of fibrate therapy. Serum creatinine values can take several weeks to return to their baseline values following discontinuation of a fibrate.

  20. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and renal failure. Randomized, prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extra-renal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical endpoints. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess renal damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  1. Decreased DACH1 expression in glomerulopathy is associated with disease progression and severity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing-Quan; Zhou, Ya-Qun; Liu, Hui-Quan; Qiu, Wen-Hui; Liu, Hui; Hu, Ting-Yang; Xu, Qing; Lv, Yong-Man; Wu, Kong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate determination factor dachshund1 (DACH1) is a chromosome-associated protein that regulates cellular differentiation throughout development. Recent genome-wide association studies have show that missense mutation in DACH1 leads to hereditary renal hypodysplasia. Renal DACH1 expression can be used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We firstly characterized the function of DACH1 in normal and diseased renal tissue using immunohistochemistry to assess DACH1 in human renal biopsy specimens from 40 immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) patients, 20 idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN) patients, and 15 minimal change disease (MCD) patients. We found that DACH1 expression was decreased in the nephropathy group relative to healthy controls. DACH1 staining in the glomerulus correlated positively with eGFR (r = 0.41, p < 0.001) but negatively with serum creatinine (r = −0.37, p < 0.01). In vitro, DACH1 overexpression in human podocytes or HK2 cells decreased expression of cyclin D1, but increased expression of p21 and p53, which suggested that DACH1 overexpression in human podocytes or HK2 cells increased the G1/S phase or G2/M cell arrest. Together, These findings indicate that DACH1 expression is decreased in glomerulopathy imply a potential role for DACH1 in the this development of human chornic glomerulopathy. These data suggest that DACH1 is a potential a marker of disease progression and severity for glomerular diseases. PMID:27888806

  2. Angiotensin II natriuresis and antinatriuresis: role of renal artery pressure, renal hemodynamics, and tubular reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Hall, J E; Montani, J P; Guyton, A C

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of changes in renal artery pressure (RAP), renal hemodynamics, and tubular reabsorption in mediating the natriuretic and antinatriuretic actions of angiotensin II (AII). In anesthetized dogs, endogenous AII formation was blocked with SQ-14225 and AII was infused i.v. at rates of 5-1215 ng/kg/min while RAP was either servo-controlled at the normal level or permitted to increase. When RAP was servo-controlled to prevent a rise i RAP, AII infusion at all rates from 5-1215 ng/kg/min decreased urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) and fractional sodium excretion (FENa), while increasing fractional reabsorption of lithium (FRLi), an index of proximal tubule fractional sodium reabsorption and distal fractional sodium reabsorption (FRDNa): When RAP was permitted to increase, AII infusion rates up to 45 ng/kg/min decreased UNaV, and FENa, while increasing FRLi and FRDNa. However, at 135 ng/kg/min and above, UNaV and FENa increased while FRLi and FRDNa decreased when RAP was allowed to rise, even though RBF and FF were not substantially different from the values observed when RAP was servo-controlled. Filtered sodium load was slightly higher when RAP was permitted to increase during AII infusion, compared to the dogs in which RAP was servo-controlled, although the differences were not statistically significant. Thus, even very large doses of AII cause antinatriuresis when RAP was prevented from increasing. The natriuretic effect of high dose of AII is caused by increased RAP which decreases fractional sodium reabsorption in proximal and distal tubules and causes slight increases in sodium delivery to the tubules.

  3. Effects of a new dihydropyridine derivative, S12968 (pranedipine), and its stereoisomer, S12967, on renal effects of endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Montañés, I; Flores, O; Eleno, N; López-Novoa, J M

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess in rats the prevention by two enantiomers of a new dihydropyridine derivative (pranedipine) (called S12967 for the dextrogyre (+) and S12968 for the levogyre (-) molecules) of the renal and cardiovascular effects induced by endothelin-1. The injection of endothelin-1 (1 nmol/kg body weight) induced a sharp and transient decrease in urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion, glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and renal blood flow, a significant increase in renal vascular resistance, and a small but significant increase in arterial pressure. Treatment with S12968 alone (0.3 mg/kg) induced a 2.5-fold increase in urine flow and potassium excretion and a 4.5-fold increase in sodium excretion. Pretreatment with S12968 completely blocked the endothelin-1 induced increase in arterial pressure, did not affect the acute effect of endothelin-1 on urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion, filtration rate, and renal blood flow, but blunted the effect on renal vascular resistance. Administration of S12967 alone (1 mg/kg) did not induce changes in either renal function or arterial pressure. In S12967-treated animals, endothelin-1 also induced a transient increase in arterial pressure nad renal vascular resistance but failed to change renal function in a significant manner. In summary, the above reported experiments show that at the higher, nonhypotensive doses, the levogyre enantiomer (S12968) of a new dihydropyridine derivative (pranedipine) completely prevented the hypertensive effect of endothelin 1, and partially prevented the effect of endothelin-1 on renal vascular resistance. The dextrogyre enantiomer (S12967) had almost no effect on either mean arterial pressure or renal vascular resistance but completely blocked the endothelin-1-induced decrease in urine flow and urinary sodium excretion.

  4. Effect of reduced renal mass on renal ammonia transporter family, Rh C glycoprotein and Rh B glycoprotein, expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Young; Baylis, Chris; Verlander, Jill W; Han, Ki-Hwan; Reungjui, Sirirat; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2007-10-01

    Kidneys can maintain acid-base homeostasis, despite reduced renal mass, through adaptive changes in net acid excretion, of which ammonia excretion is the predominant component. The present study examines whether these adaptations are associated with changes in the ammonia transporter family members, Rh B glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C glycoprotein (Rhcg). We used normal Sprague-Dawley rats and a 5/6 ablation-infarction model of reduced renal mass; control rats underwent sham operation. After 1 wk, glomerular filtration rate, assessed as creatinine clearance, was decreased, serum bicarbonate was slightly increased, and Na(+) and K(+) were unchanged. Total urinary ammonia excretion was unchanged, but urinary ammonia adjusted for creatinine clearance, an index of per nephron ammonia metabolism, increased significantly. Although reduced renal mass did not alter total Rhcg protein expression, both light microscopy and immunohistochemistry with quantitative morphometric analysis demonstrated hypertrophy of both intercalated cells and principal cells in the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct that was associated with increased apical and basolateral Rhcg polarization. Rhbg expression, analyzed using immunoblot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and measurement of cell-specific expression, was unchanged. We conclude that altered subcellular localization of Rhcg contributes to adaptive changes in single-nephron ammonia metabolism and maintenance of acid-base homeostasis in response to reduced renal mass.

  5. Renal lesions of nondomestic felids.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, K M; Newman, S J; White, L A; Rohrbach, B W; Ramsay, E C

    2011-05-01

    To comprehensively evaluate the occurrence of renal lesions in a variety of nondomestic felids, necropsy cases from 1978 to 2008 were reviewed from a municipal zoo and a large cat sanctuary for those in which the kidneys were examined histologically. Seventy exotic felids were identified (25 tigers, 18 lions, 6 cougars, 5 leopards, 3 snow leopards, 3 clouded leopards, 3 Canadian lynx, 2 ocelots, 2 bobcats, 2 cheetahs, 1 jaguar), and their histologic renal lesions were evaluated and compared. The most common lesion was tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN); 36 of 70 (51%) cats were affected to some degree. Lymphocytic interstitial nephritis was the most common lesion in the tigers (9 of 25, 36%) and was rarely seen in other species. Although the renal pelvis was not available for all cats, 28 of 47 (60%) had some degree of lymphocytic pyelitis. There was no significant association between the presence of pyelitis and that of TIN. Only 1 cat had pyelonephritis. Renal papillary necrosis was present in 13 of 70 (19%) cats and was significantly associated with historical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment (odds ratio, 7.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 26.8). Only 1 cat (lion) had amyloid accumulation, and it was restricted to the corticomedullary junction. Primary glomerular lesions were absent in all cats. Intraepithelial pigment was identified in many of the cats but was not correlated with severity of TIN. Despite several previous reports describing primary glomerular disease or renal amyloidosis in exotic felids, these lesions were rare to absent in this population.

  6. The ischemic/nephrotoxic acute kidney injury and the use of renal biomarkers in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Andreucci, Michele; Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Perticone, Maria; Michael, Ashour

    2017-04-01

    The term Acute Renal Failure (ARF) has been replaced by the term Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). AKI indicates an abrupt (within 24-48h) decrease in Glomerular Filtraton Rate, due to renal damage, that causes fluid and metabolic waste retention and alteration of electrolyte and acid-base balance. The renal biomarkers of AKI are substances or processes that are indicators of normal or impaired function of the kidney. The most used renal biomarker is still serum creatinine that is inadequate for several reasons, one of which is its inability to differentiate between hemodynamic changes of renal function ("prerenal azotemia") from intrinsic renal failure or obstructive nephropathy. Cystatin C is no better in this respect. After the description of the pathophysiology of "prerenal azotemia" and of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) due to ischemia or nephrotoxicity, the renal biomarkers are listed and described: urinary NAG, urinary and serum KIM-1, serum and urinary NGAL, urinary IL-18, urinary L-FABP, serum Midkine, urinary IGFBP7 and TIMP2, urinary α-GST and π-GST, urinary ɣGT and AP, urinary β2M, urinary RBP, serum and urinary miRNA. All have been shown to appear much earlier than the rise of serum Creatinine. Some of them have been demonstrated to predict the clinical outcomes of AKI, such as the need for initiation of dialysis and mortality.

  7. Renal epithelium regulates erythropoiesis via HIF-dependent suppression of erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Farsijani, Navid M.; Liu, Qingdu; Davidoff, Olena; Sha, Feng; Fandrey, Joachim; Ikizler, T. Alp; O’Connor, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    The adult kidney plays a central role in erythropoiesis and is the main source of erythropoietin (EPO), an oxygen-sensitive glycoprotein that is essential for red blood cell production. Decreases of renal pO2 promote hypoxia-inducible factor 2–mediated (HIF-2–mediated) induction of EPO in peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells, which serve as the cellular site of EPO synthesis in the kidney. It is not clear whether HIF signaling in other renal cell types also contributes to the regulation of EPO production. Here, we used a genetic approach in mice to investigate the role of renal epithelial HIF in erythropoiesis. Specifically, we found that HIF activation in the proximal nephron via induced inactivation of the von Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor, which targets the HIF-α subunit for proteasomal degradation, led to rapid development of hypoproliferative anemia that was associated with a reduction in the number of EPO-producing renal interstitial cells. Moreover, suppression of renal EPO production was associated with increased glucose uptake, enhanced glycolysis, reduced mitochondrial mass, diminished O2 consumption, and elevated renal tissue pO2. Our genetic analysis suggests that tubulointerstitial cellular crosstalk modulates renal EPO production under conditions of epithelial HIF activation in the kidney. PMID:26927670

  8. Dopamine regulates renal osmoregulation during hyposaline stress via DRD1 in the spotted scat (Scatophagus argus)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Maoliang; Mu, Xingjiang; Gui, Lang; Zhang, Peipei; Zhou, Jianan; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Junbin

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is an important regulator of renal natriuresis and is critical for the adaptation of many animals to changing environmental salinity. However, the molecular mechanisms through which dopamine promotes this adaptation remain poorly understood. We studied the effects of dopamine on renal hypo-osmoregulation in the euryhaline fish Scatophagus argus (S. argus) during abrupt transfer from seawater (SW) to freshwater (FW). Following the transfer, serum dopamine concentration was decreased, and dopamine activated expression of the dopamine receptor 1 (designated SaDRD1) in the kidney, triggering the osmoregulatory signaling cascade. SaDRD1 protein is expressed in the renal proximal tubule cells in vivo, and is localized to the cell membrane of renal primary cells in vitro. Knockdown of SaDRD1 mRNA by siRNA significantly increased Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) activity in cultured renal primary cells in vitro, suggesting that expression of SaDRD1 may oppose the activity of NKA. We demonstrate that exogenous dopamine enhances the response of NKA to hyposaline stress after transferring primary renal cells from isosmotic medium to hypoosmotic medium. Our results indicate that dopamine regulation via SaDRD1 ignited the renal dopaminergic system to balance the osmotic pressure through inhibiting NKA activity, providing a new perspective on the hyposaline adaptation of fish. PMID:27857228

  9. [Chronic renal insufficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism in rats. Biochemical and histological evaluation].

    PubMed

    Virgós, M J; Menéndez-Rodríguez, P; Serrano, M; González-Carcedo, A; Braga, S; Cannata, J B

    1993-12-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) in rats (surgical nephrectomy, 5/6) as well as its derived bone lesions have been studied. Eighty-five male Wistar rats were used, to which chronic renal failure was induced in 1 or 2 surgical times, the parameters of renal function in basal conditions and at different times after surgery being determined. With the method used chronic renal failure is induced with values of creatinine clearance 2/3 times lower than the initial ones (p < 0.05), which stabilize at the 7th week. On the other hand the parathyroid hormone levels (PTH) in serum triple (from 125 +/- 49 to 395 +/- 191, p < 0.05), and a decrease in the tubular phosphate reabsorption is produced (p < 0.001). In bone histology an increase in resorption and bone formation is observed as well as paratrabecular fibrosis, all of which is compatible with the histological diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism. The model of surgical renal insufficiency with ablation of 5/6 of the renal mass, reduces renal function to 1/3 of the initial values after 7 weeks, this procedure having a 20% global mortality without differences being observed between the carrying out of nephrectomies in 1 or 2 surgical times. This degree of CRF was accompanied by secondary hyperparathyroidism both at the biochemical and histological levels, findings which are of great usefulness for future experimental studies.

  10. Effect of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qiming; Lu, Jing; Wang, Benwen; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility and effects of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with heart failure. A total of 20 patients with heart failure were enrolled, aged from 47 to 75 years (63±10 years). They were divided into the standard therapy (n = 10), and renal nerve radiofrequency ablation groups (n = 10). There were 15 males and 5 female patients, including 8 ischemic cardiomyopathy, 8 dilated cardiomyopathy, and 8 hypertensive cardiopathy. All of the patients met the criteria of New York Heart Association classes III-IV cardiac function. Patients with diabetes and renal failure were excluded. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation was performed on the renal artery wall under X-ray guidance. Serum electrolytes, neurohormones, and 24 h urine volume were recorded 24 h before and after the operation. Echocardiograms were performed to obtain left ventricular ejection fraction at baseline and 6 months. Heart rate, blood pressure, symptoms of dyspnea and edema were also monitored. After renal nerve ablation, 24 h urine volume was increased, while neurohormone levels were decreased compared with those of pre-operation and standard therapy. No obvious change in heart rate or blood pressure was recorded. Symptoms of heart failure were improved in patients after the operation. No complications were recorded in the study. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation may be a feasible, safe, and effective treatment for the patients with severe congestive heart failure.

  11. Evaluation of Feline Renal Perfusion with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography and Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Vanderperren, Katrien; Bosmans, Tim; Dobbeleir, André; Duchateau, Luc; Hesta, Myriam; Lybaert, Lien; Peremans, Kathelijne; Vandermeulen, Eva; Saunders, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an emerging technique to evaluate tissue perfusion. Promising results have been obtained in the evaluation of renal perfusion in health and disease, both in human and veterinary medicine. Renal scintigraphy using 99mTc-Mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) is another non-invasive technique that can be used to evaluate renal perfusion. However, no data are available on the ability of CEUS or 99mTc- MAG3 scintigraphy to detect small changes in renal perfusion in cats. Therefore, both techniques were applied in a normal feline population to evaluate detection possibilities of perfusion changes by angiotensin II (AT II). Contrast-enhanced ultrasound using a bolus injection of commercially available contrast agent and renal scintigraphy using 99mTc-MAG3 were performed in 11 healthy cats after infusion of 0,9% NaCl (control) and AT II. Angiotensin II induced changes were noticed on several CEUS parameters. Mean peak enhancement, wash-in perfusion index and wash-out rate for the entire kidney decreased significantly after AT II infusion. Moreover, a tendency towards a lower wash-in area-under-the curve was present. Renal scintigraphy could not detect perfusion changes induced by AT II. This study shows that CEUS is able to detect changes in feline renal perfusion induced by AT II infusion. PMID:27736928

  12. Regulatory T cells participate in CD39-mediated protection from renal injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; McRae, Jennifer L; Robson, Simon C; Cowan, Peter J; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Hu, Min; Polhill, Tania; Wang, Yiping; Zheng, Guoping; Wang, Ya; Lee, Vincent W S; Unwin, Robert J; Harris, David C H; Dwyer, Karen M; Alexander, Stephen I

    2012-09-01

    CD39 is an ecto-enzyme that degrades extracellular nucleotides, such as ATP, and is highly expressed on by the vasculature and circulating cells including Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. To study the role of purinergic regulation in renal disease, we used the adriamycin nephropathy (AN) mouse model of chronic renal injury, using human CD39-transgenic (hCD39Tg) and wild-type (WT) BALB/c mice. Effects of CD39 expression by Treg cells were assessed in AN by adoptive transfer of CD4(+) CD25(+) and CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells isolated from hCD39Tg and WT mice. hCD39Tg mice were protected from renal injury in AN with decreased urinary protein and serum creatinine, and significantly less renal injury compared with WT mice. While WT CD25(+) and hCD39Tg CD25(-) T cells conferred some protection against AN, hCD39Tg CD25(+) Treg cells offered greater protection. In vitro studies showed direct pro-apoptotic effects of ATP on renal tubular cells. In conclusion, hCD39 expressed by circulating leukocytes and intrinsic renal cells limits innate AN injury. Specifically, CD39 expression by Treg cells contributes to its protective role in renal injury. These findings suggest that extracellular nucleotides mediate AN kidney injury and that CD39, expressed by Treg cells and other cells, is protective in this model.

  13. Diabetes-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species: Mechanism of Their Generation and Role in Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fakhruddin, Selim; Alanazi, Wael

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes induces the onset and progression of renal injury through causing hemodynamic dysregulation along with abnormal morphological and functional nephron changes. The most important event that precedes renal injury is an increase in permeability of plasma proteins such as albumin through a damaged glomerular filtration barrier resulting in excessive urinary albumin excretion (UAE). Moreover, once enhanced UAE begins, it may advance renal injury from progression of abnormal renal hemodynamics, increased glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickness, mesangial expansion, extracellular matrix accumulation, and glomerulosclerosis to eventual end-stage renal damage. Interestingly, all these pathological changes are predominantly driven by diabetes-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and abnormal downstream signaling molecules. In diabetic kidney, NADPH oxidase (enzymatic) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (nonenzymatic) are the prominent sources of ROS, which are believed to cause the onset of albuminuria followed by progression to renal damage through podocyte depletion. Chronic hyperglycemia and consequent ROS production can trigger abnormal signaling pathways involving diverse signaling mediators such as transcription factors, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and vasoactive substances. Persistently, increased expression and activation of these signaling molecules contribute to the irreversible functional and structural changes in the kidney resulting in critically decreased glomerular filtration rate leading to eventual renal failure. PMID:28164134

  14. Renal hemodynamic effects of nabumetone, sulindac, and placebo in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cangiano, J L; Figueroa, J; Palmer, R

    1999-03-01

    We assessed the effects of nabumetone, sulindac, and placebo on renal function and renal excretion of vasodilatory prostaglandins in older female patients (age >50 years) with osteoarthritis and normal renal function. Using a prospective, crossover design, we compared the effects of nabumetone 2000 mg/d and sulindac 400 mg/d with placebo on glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow (RPF), and urinary excretion of prostaglandin E2 and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha in 12 patients. Urinary excretion of vasodilatory prostaglandins was not decreased after 14 days of treatment with either nabumetone or sulindac. Likewise, treatment with nabumetone or sulindac did not significantly alter renal function compared with placebo. There were no differences in mean changes in GFR or RPF from baseline after treatment with nabumetone or sulindac compared with placebo. The mean (+/- SD) changes in GFR from baseline were 0%+/-8% in patients receiving nabumetone, -8%+/-15% in patients receiving sulindac, and -7%+/-15% in patients receiving placebo. The results of this study demonstrate that treatment with nabumetone or sulindac caused no deterioration in renal function in older female patients with osteoarthritis and normal renal function.

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperon Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Attenuates Aldosterone-Infused Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglei; Li, Hongmei; Ling, Lilu

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) is critically involved in the development of renal injury via the production of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is also evoked in Aldo-induced renal injury. In the present study, we investigated the role of ER stress in inflammation-mediated renal injury in Aldo-infused mice. C57BL/6J mice were randomized to receive treatment for 4 weeks as follows: vehicle infusion, Aldo infusion, vehicle infusion plus tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), and Aldo infusion plus TUDCA. The effect of TUDCA on the Aldo-infused inflammatory response and renal injury was investigated using periodic acid-Schiff staining, real-time PCR, Western blot, and ELISA. We demonstrate that Aldo leads to impaired renal function and inhibition of ER stress via TUDCA attenuates renal fibrosis. This was indicated by decreased collagen I, collagen IV, fibronectin, and TGF-β expression, as well as the downregulation of the expression of Nlrp3 inflammasome markers, Nlrp3, ASC, IL-1β, and IL-18. This paper presents an important role for ER stress on the renal inflammatory response to Aldo. Additionally, the inhibition of ER stress by TUDCA negatively regulates the levels of these inflammatory molecules in the context of Aldo. PMID:27721575

  16. Renal tract malformations: perspectives for nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Kerecuk, Larissa; Schreuder, Michiel F; Woolf, Adrian S

    2008-06-01

    Renal tract malformations are congenital anomalies of the kidneys and/or lower urinary tract. One challenging feature of these conditions is that they can present not only prenatally but also in childhood or adulthood. The most severe types of malformations, such as bilateral renal agenesis or dysplasia, although rare, lead to renal failure. With advances in dialysis and transplantation for young children, it is now possible to prevent the early death of at least some individuals with severe malformations. Other renal tract malformations, such as congenital pelviureteric junction obstruction and primary vesicoureteric reflux, are relatively common. Renal tract malformations are, collectively, the major cause of childhood end-stage renal disease. Their contribution to the number of adults on renal replacement therapy is less clear and has possibly been underestimated. Renal tract malformations can be familial, and specific mutations of genes involved in renal tract development can sometimes be found in affected individuals. These features provide information about the causes of malformations but also raise questions about whether to screen relatives. Whether prenatal decompression of obstructed renal tracts, or postnatal initiation of therapies such as prophylactic antibiotics or angiotensin blockade, improve long-term renal outcomes remains unclear.

  17. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Erythropoietin and Melatonin on Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadiasl, Nasser; Banaei, Shokofeh; Alihemmati, Alireza; Baradaran, Behzad; Azimian, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Renal ischemia reperfusion (IR) is an important cause of renal dysfunction. It contributes to the development of acute renal failure (ARF). The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of erythropoietin (EPO) and melatonin (MEL), which are known anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents, in IR-induced renal injury in rats. Methods: Male Wistar Albino rats were unilaterally nephrectomized and subjected to 45 min of renal pedicle occlusion followed by 24 h reperfusion. MEL (10mg/kg, i.p) and EPO (5000U/kg, i.p) were administered prior to ischemia. After 24 h reperfusion, blood samples were collected for the determination of total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and serum creatinine levels. Also, renal samples were taken for Immunohistochemical evaluation of Bcl2 and TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) expression. Results: Ischemia reperfusion increased creatinine, TAC, MDA levels and TNF-α expression, also, IR decreased Bcl2 expression. Treatment with EPO or MEL decreased creatinine, MDA levels, and increased TAC level. Also, MEL up-regulated Bcl2 expression and down-regulated TNF-α expression compared with EPO. Conclusion: Treatment with EPO and MEL had a curative effect on renal IR injury. These results may indicate that MEL protects against inflammation and apoptosis better than EPO in renal IR injury. PMID:24409409

  18. Protection against renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury: A comparative experimental study of the effect of ischaemic preconditioning vs. postconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Shokeir, Ahmed A.; Hussein, Abdelaziz M.; Awadalla, Amira; Samy, Ahmed; Abdelaziz, Azza; Khater, Sheiri; Barakat, Nashwa

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of ischaemic preconditioning (Ipre) vs. ischaemic postconditioning (Ipost) on renal ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Materials and methods In all, 120 male Sprague–Dawley rats were classified into four groups of 30 rats each, designated sham, control, Ipre and Ipost. Renal function, including serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine clearance (CrCl), fractional Na excretion (FENa) and renal histopathology were measured at 2, 24 and 48 h after ischaemia. Markers of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in kidney tissues during the same intervals. Results Ipre caused a significant improvement in renal function, as indicated by a significant decrease in serum creatinine, BUN and FENa, with a significant increase in CrCl. However, Ipost caused no significant improvement in renal function. Morphologically Ipre caused a marked significant improvement in the renal tubular damage score compared to Ipost. Also, Ipre caused a significant decrease in MDA, and significant increase in GSH and SOD when compared to Ipost. Conclusion Ipre is more potent than Ipost for improving the renal injury induced by I/R. Ipre caused a marked improvement in renal function and morphology, while Ipost caused a minimal improvement in morphology only. Moreover, Ipre caused a marked and significant reduction in oxidative stress in kidney tissues, while Ipost caused a minimal reduction. PMID:26558061

  19. Renal amyloidosis. Evaluation by gallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Skinner, M.; Cohen, A.S.; Ngai, S.; Peng, T.T.

    1986-09-01

    A study has been performed to evaluate the efficacy of gallium imaging in the detection of renal amyloidosis. Ten of the 11 patients who had biopsy-proven renal amyloidosis demonstrated marked uptake in both kidneys. One patient revealed moderate gallium uptake in his kidneys. None of the patients had underlying renal or extrarenal pathology other than amyloidosis, which could account for renal gallium uptake (renal infection, neoplasm, hepatic failure or frequent blood transfusions). Four patients also had extrarenal foci of abnormal gallium uptake, suggesting other sites of amyloid deposits. Our data strongly suggest that gallium imaging has a high sensitivity for detection of renal amyloidosis. Its specificity is enhanced significantly by careful review of the clinical history to exclude other known causes of renal gallium uptake. Potentially, gallium imaging may be used to monitor the progress of patients under experimental therapy.

  20. Role of renal nerves on renal functional change after back heating in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Chien, C T; Wu, M S; Fu, T C

    1994-06-20

    This study was designed to investigate the possible role of renal nerves in the regulation of renal function after the application of heat (BH), by means of an electric heating pad (42 +/- 1 degree C) to the skin of the back overlying the kidneys. Both renal efferent (RENA) and renal afferent nervous activity (RANA) were recorded in 7 anesthetized female Wistar rats. It was found that RENA reduced to less than 80% of the control level during 30 min of back heating, accompanied by an increase in excretion of urine, sodium and potassium, and enhanced the glomerular filtration rate. BH in 9 chronic bilateral renal denervated rats (RD) showed the same renal responses as in the renal nerve intact rats (RI) after back heating. It is concluded that renal nerves played only a partially role in the renal diuretic action of back heating.

  1. Decreasing Fires in Mediterranean Europe.

    PubMed

    Turco, Marco; Bedia, Joaquín; Di Liberto, Fabrizio; Fiorucci, Paolo; von Hardenberg, Jost; Koutsias, Nikos; Llasat, Maria-Carmen; Xystrakis, Fotios; Provenzale, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Forest fires are a serious environmental hazard in southern Europe. Quantitative assessment of recent trends in fire statistics is important for assessing the possible shifts induced by climate and other environmental/socioeconomic changes in this area. Here we analyse recent fire trends in Portugal, Spain, southern France, Italy and Greece, building on a homogenized fire database integrating official fire statistics provided by several national/EU agencies. During the period 1985-2011, the total annual burned area (BA) displayed a general decreasing trend, with the exception of Portugal, where a heterogeneous signal was found. Considering all countries globally, we found that BA decreased by about 3020 km2 over the 27-year-long study period (i.e. about -66% of the mean historical value). These results are consistent with those obtained on longer time scales when data were available, also yielding predominantly negative trends in Spain and France (1974-2011) and a mixed trend in Portugal (1980-2011). Similar overall results were found for the annual number of fires (NF), which globally decreased by about 12600 in the study period (about -59%), except for Spain where, excluding the provinces along the Mediterranean coast, an upward trend was found for the longer period. We argue that the negative trends can be explained, at least in part, by an increased effort in fire management and prevention after the big fires of the 1980's, while positive trends may be related to recent socioeconomic transformations leading to more hazardous landscape configurations, as well as to the observed warming of recent decades. We stress the importance of fire data homogenization prior to analysis, in order to alleviate spurious effects associated with non-stationarities in the data due to temporal variations in fire detection efforts.

  2. Decreasing Fires in Mediterranean Europe

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Marco; Bedia, Joaquín; Di Liberto, Fabrizio; Fiorucci, Paolo; von Hardenberg, Jost; Koutsias, Nikos; Llasat, Maria-Carmen; Xystrakis, Fotios; Provenzale, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Forest fires are a serious environmental hazard in southern Europe. Quantitative assessment of recent trends in fire statistics is important for assessing the possible shifts induced by climate and other environmental/socioeconomic changes in this area. Here we analyse recent fire trends in Portugal, Spain, southern France, Italy and Greece, building on a homogenized fire database integrating official fire statistics provided by several national/EU agencies. During the period 1985-2011, the total annual burned area (BA) displayed a general decreasing trend, with the exception of Portugal, where a heterogeneous signal was found. Considering all countries globally, we found that BA decreased by about 3020 km2 over the 27-year-long study period (i.e. about -66% of the mean historical value). These results are consistent with those obtained on longer time scales when data were available, also yielding predominantly negative trends in Spain and France (1974-2011) and a mixed trend in Portugal (1980-2011). Similar overall results were found for the annual number of fires (NF), which globally decreased by about 12600 in the study period (about -59%), except for Spain where, excluding the provinces along the Mediterranean coast, an upward trend was found for the longer period. We argue that the negative trends can be explained, at least in part, by an increased effort in fire management and prevention after the big fires of the 1980’s, while positive trends may be related to recent socioeconomic transformations leading to more hazardous landscape configurations, as well as to the observed warming of recent decades. We stress the importance of fire data homogenization prior to analysis, in order to alleviate spurious effects associated with non-stationarities in the data due to temporal variations in fire detection efforts. PMID:26982584

  3. Thermoelectric device exhibiting decreased stress

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.L.; Chou, D.J.

    1985-02-05

    A thermoelectric device exhibiting both structural integrity and decreased stress across the device notwithstanding the application of thermally cycled temperature differentials thereacross includes, electrically interconnected thermoelectric elements and a rigidly affixed substrate. Thermal stress is relieved by using flexible conductors to interconnect the thermoelectric elements, and by the use of a flexile joint to attach a second substrate to the remainder of the device. Complete elimination of the second substrate may also be used to eliminate stress. Presence of the rigidly affixed substrate gives the device sufficient structural integrity to enable it to withstand rugged conditions.

  4. Technologies for Decreasing Mining Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valgma, Ingo; Väizene, Vivika; Kolats, Margit; Saarnak, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In case of stratified deposits like oil shale deposit in Estonia, mining losses depend on mining technologies. Current research focuses on extraction and separation possibilities of mineral resources. Selective mining, selective crushing and separation tests have been performed, showing possibilities of decreasing mining losses. Rock crushing and screening process simulations were used for optimizing rock fractions. In addition mine backfilling, fine separation, and optimized drilling and blasting have been analyzed. All tested methods show potential and depend on mineral usage. Usage in addition depends on the utilization technology. The questions like stability of the material flow and influences of the quality fluctuations to the final yield are raised.

  5. Role of the renal sympathetic nerves in renal sodium/potassium handling and renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianling; He, Qiaoling; Wu, Weifeng; Li, Qingjie; Huang, Rongjie; Pan, Xiaofeng; Lai, Wenying

    2016-01-01

    Renal sympathetic nerve activity has an important role in renal disease-associated hypertension and in the modulation of fluid homeostasis. In the present study, changes in renal function and renal sodium/potassium handling were investigated in groups of 12-week-old male, spontaneously hypertensive rats with renal denervation (RDNX group) or sham denervation (sham group). The RDNX group excreted significantly more sodium than the sham group during the 2-week observation period (P<0.05). Following bilateral renal denervation, the fractional lithium excretion was elevated in the RDNX group compared with the sham group, but no significant effect was observed of renal denervation on the fractional distal reabsorption rate of sodium or the fractional excretion of potassium. Furthermore, the glomerular injury score and the wall-to-lumen ratio of the interlobular artery were significantly lower in the RDNX group than in the sham group (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study indicates an involvement of the renal sympathetic nerves in the regulation of renal tubular sodium reabsorption in spontaneously hypertensive rats and in the renal damage associated with hypertension. PMID:27698757

  6. Renal Scarring in the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, Russell W.; Greenfield, Saul P.; Hoberman, Alejandro; Keren, Ron; Mathews, Ranjiv; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; Ivanova, Anastasia; Carpenter, Myra A.; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Majd, Massoud; Ziessman, Harvey A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives The main objectives of the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) trial were to evaluate the role of antimicrobial prophylaxis in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal scarring in children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). We present a comprehensive evaluation of renal scarring outcomes in RIVUR trial participants. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial enrolled 607 children aged 2–71 months with grade 1–4 VUR diagnosed after a first or second febrile or symptomatic UTI. Study participants received trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or placebo and were followed for 2 years. Renal scarring was evaluated by baseline and follow-up 99mtechnetium dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scans that were reviewed independently by two blinded reference radiologists. Results At the end of the study, 58 (10%) of 599 children and 63 (5%) of 1197 renal units had renal scarring. New renal scarring did not differ between the prophylaxis and placebo groups (6% versus 7%, respectively). Children with renal scarring were significantly older (median age, 26 versus 11 months; P=0.01), had a second UTI before enrollment (odds ratio [OR], 2.85; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.38 to 5.92), were more likely to be Hispanic (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.13 to 4.34), and had higher grades of VUR (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.56 to 5.0). The proportion of new scars in renal units with grade 4 VUR was significantly higher than in units with no VUR (OR, 24.2; 95% CI, 6.4 to 91.2). Conclusions Significantly more renal scarring was seen in relatively older children and in those with a second episode of febrile or symptomatic UTI before randomization. Preexisting and new renal scars occurred significantly more in renal units with grade 4 VUR than in those with low-grade or no VUR. Antimicrobial prophylaxis did not decrease the risk of renal scarring. PMID:26555605

  7. Curcumin ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by inhibiting renal inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Masaaki; Ueno, Masaki; Morishita, Jun; Maekawa, Nobuhiro

    2013-05-01

    Inflammatory mechanisms may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Curcumin is an orange-yellow polyphenol present in curry spice and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of curcumin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, cisplatin, cisplatin + curcumin and curcumin. Mice were given cisplatin (20 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) with or without curcumin treatment (100 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally, immediately after cisplatin injection). Serum and renal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and renal monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 concentrations, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA expression in kidney, renal function and histological changes were determined 72 h after cisplatin injection. Serum TNF-alpha concentration in the cisplatin + curcumin group significantly decreased compared with that in the cisplatin group. Renal TNF-alpha and MCP-1 concentrations and ICAM-1 mRNA expression in kidney in the cisplatin + curcumin group also significantly decreased compared with those in the cisplatin group. Consequently, cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction and renal tubular necrosis scores were attenuated by curcumin treatment. These results indicate that curcumin acts to reduce cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through its anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, curcumin may become a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  8. Effects of positive acceleration /+Gz/ on renal function and plasma renin in normal man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Shubrooks, S. J., Jr.; Fishman, L. M.; Duncan, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of positive radial centrifugation (+Gz) on plasma resin activity (PRA) and renal function were assessed in 15 normal male subjects under carefully controlled conditions of Na, K, and water intake. Twenty minutes of +2.0 Gz resulted in significant decreases in the mean rate of sodium excretion and creatine clearance and in a doubling of PRA in seven sodium-depleted subjects (10 meq Na intake). In eight sodium-replete subjects (200 mq Na intake), 30 min of +2.0 Gz was also associated with a decrease in the mean rate of sodium excretion. As a consequence of a concurrent decrease in creatine clearance, the fractional excretion of sodium during centrifugation did not differ from control, suggesting that the changes in Na excretion were mediated primarily by renal hemodynamic factors, although enhanced renal tubular sodium reabsorption may also have played a role.

  9. Nature of the renal injury following total renal ischemia in man.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, B D; Miller, D C; Mehigan, J T; Olcott, C O; Golbetz, H; Robertson, C R; Derby, G; Spencer, R; Friedman, S

    1984-01-01

    The effects of total renal ischemia (TRI) of 15-87 min duration due to suprarenal clamping of the aorta were studied in 15 mannitol-treated patients undergoing abdominal aortic surgery. 15 patients undergoing similar surgery but requiring only infrarenal clamping served as controls. 1-2 h following TRI, GFR was reduced to only 39% of that in controls, 23 +/- 5 vs. 59 +/- 7 ml/min (P less than 0.001). This could not be ascribed to impaired renal plasma flow (RPF), which was mildly reduced to 331 +/- 71 and was not different from the value in controls, 407 +/- 66 ml/min. However, impaired PAH extraction (43 +/- 7%) and isosthenuria, not present in controls, suggest a primary role for tubular injury in lowering GFR at this time. 24 h following TRI, the GFR remained depressed below controls, 45 +/- 8 vs. 84 +/- 8 ml/min (P less than 0.005), while the transglomerular sieving of neutral dextrans was significantly enhanced (radius interval, 24-40 A). A theoretical analysis of transcapillary solute exchange revealed that these findings could be largely explained by a selective reduction of either RPF (-61%) or of transmembrane hydraulic pressure difference (-18%) below control values. Alternately, a combination of these two factors with changes of smaller magnitude could explain the findings. In contrast, a selective increase in oncotic pressure or decrease of the glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient could be excluded as a cause of hypofiltration 24 h after TRI. These observations lead us to suggest that the transient azotemia observed following TRI is due to a self-limited injury to the nephron that is identical to that seen in overt and sustained forms of acute renal failure. PMID:6421876

  10. Water deprivation up-regulates urine osmolality and renal aquaporin 2 in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng-Meng; Wang, De-Hua

    2016-04-01

    To better understand how desert rodents adapt to water scarcity, we examined urine osmolality, renal distribution and expression of aquaporins (AQPs) in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) during 7 days of water deprivation (WD). Urine osmolality of the gerbils during WD averaged 7503 mOsm kg(-1). Renal distributions of AQP1, AQP2, and AQP3 were similar to that described in other rodents. After the 7 day WD, renal AQP2 was up-regulated, while resting metabolic rate and total evaporative water loss decreased by 43% and 36%, respectively. Our data demonstrated that Mongolian gerbils showed high urine concentration, renal AQPs expression and body water conservation to cope with limited water availability, which may be critical for their survival during dry seasons in cold deserts.

  11. [Extracorporeal renal replacement therapies in acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Schaefer, R M; Barenbrock, M; Teschner, M; Bahner, U

    2000-05-15

    The most serious forms of acute renal failure (ARF) are nowadays encountered in the intensive care unit (ICU), where up to 25% of new patients are reported to develop ARF. Lethality rates may reach 50 to 90% when the ARF is part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. A multitude of extracorporeal procedures have been introduced into intensive care medicine. Applied with adequate skills and experience, most of these techniques will suffice to replace excretory renal function. However, because of low efficacy arterio-venous procedures (CAVH and CAVHD) have been abandoned for the veno-venous, pump-driven techniques (CVVH and CVVHD). Up to now, there is no consensus whether continuous or intermittent renal replacement therapy is more advantageous. In many cases, oliguric patients with circulatory instability will be treated by CVVH, even though there is no prospective study to show that in terms of outcome continuous treatment is superior to intermittent hemodialysis. It is equally conceivable to treat such patients with daily, prolonged (intermittent) hemodialysis. Apparently, the dose of replacement therapy, be it continuous filtration (36 to 48 l/24 h) or intermittent hemodialysis (daily 3 to 4 h) with a target BUN of less than 50 mg/dl, is more important than the modality of treatment. Moreover, there is good evidence that the use of biocompatible membranes (no complement- or leukocyte activation) is preferable and that with high-volume hemofiltration bicarbonate-containing replacement fluids should be used. However, despite all the technical advances, we firmly believe that the skills and the experience of those physicians and nurses who actually perform renal replacement therapy in the ICU are more important than the modality of treatment applied.

  12. Does Renal Artery Supply Indicate Treatment Success of Renal Denervation?

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Axel; Ditting, Tilmann; Sobotka, Paul A.; Veelken, Roland Schmieder, Roland E.; Uder, Michael; Ott, Christian

    2013-08-01

    PurposeRenal denervation (RDN) emerged as an innovative interventional antihypertensive therapy. With the exception of pretreatment blood pressure (BP) level, no other clear predictor for treatment efficacy is yet known. We analyzed whether the presence of multiple renal arteries has an impact on BP reduction after RDN.MethodsFifty-three patients with treatment-resistant hypertension (office BP {>=} 140/90 mmHg and 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring ({>=}130/80 mmHg) underwent bilateral catheter-based RDN. Patients were stratified into one-vessel (OV) (both sides) and at least multivessel (MV) supply at one side. Both groups were treated on one vessel at each side; in case of multiple arteries, only the dominant artery was treated on each side.ResultsBaseline clinical characteristics (including BP, age, and estimated glomerular filtration rate) did not differ between patients with OV (n = 32) and MV (n = 21). Office BP was significantly reduced in both groups at 3 months (systolic: OV -15 {+-} 23 vs. MV -16 {+-} 20 mmHg; diastolic: OV -10 {+-} 12 vs. MV -8 {+-} 11 mmHg, both p = NS) as well as 6 months (systolic: OV -18 {+-} 18 vs. MV -17 {+-} 22 mmHg; diastolic: OV -10 {+-} 10 vs. -10 {+-} 12 mmHg, both p = NS) after RDN. There was no difference in responder rate (rate of patients with office systolic BP reduction of at least 10 mmHg after 6 months) between the groups.ConclusionIn patients with multiple renal arteries, RDN of one renal artery-namely, the dominant one-is sufficient to induce BP reduction in treatment-resistant hypertension.

  13. Effect of renal function on prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Adrián Ignacio; Cappola, Thomas P; Fang, James; Hetzel, Scott J; Kadlec, Andrew; Astor, Brad; Sweitzer, Nancy K

    2015-01-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) is associated with increased mortality in heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify whether worsened or improved renal function during mid-term follow-up is associated with worsened outcomes in patients with chronic HF. A total of 892 participants from a multicenter cohort study of chronic HF were followed over 3.1 ± 1.9 years of enrollment. Worsened and improved renal functions were tested with multivariate models as independent predictors of HF hospitalization and mortality. Although 12% of subjects experienced a ≥25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 17% experienced a ≥25% increase in eGFR, and there was stability of kidney function observed in the cohort as a whole. The quartile with the worst RD at any point in time had increased risk of HF hospitalization and mortality. Worsened eGFR was associated with HF outcomes in the unadjusted (hazard ratio = 1.71, 95% confidence interval 1.04 to 2.81, p = 0.035), but not the adjusted analysis. Improvement in eGFR was not associated with outcome (p = 0.453). In chronic HF, the severity of RD predicts risk of poor outcome better than changes in renal function during mid-term follow-up. This suggests that in patients with appropriately treated chronic HF, worsening renal function in itself does not yield useful prognostic information and may not reflect poor outcome.

  14. Impairment of renal sodium excretion in tropical residents - phenomenological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, S. K.; Aryee, P. A.; Amuasi, J.; Hesse, I. F. A.; Affram, R. K.

    There is evidence of impaired renal sodium excretion in salt-sensitive African Blacks. A decreased rate of renal sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion, low plasma renin activity and a tendency to elevated blood pressure are the hallmarks of salt sensitivity. Recent evidence indicates that increased proximal and distal tubular fluid reabsorption in some tropical residents may explain the impaired sodium excretion in these people. In this study of a cohort population, we speculated that subjects selected from that population might be salt-sensitive. We therefore measured the sodium balance in 10 normotensive male subjects over 10 consecutive days, after they had ingested a normal or a high amount of sodium, as NaCl (salt) in their diet. We quantified their renal sodium excretion rate by phenomenological analysis of their sodium balance data. We also measured plasma renin activity for 7 consecutive days in a separate group of 6 male and 4 female subjects in order to assess the state of their renin/angiotensin system. We selected all our subjects from a cohort population of 269 subjects randomly selected from a community known to have a high prevalence of primary hypertension. Our data on two separate groups of subjects from the same cohort population revealed delayed renal sodium excretion with t1/2 of about 5 days, compared to published data for normal individuals with t1/2 of less than 24 h. Also, plasma renin activity levels were low. Hence, our subjects are salt-sensitive. Quantification of their renal impairment is important for various reasons: it heightens one's appreciation of the problem of salt retention in African Blacks who are salt-sensitive and it also underlines the importance of the need for further research into the benefits of dietary salt restriction for reducing cardiovascular mortality in African populations, as has been done in some Western countries.

  15. Natural history and etiology of hyperuricemia following pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, V O; Kaiser, B A; Polinsky, M S; Palmer, J A; Quien, R; Baluarte, H J

    1995-02-01

    A retrospective review was conducted to determine the incidence, etiology, natural history and complications of hyperuricemia after pediatric renal transplantation. Of 81 active transplant recipients aged 10.1 +/- 4.8 (mean +/- SD) years being followed by St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, 57 (70%) were males and 59 (73%) Caucasian. Their immunosuppression consisted of azathioprine, cyclosporine A and prednisone. Mean serum uric acid concentrations peaked at 6 months post transplantation (6.2 +/- 2.6 mg/dl), when 39% of the patients had hyperuricemia and 60% were receiving diuretics, and decreased thereafter. At 30 months, 23% of the patients had hyperuricemia and 17% required diuretics. When we compared 42 normouricemic (group A) with 24 hyperuricemic (group B) patients at 18 months post transplantation, we found that patients in group B were older (11.6 +/- 4.2 vs. 8.6 +/- 5.2 years, P = 0.01), had worse renal function (77 +/- 25 vs. 96 +/- 36 ml/min per 1.73 m2, P = 0.03) and required diuretics more frequently (63% vs. 21%, P = 0.001), but had identical blood levels of cyclosporine A (82 +/- 28 vs. 84 +/- 35 ng/ml, P = 0.78). A family history of gout did not affect the prevalence of hyperuricemia after transplantation. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is common following pediatric renal transplantation and is more likely attributable to reduced renal function and diuretic therapy than to the known hyperuricemic effect of cyclosporine A. Of these variables, only diuretic therapy is readily controllable and should be closely regulated following pediatric renal transplantation.

  16. Acute pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and acute renal failure favourably resolved in two renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Mihai; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, Gener; Mandache, Eugen; Hortopan, Monica; Constantinescu, Ileana; Iliescu, Olguta

    2003-03-01

    Renal transplantation is often associated with severe complications. Except for acute rejection, infections and toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment are the most frequent problems observed after transplantation. Infections with hepatic viruses (HBV, HDV, HCV, HGV) and cytomegalic virus (CMV) are the main infectious complications after renal transplantation. Cyclosporine toxicity is not unusual for a patient with renal transplantation and is even more frequent for patients with hepatic impairment due to viral infections. The subjects of this report are two renal transplant recipients with acute pancreatitis, severe hepatitis and acute renal failure on graft, receiving immunosuppressive therapy for maintaining renal graft function

  17. Normal Doppler velocimetry of renal vasculature in Persian cats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cibele F; Chammas, Maria C

    2011-06-01

    Renal diseases are common in older cats. Decreased renal blood flow may be the first sign of dysfunction and can be evaluated by Doppler ultrasound. But previous studies suggest that the resistive index (RI) has a low sensitivity for detecting renal disease. Doppler waveforms of renal and intrarenal arteries demonstrate decreased blood flow before there are any changes in the RI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the normal Doppler flowmetrics parameters of renal arteries (RAs), interlobar arteries (IAs) and abdominal aorta (AO) in adult healthy, Persian cats. Twenty-five Persian cats (13 females and 12 males with mean age of 30 months and an age range 12-60 months) with normal clinical examinations and biochemical tests and normal systemic blood pressure were given B-mode ultrasonographies in order to exclude all nephropathies, including polycystic kidney disease. All measurements were performed on both kidneys. Both kidneys (n=50) were examined by color mapping of the renal vasculature. Pulsed Doppler was used to examine both RAs, the IAs at cranial, middle and caudal sites, and the AO. The RI was calculated for all of the vessels. Early systolic acceleration (ESA) of RA and IA was obtained with Doppler spectral analysis. Furthermore, the ratio indices between RA/AO, and IA/RA velocities were calculated. The mean values of peak systolic velocity (PSV) and the diameter for AO were 53.17±13.46 cm/s and 0.38±0.08 cm, respectively. The mean RA diameter for all 50 kidneys was 0.15±0.02 cm. Considering the velocimetric values in both RAs, the mean PSV and RI that were obtained were 41.17±9.40 cm/s and 0.54±0.07. The RA had a mean ESA of 1.12±1.14 m/s(2) and the calculated upper limit of the reference value was 3.40 m/s(2). The mean renal-aortic ratio was 0.828±0.296. The IA showed PSV and RI values of 32.16±9.33 cm/s and 0.52±0.06, respectively. The mean ESA of all IAs was 0.73±0.61 m/s(2). The calculated upper limit of the reference value was 2.0m

  18. Hepcidin Mitigates Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Modulating Systemic Iron Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Scindia, Yogesh; Dey, Paromita; Thirunagari, Abhinav; Liping, Huang; Rosin, Diane L; Floris, Matteo; Okusa, Mark D; Swaminathan, Sundararaman

    2015-11-01

    Iron-mediated oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Hepcidin is an endogenous acute phase hepatic hormone that prevents iron export from cells by inducing degradation of the only known iron export protein, ferroportin. In this study, we used a mouse model to investigate the effect of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury on systemic iron homeostasis and determine if dynamic modulation of iron homeostasis with hepcidin has therapeutic benefit in the treatment of AKI. Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury induced hepatosplenic iron export through increased ferroportin expression, which resulted in hepatosplenic iron depletion and an increase in serum and kidney nonheme iron levels. Exogenous hepcidin treatment prevented renal ischemia-reperfusion-induced changes in iron homeostasis. Hepcidin also decreased kidney ferroportin expression and increased the expression of cytoprotective H-ferritin. Hepcidin-induced restoration of iron homeostasis was accompanied by a significant reduction in ischemia-reperfusion-induced tubular injury, apoptosis, renal oxidative stress, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Hepcidin -: deficient mice demonstrated increased susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion injury compared with wild-type mice. Reconstituting hepcidin-deficient mice with exogenous hepcidin induced hepatic iron sequestration, attenuated the reduction in renal H-ferritin and reduced renal oxidative stress, apoptosis, inflammation, and tubular injury. Hepcidin-mediated protection was associated with reduced serum IL-6 levels. In summary, renal ischemia-reperfusion injury results in profound alterations in systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin treatment restores iron homeostasis and reduces inflammation to mediate protection in renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, suggesting that hepcidin-ferroportin pathway holds promise as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of AKI.

  19. Hepcidin Mitigates Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Modulating Systemic Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Scindia, Yogesh; Dey, Paromita; Thirunagari, Abhinav; Liping, Huang; Rosin, Diane L.; Floris, Matteo; Okusa, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron-mediated oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of renal ischemia–reperfusion injury. Hepcidin is an endogenous acute phase hepatic hormone that prevents iron export from cells by inducing degradation of the only known iron export protein, ferroportin. In this study, we used a mouse model to investigate the effect of renal ischemia–reperfusion injury on systemic iron homeostasis and determine if dynamic modulation of iron homeostasis with hepcidin has therapeutic benefit in the treatment of AKI. Renal ischemia–reperfusion injury induced hepatosplenic iron export through increased ferroportin expression, which resulted in hepatosplenic iron depletion and an increase in serum and kidney nonheme iron levels. Exogenous hepcidin treatment prevented renal ischemia-reperfusion–induced changes in iron homeostasis. Hepcidin also decreased kidney ferroportin expression and increased the expression of cytoprotective H-ferritin. Hepcidin-induced restoration of iron homeostasis was accompanied by a significant reduction in ischemia-reperfusion–induced tubular injury, apoptosis, renal oxidative stress, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Hepcidin–deficient mice demonstrated increased susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion injury compared with wild-type mice. Reconstituting hepcidin-deficient mice with exogenous hepcidin induced hepatic iron sequestration, attenuated the reduction in renal H-ferritin and reduced renal oxidative stress, apoptosis, inflammation, and tubular injury. Hepcidin-mediated protection was associated with reduced serum IL-6 levels. In summary, renal ischemia–reperfusion injury results in profound alterations in systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin treatment restores iron homeostasis and reduces inflammation to mediate protection in renal ischemia–reperfusion injury, suggesting that hepcidin-ferroportin pathway holds promise as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of AKI. PMID:25788528

  20. Histological, molecular and biochemical detection of renal injury after Echis pyramidum snake envenomation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Johany, Awadh M.; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K.; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E.; Bauomy, Amira A.; Diab, Marwa S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a common sign of snake envenomation. The present work aimed to clarify the effect of intraperitoneal injection of 1/8 LD50 and 1/4 LD50 doses of Echis pyramidum snake venom on the renal tissue of rats after 2, 4 and 6 h from envenomation. Histopathological examination showed intense dose and time dependent abnormalities, including swelling glomerulus and tubular necrosis and damage as well as signs of intertubular medullary hemorrhage at early stages of envenomation. However, at late stages of envenomation by any of the doses under investigation, no intact renal corpuscles were recorded and complete lysis in renal corpuscles with ruptured Bowman’s capsules was observed. Immunohistochemistry by immunohistochemical staining was used to test the protein expression of Bax in renal tissue of rats. The result showed that the expression of Bax in renal tissue sections of envenomated rats was increased according to dose and time-dependant manner. The isolation of DNA from the renal cells of envenomed rats pointed out to the occurrence of DNA fragmentation, which is another indicator for renal tissue injury especially after 6 h of 1/4 LD50 of E. pyramidum envenomation. Oxidative stress biomarkers malondialdehyde and nitrite/nitrate levels, antioxidant parameters; glutathione, total antioxidant capacity and catalase were assayed in renal tissue homogenates. The venom induced significant increase in the levels of malondialdehyde and nitrite/nitrate while the levels of glutathione, total antioxidant capacity and catalase were significantly decreased, especially after 6 h of envenomation. The results revealed that the E. pyramidum induced dose and time-dependant significant disturbances in the physiological parameters in the kidney. We conclude that the use of the immunohistochemical techniques, the detection of DNA integrity and oxidative stress marker estimations are more specific tools that can clarify cellular injury and could point out to the defense

  1. Betaine supplementation protects against high-fructose-induced renal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chen-Yu; Wang, Ming-Xing; Ge, Chen-Xu; Wang, Xing; Li, Jian-Mei; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2014-03-01

    High fructose intake causes metabolic syndrome, being an increased risk of chronic kidney disease development in humans and animals. In this study, we examined the influence of betaine on high-fructose-induced renal damage involving renal inflammation, insulin resistance and lipid accumulation in rats and explored its possible mechanisms. Betaine was found to improve high-fructose-induced metabolic syndrome including hyperuricemia, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in rats with systemic inflammation. Betaine also showed a protection against renal dysfunction and tubular injury with its restoration of the increased glucose transporter 9 and renal-specific transporter in renal brush bolder membrane and the decreased organic anion transporter 1 and adenosine-triphosphate-binding cassette transporter 2 in the renal cortex in this model. These protective effects were relevant to the anti-inflammatory action by inhibiting the production of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in renal tissue of high-fructose-fed rat, being more likely to suppress renal NOD-like receptor superfamily, pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome activation than nuclear factor κB activation. Subsequently, betaine with anti-inflammation ameliorated insulin signaling impairment by reducing the up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 and lipid accumulation partly by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/palmityltransferase 1/carnitine/organic cation transporter 2 pathway in kidney of high-fructose-fed rats. These results indicate that the inflammatory inhibition plays a pivotal role in betaine's improvement of high-fructose-induced renal injury with insulin resistance and lipid accumulation in rats.

  2. Patients with nephrolithiasis had lower fetuin-A protein level in urine and renal tissue.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong Xian; Li, Cheng Yang; Deng, Yao Liang

    2014-02-01

    Fetuin-A acts as an inhibitor of systemic and local ectopic calcification and inflammatory response, but the role of fetuin-A in the etiology of urolithiasis is still unclear. We aim to investigate the expression of fetuin-A in the serum, urine and renal tissue of patients with or without nephrolithiasis. 48 patients with nephrolithiasis (group A) and 32 individuals without urolithiasis (group B, control group) were enrolled into our study. Level of fetuin-A in serum and urine was measured by ELISA, and expression of fetuin-A in renal tissue was localized and assessed by immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting, respectively. Indexes of oxidative stress in kidney were evaluated. Other routine serum and urine chemistries for inpatients were measured biochemically. The results showed that fetuin-A expressed widely in the proximal and distal renal tubule, the thin segment of Henle's loop and the collecting duct epithelium. There were no differences in serum fetuin-A level between the two groups. Compared with control group, cellular expression of P47phox and fetuin-A mRNAs in the renal tissue of patients with nephrolithiasis increased, the level of MDA in renal tissue and the level of urinary calcium also increased, but urinary and renal fetuin-A protein and the activities of SOD in renal tissue decreased. Correlation analysis showed that there was a negative correlation between the level of renal fetuin-A protein and the expression of P47phox mRNA and MDA. These results revealed that nephrolithiasis patients had lower fetuin-A protein level in urine and renal tissue.

  3. Profound bradycardia with decreased PEEP.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Susan R; Kansagra, Ankit; Richards, Jeremy B

    2013-11-01

    An athletic 21-year-old male was admitted to the surgical ICU after sustaining 2 stab wounds to his torso. He had an episode of left lung collapse early in his course, managed with suctioning and increased PEEP, to 15 cm H2O. He was bradycardic (heart rates 50-60 beats/min) throughout his ICU stay, but when the PEEP was lowered to 5 cm H2O in preparation for extubation, he developed sinus pauses and his heart rate dropped to 20 beats/min. After a thorough evaluation, the drop in his heart rate was determined to be due to increased vagal tone from increased cardiac output with the decreased PEEP. After premedication with glycopyrrolate, he was successfully extubated the following day, while his heart rate remained at his baseline of 50 beats/min. We review the physiologic mechanisms of bradycardia due to the removal of mechanical ventilation.

  4. Hyperhomocysteinemia decreases bone blood flow.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Neetu; Vacek, Thomas P; Fleming, John T; Vacek, Jonathan C; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2011-01-25

    Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), are associated with osteoporosis. A decrease in bone blood flow is a potential cause of compromised bone mechanical properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that HHcy decreases bone blood flow and biomechanical properties. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with Hcy (0.67 g/L) in drinking water for 8 weeks. Age-matched rats served as controls. At the end of the treatment period, the rats were anesthetized. Blood samples were collected from experimental or control rats. Biochemical turnover markers (body weight, Hcy, vitamin B(12), and folate) were measured. Systolic blood pressure was measured from the right carotid artery. Tibia blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flow probe. The results indicated that Hcy levels were significantly higher in the Hcy-treated group than in control rats, whereas vitamin B(12) levels were lower in the Hcy-treated group compared with control rats. There was no significant difference in folate concentration and blood pressure in Hcy-treated versus control rats. The tibial blood flow index of the control group was significantly higher (0.78 ± 0.09 flow unit) compared with the Hcy-treated group (0.51 ± 0.09). The tibial mass was 1.1 ± 0.1 g in the control group and 0.9 ± 0.1 in the Hcy-treated group. The tibia bone density was unchanged in Hcy-treated rats. These results suggest that Hcy causes a reduction in bone blood flow, which contributes to compromised bone biomechanical properties.

  5. Neonates with extra-renal pelvis: the first 2 years.

    PubMed

    Katzir, Ze'ev; Witzling, Michaela; Nikolov, Gallina; Gvirtz, Gabriela; Arbel, Eliana; Kohelet, David; Boaz, Mona; Smetana, Shmuel; Lorberboym, Mordechai

    2005-06-01

    Extra-renal pelvis (ERpel) is a common ultrasonographic finding among neonates who have undergone recurrent ultrasound examinations for a better definition of prenatal renal pelvic dilatation. This study tries to determine whether or not ERpel has important prognostic implications. Seventy-nine neonates (17 female) were examined. All had a diagnosis of prenatal renal pelvis dilatation, which was shown by postnatal ultrasound to be ERpel. Sixty ERpel neonates were examined 1.5 months to 2.5 months after the ultrasound (US) diagnosis by both Tc-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DPTA) dynamic renal scanning and (99m)Tc-pertechnetate direct cystography. Clinical assessment, urine cultures and renal ultrasound follow-up were maintained for 2 years. The proportion of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients with ERpel was compared with that of the total neonatal and infantile population with normal US scans in the region of our hospital. Associated minor congenital malformations were found in 12 of 79 neonates (15.2%). Four had a family history of ERpel. Among 60 neonates who underwent renal scanning, 36 (60%) were found to have urinary retention in the collecting system. Another nine (15%) had vesico-ureteral (VU) reflux, of which seven had urinary retention. Fifteen (25%) showed normal isotope imaging. Urinary tract infection was diagnosed in 16 ERpel neonates in whom only one exhibited VU reflux (grade 2). The incidence of neonatal UTI in the ERpel group was more than that of either neonatal or infantile UTI in those with normal US scans in the local population (20.2% vs 1.2% and 4.3%, respectively). Fifty-three infants completed a 2-year follow-up. Repeat renal ultrasonography indicated that one infant (1.8%) had developed bilateral hydronephrosis, 12 (22.6%) had unchanged findings, 18 (40%) showed an improvement (decrease of ERpel width or resolution in one side) and, in 22 (41.5%) infants, the condition had resolved. No clinical or kidney function

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Cellular Nephrotoxicity due to Radiocontrast Media

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Ashour; Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Sabbatini, Massimo; Navarra, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Modern iodinated radiocontrast media are all based on the triiodinated benzene ring with various chemical modifications having been made over the last few decades in order to reduce their toxicity. However, CIN remains a problem especially in patients with pre-existing renal failure. In vitro studies have demonstrated that all RCM are cytotoxic. RCM administration in vivo may lead to a decrease in renal medullary oxygenation leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species that may cause harmful effects to renal tissue. In addition, endothelin and adenosine release and decreased nitric oxide levels may worsen the hypoxic milieu. In vitro cell culture studies together with sparse in vivo rat model data have shown that important cell signalling pathways are affected by RCM. In particular, the prosurvival and proproliferative kinases Akt and ERK1/2 have been shown to be dephosphorylated (deactivated), whilst proinflammatory/cell death molecules such as the p38 and JNK kinases and the transcription factor NF-κB may be activated by RCM, accompanied by activation of apoptotic mediators such as caspases. Increasing our knowledge of the mechanisms of RCM action may help to develop future therapies for CIN. PMID:24745009

  7. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  8. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure. PMID:26798459

  9. Renal Response to L-Arginine in Diabetic Rats. A Possible Link between Nitric Oxide System and Aquaporin-2

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, María C.; Albertoni Borghese, María F.; Balonga, Sabrina E.; Lavagna, Agustina; Filipuzzi, Ana L.; Elesgaray, Rosana; Costa, María A.; Majowicz, Mónica P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether L-Arginine (L-Arg) supplementation modifies nitric oxide (NO) system and consequently aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression in the renal outer medulla of streptozotocin-diabetic rats at an early time point after induction of diabetes. Male Wistar rats were divided in four groups: Control, Diabetic, Diabetic treated with L-Arginine and Control treated with L-Arginine. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was estimated by [14C] L-citrulline production in homogenates of the renal outer medulla and by NADPH-diaphorase staining in renal outer medullary tubules. Western blot was used to detect the expression of AQP2 and NOS types I and III; real time PCR was used to quantify AQP2 mRNA. The expression of both NOS isoforms, NOS I and NOS III, was decreased in the renal outer medulla of diabetic rats and L-Arg failed to prevent these decreases. However, L-Arg improved NO production, NADPH-diaphorase activity in collecting ducts and other tubular structures, and NOS activity in renal homogenates from diabetic rats. AQP2 protein and mRNA were decreased in the renal outer medulla of diabetic rats and L-Arg administration prevented these decreases. These results suggest that the decreased NOS activity in collecting ducts of the renal outer medulla may cause, at least in part, the decreased expression of AQP2 in this model of diabetes and constitute additional evidence supporting a role for NO in contributing to renal water reabsorption through the modulation of AQP2 expression in this pathological condition. However, we cannot discard that another pathway different from NOS also exists that links L-Arg to AQP2 expression. PMID:25111608

  10. Gut sensing of dietary K⁺ intake increases renal K⁺excretion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ki-Sook; Oh, Young Taek; Kim, Sang-Wook; Kita, Toshihiro; Kang, Insug; Youn, Jang H

    2011-08-01

    Dietary K(+) intake may increase renal K(+) excretion via increasing plasma [K(+)] and/or activating a mechanism independent of plasma [K(+)]. We evaluated these mechanisms during normal dietary K(+) intake. After an overnight fast, [K(+)] and renal K(+) excretion were measured in rats fed either 0% K(+) or the normal 1% K(+) diet. In a third group, rats were fed with the 0% K(+) diet, and KCl was infused to match plasma [K(+)] profile to that of the 1% K(+) diet group. The 1% K(+) feeding significantly increased renal K(+) excretion, associated with slight increases in plasma [K(+)], whereas the 0% K(+) diet decreased K(+) excretion, associated with decreases in plasma [K(+)]. In the KCl-infused 0% K(+) diet group, renal K(+) excretion was significantly less than that of the 1% K(+) group, despite matched plasma [K(+)] profiles. We also examined whether dietary K(+) alters plasma profiles of gut peptides, such as guanylin, uroguanylin, glucagon-like peptide 1, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, pituitary peptides, such as AVP, α-MSH, and γ-MSH, or aldosterone. Our data do not support a role for these hormones in the stimulation of renal K(+) excretion during normal K(+) intake. In conclusion, postprandial increases in renal K(+) excretion cannot be fully accounted for by changes in plasma [K(+)] and that gut sensing of dietary K(+) is an important component of the regulation of renal K(+) excretion. Our studies on gut and pituitary peptide hormones suggest that there may be previously unknown humoral factors that stimulate renal K(+) excretion during dietary K(+) intake.

  11. Long-term measurement of renal cortical and medullary tissue oxygenation and perfusion in unanesthetized sheep.

    PubMed

    Calzavacca, Paolo; Evans, Roger G; Bailey, Michael; Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2015-05-15

    The role of renal cortical and medullary hypoxia in the development of acute kidney injury is controversial, partly due to a lack of techniques for the long-term measurement of intrarenal oxygenation and perfusion in conscious animals. We have, therefore, developed a methodology to chronically implant combination probes to chronically measure renal cortical and medullary tissue perfusion and oxygen tension (tPO2) in conscious sheep and evaluated their responsiveness and reliability. A transit-time flow probe and a vascular occluder were surgically implanted on the left renal artery. At the same operation, dual fiber-optic probes, comprising a fluorescence optode to measure tPO2 and a laser-Doppler probe to assess tissue perfusion, were inserted into the renal cortex and medulla. In recovered conscious sheep (n = 8) breathing room air, mean 24-h cortical and medullary tPO2 were similar (31.4 ± 0.6 and 29.7 ± 0.7 mmHg, respectively). In the renal cortex and medulla, a 20% reduction in renal blood flow (RBF) decreased perfusion (14.6 ± 8.6 and 41.2 ± 8.5%, respectively) and oxygenation (48.1 ± 8.5 and 72.4 ± 8.5%, respectively), with greater decreases during a 50% reduction in RBF. At autopsy, minimal fibrosis was observed around the probes. In summary, we have developed a technique to chronically implant fiber-optic probes in the renal cortex and medulla for recording tissue perfusion and oxygenation over many days. In normal resting conscious sheep, cortical and medullary tPO2 were similar. The responses to and recovery from renal artery occlusion, together with the consistent measurements over a 24-h period, demonstrate the responsiveness and stability of the probes.

  12. Eppur Si Muove: The dynamic nature of physiological control of renal blood flow by the renal sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter Ricci; Zucker, Irving H

    2017-05-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback and the myogenic response are widely appreciated as important regulators of renal blood flow, but the role of the sympathetic nervous system in physiological renal blood flow control remains controversial. Where classic studies using static measures of renal blood flow failed, dynamic approaches have succeeded in demonstrating sympathetic control of renal blood flow under normal physiological conditions. This review focuses on transfer function analysis of renal pressure-flow, which leverages the physical relationship between blood pressure and flow to assess the underlying vascular control mechanisms. Studies using this approach indicate that the renal nerves are important in the rapid regulation of the renal vasculature. Animals with intact renal innervation show a sympathetic signature in the frequency range associated with sympathetic vasomotion that is eliminated by renal denervation. In conscious rabbits, this sympathetic signature exerts vasoconstrictive, baroreflex control of renal vascular conductance, matching well with the rhythmic, baroreflex-influenced control of renal sympathetic nerve activity and complementing findings from other studies employing dynamic approaches to study renal sympathetic vascular control. In this light, classic studies reporting that nerve stimulation and renal denervation do not affect static measures of renal blood flow provide evidence for the strength of renal autoregulation rather than evidence against physiological renal sympathetic control of renal blood flow. Thus, alongside tubuloglomerular feedback and the myogenic response, renal sympathetic outflow should be considered an important physiological regulator of renal blood flow. Clinically, renal sympathetic vasomotion may be important for solving the problems facing the field of therapeutic renal denervation.

  13. Dietary sodium modulates the interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerve activity by altering activation of α2-adrenoceptors on renal sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Ulla C; Cicha, Michael Z; Smith, Lori A; Ruohonen, Saku; Scheinin, Mika; Fritz, Nicolas; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2011-02-01

    Activation of efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) increases afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), which then reflexively decreases ERSNA via activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA. The ERSNA-ARNA interaction is mediated by norepinephrine (NE) that increases and decreases ARNA by activation of renal α(1)-and α(2)-adrenoceptors (AR), respectively. The ERSNA-induced increases in ARNA are suppressed during a low-sodium (2,470 ± 770% s) and enhanced during a high-sodium diet (5,670 ± 1,260% s). We examined the role of α(2)-AR in modulating the responsiveness of renal sensory nerves during low- and high-sodium diets. Immunohistochemical analysis suggested the presence of α(2A)-AR and α(2C)-AR subtypes on renal sensory nerves. During the low-sodium diet, renal pelvic administration of the α(2)-AR antagonist rauwolscine or the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan alone failed to alter the ARNA responses to reflex increases in ERSNA. Likewise, renal pelvic release of substance P produced by 250 pM NE (from 8.0 ± 1.3 to 8.5 ± 1.6 pg/min) was not affected by rauwolscine or losartan alone. However, rauwolscine+losartan enhanced the ARNA responses to reflex increases in ERSNA (4,680 ± 1,240%·s), and renal pelvic release of substance P by 250 pM NE, from 8.3 ± 0.6 to 14.2 ± 0.8 pg/min. During a high-sodium diet, rauwolscine had no effect on the ARNA response to reflex increases in ERSNA or renal pelvic release of substance P produced by NE. Losartan was not examined because of low endogenous ANG II levels in renal pelvic tissue during a high-sodium diet. Increased activation of α(2)-AR contributes to the reduced interaction between ERSNA and ARNA during low-sodium intake, whereas no/minimal activation of α(2)-AR contributes to the enhanced ERSNA-ARNA interaction under conditions of high sodium intake.

  14. Dietary sodium modulates the interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerve activity by altering activation of α2-adrenoceptors on renal sensory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Cicha, Michael Z.; Smith, Lori A.; Ruohonen, Saku; Scheinin, Mika; Fritz, Nicolas; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Activation of efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) increases afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), which then reflexively decreases ERSNA via activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA. The ERSNA-ARNA interaction is mediated by norepinephrine (NE) that increases and decreases ARNA by activation of renal α1-and α2-adrenoceptors (AR), respectively. The ERSNA-induced increases in ARNA are suppressed during a low-sodium (2,470 ± 770% s) and enhanced during a high-sodium diet (5,670 ± 1,260% s). We examined the role of α2-AR in modulating the responsiveness of renal sensory nerves during low- and high-sodium diets. Immunohistochemical analysis suggested the presence of α2A-AR and α2C-AR subtypes on renal sensory nerves. During the low-sodium diet, renal pelvic administration of the α2-AR antagonist rauwolscine or the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan alone failed to alter the ARNA responses to reflex increases in ERSNA. Likewise, renal pelvic release of substance P produced by 250 pM NE (from 8.0 ± 1.3 to 8.5 ± 1.6 pg/min) was not affected by rauwolscine or losartan alone. However, rauwolscine+losartan enhanced the ARNA responses to reflex increases in ERSNA (4,680 ± 1,240%·s), and renal pelvic release of substance P by 250 pM NE, from 8.3 ± 0.6 to 14.2 ± 0.8 pg/min. During a high-sodium diet, rauwolscine had no effect on the ARNA response to reflex increases in ERSNA or renal pelvic release of substance P produced by NE. Losartan was not examined because of low endogenous ANG II levels in renal pelvic tissue during a high-sodium diet. Increased activation of α2-AR contributes to the reduced interaction between ERSNA and ARNA during low-sodium intake, whereas no/minimal activation of α2-AR contributes to the enhanced ERSNA-ARNA interaction under conditions of high sodium intake. PMID:21106912

  15. Intra-Parenchymal Renal Resistive Index Variation (IRRIV) Describes Renal Functional Reserve (RFR): Pilot Study in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Samoni, Sara; Nalesso, Federico; Meola, Mario; Villa, Gianluca; De Cal, Massimo; De Rosa, Silvia; Petrucci, Ilaria; Brendolan, Alessandra; Rosner, Mitchell H; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    An increase of glomerular filtration rate after protein load represents renal functional reserve (RFR) and is due to afferent arteriolar vasodilation. Lack of RFR may be a risk factor for acute kidney injury (AKI), but is cumbersome to measure. We sought to develop a non-invasive, bedside method that would indirectly measure RFR. Mechanical abdominal pressure, through compression of renal vessels, decreases blood flow and activates the auto-regulatory mechanism which can be measured by a fall in renal resistive index (RRI). The study aims at elucidating the relationship between intra-parenchymal renal resistive index variation (IRRIV) during abdominal pressure and RFR. In healthy volunteers, pressure was applied by a weight on the abdomen (fluid-bag 10% of subject's body weight) while RFR was measured through a protein loading test. We recorded RRI in an interlobular artery after application of pressure using ultrasound. The maximum percentage reduction of RRI from baseline was compared in the same subject to RFR. We enrolled 14 male and 16 female subjects (mean age 38 ± 14 years). Mean creatinine clearance was 106.2 ± 16.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2). RFR ranged between -1.9 and 59.7 with a mean value of 28.9 ± 13.1 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Mean baseline RRI was 0.61 ± 0.05, compared to 0.49 ± 0.06 during abdominal pressure; IRRIV was 19.6 ± 6.7%, ranging between 3.1% and 29.2%. Pearson's coefficient between RFR and IRRIV was 74.16% (p < 0.001). Our data show the correlation between IRRIV and RFR. Our results can lead to the development of a "stress test" for a rapid screen of RFR to establish renal susceptibility to different exposures and the consequent risk for AKI.

  16. Studies on the renal transport of trimethylpentanoic acid metabolites of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane in rat renal cortical slices.

    PubMed

    Lock, E A; Strasser, J; Bus, J S; Charbonneau, M

    1993-01-01

    2,2,4-Trimethylpentane (TMP), a nephrotoxic component of unleaded gasoline in male but not female rats, undergoes oxidative metabolism to yield 2,2,4- and 2,4,4-trimethylpentanol, pentanoic acid and 5-hydroxypentanoic acid. We have examined the effect of three of these pentanoic acid metabolites on the renal transport of the organic anion p-aminohippurate (PAH) and the organic cation tetraethylammonium (TEA) in renal cortical slices from male Fischer 344 rats. 2,4,4-Trimethylpentanoic acid, the major urinary metabolite in rats, produced a selective decrease in the accumulation of PAH without affecting TEA accumulation. Kinetic analysis showed that 2,4,4-trimethylpentanoic acid was a competitive inhibitor of the organic anion transport system, with a Ki of 4 mM. 2,4,4-Trimethyl-5-hydroxypentanoic acid also showed selective inhibition of PAH transport, while 2,2,4-trimethylpentanoic acid was less selective and reduced both PAH and TEA transport. Additional studies with radiolabeled 2,4,4-trimethylpentanoic acid showed that there was a time- and concentration-dependent accumulation of radioactivity into slices of renal cortex. However, experiments conducted at 4 degrees C and studies with metabolic inhibitors, or with an inhibitor of organic anion transport, indicated that little of the accumulated material was entering the cell. We conclude from these studies that the pentanoic acid metabolites formed from 2,2,4-trimethylpentane are not actively transported by the renal organic anion transport system. In summary, in vitro the pentanoic acid metabolites appear to bind to renal cortical tissue and thereby reduce the transport of PAH.

  17. Honey induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Afshari, Jalil Tavakkol; Davoodi, Saiedeh

    2011-01-01

    Background: The fact that antioxidants have several preventative effects against different diseases, such as coronary diseases, inflammatory disorders, neurologic degeneration, aging, and cancer, has led to the search for food rich in antioxidants. Honey has been used as a traditional food and medical source since ancient times. However, recently many scientists have been concentrating on the antioxidant property of honey. By use of human renal cancer cell lines (ACHN), we investigated the antiproliferative activity, apoptosis, and the antitumor activity of honey. Materials and Methods: The cells were cultured in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium with 10% fetal bovine serum treated with different concentrations of honey for 3 consecutive days. Cell viability was quantitated by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Apoptotic cells were determined using Annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) by flow cytometry. Results: Honey decreased the cell viability in the malignant cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The IC 50 values against the ACHN cell lines were determined as 1.7 ± 0.04% and 2.1 ± 0.03% μg/mL after 48 and 72 h, respectively. Honey induced apoptosis of the ACHN cells in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by flow cytometry histogram of treated cells. Conclusion: It might be concluded that honey may cause cell death in the ACHN cells, in which apoptosis plays an important role. Most of the drugs used in the cancer treatment are apoptotic inducers, hence apoptotic nature of honey is considered vital. Therefore, it prompted us to investigate honey as a potential candidate for renal cancer treatment. PMID:21472079

  18. Renal Response to Chronic Centrifugation in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wang, T. J.; Corbin, B. J.; Wade, C. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Previously reported effects of chronic centrifugation on renal function in mammals are contradictory. The present study was conducted as an effort to provide a comprehensive analysis of renal response to chronic centrifugation (12 days at +2 Gz). Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (210-230 g) were used: eight centrifuged (EC) and eight off centrifuge controls (OCC). During centrifugation EC had lower body weight and food consumption. EC showed a decrease (72%) in water intake for the first two days (T1 and T2) followed by significant increases from T4-T6. EC urine output increased two-fold over the first four days, returning to baseline by T9. EC urea excretion was elevated on T3 through T5. Creatinine, Na(+), K(+), and osmolar excretion were lower than OCC over the last four days of the study. Assuming constant plasma osmolarity and creatinine levels, EC free water clearance (C(sub H2O)) was elevated significantly on T4 when the peak urine output was exhibited. EC also had a greater C(sub H2O) over the last four days, associated with a significantly lower osmolar clearance and GFR. The initial diuresis exhibited during centrifugation can be attributed to a reduced water resorption and increased urea excretion. This diuresis was mediated independent of changes in GFR over the first eight days. However, differences in excretion seen after eight days of centrifugation are probably GFR mediated which would imply animals established a new homeostatic setpoint by that time. Centrifugation elicites an acute alteration in fluid homeostasis followed by adaptation within a week.

  19. Radiocontrast-Induced Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Misson, Robert T.; Cutler, Ralph E.

    1985-01-01

    Review of the literature concerning contrast-induced renal dysfunction shows that the currently used agents are remarkably safe with careful patient selection. Clinically apparent kidney failure after their use is essentially nonexistent in those without preexistent renal insufficiency. The incidence rises rapidly in those with azotemia from any cause, however, and diabetic persons with nephropathy are perhaps at special risk. Vigorous volume expansion is possibly effective as a preventive measure and may attenuate adverse effects in those in whom postcontrast dysfunction occurs. New agents are becoming available. It is not yet known if these will prove safer or cost-effective. They have some experimentally demonstrated and theoretic advantages over the presently used agents. PMID:4013281

  20. Neck swelling with renal stone.

    PubMed

    Khan, M K; Taous, A; Sultana, S Z; Sharif, A; Hossain, M M; Mostafa, G; Hussain, M A; Azim, M A; Siddique, M A

    2010-10-01

    Since the advent of screening of calcium and imaging techniques (CT and MRI), hyperparathyroidism has been detected with increasing frequency. Although in the past, most patients present with severe bone and renal diseases, a large number of patients are asymptomatic. Number of parathyroid glands and their ectopic locations in individuals are the problem of its management. Parathyroid adenoma or hyperplasia may be a part of Multiple Endocrine neoplasia type II. This is the story of a boy of 18 years who had got admitted in the department of Otolaryngology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital with the complaints of a neck swelling, abdominal discomfort, inability to walk, frequency of micturation for almost same duration of 1 year. After search, hypercalcaemia, bilateral renal stone, raised parathormone level and enlarged one parathyroid gland in lower pole of left thyroid lobe was identified. Clinically it was diagnosed as parathyroid adenoma which was proved histologically after surgical excision. Many controversies still exist regarding the treatment policy of parathyroid adenoma.

  1. EGFR signaling in renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Shougang; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Signaling through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in regulation of multiple biological processes, including proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and survival. Owing to its aberrant expression in a variety of malignant tumors, EGFR has been recognized as a target in anticancer therapy. Increasingly, evidence from animal studies indicates that EGFR signaling is also implicated in the development and progression of renal fibrosis. The therapeutic value of EGFR inhibition has not yet been evaluated in human kidney disease. In this article, we summarize recent research into the role of EGFR signaling in renal fibrogenesis, discuss the mechanism by which EGFR regulates this process, and consider the potential of EGFR as an antifibrotic target. PMID:26312153

  2. THE RENAL ELIMINATION OF BILIRUBIN

    PubMed Central

    Haessler, Herbert; Rous, Peyton; Broun, G. O.

    1922-01-01

    The elimination of bile pigment during jaundice is, for practical purposes, unincreased by diuresis from water by mouth. Possibly, though, the flushing of the kidneys tends to lessen pigment accumulation within these organs and thus to diminish a serious potential source of trouble in long continued jaundice. Flood diuresis from intravenous injections of salt solution markedly increases the output of bile pigment. It is important to know the effect of variations in the urinary output on the elimination of bile salts, but methods for the purpose are not available at present. The passage of bile pigment into the kidney cells during jaundice is attested by the presence in the freshly voided urine of desquamated renal elements specifically stained, stippled, or granulated with bilirubin. Pigmentation of this sort is readily to be distinguished from the indiscriminate staining of cellular debris that occurs in icteric urines on standing. It has clinical significance, furnishing direct evidence on the degree of renal change. PMID:19868627

  3. Use of endovascular stents in atherosclerotic renovascular stenosis: blood pressure and renal function changes in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Tagle, Rodrigo; Acevedo, Monica; Xu, Meng; Pohl, Marc; Vidt, Donald

    2007-08-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis may result in hypertension and ischemic nephropathy. Renal artery endovascular stenting has emerged as current therapy; however, the percentage of patients who benefit from this procedure is still not well established. The authors studied 116 hypertensive patients with atherosclerotic renovascular stenosis who underwent successful renal artery stenting for the first time. At 1 year, there was a significant overall decrease in blood pressure in the group after stenting; however, there was no change in renal function. Also, no significant change in the number of antihypertensive drugs was noted. Blood pressure improved in 55% of the patients, worsened in 14%, and remained unchanged in 31%. Renal function improved in 16% of the patients, worsened in 30%, and remained stable in 54%. In relation to blood pressure control, patients with resistant or difficult-to-control hypertension showed the most improvement in blood pressure control after stenting.

  4. Assessment of renal function in workers previously exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Elinder, C G; Edling, C; Lindberg, E; Kågedal, B; Vesterberg, O

    1985-01-01

    Cadmium induced renal effects were examined in 60 workers (58 men, 2 women) previously exposed to cadmium. Tubular damage in the form of beta 2-microglobulinuria was found in 40%, and urinary albumin and orosomucoid increased significantly with increasing urinary cadmium and increasing relative clearance of beta 2-microglobulin. It is suggested that increased albumin excretion is secondary to the tubular damage. In no case was typical glomerular proteinuria found that could be related to cadmium. Histories of renal stones were more common among the workers with high urinary cadmium concentrations. The glomerular filtration rate was measured in 17 of the workers who had pronounced tubular dysfunction. The average glomerular filtration rate for these men was less than the age adjusted predicted value (mean = 84%). Furthermore, there was a significant (p less than 0.05) correlation (r = -0.47) between tubular reabsorption loss and a decreased glomerular filtration rate. PMID:3904816

  5. Renal threshold phosphate concentration (TmPO4/GFR).

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, K; Kracht, U; Göpfert, G

    1982-01-01

    The ratio of maximum rate of renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate to glomerular filtration rate (TmPO4/GFR) was determined in 546 schoolchildren, aged between 6 and 17.9 years, using the nomogram of Walton and Bijvoet.1 TmPO4/GFR correlated with chronological age in girls and boys and in each remained significantly higher than in adults. TmPO4/GFR in the children correlated neither with fasting serum immunoreactive calcitonin and parathyroid hormone levels nor with the urinary cyclic AMP excretion. The study showed a parallel decrease in TmPO4/GFR, excretion of total hydroxyproline and serum alkaline phosphatase activities after puberty, with a significant relationship of both these indices of bone turnover to TmPO4/GFR values. This indicates that the high renal phosphate threshold of children may be an important factor for bone mineralisation by providing high extracellular inorganic phosphate concentrations during normal growth. PMID:6280622

  6. Arterial Stiffness and Renal Replacement Therapy: A Controversial Topic

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Edmundo Cabrera; Zócalo, Yanina; Galli, Cintia; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increase of arterial stiffness has been to have a significant impact on predicting mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a noninvasive, reliable parameter of regional arterial stiffness that integrates the vascular geometry and arterial wall intrinsic elasticity and is capable of predicting cardiovascular mortality in this patient population. Nevertheless, reports on PWV in dialyzed patients are contradictory and sometimes inconsistent: some reports claim the arterial wall stiffness increases (i.e., PWV increase), others claim that it is reduced, and some even state that it augments in the aorta while it simultaneously decreases in the brachial artery pathway. The purpose of this study was to analyze the literature in which longitudinal or transversal studies were performed in hemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis patients, in order to characterize arterial stiffness and the responsiveness to renal replacement therapy. PMID:26064684

  7. Efficacy of Ficus spp. on renal injury induced by hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Awad, Nagwa E; Hamed, Manal A; Seida, Ahmed A; Elbatanony, Marwa M

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol and hexane extracts of Ficus microcarpa, Ficus religiosa and Ficus mysorensis leaves were evaluated against renal injury induced by hypercholesterolaemia. Phytochemical screening of the investigated plants was undertaken. For the in vivo study, all rats were orally given cholesterol (30 mg kg⁻¹ body weight, BW) and leaves extract (500 mg kg⁻¹ BW) five times per week for 9 weeks. Hypercholesterolaemic rats showed significant increases in urea nitrogen and creatinine while serum protein and albumin levels, nitric oxide (NO), Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase and phospholipids in kidney tissue were all decreased. Treatment with leaves extract improved kidney function indices (urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum protein and albumin), kidney disorder biochemical parameters (NO, Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase and phospholipids), haematological profile (haemoglobin, RBCs and WBCs) and kidney histopathology. In conclusion, Ficus spp. succeeded in improving renal injury induced by hypercholesterolaemia, with the most potent effects seen while using Ficus microcarpa hexane extract.

  8. Cardiovascular and renal effects of chronic exposure to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Abdias; Escudero, Elizabeth; Pando, Jackeline; Sharma, Shailendra; Johnson, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Over 140 million people live at high altitude, defined as living at an altitude of 2400 m or more above sea level. Subjects living under these conditions are continuously living under hypoxic conditions and, depending on the population, various adaptations have developed. Interestingly, subjects living chronically at high altitude appear to have a decreased frequency of obesity, diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, these benefits on health are balanced by the frequent development of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Recently, it has been recognized that subjects living at high altitude are at risk for developing high-altitude renal syndrome (HARS), which is a syndrome consisting of polycythemia, hyperuricemia, systemic hypertension and microalbuminuria, but with preserved glomerular filtration rate. More studies should be performed to characterize the mechanisms and etiology of HARS; as such studies may be of benefit not only to the high-altitude population, but also to better understanding of the renal consequences of acute and chronic hypoxia.

  9. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia following renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating indicating a role for uric acid in the genesis and progression of kidney disease, and a few studies are beginning to show a possible beneficial effect of urate-lowering therapy. Whether this holds true for renal allograft recipients is not clear. In this short review evidence from epidemiological as well as intervention studies is summarized and discussed, with some practical considerations presented at the end. PMID:26167455

  10. Renal physiology of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Katharine L; Lafayette, Richard A

    2013-05-01

    Pregnancy involves remarkable orchestration of physiologic changes. The kidneys are central players in the evolving hormonal milieu of pregnancy, responding and contributing to the changes in the environment for the pregnant woman and fetus. The functional impact of pregnancy on kidney physiology is widespread, involving practically all aspects of kidney function. The glomerular filtration rate increases 50% with subsequent decrease in serum creatinine, urea, and uric acid values. The threshold for thirst and antidiuretic hormone secretion are depressed, resulting in lower osmolality and serum sodium levels. Blood pressure drops approximately 10 mmHg by the second trimester despite a gain in intravascular volume of 30% to 50%. The drop in systemic vascular resistance is multifactorial, attributed in part to insensitivity to vasoactive hormones, and leads to activation of the renin-aldosterone-angiostensin system. A rise in serum aldosterone results in a net gain of approximately 1000 mg of sodium. A parallel rise in progesterone protects the pregnant woman from hypokalemia. The kidneys increase in length and volume, and physiologic hydronephrosis occurs in up to 80% of women. This review will provide an understanding of these important changes in kidney physiology during pregnancy, which is fundamental in caring for the pregnant patient.

  11. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  12. Renal Trauma: The Rugby Factor

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Catherine M.; Kelly, Michael E.; Nason, Gregory J.; McGuire, Barry B.; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Ryan, John; Lennon, Gerald; Galvin, David; Quinlan, David; Mulvin, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal trauma accounts for 5% of all trauma cases. Rare mechanisms of injuries including sports participation are increasingly common. Rugby-related trauma poses a conundrum for physicians and players due to the absence of clear guidelines and a paucity of evidence. Our series highlights traumatic rugby-related renal injuries in our institution, and emphasize the need for international guidelines on management. Methods A retrospective review of all abdominal traumas between January 2006 and April 2013, specifically assessing for renal related trauma that were secondary to rugby injuries was performed. All patients' demographics, computerized tomography results, hematological and biochemical results and subsequent management were recorded. Results Five male patients presented with rugby-related injuries. Mean age was 21 years old. All patients were hemodynamically stable and managed conservatively in acute setting. One patient was detected to have an unknown pre-existing atrophic kidney that had been subsequently injured, and was booked for an elective nephrectomy an 8-week interval. Conclusion Rugby-related trauma has generated essential attention. This paper serves to highlight this type of injury and the need for defined guidelines on role of imaging and international consensus on timing of return to contact sport, in both professional and amateur settings. PMID:26889132

  13. [Multiple complications after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Manrique, J; Rossich, E; Hernández Sierra, A

    2004-01-01

    This is the case of a 32-year-old male patient, diagnosed with end stage renal disease secondary to a focal and segmental glomerulonephritis. After four years of haemodialysis, he received a renal graft from a cadaveric donor. During the following sixteen years, he developped many different complications. In the early post-transplant period, he developed a severe acute tubular necrosis and two episodes of acute rejection took place, both of them with later recovery. Among the outstanding infectious complications were a virus herpes zoster dorsal infection and a Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial pneumonia. Twelve months later, a series of severe digestive complications took place: cholecystitis that required cholecystectomy, pancreatic pseudocyst which required laparotomy because of an abdominal complication, two separate episodes of upper digestive bleeding that finally required gastric surgery, and an hemorrhagic subphrenic abscess that required a second laparotomy. Currently he has developed a calcified chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, metabolic complications must be mentioned carbohydrate intolerance, cataracts and an avascular bone necrosis, all of them closely related to the immunosuppressive therapy. In spite of these multiple complications, he mantains a good renal function and his quality of life is acceptable.

  14. Biomarkers of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tin C; Wood, Christopher G; Karam, Jose A

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has increased steadily in past few decades and is partially attributable to the increased utilization of cross-sectional imaging. Many of these carcinomas are small incidental discoveries, although a subset leads to locally advanced or distant disease. Although its molecular pathophysiology is not completely understood, knowledge of hereditary RCCs has shed light on some of the pathways involved. More recently, the rapid advances in genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics have allowed for a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the genetic aberrations that lead up to and result from the transformation of a renal tubular epithelial cell into a carcinoma. These discoveries have allowed for the development of novel therapeutics that target these pathways. They have also led to the development of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers that could radically change the way RCC is diagnosed and treated. Although some of the current investigations are nascent and it remains to be seen which biomarkers will become clinically available, many candidate biomarkers show promise and require external validation. Ultimately, biomarkers may allow for cost-effective screening of high-risk patients, the identification of aggressive cancers among small renal masses, the identification of high-risk patients, the detection of recurrences postoperatively with minimal imaging, and the ability to choose appropriate targeted therapies for patients with metastatic disease.

  15. Tempol improves renal hemodynamics and pressure natriuresis in hyperthyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez Gómez, Isabel; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; de Dios Luna, Juan; García-Estañ, Joaquín; Vargas, Félix

    2008-03-01

    Hyperthyroidism in rats is associated with increased oxidative stress. These animals also show abnormal r