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Sample records for decreases airway hyperresponsiveness

  1. SPONTANEOUS AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-A DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Airway hyperresponsiveness is a critical feature of asthma. Substantial epidemiologic evidence supports a role for female sex hormones in modulating lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in humans. Objectives: To examine the role of estrogen receptors in modulat...

  2. Effect of ozone exposure on antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.H.; Segura, P.; Campos, M.G.; Hong, E.; Montano, L.M.

    1994-12-31

    Airway hyperresponsiveness can be induced by several stimuli including antigen and ozone, both of which may be present in the air of polluted cities. Though the effect of ozone on the bronchoconstrictor response to antigen has been well described, the combined effect of these stimuli on airway hyperresponsiveness has not yet been studied. Sensitized guinea pigs with or without ozone exposure for 1 h at 3 ppm, 18 h prior to study, were challenged with a dose-response curve to histamine (0.01-1.8 {mu}g/kg, iv), and then by a second histamine dose-response curve 1 h later. Airway responses were measured as the increase in pulmonary insufflation pressure. In sensitized guinea pigs, the histamine ED50 significantly decreased after antigen challenge, demonstrating the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Sensitized guinea pigs exposed to ozone showed airway hyperresponsiveness to histamine when compared with nonexposed animals, and such hyperresponsiveness was further enhanced after antigen challenge. We conclude that in this guinea pig model of acute allergic bronchoconstriction both antigen challenge and ozone induce airway hyperresponsiveness, while ozone exposure does not modify the development of antigen-induced hyperresponsiveness. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Interleukin 12 inhibits antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and Th2 cytokine expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia, and may be mediated by T helper (Th) lymphocytes expressing a Th2 cytokine pattern. Interleukin (IL) 12 suppresses the expression of Th2 cytokines and their associated responses, including eosinophilia, serum immunoglobulin E, and mucosal mastocytosis. We have previously shown in a murine model that antigen- induced increases in airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia are CD4+ T cell dependent. We used this model to determine the ability of IL-12 to prevent antigen-induced increases in airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophils, and lung Th2 cytokine expression. Sensitized A/J mice developed airway hyperresponsiveness and increased numbers of BAL eosinophils and other inflammatory cells after single or repeated intratracheal challenges with sheep red blood cell antigen. Pulmonary mRNA and protein levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 were increased after antigen challenge. Administration of IL-12 (1 microgram/d x 5 d) at the time of a single antigen challenge abolished the airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia and promoted an increase in interferon (IFN) gamma and decreases in IL-4 and IL-5 expression. The effects of IL-12 were partially dependent on IFN-gamma, because concurrent treatment with IL-12 and anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody partially reversed the inhibition of airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilia by IL-12. Treatment of mice with IL-12 at the time of a second antigen challenge also prevented airway hyperresponsiveness and significantly reduced numbers of BAL inflammatory cells, reflecting the ability of IL-12 to inhibit responses associated with ongoing antigen-induced pulmonary inflammation. These data show that antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation can be blocked by IL-12, which suppresses Th2 cytokine expression. Local administration of IL-12 may provide a novel

  4. Mitochondrial Transplantation Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness by Inhibition of Cholinergic Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuan; Zhu, Liping; Yu, Xiangyuan; Cai, Lei; Lu, Yankai; Zhang, Jiwei; Li, Tongfei; Li, Jiansha; Xia, Jingyan; Xu, Feng; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Increased cholinergic activity has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness, and alternations of mitochondrial structure and function appear to be involved in many lung diseases including airway hyperresponsiveness. It is crucial to clarify the cause-effect association between mitochondrial dysfunction and cholinergic hyperactivity in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. Male SD rats and cultured airway epithelial cells were exposed to cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide administration; mitochondria isolated from airway epithelium were delivered into epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Both the cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-induced cholinergic hyperactivity in vitro and the airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine in vivo were reversed by the transplantation of exogenous mitochondria. The rescue effects of exogenous mitochondria were imitated by the elimination of excessive reactive oxygen species or blockage of muscarinic M3 receptor, but inhibited by M receptor enhancer. Mitochondrial transplantation effectively attenuates cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-stimulated airway hyperresponsiveness through the inhibition of ROS-enhanced epithelial cholinergic hyperactivity. PMID:27279915

  5. Immunomodulatory Effects of Ambroxol on Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Nobuaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Taube, Christian; Kitamura, Kenichi; Hirano, Astushi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Gelfand, Erwin W.

    2016-01-01

    Ambroxol is used in COPD and asthma to increase mucociliary clearance and regulate surfactant levels, perhaps through anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. To determine the role and effect of ambroxol in an experimental model of asthma, BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by 3 days of challenge. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung cell composition and histology, and cytokine and protein carbonyl levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were determined. Ambroxol was administered either before the first OVA challenge or was begun after the last allergen challenge. Cytokine production levels from lung mononuclear cells (Lung MNCs) or alveolar macrophages (AM) were also determined. Administration of ambroxol prior to challenge suppressed AHR, airway eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and reduced inflammation in subepithelial regions. When given after challenge, AHR was suppressed but without effects on eosinophil numbers. Levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in BAL fluid were decreased when the drug was given prior to challenge; when given after challenge, increased levels of IL-10 and IL-12 were detected. Decreased levels of protein carbonyls were detected in BAL fluid following ambroxol treatment after challenge. In vitro, ambroxol increased levels of IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12 from Lung MNCs and AM, whereas IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 production was not altered. Taken together, ambroxol was effective in preventing AHR and airway inflammation through upregulation of Th1 cytokines and protection from oxidative stress in the airways. PMID:27340385

  6. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W.; Stober, Vandy P.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca2+, and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca2+, blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca2+ channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  7. Glutathione redox regulates airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yoko; Hisada, Takeshi; Utsugi, Mitsuyoshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Shimizu, Yasuo; Ono, Akihiro; Murata, Yukie; Hamuro, Junji; Mori, Masatomo; Dobashi, Kunio

    2007-09-01

    Glutathione is the major intracellular redox buffer. We have shown that glutathione redox status, which is the balance between intracellular reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, in antigen-presenting cells (APC) regulates the helper T cell type 1 (Th1)/Th2 balance due to the production of IL-12. Bronchial asthma is a typical Th2 disease. Th2 cells and Th2 cytokines are characteristic of asthma and trigger off an inflammation. Accordingly, we studied the effects of the intracellular glutathione redox status on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and allergen-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. We used gamma-Glutamylcysteinylethyl ester (gamma-GCE), which is a membrane-permeating GSH precursor, to elevate the intracellular GSH level and GSH/GSSG ratio of mice. In vitro, gamma-GCE pretreatment of human monocytic THP-1 cells elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio and enhanced IL-12(p70) production induced by LPS. In the mouse asthma model, intraperitoneal injection of gamma-GCE elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio of lung tissue and reduced AHR. gamma-GCE reduced levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and the chemokines eotaxin and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas it enhanced the production of IL-12 and IFN-gamma. Histologically, gamma-GCE suppressed eosinophils infiltration. Interestingly, we also found that gamma-GCE directly inhibited chemokine-induced eosinophil chemotaxis without affecting eotaxin receptor chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) expressions. Taken together, these findings suggest that changing glutathione redox balance, increase in GSH level, and the GSH/GSSG ratio by gamma-GCE, ameliorate bronchial asthma by altering the Th1/Th2 imbalance through IL-12 production from APC and suppressing chemokine production and eosinophil migration itself.

  8. Role of the parasympathetic nervous system in airway hyperresponsiveness after ozone inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.L.; Lane, C.G.; Manning, P.J.; O'Byrne, P.M.

    1987-09-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness develops in dogs after ozone inhalation. This study examined the role of the parasympathetic nervous system in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in dogs. Dose-response curves to acetylcholine (n = 8) and histamine (n = 4) were measured before and after exposure to ozone (3 ppm for 30 min). The provocative concentration of each agonist was measured on two randomly assigned days separated by at least 1 wk. On one day a control experiment was performed, and on the other day the dogs were pretreated with the ganglionic blocker hexamethonium bromide in doses that block ganglionic transmission. The acetylcholine provocative concentration decreased on the control day from 5.5 mg/ml (%SE 1.8) before ozone to 0.5 mg/ml (%SE 2.0) after ozone (P less than 0.0001). After pretreatment with hexamethonium the acetylcholine provocative concentration decreased from 9.0 mg/ml (%SE 1.8) before ozone to 1.0 mg/ml (%SE 2.0) after ozone (P = 0.002). The results were similar when histamine was used as the agonist. Therefore, ganglionic blockade does not prevent airway hyperresponsiveness after ozone inhalation, and a parasympathetic reflex mechanism is not responsible for airway hyperresponsiveness after ozone inhalation in dogs.

  9. Strain-Dependent Genomic Factors Affect Allergen-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kelada, Samir N. P.; Wilson, Mark S.; Tavarez, Urraca; Kubalanza, Kari; Borate, Bhavesh; Whitehead, Greg S.; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Roy, Michelle G.; Olive, Michelle; Carpenter, Danielle E.; Brass, David M.; Wynn, Thomas A.; Cook, Donald N.; Evans, Christopher M.; Schwartz, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is etiologically and clinically heterogeneous, making the genomic basis of asthma difficult to identify. We exploited the strain-dependence of a murine model of allergic airway disease to identify different genomic responses in the lung. BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J mice were sensitized with the immunodominant allergen from the Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus species of house dust mite (Der p 1), without exogenous adjuvant, and the mice then underwent a single challenge with Der p 1. Allergic inflammation, serum antibody titers, mucous metaplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness were evaluated 72 hours after airway challenge. Whole-lung gene expression analyses were conducted to identify genomic responses to allergen challenge. Der p 1–challenged BALB/cJ mice produced all the key features of allergic airway disease. In comparison, C57BL/6J mice produced exaggerated Th2-biased responses and inflammation, but exhibited an unexpected decrease in airway hyperresponsiveness compared with control mice. Lung gene expression analysis revealed genes that were shared by both strains and a set of down-regulated genes unique to C57BL/6J mice, including several G-protein–coupled receptors involved in airway smooth muscle contraction, most notably the M2 muscarinic receptor, which we show is expressed in airway smooth muscle and was decreased at the protein level after challenge with Der p 1. Murine strain–dependent genomic responses in the lung offer insights into the different biological pathways that develop after allergen challenge. This study of two different murine strains demonstrates that inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness can be decoupled, and suggests that the down-modulation of expression of G-protein–coupled receptors involved in regulating airway smooth muscle contraction may contribute to this dissociation. PMID:21378263

  10. Omega-3 Fatty acids and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma.

    PubMed

    Mickleborough, Timothy D; Ionescu, Alina A; Rundell, Kenneth W

    2004-12-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in the treatment of asthma, the prevalence and burden of this disease has continued to increase. Exercise is a powerful trigger of asthma symptoms and reversible airflow obstruction and may result in the avoidance of physical activity by patients with asthma, resulting in detrimental consequences to their health. Approximately 90% of patients with asthma are hyperresponsive to exercise and experience exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). While pharmacologic treatment of asthma is usually highly effective, medications often have significant side-effects or exhibit tachyphylaxis. Alternative therapies for treatment (complementary medicine) that reduce the dose requirements of pharmacologic interventions would be beneficial, and could potentially reduce the public health burden of this disease. There is accumulating evidence that dietary modification has potential to influence the severity of asthma and reduce the prevalence and incidence of this condition. A possible contributing factor to the increased incidence of asthma in Western societies may be the consumption of a proinflammatory diet. In the typical Western diet, 20- to 25-fold more omega- 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) than omega-3 PUFA are consumed, which causes the release of proinflammatory arachidonic acid metabolites (leukotrienes and prostanoids). This review analyzes the existing literature on omega-3 PUFA supplementation as a potential modifier of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma and includes studies concerning the efficacy of omega-3 PUFA supplementation in EIB. While clinical data evaluating the effect of omega-3 PUFA supplementation in asthma has been equivocal, it has recently been shown that pharmaceutical-grade fish oil (omega-3 PUFA) supplementation reduces airway hyperresponsiveness after exercise, medication use, and proinflammatory mediator generation in nonatopic elite athletes with EIB. These findings are provocative and suggest that

  11. Extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness as a mechanism of post infectious cough: case report

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Nicole M; Gibson, Peter G

    2008-01-01

    Post-infectious cough is a common diagnosis in people with chronic cough. However, the specific infectious aetiology and cough mechanisms are seldom identified. We report a case of chronic cough after Mycoplasma pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection with extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness as the cough mechanism. Extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness may be a common mechanism in post-infectious cough which may be useful both diagnostically and therapeutically since chronic cough with extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness responds to speech pathology treatment. PMID:18673583

  12. Prevention of allergic airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling in mice by Astragaliradix Antiasthmatic decoction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Astragali radix Antiasthmatic Decoction (AAD), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating allergic diseases and chronic cough. The purpose of this study is to determine whether this medication could suppress allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and remodeling in mice, and its possible mechanisms. Methods A mouse model of chronic asthma was used to investigate the effects of AAD on the airway lesions. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA), and the extent of AHR and airway remodeling were characterized. Cells and cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were examined. Results AAD treatment effectively decreased OVA-induced AHR, eosinophilic airway inflammation, and collagen deposition around the airway. It significantly reduced the levels of IL-13 and TGF-β1, but exerted inconsiderable effect on INF-γ and IL-10. Conclusions AAD greatly improves the symptoms of allergic airway remodeling probably through inhibition of Th2 cytokines and TGF-β1. PMID:24367979

  13. Syk Regulates Neutrophilic Airway Hyper-Responsiveness in a Chronic Mouse Model of Allergic Airways Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen; Scott, Jeremy A.; Chow, Chung-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airways hyper-responsiveness (AHR), reversible airway obstruction, and airway inflammation and remodeling. We previously showed that Syk modulates methacholine-induced airways contractility in naïve mice and in mice with allergic airways inflammation. We hypothesize that Syk plays a role in the pathogenesis of AHR; this was evaluated in a chronic 8-week mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airways inflammation. Methods We used the Sykflox/flox//rosa26CreERT2 conditional Syk knock-out mice to assess the role of Syk prior to HDM exposure, and treated HDM-sensitized mice with the Syk inhibitor, GSK143, to evaluate its role in established allergic airways inflammation. Respiratory mechanics and methacholine (MCh)-responsiveness were assessed using the flexiVent® system. Lungs underwent bronchoalveolar lavage to isolate inflammatory cells or were frozen for determination of gene expression in tissues. Results MCh-induced AHR was observed following HDM sensitization in the Syk-intact (Sykflox/flox) and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice. MCh responsiveness was reduced to control levels in HDM-sensitized Sykdel/del mice and in BALB/c and Sykflox/flox mice treated with GSK143. Both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice mounted appropriate immune responses to HDM, with HDM-specific IgE levels that were comparable to Sykflox/flox and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice. HDM-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage cell counts were attenuated in both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice, due primarily to decreased neutrophil recruitment. Gene expression analysis of lung tissues revealed that HDM-induced expression of IL-17 and CXCL-1 was significantly attenuated in both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice. Conclusion Syk inhibitors may play a role in the management of neutrophilic asthma. PMID:28107345

  14. Physiological Mechanisms of Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Obese Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T

    2016-05-01

    Obesity affects the incidence and severity of asthma in at least two major phenotypes: an early-onset allergic (EOA) form that is complicated by obesity and a late-onset nonallergic (LONA) form that occurs only in the setting of obesity. Both groups exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine challenge but exhibit differential effects of weight loss. Measurements of lung function in patients with LONA obese asthma suggest that this group of individuals may simply be those unlucky enough to have airways that are more compliant than average, and that this leads to airway hyperresponsiveness at the reduced lung volumes caused by excess adipose tissue around the chest wall. In contrast, the frequent exacerbations in those with EOA obese asthma can potentially be explained by episodic inflammatory thickening of the airway wall synergizing with obesity-induced reductions in lung volume. These testable hypotheses are based on the strong likelihood that LONA and EOA obese asthma are distinct diseases. Both, however, may benefit from targeted therapeutics that impose elevations in lung volume.

  15. Attenuation of allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of asthma by silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Keun Hwa; Jang, Sunhyae; Park, Ji Won; Cha, Hye Rim; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Ju Ock; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Choong Sik; Kim, Joo Pyung; Jung, Sung Soo

    2010-01-01

    The use of silver in the past demonstrated the certain antimicrobial activity, though this has been replaced by other treatments. However, nanotechnology has provided a way of producing pure silver nanoparticles, and it shows cytoprotective activities and possible pro-healing properties. But, the mechanism of silver nanoparticles remains unknown. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of silver nanoparticles on bronchial inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled female C57BL/6 mice to evaluate the roles of silver nanoparticles and the related molecular mechanisms in allergic airway disease. In this study with an OVA-induced murine model of allergic airway disease, we found that the increased inflammatory cells, airway hyperresponsiveness, increased levels of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and the increased NF-κB levels in lungs after OVA inhalation were significantly reduced by the administration of silver nanoparticles. In addition, we have also found that the increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after OVA inhalation were decreased by the administration of silver nanoparticles. These results indicate that silver nanoparticles may attenuate antigen-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. And antioxidant effect of silver nanoparticles could be one of the molecular bases in the murine model of asthma. These findings may provide a potential molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles in preventing or treating asthma. PMID:20957173

  16. Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Children With Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Field, Joshua J.; Stocks, Janet; Kirkham, Fenella J.; Rosen, Carol L.; Dietzen, Dennis J.; Semon, Trisha; Kirkby, Jane; Bates, Pamela; Seicean, Sinziana; DeBaun, Michael R.; Redline, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background: The high prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) among children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) remains unexplained. Methods: To determine the relationship between AHR, features of asthma, and clinical characteristics of SCA, we conducted a multicenter, prospective cohort study of children with SCA. Dose response slope (DRS) was calculated to describe methacholine responsiveness, because 30% of participants did not achieve a 20% decrease in FEV1 after inhalation of the highest methacholine concentration, 25 mg/mL. Multiple linear regression analysis was done to identify independent predictors of DRS. Results: Methacholine challenge was performed in 99 children with SCA aged 5.6 to 19.9 years (median, 12.8 years). Fifty-four (55%) children had a provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% decrease in FEV1 < 4 mg/mL. In a multivariate analysis, independent associations were found between increased methacholine responsiveness and age (P < .001), IgE (P = .009), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (P = .005). There was no association between methacholine responsiveness and a parent report of a doctor diagnosis of asthma (P = .986). Other characteristics of asthma were not associated with methacholine responsiveness, including positive skin tests to aeroallergens, exhaled nitric oxide, peripheral blood eosinophil count, and pulmonary function measures indicating airflow obstruction. Conclusions: In children with SCA, AHR to methacholine is prevalent. Younger age, serum IgE concentration, and LDH level, a marker of hemolysis, are associated with AHR. With the exception of serum IgE, no signs or symptoms of an allergic diathesis are associated with AHR. Although the relationship between methacholine responsiveness and LDH suggests that factors related to SCA may contribute to AHR, these results will need to be validated in future studies. PMID:20724735

  17. Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma: mechanisms, clinical significance, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Brannan, John D; Lougheed, M Diane

    2012-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation are key pathophysiological features of asthma. Bronchial provocation tests (BPTs) are objective tests for AHR that are clinically useful to aid in the diagnosis of asthma in both adults and children. BPTs can be either "direct" or "indirect," referring to the mechanism by which a stimulus mediates bronchoconstriction. Direct BPTs refer to the administration of pharmacological agonist (e.g., methacholine or histamine) that act on specific receptors on the airway smooth muscle. Airway inflammation and/or airway remodeling may be key determinants of the response to direct stimuli. Indirect BPTs are those in which the stimulus causes the release of mediators of bronchoconstriction from inflammatory cells (e.g., exercise, allergen, mannitol). Airway sensitivity to indirect stimuli is dependent upon the presence of inflammation (e.g., mast cells, eosinophils), which responds to treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Thus, there is a stronger relationship between indices of steroid-sensitive inflammation (e.g., sputum eosinophils, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide) and airway sensitivity to indirect compared to direct stimuli. Regular treatment with ICS does not result in the complete inhibition of responsiveness to direct stimuli. AHR to indirect stimuli identifies individuals that are highly likely to have a clinical improvement with ICS therapy in association with an inhibition of airway sensitivity following weeks to months of treatment with ICS. To comprehend the clinical utility of direct or indirect stimuli in either diagnosis of asthma or monitoring of therapeutic intervention requires an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of AHR and mechanisms of action of both stimuli.

  18. Airway hyperresponsiveness; smooth muscle as the principal actor

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Martin, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a defining characteristic of asthma that refers to the capacity of the airways to undergo exaggerated narrowing in response to stimuli that do not result in comparable degrees of airway narrowing in healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction mediates airway narrowing, but it remains uncertain as to whether the smooth muscle is intrinsically altered in asthmatic subjects or is responding abnormally as a result of the milieu in which it sits. ASM in the trachea or major bronchi does not differ in its contractile characteristics in asthmatics, but the more pertinent peripheral airways await complete exploration. The mass of ASM is increased in many but not all asthmatics and therefore cannot be a unifying hypothesis for AHR, although when increased in mass it may contribute to AHR. The inability of a deep breath to reverse or prevent bronchial narrowing in asthma may reflect an intrinsic difference in the mechanisms that lead to softening of contracted ASM when subjected to stretch. Cytokines such as interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α promote a more contractile ASM phenotype. The composition and increased stiffness of the matrix in which ASM is embedded promotes a more proliferative and pro-inflammatory ASM phenotype, but the expected dedifferentiation and loss of contractility have not been shown. Airway epithelium may drive ASM proliferation and/or molecular remodeling in ways that may lead to AHR. In conclusion, AHR is likely multifactorial in origin, reflecting the plasticity of ASM properties in the inflammatory environment of the asthmatic airway. PMID:26998246

  19. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in the assessment of asthma control: Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma: its measurement and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Brannan, John D

    2010-08-01

    The two key pathophysiologic features of asthma are bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and airway inflammation. Symptoms and lung function are the most accessible clinical markers for the diagnosis of asthma as well as for assessing asthma control using the most effective treatment of asthma, inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). However, BHR and inflammation usually take longer to resolve using ICS compared with symptoms and lung function. BHR can be assessed using "direct" stimuli that act on the airway smooth muscle (eg, methacholine) or "indirect" stimuli that require the presence of airway inflammation (eg, exercise, osmotic stimuli). Although there are practical limitations in using BHR to assess asthma control, efforts have been made to make BHR more accessible and standardized. Some studies have demonstrated that treatment aimed to decrease BHR with direct stimuli can lead to improved asthma control; however, it often results in the use of higher doses of ICS. Furthermore, BHR to direct stimuli does not usually resolve using ICS because of a fixed component. By contrast, BHR with an indirect stimulus indicates a responsive smooth muscle that occurs only in the presence of inflammation sensitive to ICS (eg, mast cells, eosinophils). BHR to indirect stimuli does resolve using ICS. Because ICS target both key pathophysiologic features of asthma, assessing indirect BHR in the presence of ICS will identify resolution or persistence of BHR and airway inflammation. This may provide a more clinically relevant marker for asthma control that may also lead to improving the clinical usefulness of ICS.

  20. Respiratory syncytial virus infection increases chlorine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weifeng; Yu, Zhihong; Doran, Stephen F.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Steele, Chad; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) damages airway and alveolar epithelia resulting in acute lung injury and reactive airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine. However, little is known about the effect of preexisting respiratory disease on Cl2-induced lung injury. By using a murine respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection model, we found that preexisting RSV infection increases Cl2 (187 ppm for 30 min)-induced lung inflammation and airway AHR at 24 h after exposure (5 days after infection). RSV infection and Cl2 exposure synergistically induced oxygen desaturation and neutrophil infiltration and increased MCP-1, MIP-1β, IL-10, IFN-γ, and RANTES concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In contrast, levels of type 2 cytokines (i.e., IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, and IL-13) were not significantly affected by either RSV infection or Cl2 exposure. Cl2 exposure, but not RSV infection, induced AHR to methacholine challenge as measured by flexiVent. Moreover, preexisting RSV infection amplified BALF levels of hyaluronan (HA) and AHR. The Cl2-induced AHR was mitigated by treatment with inter-α-trypsin inhibitor antibody, which inhibits HA signaling, suggesting a mechanism of HA-mediated AHR from exacerbated oxidative injury. Our results show for the first time that preexisting RSV infection predisposes the lung to Cl2-induced injury. These data emphasize the necessity for further research on the effects of Cl2 in vulnerable populations and the development of appropriate treatments. PMID:26071553

  1. ROCK insufficiency attenuates ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, David I; Mathews, Joel A; Park, Chan Y; Cho, Youngji; Hunt, Gabrielle; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Liao, James K; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-10-01

    Ozone causes airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and pulmonary inflammation. Rho kinase (ROCK) is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell contraction and inflammatory cell migration. To determine the contribution of the two ROCK isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2 to ozone-induced AHR, we exposed wild-type, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice to air or ozone (2 ppm for 3 h) and evaluated mice 24 h later. ROCK1 or ROCK2 haploinsufficiency did not affect airway responsiveness in air-exposed mice but significantly reduced ozone-induced AHR, with a greater reduction in ROCK2(+/-) mice despite increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cells in ROCK2(+/-) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, ozone-induced increases in BAL hyaluronan, a matrix protein implicated in ozone-induced AHR, were lower in ROCK1(+/-) but not ROCK2(+/-) mice. Ozone-induced increases in other inflammatory moieties reported to contribute to ozone-induced AHR (IL-17A, osteopontin, TNFα) were not different in wild-type vs. ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. We also observed a dose-dependent reduction in ozone-induced AHR after treatment with the ROCK1/ROCK2 inhibitor fasudil, even though fasudil was administered after induction of inflammation. Ozone increased pulmonary expression of ROCK2 but not ROCK1 or RhoA. A ROCK2 inhibitor, SR3677, reduced contractile forces in primary human airway smooth muscle cells, confirming a role for ROCK2 in airway smooth muscle contraction. Our results demonstrate that ozone-induced AHR requires ROCK. Whereas ROCK1-dependent changes in hyaluronan may contribute to ROCK1's role in O3-induced AHR, the role of ROCK2 is downstream of inflammation, likely at the level of airway smooth muscle contraction.

  2. Acid aspiration-induced airways hyperresponsiveness in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leclair, Timothy R.; von Reyn, Jessica; Larrabee, Yuna C.; Cloutier, Mary E.; Irvin, Charles G.; Bates, Jason H. T.

    2009-01-01

    The role of gastroesophageal reflux and micro-aspiration as a trigger of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in patients with asthma is controversial. The role of acid reflux and aspiration as a direct cause of AHR in normal subjects is also unclear. We speculated that aspiration of a weak acid with a pH (1.8) equivalent to the upper range of typical gastric contents would lead to AHR in naive mice. We further speculated that modest reductions in aspirate acidity to a level expected during gastric acid suppression therapy (pH 4.0) would impede aspiration-induced AHR. BALB/c female mice were briefly anesthetized with isoflurane and allowed to aspirate 75 μl of saline with HCl (pH 1.8, 4.0, or 7.4) or underwent sham aspiration. Mice were re-anesthetized 2 or 24 h later, underwent tracheostomy, and were coupled to a mechanical ventilator. Forced oscillations were used to periodically measure respiratory impedance (Zrs) following aerosol delivery of saline and increasing doses of methacholine to measure for AHR. Values for elastance (H), airways resistance (RN), and tissue damping (G) were derived from Zrs. Aspirate pH of 1.8 led to a significant overall increase in peak RN, G, and H compared with pH 4.0 and 7.4 at 2 and 24 h. Differences between pH 7.4 and 4.0 were not significant. In mice aspirating pH 1.8 compared with controls, airway lavage fluid contained more neutrophils, higher protein, and demonstrated higher permeability. We conclude that acid aspiration triggers an acute AHR, driven principally by breakdown of epithelial barrier integrity within the airways. PMID:19797689

  3. Clinical implications of airway hyper-responsiveness in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Scichilone, Nicola; Battaglia, Salvatore; La Sala, Alba; Bellia, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    COPD represents one of the leading causes of mortality in the general population. This study aimed at evaluating the relationship between airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and COPD and its relevance for clinical practice. We performed a MEDLINE search that yielded a total of 1919 articles. Eligible studies were defined as articles that addressed specific aspects of AHR in COPD, such as prevalence, pathogenesis, or prognosis. AHR appears to be present in at least one out of two individuals with COPD. The occurrence of AHR in COPD is influenced by multiple mechanisms, among which impairment of factors that oppose airway narrowing plays an important role. The main determinants of AHR are reduction in lung function and smoking status. We envision a dual role of AHR: in suspected COPD, specific determinants of AHR, such as reactivity and the plateau response, may help the physician to discriminate COPD from asthma; in definite COPD, AHR may be relevant for the prognosis. Indeed, AHR is an independent predictor of mortality in COPD patients. Smoking cessation has been shown to reduce AHR. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether this functional change is associated with improvement in lung function and respiratory symptoms. PMID:18046902

  4. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Reverses Ammonium Metavanadate-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tlili, Mounira; Rouatbi, Sonia; Sriha, Badreddine; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Sakly, Mohsen; Vaudry, David; Wurtz, Olivier; Tebourbi, Olfa

    2015-01-01

    The rate of atmospheric vanadium is constantly increasing due to fossil fuel combustion. This environmental pollution favours vanadium exposure in particular to its vanadate form, causing occupational bronchial asthma and bronchitis. Based on the well admitted bronchodilator properties of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), we investigated the ability of this neuropeptide to reverse the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in rats. Exposure to ammonium metavanadate aerosols (5 mg/m3/h) for 15 minutes induced 4 hours later an array of pathophysiological events, including increase of bronchial resistance and histological alterations, activation of proinflammatory alveolar macrophages, and increased oxidative stress status. Powerfully, PACAP inhalation (0.1 mM) for 10 minutes alleviated many of these deleterious effects as demonstrated by a decrease of bronchial resistance and histological restoration. PACAP reduced the level of expression of mRNA encoding inflammatory chemokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, and KC) and cytokines (IL-1α and TNF-α) in alveolar macrophages and improved the antioxidant status. PACAP reverses the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness not only through its bronchodilator activity but also by counteracting the proinflammatory and prooxidative effects of the metal. Then, the development of stable analogs of PACAP could represent a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory respiratory disorders. PMID:26199679

  5. Involvement of PTEN in airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yong-Geun; Song, Chang H; Yi, Ho K; Hwang, Pyoung H; Kim, Jong-Suk; Lee, Kyung S; Lee, Yong C

    2003-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is part of a complex signaling system that affects a variety of important cell functions. PTEN blocks the action of PI3K by dephosphorylating the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. We have used a mouse model for asthma to determine the effect of PI3K inhibitors and PTEN on allergen-induced bronchial inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K activity increased significantly after allergen challenge. PTEN protein expression and PTEN activity were decreased in OVA-induced asthma. Immunoreactive PTEN localized in epithelial layers around the bronchioles in control mice. However, this immunoreactive PTEN dramatically disappeared in allergen-induced asthmatic lungs. The increased IL-4, IL-5, and eosinophil cationic protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids after OVA inhalation were significantly reduced by the intratracheal administration of PI3K inhibitors or adenoviruses carrying PTEN cDNA (AdPTEN). Intratracheal administration of PI3K inhibitors or AdPTEN remarkably reduced bronchial inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. These findings indicate that PTEN may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the asthma phenotype.

  6. Hyperresponsiveness in the human nasal airway: new targets for the treatment of allergic airway disease.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, P J; Foreman, J C

    1999-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a condition which affects over 15% of the population in the United Kingdom. The pathological process involves two stages: nasal inflammation, and the development of nasal airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to allergen and a number of other stimuli. This results in the amplification of any subsequent allergic reaction, contributing to the chronic allergic state. A number of different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of AHR, including a role for eosinophil-derived proteins, free radicals and neuropeptides. While there may be a number of independent pathways which can result in AHR, evidence obtained from both animal models and in vivo experiments in humans indicate that some mediators may interact with one another, resulting in AHR. Further research into these interactions may open new avenues for the pharmacological treatment of chronic allergic rhinitis, and possibly other allergic airway diseases. PMID:10704051

  7. Nebulized lidocaine blunts airway hyper-responsiveness in experimental feline asthma.

    PubMed

    Nafe, Laura A; Guntur, Vamsi P; Dodam, John R; Lee-Fowler, Tekla M; Cohn, Leah A; Reinero, Carol R

    2013-08-01

    Nebulized lidocaine may be a corticosteroid-sparing drug in human asthmatics, reducing airway resistance and peripheral blood eosinophilia. We hypothesized that inhaled lidocaine would be safe in healthy and experimentally asthmatic cats, diminishing airflow limitation and eosinophilic airway inflammation in the latter population. Healthy (n = 5) and experimentally asthmatic (n = 9) research cats were administered 2 weeks of nebulized lidocaine (2 mg/kg q8h) or placebo (saline) followed by a 2-week washout and crossover to the alternate treatment. Cats were anesthetized to measure the response to inhaled methacholine (MCh) after each treatment. Placebo and doubling doses of methacholine (0.0625-32.0000 mg/ml) were delivered and results were expressed as the concentration of MCh increasing baseline airway resistance by 200% (EC200Raw). Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed after each treatment and eosinophil numbers quantified. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) % eosinophils and EC200Raw within groups after each treatment were compared using a paired t-test (P <0.05 significant). No adverse effects were noted. In healthy cats, lidocaine did not significantly alter BALF eosinophilia or the EC200Raw. There was no difference in %BALF eosinophils in asthmatic cats treated with lidocaine (36±10%) or placebo (33 ± 6%). However, lidocaine increased the EC200Raw compared with placebo 10 ± 2 versus 5 ± 1 mg/ml; P = 0.043). Chronic nebulized lidocaine was well-tolerated in all cats, and lidocaine did not induce airway inflammation or airway hyper-responsiveness in healthy cats. Lidocaine decreased airway response to MCh in asthmatic cats without reducing airway eosinophilia, making it unsuitable for monotherapy. However, lidocaine may serve as a novel adjunctive therapy in feline asthmatics with beneficial effects on airflow obstruction.

  8. Does the length dependency of airway smooth muscle force contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness?

    PubMed

    Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Pascoe, Chris D; Couture, Christian; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2013-11-01

    Airway wall remodeling and lung hyperinflation are two typical features of asthma that may alter the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) by affecting its operating length. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to describe in detail the "length dependency of ASM force" in response to different spasmogens; and 2) to predict, based on morphological data and a computational model, the consequence of this length dependency of ASM force on airway responsiveness in asthmatic subjects who have both remodeled airway walls and hyperinflated lungs. Ovine tracheal ASM strips and human bronchial rings were isolated and stimulated to contract in response to increasing concentrations of spasmogens at three different lengths. Ovine tracheal strips were more sensitive and generated greater force at longer lengths in response to acetylcholine (ACh) and K(+). Equipotent concentrations of ACh were approximately a log less for ASM stretched by 30% and approximately a log more for ASM shortened by 30%. Similar results were observed in human bronchi in response to methacholine. Morphometric and computational analyses predicted that the ASM of asthmatic subjects may be elongated by 6.6-10.4% (depending on airway generation) due to remodeling and/or hyperinflation, which could increase ACh-induced force by 1.8-117.8% (depending on ASM length and ACh concentration) and enhance the increased resistance to airflow by 0.4-4,432.8%. In conclusion, elongation of ASM imposed by airway wall remodeling and/or hyperinflation may allow ASM to operate at a longer length and to consequently generate more force and respond to lower concentration of spasmogens. This phenomenon could contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness.

  9. Micropolyspora faeni causes airway inflammation but not hyperresponsiveness in sensitized ponies.

    PubMed

    Derksen, F J; Scott, J S; Slocombe, R F; Robinson, N E

    1987-04-01

    We assessed the effect of aerosol Micropolyspora faeni challenge in two groups of ponies by measuring lung function, airway reactivity to aerosol histamine, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology. One group of ponies was sensitized by subcutaneous injection of M. faeni in complete Freund's adjuvant, and the other group served as control. In both groups of ponies, measurements were made at base line and 5 h after aerosol administration of 30 ml of saline or 30 ml of 1% wt/vol particulate M. faeni antigen in saline. Saline challenge had no effect on any of the measured variables. M. faeni challenge had no effect on pulmonary mechanics or gas exchange in the control group but significantly increased respiratory frequency and minute ventilation and decreased arterial CO2 tension in the sensitized ponies. In both groups of ponies, aerosol M. faeni challenge significantly increased total white blood cell count and neutrophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid while large mononuclear cell numbers decreased. Airway responsiveness was unaltered by saline or M. faeni challenge in both pony groups. We conclude that aerosol M. faeni challenge induces pulmonary neutrophilia and abnormalities of ventilation but is not accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness in sensitized ponies.

  10. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Spaziano, Giuseppe; Piegari, Elena; Matteis, Maria; Cappetta, Donato; Esposito, Grazia; Russo, Rosa; Tartaglione, Gioia; De Palma, Raffaele; Rossi, Francesco; D’Agostino, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce. Objectives To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model. Methods GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro. Results Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties. Conclusion Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide

  11. CD38 and airway hyper-responsiveness: studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Alonso G P; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-02-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility, and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyper-responsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g., TNF-α) that requires the activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-κB and AP-1, and is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3' Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in Cd38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to the response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of Cd38-deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared with wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyper-responsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38-deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyper-responsiveness; a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and (or) activity are warranted.

  12. Streptomycin treatment alters the intestinal microbiome, pulmonary T cell profile and airway hyperresponsiveness in a cystic fibrosis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bazett, Mark; Bergeron, Marie-Eve; Haston, Christina K.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator deficient mouse models develop phenotypes of relevance to clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) including airway hyperresponsiveness, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and an altered intestinal microbiome. As dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota has been recognized as an important contributor to many systemic diseases, herein we investigated whether altering the intestinal microbiome of BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice and wild-type littermates, through treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin, affects the CF lung, intestinal and bone disease. We demonstrate that streptomycin treatment reduced the intestinal bacterial overgrowth in Cftrtm1UNC mice and altered the intestinal microbiome similarly in Cftrtm1UNC and wild-type mice, principally by affecting Lactobacillus levels. Airway hyperresponsiveness of Cftrtm1UNC mice was ameliorated with streptomycin, and correlated with Lactobacillus abundance in the intestine. Additionally, streptomycin treated Cftrtm1UNC and wild-type mice displayed an increased percentage of pulmonary and mesenteric lymph node Th17, CD8 + IL-17+ and CD8 + IFNγ+ lymphocytes, while the CF-specific increase in respiratory IL-17 producing γδ T cells was decreased in streptomycin treated Cftrtm1UNC mice. Bone disease and intestinal phenotypes were not affected by streptomycin treatment. The airway hyperresponsiveness and lymphocyte profile of BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice were affected by streptomycin treatment, revealing a potential intestinal microbiome influence on lung response in BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice. PMID:26754178

  13. Inhibitory effect of hydrogen sulfide on ozone-induced airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengyu; Li, Feng; Wiegman, Coen H; Zhang, Min; Hong, Yan; Gong, Jicheng; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Adcock, Ian; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ozone has been associated with airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The goal of this study was to examine whether these adverse effects of ozone could be prevented or reversed by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a reducing agent. The H2S donor sodium (NaHS) (2 mg/kg) or vehicle (PBS) was intraperitoneally injected into mice 1 hour before and after 3-hour ozone (2.5 ppm) or air exposure, and the mice were studied 24 hours later. Preventive and therapeutic treatment with NaHS reduced the ozone-induced increases in the total cells, including neutrophils and macrophages; this treatment also reduced levels of cytokines, including TNF-α, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid; inhibited bronchial hyperresponsiveness; and attenuated ozone-induced increases in total malondialdehyde in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreases in the ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione in the lung. Ozone exposure led to decreases in the H2S production rate and in mRNA and protein levels of cystathionine-β-synthetase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in the lung. These effects were prevented and reversed by NaHS treatment. Furthermore, NaHS prevented and reversed the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and heat shock protein 27. H2S may have preventive and therapeutic value in the treatment of airway diseases that have an oxidative stress basis.

  14. Involvement of superoxide in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in anesthetized cats

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, T.; Miura, M.; Katsumata, U.; Ichinose, M.; Kimura, K.; Inoue, H.; Takishima, T.; Shirato, K. )

    1993-07-01

    To determine whether oxygen radical scavengers inhibit ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, we examined the protective effect of polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD) and PEG-catalase (PEG-CAT) on ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in cat airways. Twenty-five cats divided into five groups were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. There was no difference between the groups in baseline airway responsiveness to inhaled acetylcholine (ACh). In the control group, AChPC, the concentration required to produce a doubling increase in baseline pulmonary resistance, was significantly reduced by ozone exposure (2.0 ppm for 2 h); the ratios of AChPC before ozone exposure to after ozone exposure (AChPC ratio) were 14.8 +/- 5.7 (p < 0.001) and 4.80 +/- 1.6 (p < 0.01) 30 and 120 min after exposure, respectively. Local administration of PEG-SOD (2,000 U/kg) into airways partially but significantly prevented ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. The AChPC ratios were 6.2 +/- 1.4 and 1.5 +/- 0.2 30 and 120 min after exposure, respectively, which were significantly different from those of the control group (p < 0.05), whereas PEG-CAT pretreatment (6,000 U/kg) was without effect. Combined pretreatment with PEG-SOD and PEG-CAT had no additional protective effect compared with PEG-SOD alone. PEG-SOD had no direct effect on airway responsiveness to ACh. These results suggest that superoxide may be involved in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

  15. New Role of Adult Lung c-kit+ Cells in a Mouse Model of Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cappetta, Donato; Urbanek, Konrad; Esposito, Grazia; Matteis, Maria; Sgambato, Manuela; Tartaglione, Gioia; Rossi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airflow obstruction in asthma. Emerging evidence points to the involvement of c-kit+ cells in lung homeostasis, although their potential role in asthma is unknown. Our aim was to isolate c-kit+ cells from normal mouse lungs and to test whether these cells can interfere with hallmarks of asthma in an animal model. Adult mouse GFP-tagged c-kit+ cells, intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, positively affected airway remodeling and improved airway function. In bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of cell-treated animals, a reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and in IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 release, along with an increase of IL-10, was observed. In MSC-treated mice, the macrophage polarization to M2-like subset may explain, at least in part, the increment in the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. After in vitro stimulation of c-kit+ cells with proinflammatory cytokines, the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and TGFβ were upregulated. These data, together with the increased apoptosis of inflammatory cells in vivo, indicate that c-kit+ cells downregulate immune response in asthma by influencing local environment, possibly by cell-to-cell contact combined to paracrine action. In conclusion, intratracheally administered c-kit+ cells reduce inflammation, positively modulate airway remodeling, and improve function. These data document previously unrecognized properties of c-kit+ cells, able to impede pathophysiological features of experimental airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:28090152

  16. Acute exposure to hair bleach causes airway hyperresponsiveness in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Mensing, T; Marek, W; Raulf-Heimsoth, M; Baur, X

    1998-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate (APS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are used as oxidants in many industrial processes and are the main constituents of standard hair bleaching products. In a previous study, it was demonstrated that aerosols of APS induce alterations in airway responsiveness. The present study examined whether exposure for 4 h to a hair bleach composition (containing APS, potassium persulphate and H2O2) or H2O2 could induce airway hyperresponsiveness and/or an obstructive ventilation pattern in a rabbit model. Exposure to the aerosols altered neither baseline airway resistance, dynamic elastance, slope of inspiratory pressure generation nor arterial blood pressure and blood gas measurements. Similarly to APS, hair bleach aerosols containing > or =10.9 mg x m(-3) persulphate (ammonium and potassium salt) in air and > or =1.36 mg x m(-3) H2O2 in air caused airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine after 4 h of exposure. Aerosolized H2O2 (> or =37 mg x m(-3) in air) did not influence airway responsiveness to acetylcholine. The results demonstrate that hair bleaching products containing persulphates dissolved in H2O2 cause airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine in rabbits.

  17. O3-induced airway hyperresponsiveness to noncholinergic system and other stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, M.G.; Segura, P.; Vargas, M.H.; Vanda, B.; Ponce-Monter, H.; Selman, M.; Montano, L.M. )

    1992-07-01

    The effect of O3 exposure (3 ppm, 1 h) on the in vivo and in vitro airway responsiveness, as well as the changes in cell contents in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, were evaluated 16-18 h after O3 exposure in sensitized and nonsensitized male guinea pigs. The sensitization procedure was performed through repeated inhalation of ovalbumin for 3 wk. Increase in pulmonary insufflation pressure produced by the excitatory nonadrenergic noncholinergic (eNANC) system, histamine, and antigen were assessed in in vivo conditions, whereas airway responsiveness to histamine and substance P was evaluated in in vitro conditions by use of tracheal chains with or without epithelium and lung parenchymal strips. The authors found that O3 exposure (1) increased the neutrophil content in BAL fluids in both sensitized and nonsensitized guinea pigs, (2) caused hyperresponsiveness to eNANC stimulation in nonsensitized guinea pigs (although combination of sensitization and O3 exposure paradoxically abolished the hyperresponsiveness to eNANC stimulation), (3) increased the in vivo bronchoconstrictor responses to histamine and antigen, (4) caused hyperresponsiveness to substance P in nonsensitized tracheae with or without epithelium and in sensitized tracheae with epithelium, (5) did not modify the responsiveness to histamine in tracheae with or without epithelium (and in addition, epithelium removal caused hyperresponsiveness to histamine even in those tracheae exposed to O3), and (6) produced hyperresponsiveness to histamine in lung parenchymal strips either from sensitized or nonsensitized guinea pigs.

  18. Gene-environment interactions in a mutant mouse kindred with native airway constrictor hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lawrence H; Eaton, Emily; Chen, Bohao; Fleisher, Jonah; Shuster, Dmitry; McCauley, Joel; Kedainis, Dalius; Siepka, Sandra M; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Song, Eun-Joo; Husain, Aliya; Lakser, Oren J; Mitchell, Richard W; Dowell, Maria L; Brown, Melanie; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Naclerio, Robert; Sperling, Anne I; Levin, Stephen I; Turek, Fred W; Solway, Julian

    2008-01-01

    We mutagenized male BTBR mice with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and screened 1315 of their G3 offspring for airway hyperresponsiveness. A phenovariant G3 mouse with exaggerated methacholine bronchoconstrictor response was identified and his progeny bred in a nonspecific-pathogen-free (SPF) facility where sentinels tested positive for minute virus of mice and mouse parvovirus and where softwood bedding was used. The mutant phenotype was inherited through G11 as a single autosomal semidominant mutation with marked gender restriction, with males exhibiting almost full penetrance and very few females phenotypically abnormal. Between G11 and G12, facility infection eradication was undertaken and bedding was changed to hardwood. We could no longer detect airway hyperresponsiveness in more than 37 G12 offspring of 26 hyperresponsive G11 males. Also, we could not identify the mutant phenotype among offspring of hyperresponsive G8-G10 sires rederived into an SPF facility despite 21 attempts. These two observations suggest that both genetic and environmental factors were needed for phenotype expression. We suspect that rederivation into an SPF facility or altered exposure to pathogens or other unidentified substances modified environmental interactions with the mutant allele, and so resulted in disappearance of the hyperresponsive phenotype. Our experience suggests that future searches for genes that confer susceptibility for airway hyperresponsiveness might not be able to identify some genes that confer susceptibility if the searches are performed in SPF facilities. Experimenters are advised to arrange for multigeneration constancy of mouse care in order to clone mutant genes. Indeed, we were not able to map the mutation before losing the phenotype.

  19. Alpha 4-integrins mediate antigen-induced late bronchial responses and prolonged airway hyperresponsiveness in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, W M; Sielczak, M W; Ahmed, A; Cortes, A; Lauredo, I T; Kim, J; Pepinsky, B; Benjamin, C D; Leone, D R; Lobb, R R

    1994-01-01

    Eosinophils and T lymphocytes are thought to be involved in allergic airway inflammation. Both cells express the alpha 4 beta 1-integrin, very late antigen-4 (VLA-4, CD49d/CD29); alpha 4-integrins can promote cellular adhesion and activation. Therefore, we examined the in vivo effects of a blocking anti-alpha 4 monoclonal antibody, HP 1/2, on antigen-induced early and late bronchial responses, airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammatory cell influx, and peripheral leukocyte counts in allergic sheep. Sheep blood lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils expressed alpha 4 and bound HP 1/2. In control sheep, Ascaris antigen challenge produced early and late increases in specific lung resistance of 380 +/- 42% and 175 +/- 16% over baseline immediately and 7 h after challenge, respectively, as well as airway hyperresponsiveness continuing for 14 d after antigen challenge. Treatment with HP 1/2 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) 30 min before antigen challenge did not affect the early increase in specific lung resistance but inhibited the late-phase increase at 5-8 h by 75% (P < 0.05) and inhibited the post-antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness at 1, 2, 7, and 14 d (P < 0.05, for each time). Intravenous HP 1/2 given 2 h after antigen challenge likewise blocked late-phase airway changes and postchallenge airway hyperresponsiveness. Airway administration of HP 1/2 (16-mg dose) was also effective in blocking these antigen-induced changes. Response to HP 1/2 was specific since an isotypic monoclonal antibody, 1E6, was ineffective by intravenous and aerosol administration. Inhibition of leukocyte recruitment did not totally account for the activity of anti-alpha 4 antibody since HP 1/2 neither diminished the eosinopenia or lymphopenia that followed antigen challenge nor consistently altered the composition of leukocytes recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage. Because airway administration of HP 1/2 was also active, HP 1/2 may have inhibited cell activation. Reduction of platelet-activating factor

  20. Anti-inflammatory drug (BW755C) inhibits airway hyperresponsiveness induced by ozone in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbri, L.M.; Aizawa, H.; O'Byrne, P.M.; Bethel, R.A.; Walters, E.H.; Holtzman, M.J.; Nadel, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    To follow up a previous observation that airway hyperresponsiveness induced by ozone is linked to airway inflammation, the authors investigated the effect of BW755C, an anti-inflammatory drug, on ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness in dogs. Airway responsiveness was assessed with dose-response curves of acetylcholine aerosol versus pulmonary resistance in two sets of experiments. In one set (placebo treatment), five dogs were given only saline solution treatment and were studied before treatment or ozone exposure and then after treatment both before and after ozone (3.0 ppm, 2 hours); in another set (BW755C treatment), the same dogs were studied before BW755C treatment or ozone and then after treatment (10 mg/kg intravenously) both before and after ozone. When the dogs were given no BW755C treatment, ozone induced a marked increase in airway responsiveness to acetylcholine. When the dogs were given BW755C, responsiveness was no different during treatment than before treatment but, more importantly, responsiveness did not increase significantly after ozone. The authors conclude that BW755C markedly inhibits ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in dogs, probably by inhibiting the formation of oxygenation products of arachidonic acid.

  1. A 'Good' muscle in a 'Bad' environment: the importance of airway smooth muscle force adaptation to airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Ynuk; Chapman, David G; Paré, Peter D; King, Gregory G; Salome, Cheryl M

    2011-12-15

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, with a consequent increase in spasmogens, and exaggerated airway narrowing in response to stimuli, termed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The nature of any relationship between inflammation and AHR is less clear. Recent ex vivo data has suggested a novel mechanism by which inflammation may lead to AHR, in which increased basal ASM-tone, due to the presence of spasmogens in the airways, may "strengthen" the ASM and ultimately lead to exaggerated airway narrowing. This phenomenon was termed "force adaptation" [Bossé, Y., Chin, L.Y., Paré, P.D., Seow, C.Y., 2009. Adaptation of airway smooth muscle to basal tone: relevance to airway hyperresponsiveness. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 40, 13-18]. However, it is unknown whether the magnitude of the effect of force adaptation ex vivo could contribute to exaggerated airway narrowing in vivo. Our aim was to utilize a computational model of ASM shortening in order to quantify the potential effect of force adaptation on airway narrowing when all other mechanical factors were kept constant. The shortening in the model is dictated by a balance between physiological loads and ASM force-generating capacity at different lengths. The results suggest that the magnitude of the effect of force adaptation on ASM shortening would lead to substantially more airway narrowing during bronchial challenge at any given airway generation. We speculate that the increased basal ASM-tone in asthma, due to the presence of inflammation-derived spasmogens, produces an increase in the force-generating capacity of ASM, predisposing to AHR during subsequent challenge.

  2. Ozone at high-pollution urban levels causes airway hyperresponsiveness to substance P but not to other agonists.

    PubMed

    Segura, P; Montaño, L M; Bazán-Perkins, B; Gustin, P; Vargas, M H

    1997-06-06

    Ozone (O(3)) causes airway hyperresponsiveness, but few studies have evaluated this effect at urban concentrations. In this work dose-response curves to intravenous acetylcholine, histamine or substance P were performed in guinea pigs with or without previous exposure to O(3) (0.15, 0.3, 0.6 or 1.2 ppm for 4 h, 16-18 h before the studies). We found airway hyperresponsiveness to histamine, but not to acetylcholine, only after 1.2 ppm O(3). By contrast, airway hyperresponsiveness to substance P was developed at O(3) levels encountered in highly-polluted cities (0.3 ppm). These results suggest that excitatory non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses could be affected by air pollution, and that substance P is a useful pharmacological tool for evaluating the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by low O(3) concentrations.

  3. IL-17A Modulates Oxidant Stress-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness but Not Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Pinart, Mariona; Zhang, Min; Li, Feng; Hussain, Farhana; Zhu, Jie; Wiegman, Coen; Ryffel, Bernard; Chung, Kian Fan

    2013-01-01

    IL-17A induces the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and of reactive oxygen species which could lead to neutrophilic inflammation. We determined the role of IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) signalling in oxidant-induced lung emphysema and airway hyperresponsiveness. IL-17R−/− and wild-type C57/BL6 mice were exposed to ozone (3 ppm; 3 hours) for 12 times over 6 weeks. Bronchial responsiveness to acetylcholine was measured, and lungs were retrieved. Mean linear intercept (Lm) and isometric contractile responses of intrapulmonary airways to acetylcholine were determined. In wild-type mice but not in IL-17R−/−, chronic ozone exposure caused airway hyperresponsiveness. The increase in Lm after chronic ozone exposure of wild-type mice was also observed in IL-17R−/− mice. The increased maximal contractile response to acetylcholine seen in airways of wild-type mice exposed to ozone was abolished in IL-17R−/− mice. p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and dexamethasone-dependent increase in contractile response was reduced in airways from IL-17R−/− ozone-exposed mice. Lung inflammation scores were not altered in IL-17R−/− mice exposed to ozone compared to wild-type mice. The increased release of IL-17 and IL-1β, and the activation of p38 MAPK in the lungs of ozone-exposed mice was reduced in IL-17R−/− mice. IL-17R signalling underlies the increase in airway hyperresponsiveness seen after ozone exposure, mediated by the increased contractility of airway smooth muscle. The emphysema and lung inflammation induced by ozone is not dependent on IL-17. PMID:23505509

  4. IL-17A modulates oxidant stress-induced airway hyperresponsiveness but not emphysema.

    PubMed

    Pinart, Mariona; Zhang, Min; Li, Feng; Hussain, Farhana; Zhu, Jie; Wiegman, Coen; Ryffel, Bernard; Chung, Kian Fan

    2013-01-01

    IL-17A induces the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and of reactive oxygen species which could lead to neutrophilic inflammation. We determined the role of IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) signalling in oxidant-induced lung emphysema and airway hyperresponsiveness. IL-17R(-/-) and wild-type C57/BL6 mice were exposed to ozone (3 ppm; 3 hours) for 12 times over 6 weeks. Bronchial responsiveness to acetylcholine was measured, and lungs were retrieved. Mean linear intercept (Lm) and isometric contractile responses of intrapulmonary airways to acetylcholine were determined. In wild-type mice but not in IL-17R(-/-), chronic ozone exposure caused airway hyperresponsiveness. The increase in Lm after chronic ozone exposure of wild-type mice was also observed in IL-17R(-/-) mice. The increased maximal contractile response to acetylcholine seen in airways of wild-type mice exposed to ozone was abolished in IL-17R(-/-) mice. p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and dexamethasone-dependent increase in contractile response was reduced in airways from IL-17R(-/-) ozone-exposed mice. Lung inflammation scores were not altered in IL-17R(-/-) mice exposed to ozone compared to wild-type mice. The increased release of IL-17 and IL-1β, and the activation of p38 MAPK in the lungs of ozone-exposed mice was reduced in IL-17R(-/-) mice. IL-17R signalling underlies the increase in airway hyperresponsiveness seen after ozone exposure, mediated by the increased contractility of airway smooth muscle. The emphysema and lung inflammation induced by ozone is not dependent on IL-17.

  5. A Phosphorylatable Sphingosine Analog Induces Airway Smooth Muscle Cytostasis and Reverses Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Experimental Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, David R.; Lecours, Pascale B.; Lemay, Anne-Marie; Beaulieu, Marie-Josée; Huppé, Carole-Ann; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Flamand, Nicolas; Don, Anthony S.; Bissonnette, Élyse; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laplante, Mathieu; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.; Bossé, Ynuk; Marsolais, David

    2017-01-01

    In asthma, excessive bronchial narrowing associated with thickening of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) causes respiratory distress. Numerous pharmacological agents prevent experimental airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) when delivered prophylactically. However, most fail to resolve this feature after disease is instated. Although sphingosine analogs are primarily perceived as immune modulators with the ability to prevent experimental asthma, they also influence processes associated with tissue atrophy, supporting the hypothesis that they could interfere with mechanisms sustaining pre-established AHR. We thus assessed the ability of a sphingosine analog (AAL-R) to reverse AHR in a chronic model of asthma. We dissected the pharmacological mechanism of this class of agents using the non-phosphorylatable chiral isomer AAL-S and the pre-phosphorylated form of AAL-R (AFD-R) in vivo and in human ASM cells. We found that a therapeutic course of AAL-R reversed experimental AHR in the methacholine challenge test, which was not replicated by dexamethasone or the non-phosphorylatable isomer AAL-S. AAL-R efficiently interfered with ASM cell proliferation in vitro, supporting the concept that immunomodulation is not necessary to interfere with cellular mechanisms sustaining AHR. Moreover, the sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase inhibitor SM4 and the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor antagonist VPC23019 failed to inhibit proliferation, indicating that intracellular accumulation of sphingosine-1-phosphate or interference with cell surface S1P1/S1P3 activation, are not sufficient to induce cytostasis. Potent AAL-R-induced cytostasis specifically related to its ability to induce intracellular AFD-R accumulation. Thus, a sphingosine analog that possesses the ability to be phosphorylated in situ interferes with cellular mechanisms that beget AHR. PMID:28270767

  6. Could an increase in airway smooth muscle shortening velocity cause airway hyperresponsiveness?

    PubMed

    Bullimore, Sharon R; Siddiqui, Sana; Donovan, Graham M; Martin, James G; Sneyd, James; Bates, Jason H T; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a characteristic feature of asthma. It has been proposed that an increase in the shortening velocity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) could contribute to AHR. To address this possibility, we tested whether an increase in the isotonic shortening velocity of ASM is associated with an increase in the rate and total amount of shortening when ASM is subjected to an oscillating load, as occurs during breathing. Experiments were performed in vitro using 27 rat tracheal ASM strips supramaximally stimulated with methacholine. Isotonic velocity at 20% isometric force (Fiso) was measured, and then the load on the muscle was varied sinusoidally (0.33 ± 0.25 Fiso, 1.2 Hz) for 20 min, while muscle length was measured. A large amplitude oscillation was applied every 4 min to simulate a deep breath. We found that: 1) ASM strips with a higher isotonic velocity shortened more quickly during the force oscillations, both initially (P < 0.001) and after the simulated deep breaths (P = 0.002); 2) ASM strips with a higher isotonic velocity exhibited a greater total shortening during the force oscillation protocol (P < 0.005); and 3) the effect of an increase in isotonic velocity was at least comparable in magnitude to the effect of a proportional increase in ASM force-generating capacity. A cross-bridge model showed that an increase in the total amount of shortening with increased isotonic velocity could be explained by a change in either the cycling rate of phosphorylated cross bridges or the rate of myosin light chain phosphorylation. We conclude that, if asthma involves an increase in ASM velocity, this could be an important factor in the associated AHR.

  7. Role of leukotrienes in airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, K.; Thomson, R. J.; Schellenberg, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. Repeated aerosolization of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) to guinea-pigs produced leftward shift in their pulmonary resistance (RL) dose-response curves to inhaled acetylcholine (ACh) without increasing the maximum responses. 2. Repeated LTC4 aerosolization did not increase airway eosinophils. 3. The 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) inhibitor, MK-886, prevented the leftward shift in RL dose-response curves to ACh following repeated antigen challenge in guinea-pigs. 4. MK-886 did not inhibit the increased maximal RL produced by repeated antigen challenge, nor inhibit the airway eosinophilia induced by repeated antigen challenge. 5. Our findings suggest that leukotrienes may account for the leftward shift in pulmonary resistance responses caused by antigen but do not cause the airway eosinophilia nor enhanced maximum broncho-constrictor response to antigen. PMID:8467358

  8. Airway Microbiota and Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness in Patients with Sub-optimally Controlled Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.; Nelson, Craig E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Baek, Marshall S.; Liu, Jane; Woyke, Tanja; Allgaier, Martin; Bristow, Jim; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine P.; Sutherland, E. Rand; King, Tonya S.; Icitovic, Nikolina; Martin, Richard J.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Denlinger, Loren C.; DiMango, Emily; Kraft, Monica; Peters, Stephen P.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Wechsler, Michael E.; Boushey, Homer A.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Improvement in lung function following macrolide antibiotic therapy has been attributed to reduction in bronchial infection due to specific bacteria. However, the airway may be populated by a more diverse microbiota, and clinical features of asthma may be associated with characteristics of the airway microbiota present. Objective To determine if relationships exist between the composition of the airway bacterial microbiota and clinical features of asthma, using culture-independent tools capable of detecting the presence and relative abundance of most known bacteria. Methods In this pilot study, bronchial epithelial brushings were collected from sixty-five adults with sub-optimally controlled asthma participating in a multicenter study of the effects of clarithromycin on asthma control, and ten healthy subjects. A combination of high-density 16S rRNA microarray and parallel clone library-sequencing analysis was used to profile the microbiota and examine relationships with clinical measurements. Results Compared to controls, 16S rRNA amplicon concentrations (a proxy for bacterial burden) and bacterial diversity were significantly higher among asthmatic patients. In multivariate analyses, airway microbiota composition and diversity were significantly correlated with bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Specifically, the relative abundance of particular phylotypes, including members of the Comamonadaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae and other bacterial families, were highly correlated with the degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Conclusion The composition of bronchial airway microbiota is associated with the degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness among patients with sub-optimally controlled asthma. These findings support the need for further functional studies to examine the potential contribution of members of the airway microbiota in asthma pathogenesis. PMID:21194740

  9. Airways Hyperresponsiveness Following a Single Inhalation Exposure to Doxorubicin-Induced Heart Failure Prevents Airways Transition Metal-Rich Particulate Matter in Hypertensive Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution results in airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR), however it also results in adverse cardiovascular effects, particularly in individuals with underlying cardiovascular disease. The impact of pre-existing cardiac deficit on PM-induced ...

  10. Streptomycin treatment alters the intestinal microbiome, pulmonary T cell profile and airway hyperresponsiveness in a cystic fibrosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bazett, Mark; Bergeron, Marie-Eve; Haston, Christina K

    2016-01-12

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator deficient mouse models develop phenotypes of relevance to clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) including airway hyperresponsiveness, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and an altered intestinal microbiome. As dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota has been recognized as an important contributor to many systemic diseases, herein we investigated whether altering the intestinal microbiome of BALB/c Cftr(tm1UNC) mice and wild-type littermates, through treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin, affects the CF lung, intestinal and bone disease. We demonstrate that streptomycin treatment reduced the intestinal bacterial overgrowth in Cftr(tm1UNC) mice and altered the intestinal microbiome similarly in Cftr(tm1UNC) and wild-type mice, principally by affecting Lactobacillus levels. Airway hyperresponsiveness of Cftr(tm1UNC) mice was ameliorated with streptomycin, and correlated with Lactobacillus abundance in the intestine. Additionally, streptomycin treated Cftr(tm1UNC) and wild-type mice displayed an increased percentage of pulmonary and mesenteric lymph node Th17, CD8 + IL-17+ and CD8 + IFNγ+ lymphocytes, while the CF-specific increase in respiratory IL-17 producing γδ T cells was decreased in streptomycin treated Cftr(tm1UNC) mice. Bone disease and intestinal phenotypes were not affected by streptomycin treatment. The airway hyperresponsiveness and lymphocyte profile of BALB/c Cftr(tm1UNC) mice were affected by streptomycin treatment, revealing a potential intestinal microbiome influence on lung response in BALB/c Cftr(tm1UNC) mice.

  11. Epithelium-generated neuropeptide Y induces smooth muscle contraction to promote airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanru; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jude, Joseph; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Cao, Gaoyuan; Yoo, Edwin; Jester, William; Morley, Michael P.; Zhou, Su; Wang, Yi; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases globally and can be divided into presenting with or without an immune response. Current therapies have little effect on nonimmune disease, and the mechanisms that drive this type of asthma are poorly understood. Here, we have shown that loss of the transcription factors forkhead box P1 (Foxp1) and Foxp4, which are critical for lung epithelial development, in the adult airway epithelium evokes a non-Th2 asthma phenotype that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) without eosinophilic inflammation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that loss of Foxp1 and Foxp4 expression induces ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y (Npy), which has been reported to be present in the airways of asthma patients, but whose importance in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment of human lung airway explants with recombinant NPY increased airway contractility. Conversely, loss of Npy in Foxp1- and Foxp4-mutant airway epithelium rescued the AHR phenotype. We determined that NPY promotes AHR through the induction of Rho kinase activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which induces airway smooth muscle contraction. Together, these studies highlight the importance of paracrine signals from the airway epithelium to the underlying smooth muscle to induce AHR and suggest that therapies targeting epithelial induction of this phenotype may prove useful in treatment of noneosinophilic asthma. PMID:27088802

  12. Linking Ventilation Heterogeneity Quantified via Hyperpolarized 3He MRI to Dynamic Lung Mechanics and Airway Hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Lui, Justin K; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Albert, Mitchell S; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI (HP 3He-MRI) have introduced the ability to render and quantify ventilation patterns throughout the anatomic regions of the lung. The goal of this study was to establish how ventilation heterogeneity relates to the dynamic changes in mechanical lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic subjects. In four healthy and nine mild-to-moderate asthmatic subjects, we measured dynamic lung resistance and lung elastance from 0.1 to 8 Hz via a broadband ventilation waveform technique. We quantified ventilation heterogeneity using a recently developed coefficient of variation method from HP 3He-MRI imaging. Dynamic lung mechanics and imaging were performed at baseline, post-challenge, and after a series of five deep inspirations. AHR was measured via the concentration of agonist that elicits a 20% decrease in the subject's forced expiratory volume in one second compared to baseline (PC20) dose. The ventilation coefficient of variation was correlated to low-frequency lung resistance (R = 0.647, P < 0.0001), the difference between high and low frequency lung resistance (R = 0.668, P < 0.0001), and low-frequency lung elastance (R = 0.547, P = 0.0003). In asthmatic subjects with PC20 values <25 mg/mL, the coefficient of variation at baseline exhibited a strong negative trend (R = -0.798, P = 0.02) to PC20 dose. Our findings were consistent with the notion of peripheral rather than central involvement of ventilation heterogeneity. Also, the degree of AHR appears to be dependent on the degree to which baseline airway constriction creates baseline ventilation heterogeneity. HP 3He-MRI imaging may be a powerful predictor of the degree of AHR and in tracking the efficacy of therapy.

  13. MAG-DPA curbs inflammatory biomarkers and pharmacological reactivity in cytokine-triggered hyperresponsive airway models.

    PubMed

    Khaddaj-Mallat, Rayan; Hiram, Roddy; Sirois, Chantal; Sirois, Marco; Rizcallah, Edmond; Marouan, Sofia; Morin, Caroline; Rousseau, Éric

    2016-12-01

    Bronchial inflammation contributes to a sustained elevation of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma. Conversely, omega-3 fatty acid derivatives have been shown to resolve inflammation in various tissues. Thus, the effects of docosapentaenoic acid monoacylglyceride (MAG-DPA) were assessed on inflammatory markers and reactivity of human distal bronchi as well as in a cultured model of guinea pig tracheal rings. Human bronchi were dissected and cultured for 48 h with 10 ng/mL TNF-α or IL-13. Guinea pig tracheas were maintained in organ culture for 72 h which was previously shown to trigger spontaneous AHR. All tissues were treated with increasing concentrations of MAG-DPA (0.1, 0.3, and 1 μmol/L). Pharmacomechanical reactivity, Ca(2+) sensitivity, and western blot analysis for specific phosphoproteins and transcription factors were performed to assess the effects of both cytokines, alone or in combination with MAG-DPA, on human and guinea pig airway preparations. Although 0.1 μmol/L MAG-DPA did not significantly reduce inflammatory biomarkers, the higher concentrations of MAG-DPA (0.3 and 1 μmol/L) blunted the activation of the TNF-α/NF κB pathway and abolished COX-2 expression in human and guinea pig tissues. Moreover, 0.3 and 1 μmol/L MAG-DPA consistently decreased the Ca(2+) sensitivity and pharmacological reactivity of cultured bronchial explants. Furthermore, in human bronchi, IL-13-stimulated phosphorylation of CPI-17 was reversed by 1 μmol/L MAG-DPA. This effect was further amplified in the presence of 100 μmol/L aspirin. MAG-DPA mediates antiphlogistic effects by increasing the resolution of inflammation, while resetting Ca(2+) sensitivity and contractile reactivity.

  14. Graphene Oxide Attenuates Th2-Type Immune Responses, but Augments Airway Remodeling and Hyperresponsiveness in a Murine Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) is able to modify airway immune responses, thus facilitating the development of respiratory diseases. Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising carbonaceous nanomaterial with unique physicochemical properties, envisioned for a multitude of medical and industrial applications. In this paper, we determined how exposure to GO modulates the allergic pulmonary response. Using a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma, we revealed that GO, given at the sensitization stage, augmented airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling in the form of goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. At the same time, the levels of the cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 were reduced in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in GO-exposed mice. Exposure to GO during sensitization with OVA decreased eosinophil accumulation and increased recruitment of macrophages in BAL fluid. In line with the cytokine profiles, sensitization with OVA in the presence of GO stimulated the production of OVA-specific IgG2a and down-regulated the levels of IgE and IgG1. Moreover, exposure to GO increased the macrophage production of the mammalian chitinases, CHI3L1 and AMCase, whose expression is associated with asthma. Finally, molecular modeling has suggested that GO may directly interact with chitinase, affecting AMCase activity, which has been directly proven in our studies. Thus, these data show that GO exposure attenuates Th2 immune response in a model of OVA-induced asthma, but leads to potentiation of airway remodeling and hyperresponsiveness, with the induction of mammalian chitinases. PMID:24847914

  15. Inhalation of diesel exhaust enhances allergen-related eosinophil recruitment and airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Takano, H; Ichinose, T; Miyabara, Y; Shibuya, T; Lim, H B; Yoshikawa, T; Sagai, M

    1998-06-01

    We have previously shown that intratracheal instillation of suspension of diesel exhaust particles enhances allergen-related eosinophilic airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and local expression of interleukin (IL)-5 and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in mice. The present study was designed to elucidate the effects of daily inhalation of diesel exhaust (DE) on the allergen-related respiratory disease. ICR mice were exposed for 40 weeks to clean air or DE at a soot concentration of 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/m3 with aerosol allergen challenges (1% ovalbumin in isotonic saline for 6 min) at 3-week intervals during the last 24 weeks of exposures. Exposure to DE enhanced allergen-related eosinophil recruitment to the submucosal layers of the airways and to the bronchoalveolar space, and increased protein levels of GM-CSF and IL-5 in the lung in a dose-dependent manner compared to exposure to clean air. There were strong correlations between the number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and IL-5 concentrations in BAL supernatants and lung tissue supernatants. In addition, the increases in eosinophil recruitment and local cytokine expression were accompanied by goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium and airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled acetylcholine. In contrast, the control mice exposed for 40 weeks to clean air or DE at a soot concentration of 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/m3 without allergen provocation showed no eosinophil recruitment to the submucosal layers of the airways nor to the bronchoalveolar space and few goblet cells in the bronchial epithelium. The present study provides experimental evidence that daily inhalation of DE can enhance allergen-related respiratory diseases such as allergic asthma. This effect may be mediated by the enhanced local expression of IL-5 and GM-CSF. Increased ambient levels of DE may be implicated in the increasing prevalence of bronchial asthma in recent years.

  16. Induction of transient airway hyperresponsiveness by exposure to 4 ppm nitrogen dioxide in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Shinozaki, Y. )

    1992-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated (1) whether airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine-aerosol could be induced during 7-d exposure of guinea pigs to 4 ppm NO[sub 2] and, if so, (2) whether thromboxane A2 may be involved in such increase. Female Hartley guinea pigs were divided into 6 groups (n = 15/group). Three groups were exposed to filtered air and the other 3 groups were exposed to NO[sub 2] for 1, 3, or 7 d (24 h/d). Baseline specific airway resistance (SRaw) did not change significantly after exposure to 4 ppm NO[sub 2] or air. Airway responsiveness was determined 1 wk before the beginning of exposure and on the day of termination of the exposure. Prior to exposure to NO[sub 2], the EC200His, the concentrations of inhaled histamine necessary to double SRawNaCl (SRaw after inhalation of 0.9% NaCl), were 1.07 [plus minus] 0.20, 1.30 [plus minus] 0.20, and 1.01 [plus minus] 0.18 mM for the 3 groups later given NO[sub 2] for 1, 3, and 7 d, respectively. Following exposure to NO[sub 2] for 1, 3, or 7 d, EC200His values were 1.42 [plus minus] 0.25, 0.66 [plus minus] 0.10 (p < .05), and 1.05 [plus minus] 0.22 mM, respectively. These results show that 7-d exposure to 4 ppm NO[sub 2] induced a significant increase in airway responsiveness on d 3. Exposure to air had no significant effect on the airway responsiveness. This transient hyperresponsiveness was inhibited by a specific inhibitor of thromboxane synthetase, OKY 046. These results indicated that (1) a lower concentration (4 ppm) of NO[sub 2] than that previously reported can induce transient hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs during appropriate long-term exposure, and (2) thromboxane A2 may play an important role in this transient airway hyperresponsiveness.

  17. G Protein βγ-subunit signaling mediates airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nino, Gustavo; Hu, Aihua; Grunstein, Judith S; McDonough, Joseph; Kreiger, Portia A; Josephson, Maureen B; Choi, John K; Grunstein, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    Since the Gβγ subunit of Gi protein has been importantly implicated in regulating immune and inflammatory responses, this study investigated the potential role and mechanism of action of Gβγ signaling in regulating the induction of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in a rabbit model of allergic asthma. Relative to non-sensitized animals, OVA-sensitized rabbits challenged with inhaled OVA exhibited AHR, lung inflammation, elevated BAL levels of IL-13, and increased airway phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) activity. These proasthmatic responses were suppressed by pretreatment with an inhaled membrane-permeable anti-Gβγ blocking peptide, similar to the suppressive effect of glucocorticoid pretreatment. Extended mechanistic studies demonstrated that: 1) corresponding proasthmatic changes in contractility exhibited in isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM) sensitized with serum from OVA-sensitized+challenged rabbits or IL-13 were also Gβγ-dependent and mediated by MAPK-upregulated PDE4 activity; and 2) the latter was attributed to Gβγ-induced direct stimulation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Src, resulting in downstream activation of ERK1/2 and its consequent transcriptional upregulation of PDE4. Collectively, these data are the first to identify that a mechanism involving Gβγ-induced direct activation of c-Src, leading to ERK1/2-mediated upregulation of PDE4 activity, plays a decisive role in regulating the induction of AHR and inflammation in a rabbit model of allergic airway disease.

  18. IL-10 is necessary for the expression of airway hyperresponsiveness but not pulmonary inflammation after allergic sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, M. J.; Kanehiro, A.; Borish, L.; Dakhama, A.; Loader, J.; Joetham, A.; Xing, Z.; Jordana, M.; Larsen, G. L.; Gelfand, E. W.

    2000-05-01

    Cytokines play an important role in modulating inflammatory responses and, as a result, airway tone. IL-10 is a regulatory cytokine that has been suggested for treatment of asthma because of its immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to these suggestions, we demonstrate in a model of allergic sensitization that mice deficient in IL-10 (IL-10/) develop a pulmonary inflammatory response but fail to exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness in both in vitro and in vivo assessments of lung function. Reconstitution of these deficient mice with the IL-10 gene fully restores development of airway hyperresponsiveness comparable to control mice. These results identify an important role of IL-10, downstream of the inflammatory cascade, in regulating the tone of the airways after allergic sensitization and challenge.

  19. Airway hyperresponsiveness induced by repeated esophageal infusion of HCl in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan-Mei; Cao, Ai-Li; Zheng, Jian-Pu; Wang, Hong-Wei; Sun, Yong-Shun; Liu, Chun-Fang; Zhang, Bei-Bei; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Sheng-Liang; Wu, Da-Zheng

    2014-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a common disorder closely related to chronic airway diseases, such as chronic cough, asthma, chronic bronchitis, and chronic obstructive disease. Indeed, gastroesophageal acid reflux into the respiratory tract causes bronchoconstriction, but the underlying mechanisms have still not been clarified. This study aimed to elucidate functional changes of bronchial smooth muscles (BSMs) isolated from guinea pigs in an animal model of gastroesophageal reflux. The marked airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness and remodeling were observed after guinea pigs were exposed to intraesophageal HCl infusion for 14 days. In addition, contractile responses to acetylcholine (ACh), KCl, electrical field stimulation, and extracellular Ca(2+) were greater in guinea pigs infused with HCl compared with control groups. The L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (L-VDCC) blocker, nicardipine, significantly inhibited ACh- and Ca(2+)-enhanced BSM contractions in guinea pigs infused with HCl. The Rho-kinase inhibitor, Y27632, attenuated ACh-enhanced BSM contractions in guinea pigs infused with HCl. Moreover, mRNA and protein expressions for muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors, RhoA, and L-VDCC in BSM were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot. Expressions of mRNA and protein for muscarinic M3 receptors, RhoA, and L-VDCC were greater than in BSM of HCl-infused guinea pigs, whereas levels of muscarinic M2 receptors were unchanged. We demonstrate that acid infusion to the lower esophagus and, subsequently, microaspiration into the respiratory tract in guinea pigs leads to airway hyperresponsiveness and overactive BSM. Functional and molecular results indicate that overactive BSM is the reason for enhancement of extracellular Ca(2+) influx via L-VDCC and Ca(2+) sensitization through Rho-kinase signaling.

  20. Chronic exposure to ozone causes tolerance to airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs: lack of SOD role.

    PubMed

    Vargas, M H; Romero, L; Sommer, B; Zamudio, P; Gustin, P; Montaño, L M

    1998-05-01

    Tolerance to respiratory effects of O3 has been demonstrated for anatomic and functional changes, but information about tolerance to O3-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is scarce. In guinea pigs exposed to air or O3 (0.3 parts/million, 4 h/day, for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 days, studied 16-18 h later), pulmonary insufflation pressure changes induced by intravenous substance P (SP, 0.032-3.2 micro ug/kg) were measured, then the animals were subjected to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Bronchial rings with or without phosphoramidon were also evaluated 3 h after air or a single O3 exposure. O3 caused in vivo AHR (increased sensitivity) to SP after 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 days of exposure compared with control. However, after 48 days of exposure, O3 no longer caused AHR. Total cell, macrophage, neutrophil, and eosinophil counts in BAL were increased in most O3-exposed groups. When data from all animals were pooled, we found a highly significant correlation between degree of airway responsiveness and total cells (r = 0.55), macrophages (r = 0.54), neutrophils (r = 0.47), and eosinophils (r = 0.53), suggesting that airway inflammation is involved in development of AHR to SP. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in BAL fluids were increased (P < 0.05) after 1, 3, 6, and 12 days of O3 exposure and returned to basal levels after 24 and 48 days of exposure. O3 failed to induce hyperresponsiveness to SP in bronchial rings, and phosphoramidon increased responses to SP in air- and O3-exposed groups, suggesting that neutral endopeptidase inactivation was not involved in O3-induced AHR to SP in vivo. We conclude that chronic exposure to 0. 3 ppm O3, a concentration found in highly polluted cities, resulted in tolerance to AHR to SP in guinea pigs by an SOD-independent mechanism.

  1. Early treatment of chlorine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation with corticosteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Jonasson, Sofia; Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Koch, Bo; Bucht, Anders

    2013-09-01

    Chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) is an industrial gas that is highly toxic and irritating when inhaled causing tissue damage and an acute inflammatory response in the airways followed by a long-term airway dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether early anti-inflammatory treatment can protect against the delayed symptoms in Cl{sub 2}-exposed mice. BALB/c mice were exposed by nose-only inhalation using 200 ppm Cl{sub 2} during 15 min. Assessment of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage, occurrence of lung edema and lung fibrosis were analyzed 24 h or 14 days post-exposure. A single dose of the corticosteroid dexamethasone (10 or 100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 1, 3, 6, or 12 h following Cl{sub 2} exposure. High-dose of dexamethasone reduced the acute inflammation if administered within 6 h after exposure but treated animals still displayed a significant lung injury. The effect of dexamethasone administered within 1 h was dose-dependent; high-dose significantly reduced acute airway inflammation (100 mg/kg) but not treatment with the relatively low-dose (10 mg/kg). Both doses reduced AHR 14 days later, while lung fibrosis measured as collagen deposition was not significantly reduced. The results point out that the acute inflammation in the lungs due to Cl{sub 2} exposure only partly is associated with the long-term AHR. We hypothesize that additional pathogenic mechanisms apart from the inflammatory reactions contribute to the development of long-term airway dysfunction. By using this mouse model, we have validated early administration of corticosteroids in terms of efficacy to prevent acute lung injury and delayed symptoms induced by Cl{sub 2} exposure. - Highlights: • Inhalation of Cl{sub 2} may lead to a long-standing airway hyperresponsiveness. • The symptoms in Cl{sub 2}-exposed mice are similar to those described for RADS in humans. • Corticosteroids prevent delayed symptoms such as AHR in

  2. OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness alters murine heart rate variability and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Domnik, N J; Seaborn, G; Vincent, S G; Akl, S G; Redfearn, D P; Fisher, J T

    2012-01-01

    Altered autonomic (ANS) tone in chronic respiratory disease is implicated as a factor in cardiovascular co-morbidities, yet no studies address its impact on cardiovascular function in the presence of murine allergic airway (AW) hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Since antigen (Ag)-induced AHR is used to model allergic asthma (in which ANS alterations have been reported), we performed a pilot study to assess measurement feasibility of, as well as the impact of allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) on, heart rate variability (HRV) in a murine model. Heart rate (HR), body temperature (T(B)), and time- and frequency-domain HRV analyses, a reflection of ANS control, were obtained in chronically instrumented mice (telemetry) before, during and for 22 h after OVA or saline aerosolization in sensitized (OVA) or Alum adjuvant control exposed animals. OVA mice diverged significantly from Alum mice with respect to change in HR during aerosol challenge (P < 0.001, Two-Way ANOVA; HR max change Ctrl = +80 ± 10 bpm vs. OVA = +1 ± 23 bpm, mean ± SEM), and displayed elevated HR during the subsequent dark cycle (P = 0.006). Sensitization decreased the T(B) during aerosol challenge (P < 0.001). Sensitized mice had decreased HRV prior to challenge (SDNN: P = 0.038; Low frequency (LF) power: P = 0.021; Low/high Frequency (HF) power: P = 0.042), and increased HRV during Ag challenge (RMSSD: P = 0.047; pNN6: P = 0.039). Sensitized mice displayed decreased HRV subsequent to OVA challenge, primarily in the dark cycle (RMSSD: P = 0.018; pNN6: P ≤ 0.001; LF: P ≤ 0.001; HF: P = 0.040; LF/HF: P ≤ 0.001). We conclude that implanted telemetry technology is an effective method to assess the ANS impact of allergic sensitization. Preliminary results show mild sensitization is associated with reduced HRV and a suppression of the acute T(B)-response to OVA challenge. This approach to assess altered ANS control in the acute OVA model may also be beneficial in chronic AHR models.

  3. Eight-year follow-up of airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ludviksdottir, Dora; Valtysdottir, Sigridur Th.; Hedenström, Hans; Hällgren, Roger; Gudbjörnsson, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate in a longitudinal study the influence of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) on lung function in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS). Methods Lung function was studied over an eight-year period in 15 patients who fulfilled the Copenhagen criteria for primary Sjögren’s syndrome and who were covered in our earlier published study on AHR in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome. Standard spirometry and measurements of lung volumes, diffusing capacity (DLCO), and AHR to methacholine were performed. Results A significant decline over time was found in total lung capacity (TLC), vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), functional residual capacity (FRC), and expiratory midflows (FEF50). A sign of small airway obstruction (decrease in FEF50) at entry correlated with VC at follow-up (r = .8, P < .003), and the individual change in FEF50 during the observation period correlated with the individual change in VC (r = .6, P < .05). Six patients had increased AHR, and three of them had decreased DLCO. Six of the patients progressively reduced DLCO over time, and five of them had spirometric signs of increased small airway obstruction. Conclusions During this eight-year follow-up we observed that one-third of the patients with pSS developed a significant reduction in lung function. Our findings suggest that small airways obstruction and AHR are associated with reduction of VC and development of impaired DLCO as a sign of interstitial lung disease in this group of patients. PMID:27849141

  4. Are mouse models of asthma appropriate for investigating the pathogenesis of airway hyper-responsiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh K.; Foster, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Whether mouse models of chronic asthma can be used to investigate the relationship between airway inflammation/remodeling and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) is a vexed question. It raises issues about the extent to which such models replicate key features of the human disease. Here, we review some of the characteristic pathological features of human asthma and their relationship to AHR and examine some limitations of mouse models that are commonly used to investigate these relationships. We compare these conventional models with our mouse model of chronic asthma involving long-term low-level inhalational challenge and review studies of the relationship between inflammation/remodeling and AHR in this model and its derivatives, including models of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma and of the induction phase of childhood asthma. We conclude that while extrapolating from studies in mouse models to AHR in humans requires cautious interpretation, such experimental work can provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of airway responsiveness and its molecular and cellular regulation. PMID:23060800

  5. The antidiabetic agent glibenclamide protects airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Zhang, Shufang; Cai, Zhijian; Hu, Xinlei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Wang, Yong; Li, Na; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Gensheng

    2015-04-01

    Glibenclamide has a newly discovered role in inflammation regulation besides its antidiabetic effect. As an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel, glibenclamide antagonizes the relaxation of the tracheal smooth muscle. This indicates that glibenclamide might attenuate airway inflammation while aggravate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthmatics. Clinically, many diabetics with asthma are prescribed with glibenclamide to control blood glucose. However, whether glibenclamide could exert any effects on asthmatic inflammation remains unknown. Using an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse model of asthma, we evaluated the effects of glibenclamide on the AHR and inflammation. Interestingly, glibenclamide reduced all the cardinal features of asthma in OVA-challenged mice, including AHR, airway inflammation, and T-helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines. Glibenclamide also downregulated OVA-induced expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (p-STAT6) in the lung. In addition, increased sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) expression in the lung was observed after the OVA challenge. These findings suggest that the classic sulfonylurea glibenclamide plays an important protective role in the development of asthma, which not only provides the evidence for the safety of prescribed glibenclamide in diabetics combined with asthma but also indicates a possible new therapeutic for asthma via targeting glibenclamide-related pathways.

  6. Epigenetic alterations by DNA methylation in house dust mite-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yan; Das, Sandhya; Rabold, Richard; Sham, James S K; Mitzner, Wayne; Tang, Wan-yee

    2013-08-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic lung diseases, affecting 235 million individuals around the world, with its related morbidity and mortality increasing steadily over the last 20 years. Exposure to the environmental allergen, house dust mite (HDM), results in airway inflammation with a variable degree of airway obstruction. Although there has been much experimental work in the past using HDM challenge models to understand mechanistic details in allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), there has been no study on reprogramming of lung or airways mediated through epigenetic mechanisms in response to an acute HDM exposure. Male mice, 6 weeks of age, were administrated HDM extracts or saline at Days 1, 14, and 21. Exposure of mice to HDM extracts caused significant airway inflammation and increased AHR. These HDM-challenged mice also exhibited a change in global DNA methylation as compared with saline-exposed (control) mice. Next, by employing methylation-sensitive restriction fingerprinting, we identified a set of genes, showing aberrant methylation status, associated with the HDM-induced AHR. These candidate genes are known to be involved in cAMP signaling (pde4 d), Akt-signaling (akt1 s1), ion transport (tm6 sf1, pom121l2, and slc8a3), and fatty acid metabolism (acsl3). Slc8a3 and acsl3 were down-regulated, whereas pde4 d, akt1 s1, tm6 sf1, and pom121l2 were up-regulated in the mice exposed to HDM. Hence, our results suggest that HDM exposure induces a series of aberrant methylated genes that are potentially important for the development of allergic AHR.

  7. Airway hyperresponsiveness, prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms, and lung function in workers exposed to irritants.

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, A M; Pal, T M; Boleij, J S; Schouten, J P; Rijcken, B

    1994-01-01

    The association between occupational exposure to airway irritants and the prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and level of lung function, and whether these associations were modified by airway hyperresponsiveness, smoking, and a history of allergy were studied in 668 workers from synthetic fibre plants. Respiratory symptoms were recorded with a self administered Dutch version of the British Medical Research Council questionnaire, with additional questions on allergy. Airway responsiveness was measured by a 30 second tidal breathing histamine challenge test. On the basis of job titles and working department, the current state of exposure of all workers was characterised as (1) no exposure, reference group; (2) white collar workers; (3) SO2 HCl, SO4(2); (4) polyester vapour; (5) oil mist and vapour; (6) polyamide and polyester vapour; (7) multiple exposure. Workers exposed to airway irritants were not simultaneously exposed to airborne dust. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), defined as a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) at < or = 32 mg/ml histamine, was present in 23% of the subjects. The association between exposure groups and prevalence of symptoms was estimated by means of multiple logistic regression; the association with level of lung function (forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1, maximum mid-expiratory flow rate (MMEF)) was estimated by means of multiple linear regression. Both methods allow simultaneous adjustment for potential confounding factors. The exposure groups were associated with a higher prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms. Lower prevalence of symptoms was found for workers exposed to SO2, HCl, and SO4(2-), most likely due to pre-employment selection procedures. Current smoking, AHR, and a history of allergy were significantly associated with a higher prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms, independent of each other, and independent of irritant exposure. The association between exposure and prevalence of

  8. Airway hyperresponsiveness, prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms, and lung function in workers exposed to irritants.

    PubMed

    Kremer, A M; Pal, T M; Boleij, J S; Schouten, J P; Rijcken, B

    1994-01-01

    The association between occupational exposure to airway irritants and the prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and level of lung function, and whether these associations were modified by airway hyperresponsiveness, smoking, and a history of allergy were studied in 668 workers from synthetic fibre plants. Respiratory symptoms were recorded with a self administered Dutch version of the British Medical Research Council questionnaire, with additional questions on allergy. Airway responsiveness was measured by a 30 second tidal breathing histamine challenge test. On the basis of job titles and working department, the current state of exposure of all workers was characterised as (1) no exposure, reference group; (2) white collar workers; (3) SO2 HCl, SO4(2); (4) polyester vapour; (5) oil mist and vapour; (6) polyamide and polyester vapour; (7) multiple exposure. Workers exposed to airway irritants were not simultaneously exposed to airborne dust. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), defined as a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) at < or = 32 mg/ml histamine, was present in 23% of the subjects. The association between exposure groups and prevalence of symptoms was estimated by means of multiple logistic regression; the association with level of lung function (forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1, maximum mid-expiratory flow rate (MMEF)) was estimated by means of multiple linear regression. Both methods allow simultaneous adjustment for potential confounding factors. The exposure groups were associated with a higher prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms. Lower prevalence of symptoms was found for workers exposed to SO2, HCl, and SO4(2-), most likely due to pre-employment selection procedures. Current smoking, AHR, and a history of allergy were significantly associated with a higher prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms, independent of each other, and independent of irritant exposure. The association between exposure and prevalence of

  9. Vitamin D deficiency causes airway hyperresponsiveness, increases airway smooth muscle mass, and reduces TGF-β expression in the lungs of female BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Shaw, Nicole C; Berry, Luke J; Hart, Prue H; Gorman, Shelley; Zosky, Graeme R

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease severity in asthma. We tested whether there is a causal association between vitamin D deficiency, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A physiologically relevant mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was developed by raising BALB/c mice on vitamin D-deficient or -replete diets. AHR was assessed by measuring lung function responses to increasing doses of inhaled methacholine. Five-micron sections from formalin-fixed lungs were used for ASM measurement and assessment of lung structure using stereological methods. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Lungs were dissected from embryonic day (E) 17.5 vitamin D-deficient and -replete fetal mice for quantification of ASM density and relative gene expression of TGF-β signaling pathway molecules. Eight-week-old adult vitamin D-deficient female mice had significantly increased airway resistance and ASM in the large airways compared with controls. Vitamin D-deficient female mice had a smaller lung volume, volume of parenchyma, and alveolar septa. Both vitamin D-deficient male and female mice had reduced TGF-β levels in BALF. Vitamin D deficiency did not have an effect on ASM density in E17.5 mice, however, expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptor I was downregulated in vitamin D-deficient female fetal mice. Decreased expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptor I during early lung development in vitamin D-deficient mice may contribute to airway remodeling and AHR in vitamin D-deficient adult female mice. This study provides a link between vitamin D deficiency and respiratory symptoms in chronic lung disease.

  10. PM2.5-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Keiki; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Okuda, Tomoaki; Oka, Akira; Kubo, Masayuki; Eguchi, Eri; Fujikura, Yoshihisa

    2017-03-01

    The allergic inflammatory effects of particulate matter (PM) 2.5, collected with the cyclone system in Yokohama city in Japan, were investigated in NC/Nga mice, which are hypersensitive to mite allergens. PM2.5 with alum was injected intraperitoneally for sensitization. Five days later, 200 μg of PM2.5 in 25 μL of saline was administered to mice intranasally five times for further sensitization. On the 11th day, PM2.5 was administered as a challenge. On the 12th day, mice were examined for airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell count, mRNA expression of Th1 , Th2 cytokines, and metallothioneins in lung tissue, and histopathology. PM2.5 increased AHR, total cell numbers including eosinophils in BALF, and mRNA levels of IL-5, IL-22, eotaxin, eotaxin 2, and metallothionein 3. In PM2.5-induced lungs, inflammation was observed around the bronchus. These results demonstrate that PM2.5 alone, collected with the cyclone system in Yokohama city in Japan, induces asthma-like airway inflammation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1047-1054, 2017.

  11. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  12. Ingestion of milk containing the Dp2 peptide, a dust mite allergen, protects mice from allergic airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergen-specific immunotherapy has been demonstrated to have potential for the treatment of allergic diseases. Transgenic animals are currently the best available bioreactors to produce recombinant proteins, which can be secreted in milk. It has not been clearly demonstrated whether milk from transgenic animals expressing recombinant allergens has immunomodulatory effects on allergic asthma. Methods We aimed to determine whether the oral administration of milk containing a mite allergen can down-regulate allergen-specific airway inflammation. Transgenic CD-1 mice that express a recombinant group 2 allergen from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp2) in their milk were generated using an embryonic gene-microinjection technique. Mouse pups were fed transgenic Dp2-containing milk or wild-type milk. Subsequently, these mice were sensitized and challenged with Dp2 to induce allergic airway inflammation. Results Upon sensitization and challenge, mice fed transgenic Dp2 milk had decreased T-helper 2 (Th2) and increased T-helper 1 (Th1) responses in the airway compared with mice fed wild-type milk. Moreover, pre-treatment with transgenic Dp2 milk attenuated airway inflammation and decreased airway hyper-responsiveness. Conclusions This study provides new evidence that oral administration of transgenic milk containing the Dp2 allergen down-regulated and moderately protected against allergic airway inflammation. Milk from transgenic animals expressing allergens may have potential use in the prevention of allergic asthma. PMID:23763898

  13. Inhalation of inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei prevents asthma‑mediated airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia in mice by reducing IL‑5 and IL‑13 levels.

    PubMed

    Ming, Moyu; Luo, Zhixi; Lv, Shengqiu; Li, Chaoqian

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether inhalation of inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei could prevent airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia. A total of 24 male Balb/c mice were randomly divided into three groups: Normal control group (group A), asthma model group (group B) and the intervention group (group C), (8 mice/group). Group A mice were sensitized and with challenged saline and group B with ovalbumin (OVA). Group C mice were administered with aerosol Mycobacterium phlei once daily prior to the allergen challenge. Airway responsiveness in each group was assessed. All the animals were sacrificed and lung tissues, blood samples and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were harvested. Cell fractionation and differential cells were counted in serum and BALF. HE staining and alcian blue/periodic acid Schiff staining were used to measure airway eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production. The levels of the cytokines IL‑5, IL‑13 and IgE were measured in lung and BALF as determined by ELISA and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results indicated that inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei suppressed the airway hyperresponsiveness and mitigated airway eosinophilia induced by a methacholine challenge, and significantly reduced the levels of cytokines IL‑5 and IL‑13 in lung tissue and IgE level in BALF when compared with the OVA‑sensitized mice. In conclusion, inhalation of inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei could reduce OVA‑induced airway hyperresponsiveness and may be a potential alternative therapy for allergic airway diseases.

  14. Accumulating evidence for increased velocity of airway smooth muscle shortening in asthmatic airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Ijpma, Gijs; Matusovsky, Oleg; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    It remains unclear whether airway smooth muscle (ASM) mechanics is altered in asthma. While efforts have originally focussed on contractile force, some evidence points to an increased velocity of shortening. A greater rate of airway renarrowing after a deep inspiration has been reported in asthmatics compared to controls, which could result from a shortening velocity increase. In addition, we have recently shown in rats that increased shortening velocity correlates with increased muscle shortening, without increasing muscle force. Nonetheless, establishing whether or not asthmatic ASM shortens faster than that of normal subjects remains problematic. Endobronchial biopsies provide excellent tissue samples because the patients are well characterized, but the size of the samples allows only cell level experiments. Whole human lungs from transplant programs suffer primarily from poor patient characterization, leading to high variability. ASM from several animal models of asthma has shown increased shortening velocity, but it is unclear whether this is representative of human asthma. Several candidates have been suggested as responsible for increased shortening velocity in asthma, such as alterations in contractile protein expression or changes in the contractile apparatus structure. There is no doubt that more remains to be learned about the role of shortening velocity in asthma.

  15. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness to mannitol, airway inflammation and Asthma Control Test in atopic asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Consilvio, Nicola P.; Rapino, Daniele; Nicola, Marta Di; Scaparrotta, Alessandra; Cingolani, Anna; Petrosino, Marianna I.; Filippo, Paola Di; Pillo, Sabrina Di; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to mannitol and bronchial inflammation measured as exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and to assess whether asthma control correlates with AHR to mannitol and FeNO in atopic asthmatic children. Material and methods Allergy evaluation, the mannitol challenge test, FeNO levels and the Asthma Control Test (ACT) questionnaire were assessed in 40 children with intermittent and mild persistent allergic asthma. Results All the subjects showed positive AHR to mannitol. Pearson's correlation test revealed a significant inverse correlation between AHR (mannitol PD15) and FeNO (p = 0.020). There was also a significant positive correlation between ACT and PD15 (p = 0.020) and a significant negative correlation between ACT and FeNO levels (p = 0.003). The study population was divided into two groups according to FeNO levels (group A ≥ 16 ppb vs. group B < 16 ppb). In group A mannitol PD15 was significantly lower (p = 0.040) and ACT score values were significantly lower (p = 0.001) compared to group B. In group A, the ACT showed that 13.3% of subjects had well-controlled asthma, 80% had partially controlled asthma and 6.7% had uncontrolled asthma. In group B, the ACT showed that 72% of subjects had well-controlled asthma and 28% had partially controlled asthma. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the degree of AHR to mannitol correlates with the degree of airway inflammation in asthmatic atopic children; moreover, better control of asthma correlates with a lower degree of AHR to both mannitol and FeNO. PMID:26925129

  16. Nonhematopoietic NADPH oxidase regulation of lung eosinophilia and airway hyperresponsiveness in experimentally induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Earwood, Julie; Bansal, Shelly; Jansen, Michael; Babcock, George; Garvy, Beth; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Cook-Mills, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilia is one of the most consistent hallmarks of asthma. Infiltration of eosinophils into the lung in experimental asthma is dependent on the adhesion molecule vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) on endothelial cells. Ligation of VCAM-1 activates endothelial cell NADPH oxidase, which is required for VCAM-1-dependent leukocyte migration in vitro. To examine whether endothelial-derived NADPH oxidase modulates eosinophil recruitment in vivo, mice deficient in NADPH oxidase (CYBB mice) were irradiated and received wild-type hematopoietic cells to generate chimeric CYBB mice. In response to ovalbumin (OVA) challenge, the chimeric CYBB mice had increased numbers of eosinophils bound to the endothelium as well as reduced eosinophilia in the lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage. This occurred independent of changes in VCAM-1 expression, cytokine/chemokine levels (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IFNγ, or eotaxin), or numbers of T cells, neutrophils, or mononuclear cells in the lavage fluids or lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. Importantly, the OVA-challenged chimeric CYBB mice had reduced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The AHR in OVA-challenged chimeric CYBB mice was restored by bypassing the endothelium with intratracheal administration of eosinophils. These data suggest that VCAM-1 induction of NADPH oxidase in the endothelium is necessary for the eosinophil recruitment during allergic inflammation. Moreover, these studies provide a basis for targeting VCAM-1-dependent signaling pathways in asthma therapies. PMID:17293377

  17. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma.

    PubMed

    Mickleborough, Timothy D

    2005-06-01

    Asthma prevalence continues to increase despite the progress that has been made in the treatment options for asthma. Alternative treatment therapies that reduce the dose requirements of pharmacological interventions would be beneficial, and could potentially reduce the public health burden of this disease. There is accumulating evidence that dietary modification has potential to influence the severity of asthma and reduce the prevalence and incidence of this condition. A possible contributing factor to the increased incidence of asthma in Western societies may the consumption of a pro-inflammatory diet. In the typical Western diet, 20-25-fold more omega (n)-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) than n-3 PUFA are consumed, which results in the release of pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid metabolites. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid are n-3 PUFA derived from fish oil that competitively inhibit n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism and this reduce the generation of pro-inflammatory 4-series leukotrienes (LTs) and 2-series prostaglandins (PGs) and production of cytokines from inflammatory cells. These data are consistent with the proposed pathway by which dietary intake of n-3 PUFA modulates lung disease. This article will review the existing information concerning the relationship between n-3 PUFA supplementation and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. It includes studies assessing the efficacy of n-3 PUFA supplementation in exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. This review will also address the question as to whether supplementing the diet with n-3 PUFA represents a viable alternative treatment regimen for asthma.

  18. Antibody to very late activation antigen 4 prevents interleukin-5-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophil infiltration in the airways of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kraneveld, A D; van Ark, I; Van Der Linde, H J; Fattah, D; Nijkamp, F P; Van Oosterhout, A J

    1997-08-01

    This study examines the effect of monoclonal antibody to very late activation antigen-4 (VLA-4) on IL5-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo and eosinophil accumulation into guinea pig airways. IL5 has been shown to be important in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophil accumulation in the guinea pig. Eosinophils, unlike neutrophils, express VLA-4 which mediates the adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 on endothelial cells. Thus VLA-4 seems to be an important adhesion molecule in the infiltration of eosinophils from the vasculature into the airway tissue. In addition, it has been shown that IL5 activates VLA-4 on eosinophils to facilitate their adhesion. In the present study, IL5 (1 microg, twice on one day) or vehicle were administered intranasally. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) to VLA-4 (HP1/2) or the isotype-matched control mAb (1E6) were injected 1 hour before each IL5 or vehicle treatment at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight. The next day in vivo bronchial reactivity, eosinophil number in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity in cell-free BAL fluid were determined. IL5 induces an increase in bronchial reactivity to histamine, which is associated with an accumulation of eosinophils into BAL fluid (control: 12 (5 to 42) x 10(5) cells and IL5: 69 (11 to 99) x 10(5) cells, p < 0.05) and an increase of 35% +/- 14% in EPO activity in cell-free BAL fluid. Intravenous administration of anti-VLA-4 mAb, but not of the control antibody, completely inhibits the bronchial hyperresponsiveness as well as the airway eosinophilia found after intraairway application of IL5. HP1/2 also suppresses the IL5-induced increase in EPO activity in cell-free BAL fluid. In conclusion, for the development of IL5-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig, the VLA-4-dependent infiltration and activation of eosinophils in the bronchial tissue seems to be essential.

  19. Pulmonary C Fibers Modulate MMP-12 Production via PAR2 and Are Involved in the Long-Term Airway Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness Induced by Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Na; Zhuang, Jianguo; Deng, Yu; Yang, Zhimei; Ye, Zhixu; Xie, Xiaohong; Ren, Luo; Fu, Zhou; Luo, Zhengxiu; Xu, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Children with acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection often develop sequelae of persistent airway inflammation and wheezing. Pulmonary C fibers (PCFs) are involved in the generation of airway inflammation and resistance; however, their role in persistent airway diseases after RSV is unexplored. Here, we elucidated the pathogenesis of PCF activation in RSV-induced persistent airway disorders. PCF-degenerated and intact mice were used in the current study. Airway inflammation and airway resistance were evaluated. MMP408 and FSLLRY-NH2 were the selective antagonists for MMP-12 and PAR2, respectively, to investigate the roles of MMP-12 and PAR2 in PCFs mediating airway diseases. As a result, PCF degeneration significantly reduced the following responses to RSV infection: augmenting of inflammatory cells, especially macrophages, and infiltrating of inflammatory cells in lung tissues; specific airway resistance (sRaw) response to methacholine; and upregulation of MMP-12 and PAR2 expression. Moreover, the inhibition of MMP-12 reduced the total number of cells and macrophages in bronchiolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well infiltrating inflammatory cells, and decreased the sRaw response to methacholine. In addition, PAR2 was upregulated especially at the later stage of RSV infection. Downregulation of PAR2 ameliorated airway inflammation and resistance following RSV infection and suppressed the level of MMP-12. In all, the results suggest that PCF involvement in long-term airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness occurred at least partially via modulating MMP-12, and the activation of PAR2 might be related to PCF-modulated MMP-12 production. Our initial findings indicated that the inhibition of PCF activity would be targeted therapeutically for virus infection-induced long-term airway disorders. IMPORTANCE The current study is critical to understanding that PCFs are involved in long-term airway inflammation and airway resistance after RSV infection

  20. Anti-angiogenic Nanotherapy Inhibits Airway Remodeling and Hyper-responsiveness of Dust Mite Triggered Asthma in the Brown Norway Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Gregory M.; Jenkins, John; Schmieder, Anne H.; Moldobaeva, Aigul; Cui, Grace; Zhang, Huiying; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhong, Qiong; Keupp, Jochen; Sergin, Ismail; Paranandi, Krishna S.; Eldridge, Lindsey; Allen, John S.; Williams, Todd; Scott, Michael J.; Razani, Babak; Wagner, Elizabeth M.

    2017-01-01

    Although angiogenesis is a hallmark feature of asthmatic inflammatory responses, therapeutic anti-angiogenesis interventions have received little attention. Objective: Assess the effectiveness of anti-angiogenic Sn2 lipase-labile prodrugs delivered via αvβ3-micellar nanotherapy to suppress microvascular expansion, bronchial remodeling, and airway hyper-responsiveness in Brown Norway rats exposed to serial house dust mite (HDM) inhalation challenges. Results: Anti-neovascular effectiveness of αvβ3-mixed micelles incorporating docetaxel-prodrug (Dxtl-PD) or fumagillin-prodrug (Fum-PD) were shown to robustly suppress neovascular expansion (p<0.01) in the upper airways/bronchi of HDM rats using simultaneous 19F/1H MR neovascular imaging, which was corroborated by adjunctive fluorescent microscopy. Micelles without a drug payload (αvβ3-No-Drug) served as a carrier-only control. Morphometric measurements of HDM rat airway size (perimeter) and vessel number at 21d revealed classic vascular expansion in control rats but less vascularity (p<0.001) after the anti-angiogenic nanotherapies. CD31 RNA expression independently corroborated the decrease in airway microvasculature. Methacholine (MCh) induced respiratory system resistance (Rrs) was high in the HDM rats receiving αvβ3-No-Drug micelles while αvβ3-Dxtl-PD or αvβ3-Fum-PD micelles markedly and equivalently attenuated airway hyper-responsiveness and improved airway compliance. Total inflammatory BAL cells among HDM challenged rats did not differ with treatment, but αvβ3+ macrophages/monocytes were significantly reduced by both nanotherapies (p<0.001), most notably by the αvβ3-Dxtl-PD micelles. Additionally, αvβ3-Dxtl-PD decreased BAL eosinophil and αvβ3+ CD45+ leukocytes relative to αvβ3-No-Drug micelles, whereas αvβ3-Fum-PD micelles did not. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the potential of targeted anti-angiogenesis nanotherapy to ameliorate the inflammatory hallmarks of asthma in a

  1. Anti-angiogenic Nanotherapy Inhibits Airway Remodeling and Hyper-responsiveness of Dust Mite Triggered Asthma in the Brown Norway Rat.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Gregory M; Jenkins, John; Schmieder, Anne H; Moldobaeva, Aigul; Cui, Grace; Zhang, Huiying; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhong, Qiong; Keupp, Jochen; Sergin, Ismail; Paranandi, Krishna S; Eldridge, Lindsey; Allen, John S; Williams, Todd; Scott, Michael J; Razani, Babak; Wagner, Elizabeth M

    2017-01-01

    Although angiogenesis is a hallmark feature of asthmatic inflammatory responses, therapeutic anti-angiogenesis interventions have received little attention. Objective: Assess the effectiveness of anti-angiogenic Sn2 lipase-labile prodrugs delivered via αvβ3-micellar nanotherapy to suppress microvascular expansion, bronchial remodeling, and airway hyper-responsiveness in Brown Norway rats exposed to serial house dust mite (HDM) inhalation challenges. Results: Anti-neovascular effectiveness of αvβ3-mixed micelles incorporating docetaxel-prodrug (Dxtl-PD) or fumagillin-prodrug (Fum-PD) were shown to robustly suppress neovascular expansion (p<0.01) in the upper airways/bronchi of HDM rats using simultaneous (19)F/(1)H MR neovascular imaging, which was corroborated by adjunctive fluorescent microscopy. Micelles without a drug payload (αvβ3-No-Drug) served as a carrier-only control. Morphometric measurements of HDM rat airway size (perimeter) and vessel number at 21d revealed classic vascular expansion in control rats but less vascularity (p<0.001) after the anti-angiogenic nanotherapies. CD31 RNA expression independently corroborated the decrease in airway microvasculature. Methacholine (MCh) induced respiratory system resistance (Rrs) was high in the HDM rats receiving αvβ3-No-Drug micelles while αvβ3-Dxtl-PD or αvβ3-Fum-PD micelles markedly and equivalently attenuated airway hyper-responsiveness and improved airway compliance. Total inflammatory BAL cells among HDM challenged rats did not differ with treatment, but αvβ3(+) macrophages/monocytes were significantly reduced by both nanotherapies (p<0.001), most notably by the αvβ3-Dxtl-PD micelles. Additionally, αvβ3-Dxtl-PD decreased BAL eosinophil and αvβ3(+) CD45(+) leukocytes relative to αvβ3-No-Drug micelles, whereas αvβ3-Fum-PD micelles did not. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the potential of targeted anti-angiogenesis nanotherapy to ameliorate the inflammatory hallmarks of asthma in

  2. AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN MICE FOLLOWING ANTIGEN AND PARTICULATE MATTER EXPOSURE IS VAGALLY MEDIATED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sensory nerves within the airways can initiate a variety of protective reflexes. We hypothesized that insults such as exposure to antigen and particulate matter (PM) might dysregulate airway sensory nerve function, thereby contributing to enhanced airway inflammation and hyperre...

  3. Bromodomain and Extra Terminal (BET) Inhibitor Suppresses Macrophage-Driven Steroid-Resistant Exacerbations of Airway Hyper-Responsiveness and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Hiep; Maltby, Steven; Eyers, Fiona; Foster, Paul S.; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma are linked to significant decline in lung function and are often poorly controlled by corticosteroid treatment. Clinical investigations indicate that viral and bacterial infections play crucial roles in the onset of steroid-resistant inflammation and airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that are hallmark features of exacerbations. We have previously shown that interferon γ (IFNγ) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cooperatively activate pulmonary macrophages and induce steroid-resistant airway inflammation and AHR in mouse models. Furthermore, we have established a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced exacerbation of asthma, which exhibits macrophage-dependent, steroid-resistant lung disease. Emerging evidence has demonstrated a key role for bromo- and extra-terminal (BET) proteins in the regulation of inflammatory gene expression in macrophages. We hypothesised that BET proteins may be involved in the regulation of AHR and airway inflammation in our steroid-resistant exacerbation models. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the effects of a BET inhibitor (I-BET-762) on the development of steroid-resistant AHR and airway inflammation in two mouse models. I-BET-762 administration decreased macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the airways, and suppressed key inflammatory cytokines in both models. I-BET treatment also suppressed key inflammatory cytokines linked to the development of steroid-resistant inflammation such as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), keratinocyte-derived protein chemokine (KC), IFNγ, and interleukin 27 (IL-27). Attenuation of inflammation was associated with suppression of AHR. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that BET proteins play an important role in the regulation of steroid-resistant exacerbations of airway inflammation and AHR. BET proteins may be potential targets for the development of future therapies to treat steroid-resistant inflammatory components

  4. Use of a novel one-nostril mask-spacer device to evaluate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in horses after chronic administration of albuterol.

    PubMed

    Mazan, Melissa R; Lascola, Kara; Bruns, Susan J; Hoffman, Andrew M

    2014-07-01

    Inflammatory airway disease (IAD) is very common in stabled horses. Short-acting beta agonist (SABA) drugs are often used to relieve clinical signs, although long-term exposure to these drugs may result in rebound bronchoconstriction. The purpose of this study was twofold: i) to describe the deposition of radiolabeled drugs using a novel one-nostril design mask-spacer combination with a breath-activated inhaler (BAI), and ii) to determine whether treatment for 10 d with inhaled albuterol using this device would impair the ability of albuterol to prevent bronchospasm during a histamine challenge test. The percentage of radio-aerosol deposited in the total lung was 12.39% ± 5.05%. All study horses demonstrated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) before enrollment in the study [mean provocative concentration eliciting 35% increase in delta flow (PC35) < 6 mg/mL histamine]. There was no significant difference in airway hyperresponsiveness to post-albuterol histamine challenge before or after treatment with albuterol. A 10-d treatment with placebo, however, caused a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness in all horses (P < 0.001). The results of this study show that the novel mask-spacer device was effective in delivering radiolabeled aerosolized drug to the lung and that delivery of a SABA for 10 d using this device did not result in increased airway hyperresponsiveness.

  5. Oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 attenuates PM2.5-induced enhancement of airway hyperresponsiveness and allergic airway response in murine model of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Hao, Yanling; Guo, Huiyuan; Ren, Fazheng

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated allergy immunotherapy potential of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 to prevent or mitigate the particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) enhanced pre-existing asthma in mice. Firstly, we used a mouse model of asthma (a 21-day ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge model) followed by PM2.5 exposure twice on the same day of the last challenge. PM2.5 was collected from the urban area of Beijing and underwent analysis for metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contents. The results showed that PM2.5 exposure enhanced airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and lead to a mixed Th2/ IL-17 response in asthmatic mice. Secondly, the PM2.5 exposed asthmatic mice were orally administered with L9 (4×107, 4×109 CFU/mouse, day) from the day of first sensitization to the endpoint, for 20 days, to investigate the potential mitigative effect of L9 on asthma. The results showed that L9 ameliorated PM2.5 exposure enhanced AHR with an approximate 50% decrease in total airway resistance response to methacholine (48 mg/ml). L9 also prevented the exacerbated eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and decreased the serum level of total IgE and OVA-specific IgG1 by 0.44-fold and 0.3-fold, respectively. Additionally, cytokine production showed that L9 significantly decreased T-helper cell type 2 (Th2)–related cytokines (IL-4, -5, -13) and elevated levels of Th1 related IFN-γ in BALF. L9 also reduced the level of IL-17A and increased the level of TGF-β. Taken together, these results indicate that L9 may exert the anti-allergic benefit, possibly through rebalancing Th1/Th2 immune response and modulating IL-17 pro-inflammatory immune response. Thus, L9 is a promising candidate for preventing PM exposure enhanced pre-existing asthma. PMID:28199353

  6. Oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 attenuates PM2.5-induced enhancement of airway hyperresponsiveness and allergic airway response in murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xifan; Hui, Yan; Zhao, Liang; Hao, Yanling; Guo, Huiyuan; Ren, Fazheng

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated allergy immunotherapy potential of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 to prevent or mitigate the particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) enhanced pre-existing asthma in mice. Firstly, we used a mouse model of asthma (a 21-day ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge model) followed by PM2.5 exposure twice on the same day of the last challenge. PM2.5 was collected from the urban area of Beijing and underwent analysis for metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contents. The results showed that PM2.5 exposure enhanced airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and lead to a mixed Th2/ IL-17 response in asthmatic mice. Secondly, the PM2.5 exposed asthmatic mice were orally administered with L9 (4×107, 4×109 CFU/mouse, day) from the day of first sensitization to the endpoint, for 20 days, to investigate the potential mitigative effect of L9 on asthma. The results showed that L9 ameliorated PM2.5 exposure enhanced AHR with an approximate 50% decrease in total airway resistance response to methacholine (48 mg/ml). L9 also prevented the exacerbated eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and decreased the serum level of total IgE and OVA-specific IgG1 by 0.44-fold and 0.3-fold, respectively. Additionally, cytokine production showed that L9 significantly decreased T-helper cell type 2 (Th2)-related cytokines (IL-4, -5, -13) and elevated levels of Th1 related IFN-γ in BALF. L9 also reduced the level of IL-17A and increased the level of TGF-β. Taken together, these results indicate that L9 may exert the anti-allergic benefit, possibly through rebalancing Th1/Th2 immune response and modulating IL-17 pro-inflammatory immune response. Thus, L9 is a promising candidate for preventing PM exposure enhanced pre-existing asthma.

  7. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  8. Inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway with piriprost (U-60,257) protects normal primates from ozone-induced methacholine hyperresponsive small airways

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.G.; Stout, B.K.; Ruppel, P.L.

    1988-03-01

    Weekly exposure to ozone in seven normal Rhesus monkeys led to induction of methacholine hypersensitive airways (RL increases 242 +/- 60% and Cdyn decreases 68 +/- 13% of baseline methacholine responses). It took 19 weeks to establish this hyperresponse that persisted for greater than 15 weeks once ozone was stopped. A second exposure led to similar response peaks in 6 weeks. At the peak of the second response, weekly 1% piriprost exposure before ozone led to a return to baseline that was not different between placebo and piriprost treated animals (9.4 +/- 1.0 and 4.3 +/- 2.9 weeks, placebo and treated, respectively P = 0.09 NS). A statistical difference in the mecholyl response in placebo and piriprost treated groups while on ozone was shown only in the Cdyn measurement (Cdyn% change 68 +/- 13 vs 24 +/- 14, placebo and piriprost, respectively P = 0.03). Off ozone (or return to baseline), a statistical difference could be detected both in RL and Cdyn (RL% changed 151 +/- 41 vs 31.1 +/- 49, P = 0.03, and for Cdyn 62.7 +/- 8 vs 9 +/- 10, P = 0.0006, placebo and piriprost, respectively). We conclude tha the primate provides a chronic model of airways reactivity in which the role of lipoxygenase is implicated because of the beneficial role of piriprost, and further that the ozone lesion is primarily in the smaller airways (possibly and alveolitis).

  9. Airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation induced by toluene diisocyanate in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, T.; Sheppard, D.; McDonald, D.M.; Distefano, S.; Scypinski, L.

    1985-11-01

    The authors examined the changes in airway responsiveness to increasing doses of an acetylcholine aerosol in anesthetized and ventilated guinea pigs 2, 6, or 24 h after exposure to 2 ppm toluene diisocyanate (TDI) or 2 h after exposure to air or 1 ppm TDI. The concentration of acetylcholine calculated to cause a 200% increase in RL was significantly lower for animals studied at 2 h (0.68%) or at 6 h (0.77%), but not at 24 h (2.39%), after TDI than for air animals (3.07%). The increase in airway responsiveness in the TDI-exposed animals was associated with histologic changes in the trachea and intrapulmonary airways. Exposure to 2 ppm TDI caused a patchy loss of cilia, shedding of epithelial cells into the airway lumen, and an influx of inflammatory cells into the trachea and other airways. In the lamina propria of the trachea, the concentration of extravascular polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was 13- to 26-fold greater in animals studied 2 or 6 h after exposure to 2 ppm TDI or at 2 h after 1 ppm TDI than in animals exposed to air. The concentration of PMN in the epithelium was significantly increased only in animals examined 2 h after 2 ppm TDI. These results indicate that a single exposure to TDI can cause an increase in airway responsiveness that is associated with epithelial injury and acute airway inflammation.

  10. The allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in a human-mouse chimera model of asthma is T cell and IL-4 and IL-5 dependent.

    PubMed

    Tournoy, K G; Kips, J C; Pauwels, R A

    2001-06-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) of patients with allergic asthma remain unclear. A role for Th2 inflammatory cells was suggested based on murine asthma models. No direct evidence exists on the role of these cells in human asthma. The development of a mouse-human chimera might be useful, allowing the in vivo study of the components of the human immune system relevant to asthma. We investigated the role of allergen-reactive T lymphocytes in a human-mouse SCID model. SCID mice were reconstituted intratracheally with human PBMC from healthy, nonallergic, nonasthmatic donors and exposed to an aerosol of house dust mite allergen after i.p. injection with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus I Ag and alum. The donor T lymphocytes had a Th1 cytokine phenotype. The reconstituted and allergen-challenged mice developed AHR to carbachol. The mouse airways and lungs were infiltrated with human T lymphocytes. No eosinophils or increases in human IgE were observed. The intrapulmonary human T lymphocytes demonstrated an increase in intracytoplasmic IL-4 and IL-5 and a decrease in IFN-gamma after exposure to allergen adjuvant. Antagonizing human IL-4/IL-13 or IL-5 resulted in a normalization of the airway responsiveness, despite a sustained intracellular Th2 cytokine production. These results provide evidence that the activated human allergen-reactive Th2 cells producing IL-4 or IL-5 are pivotal in the induction of AHR, whereas no critical role for eosinophils or IgE could be demonstrated. They also demonstrate that human allergen-specific Th1 lymphocytes can be driven to a Th2 phenotype.

  11. Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Asthma Model Occurs Independently of Secretion of β1 Integrins in Airway Wall and Focal Adhesions Proteins Down Regulation.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Santos, Mayra; Carbajal, Verónica; Tellez-Jiménez, Olivia; Martínez-Cordero, Erasmo; Ruiz, Victor; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Lascurain, Ricardo; Santibañez-Salgado, Alfredo; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca

    2016-10-01

    The extracellular domains of some membrane proteins can be shed from the cell. A similar phenomenon occurs with β1 integrins (α1β1 and α2β1) in guinea pig. The putative role of β1 integrin subunit alterations due to shedding in airway smooth muscle (ASM) in an allergic asthma model was evaluated. Guinea pigs were sensitized and challenged with antigen. Antigenic challenges induced bronchoobstruction and hyperresponsiveness at the third antigenic challenge. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectronmicroscopy studies showed that the cytosolic and extracellular domains of the β1 integrin subunit shared the same distribution in airway structures in both groups. Various polypeptides with similar molecular weights were detected with both the cytosolic and extracellular β1 integrin subunit antibodies in isolated airway myocytes and the connective tissue that surrounds the ASM bundle. Flow cytometry and Western blot studies showed that the expression of cytosolic and extracellular β1 integrin subunit domains in ASM was similar between groups. An increment of ITGB1 mRNA in ASM was observed in the asthma model group. RACE-PCR of ITGB1 in ASM did not show splicing variants. The expression levels of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and paxillin diminished in the asthma model, but not talin. The levels of phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) at Thr(696) increased in asthma model. Our work suggests that β1 integrin is secreted in guinea pig airway wall. This secretion is not altered in asthma model; nevertheless, β1 integrin cytodomain assembly proteins in focal cell adhesions in which ILK and paxillin are involved are altered in asthma model. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2385-2396, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Attenuated allergic airway hyperresponsiveness in C57BL/6 mice is associated with enhanced surfactant protein (SP)-D production following allergic sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Atochina, Elena N; Beers, Michael F; Tomer, Yaniv; Scanlon, Seth T; Russo, Scott J; Panettieri, Reynold A; Haczku, Angela

    2003-01-01

    Background C57BL/6 mice have attenuated allergic airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) when compared with Balb/c mice but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. SP-D, an innate immune molecule with potent immunosuppressive activities may have an important modulatory role in the allergic airway response and the consequent physiological changes. We hypothesized that an elevated SP-D production is associated with the impaired ability of C57BL/6 mice to develop allergic AHR. Methods SP-D mRNA and protein expression was investigated during development of allergic airway changes in a model of Aspergillus fumigatus (Af)-induced allergic inflammation. To study whether strain dependency of allergic AHR is associated with different levels of SP-D in the lung, Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice were compared. Results Sensitization and exposure to Af induced significant airway inflammation in both mouse strains in comparison with naïve controls. AHR to acetylcholine however was significantly attenuated in C57BL/6 mice in spite of increased eosinophilia and serum IgE when compared with Balb/c mice (p < 0.05). Af challenge of sensitized C57BL/6 mice induced a markedly increased SP-D protein expression in the SA surfactant fraction (1,894 ± 170% of naïve controls) that was 1.5 fold greater than the increase in Balb/c mice (1,234 ± 121% p < 0.01). These changes were selective since levels of the hydrophobic SP-B and SP-C and the hydrophilic SP-A were significantly decreased following sensitization and challenge with Af in both strains. Further, sensitized and exposed C57BL/6 mice had significantly lower IL-4 and IL-5 in the BAL fluid than that of Balb/c mice (p < 0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that enhanced SP-D production in the lung of C57BL/6 mice may contribute to an attenuated AHR in response to allergic airway sensitization. SP-D may act by inhibiting synthesis of Th2 cytokines. PMID:14748931

  13. Cyclooxygenase-1 overexpression decreases Basal airway responsiveness but not allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Card, Jeffrey W; Carey, Michelle A; Bradbury, J Alyce; Graves, Joan P; Lih, Fred B; Moorman, Michael P; Morgan, Daniel L; DeGraff, Laura M; Zhao, Yun; Foley, Julie F; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2006-10-01

    Pharmacological inhibition or genetic disruption of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 or COX-2 exacerbates the inflammatory and functional responses of the lung to environmentally relevant stimuli. To further examine the contribution of COX-derived eicosanoids to basal lung function and to allergic lung inflammation, transgenic (Tr) mice were generated in which overexpression of human COX-1 was targeted to airway epithelium. Although no differences in basal respiratory or lung mechanical parameters were observed, COX-1 Tr mice had increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid PGE(2) content compared with wild-type littermates (23.0 +/- 3.6 vs 8.4 +/- 1.4 pg/ml; p < 0.05) and exhibited decreased airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine. In an OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation model, comparable up-regulation of COX-2 protein was observed in the lungs of allergic wild-type and COX-1 Tr mice. Furthermore, no genotype differences were observed in allergic mice in total cell number, eosinophil content (70 vs 76% of total cells, respectively), and inflammatory cytokine content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, or in airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine (p > 0.05). To eliminate the presumed confounding effects of COX-2 up-regulation, COX-1 Tr mice were bred into a COX-2 null background. In these mice, the presence of the COX-1 transgene did not alter allergen-induced inflammation but significantly attenuated allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, coincident with reduced airway leukotriene levels. Collectively, these data indicate that COX-1 overexpression attenuates airway responsiveness under basal conditions but does not influence allergic airway inflammation.

  14. Diet-induced obesity causes innate airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and enhances ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Richard A; Theman, Todd A; Lu, Frank L; Terry, Raya D; Williams, Erin S; Shore, Stephanie A

    2008-06-01

    We previously reported that genetically obese mice exhibit innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and enhanced ozone (O(3))-induced pulmonary inflammation. Such genetic deficiencies in mice are rare in humans, and they may not be representative of human obesity. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine the pulmonary phenotype of mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO), which more closely mimics the cause of human obesity. Therefore, wild-type C57BL/6 mice were reared from the time of weaning until at least 30 wk of age on diets in which either 10 or 60% of the calories are derived from fat in the form of lard. Body mass was approximately 40% greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. Baseline airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine, measured by forced oscillation, was greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. We also examined lung permeability and inflammation after exposure to room air or O(3) (2 parts/million for 3 h), an asthma trigger. Four hours after the exposure ended, O(3)-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, interleukin-6, KC, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10, and eotaxin were greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. Innate AHR and augmented responses to O(3) were not observed in mice raised from weaning until 20-22 wk of age on a 60% fat diet. These results indicate that mice with DIO exhibit innate AHR and enhanced O(3)-induced pulmonary inflammation, similar to genetically obese mice. However, mice with DIO must remain obese for an extended period of time before this pulmonary phenotype is observed.

  15. Genetic Deletion of β-Arrestin-2 and the Mitigation of Established Airway Hyperresponsiveness in a Murine Asthma Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minyong; Hegde, Akhil; Choi, Yeon Ho; Theriot, Barbara S.; Premont, Richard T.; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    β-Arrestin-2 (βarr2) is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic protein that terminates G protein–coupled receptor signaling and transduces G protein–independent signaling. We previously showed that mice lacking βarr2 do not develop an asthma phenotype when sensitized to, and challenged with, allergens. The current study evaluates if an established asthma phenotype can be mitigated by deletion of βarr2 using an inducible Cre recombinase. We sensitized and challenged mice to ovalbumin (OVA) and demonstrated that on Day (d) 24 the allergic asthma phenotype was apparent in uninduced βarr2 and wild-type (WT) mice. In a second group of OVA-treated mice, tamoxifen was injected on d24 to d28 to activate Cre recombinase, and OVA aerosol challenge was continued through d44. The asthma phenotype was assessed using lung mechanics measurements, bronchoalveolar lavage cell analysis, and histological assessment of mucin and airway inflammation. Compared with their respective saline-treated controls, OVA-treated WT mice and mice expressing the inducible Cre recombinase displayed a significant asthma phenotype at d45. Whereas tamoxifen treatment had no significant effect on the asthma phenotype in WT mice, it inhibited βarr2 expression and caused a significant reduction in airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) in Cre-inducible mice. These findings suggest that βarr2 is actively required for perpetuation of the AHR component of the allergic asthma phenotype. Our finding that βarr2 participates in the perpetuation of AHR in an asthma model means that targeting βarr2 may provide immediate and potentially long-term relief from daily asthma symptoms due to AHR irrespective of inflammation. PMID:25569510

  16. Correlation of Airway Hyper-responsiveness with Obstructive with Spirometric Indices and FEV1 90% Predicted

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    carbon monoxide], gas exchange evaluation, and measurement of muscle strength or exercise testing.1 There is a lack of evidence supporting this...FEV1 (108% of predicted) along with upper-airway obstruction based on the midexpiratory to inspiratory flow ratio.16 Subsequent studies of acromeg... muscle function and control of breathing in patients with acromegaly. Eur Respir J 1997;10(5):977-982. 19. Armour J, Donnelly PM, Bye PTP. The large

  17. Oral administration of allergen extracts from Dermatophagoides farinae desensitizes specific allergen-induced inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiang-min; Wu, Ximei; Wu, Hui-min; Deng, Yang-mei; Zhang, Shui-juan; Zhu, Jian-ping; Dong, Xin-wei

    2008-12-10

    Clinically sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) by using allergen extracts effectively alleviates the symptoms of allergic rhinitis and asthma. Supposed that oral administration of high-dose of allergen extracts imitates SLIT and may prevent IgE-related responses in allergic diseases, we investigated the effects of oral administration of allergen extracts from Dermatophagoides farinae (Derf) on allergen-induced inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in a model of asthmatic rat. After administration to the specific Derf-sensitized rats with Derfdrop solution containing Derf1 and Derf2 extracts derived from Derf, the effects of Derfdrop on AHR, inflammatory cell accumulation, cytokine production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue, as well as serum IgE and IgG levels were investigated. Results indicated that Derfdrop not only dose-dependently prevented the AHR in response to methacholine, but also significantly reduced the serum total and allergen-specific IgE levels, all the maximal effects were achieved at dose of 5 mg/kg/d, and were as comparable as those of dexamethasone at dose of 1.0 mg/kg/d. Furthermore, oral administration of Derfdrop not only dose-dependently elevated allergen-specific serum IgG levels and reduced total and allergen-specific IgE levels, but also normalized the imbalance between the Th1 cytokine, IFN-gamma and Th2 cytokine, IL-4. Finally, oral administration of Derfdrop significantly reduced Goblet cell hyperplasia and eosinophilia in the Derf-sensitized allergic rat model. These data suggest that Derfdrop effectively improves specific allergen-induced inflammation and AHR in Derf-sensitized and -challenged rats and provide with the rationale for clinical SLIT by using Derfdrop in a specific allergen-induced asthma.

  18. COLCHICINE DECREASES AIRWAY HYPERACTIVITY AFTER PHOSGENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phosgene (COCl(2)) exposure affects an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung, which can be reduced in an animal model by pretreatment with colchicine. Inflammation in the respiratory tract can be associated with an increase in airway hyperreactivity. We tested the hypotheses...

  19. Macrophage/epithelial cell CCL2 contributes to rhinovirus-induced hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in a mouse model of allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dina; Hong, Jun Young; Bowman, Emily R; Chung, Yutein; Nagarkar, Deepti R; McHenry, Christina L; Goldsmith, Adam M; Bentley, J Kelley; Lewis, Toby C; Hershenson, Marc B

    2013-02-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections lead to exacerbations of lower airways disease in asthmatic patients but not in healthy individuals. However, underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. We hypothesized that the Th2-driven allergic environment enhances HRV-induced CC chemokine production, leading to asthma exacerbations. Ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and -challenged mice inoculated with HRV showed significant increases in the expression of lung CC chemokine ligand (CCL)-2/monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, CCL4/macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β, CCL7/MCP-3, CCL19/MIP-3β, and CCL20/MIP3α compared with mice treated with OVA alone. Inhibition of CCL2 with neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated HRV-induced airways inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in OVA-treated mice. Immunohistochemical stains showed colocalization of CCL2 with HRV in epithelial cells and CD68-positive macrophages, and flow cytometry showed increased CCL2(+), CD11b(+) cells in the lungs of OVA-treated, HRV-infected mice. Compared with lung macrophages from naïve mice, macrophages from OVA-exposed mice expressed significantly more CCL2 in response to HRV infection ex vivo. Pretreatment of mouse lung macrophages and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells with interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 increased HRV-induced CCL2 expression, and mouse lung macrophages from IL-4 receptor knockout mice showed reduced CCL2 expression in response to HRV, suggesting that exposure to these Th2 cytokines plays a role in the altered HRV response. Finally, bronchoalveolar macrophages from children with asthma elaborated more CCL2 upon ex vivo exposure to HRV than cells from nonasthmatic patients. We conclude that CCL2 production by epithelial cells and macrophages contributes to HRV-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in a mouse model of allergic airways disease and may play a role in HRV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  20. Hyperresponse to Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone Accompanying Small Decreases in Serum Thyroid Hormone Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Vagenakis, Apostolos G.; Rapoport, Basil; Azizi, Fereidoun; Portnay, Gary I.; Braverman, Lewis E.; Ingbar, Sidney H.

    1974-01-01

    To determine whether pituitary thyrotropin (TSH) responsiveness to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is enhanced by small decreases in serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), 12 euthyroid volunteers were given 190 mg iodide po daily for 10 days to inhibit T4 and T3 release from the thyroid. Basal serum T4, T3, and TSH concentrations and the serum T4 and TSH responses to 400 μg TRH i.v. were assessed before and at the end of iodide administration. Iodide induced small but highly significant decreases in basal serum T4 (8.0±1.6 vs. 6.6±1.7 μg/100 ml; mean ± SD) and T3 (128±15 vs. 110±22 ng/100 ml) and increases in basal serum TSH (1.3±0.9 vs. 2.1±1.0 μU/ml). During iodide administration, the TSH response to TRH was significantly increased at each of seven time points up to 120 min. The maximum increment in serum TSH after TRH increased from a control mean of 8.8±4.1 to a mean of 13.0±2.8 μU/ml during iodide administration. As evidence of the inhibitory effect of iodide on hormonal release, the increment in serum T3 at 120 min after TRH was significantly lessened during iodide administration (61±42 vs. 33±24 ng/100 ml). These findings demonstrate that small acute decreases in serum T4 and T3 concentrations, resulting in values well within the normal range, are associated both with slight increases in basal TSH concentrations and pronounced increases in the TSH response to TRH. These results demonstrate that a marked sensitivity of TSH secretion and responsiveness to TRH is applicable to decreasing, as well as increasing, concentrations of thyroid hormones. PMID:4214837

  1. Lymphocyte Gene Expression Characteristic of Immediate Airway Responses (IAR) and Methacholine (MCH) Hyperresponsiveness in Mice Sensitized and Challenged with Isocyanates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to isocyanates has been associated with occupational airway diseases, including asthma. Previously we reported on respiratory and immune responses following dermal sensitization and intranasal challenge of BALB/c mice with 6 different isocyanates. The purpose of this st...

  2. The MIF Antagonist ISO-1 Attenuates Corticosteroid-Insensitive Inflammation and Airways Hyperresponsiveness in an Ozone-Induced Model of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Kirsty E.; Chung, Kian Fan; Clarke, Colin J.; Durham, Andrew L.; Mallia, Patrick; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Barnes, Peter J.; Hall, Simon R.; Simpson, Karen D.; Starkey, Malcolm R.; Hansbro, Philip M.; Adcock, Ian M.; Wiegman, Coen H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine associated with acute and chronic inflammatory disorders and corticosteroid insensitivity. Its expression in the airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a relatively steroid insensitive inflammatory disease is unclear, however. Methods Sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) macrophages and serum were obtained from non-smokers, smokers and COPD patients. To mimic oxidative stress-induced COPD, mice were exposed to ozone for six-weeks and treated with ISO-1, a MIF inhibitor, and/or dexamethasone before each exposure. BAL fluid and lung tissue were collected after the final exposure. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and lung function were measured using whole body plethysmography. HIF-1α binding to the Mif promoter was determined by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation assays. Results MIF levels in sputum and BAL macrophages from COPD patients were higher than those from non-smokers, with healthy smokers having intermediate levels. MIF expression correlated with that of HIF-1α in all patients groups and in ozone-exposed mice. BAL cell counts, cytokine mRNA and protein expression in lungs and BAL, including MIF, were elevated in ozone-exposed mice and had increased AHR. Dexamethasone had no effect on these parameters in the mouse but ISO-1 attenuated cell recruitment, cytokine release and AHR. Conclusion MIF and HIF-1α levels are elevated in COPD BAL macrophages and inhibition of MIF function blocks corticosteroid-insensitive lung inflammation and AHR. Inhibition of MIF may provide a novel anti-inflammatory approach in COPD. PMID:26752192

  3. Dietary Acacetin Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Eosinophil Infiltration by Modulating Eotaxin-1 and Th2 Cytokines in a Mouse Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Chung; Liou, Chian-Jiun

    2012-01-01

    A previous study found that eosinophil infiltration and Th2 cell recruitment are important causes of chronic lung inflammation in asthma. The plant flavonoid acacetin is known to have an anti-inflammatory effect in vitro. This study aims to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of orally administered acacetin in ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized asthmatic mice and its underlying molecular mechanism. BALB/c mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal OVA injection. OVA-sensitized mice were fed acacetin from days 21 to 27. Acacetin treatment attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness and reduced eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell hyperplasia in lung tissue. Additionally, eotaxin-1- and Th2-associated cytokines were inhibited in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and suppressed the level of OVA-IgE in serum. Human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells were used to examine the effect of acacetin on proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion molecule production in vitro. At the molecular level, acacetin significantly reduced IL-6, IL-8, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and eotaxin-1 in activated BEAS-2B cells. Acacetin also significantly suppressed the ability of eosinophils to adhere to inflammatory BEAS-2B cells. These results suggest that dietary acacetin may improve asthma symptoms in OVA-sensitized mice. PMID:23049614

  4. Potential of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase as a Therapeutic Target for Allergen-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness: A Critical Connection to Nitric Oxide Levels and PARP Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ghonim, Mohamed A.; Pyakurel, Kusma; Mishra, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Although expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the lungs of asthmatics and associated nitrosative damage are established, iNOS failed as a therapeutic target for blocking airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in asthmatics. This dichotomy calls for better strategies with which the enzyme is adequately targeted. Here, we confirm iNOS expression in the asthmatic lung with concomitant protein nitration and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation. We show, for the first time, that iNOS is highly expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of asthmatics with uncontrolled disease, which did not correspond to protein nitration. Selective iNOS inhibition with L-NIL protected against AHR upon acute, but not chronic, exposure to ovalbumin or house dust mite (HDM) in mice. Supplementation of NO by nitrite administration significantly blocked AHR in chronically HDM-exposed mice that were treated with L-NIL. Protection against chronic HDM exposure-induced AHR by olaparib-mediated PARP inhibition may be associated with the partial but not the complete blockade of iNOS expression. Indeed, L-NIL administration prevented olaparib-mediated protection against AHR in chronically HDM-exposed mice. Our study suggests that the amount of iNOS and NO are critical determinants in the modulation of AHR by selective iNOS inhibitors and renews the potential of iNOS as a therapeutic target for asthma. PMID:27524861

  5. Oral Administration of Heat-Inactivated Lactobacillus plantarum K37 Modulated Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Ovalbumin-Sensitized BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Wenn; Liao, Tan-Wei; Chen, Yu-Han; Chiang, Yi-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the anti-allergic effects of Lactobacillus plantarum K37 (K37) on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and systemic allergic responses in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and -challenged BALB/c mice. Heat-inactivated K37 (105, 107, and 109 CFU/mouse, day) were orally administered to OVA-sensitized BALB/c mice to investigate their effects on AHR, immunoglobulin (Ig) and cytokine production. The results showed that K37 dose-dependently lowered the serum levels of IgE, OVA-specific IgE and OVA-specific IgG1, ameliorated AHR induced by methacholine and suppressed eosinophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The cytokine production in spleen cells culture and BALF showed that K37 drove the immune responses toward T-helper cell type 1 (Th1) responses, elevated levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ, and reduced of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. K37 also improved cell infiltration in lung sections. Our results demonstrated that oral administration of K37 alleviated effectively the allergic responses in vivo. Thus, K37 can be a good source material and a promising candidate for prophylactic and therapeutic treatments of allergic diseases, like asthma. PMID:24936861

  6. BLUNTING AIRWAYS EOSINOPHILIC INFLAMMATION RESULTS IN A DECREASED AIRWAY NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE TO INHALED LPS IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS A ROLE FOR CD-14

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent data demonstrate that atopic inflammation might enhance airway responses to inhaled LPS in individuals with atopic asthma by increasing CD14 expression on airway macrophages. We sought to determine whether blunting airway eosinophilic inflammation decreases CD14 expressio...

  7. Proof-of-concept evaluation of trough airway hyper-responsiveness following regular racemic or levosalbutamol in genotype-stratified steroid-treated persistent asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Anderson, William J; Short, Philip M; Williamson, Peter A; Morrison, Ashley E; Palmer, Colin; Tavendale, Roger; Lipworth, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Asthmatic patients receiving ICSs (inhaled corticosteroids) may take frequent add-on therapy with salbutamol despite on-demand prescription. Frequent salbutamol use can be detrimental in asthma. The isomeric formulation of salbutamol and the B2ADR (β2 adrenoceptor) 16 genotype may also influence this phenomenon. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, triple crossover, proof of concept trial comparing 2 weeks of regular therapy with inhaled racemic salbutamol [200 μg q.i.d. (four times daily)], levosalbutamol (100 μg q.i.d.) or placebo on trough methacholine PC20 [provocative concentration causing 20% fall in FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 s)] 6 h post-dose (the primary outcome) in 30 persistent asthmatic patients (15 who were Arg16 homozygous and 15 who were Gly16 homozygous) all receiving ICSs. There was no worsening of AHR (airway hyper-responsiveness) at trough to methacholine after 2 weeks regular exposure to either racemic (P=0.53) or levosalbutamol (P=0.84) compared with placebo, nor between genotypes-as dd (doubling dilution) difference in methacholine PC20 from placebo [salbutamol/Arg16=0.36 dd [95% CI (confidence interval), -0.43, 1.15]; salbutamol/Gly16=0.01 dd (95% CI, -0.47, 0.49); levosalbutamol/Arg16=-0.01 dd (95% CI, -0.89, 0.87); and levosalbutamol/Gly16=0.28 dd (95% CI, -0.22, 0.77)]. Both active treatments improved morning PEF (peak expiratory flow) in Gly16 (P=0.04 overall) but not Arg16 (P=0.50 overall) patients, whereas evening PEF improved in both Gly16 (P<0.001 overall) and Arg16 (P=0.006 overall) patients. In conclusion, the regular exposure to either racemic or levosalbutamol for 2 weeks added to ICSs did not cause worsening of AHR at trough compared with placebo; with no difference seen between B2ADR 16 genotypes.

  8. EDU pretreatment decreases polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration into rat lung airways.

    PubMed

    Bassett, D J; Elbon, C L; Ishii, Y; Yang, H; Otterbein, L; Boswell, G A; Kerr, J S

    1994-07-01

    Pretreatment with the heterocyclic compound EDU (N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolindinyl)ethyl]-N'-phenylurea) has previously been shown to reduce polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) infiltration into the airways of ozone-exposed rats. The present study further examined the effects of 1 and 2 days EDU pretreatment on rat lung inflammatory responses by determining PMN infiltration in response to intratracheal instillation with the chemoattractant formyl-norleucine-leucine-phenylalanine (fNLP). Maximal recovery of PMNs by bronchoalveolar lavage was observed 4 hr after fNLP instillation with no alteration in the numbers of recoverable macrophages and lymphocytes. Although 1-day pretreatment with EDU did not affect PMN recovery from fNLP-instilled rat lungs, 2 days of EDU pretreatment prevented PMN infiltration as indicated by PMN recoveries that were similar to those obtained from saline-instilled lungs. Measurements of lung-marginated and interstitial pools of inflammatory cells using collagenase tissue digestion demonstrated no effect of 2 days EDU pretreatment. Although 2 days EDU pretreatment alone did not alter blood PMN content, lung permeability, and the lavage recoveries of inflammatory cells, blood PMN responses to chemotactic stimuli in vitro were impaired. In addition, EDU was shown to directly inhibit PMN chemotaxis and superoxide anion generation in vitro. These data demonstrated that EDU acts by interfering with PMN activation and migration rather than by decreasing PMN availability. EDU, by modulating the inflammatory response, represents a useful compound for preventing PMN-associated amplification of acute lung injuries.

  9. Long-term exposure of adults to outdoor air pollution is associated with increased airway obstruction and higher prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Jammres, Y.; Delpierre, S.; Burnet, H.; Delvolgo, M.J.; Humbert-Tena, C.

    1998-11-01

    The authors studied the association between long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution and the severity of obstructive pulmonary disease and prevalence of bronchial hyperreactivity to {beta}2 agonists in two groups of adult patients who were of similar ages and who had similar smoking habits. The subjects lived in downtown districts or in the outer suburbs of Marseilles, the neighborhood that contained air samplers. The regions were similar with respect to sulfur dioxide levels, but levels of nitric oxides and particulate matter were higher in the downtown area than the suburbs. The authors assessed airway obstruction, as determined by a decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s, mean forced expiratory flow measured between 25% and 75% of vital capacity, and an elevated value of central airway resistance. The authors tested the changes in these variables induced by inhalation of a {beta}2 agonist. Baseline lung function was altered more significantly in both male and female patients who lived in downtown Marseilles than in those who resided in the suburbs, and the differences persisted regardless of the season during which the study occurred. Prevalence of bronchial hyperreactivity and symptoms of asthma were higher in the downtown than suburban male subjects. The results of this study suggest that an association exists between actual environmental exposure to outdoor air pollution and respiratory effects in sensitive adults represented by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma.

  10. Inhaled Bordetella pertussis vaccine decreases airway responsiveness in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Vargas, M H; Bazán-Perkins, B; Segura, P; Campos, M G; Selman, M; Montaño, L M

    1995-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis (BP) has been used as adjuvant for experimental animal immunization, but its effects on airway responsiveness are uncertain. Three groups of guinea pigs were used: animals with a single exposure to inhaled BP vaccine (strain 134, total dose 1.24 x 10(12) germs), animals submitted to a sensitization procedure through inhalation of ovalbumin plus BP, and healthy control animals. Four weeks after inhalation of BP or after the beginning of sensitization, dose- or concentration-response curves to histamine were constructed in vivo and in vitro (tracheal and parenchymal preparations). We found that BP alone produced lower responses to histamine than control guinea pigs in vivo (insufflation pressure, p = 0.0003) and in tracheal tissues (p = 0.04), but not in parenchymal preparations. Sensitization did not modify the responsiveness compared with their respective controls. These results suggest that some BP component(s), probably pertussis toxin, causes a long lasting airway hyporesponsiveness in guinea pigs.

  11. Airway responsiveness to sulfur dioxide in an adult population sample.

    PubMed

    Nowak, D; Jörres, R; Berger, J; Claussen, M; Magnussen, H

    1997-10-01

    We determined the prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness to sulfur dioxide (SO2) in an adult population sample of 790 subjects 20 to 44 yr of age. Subjects were drawn randomly from the population of Hamburg, Northern Germany, within the framework of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. In addition, we analyzed the relationship between SO2 responsiveness and a number of risk factors, such as a history of respiratory symptoms, methacholine responsiveness, and atopy derived from skin-prick test results. SO2 inhalation challenges were performed during isocapnic hyperventilation at constant rate (40 L x min(-1), for 3 min) with doubling concentrations of SO2 up to a maximum concentration of 2.0 ppm. If subjects achieved a 20% decrease in FEV1 from baseline during the challenge, they were considered to be hyperresponsive to SO2. The raw prevalence of SO2 hyperresponsiveness within the population sample studied was 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.3 to 5.0%). Adjustment for nonparticipation led to an estimated prevalence of SO2 hyperresponsiveness of 5.4%. Among subjects with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, 22.4% (95% CI: 20.1 to 25.3) demonstrated hyperresponsiveness to SO2. There was no significant correlation between the degrees of hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and SO2. Predictors of a positive SO2 response were hyperresponsiveness to methacholine (p < 0.0001), a positive history of respiratory symptoms (p < 0.05), and a positive skin-prick test to at least one common allergen (p < 0.05). We conclude from these data that airway hyperresponsiveness to SO2 can be found in about 20 to 25% of subjects within the 20- to 44-yr age range who are hyperresponsive to methacholine.

  12. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms.

  13. Pretreatment with antibody to eosinophil major basic protein prevents hyperresponsiveness by protecting neuronal M2 muscarinic receptors in antigen-challenged guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C M; Fryer, A D; Jacoby, D B; Gleich, G J; Costello, R W

    1997-01-01

    In antigen-challenged guinea pigs there is recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs and to airway nerves, decreased function of inhibitory M2 muscarinic autoreceptors on parasympathetic nerves in the lungs, and airway hyperresponsiveness. A rabbit antibody to guinea pig eosinophil major basic protein was used to determine whether M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction, and the subsequent hyperresponsiveness, are due to antagonism of the M2 receptor by eosinophil major basic protein. Guinea pigs were sensitized, challenged with ovalbumin and hyperresponsiveness, and M2 receptor function tested 24 h later with the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine. Antigen-challenged guinea pigs were hyperresponsive to electrical stimulation of the vagus nerves compared with controls. Likewise, loss of M2 receptor function was demonstrated since the agonist pilocarpine inhibited vagally-induced bronchoconstriction in control but not challenged animals. Pretreatment with rabbit antibody to guinea pig eosinophil major basic protein prevented hyperresponsiveness, and protected M2 receptor function in the antigen-challenged animals without inhibiting eosinophil accumulation in the lungs or around the nerves. Thus, hyperresponsiveness is a result of inhibition of neuronal M2 muscarinic receptor function by eosinophil major basic protein in antigen-challenged guinea pigs. PMID:9410903

  14. Pinellia ternata, Citrus reticulata, and Their Combinational Prescription Inhibit Eosinophil Infiltration and Airway Hyperresponsiveness by Suppressing CCR3+ and Th2 Cytokines Production in the Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma Model

    PubMed Central

    Ok, In-Soo; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Kim, Bok-Kyu; Lee, Jang-Cheon; Lee, Young-Cheol

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective. This study was aimed to analyse the curative effects of Pinellia ternata, Citrus reticulata, and their combination on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled methacholine, pulmonary eosinophilic infiltration, Th2 cytokine production, and IgE and histamine production in a murine model of asthma. Methods. For this purpose, BALB/c mice were systemically sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) followed intratracheally, intraperitoneally, and by aerosol allergen challenges for 12 weeks. We examined the development of pulmonary eosinophilic accumulation, control of Th2 cytokine, immunoglobulin E (IgE), and histamine productions in a murine model of asthma. Results. Our data suggest that the therapeutic mechanism by which Pinellia ternata, Citrus reticulata, and their combinational prescription effectively treats asthma is based on reductions of eosinophil infiltration, eotaxin receptor (CCR3), histamine, OVA-specific IgE productions in serum, and Th2 cytokines (IL-5, IL-13) by marked reductions of IL-5 and IL-13 mRNA expression in lung tissue. Conclusions. These findings provide evidence that Pinellia ternata, Citrus reticulata, and their combination play a regulatory role in allergic inflammation and offer therapeutic approaches as novel CCR3 antagonists for treatment asthma. However, it is not clear whether pharmacological activities of prescription composed of two herbs are potentiated due to synergistic effect or additive effect. PMID:19657453

  15. MAG-EPA and 17,18-EpETE target cytoplasmic signalling pathways to reduce short-term airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Khaddaj-Mallat, Rayan; Rousseau, Éric

    2015-07-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the role of eicosapentaenoic acid monoacylglyceride (MAG-EPA) and 17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (17,18-EpETE) on the regulation of contractile reactivity and nuclear protein expression in 72-h-cultured and TNF-α-treated guinea pig tracheal rings. Tension measurements performed on native tissues demonstrated that the cytochrome P-450 epoxygenase (CYP450)-dependent EPA metabolite, 17,18-EpETE, displayed a higher potency than MAG-EPA in inhibiting U-46619-induced tone. Calphostin C (a PKC inhibitor), whether in association or not with MAG-EPA or 17,18-EpETE, had no further effect, while 17,18-EpETE and Y-27632 (a Rho kinase inhibitor) yielded additive effects. Of note, MAG-EPA and 17,18-EpETE pre-treatments normalized the contractile responses to broncho-constrictive agents in 72-h-cultured trachea. The enhanced expression of TNF-α, P-p65-nuclear factor kappaB (NF)-κB, c-fos and c-Jun in 72-h-cultured tissues likely contributed to the hyperresponsiveness. β-Escin-permeabilized preparations demonstrated that 17,18-EpETE abolished Ca(2+) hypersensitivity, suggesting a blunting of PKC and/or Rho kinase activation. Lastly, activation of NF-κB and activating protein-1 (AP-1) signalling by exogenous TNF-α markedly increased the contractile response to MCh, through an increase in 17-kDa PKC-potentiated inhibitory protein of PP1 (CPI-17) phosphorylation and IκBα degradation. Dual incubation of 17,18-EpETE with calphostin C or Y-27632 induced cumulative inhibitory effects on MCh responses in TNF-α-incubated tracheal rings. 17,18-EpETE also reduced the detection level of P-p65-NF-κB and AP-1 subunits. The present data provide evidence that MAG-EPA, through its bioactive metabolite, represents a prospective pharmacological target in respiratory diseases.

  16. Increased airway responsiveness and decreased alveolar attachment points following in utero smoke exposure in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Elliot, J; Carroll, N; Bosco, M; McCrohan, M; Robinson, P

    2001-01-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy has been shown to result in abnormalities in lung function in newborn infants, including reduced expiratory flow and increased airway responsiveness to inhaled agonists. The mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. Using a guinea pig model of in utero smoke exposure, we measured airway responsiveness and lung morphology in a group of neonatal guinea pigs 21 d after delivery. Pregnant guinea pigs were exposed to cigarette smoke from Day 28 to term (Day 68 of gestation). After delivery newborn animals did not receive any smoke exposure. Airway wall thickness, smooth muscle area, and the number of points where the alveoli attached to the airway adventitia were measured. Airway responsiveness was increased (p < 0.05) and the mean distance between alveolar attachment points was increased (mean 0.052 +/- SE 0.001 mm versus 0.046 +/- 0.001, p = 0.001) in animals exposed to cigarette smoke in utero compared with nonexposed animals. Although not statistically significant, both the inner and outer airway wall and the smooth muscle area were greater in exposed animals compared with nonexposed animals. The increased mean distance between alveolar attachments in the smoke-exposed group was the result of a reduction in the number of attachments and an increase in the outer airway wall perimeter. These findings suggest that the increased airway responsiveness observed in postnatal animals, subsequent to in utero cigarette smoke exposure, may be the result of decreased alveolar attachment points to the airways and changes in airway dimensions.

  17. CpG in combination with an inhibitor of Notch signaling suppresses FI-RSV-enhanced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation through inhibiting Th17 memory responses and promoting tissue resident memory cells in lungs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Hongyong; Hai, Yan; Yin, Wei; Li, Wenjian; Zheng, Boyang; Du, Xiaomin; Li, Na; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Deng, Yuqing; Zeng, Ruihong; Wei, Lin

    2017-03-08

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of childhood hospitalizations. The formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) vaccine enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) has been an obstacle to the development of a safe and effective killed RSV vaccine. Agonists of Toll-like receptor (TLR) have been shown to regulate immune responses induced by FI-RSV. Notch signaling plays critical roles during the differentiation and effector function phases of innate and adaptive immune responses. Cross-talk between TLR and Notch signaling pathways results in fine tuning of TLR-triggered innate inflammatory responses. We evaluated the impact of TLR and Notch signaling on ERD in a murine model by administering CpG, an agonist of TLR9, in combination with L685,458, an inhibitor of Notch signaling during FI-RSV immunization. Activation with CpG or deficiency of MyD88-dependent TLR signaling did not alleviate airway inflammation in FI-RSV-immunized mice. Activation or inhibition of Notch signaling with Dll4 or L685,458 did not suppress FI-RSV enhanced airway inflammation either. However, the CpG together with L685,458 markedly inhibited FI-RSV-enhanced airway hyperresponsiveness, weight loss, and lung inflammation. Interestingly, CpG+L685,458 completely inhibited FI-RSV associated Th17, and Th17-associated proinflammatory chemokine responses in lungs following RSV challenge, but not Th1 or Th2, memory responses. In addition, FI-RSV+CpG+L685,458 promoted protective CD8(+) lung tissue-resident memory cells (TRM). These results indicate that activation of TLR signaling combined with inhibition of Notch signaling prevent FI-RSV ERD, and the mechanism appears to involve suppressing proinflammatory Th17 memory responses and promoting protective TRM in lungs.IMPORTANCE RSV is the most important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants. The FI-RSV enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) is a major impediment to the development of a safe and effective killed RSV vaccine. Using

  18. Allergic airway inflammation decreases lung bacterial burden following acute Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in a neutrophil- and CCL8-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dulek, Daniel E; Newcomb, Dawn C; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P; Blackwell, Timothy S; Moore, Martin L; Boyd, Kelli L; Kolls, Jay K; Peebles, R Stokes

    2014-09-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infection, we developed a combined model in which allergic airway inflammation and lung IL-4 and IL-13 expression were induced by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge prior to acute lung infection with K. pneumoniae. We hypothesized that preexisting allergic airway inflammation decreases lung IL-17A expression and airway neutrophil recruitment in response to acute K. pneumoniae infection and thereby increases the lung K. pneumoniae burden. As hypothesized, we found that allergic airway inflammation decreased the number of K. pneumoniae-induced airway neutrophils and lung IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 expression. Despite the marked reduction in postinfection airway neutrophilia and lung expression of Th17 cytokines, allergic airway inflammation significantly decreased the lung K. pneumoniae burden and postinfection mortality. We showed that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden was independent of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17A and partially dependent on IL-13 and STAT6. Additionally, we demonstrated that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden associated with allergic airway inflammation was both neutrophil and CCL8 dependent. These findings suggest a novel role for CCL8 in lung antibacterial immunity against K. pneumoniae and suggest new mechanisms of orchestrating lung antibacterial immunity.

  19. Airway Peroxidases Catalyze Nitration of the β2-Agonist Salbutamol and Decrease Its Pharmacological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sallans, Larry; Macha, Stephen; Brown, Kari; McGraw, Dennis W.; Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2011-01-01

    β2-Agonists are the most effective bronchodilators for the rapid relief of asthma symptoms, but for unclear reasons, their effectiveness may be decreased during severe exacerbations. Because peroxidase activity and nitrogen oxides are increased in the asthmatic airway, we examined whether salbutamol, a clinically important β2-agonist, is subject to potentially inactivating nitration. When salbutamol was exposed to myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase or lactoperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrite (NO2−), both absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry indicated formation of a new metabolite with features expected for the nitrated drug. The new metabolites showed an absorption maximum at 410 nm and pKa of 6.6 of the phenolic hydroxyl group. In addition to nitrosalbutamol (m/z 285.14), a salbutamol-derived nitrophenol, formed by elimination of the formaldehyde group, was detected (m/z 255.13) by mass spectrometry. It is noteworthy that the latter metabolite was detected in exhaled breath condensates of asthma patients receiving salbutamol but not in unexposed control subjects, indicating the potential for β2-agonist nitration to occur in the inflamed airway in vivo. Salbutamol nitration was inhibited in vitro by ascorbate, thiocyanate, and the pharmacological agents methimazole and dapsone. The efficacy of inhibition depended on the nitrating system, with the lactoperoxidase/H2O2/NO2− being the most affected. Functionally, nitrated salbutamol showed decreased affinity for β2-adrenergic receptors and impaired cAMP synthesis in airway smooth muscle cells compared with the native drug. These results suggest that under inflammatory conditions associated with asthma, phenolic β2-agonists may be subject to peroxidase-catalyzed nitration that could potentially diminish their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20974700

  20. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  1. NEUROTROPHIN MEDIATION OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES TO INHALED DIESEL PARTICLES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway hyper-responsiveness. Diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbate many of these allergic airways respons...

  2. Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome without tracheoesophageal fistula and with in utero decrease in relative lung size.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Rieko; Aihara, Toshinori; Tazuke, Yuko; Maeda, Kosaku; Kuwata, Tomoyuki

    2012-12-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is diagnosed by characteristic features on US and MRI including fetal upper airway occlusion, lung hyperinflation with an inverted diaphragm, and sometimes massive ascites and hydrops. We describe a case of CHAOS in which improvement in the fetal condition was observed on three sequential fetal MRIs. Such an improvement was thought to represent decrease in intrathoracic pressure caused by a spontaneous perforation such as a tracheoesophageal fistula. However, a fistula was not observed in the present case. Therefore, we suggest that imaging improvements in patients with CHAOS do not always correspond to the presence of a fistula and other factors might contribute to decreasing fetal intrathoracic pressure.

  3. Down-regulation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 expression in the airway epithelium ameliorates allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bacsi, Attila; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Szczesny, Bartosz; Radak, Zsolt; Hazra, Tapas K; Sur, Sanjiv; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Allergic airway inflammation is characterized by increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, inflammatory cell infiltration, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness, in parallel with oxidative DNA base and strand damage, whose etiological role is not understood. Our goal was to establish the role of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common oxidatively damaged base, and its repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) in allergic airway inflammatory processes. Airway inflammation was induced by intranasally administered ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grain extract (RWPE) in sensitized BALB/c mice. We utilized siRNA technology to deplete Ogg1 from airway epithelium; 8-oxoG and DNA strand break levels were quantified by Comet assays. Inflammatory cell infiltration and epithelial methaplasia were determined histologically, mucus and cytokines levels biochemically and enhanced pause was used as the main index of airway hyperresponsiveness. Decreased Ogg1 expression and thereby 8-oxoG repair in the airway epithelium conveyed a lower inflammatory response after RWPE challenge of sensitized mice, as determined by expression of Th2 cytokines, eosinophilia, epithelial methaplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness. In contrast, 8-oxoG repair in Ogg1-proficient airway epithelium was coupled to an increase in DNA single-strand break (SSB) levels and exacerbation of allergen challenge-dependent inflammation. Decreased expression of the Nei-like glycosylases Neil1 and Neil2 that preferentially excise ring-opened purines and 5-hydroxyuracil, respectively, did not alter the above parameters of allergic immune responses to RWPE. These results show that DNA SSBs formed during Ogg1-mediated repair of 8-oxoG augment antigen-driven allergic immune responses. A transient modulation of OGG1 expression/activity in airway epithelial cells could have clinical benefits.

  4. Decreased levels of nitrosothiols in the lower airways of patients with cystic fibrosis and normal pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, H; Gaston, B; Fang, K; Paul, K; Ratjen, F

    1999-12-01

    Airway S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are naturally occurring bronchodilators. SNOs, nitrate, and nitrite were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of 23 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and mild pulmonary disease (aged 6-16 years) and 13 healthy children (aged 8-15 years). Concentrations of SNOs were decreased in the lower airways of patients with CF and mild pulmonary disease (median, range: 0, 0-320 nmol/L vs 80, 0-970 nmol/L) despite normal levels of the inert nitric oxide metabolites nitrate and nitrite (mean +/- SEM: 3.7 +/- 0.5 micromol/L vs 4.8 +/- 0.9 micromol/L). S-nitrosolation- mediated bioreactivities may be impaired by depletion of the CF airway SNO reservoir.

  5. Differences between inhaled and intravenous bronchial challenge to detect O(3)-induced hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Sommer, B; Vargas, M H; Chavez, J; Carbajal, V; Segura, P; Montaño, L M

    2001-12-01

    Ozone (O(3))-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in laboratory animals is usually demonstrated through dose-response curves with inhaled or intravenous bronchoconstrictor agonists. However, comparability of these two routes has not been well documented. Thus guinea pig airway responsiveness to ACh and histamine was evaluated 16-18 h after O(3) (3 parts/million, 1 h) or air exposure by two plethysmographic methods (spontaneously breathing and mechanically ventilated) and by two administration routes (inhalatory or intravenous). We found that O(3) caused airway hyperresponsiveness to intravenous, but not to inhaled, agonists, independent of the plethysmographic method used. Suitability of the inhalatory route to detect airway hyperresponsiveness was corroborated with inhaled ACh after an antigen challenge or extending O(3) exposure to 3 h. Acetylcholinesterase activity was not modified after O(3) exposure in lung homogenates and blood samples. Thus inhaled agonists were less effective to reveal the airway hyperresponsiveness after an acute O(3) exposure than intravenous ones, at least for the 1-h exposure to 3 parts/million, and this difference seems not to be related to an O(3)-induced inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase activity.

  6. The extract of Cordyceps sinensis inhibited airway inflammation by blocking NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ya-Ling; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2012-06-01

    Aiming the extract of Cordyceps sinensis significantly inhibits airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and the infiltration of eosinophils in the airway of rats and may be related to the modulation of T helper (Th)1 and Th2 cells functions. The mechanisms of C. sinensis involved in modulation of suppression inflammation are not yet determined. In this study, the mechanism involved in the extract of C. sinensis-C.S.3-modulated suppression of inflammation was investigated in vivo and in vitro systems. The results showed that C.S.3 reduced airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice. Furthermore, we found C.S.3 could decrease extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway to suppress activity of nuclear factor-κB in lung cells and cultured airway smooth muscle cells. Conclusion C.S.3 may provide clinical applications for asthma in the future.

  7. Hyperresponsive Sensory Patterns in Young Children with Autism, Developmental Delay, and Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranek, Grace T.; Boyd, Brian A.; Poe, Michele D.; David, Fabian J.; Watson, Linda R.

    2007-01-01

    The nature of hyperresponsiveness to sensory stimuli in children with autism, using a new observational measure, the SPA, was examined. Three groups of young participants were assessed (autism, developmental delay, typical). Across all groups, MA was a predictor of hyperresponsiveness, such that aversion to multisensory toys decreased as MA…

  8. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease.

  9. Decreased Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on nanomodified endotracheal tubes: a dynamic airway model.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mary C; Tarquinio, Keiko M; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious and costly clinical problem. Specifically, receiving mechanical ventilation for over 24 hours increases the risk of VAP and is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and medical costs. Cost-effective endotracheal tubes (ETTs) that are resistant to bacterial infections could help prevent this problem. The objective of this study was to determine differences in the growth of Staphylococcus aureus on nanomodified and unmodified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ETTs under dynamic airway conditions simulating a ventilated patient. PVC ETTs were modified to have nanometer surface features by soaking them in Rhizopus arrhisus, a fungal lipase. Twenty-four-hour experiments (supported by computational models) showed that airflow conditions within the ETT influenced both the location and the concentration of bacterial growth on the ETTs, especially within areas of tube curvature. More importantly, experiments revealed a 1.5 log reduction in the total number of S. aureus on the novel nanomodified ETTs compared with the conventional ETTs after 24 hours of airflow. This dynamic study showed that lipase etching can create nanorough surface features on PVC ETTs that suppress S. aureus growth, and thus may provide clinicians with an effective and inexpensive tool to combat VAP.

  10. Decreased Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on nanomodified endotracheal tubes: a dynamic airway model

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Mary C; Tarquinio, Keiko M; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious and costly clinical problem. Specifically, receiving mechanical ventilation for over 24 hours increases the risk of VAP and is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and medical costs. Cost-effective endotracheal tubes (ETTs) that are resistant to bacterial infections could help prevent this problem. The objective of this study was to determine differences in the growth of Staphylococcus aureus on nanomodified and unmodified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ETTs under dynamic airway conditions simulating a ventilated patient. PVC ETTs were modified to have nanometer surface features by soaking them in Rhizopus arrhisus, a fungal lipase. Twenty-four-hour experiments (supported by computational models) showed that airflow conditions within the ETT influenced both the location and the concentration of bacterial growth on the ETTs, especially within areas of tube curvature. More importantly, experiments revealed a 1.5 log reduction in the total number of S. aureus on the novel nanomodified ETTs compared with the conventional ETTs after 24 hours of airflow. This dynamic study showed that lipase etching can create nanorough surface features on PVC ETTs that suppress S. aureus growth, and thus may provide clinicians with an effective and inexpensive tool to combat VAP. PMID:22904622

  11. Mechanisms of inflammation-mediated airway smooth muscle plasticity and airways remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Halayko, Andrew J; Amrani, Yassine

    2003-09-16

    Recent evidence points to progressive structural change in the airway wall, driven by chronic local inflammation, as a fundamental component for development of irreversible airway hyperresponsiveness. Acute and chronic inflammation is orchestrated by cytokines from recruited inflammatory cells, airway myofibroblasts and myocytes. Airway myocytes exhibit functional plasticity in their capacity for contraction, proliferation, and synthesis of matrix protein and cytokines. This confers a principal role in driving different components of the airway remodeling process, and mediating constrictor hyperresponsiveness. Functional plasticity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is regulated by an array of environmental cues, including cytokines, which mediate their effects through receptors and a number of intracellular signaling pathways. Despite numerous studies of the cellular effects of cytokines on cultured airway myocytes, few have identified how intracellular signaling pathways modulate or induce these cellular responses. This review summarizes current understanding of these concepts and presents a model for the effects of inflammatory mediators on functional plasticity of ASM in asthma.

  12. Inhaled mannitol as a test for bronchial hyper-responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Brannan, John D; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Anderson, Sandra D

    2009-10-01

    Bronchial provocation tests (BPTs) are useful for identifying one of the key features of asthma: bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR). The symptoms of asthma are not always reflective of the underlying pathophysiology of asthma and there is a need for objective tests to identify the presence and severity of BHR. A new BPT, involving the inhalation of dry powder mannitol, has recently been approved to identify BHR and is now in use as a diagnostic tool for currently active asthma. Airway sensitivity to mannitol identifies BHR that is dependent upon the presence of airway inflammation and would probably benefit from treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. The mannitol BPT is available commercially as a (single-use) test kit (Aridol/Osmohale), with the only additional requirement to perform the test being a spirometer. Accordingly, the mannitol BPT provides a point-of-need tool to identify BHR to assist in the diagnosis of asthma.

  13. The importance of synergy between deep inspirations and fluidization in reversing airway closure.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Graham M; Sneyd, James; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2012-01-01

    Deep inspirations (DIs) and airway smooth muscle fluidization are two widely studied phenomena in asthma research, particularly for their ability (or inability) to counteract severe airway constriction. For example, DIs have been shown effectively to reverse airway constriction in normal subjects, but this is impaired in asthmatics. Fluidization is a connected phenomenon, wherein the ability of airway smooth muscle (ASM, which surrounds and constricts the airways) to exert force is decreased by applied strain. A maneuver which sufficiently strains the ASM, then, such as a DI, is thought to reduce the force generating capacity of the muscle via fluidization and hence reverse or prevent airway constriction. Understanding these two phenomena is considered key to understanding the pathophysiology of asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness, and while both have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DIs fail in asthmatics remains elusive. Here we show for the first time the synergistic interaction between DIs and fluidization which allows the combination to provide near complete reversal of airway closure where neither is effective alone. This relies not just on the traditional model of airway bistability between open and closed states, but also the critical addition of previously-unknown oscillatory and chaotic dynamics. It also allows us to explore the types of subtle change which can cause this interaction to fail, and thus could provide the missing link to explain DI failure in asthmatics.

  14. Relation of perceived nasal and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to FEV1, basophil counts, and methacholine response.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffmann, F; Neukirch, F; Annesi, I; Korobaeff, M; Doré, M F; Lellouch, J

    1988-01-01

    Perceived nasal and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to tobacco smoke and cold air were assessed in 912 working men in the Paris area. Baseline lung function measurements and peripheral leucocyte counts with standard differential counts were performed. At least one perceived nasal or bronchial hyperresponsiveness symptom was reported by 15.7%. Current smoking was significantly less frequent among those with cough induced by tobacco smoke. Rhinitis induced by cold air was associated with lower FEV1 (p less than 0.01) and the association remained after adjustment for smoking, asthma, and wheezing (p = 0.06). Symptoms induced by cold air were related to circulating basophils. Neither perceived nasal nor perceived bronchial hyperresponsiveness was significantly related to the airway response to methacholine in a sample of the group (n = 324) surveyed again five years later. The result suggest that the symptom of rhinitis provoked by cold air is a possible "new" risk factor or marker for chronic airflow limitation. PMID:3420556

  15. Control of allergen-induced inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by the metalloproteinase ADAMTS-12.

    PubMed

    Paulissen, Geneviève; El Hour, Mehdi; Rocks, Natacha; Guéders, Maud M; Bureau, Fabrice; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Noel, Agnès; Cataldo, Didier D

    2012-10-15

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) constitute a family of endopeptidases related to matrix metalloproteinases. These proteinases have been largely implicated in tissue remodeling associated with pathological processes. Among them, ADAMTS12 was identified as an asthma-associated gene in a human genome screening program. However, its functional implication in asthma is not yet documented. The present study aims at investigating potential ADAMTS-12 functions in experimental models of allergic airways disease. Two different in vivo protocols of allergen-induced airways disease were applied to the recently generated Adamts12-deficient mice and corresponding wild-type mice. In this study, we provide evidence for a protective effect of ADAMTS-12 against bronchial inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. In the absence of Adamts12, challenge with different allergens (OVA and house dust mite) led to exacerbated eosinophilic inflammation in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in lung tissue, along with airway dysfunction assessed by increased airway responsiveness following methacholine exposure. Furthermore, mast cell counts and ST2 receptor and IL-33 levels were higher in the lungs of allergen-challenged Adamts12-deficient mice. The present study provides, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence for a contribution of ADAMTS-12 as a key mediator in airways disease, interfering with immunological processes leading to inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness.

  16. Hyaluronan and layilin mediate loss of airway epithelial barrier function induced by cigarette smoke by decreasing E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Casalino-Matsuda, S Marina; Falcon, Nieves S; Valencia Gattas, Monica; Monzon, Maria E

    2012-12-07

    Cigarette smoke (CigS) exposure is associated with increased bronchial epithelial permeability and impaired barrier function. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to CigS exhibit decreased E-cadherin expression and reduced transepithelial electrical resistance. These effects were mediated by hyaluronan (HA) because inhibition of its synthesis with 4-methylumbelliferone prevented these effects, and exposure to HA fragments of <70 kDa mimicked these effects. We show that the HA receptor layilin is expressed apically in human airway epithelium and that cells infected with lentivirus expressing layilin siRNAs were protected against increased permeability triggered by both CigS and HA. We identified RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) as the signaling effectors downstream layilin. We conclude that HA fragments generated by CigS bind to layilin and signal through Rho/ROCK to inhibit the E-cadherin gene and protein expression, leading to a loss of epithelial cell-cell contact. These studies suggest that HA functions as a master switch protecting or disrupting the epithelial barrier in its high versus low molecular weight form and that its depolymerization is a first and necessary step triggering the inflammatory response to CigS.

  17. Hyaluronan and Layilin Mediate Loss of Airway Epithelial Barrier Function Induced by Cigarette Smoke by Decreasing E-cadherin*

    PubMed Central

    Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Casalino-Matsuda, S. Marina; Falcon, Nieves S.; Valencia Gattas, Monica; Monzon, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CigS) exposure is associated with increased bronchial epithelial permeability and impaired barrier function. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to CigS exhibit decreased E-cadherin expression and reduced transepithelial electrical resistance. These effects were mediated by hyaluronan (HA) because inhibition of its synthesis with 4-methylumbelliferone prevented these effects, and exposure to HA fragments of <70 kDa mimicked these effects. We show that the HA receptor layilin is expressed apically in human airway epithelium and that cells infected with lentivirus expressing layilin siRNAs were protected against increased permeability triggered by both CigS and HA. We identified RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) as the signaling effectors downstream layilin. We conclude that HA fragments generated by CigS bind to layilin and signal through Rho/ROCK to inhibit the E-cadherin gene and protein expression, leading to a loss of epithelial cell-cell contact. These studies suggest that HA functions as a master switch protecting or disrupting the epithelial barrier in its high versus low molecular weight form and that its depolymerization is a first and necessary step triggering the inflammatory response to CigS. PMID:23048036

  18. Lysophosphatidylcholine plays critical role in allergic airway disease manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Preeti; Gaur, Shailendera Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), pivotal for allergic and inflammatory response, hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC) to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In present study, the role of LPC in allergic airway disease manifestation was studied using mouse model. Balb/c mice were immunized using cockroach extract (CE) and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2 inhibitor. Airway hyperresponse (AHR), lung-histology, total and differential leukocyte count (TLC&DLC), Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. Exogenous LPC was given to the mice with or without CE sensitization, to demonstrate its role in allergic airway disease manifestation. Anti-CD1d antibody was given to study the involvement of natural killer T (NKT) cells in LPC induced response. AHR, lung-inflammation, TLC, DLC, Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels were increased on CE challenge. sPLA2 activity and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2-inhibitor, which decreased AHR, and inflammatory parameters. Exogenous LPC with or without CE sensitization increased above parameters. CE challenge or LPC exposure increased LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells in BALF and spleen, which was reduced by anti-CD1d antibody, accompanied with reduction in AHR and allergic airway inflammation parameters. Conclusively, LPC induces allergic airway disease manifestation and it does so probably via CD1d-restricted LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells. PMID:27282246

  19. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma.

    PubMed

    An, S S; Bai, T R; Bates, J H T; Black, J L; Brown, R H; Brusasco, V; Chitano, P; Deng, L; Dowell, M; Eidelman, D H; Fabry, B; Fairbank, N J; Ford, L E; Fredberg, J J; Gerthoffer, W T; Gilbert, S H; Gosens, R; Gunst, S J; Halayko, A J; Ingram, R H; Irvin, C G; James, A L; Janssen, L J; King, G G; Knight, D A; Lauzon, A M; Lakser, O J; Ludwig, M S; Lutchen, K R; Maksym, G N; Martin, J G; Mauad, T; McParland, B E; Mijailovich, S M; Mitchell, H W; Mitchell, R W; Mitzner, W; Murphy, T M; Paré, P D; Pellegrino, R; Sanderson, M J; Schellenberg, R R; Seow, C Y; Silveira, P S P; Smith, P G; Solway, J; Stephens, N L; Sterk, P J; Stewart, A G; Tang, D D; Tepper, R S; Tran, T; Wang, L

    2007-05-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not "cure" asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored.

  20. Chrysin alleviates allergic inflammation and airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Jiang, Mingzi; Zhang, Yunshi; Liu, Xing; Du, Qiang; Feng, Ganzhu

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disorder and progresses mainly due to airway remodeling. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid, has been reported to possess multiple biologic activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and anti-proliferation. The present study aimed to investigate whether chrysin could relieve allergic airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma and the mechanism involved. The female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) successfully developed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation and remodeling. The experimental data showed that chrysin could alleviate OVA-induced AHR. Chrysin could also reduce OVA-induced increases in the number of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, interleukin (IL) -4, and IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and total IgE in serum. The decreased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) level in BALF was also upregulated by chrysin. In addition, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) around bronchioles were suppressed by chrysin. Furthermore, the phosphorylation levels of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) could be decreased by chrysin, which are associated with airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. These results indicate the promising therapeutic effect of chrysin on chronic asthma, especially the progression of airway remodeling.

  1. Changes of Airway Reactivity after Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection in Children: A Study for Early Precautions against Pediatric Asthma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Lv, Gaomei; Shang, Yunxiao; Liu, Liyun; Xiang, Yun; Feng, Jing; Wang, Zhijia

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection and asthma has rarely been explored through examination of airway reactivity. The aim of this study was to determine airway reactivity changes after MP infection in children. First, 106 children were divided into four groups according to the existence of MP infection and/or asthma. Then children with only MP belonged to the MP group; children who had both MP infection and asthma belonged to the MP+A group; children with asthma but not MP infection belonged to the non-MP+A group; normal children were classified as normal control (NC) group. Each subject underwent a bronchial provocation test (BPT) after effectively controlling the symptoms. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) parameters were compared among the groups. BPT positive rates were also calculated and compared. All AHR parameters decreased following MP infection, with a more significant decrease of small airway reactivity related indexes. The BPT-positive rate in the MP+A group was significantly higher than that in the MP group. Large airway reactivity showed no significant differences between the MP+A and non-MP+A groups, while the small airway reactivity augmented more significantly in the MP+A group. MP infection caused increased reactivity of both large and small airways in lungs, and BPT-positive identification in some patients.

  2. Decreased S100A9 Expression Promoted Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Stimulating ROS Generation and Inhibiting p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lei-Miao; Han, Xiao-Jie; Duan, Ting-Ting; Xu, Yu-Dong; Ulloa, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Asthma is a disease with a core abnormality in airway smooth muscle function, and the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) plays a pivotal role in asthma airway remodeling. Our previous study showed that S100A9 (S100 calcium-binding protein A9; 400 and 800 ng/mL) significantly inhibited rat ASMCs proliferation at 48 h, and 50–800 ng/mL S100A9 (50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 ng/mL) also induced a lasting effect by significantly inhibiting rat ASMCs proliferation at 72 h in a dose-dependent manner. However, the intracellular effects of S100A9 on ASMCs proliferation remain unknown. Methods. Rat ASMCs with stable S100A9 knockdown were generated using short hairpin RNA. The effects of decreased S100A9 expression on cellular proliferation, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and p38 MAPK pathway protein expression were examined. Results. Decreased intracellular S100A9 expression significantly promoted platelet-derived growth factor-induced rat ASMCs proliferation and increased ROS production. The antioxidative agent N-acetylcysteine significantly inhibited rat ASMCs proliferation. Western blot results showed that the decreased intracellular S100A9 expression significantly inhibited p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Conclusion. Decreased S100A9 expression promoted rat ASMCs proliferation by stimulating ROS generation and inhibiting p38 MAPK. Our study may provide novel insights into the regulation of asthma airway remodeling. PMID:28050155

  3. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma.

  4. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  5. The Effects of Proresolution of Ellagic Acid in an Experimental Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Alves, Claudiney; Angeli, Giovanna Natalia; Favarin, Daniely Cornélio; Lemos de Andrade, Edinéia; Lazo Chica, Javier Emilio; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Roberto da Silva, Paulo; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ellagic acid, a compound derived from medicinal plants and fruits, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the classical experimental model, in BALB/c mice, of sensibilization with ovalbumin to determine the effect of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route) in the resolution of allergic airways response. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route) was used as a positive control. The control group consisted of nonimmunized mice that received challenge with ovalbumin. Ellagic acid and dexamethasone or vehicle (water) were administered before or after intranasal allergen challenge. Ellagic acid accelerated the resolution of airways inflammation by decreasing total leukocytes and eosinophils numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the mucus production and lung inflammation in part by reducing IL-5 concentration, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity, and P-selectin expression, but not activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. In addition, ellagic acid enhanced alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of IgG-OVA-coated beads ex vivo, a new proresolving mechanism for the clearance of allergen from the airways. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for accelerating the resolution of allergic airways inflammation. PMID:24376308

  6. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  7. The effects of in utero vitamin D deficiency on airway smooth muscle mass and lung function.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Jones, Anya C; Gout, Alex; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Zosky, Graeme R

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and airway hyperresponsiveness in whole-life vitamin D-deficient female mice. In this study, we aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms contributing to altered lung structure and function. RNA was extracted from lung tissue of whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete female mice, and gene expression patterns were profiled by RNA sequencing. The data showed that genes involved in embryonic organ development, pattern formation, branching morphogenesis, Wingless/Int signaling, and inflammation were differentially expressed in vitamin D-deficient mice. Network analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes were connected by the hubs matrix metallopeptidase 9; NF-κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, α; epidermal growth factor receptor; and E1A binding protein p300. Given our findings that developmental pathways may be altered, we investigated if the timing of vitamin D exposure (in utero vs. postnatal) had an impact on lung health outcomes. Gene expression was measured in in utero or postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice, as well as whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete mice at 8 weeks of age. Baseline lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation were measured and lungs fixed for lung structure assessment using stereological methods and quantification of ASM mass. In utero vitamin D deficiency was sufficient to increase ASM mass and baseline airway resistance and alter lung structure. There were increased neutrophils but decreased lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Expression of inflammatory molecules S100A9 and S100A8 was mainly increased in postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice. These observations suggest that in utero vitamin D deficiency can alter lung structure and function and increase inflammation, contributing to symptoms in chronic diseases, such as asthma.

  8. Inhibitory Effects of Resveratrol on Airway Remodeling by Transforming Growth Factor-β/Smad Signaling Pathway in Chronic Asthma Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa Young; Kim, In Kyoung; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Kwon, Soon Suk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by airway remodeling, leading to a progressive decline in lung function. Therapeutic agents that attenuate airway remodeling can complement the limited effects of traditional glucocorticoids. In this study, we investigated the effect of resveratrol on allergic airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic bronchial asthma. Methods Peribronchial smooth muscle thickening that developed in mice challenged with a 3-month repeated exposure to ovalbumin (OVA) was used to study airway remodeling. Oral resveratrol was administered daily during the OVA challenge. The expression of TGF-β1/Smad signaling proteins and downstream mesenchymal markers in the presence or absence of resveratrol was examined in bronchial epithelial cells. Results OVA sensitization and chronic challenge increased airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and collagen deposition. Resveratrol effectively suppressed OVA-induced airway inflammation and remodeling. The expression of TGF-β1/phosphorylated Smad2/3 was increased in the lung tissues of OVA-challenged mice but effectively inhibited by resveratrol. In bronchial epithelial cells, the TGF-β1-induced expression of the mesenchymal markers snail, slug, vimentin, and α-SMA was suppressed by resveratrol treatment. Conclusions Resveratrol effectively ameliorated both airway inflammation and airway structural changes in a mouse model of bronchial asthma. These effects were mediated by decreased TGF-β1 expression, in turn suppressing TGF-β1/Smad signaling and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process. Our results demonstrate the potential benefits of resveratrol for the treatment of airway remodeling associated with bronchial asthma. PMID:27826959

  9. Glucocorticoids decrease Treg cell numbers in lungs of allergic mice.

    PubMed

    Olsen, P C; Kitoko, J Z; Ferreira, T P; de-Azevedo, C T; Arantes, A C; Martins, Μ A

    2015-01-15

    Glucocorticoids have been the hallmark anti-inflammatory drug used to treat asthma. It has been shown that glucocorticoids ameliorate asthma by increasing numbers and activity of Tregs, in contrast recent data show that glucocorticoid might have an opposite effect on Treg cells from normal mice. Since Tregs are target cells that act on the resolution of asthma, the aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on lung Tregs in mouse models of asthma. Allergen challenged mice were treated with either oral dexamethasone or nebulized budesonide. Broncoalveolar lavage and airway hyperresponsiveness were evaluated after allergenic challenge. Lung, thymic and lymph node cells were phenotyped on Treg through flow cytometry. Lung cytokine secretion was detected by ELISA. Although dexamethasone inhibited airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, improving resolution, we have found that both dexamethasone and budesonide induce a reduction of Treg numbers on lungs and lymphoid organs of allergen challenged mice. The reduction of lung Treg levels was independent of mice strain or type of allergen challenge. Our study also indicates that both glucocorticoids do not increase Treg activity through production of IL-10. Glucocorticoid systemic or localized treatment induced thymic atrophy. Taken together, our results demonstrate that glucocorticoids decrease Treg numbers and activity in different asthma mouse models, probably by reducing thymic production of T cells. Therefore, it is possible that glucocorticoids do not have beneficial effects on lung populations of Treg cells from asthmatic patients.

  10. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gudbjörnsson, B; Hedenström, H; Stålenheim, G; Hällgren, R

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) to methacholine inhalation in a consecutive series of 21 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome was studied prospectively. Slight to severe BHR was seen in 12/20 (60%) of the patients. Ten of 12 patients with BHR (83%) had a non-productive cough, wheezing, or intermittent breathlessness. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness was more common in patients with extraglandular symptoms (10/14, 71%) than in those with only glandular symptoms (29%). Spirometrically 29% (6/21) of the patients had 'small airways' disease', and all those had BHR. Of 6/21 (29%) who had diffuse interstitial lung disease, two had BHR. Three of the four patients with obstructive lung function were challenged with methacholine and two of them had BHR. Only two patients with BHR had normal spirometry findings. The data showed that respiratory disease--mostly mild or moderate but even severe bronchial hyperresponsiveness--is commonly seen in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:1994866

  11. Decreasing SMPD1 activity in BEAS-2B bronchial airway epithelial cells results in increased NRF2 activity, cytokine synthesis and neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    MacFadden-Murphy, Elyse; Roussel, Lucie; Martel, Guy; Bérubé, Julie; Rousseau, Simon

    2017-01-22

    Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) type B is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by variable levels of impairment in sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) activity. Lung involvement is the most important prognostic factor in NPD-B, with recurrent respiratory infections starting in infancy being the major cause of morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that decreased SMPD1 activity impaired airway epithelium host defense response. SMPD1 activity was reduced using inducible shRNA. Surprisingly, decreasing SMPD1 activity by 50%, resulted in increased neutrophil recruitment, both at baseline and in response to bacterial stimulation. This correlated with elevated levels of cytokine mRNA shown to contribute to neutrophil recruitment in unstimulated (e.g. IL-8 and GRO-α) and infected cells (e.g. IL-8, GRO-α, GM-CSF and CCL20). Instead of preventing the host defence responses, decreased SMPD1 activity results in an inflammatory response even in the absence of infection. Moreover, decreasing SMPD1 activity resulted in a pro-oxidative shift. Accordingly, expression of an inactive mutant, SMPD1[L225P] but not the WT enzyme increased activation of the antioxidant transcription factor NRF2. Therefore, decreasing SMPD1 activity by 50% in airway epithelial cells, the equivalent of the loss of one allele, results in the accumulation of oxidants that activates NRF2 and a concomitant increased cytokine production as well as neutrophil recruitment. This can result in a chronic inflammatory state that impairs host defence similar to scenarios observe in other chronic inflammatory lung disease such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Cystic Fibrosis.

  12. A locus regulating bronchial hyperresponsiveness maps to chromosome 5q

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, R.C.; Meyers, D.A.; Bleecker, E.R.

    1994-09-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) is one of the hallmarks of asthma. BHR correlates well with asthmatic symptoms and the response to treatment. Moreover, BHR appears to be closely related to airways inflammation. Numerous studies have demonstrated a familial aggregation; however, this phenotype is not likely inherited as a simple Mendelian trait. BHR is also closely associated with total serum IgE levels, as are allergy and asthma. We studied 92 families from Northern Holland ascertained through a parent with asthma who were originally studied between 1962-1970. Since there are a number of candidate genes on chromosome 5q potentially important in producing BHR, families were genotyped for markers in this region. These genes regulate IgE production and the cellular elements that are likely involved in inflammation associated with BHR, allergy and asthma. They include IL-4, IL-3, IL-5, IL-9, IL-12, IL-13 and GM-CSF. Linkage of BHR with markers on 5q was tested using a model free sib-pair method. The data suggest a locus for BHR maps near the cytokine gene cluster on 5q. This region appears critical in producing susceptibility to BHR and possibly to asthma.

  13. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  14. Construction of a Der p2-transgenic plant for the alleviation of airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, CC; Ho, H; Lee, KT; Jeng, ST; Chiang, BL

    2011-01-01

    In clinical therapy, the amount of antigen administered to achieve oral tolerance for allergic diseases is large, and the cost is a major consideration. In this study, we used tobacco plants to develop a large-scale protein production system for allergen-specific immunotherapy, and we investigated the mechanisms of oral tolerance induced by a transgenic plant-derived antigen. We used plants (tobacco leaves) transgenic for the Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 2 (Der p2) antigen to produce Der p2. Mice received total protein extract from Der p2 orally once per day over 6 days (days 0–2 and days 6–8). Mice were also sensitized and challenged with yeast-derived recombinant Der p2 (rDer p2), after which the mice were examined for airway hyper-responsiveness and airway inflammation. After sensitization and challenge with rDer p2, mice that were fed with total protein extracted from transgenic plants showed decreases in serum Der p2-specific IgE and IgG1 titers, decreased IL-5 and eotaxin levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid, and eosinophil infiltration in the airway. In addition, hyper-responsiveness was also decreased in mice that were fed with total protein extracted from transgenic plants, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells were significantly increased in mediastinal and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, splenocytes isolated from transgenic plant protein-fed mice exhibited decreased proliferation and increased IL-10 secretion after stimulation with rDer p2. The data here suggest that allergen-expressing transgenic plants could be used for therapeutic purposes for allergic diseases. PMID:21602845

  15. Reduced levels of maternal progesterone during pregnancy increase the risk for allergic airway diseases in females only.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Isabel R V; Bruenahl, Christian A; Ramisch, Katherina; Keil, Thomas; Inman, Mark; Arck, Petra C; Pincus, Maike

    2014-10-01

    Observational as well as experimental studies support that prenatal challenges seemed to be associated with an increased risk for allergic airway diseases in the offspring. However, insights into biomarkers involved in mediating this risk are largely elusive. We here aimed to test the association between endogenous and exogenous factors documented in pregnant women, including psychosocial, endocrine, and life style parameters, and the risk for allergic airway diseases in the children later in life. We further pursued to functionally test identified factors in a mouse model of an allergic airway response. In a prospectively designed pregnancy cohort (n = 409 families), women were recruited between the 4th and 12th week of pregnancy. To investigate an association between exposures during pregnancy and the incidence of allergic airway disease in children between 3 and 5 years of age, multiple logistic regression analyses were applied. Further, in prenatally stressed adult offspring of BALB/c-mated BALB/c female mice, asthma was experimentally induced by ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization. In addition to the prenatal stress challenge, some pregnant females were treated with the progesterone derivative dihydrodydrogesterone (DHD). In humans, we observed that high levels of maternal progesterone in early human pregnancies were associated with a decreased risk for an allergic airway disease (asthma or allergic rhinitis) in daughters (adjusted OR 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84 to 1.00) but not sons (aOR 1.02, 95% CI 0.94-1.10). In mice, prenatal DHD supplementation of stress-challenged dams attenuated prenatal stress-induced airway hyperresponsiveness exclusively in female offspring. Reduced levels of maternal progesterone during pregnancy-which can result from high stress perception-increase the risk for allergic airway diseases in females but not in males. Key messages: Lower maternal progesterone during pregnancy increases the risk for allergic airway disease

  16. Behavioral Inhibition in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Is Related to the Airways Response, but Not Immune Measures, Commonly Associated with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Katie; Miller, Lisa A.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Capitanio, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition reflects a disposition to react warily to novel situations, and has been associated with atopic diseases such as asthma. Retrospective work established the relationship between behavioral inhibition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and airway hyperresponsiveness, but not atopy, and the suggestion was made that behavioral inhibition might index components of asthma that are not immune-related. In the present study, we prospectively examined the relationship between behavioral inhibition and airway hyperresponsiveness, and whether hormonal and immune measures often associated with asthma were associated with behavioral inhibition and/or airway hyperresponsiveness. In a sample of 49 yearling rhesus monkeys (mean = 1.25 years, n = 24 behaviorally inhibited animals), we measured in vitro cytokine levels (IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ) in response to stimulation, as well as peripheral blood cell percentages, cortisol levels, and percentage of regulatory T-cells (CD3+CD4+CD25+FOXP3+). Airway reactivity was assessed using an inhaled methacholine challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the proportion of immune cells was determined. Behaviorally inhibited monkeys had airway hyperresponsiveness as indicated by the methacholine challenge (p = 0.031), confirming our earlier retrospective result. Airway hyperresponsiveness was also associated with lower lymphocyte percentages in lavage fluid and marginally lower plasma cortisol concentrations. However, none of the tested measures was significantly related to both behavioral inhibition and airway hyperresponsiveness, and so could not mediate their relationship. Airway hyperresponsiveness is common to atopic and non-atopic asthma and behavioral inhibition has been related to altered autonomic activity in other studies. Our results suggest that behavioral inhibition might index an autonomically mediated reactive airway phenotype, and that a variety of stimuli (including inflammation

  17. Airway Surface Dehydration by Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) in Cystic Fibrosis Is Due to Decreased Function of a Voltage-dependent Potassium Channel and Can Be Rescued by the Drug Pirfenidone*

    PubMed Central

    Manzanares, Dahis; Krick, Stefanie; Baumlin, Nathalie; Dennis, John S.; Tyrrell, Jean; Tarran, Robert; Salathe, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is not only elevated in airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, whose airways are characterized by abnormal ion transport and mucociliary clearance, but TGF-β1 is also associated with worse clinical outcomes. Effective mucociliary clearance depends on adequate airway hydration, governed by ion transport. Apically expressed, large-conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-dependent K+ (BK) channels play an important role in this process. In this study, TGF-β1 decreased airway surface liquid volume, ciliary beat frequency, and BK activity in fully differentiated CF bronchial epithelial cells by reducing mRNA expression of the BK γ subunit leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 26 (LRRC26) and its function. Although LRRC26 knockdown itself reduced BK activity, LRRC26 overexpression partially reversed TGF-β1-induced BK dysfunction. TGF-β1-induced airway surface liquid volume hyper-absorption was reversed by the BK opener mallotoxin and the clinically useful TGF-β signaling inhibitor pirfenidone. The latter increased BK activity via rescue of LRRC26. Therefore, we propose that TGF-β1-induced mucociliary dysfunction in CF airways is associated with BK inactivation related to a LRRC26 decrease and is amenable to treatment with clinically useful TGF-β1 inhibitors. PMID:26338706

  18. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that KATP channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K(+) channels triggers K(+) efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca(2+)entry through closing voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. Intracellular Ca(2+) is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K(+) efflux decreases Ca(2+) influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a KATP channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective KATP channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt antagonize the proliferating and migrating effects of PDGF-BB on

  19. NK cells contribute to persistent airway inflammation and AHR during the later stage of RSV infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiaoru; Xie, Jun; Zhao, Keting; Li, Wei; Tang, Wei; Chen, Sisi; Zang, Na; Ren, Luo; Deng, Yu; Xie, Xiaohong; Wang, Lijia; Fu, Zhou; Liu, Enmei

    2016-10-01

    RSV can lead to persistent airway inflammation and AHR and is intimately associated with childhood recurrent wheezing and asthma, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. There are high numbers of NK cells in the lung, which not only play important roles in the acute stage of RSV infection, but also are pivotal in regulating the pathogenesis of asthma. Therefore, in this study, we assumed that NK cells might contribute to persistent airway disease during the later stage of RSV infection. Mice were killed at serial time points after RSV infection to collect samples. Leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted, lung histopathology was examined, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured by whole-body plethysmography. Cytokines were detected by ELISA, and NK cells were determined by flow cytometry. Rabbit anti-mouse asialo-GM-1 antibodies and resveratrol were used to deplete or suppress NK cells. Inflammatory cells in BALF, lung tissue damage and AHR were persistent for 60 days post-RSV infection. Type 2 cytokines and NK cells were significantly increased during the later stage of infection. When NK cells were decreased by the antibodies or resveratrol, type 2 cytokines, the persistent airway inflammation and AHR were all markedly reduced. NK cells can contribute to the RSV-associated persistent airway inflammation and AHR at least partially by promoting type 2 cytokines. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of NK cells may provide a novel approach to alleviating the recurrent wheezing subsequent to RSV infection.

  20. Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 promotes house dust mite-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xianglan; Gao, Meixia; Dai, Cuilian; Meyer, Katharine S; Chen, Jichun; Keeran, Karen J; Nugent, Gayle Z; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Dagur, Pradeep K; McCoy, J Philip; Levine, Stewart J

    2013-12-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition protein (Pglyrp) 1 is a pattern-recognition protein that mediates antibacterial host defense. Because we had previously shown that Pglyrp1 expression is increased in the lungs of house dust mite (HDM)-challenged mice, we hypothesized that it might modulate the pathogenesis of asthma. Wild-type and Pglyrp1(-/-) mice on a BALB/c background received intranasal HDM or saline, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. HDM-challenged Pglyrp1(-/-) mice showed decreases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid eosinophils and lymphocytes, serum IgE, and mucous cell metaplasia, whereas airway hyperresponsiveness was not changed when compared with wild-type mice. T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines were reduced in the lungs of HDM-challenged Pglyrp1(-/-) mice, which reflected a decreased number of CD4(+) Th2 cells. There was also a reduction in C-C chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenates from HDM-challenged Pglyrp1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, secretion of CCL17, CCL22, and CCL24 by alveolar macrophages from HDM-challenged Pglyrp1(-/-) mice was markedly reduced. As both inflammatory cells and airway epithelial cells express Pglyrp1, bone marrow transplantation was performed to generate chimeric mice and assess which cell type promotes HDM-induced airway inflammation. Chimeric mice lacking Pglyrp1 on hematopoietic cells, not structural cells, showed a reduction in HDM-induced eosinophilic and lymphocytic airway inflammation. We conclude that Pglyrp1 expressed by hematopoietic cells, such as alveolar macrophages, mediates HDM-induced airway inflammation by up-regulating the production of C-C chemokines that recruit eosinophils and Th2 cells to the lung. This identifies a new family of innate immune response proteins that promotes HDM-induced airway inflammation in asthma.

  1. Role of neutralizing anti-murine interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody on chronic ozone-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Fei, Xia; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Li, Feng; Bao, Wu-Ping; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to ozone has led to airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness, which potential mechanisms relate to ozone-induced oxidative stress. IL-17 is a growing target for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of the study was to examine the inhibitory effects of anti-murine interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody (IL-17mAb) on adverse effects of ozone which are noted above. After C57/BL6 mice were exposed to ozone (2.5ppm; 3h) for 12 times over 6 weeks, IL-17mAb, PBS was intraperitoneally injected into mice 1h after ozone or air exposure for 6 weeks and mice were studied 24h after final exposure, monitoring bronchial responsiveness, airway inflammatory cells, lung histology, levels of neutrophil-related chemokine and proinflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and serum, the expression of IL-17A mRNA and protein, glucocorticoid receptors (GR), and the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in lung tissues. The administration of IL-17mAb reduced the ozone-induced increases in total cells, especially neutrophils; decreased levels of cytokines, including IL-8 in BAL fluid, IL-8 and IL-17A in serum; mitigated the severity of airway hyperresponsiveness; attenuated lung inflammation scores and histologic analysis confirmed the suppression of lung inflammation, compared with the administration of a control PBS. Exposure to ozone results in increases in IL-17A production rate, mRNA and protein levels of IL-17A and the protein level of GR. These effects were halted and reversed by IL-17mAb treatment. Furthermore, IL-17mAb also reduced the phosphorylation of p38MAPK. Therefore, we conclude that IL-17mAb may be a useful therapy in ozone-related diseases, including COPD.

  2. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  3. Regulation of eosinophilia and allergic airway inflammation by the glycan-binding protein galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao Na; Ha, Sung Gil; Greenberg, Yana G; Rao, Amrita; Bastan, Idil; Blidner, Ada G; Rao, Savita P; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Sriramarao, P

    2016-08-16

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a glycan-binding protein with broad antiinflammatory activities, functions as a proresolving mediator in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders. However, its role in allergic airway inflammation has not yet been elucidated. We evaluated the effects of Gal-1 on eosinophil function and its role in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Allergen exposure resulted in airway recruitment of Gal-1-expressing inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, as well as increased Gal-1 in extracellular spaces in the lungs. In vitro, extracellular Gal-1 exerted divergent effects on eosinophils that were N-glycan- and dose-dependent. At concentrations ≤0.25 µM, Gal-1 increased eosinophil adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, caused redistribution of integrin CD49d to the periphery and cell clustering, but inhibited ERK(1/2) activation and eotaxin-1-induced migration. Exposure to concentrations ≥1 µM resulted in ERK(1/2)-dependent apoptosis and disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton. At lower concentrations, Gal-1 did not alter expression of adhesion molecules (CD49d, CD18, CD11a, CD11b, L-selectin) or of the chemokine receptor CCR3, but decreased CD49d and CCR3 was observed in eosinophils treated with higher concentrations of this lectin. In vivo, allergen-challenged Gal-1-deficient mice exhibited increased recruitment of eosinophils and CD3(+) T lymphocytes in the airways as well as elevated peripheral blood and bone marrow eosinophils relative to corresponding WT mice. Further, these mice had an increased propensity to develop airway hyperresponsiveness and displayed significantly elevated levels of TNF-α in lung tissue. This study suggests that Gal-1 can limit eosinophil recruitment to allergic airways and suppresses airway inflammation by inhibiting cell migration and promoting eosinophil apoptosis.

  4. Regulation of eosinophilia and allergic airway inflammation by the glycan-binding protein galectin-1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiao Na; Ha, Sung Gil; Greenberg, Yana G.; Rao, Amrita; Bastan, Idil; Blidner, Ada G.; Rao, Savita P.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Sriramarao, P.

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a glycan-binding protein with broad antiinflammatory activities, functions as a proresolving mediator in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders. However, its role in allergic airway inflammation has not yet been elucidated. We evaluated the effects of Gal-1 on eosinophil function and its role in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Allergen exposure resulted in airway recruitment of Gal-1–expressing inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, as well as increased Gal-1 in extracellular spaces in the lungs. In vitro, extracellular Gal-1 exerted divergent effects on eosinophils that were N-glycan– and dose-dependent. At concentrations ≤0.25 µM, Gal-1 increased eosinophil adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, caused redistribution of integrin CD49d to the periphery and cell clustering, but inhibited ERK(1/2) activation and eotaxin-1–induced migration. Exposure to concentrations ≥1 µM resulted in ERK(1/2)-dependent apoptosis and disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton. At lower concentrations, Gal-1 did not alter expression of adhesion molecules (CD49d, CD18, CD11a, CD11b, L-selectin) or of the chemokine receptor CCR3, but decreased CD49d and CCR3 was observed in eosinophils treated with higher concentrations of this lectin. In vivo, allergen-challenged Gal-1–deficient mice exhibited increased recruitment of eosinophils and CD3+ T lymphocytes in the airways as well as elevated peripheral blood and bone marrow eosinophils relative to corresponding WT mice. Further, these mice had an increased propensity to develop airway hyperresponsiveness and displayed significantly elevated levels of TNF-α in lung tissue. This study suggests that Gal-1 can limit eosinophil recruitment to allergic airways and suppresses airway inflammation by inhibiting cell migration and promoting eosinophil apoptosis. PMID:27457925

  5. Identification of genes differentially regulated by vitamin D deficiency that alter lung pathophysiology and inflammation in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Troy, Niamh M; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Kicic, Anthony; Zosky, Graeme R

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with asthma risk. Vitamin D deficiency may enhance the inflammatory response, and we have previously shown that airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness is increased in vitamin D-deficient mice. In this study, we hypothesize that vitamin D deficiency would exacerbate house dust mite (HDM)-induced inflammation and alterations in lung structure and function. A BALB/c mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was established by dietary manipulation. Responsiveness to methacholine, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, mucus cell metaplasia, lung and airway inflammation, and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were assessed. Gene expression patterns in mouse lung samples were profiled by RNA-Seq. HDM exposure increased inflammation and inflammatory cytokines in BAL, baseline airway resistance, tissue elastance, and ASM mass. Vitamin D deficiency enhanced the HDM-induced influx of lymphocytes into BAL, ameliorated the HDM-induced increase in ASM mass, and protected against the HDM-induced increase in baseline airway resistance. RNA-Seq identified nine genes that were differentially regulated by vitamin D deficiency in the lungs of HDM-treated mice. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that protein expression of midline 1 (MID1) and adrenomedullin was differentially regulated such that they promoted inflammation, while hypoxia-inducible lipid droplet-associated, which is associated with ASM remodeling, was downregulated. Protein expression studies in human bronchial epithelial cells also showed that addition of vitamin D decreased MID1 expression. Differential regulation of these genes by vitamin D deficiency could determine lung inflammation and pathophysiology and suggest that the effect of vitamin D deficiency on HDM-induced allergic airways disease is complex.

  6. Involvement of RhoA-mediated Ca2+ sensitization in antigen-induced bronchial smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Yoshihiko; Ueno, Ayako; Shinozaki, Koji; Takeyama, Hisao; Nakazawa, Shuji; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Misawa, Miwa

    2005-01-01

    Background It has recently been suggested that RhoA plays an important role in the enhancement of the Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle contraction. In the present study, a participation of RhoA-mediated Ca2+ sensitization in the augmented bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) contraction in a murine model of allergic asthma was examined. Methods Ovalbumin (OA)-sensitized BALB/c mice were repeatedly challenged with aerosolized OA and sacrificed 24 hours after the last antigen challenge. The contractility and RhoA protein expression of BSMs were measured by organ-bath technique and immunoblotting, respectively. Results Repeated OA challenge to sensitized mice caused a BSM hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine (ACh), but not to high K+-depolarization. In α-toxin-permeabilized BSMs, ACh induced a Ca2+ sensitization of contraction, which is sensitive to Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, indicating that RhoA is implicated in this Ca2+ sensitization. Interestingly, the ACh-induced, RhoA-mediated Ca2+ sensitization was significantly augmented in permeabilized BSMs of OA-challenged mice. Moreover, protein expression of RhoA was significantly increased in the hyperresponsive BSMs. Conclusion These findings suggest that the augmentation of Ca2+ sensitizing effect, probably via an up-regulation of RhoA protein, might be involved in the enhanced BSM contraction in antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:15638941

  7. World Trade Center fine particulate matter causes respiratory tract hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gavett, Stephen H; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Highfill, Jerry W; Ledbetter, Allen D; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Harkema, Jack R; Wagner, James G; Costa, Daniel L

    2003-01-01

    Pollutants originating from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City on 11 September 2001 have been reported to cause adverse respiratory responses in rescue workers and nearby residents. We examined whether WTC-derived fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)] has detrimental respiratory effects in mice to contribute to the risk assessment of WTC-derived pollutants. Samples of WTC PM2.5 were derived from settled dust collected at several locations around Ground Zero on 12 and 13 September 2001. Aspirated samples of WTC PM2.5 induced mild to moderate degrees of pulmonary inflammation 1 day after exposure but only at a relatively high dose (100 microg). This response was not as great as that caused by 100 microg PM2.5 derived from residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or Washington, DC, ambient air PM [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649a]. However, this same dose of WTC PM2.5 caused airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine aerosol comparable to that from SRM 1649a and to a greater degree than that from ROFA. Mice exposed to lower doses by aspiration or inhalation exposure did not develop significant inflammation or hyperresponsiveness. These results show that exposure to high levels of WTC PM2.5 can promote mechanisms of airflow obstruction in mice. Airborne concentrations of WTC PM2.5 that would cause comparable doses in people are high (approximately 425 microg/m3 for 8 hr) but conceivable in the aftermath of the collapse of the towers when rescue and salvage efforts were in effect. We conclude that a high-level exposure to WTC PM2.5 could cause pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in people. The effects of chronic exposures to lower levels of WTC PM2.5, the persistence of any respiratory effects, and the effects of coarser WTC PM are unknown and were not examined in these studies. Degree of exposure and respiratory

  8. World Trade Center fine particulate matter causes respiratory tract hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Gavett, Stephen H; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Highfill, Jerry W; Ledbetter, Allen D; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Harkema, Jack R; Wagner, James G; Costa, Daniel L

    2003-06-01

    Pollutants originating from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City on 11 September 2001 have been reported to cause adverse respiratory responses in rescue workers and nearby residents. We examined whether WTC-derived fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)] has detrimental respiratory effects in mice to contribute to the risk assessment of WTC-derived pollutants. Samples of WTC PM2.5 were derived from settled dust collected at several locations around Ground Zero on 12 and 13 September 2001. Aspirated samples of WTC PM2.5 induced mild to moderate degrees of pulmonary inflammation 1 day after exposure but only at a relatively high dose (100 microg). This response was not as great as that caused by 100 microg PM2.5 derived from residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or Washington, DC, ambient air PM [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649a]. However, this same dose of WTC PM2.5 caused airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine aerosol comparable to that from SRM 1649a and to a greater degree than that from ROFA. Mice exposed to lower doses by aspiration or inhalation exposure did not develop significant inflammation or hyperresponsiveness. These results show that exposure to high levels of WTC PM2.5 can promote mechanisms of airflow obstruction in mice. Airborne concentrations of WTC PM2.5 that would cause comparable doses in people are high (approximately 425 microg/m3 for 8 hr) but conceivable in the aftermath of the collapse of the towers when rescue and salvage efforts were in effect. We conclude that a high-level exposure to WTC PM2.5 could cause pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in people. The effects of chronic exposures to lower levels of WTC PM2.5, the persistence of any respiratory effects, and the effects of coarser WTC PM are unknown and were not examined in these studies. Degree of exposure and respiratory

  9. Airway smooth muscle in airway reactivity and remodeling: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is now established that airway smooth muscle (ASM) has roles in determining airway structure and function, well beyond that as the major contractile element. Indeed, changes in ASM function are central to the manifestation of allergic, inflammatory, and fibrotic airway diseases in both children and adults, as well as to airway responses to local and environmental exposures. Emerging evidence points to novel signaling mechanisms within ASM cells of different species that serve to control diverse features, including 1) [Ca2+]i contractility and relaxation, 2) cell proliferation and apoptosis, 3) production and modulation of extracellular components, and 4) release of pro- vs. anti-inflammatory mediators and factors that regulate immunity as well as the function of other airway cell types, such as epithelium, fibroblasts, and nerves. These diverse effects of ASM “activity” result in modulation of bronchoconstriction vs. bronchodilation relevant to airway hyperresponsiveness, airway thickening, and fibrosis that influence compliance. This perspective highlights recent discoveries that reveal the central role of ASM in this regard and helps set the stage for future research toward understanding the pathways regulating ASM and, in turn, the influence of ASM on airway structure and function. Such exploration is key to development of novel therapeutic strategies that influence the pathophysiology of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24142517

  10. Hesperidin suppresses ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a mouse allergic asthma model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dajun; Ci, Xinxin; Chu, Xiao; Wei, Miaomiao; Hua, Shucheng; Deng, Xuming

    2012-02-01

    Hesperidin, a flavanone glycoside comprised of the flavanone hesperetin and the disaccharide rutinose, is a plentiful and inexpensive by-product of citrus cultivation. It has been reported to exert a wide range of pharmacological effects that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. In this study, we attempt to determine whether hesperidin inhibits inflammatory mediators in the mouse allergic asthma model. Mice were sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin (OVA) to induce chronic airway inflammation and airway remodeling. The administration of hesperidin significantly decreased the number of infiltrating inflammatory cells and Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid compared with the OVA-induced group of mice. In addition, hesperidin reduced OVA-specific IgE levels in serum. Hesperidin markedly alleviated the OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled methacholine. Based on lung histopathological studies using hematoxylin and eosin and alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff staining, hesperidin inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion compared with the OVA-induced group of mice. These findings provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of hesperidin in terms of its effects in a murine model of asthma.

  11. Ion channel regulation of intracellular calcium and airway smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F; Karner, Charlotta; Ito, Satoru; Shepherd, Malcolm; Alrashdan, Yazan; Sanderson, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Airway hyper-responsiveness associated with asthma is mediated by airway smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and has a complicated etiology involving increases in cell contraction and proliferation and the secretion of inflammatory mediators. Although these pathological changes are diverse, a common feature associated with their regulation is a change in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Because the [Ca(2+)](i) itself is a function of the activity and expression of a variety of ion channels, in both the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum of the SMC, the modification of this ion channel activity may predispose airway SMCs to hyper-responsiveness. Our objective is to review how ion channels determine the [Ca(2+)](i) and influence the function of airway SMCs and emphasize the potential of ion channels as sites for therapeutic approaches to asthma.

  12. Wogonin Induces Eosinophil Apoptosis and Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dorward, David A.; Sharma, Sidharth; Rennie, Jillian; Felton, Jennifer M.; Alessandri, Ana L.; Duffin, Rodger; Schwarze, Jurgen; Haslett, Christopher; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Eosinophils are key effector cells in allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, eczema, and asthma. Their tissue presence is regulated by both recruitment and increased longevity at inflamed sites. Objectives: To investigate the ability of the flavone wogonin to induce eosinophil apoptosis in vitro and attenuate eosinophil-dominant allergic inflammation in vivo in mice. Methods: Human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in response to wogonin was investigated by cellular morphology, flow cytometry, mitochondrial membrane permeability, and pharmacological caspase inhibition. Allergic lung inflammation was modeled in mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were examined for inflammation, mucus production, and inflammatory mediator production. Airway hyperresponsiveness to aerosolized methacholine was measured. Measurements and Main Results: Wogonin induced time- and concentration-dependent human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in vitro. Wogonin-induced eosinophil apoptosis occurred with activation of caspase-3 and was inhibited by pharmacological caspase inhibition. Wogonin administration attenuated allergic airway inflammation in vivo with reductions in BAL and interstitial eosinophil numbers, increased eosinophil apoptosis, reduced airway mucus production, and attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness. This wogonin-induced reduction in allergic airway inflammation was prevented by concurrent caspase inhibition in vivo. Conclusions: Wogonin induces eosinophil apoptosis and attenuates allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that it has therapeutic potential for the treatment of allergic inflammation in humans. PMID:25629436

  13. Effect of once daily and twice daily sustained release theophylline formulations on daytime variation of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, M.; Olivieri, M.; Lampronti, G.; Bonazza, L.; Biasin, C.; Nacci, P.; Talamini, G.; Lo, C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies evaluating spirometric values and symptoms have shown that once daily theophylline administered in the evening produces greater stabilisation of the airway function in asthmatic patients than the prototype theophylline given twice a day. The aim of this study was to compare the effects on bronchial responsiveness to methacholine of an ultrasustained release theophylline formulation (Diffumal-24, Malesci, Florence, Italy) administered once a day, a sustained release theophylline formulation (Theo-Dur, Recordati, Milan, Italy) administered twice a day, and placebo. METHODS: The study was performed in 12 adult patients with asthma using a randomised, double blind, three phase, cross-over design. Each phase lasted seven days and was followed or preceded by at least three days of theophylline washout. Diffumal-24 was administered once a day at 20.00 hours whereas Theo-Dur was given twice a day at 08.00 hours and 20.00 hours. In each patient the total daily dose of theophylline was the same during both phases. The dose of the two active preparations was titrated to individual needs before the beginning of the study and then given in divided or once daily doses. At 08.00, 14.00, and 20.00 hours on day 7 of each phase serum theophylline concentrations were measured and spirometric tests (FEV1) and bronchial challenge with methacholine were also performed. RESULTS: When the administration of Diffumal-24 was compared with that of Theo-Dur, a higher serum theophylline concentration of the former was seen in the morning whereas at 20.00 hours the reverse was true. Compared with placebo, at 08.00 hours Diffumal-24 improved FEV1 whereas Theo-Dur did not (difference between treatments 0.29 1, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.45). At 08.00 hours Diffumal-24 decreased bronchial sensitivity to methacholine, expressed as a natural logarithm of PD20, to a greater extent than Theo-Dur (difference between treatments 0.54 log units, 95% CI 0.016 to 1.08). The morning

  14. C5 Modulates Airway Hyperreactivity and Pulmonary Eosinophilia during Enhanced Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease by Decreasing C3a Receptor Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Melendi, Guillermina A.; Hoffman, Scott J.; Karron, Ruth A.; Irusta, Pablo M.; Laham, Federico R.; Humbles, Alison; Schofield, Brian; Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Rabold, Richard; Thumar, Bhagvanji; Thumar, Adeep; Gerard, Norma P.; Mitzner, Wayne; Barnum, Scott R.; Gerard, Craig; Kleeberger, Steven R.; Polack, Fernando P.

    2007-01-01

    Enhanced respiratory syncytial virus disease, a serious pulmonary disorder that affected recipients of an inactivated vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus in the 1960s, has delayed the development of vaccines against the virus. The enhanced disease was characterized by immune complex-mediated airway hyperreactivity and a severe pneumonia associated with pulmonary eosinophilia. In this paper, we show that complement factors contribute to enhanced-disease phenotypes. Mice with a targeted disruption of complement component C5 affected by the enhanced disease displayed enhanced airway reactivity, lung eosinophilia, and mucus production compared to wild-type mice and C5-deficient mice reconstituted with C5. C3aR expression in bronchial epithelial and smooth muscle cells in the lungs of C5-deficient mice was enhanced compared to that in wild-type and reconstituted rodents. Treatment of C5-deficient mice with a C3aR antagonist significantly attenuated airway reactivity, eosinophilia, and mucus production. These results indicate that C5 plays a crucial role in modulating the enhanced-disease phenotype, by affecting expression of C3aR in the lungs. These findings reveal a novel autoregulatory mechanism for the complement cascade that affects the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:17079327

  15. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  16. KyoT2 downregulates airway remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mei; Ou-Yang, Hai-Feng; Han, Xing-Peng; Ti, Xin-Yu; Wu, Chang-Gui

    2015-01-01

    The typical pathological features of asthma are airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). KyoT2, a negative modulator of Notch signaling, has been linked to asthma in several previous studies. However, whether KyoT2 is involved in the regulation of airway remodeling or the modulation of airway resistance in asthma is unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of KyoT2 in preventing asthma-associated airway remodeling and AHR. BALB/c mice were used to generate a mouse model of asthma. Additionally, the expression of Hes1 and Notch1 in airway was analyzed using Immunofluorescence examination. The asthmatic mice were intranasally administered adenovirus expressing KyoT2 and were compared to control groups. Furthermore, subepithelial fibrosis and other airway remodeling features were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Van Gieson's staining and Masson's trichrome staining. AHR was also evaluated. This study revealed that KyoT2 downregulated the expression of Hes1, repressed airway remodeling, and alleviated AHR in asthmatic mice. It is reasonable to assume that KyoT2 downregulates airway remodeling and resistance in asthmatic mice through a Hes1-dependent mechanism. Therefore, KyoT2 is a potential clinical treatment strategy for asthma.

  17. Role of capsaicin-sensitive afferents and sensory neuropeptides in endotoxin-induced airway inflammation and consequent bronchial hyperreactivity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Elekes, Krisztián; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Németh, József; Sándor, Katalin; Pozsgai, Gábor; Kereskai, László; Börzsei, Rita; Pintér, Erika; Szabó, Arpád; Szolcsányi, János

    2007-06-07

    Substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from capsaicin-sensitive afferents induce neurogenic inflammation via NK(1), NK(2) and CGRP1 receptor activation. This study examines the role of capsaicin-sensitive fibres and sensory neuropeptides in endotoxin-induced airway inflammation and consequent bronchial hyperreactivity with functional, morphological and biochemical techniques in mice. Carbachol-induced bronchoconstriction was measured with whole body plethysmography 24 h after intranasal lipopolysaccharide administration. SP and CGRP were determined with radioimmunoassay, myeloperoxidase activity with spectrophotometry, interleukin-1beta with ELISA and histopathological changes with semiquantitative scoring from lung samples. Treatments with resiniferatoxin for selective destruction of capsaicin-sensitive afferents, NK(1) antagonist SR 140333, NK(2) antagonist SR 48968, their combination, or CGRP1 receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37) were performed. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased lung SP and CGRP concentrations, which was prevented by resiniferatoxin pretreatment. Resiniferatoxin-desensitization markedly enhanced inflammation, but decreased bronchoconstriction. CGRP(8-37) or combination of SR 140333 and SR 48968 diminished neutrophil accumulation, MPO levels and IL-1beta production, airway hyperresponsiveness was inhibited only by SR 48968. This is the first evidence that capsaicin-sensitive afferents exert a protective role in endotoxin-induced airway inflammation, but contribute to increased bronchoconstriction. Activation of CGRP1 receptors or NK(1)+NK(2) receptors participate in granulocyte accumulation, but NK(2) receptors play predominant role in enhanced airway resistance.

  18. Increased oxidative DNA damage and decreased expression of base excision repair proteins in airway epithelial cells of women who cook with biomass fuels.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bidisha; Bindhani, Banani; Saha, Hirak; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2014-09-01

    To investigate whether biomass burning causes oxidative DNA damage and alters the expression of DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins in airway cells, sputum samples were collected from 80 premenopausal rural biomass-users and 70 age-matched control women who cooked with liquefied petroleum gas. Compared with control the airway cells of biomass-users showed increased DNA damage in alkaline comet assay. Biomass-users showed higher percentage of cells expressing oxidative DNA damage marker 8-oxoguanine and lower percentages of BER proteins OGG1 and APE1 by immunocytochemical staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was doubled and level of superoxide dismutase was depleted significantly among biomass-users. The concentrations of particulate matters were higher in biomass-using households which positively correlated with ROS generation and negatively with BER proteins expressions. ROS generation was positively correlated with 8-oxoguanine and negatively with BER proteins suggesting cooking with biomass is a risk for genotoxicity among rural women in their child-bearing age.

  19. PULMONARY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO SELECTED DIISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    PULMONARY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO SELECTED DIISOCYANATES

    M.J.K. Selgrade, E.H. Boykin, N.H. Coates, D.L. Doerfler, S.H. Gavett
    Experimental Toxicology Div., National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Developmen...

  20. Silencing nociceptor neurons reduces allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E.; Burkett, Patrick R.; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J.F.; Pascal, Maud A.; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L.; Tran, Johnathan V.; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M.; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Bean, Bruce P.; Levy, Bruce D.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8+ sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin or house dust mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4+ and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  1. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum of Airway Smooth Muscle. Implications for Airway Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel P.; Rector, Michael V.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Li, Xiaopeng; Stroik, Mallory R.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Thompson, Michael A.; Prakash, Y. S.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Meyerholz, David K.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: An asthma-like airway phenotype has been described in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Whether these findings are directly caused by loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function or secondary to chronic airway infection and/or inflammation has been difficult to determine. Objectives: Airway contractility is primarily determined by airway smooth muscle. We tested the hypothesis that CFTR is expressed in airway smooth muscle and directly affects airway smooth muscle contractility. Methods: Newborn pigs, both wild type and with CF (before the onset of airway infection and inflammation), were used in this study. High-resolution immunofluorescence was used to identify the subcellular localization of CFTR in airway smooth muscle. Airway smooth muscle function was determined with tissue myography, intracellular calcium measurements, and regulatory myosin light chain phosphorylation status. Precision-cut lung slices were used to investigate the therapeutic potential of CFTR modulation on airway reactivity. Measurements and Main Results: We found that CFTR localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum compartment of airway smooth muscle and regulates airway smooth muscle tone. Loss of CFTR function led to delayed calcium reuptake following cholinergic stimulation and increased myosin light chain phosphorylation. CFTR potentiation with ivacaftor decreased airway reactivity in precision-cut lung slices following cholinergic stimulation. Conclusions: Loss of CFTR alters porcine airway smooth muscle function and may contribute to the airflow obstruction phenotype observed in human CF. Airway smooth muscle CFTR may represent a therapeutic target in CF and other diseases of airway narrowing. PMID:26488271

  2. The Impact of Vitamin D on Asthmatic Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sannette C.; Fischer, Kimberly D.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic heterogeneous disorder, which involves airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway remodeling. The airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle regulates the broncho-motor tone and plays a critical role in AHR as well as orchestrating inflammation. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased severity and exacerbations of symptoms in asthmatic patients. It has been shown to modulate both immune and structural cells, including ASM cells, in inflammatory diseases. Given that current asthma therapies have not been successful in reversing airway remodeling, vitamin D supplementation as a potential therapeutic option has gained a great deal of attention. Here, we highlight the potential immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D in regulating ASM function and airway inflammation in bronchial asthma. PMID:26634624

  3. FSTL1 PROMOTES ASTHMATIC AIRWAY REMODELING BY INDUCING ONCOSTATIN M

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marina; Beppu, Andrew; Rosenthal, Peter; Pham, Alexa; Das, Sudipta; Karta, Maya; Song, Dae Jin; Vuong, Christine; Doherty, Taylor; Croft, Michael; Zuraw, Bruce; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Xiang; Aceves, Seema; Chouiali, Fazila; Hamid, Qutayba; Broide, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic asthma is associated with airway remodeling and decline in lung function. Here we show that follistatin like 1 (Fstl1), a mediator not previously associated with asthma is highly expressed by macrophages in the lungs of severe human asthmatics. Chronic allergen challenged Lys-Cretg/Fstl1Δ/Δ mice in whom Fstl1 is inactivated in macrophages/myeloid cells had significantly reduced airway remodeling and reduced levels of oncostatin M (OSM) a cytokine previously not known to be regulated by Fstl1. The importance of the Fstl1 induction of OSM to airway remodeling was demonstrated in murine studies in which administration of Fstl1 induced airway remodeling and increased OSM, while administration of an anti-OSM antibody blocked the effect of Fstl1 on inducing airway remodeling, eosinophilic airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness all cardinal features of asthma. Overall, these studies demonstrate that the Fstl1/oncostatin M pathway may be a novel pathway to inhibit airway remodeling in severe human asthma. PMID:26355153

  4. Targeted expression of IL-11 in the murine airway causes lymphocytic inflammation, bronchial remodeling, and airways obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W; Geba, G P; Zheng, T; Ray, P; Homer, R J; Kuhn, C; Flavell, R A; Elias, J A

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin-11 is a pleotropic cytokine produced by lung stromal cells in response to respiratory viruses, cytokines, and histamine. To further define its potential effector functions, the Clara cell 10-kD protein promoter was used to express IL-11 and the airways of the resulting transgene mice were characterized. In contrast to transgene (-) littermates, the airways of IL-11 transgene (+) animals manifest nodular peribronchiolar mononuclear cell infiltrates and impressive airways remodeling with subepithelial fibrosis. The inflammatory foci contained large numbers of B220(+) and MHC Class II(+) cells and lesser numbers of CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) cells. The fibrotic response contained increased amounts of types III and I collagen, increased numbers of alpha smooth muscle actin and desmin-containing cells and a spectrum of stromal elements including fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells. Physiologic evaluation also demonstrated that 2-mo-old transgene (+) mice had increased airways resistance and non-specific airways hyperresponsiveness to methacholine when compared with their transgene (-) littermates. These studies demonstrate that the targeted expression of IL-11 in the mouse airway causes a B and T cell-predominant inflammatory response, airway remodeling with increased types III and I collagen, the local accumulation of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, and myocytes, and obstructive physiologic dysregulation. IL-11 may play an important role in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses in viral and/or nonviral human airway disorders. PMID:8981933

  5. Preventive Intra Oral Treatment of Sea Cucumber Ameliorate OVA-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-In; Park, Mi-Kyung; Kang, Shin Ae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Kang, Seok-Jung; Lee, Jeong-Yeol; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-01-01

    Sea cucumber extracts have potent biological effects, including anti-viral, anti-cancer, antibacterial, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammation effects. To understand their anti-asthma effects, we induced allergic airway inflammation in mice after 7 oral administrations of the extract. The hyper-responsiveness value in mice with ovalbumin (OVA)-alum-induced asthma after oral injection of sea cucumber extracts was significantly lower than that in the OVA-alum-induced asthma group. In addition, the number of eosinophils in the lungs of asthma-induced mice pre-treated with sea cucumber extract was significantly decreased compared to that of PBS pre-treated mice. Additionally, CD4[Formula: see text]CD25[Formula: see text]Foxp3[Formula: see text]T (regulatory T; Treg) cells significantly increased in mesenteric lymph nodes after 7 administrations of the extract. These results suggest that sea cucumber extract can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation via Treg cell activation and recruitment to the lung.

  6. Treatment with 8-OH-modified adenine (TLR7 ligand)-allergen conjugates decreases T helper type 2-oriented murine airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nencini, Francesca; Pratesi, Sara; Petroni, Giulia; Filì, Lucia; Cardilicchia, Elisa; Casini, Andrea; Occhiato, Ernesto Giovanni; Calosi, Laura; Bani, Daniele; Romagnani, Sergio; Maggi, Enrico; Parronchi, Paola; Vultaggio, Alessandra

    2015-08-01

    A strategy to improve allergen-specific immunotherapy is to employ new adjuvants stably linked to allergens. The study is addressed to evaluate the in vivo and in vitro effects of allergens [natural Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 2 (nDer p 2) and ovalbumin (OVA)] chemically bound to an 8-OH-modified adenine. Humoral and cellular responses were analysed in allergen-sensitized and challenged mice by using conjugates (Conj) in a therapeutic setting. The in vitro activity of the conjugates on cytokine production induced by bone marrow dendritic cells and the co-culture system was also investigated. The nDer p 2-Conj treatment in nDer p 2-primed and challenged BALB/c mice reduced the numbers of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung, airway allergen-driven interleukin-13 (IL-13) production in lung mononuclear cells and IgE, in comparison with nDer p 2-treated mice. The increase of IgG2a paralleled that of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-10 in allergen-stimulated spleen cells. Similar effects were elicited by treatment with OVA-Conj in an OVA-driven BALB/c model. The nDer p 2-Conj or OVA-Conj redirected memory T helper type 2 cells towards the production of IL-10 and IFN-γ also in C57BL/6 mice and when subcutaneously administered. Interleukin-10, IL-12 and IL-27 were produced in vitro by Conj-stimulated bone marrow dendritic cells, whereas IL-10 and IFN-γ were up-regulated in co-cultures of CD11c(+) and CD4(+) T cells from Conj-treated mice stimulated with allergen. Cytofluorometric analysis indicated that the Conj expanded IFN-γ- and IL-10- producing memory T cells. The Conj effects on IL-10(-/-) and IL-12(-/-) mice confirmed the role of IL-10 and IFN-γ in inducing a protective and balanced redirection the T helper type 2-mediated airway inflammation.

  7. Chinese herbal medicine formula Gu-Ben-Fang-Xiao-Tang attenuates airway inflammation by modulating Th17/Treg balance in an ovalbumin-induced murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Guiying; Tao, Baohong; Wang, Dongguo; Li, Yong; Wu, Jingyi; Yin, Genquan

    2016-01-01

    Gu-Ben-Fang-Xiao-Tang (GBFXT) is a traditional Chinese medicine formula consisting of 11 medicinal plants, which has been used in the treatment of asthma. The present study aimed to determine the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of GBFXT on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma. A total of 50 mice were randomly assigned to the following five experimental groups: Normal, model, montelukast (2.6 mg/kg), 12 g/kg GBFXT and 36 g/kg GBFXT groups. Airway responsiveness was measured using the forced oscillation technique, while differential cell count in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by Wright-Giemsa staining. Histological assessment was performed by hematoxylin and eosin staining, while BALF levels of Th17/Treg cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the proportions of Th17 and Treg cells were evaluated by flow cytometry. The results showed that GBFXT suppressed airway hyperresponsiveness during methacholine-induced constriction, reduced the percentage of leukocytes and eosinophils, and resulted in decreased absolute neutrophil infiltration in lung tissue. In addition, GBFXT treatment significantly decreased the IL-17A cytokine level and increased the IL-10 cytokine level in the BALF. Furthermore, GBFXT significantly suppressed Th17 cells and increased Treg cells in asthmatic mice. In conclusion, the current results demonstrated that GBFXT may effectively inhibit the progression of airway inflammation in allergic asthma, partially by modulating the Th17/Treg cell balance. PMID:27588063

  8. Structural and functional localization of airway effects from episodic exposure of infant monkeys to allergen and/or ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. . E-mail: jesse.joad@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Peake, Janice L.; Plopper, Charles G.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2006-08-01

    Both allergen and ozone exposure increase asthma symptoms and airway responsiveness in children. Little is known about how these inhalants may differentially modify airway responsiveness in large proximal as compared to small distal airways. We evaluated whether bronchi and respiratory bronchioles from infant monkeys exposed episodically to allergen and/or ozone differentially develop intrinsic hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and whether eosinophils and/or pulmonary neuroendocrine cells play a role. Infant monkeys were exposed episodically for 5 months to: (1) filtered air, (2) aerosolized house dust mite allergen, (3) ozone 0.5 ppm, or (4) house dust mite allergen + ozone. Studying the function/structure relationship of the same lung slices, we evaluated methacholine airway responsiveness and histology of bronchi and respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, intrinsic responsiveness was increased by allergen exposure, an effect reduced by bombesin antagonist. In respiratory bronchioles, intrinsic airway responsiveness was increased by allergen + ozone exposure. Eosinophils were increased by allergen and allergen + ozone exposure in bronchi and by allergen exposure in respiratory bronchioles. In both airways, exposure to allergen + ozone resulted in fewer tissue eosinophils than did allergen exposure alone. In bronchi, but not in respiratory bronchioles, the number of eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells correlated with airway responsiveness. We conclude that episodically exposing infant monkeys to house dust mite allergen with or without ozone increased intrinsic airway responsiveness to methacholine in bronchi differently than in respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells may play a role in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.

  9. Cyclic nitroxide radicals attenuate inflammation and Hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Assayag, Miri; Goldstein, Sara; Samuni, Amram; Berkman, Neville

    2015-10-01

    The effects of stable cyclic nitroxide radicals have been extensively investigated both in vivo and in vitro demonstrating anti-inflammatory, radioprotective, anti-mutagenic, age-retardant, hypotensive, anti-cancer and anti-teratogenic activities. Yet, these stable radicals have not been evaluated in asthma and other airway inflammatory disorders. The present study investigated the effect of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (TPL) and 3-carbamoyl-proxyl (3-CP) in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma. Both 3-CP and TPL were non-toxic when administered either orally (1% w/w nitroxide-containing chow) or via intraperitoneal (IP) injection (∼300 mg/kg). Feeding the mice orally demonstrated that 3-CP was more effective than TPL in reducing inflammatory cell recruitment into the airway and in suppressing airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) in OVA-challenged mice. To characterize the optimal time-window of intervention and mode of drug administration, 3-CP was given orally during allergen sensitization, during allergen challenge or during both sensitization and challenge stages, and via IP injection or intranasal instillation for 3 days during the challenge period. 3-CP given via all modes of delivery markedly inhibited OVA-induced airway inflammation, expression of cytokines, AHR and protein nitration of the lung tissue. Oral administration during the entire experiment was the most efficient delivery of 3-CP and was more effective than dexamethasone a potent corticosteroid used for asthma treatment. Under a similar administration regimen (IP injection before the OVA challenge), the effect of 3-CP was similar to that of dexamethasone and even greater on AHR and protein nitration. The protective effect of the nitroxides, which preferentially react with free radicals, in suppressing the increase of main asthmatic inflammatory markers substantiate the key role played by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the molecular mechanism of

  10. The Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness, Sputum Eosinophilia, and Mast Cell Mediators in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bood, Johan; Alkhabaz, Ahmad; Balgoma, David; Otis, Joceline; Delin, Ingrid; Dahlén, Barbro; Wheelock, Craig E.; Nair, Parameswaran; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; O’Byrne, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Omega-3 fatty acid supplements have been reported to inhibit exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). It has not been determined whether omega-3 supplements inhibit airway sensitivity to inhaled mannitol, a test for bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and model for EIB in people with mild to moderate asthma. METHODS: In a double-blind, crossover trial, subjects with asthma who had BHR to inhaled mannitol (n = 23; 14 men; mean age, 28 years; one-half taking regular inhaled corticosteroids) were randomized to omega-3 supplements (4.0 g/d eicosapentaenoic acid and 2.0 g/d docosahexaenoic acid) or matching placebo for 3 weeks separated by a 3-week washout. The primary outcome was the provoking dose of mannitol (mg) to cause a 15% fall in FEV1 (PD15). Secondary outcomes were sputum eosinophil count, spirometry, Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score, serum triacylglyceride level, and lipid mediator profile in urine and serum. RESULTS: PD15 (geometric mean, 95% CI) to mannitol following supplementation with omega-3s (78 mg, 51-119 mg) was not different from placebo (88 mg, 56-139 mg, P = .5). There were no changes in sputum eosinophils (mean ± SD) in a subgroup of 11 subjects (omega-3, 8.4% ± 8.2%; placebo, 7.8% ± 11.8%; P = .9). At the end of each treatment period, there were no differences in FEV1 % predicted (omega-3, 85% ± 13%; placebo, 84% ± 11%; P = .9) or ACQ score (omega-3, 1.1% ± 0.5%; placebo, 1.1% ± 0.5%; P = .9) (n = 23). Omega-3s caused significant lowering of blood triglyceride levels and expected shifts in serum fatty acids and eicosanoid metabolites, confirming adherence to the supplements; however, no changes were observed in urinary mast cell mediators. CONCLUSIONS: Three weeks of omega-3 supplements does not improve BHR to mannitol, decrease sputum eosinophil counts, or inhibit urinary excretion of mast cell mediators in people with mild to moderate asthma, indicating that dietary omega-3 supplementation is not useful in the

  11. High-fat diet promotes lung fibrosis and attenuates airway eosinophilia after exposure to cockroach allergen in mice.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao Na; Greenberg, Yana; Hosseinkhani, M Reza; Long, Eric K; Bahaie, Nooshin S; Rao, Amrita; Ha, Sung Gil; Rao, Savita P; Bernlohr, David A; Sriramarao, P

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for asthma but the mechanistic basis for this association is not well understood. In the current study, the impact of obesity on lung inflammatory responses after allergen exposure was investigated. C57BL/6 mice maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) or a normal diet (ND) after weaning were sensitized and challenged with cockroach allergen (CRA). Airway inflammation was assessed based on inflammatory cell recruitment, measurement of lung Th1-Th2 cytokines, chemokines, eicosanoids, and other proinflammatory mediators as well as airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). CRA-challenged mice fed a HFD exhibited significantly decreased allergen-induced airway eosinophilia along with reduced lung IL-5, IL-13, LTC4, CCL11, and CCL2 levels as well as reduced mucus secretion and smooth muscle mass compared to ND fed mice. However, allergen-challenged HFD fed mice demonstrated significantly increased PAI-1 and reduced PGE2 levels in the lung relative to corresponding ND fed mice. Interestingly, saline-exposed HFD fed mice demonstrated elevated baseline levels of TGF-β1, arginase-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and lung collagen expression associated with decreased lung function compared to corresponding ND fed mice. These studies indicate that a HFD inhibits airway eosinophilia while altering levels of PAI-1 and PGE2 in response to CRA in mice. Further, a HFD can lead to the development of lung fibrosis even in the absence of allergen exposure which could be due to innate elevated levels of specific profibrotic factors, potentially affecting lung function during asthma.

  12. Phloretin Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Asthmatic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Chung; Fang, Li-Wen; Liou, Chian-Jiun

    2017-01-01

    Phloretin (PT), isolated from the apple tree, was previously demonstrated to have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages and anti-adiposity effects in adipocytes. Inflammatory immune cells generate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for stimulated severe airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation. In this study, we investigated whether PT could reduce oxidative stress, airway inflammation, and eosinophil infiltration in asthmatic mice, and ameliorate oxidative and inflammatory responses in tracheal epithelial cells. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce asthma symptoms. Mice were randomly assigned to the five experimental groups: normal controls; OVA-induced asthmatic mice; and OVA-induced mice injected intraperitoneally with one of the three PT doses (5, 10, or 20 mg/kg). In addition, we treated inflammatory human tracheal epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells) with PT to assess oxidative responses and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We found that PT significantly reduced goblet cell hyperplasia and eosinophil infiltration, which decreased AHR, inflammation, and oxidative responses in the lungs of OVA-sensitized mice. PT also decreased malondialdehyde levels in the lung and reduced Th2 cytokine production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Furthermore, PT reduced ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and eotaxin production in BEAS-2B cells. PT also suppressed monocyte cell adherence to inflammatory BEAS-2B cells. These findings suggested that PT alleviated pathological changes, inflammation, and oxidative stress by inhibiting Th2 cytokine production in asthmatic mice. PT showed therapeutic potential for ameliorating asthma symptoms in the future. PMID:28243240

  13. Single-Cell Analysis of Mast Cell Degranulation Induced by Airway Smooth Muscle-Secreted Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Benjamin M.; Meyer, Audrey F.; Gruba, Sarah M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by narrowed airways, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, mucus hyper-secretion, and airway remodeling. Mast cell (MC) infiltration into airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a defining feature of asthma, and ASM regulates the inflammatory response by secreting chemokines, including CXCL10 and CCL5. Single cell analysis offers a unique approach to study specific cellular signaling interactions within large and complex signaling networks such as the inflammatory microenvironment in asthma. Methods Carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry was used to study the effects of ASM–secreted chemokines on mouse peritoneal MC degranulation. Results MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 was monitored at the single cell level. Relative to IgE-mediated degranulation, CXCL10- and CCL5-stimulated MCs released a decreased amount of serotonin per granule with fewer release events per cell. Decreased serotonin released per granule was correlated with increased spike half-width and rise-time values. Conclusions MCs are directly activated with ASM-associated chemokines. CXCL10 and CCL5 induce less robust MC degranulation compared to IgE- and A23187-stimulation. The kinetics of MC degranulation are signaling pathway-dependent, suggesting a biophysical mechanism of regulated degranulation that incorporates control over granule trafficking, transport, and docking machinery. General Significance The biophysical mechanisms, including variations in number of exocytotic release events, serotonin released per granule, and the membrane kinetics of exocytosis that underlie MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 were characterized at the single cell level. These findings clarify the function of ASM-derived chemokines as instigators of MC degranulation relative to classical mechanisms of MC stimulation. PMID:25986989

  14. Quercetin Blocks Airway Epithelial Cell Chemokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nanua, Suparna; Zick, Suzanna M.; Andrade, Juan E.; Sajjan, Umadevi S.; Burgess, John R.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2006-01-01

    Quercetin (3,3′,4′,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, is an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and potent antioxidant. We hypothesized that quercetin blocks airway epithelial cell chemokine expression via PI 3-kinase–dependent mechanisms. Pretreatment with quercetin and the PI 3–kinase inhibitor LY294002 each reduced TNF-α–induced IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (also called CCL2) expression in cultured human airway epithelial cells. Quercetin also inhibited TNF-α–induced PI 3-kinase activity, Akt phosphorylation, intracellular H2O2 production, NF-κB transactivation, IL-8 promoter activity, and steady-state mRNA levels, consistent with the notion that quercetin inhibits chemokine expression by attenuating NF-κB transactivation via a PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent pathway. Quercetin also reduced TNF-α–induced chemokine secretion in the presence of the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D, while inducing phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)-2α, suggesting that quercetin attenuates chemokine expression by post-transcriptional as well as transcriptional mechanisms. Finally, we tested the effects of quercetin in cockroach antigen–sensitized and –challenged mice. These mice show MCP-1–dependent airways hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Quercetin significantly reduced lung MCP-1 and methacholine responsiveness. We conclude that quercetin blocks airway cell chemokine expression via transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways. PMID:16794257

  15. Relationship between exhaled NO, respiratory symptoms, lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and blood eosinophilia in school children

    PubMed Central

    Steerenberg, P; Janssen, N; de Meer, G; Fischer, P; Nierkens, S; van Loveren, H; Opperhuizen, A; Brunekreef, B; van Amsterdam, J G C

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Levels of eNO in a sample of 450 children aged 7–12 years out of a total sample of 2504 school children living in different urban areas near motorways were determined. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the relationship between eNO, impairment of lung function (PEF, FVC, FEV1 and MMEF), bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), and blood eosinophilia in children with and without atopy as assessed by skin prick testing. Results: Regression analysis showed that wheezing and nasal discharge and conjunctivitis that had occurred during the previous 12 months were positively associated with eNO levels in atopic children (relative increase of 1.48 and 1.41, respectively; p<0.05) but not in non-atopic children. Similarly, BHR and the number of blood eosinophils per ml were positively associated with eNO levels in atopic children (relative increase of 1.55 and 2.29, respectively; p<0.05) but not in non-atopic children. The lung function indices PEF, FVC, FEV1 and MMEF were not associated with eNO levels. Conclusions: In addition to conventional lung function tests and symptom questionnaires, eNO is a suitable measure of airway inflammation and its application may reinforce the power of epidemiological surveys on respiratory health. PMID:12612304

  16. Elevated bronchoalveolar lavage fluid histamine levels in allergic asthmatics are associated with methacholine bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Casale, T B; Wood, D; Richerson, H B; Trapp, S; Metzger, W J; Zavala, D; Hunninghake, G W

    1987-01-01

    Using a sensitive single isotope enzymatic assay we measured bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid histamine in asymptomatic normal (nonallergic), allergic rhinitic, and allergic asthmatic subjects. Normal subjects were found to have little or no detectable amounts of histamine in BAL fluid (11 +/- 11 pg/ml), and few BAL fluid mast cells. In comparison, the allergic rhinitics and allergic asthmatics had much higher amounts of BAL fluid histamine (113 +/- 53 and 188 +/- 42 pg/ml, respectively), and a significantly greater number of BAL fluid mast cells. Furthermore, despite having equivalent baseline pulmonary function values, allergic asthmatics with BAL fluid histamine levels greater than 100 pg/ml required only 7 +/- 2 breath units of methacholine to induce a 20% drop in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) (PD20FEV1) while asthmatics with BAL fluid histamine levels less than 100 pg/ml required 49 +/- 19 breath units (P less than 0.05). These data suggest that allergic asthmatics have ongoing lung mast cell degranulation that might contribute to the etiology of airway hyperresponsiveness. Images PMID:3549781

  17. HSP70/CD80 DNA vaccine inhibits airway remodeling by regulating the transcription factors T-bet and GATA-3 in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Xiao-Ling, Shi; Zheng-Yan, Cheng; Guo-Ping, Li; Sen, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Airway remodeling is an important pathologic feature of chronic asthma. T-bet and GATA-3, the key transcription factors for differentiation toward Th1 and Th2 cells, play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. Previous studies showed that HSP70/CD80 DNA vaccine can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in acute asthmatic mice. The present study was designed to determine the effect of HSP70/CD80 DNA vaccine on airway remodeling through regulating the development of Th1/Th2. Material and methods Before being sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin, the BALB/c mice were immunized with DNA vaccine. Lung tissues were assessed by histological examinations. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)/interleukin-4 (IL-4) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined by ELISA and expressions of IFN-γ, IL-4, T-bet and GATA-3 in spleen were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Chronic asthmatic mice had higher airway hyperresponsiveness, a thicker airway wall, more PAS-positive goblet cells, more subepithelial extracellular matrix deposition and more proliferating airway smooth muscle (ASM)-like cells than control mice (p < 0.05). Compared with the chronic asthmatic mice, the treatment with HSP70/CD80 DNA vaccine could reduce airway hyperreactivity, mucus secretion, subepithelial collagen deposition, and smooth muscle cell proliferation (p < 0.05). DNA vaccination also increased levels of IFN-γ/IL-4 in BAL fluid (p < 0.05), and expression of T-bet/GATA-3 in the spleen (p < 0.05). Conclusions HSP70/CD80 DNA vaccine can inhibit airway remodeling through regulating the development of Th1/Th2 subsets in asthmatic mice. PMID:24273578

  18. Bronchospasm and its biophysical basis in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2004-01-01

    Airways hyperresponsiveness is a cardinal feature of asthma but remains unexplained. In asthma, the airway smooth muscle cell is the key end-effector of bronchospasm and acute airway narrowing, but in just the past five years our understanding of the relationship of responsiveness to muscle biophysics has dramatically changed. It has become well established, for example, that muscle length is equilibrated dynamically rather than statically, and that non-classical features of muscle biophysics come to the forefront, including unanticipated interactions between the muscle and its time-varying load, as well as the ability of the muscle cell to adapt rapidly to changes in its dynamic microenvironment. These newly discovered phenomena have been described empirically, but a mechanistic basis to explain them is only beginning to emerge. PMID:15084229

  19. [Therapeutic effects of histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat on air inflammation and high airway resistance in a murine asthma model].

    PubMed

    Su, X M; Ren, Y; Kong, L F; Kang, J

    2017-02-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effects of givinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), on the development of chronic asthma with airway inflammation, airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Methods: BALB/C mice were randomly divided into control group, asthma group, dexamethasone group and givinostat group (n=12 per group). AHR was assessed. Total cell numbers and differential counts, interleukin-4(IL-4), interleukin-5(IL-5) and interferon-γ (IFNγ) levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured in the above 4 groups. The pathology of lung tissue was evaluated. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and Western blot were used to detect α smooth muscle actin(α-SMA) and transforming growth factor-β1(TGFβ1). Results: Compared with the asthma only group, givinostat treatment relieved airway resistance (2.96±1.01 vs 6.50±0.79, P<0.05). Total inflammatory cells [(33.04±5.62)×10(4)/ml vs (98.04±9.27)×10(4)/ml, P<0.01], eosinophil cells [(9.17±2.33)×10(4)/ml vs(37.64±6.98)×10(4)/ml, P<0.01], IL-4 [(10.12±2.98)ng/ml vs (16.88±2.78)ng/ml, P<0.05] and IL-5 [(27.09±3.62)ng/ml vs (37.86±7.34)ng/ml, P<0.05] levels were all reduced in givinostat group, while IFNγ [(91.86±23.73)pg/ml vs (60.49±11.88)pg/ml, P>0.05] was enhanced in BALF. Inflammatory cell infiltration around the airway was reduced, with decreased inflammatory cell score[(1.60±0.69)points vs (3.40±0.68) points, P<0.01] and inflammatory cell number (111.65±31.41 vs 601.25±186.85, P<0.01). The goblet cell metaplasia [(26.36±2.33)% vs (57.21±11.56)%] and collagen deposition area [(52.77±7.58)μm(2)/μm vs (111.81±12.40)μm(2)/μm] were obviously reduced (P<0.01). The expressions of α-SMA and TGFβ1 in the lung tissue were both significantly decreased (P<0.01). Conclusion: Givinostat treatment can reduce airway inflammation, airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness in chronic asthma. Its effect is comparable to that of glucocorticoid

  20. Airway responsiveness to psychological processes in asthma and health

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial factors have been found to impact airway pathophysiology in respiratory disease with considerable consistency. Influences on airway mechanics have been studied particularly well. The goal of this article is to review the literature on airway responses to psychological stimulation, discuss potential pathways of influence, and present a well-established emotion-induction paradigm to study airway obstruction elicited by unpleasant stimuli. Observational studies have found systematic associations between lung function and daily mood changes. The laboratory-based paradigm of bronchoconstrictive suggestion has been used successfully to elicit airway obstruction in a substantial proportion of asthmatic individuals. Other studies have demonstrated modulation of airway responses to standard airway challenges with exercise, allergens, or pharmacological agents by psychological factors. Standardized emotion-induction techniques have consistently shown airway constriction during unpleasant stimulation, with surgery, blood, and injury stimuli being particularly powerful. Findings with various forms of stress induction have been more mixed. A number of methodological factors may account for variability across studies, such as choice of measurement technique, temporal association between stimulation and measurement, and the specific quality and intensity of the stimulus material, in particular the extent of implied action-orientation. Research has also begun to elucidate physiological processes associated with psychologically induced airway responses, with vagal excitation and ventilatory influences being the most likely candidate pathways, whereas the role of specific central nervous system pathways and inflammatory processes has been less studied. The technique of emotion-induction using films has the potential to become a standardized challenge paradigm for the further exploration of airway hyperresponsiveness mediated by central nervous system processes. PMID

  1. Nonlinear Compliance Modulates Dynamic Bronchoconstriction in a Multiscale Airway Model

    PubMed Central

    Hiorns, Jonathan E.; Jensen, Oliver E.; Brook, Bindi S.

    2014-01-01

    The role of breathing and deep inspirations (DI) in modulating airway hyperresponsiveness remains poorly understood. In particular, DIs are potent bronchodilators of constricted airways in nonasthmatic subjects but not in asthmatic subjects. Additionally, length fluctuations (mimicking DIs) have been shown to reduce mean contractile force when applied to airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and tissue strips. However, these observations are not recapitulated on application of transmural pressure (PTM) oscillations (that mimic tidal breathing and DIs) in isolated intact airways. To shed light on this paradox, we have developed a biomechanical model of the intact airway, accounting for strain-stiffening due to collagen recruitment (a large component of the extracellular matrix (ECM)), and dynamic actomyosin-driven force generation by ASM cells. In agreement with intact airway studies, our model shows that PTM fluctuations at particular mean transmural pressures can lead to only limited bronchodilation. However, our model predicts that moving the airway to a more compliant point on the static pressure-radius relationship (which may involve reducing mean PTM), before applying pressure fluctuations, can generate greater bronchodilation. This difference arises from competition between passive strain-stiffening of ECM and force generation by ASM yielding a highly nonlinear relationship between effective airway stiffness and PTM, which is modified by the presence of contractile agonist. Effectively, the airway at its most compliant may allow for greater strain to be transmitted to subcellular contractile machinery. The model predictions lead us to hypothesize that the maximum possible bronchodilation of an airway depends on its static compliance at the PTM about which the fluctuations are applied. We suggest the design of additional experimental protocols to test this hypothesis. PMID:25517167

  2. Effect of heparin and a low-molecular weight heparinoid on PAF-induced airway responses in neonatally immunized rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, M.; Herd, C. M.; Page, C. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effect of an unfractionated heparin preparation, a low-molecular weight heparinoid (Org 10172) and the polyanionic molecule polyglutamic acid against PAF-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary cell infiltration in neonatally immunized rabbits in vivo. 2. Exposure of neonatally immunized rabbits to aerosolized platelet activating factor (PAF) (80 micrograms ml-1 for 60 min) elicited an increase in airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine 24 h and 72 h following challenge which was associated with an infiltration of inflammatory cells into the airways, as assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). 3. A significant increase in the total numbers of cells recovered from BAL fluid was associated with significantly increased cell numbers of neutrophils, eosinophils and mononuclear cells 24 h following PAF exposure. The numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils in the airways remained elevated 72 h after challenge. 4. The intravenous administration of an unfractionated preparation of heparin (100 units kg-1) or Org 10172 (100 micrograms kg-1) 30 min prior to PAF exposure significantly inhibited the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by PAF, 24 h and 72 h following challenge. PAF-induced hyperresponsiveness was not significantly affected by prior intravenous administration of polyglutamic acid (100 micrograms kg-1). 5. The intravenous administration of unfractionated heparin (100 units kg-1), Org 10172 (100 micrograms kg-1) or polyglutamic acid (100 micrograms kg-1) 30 min prior to PAF exposure significantly inhibited the expected increase in total cell infiltration. 6. This study shows that unfractionated heparin and a low-molecular weight heparinoid, Org 10172, are capable of inhibiting both the airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary cell infiltration induced by PAF in the rabbit. PMID:7693273

  3. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor: A Novel Pharmacological Target for Treating Human Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Rogliani, Paola; Calzetta, Luigino; Capuani, Barbara; Facciolo, Francesco; Cazzola, Mario; Lauro, Davide; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2016-12-01

    Asthma is associated with several comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, which may lead to bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR). Because glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 1 regulates glucose homeostasis, we pharmacologically investigated the influence of the GLP1 receptor (GLP1-R) agonist, exendin-4, on BHR induced in human isolated airways. The effect of exendin-4 was assessed in human isolated airways undergoing overnight passive sensitization and high-glucose stimulation, two conditions mimicking ex vivo the BHR typical of patients with asthma and diabetes, respectively. GLP1-R activation modulated the bronchial contractile tone induced by transmural stimulation (maximum effect -56.7 ± 3.6%; onset of action, 28.2 ± 4.4 min). Exendin-4 prevented BHR induced by both high-glucose stimulation and passive sensitization (-37.8 ± 7.5% and -74.9 ± 3.9%, P < 0.05 versus control, respectively) through selective activation of GLP1-R and in an epithelium-independent manner. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase A inhibitor, KT5720, reduced the protective role of exendin-4 (P > 0.05 versus passively sensitized tissues). The GLP1-R stimulation by overnight incubation with exendin-4 induced the overexpression of adenylyl cyclase isoform V (+48.4 ± 1.3%, P < 0.05 versus passively sensitized tissues) and restored the cAMP levels depleted by this procedure (+330.8 ± 63.3%, P < 0.05 versus passively sensitized tissues). In conclusion, GLP1-R may represent a novel target for treating BHR by activating the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway in human airways, and GLP1-R agonists could be used as a "new" class to treat patients with asthma and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with BHR.

  4. Sports in extreme conditions: the impact of exercise in cold temperatures on asthma and bronchial hyper-responsiveness in athletes.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Kai-Håkon

    2012-09-01

    Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) and bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) are frequently reported among elite athletes of outdoor endurance winter sports, particularly in cross-country and biathlon skiers. The pathogenesis of EIA is related to water loss and heat-loss through the increased respiration during exercise, leading to mediator release, airways inflammation and increased parasympathetic nervous activity in the airways, causing bronchial constriction and BHR. In the competing elite athlete this is presently considered to be due to the frequently repeated increased ventilation during training and competitions in combination with the repeated environmental exposure to cold air in outdoor winter sports. It is important that athletes at risk of asthma and BHR are monitored through regular medical control with assessment of lung function and BHR, and when BHR or asthma is diagnosed, optimal controlling treatment through anti-inflammatory treatment by inhaled steroids should be started and relieving treatment (inhaled ipratropium bromide and inhaled β2-agonists) should be used to relieve bronchial constriction if present.

  5. Baicalein Reduces Airway Injury in Allergen and IL-13 Induced Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ahmad, Tanveer; Rehman, Rakhshinda; Leishangthem, Geeta Devi; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Balaram; Sharma, Surendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background Baicalein, a bioflavone present in the dry roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, is known to reduce eotaxin production in human fibroblasts. However, there are no reports of its anti-asthma activity or its effect on airway injury. Methodology/Principal Findings In a standard experimental asthma model, male Balb/c mice that were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA), treated with baicalein (10 mg/kg, ip) or a vehicle control, either during (preventive use) or after OVA challenge (therapeutic use). In an alternate model, baicalein was administered to male Balb/c mice which were given either IL-4 or IL-13 intranasally. Features of asthma were determined by estimating airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), histopathological changes and biochemical assays of key inflammatory molecules. Airway injury was determined with apoptotic assays, transmission electron microscopy and assessing key mitochondrial functions. Baicalein treatment reduced AHR and inflammation in both experimental models. TGF-β1, sub-epithelial fibrosis and goblet cell metaplasia, were also reduced. Furthermore, baicalein treatment significantly reduced 12/15-LOX activity, features of mitochondrial dysfunctions, and apoptosis of bronchial epithelia. Conclusion/Significance Our findings demonstrate that baicalein can attenuate important features of asthma, possibly through the reduction of airway injury and restoration of mitochondrial function. PMID:23646158

  6. Self-Assembling Nanoparticles Containing Dexamethasone as a Novel Therapy in Allergic Airways Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Bratt, Jennifer M.; Lee, Joyce; Luo, Juntao; Franzi, Lisa M.; Zeki, Amir A.; Lam, Kit S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocarriers can deliver a wide variety of drugs, target them to sites of interest, and protect them from degradation and inactivation by the body. They have the capacity to improve drug action and decrease undesirable systemic effects. We have previously developed a well-defined non-toxic PEG-dendritic block telodendrimer for successful delivery of chemotherapeutics agents and, in these studies, we apply this technology for therapeutic development in asthma. In these proof-of-concept experiments, we hypothesized that dexamethasone contained in self-assembling nanoparticles (Dex-NP) and delivered systemically would target the lung and decrease allergic lung inflammation and airways hyper-responsiveness to a greater degree than equivalent doses of dexamethasone (Dex) alone. We found that ovalbumin (Ova)-exposed mice treated with Dex-NP had significantly fewer total cells (2.78±0.44×105 (n = 18) vs. 5.98±1.3×105 (n = 13), P<0.05) and eosinophils (1.09±0.28×105 (n = 18) vs. 2.94±0.6×105 (n = 12), p<0.05) in the lung lavage than Ova-exposed mice alone. Also, lower levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-4 (3.43±1.2 (n = 11) vs. 8.56±2.1 (n = 8) pg/ml, p<0.05) and MCP-1 (13.1±3.6 (n = 8) vs. 28.8±8.7 (n = 10) pg/ml, p<0.05) were found in lungs of the Dex-NP compared to control, and they were not lower in the Dex alone group. In addition, respiratory system resistance was lower in the Dex-NP compared to the other Ova-exposed groups suggesting a better therapeutic effect on airways hyperresponsiveness. Taken together, these findings from early-stage drug development studies suggest that the encapsulation and protection of anti-inflammatory agents such as corticosteroids in nanoparticle formulations can improve efficacy. Further development of novel drugs in nanoparticles is warranted to explore potential treatments for chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. PMID:24204939

  7. Exposure of airway epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-derived quorum sensing molecules decrease the activity of the anti-oxidant response element bound by NRF2.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Lucie; Rousseau, Simon

    2017-02-05

    Chronic bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis lung disease are often characterized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms that are regulated by bacterial intercellular signals termed quorum sensing (QS), such as N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL). This study reports that biofilm-derived exoproducts decrease the transcriptional activity of the anti-oxidant response element in bronchial epithelial cells. In a live co-culture assay of BEAS-2B cells and P. aeruginosa biofilm, the QS molecule 3OC12-HSL was an important but not sole contributor to the inhibition of basal NRF2 luciferase reporter activity. Moreover, biofilm-derived exoproducts and 3OC12-HSL decrease the expression of endogenous antioxidant response element-regulated genes hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H Quinone Dehydrogenase-1 (NQO-1) while they increase IL-8 expression. As previously reported, IL-8 expression is partially dependent on p38 MAPK activity, but the inhibitory effect of biofilm QS molecules on HO-1 and NQO-1 expression occurs independently of this protein kinase. Finally, the transfection of CFTRdelF508 but not its wild type counterpart decreases basal, planktonic PsaDM and sulforaphane-driven NRF2 luciferase reporter activity in BEAS-2B cells. Therefore, the presence of quorum sensing molecules derived from bacterial biofilms lowers the transcriptional activity of the anti-oxidant response element, which may contribute to the establishment of chronic bacterial infections, especially in the presence of mutated CFTR. Increasing NRF2 activity may thus be a promising strategy to potentiate anti-biofilm activity in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

  8. Resting calcium influx in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Luis M; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca

    2005-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ leak remains the most uncertain of the cellular Ca2+ regulation pathways. During passive Ca2+ influx in non-stimulated smooth muscle cells, basal activity of constitutive Ca2+ channels seems to be involved. In vascular smooth muscle, the 3 following Ca2+ entry pathways contribute to this phenomenon: (i) via voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, (ii) receptor gated Ca2+ channels, and (iii) store operated Ca2+ channels, although, in airway smooth muscle it seems only 2 passive Ca2+ influx pathways are implicated, one sensitive to SKF 96365 (receptor gated Ca2+ channels) and the other to Ni2+ (store operated Ca2+ channels). Resting Ca2+ entry could provide a sufficient amount of Ca2+ and contribute to resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), maintenance of the resting membrane potential, myogenic tone, and sarcoplasmic reticulum-Ca2+ refilling. However, further research, especially in airway smooth muscle, is required to better explore the physiological role of this passive Ca2+ influx pathway as it could be involved in airway hyperresponsiveness.

  9. Morin Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation by Modulating Oxidative Stress-Responsive MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuan; Ge, Ai; Zhu, Wen; Liu, Ya-Nan; Ji, Ning-Fei; Zha, Wang-Jian; Zhang, Jia-Xiang; Zeng, Xiao-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common inflammatory diseases characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Morin, an active ingredient obtained from Moraceae plants, has been demonstrated to have promising anti-inflammatory activities in a range of disorders. However, its impacts on pulmonary diseases, particularly on asthma, have not been clarified. This study was designed to investigate whether morin alleviates airway inflammation in chronic asthma with an emphasis on oxidative stress modulation. In vivo, ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized mice were administered with morin or dexamethasone before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were obtained to perform cell counts, histological analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro, human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were challenged by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The supernatant was collected for the detection of the proinflammatory proteins, and the cells were collected for reactive oxygen species (ROS)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) evaluations. Severe inflammatory responses and remodeling were observed in the airways of the OVA-sensitized mice. Treatment with morin dramatically attenuated the extensive trafficking of inflammatory cells into the BALF and inhibited their infiltration around the respiratory tracts and vessels. Morin administration also significantly suppressed goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition/fibrosis and dose-dependently inhibited the OVA-induced increases in IgE, TNF-α, interleukin- (IL-) 4, IL-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and malondialdehyde. In human BECs challenged by TNF-α, the levels of proteins such as eotaxin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, were consistently significantly decreased by morin. Western blotting and the 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein assay revealed that the increases in intracellular ROS and MAPK phosphorylation were abolished by

  10. The Phillips airway.

    PubMed

    Haridas, R P; Wilkinson, D J

    2012-07-01

    The Phillips airway was developed by George Ramsay Phillips. There is no known original description of the airway and the earliest known reference to it is from 1919. The airway and its modifications are described.

  11. IL-17 producing T cells correlate with polysensitization but not with bronchial hyperresponsiveness in patients with allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Th2-type T cell response has a considerable role in atopic diseases. The involvement of Th17 and IL-17 in atopy process provided new understanding of allergic diseases. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness is quite common in allergic rhinitis. We aimed to explore the expression of IL-17 producing CD3+ CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood of rhinitic patients, with/without bronchial hyperresponsiveness and sensitized to common allergens, as this relationship has not been examined. Methods Sixty one patients with allergic rhinitis and thirty controls were examined. IL-17 producing T cells were detected by flow cytometry, IL-17, IL-4 and IL-13 levels in peripheral blood were evaluated by ELISA. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness was investigated with methacholine challenge test. Atopy was evaluated by skin prick tests with common allergens. Results IL-17 producing T cell percentage of AR group was significantly higher: 2.59 ± 1.32 than in controls 1.24 ± 0.22, (p = 0.001). Significant sex related difference in CD3+ CD4+ IL-17 T cells was observed: respectively in male patients versus female 3.15 ± 1.8% and 2.31 ± 0.9%, (p = 0.02). Rhinitics had greater bronchodilator responses compared to controls (p = 0.001), however the percentages of T cells in both groups appeared equal. Serum IL-17 levels in AR group were significantly higher (5.10 ± 4.40) pg/ml than in controls (3.46 ±1.28) pg/ml, (p = 0.04). IL-4 levels (0.88 ± 1.27) and IL-13 levels (3.14 ± 5.85) in patients were significantly higher than in control’s (0.54 ± 0.10) pg/ml, (p = 0.001) and (1.19 ± 0.64) pg/ml; (p = 0.001) respectively. The percentages of T cells in patients sensitized to 5 allergens (group I) were significantly lower (1.91 ± 0.62) than those sensitized to more than 5 allergens (group II) (2.91 ± 1.5) (p = 0.004). Conclusions The observed higher levels of IL-17 producing T cells in polysensitized males suggest a role of IL-17 in pathogenesis of AR. The higher airway responsiveness in AR

  12. Effect of heparin on antigen-induced airway responses and pulmonary leukocyte accumulation in neonatally immunized rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Janet M H; Page, Clive P

    2000-01-01

    The effect of single administrations of aerosolized heparin, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and the linear polyanionic molecule, polyglutamic acid (PGA) were examined on antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and leukocyte accumulation in neonatally immunized rabbits.Adult litter-matched NZW rabbits immunized within 24 h of birth with Alternaria tenuis antigen were treated with heparin, LMWH or PGA prior to or following antigen challenge (Alternaria tenuis). For each drug-treated group, a parallel group of rabbits were treated with the appropriate vehicle. In all groups, airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 24 h prior to and following antigen challenge.Basal lung function in terms of resistance (RL) and dynamic compliance (Cdyn) and acute bronchoconstriction was unaltered by pre-treatment with heparin, LMWH or PGA compared to their respective vehicles 24 h prior to or following antigen challenge.In vehicle-treated animals, airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled histamine was indicated by an increase in the maximal responses of the cumulative concentration-effect curves to histamine and reductions in RLPC50 and CdynPC35 values 24 h following antigen challenge.Heparin and LMWH given prior to antigen challenge significantly inhibited the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas PGA did not. When given following antigen challenge, all three drugs failed to inhibit the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.Eosinophil and neutrophil cell numbers in BAL fluid increased significantly 24 h following antigen challenge. Heparin, LMWH and PGA failed to inhibit the increase in cell numbers following antigen challenge whether given prior to or following antigen challenge. PMID:10780962

  13. Respiratory symptoms and airway responsiveness in apparently healthy workers exposed to flour dust.

    PubMed

    Bohadana, A B; Massin, N; Wild, P; Kolopp, M N; Toamain, J P

    1994-06-01

    Our aim was to measure the levels of exposure to wheat flour dust in a modern industrial bakery, and to assess the relationship between respiratory symptoms, sensitization to wheat flour antigens and airway responsiveness in the workforce. Forty four flour-exposed male workers and 164 unexposed controls were examined. Inspirable dust concentrations were measured using personal samplers. Respiratory symptoms were assessed by questionnaire, sensitization to wheat flour antigens by skin-prick tests, and methacholine airway challenge (MAC) test using an abbreviated method. Subjects were labelled MAC+ if forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) fell by 20% or more. The linear dose-response slope (DRS) was calculated as the percentage fall in FEV1 at last dose divided by the total dose administered. Inspirable dust concentrations were within acceptable limits in all working areas but one. The proportion of subjects with one or more symptoms and with airway hyperresponsiveness was significantly greater among flour-exposed workers than among controls. Using logistic or linear regression analysis, airway responsiveness was found to be strongly related to working at the bakery and to the baseline level of lung function. A positive skin-prick test was found in only 11% of flour-exposed workers and 6% of controls. In conclusion, our data show that despite exposure to relatively low concentration levels of inspirable flour dust, subjects working in the baking industry are at risk of developing both respiratory symptoms and airway hyperresponsiveness.

  14. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease related to wood smoke

    PubMed Central

    González-García, Mauricio; Torres-Duque, Carlos A; Bustos, Adriana; Jaramillo, Claudia; Maldonado, Darío

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) related to wood smoke exposure is characterized by important inflammation of the central and peripheral airways without significant emphysema. The objective of this study is to describe the bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) level in women with COPD related to wood smoke exposure and to compare it with the BHR in women with COPD related to tobacco smoking. Materials and methods Two groups of women with stable COPD were studied: (1) wood smoke exposed (WS-COPD); and (2) tobacco smoke exposed (TS-COPD). A methacholine challenge test (MCT) was performed in all patients according to American Thoracic Society criteria. BHR levels were compared using the methacholine concentration, which caused a 20% fall in the FEV1 (PC20). Results Thirty-one patients, 19 with WS-COPD and 12 with TS-COPD, were included. There were no significant differences between the groups in baseline FVC, FEV1, IC, FEF25–75, and FEF25–75/FVC. All 31 patients had a positive MCT (PC20 < 16 mg/mL) and the fall in the FEV1 and IC was similar in both groups. The severity of BHR was significantly higher in the WS-COPD patients (PC20: 0.39 mg/mL) than in the TS-COPD patients (PC20: 1.24 mg/mL) (P = 0.028). The presence of cough, phlegm, and dyspnea during the test were similar in both groups. Conclusion We found moderate to severe BHR in women with WS-COPD, which was more severe than in the TS-COPD women with similar age and airflow obstruction. This paper suggests that the structural and inflammatory changes induced by the chronic exposure to wood smoke, described in other studies, can explain the differences with TS-COPD patients. Future studies may clarify our understanding of the impact of BHR on COPD physiopathology, phenotypes, and treatment strategies. PMID:22791990

  15. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  16. Downregulation of Orai1 expression in the airway alleviates murine allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lin, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Orai1 is the key subunit of the Ca2+-release-activated Ca2+ channel. Our previous report has demonstrated that Orai1 expression in the airway was upregulated in the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis (AR) mouse models. To observe whether inhibition of Orai1 expression in the airway could suppress symptoms in a murine model of AR and to assess the impacts of this inhibition on the responses of local and systemic immunocytes, we administered recombinant lentivirus vectors that encoded shRNA against ORAI1 (lenti-ORAI1) into the nostrils of OVA-sensitized mice before the challenges, and analyzed its effect on allergic responses, as compared with the unsensitized mice and untreated AR mice. Administration of lenti-ORAI1 into the nasal cavity successfully infected cells in the epithelial layer of the nasal mucosa, and significantly decreased the frequencies of sneezing and nasal rubbing of the mice. Protein levels of leukotriene C4, OVA-specific IgE, and IL-4 in the nasal lavage fluid and serum and eosinophil cation protein in the serum were also significantly reduced by lenti-ORAI1, as were the mRNA levels of these factors in the nasal mucosa and spleen. These data suggested that administration of lenti-ORAI1 into the nasal cavity effectively decreased Orai1 expression in the nasal mucosa, alleviated AR symptoms, and partially inhibited the hyperresponsiveness of the local and systemic immune cells including T cells, B cells, mast cells and eosinophils that are involved in the pathogenesis of AR. PMID:22170034

  17. Effects of gasoline engine emissions on preexisting allergic airway responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Day, Kimberly C; Reed, Matthew D; McDonald, Jacob D; Seilkop, Steven K; Barrett, Edward G

    2008-10-01

    Gasoline-powered vehicle emissions contribute significantly to ambient air pollution. We hypothesized that exposure to gasoline engine emissions (GEE) may exacerbate preexisting allergic airway responses. Male BALB/c mice were sensitized by injection with ovalbumin (OVA) and then received a 10-min aerosolized OVA challenge. Parallel groups were sham-sensitized with saline. Mice were exposed 6 h/day to air (control, C) or GEE containing particulate matter (PM) at low (L), medium (M), or high (H) concentrations, or to the H level with PM removed by filtration (high-filtered, HF). Immediately after GEE exposure mice received another 10-min aerosol OVA challenge (pre-OVA protocol). In a second (post-OVA) protocol, mice were similarly sensitized but only challenged to OVA before air or GEE exposure. Measurements of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and blood collection were performed approximately 24 h after the last exposure. In both protocols, M, H, and HF GEE exposure significantly decreased BAL neutrophils from nonsensitized mice but had no significant effect on BAL cells from OVA-sensitized mice. In the pre-OVA protocol, GEE exposure increased OVA-specific IgG(1) but had no effect on BAL interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-13, or interferon (IFN)-gamma in OVA-sensitized mice. Nonsensitized GEE-exposed mice had increased OVA-specific IgG(2a), IgE, and IL-2, but decreased total IgE. In the post-OVA protocol, GEE exposure reduced BAL IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma in nonsensitized mice but had no effect on sensitized mice. These results suggest acute exposure to the gas-vapor phase of GEE suppressed inflammatory cells and cytokines from nonsensitized mice but did not substantially exacerbate allergic responses.

  18. Dual effects of respiratory syncytial virus infections on airway inflammation by regulation of Th17/Treg responses in ovalbumin-challenged mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Kong, Lingwen; Luo, Qingli; Li, Bei; Wu, Jinfeng; Liu, Baojun; Wu, Xiao; Dong, Jingcheng

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the effects of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections on ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice via regulation of Th17/Treg cell responses. BALB/c mice were challenged with OVA, followed by RSV infections twice. In OVA-challenged mice, the secretion of Th2/Th17-type cytokines, airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation were significantly inhibited by initial RSV infection. Moreover, the in vivo findings demonstrated that initial RSV infection reversed the imbalance of Th17/Treg responses. In contrast, RSV re-infection strengthened Th2/Th17-type cytokine secretion, airway hyperresponsiveness, and inflammation, especially for lymphocyte infiltration in OVA-challenged mice. Meanwhile, RSV re-infection enhanced the imbalanced Th17/Treg responses. Upon all results reveal that RSV-induced respiratory infections may lead to dual effects pertaining to allergic airway inflammation by regulation of Th17/Treg responses.

  19. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 regulates TGF-β1 production in airway epithelia and asthmatic airway remodeling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qin, X.-J.; Zhang, G.-S.; Zhang, X.; Qiu, Z.-W.; Wang, P.-L.; Li, Y.-W.; Li, W.; Xie, Q.-M.; Ke, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J.; Shen, H.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 produced in airway epithelia has been suggested as a contributor to the airway remodeling observed in asthma patients. The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 is a demonstrable modulator of TGF-β1 production and thus a potential regulator of airway remodeling. Objectives To define the signal event by which SHP2 regulates asthmatic responses in airway epithelial cells by using a mouse model of experimental OVA-induced airway remodeling. Methods The airways of Shp2flox/flox mice were infected with recombinant adenovirus vectors expressing a Cre recombinase–green fluorescence protein (GFP) fusion protein as part of allergen provocation studies using mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and repeatedly challenged with OVA. Several endpoint pathologies were assessed, including airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), lung inflammatory score, peribronchial collagen deposition, and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) hyperplasia. In vitro studies using airway epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were used to investigate the role of SHP2 in the regulation of pulmonary remodeling events, including the expression of collagen, α-SMA, and TGF-β1. Results Chronic OVA challenges in wild-type mice resulted in airway remodeling and lung dysfunction (e.g., increased inflammatory scores, collagen deposition (fibrosis), smooth muscle hyperplasia, and a significant increase in AHR). These endpoint pathology metrics were each significantly attenuated by conditional shp2 gene knockdown in airway epithelia. In vitro studies using BEAS-2B cells also demonstrated that the level of TGF-β1 production by these cells correlated with the extent of shp2 gene expression. Conclusions SHP2 activities in airway epithelial cells appear to modulate TGF-β1 production and, in turn, regulate allergic airway remodeling following allergen provocation. Clinical Implications Our findings identify SHP2 as a previously underappreciated contributor to the airway remodeling and lung

  20. Protective effects of the polyphenol sesamin on allergen-induced T(H)2 responses and airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Huei; Shen, Mei-Lin; Zhou, Ning; Lee, Chen-Chen; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a lifelong airway condition that affects people of all ages. In recent decades, asthma prevalence continues to increase globally, with an estimated number of 250,000 annual deaths attributed to the disease. Although inhaled corticosteroids and β-adrenergic receptor agonists are the primary therapeutic avenues that effectively reduce asthma symptoms, profound side effects may occur in patients with long-term treatments. Therefore, development of new therapeutic strategies is needed as alternative or supplement to current asthma treatments. Sesamin is a natural polyphenolic compound with strong anti-oxidative effects. Several studies have reported that sesamin is effective in preventing hypertension, thrombotic tendency, and neuroinflammation. However, it is still unknown whether sesamin can reduce asthma-induced allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Our study has revealed that sesamin exhibited significant anti-inflammatory effects in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma model. We found that treatments with sesamin after OVA sensitization and challenge significantly decreased expression levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-13, and serum IgE. The numbers of total inflammatory cells and eosinophils in BALF were also reduced in the sesamin-treated animals. Histological results demonstrated that sesamin attenuated OVA-induced eosinophil infiltration, airway goblet cell hyperplasia, mucus occlusion, and MUC5AC expression in the lung tissue. Mice administered with sesamin showed limited increases in AHR compared with mice receiving vehicle after OVA challenge. OVA increased phosphorylation levels of IκB-α and nuclear expression levels of NF-κB, both of which were reversed by sesamin treatments. These data indicate that sesamin is effective in treating allergic asthma responses induced by OVA in mice.

  1. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor agonist suppresses airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma through IL-10.

    PubMed

    Itoga, Masamichi; Konno, Yasunori; Moritoki, Yuki; Saito, Yukiko; Ito, Wataru; Tamaki, Mami; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yuta; Chihara, Junichi; Takeda, Masahide; Ueki, Shigeharu; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen influences the disease severity and sexual dimorphism in asthma, which is caused by complex mechanisms. Besides classical nuclear estrogen receptors (ERαβ), G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) was recently established as an estrogen receptor on the cell membrane. Although GPER is associated with immunoregulatory functions of estrogen, the pathophysiological role of GPER in allergic inflammatory lung disease has not been examined. We investigated the effect of GPER-specific agonist G-1 in asthmatic mice. GPER expression in asthmatic lung was confirmed by immunofluorescent staining. OVA-sensitized BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were treated with G-1 by daily subcutaneous injections during an airway challenge phase, followed by histological and biochemical examination. Strikingly, administration of G-1 attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness, accumulation of inflammatory cells, and levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) in BAL fluid. G-1 treatment also decreased serum levels of anti-OVA IgE antibodies. The frequency of splenic Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells and IL-10-producing GPER+CD4+ T cells was significantly increased in G-1-treated mice. Additionally, splenocytes isolated from G-1-treated mice showed greater IL-10 production. G-1-induced amelioration of airway inflammation and IgE production were abolished in IL-10-deficient mice. Taken together, these results indicate that extended GPER activation negatively regulates the acute asthmatic condition by altering the IL-10-producing lymphocyte population. The current results have potential importance for understanding the mechanistic aspects of function of estrogen in allergic inflammatory response.

  2. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  3. Toll-like Receptors, Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells Family Members and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sannette C.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disorder of the airways characterized by cellular infiltration, airway hyper-responsive and airway inflammation. Innate immune cells are the first line of defense against endogenous and exogenous signals in the airways and as such possess a diverse array of pattern recognition receptors. Toll-like receptors are crucial sentinels which when activated, can either promote or ameliorate the inflammatory response in predisposed individuals. The recently discovered triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells family members are emerging mediators of inflammation. These receptors are believed to modulate inflammatory responses by collaborating with classic PRRs. Endogenous signals like HMGB-1, signaling through the receptor for advanced glycation end products, also promotes inflammation, however, its contribution to inflammation in the airways is not well known. Here, we discuss the role of each receptor in airway inflammation and highlight potential synergistic mechanisms, which contribute to disease pathogenesis in allergic asthma. PMID:26678062

  4. Notch ligand delta-like 4 regulates development and pathogenesis of allergic airway responses by modulating IL-2 production and Th2 immunity.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sihyug; Schaller, Matthew; Berlin, Aaron A; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2010-11-15

    Activation of the canonical Notch pathways has been implicated in Th cell differentiation, but the role of specific Notch ligands in Th2-mediated allergic airway responses has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we show that delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) was upregulated on dendritic cells in response to cockroach allergen. Blocking Dll4 in vivo during either the primary or secondary response enhanced allergen-induced pathogenic consequences including airway hyperresponsiveness and mucus production via increased Th2 cytokines. In vitro assays demonstrated that Dll4 regulates IL-2 in T cells from established Th2 responses as well as during primary stimulation. Notably, Dll4 blockade during the primary, but not the secondary, response increased IL-2 levels in lung and lymph node of allergic mice. The in vivo neutralization of Dll4 was associated with increased expansion and decreased apoptosis during the primary allergen sensitization. Moreover, Dll4-mediated Notch activation of T cells during primary stimulation in vitro increased apoptosis during the contraction/resting phase of the response, which could be rescued by exogenous IL-2. Consistent with the role for Dll4-mediated IL-2 regulation in overall T cell function, the frequency of IL-4-producing cells was also significantly altered by Dll4 both in vivo and in vitro. These data demonstrate a regulatory role of Dll4 both in initial Th2 differentiation and in Th2 cytokine production in established allergic responses.

  5. Prevention of airway inflammation with topical cream containing imiquimod and small interfering RNA for natriuretic peptide receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Xu, Weidong; Mohapatra, Subhra; Kong, Xiaoyuan; Li, Xu; Lockey, Richard F; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2008-01-01

    Background Asthma is a complex disease, characterized by reversible airway obstruction, hyperresponsiveness and chronic inflammation. Principle pharmacologic treatments for asthma include bronchodilating beta2-agonists and anti-inflammatory glucocorticosteroids; but these agents do not target the main cause of the disease, the generation of pathogenic Th2 cells. We previously reported reduction in allergic inflammation in mice deficient in the ANP receptor NPRA. Here we determined whether siRNA for natriuretic peptide receptor A (siNPRA) protected against asthma when administered transdermally. Methods Imiquimod cream mixed with chitosan nanoparticles containing either siRNA green indicator (siGLO) or siNPRA was applied to the skin of mice. Delivery of siGLO was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The anti-inflammatory activity of transdermal siNPRA was tested in OVA-sensitized mice by measuring airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilia, lung histopathology and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results SiGLO appearing in the lung proved the feasibility of transdermal delivery. In a mouse asthma model, BALB/c mice treated with imiquimod cream containing siNPRA chitosan nanoparticles showed significantly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilia, lung histopathology and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 in lung homogenates compared to controls. Conclusion These results demonstrate that topical cream containing imiquimod and siNPRA nanoparticles exerts an anti-inflammatory effect and may provide a new and simple therapy for asthma. PMID:18279512

  6. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  7. Myeloid cell HIF-1α regulates asthma airway resistance and eosinophil function

    PubMed Central

    Akong-Moore, Kathryn; Feldstein, Stephanie; Johansson, Per; Nyugen, Anh; McEachern, Elisa K.; Nicatia, Shari; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Olson, Joshua; Cho, Jae Youn; Isaacs, Hart; Johnson, Randall S.; Broide, David H.; Nizet, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α is a master regulator of inflammatory activities of myeloid cells, including neutrophils and macrophages. These studies examine the role of myeloid cell HIF-1α in regulating asthma induction and pathogenesis, and for the first time, evaluate the roles of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in the chemotactic properties of eosinophils, the myeloid cells most associated with asthma. Wild-type (WT) and myeloid cell-specific HIF-1α knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice were studied in an ovalbumin (OVA) model of asthma. Administration of the pharmacological HIF-1α antagonist YC-1 was used to corroborate findings from the genetic model. WT, HIF-1α, and HIF-2α KO eosinophils underwent in vitro chemotaxis assays. We found that deletion of HIF-1α in myeloid cells and systemic treatment with YC-1 during asthma induction decreased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Deletion of HIF-1α in myeloid cells in OVA-induced asthma also reduced eosinophil infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia, and levels 34 of cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in the lung. HIF-1α inhibition with YC-1 during asthma induction decreased eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage, lung parenchyma, and blood, as well as decreased total lung inflammation, IL-5, and serum OVA-specific IgE levels. Deletion of HIF-1α in eosinophils decreased their chemotaxis, while deletion of the isoform HIF-2α led to increased chemotaxis. This work demonstrates that HIF-1α in myeloid cells plays a role in asthma pathogenesis, particularly in AHR development. Additionally, treatment with HIF-1α inhibitors during asthma induction decreases AHR and eosinophilia. Finally, we show that HIF- 1α and HIF-2α regulate eosinophil migration in opposing ways. PMID:23250618

  8. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... support for only a very short period of time. Alternative Names Needle cricothyrotomy Images Emergency airway puncture Cricoid cartilage Emergency airway puncture - series References Hebert RB, Bose S, Mace SE. Cricothyrotomy and ...

  9. Upper airway biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... upper airway Images Upper airway test Bronchoscopy Throat anatomy References Yung RC, Boss EF. Tracheobronchial endoscopy. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  10. Cutting edge: STAT6 signaling in eosinophils is necessary for development of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Kindra; LaMarche, Nelson M; Islam, Nasif; Wood, Amie; Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2015-03-15

    Eosinophils are critical cellular mediators in allergic asthma and inflammation; however, the signals that regulate their functions are unclear. The transcription factor STAT6 regulates Th2 cytokine responses, acting downstream of IL-4 and IL-13. We showed previously that eosinophil-derived IL-13 plays an important role in the recruitment of T cells to the lung and the subsequent development of allergic asthma. However, whether eosinophils respond to Th2 signals to control allergic airway inflammation is unclear. In this report, we show that STAT6(-/-) eosinophils are unable to induce the development of allergic lung inflammation, including recruitment of CD4(+) T cells, mucus production, and development of airways hyperresponsiveness. This is likely due to the reduced migration of STAT6(-/-) eosinophils to the lung and in response to eotaxin. These data indicate that, like Th cells, eosinophils need to respond to Th2 cytokines via STAT6 during the development of allergic airway inflammation.

  11. Utility of an alternative bicycle commute route of lower proximity to motorised traffic in decreasing exposure to ultra-fine particles, respiratory symptoms and airway inflammation – a structured exposure experiment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bicycle commuting in an urban environment of high air pollution is known to be a potential health risk, especially for susceptible individuals. While risk management strategies aimed to reduce exposure to motorised traffic emissions have been suggested, only limited studies have assessed the utility of such strategies in real-world circumstances. Objectives The potential to lower exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP; < 0.1 μm) during bicycle commuting by reducing proximity to motorised traffic was investigated with real-time air pollution and intermittent acute inflammatory measurements in healthy individuals using their typical higher proximity, and an alternative lower proximity, bicycle commute route. Methods Thirty-five healthy adults (mean ± SD: age = 39 ± 11 yr; 29% female) completed two return trips, one each in the condition of their typical route (HIGH) and a pre-determined alternative route of lower proximity to motorised traffic (LOW); proximity being determined by the proportion of on-road cycle paths. Particle number concentration (PNC) and diameter (PD) were monitored in-commute in real-time. Acute inflammatory indices of respiratory symptoms (as a scalar of frequency from very low to very high / 1 to 5), lung function and spontaneous sputum (for inflammatory cell analyses) were collected immediately pre-commute, and immediately and three hours post-commute. Results In the condition of LOW, compared to in the condition of HIGH, there was a significant decrease in mean PNC (1.91 x e4 ± 0.93 × e4 ppcc vs. 2.95 × e4 ± 1.50 × e4 ppcc; p ≤ 0.001), and the mean frequency of in-commute offensive odour detection (2.1 vs. 2.8; p = 0.019), dust and soot observation (1.7 vs. 2.3; p = 0.038) and nasopharyngeal irritation (1.5 vs. 1.9; p = 0.007). There were no significant differences between LOW and HIGH in the commute distance and duration (12.8 ± 7.1 vs. 12.0 ± 6.9 km and 44 ± 17 vs. 42 ± 17 min, respectively), or other indices of

  12. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  13. New insights into the relationship between airway inflammation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, A J; Brightling, C E; Green, R; Woltmann, G; Bradding, P; Pavord, I D

    2002-08-01

    Asthma is a condition characterized by variable airflow obstruction, airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation which is usually, but not invariably, eosinophilic. Current thoughts on the pathogenesis of asthma are focused on the idea that it is caused by an inappropriate response of the specific immune system to harmless antigens, particularly allergens such as cat dander and house dust mite, that result in Th2-mediated chronic inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and asthma is complex, with no good correlation between the severity of inflammation, at least as measured by the number of eosinophils, and the severity of asthma. In addition, there are a number of conditions, such as eosinophilic bronchitis and allergic rhinitis, in which there is a Th2-mediated inflammatory response, but no asthma, as measured by variable airflow obstruction or AHR. Bronchoconstriction can also occur without obvious airway inflammation, and neutrophilic inflammation can in some cases be associated with asthma. When we compared the immunopathology of eosinophilic bronchitis and asthma, the only difference we observed was that, in asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) was infiltrated by mast cells, suggesting that airway obstruction and AHR are due to an ASM mast cell myositis. This observation emphasizes that the features that characterize asthma, as opposed to bronchitis, are due to abnormalities in smooth muscle responsiveness, which could be intrinsic or acquired, and that inflammation is only relevant in that it leads to these abnormalities. It also emphasizes the importance of micro-localization as an organizing principle in physiological responses to airway inflammation. Thus, if inflammation is localized to the epithelium and lamina propria, then the symptoms of bronchitis (cough and mucus hypersecretion) result, and it is only if the ASM is involved -- for reasons that remain to be established -- that asthma occurs.

  14. Effects of Ginger and Its Constituents on Airway Smooth Muscle Relaxation and Calcium Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Siviski, Matthew E.; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Carrie; Hoonjan, Bhupinder; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent years, and is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Many patients report using alternative therapies to self-treat asthma symptoms as adjuncts to short-acting and long-acting β-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). As many as 40% of patients with asthma use herbal therapies to manage asthma symptoms, often without proven efficacy or known mechanisms of action. Therefore, investigations of both the therapeutic and possible detrimental effects of isolated components of herbal treatments on the airway are important. We hypothesized that ginger and its active components induce bronchodilation by modulating intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in airway smooth muscle (ASM). In isolated human ASM, ginger caused significant and rapid relaxation. Four purified constituents of ginger were subsequently tested for ASM relaxant properties in both guinea pig and human tracheas: [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol induced rapid relaxation of precontracted ASM (100–300 μM), whereas [10]-gingerol failed to induce relaxation. In human ASM cells, exposure to [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol, but not [10]-gingerol (100 μM), blunted subsequent Ca2+ responses to bradykinin (10 μM) and S-(−)-Bay K 8644 (10 μM). In A/J mice, the nebulization of [8]-gingerol (100 μM), 15 minutes before methacholine challenge, significantly attenuated airway resistance, compared with vehicle. Taken together, these novel data show that ginger and its isolated active components, [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol, relax ASM, and [8]-gingerol attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, in part by altering [Ca2+]i regulation. These purified compounds may provide a therapeutic option alone or in combination with accepted therapeutics, including β2-agonists, in airway diseases such as asthma. PMID:23065130

  15. Intranasal administration of a combination of choline chloride, vitamin C, and selenium attenuates the allergic effect in a mouse model of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Preeti; Saw, Sanjay; Govindaraj, Dhanapal; Arora, Naveen

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory allergic disease is an inflammatory condition accompanied by oxidative stress. Supplementation of an anti-inflammatory agent with antioxidants may have a therapeutic effect. In this study, the effects of choline chloride in combination with antioxidants were evaluated via the intranasal route in a mouse model of allergic airway disease. Balb/c mice were sensitized on days 0, 7, and 14 and challenged on days 25-30 with cockroach extract (CE) and with a booster challenge on day 38. They were treated with choline chloride (ChCl; 1mg/kg), vitamin C (Vit C; 308.33 mg/kg), and selenium (Se; 1mg/kg) alone or in combination via the intranasal route on days 31, 33, 35, 37, and 39. The mice were sacrificed on day 40 to collect blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lungs, and spleen. Mice immunized with CE showed a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung inflammation, Th2 cytokines, and the oxidative stress markers intracellular reactive oxygen species and 8-isoprostanes compared to the phosphate-buffered saline control group. A significant decrease was observed in these parameters with all the treatments (p<0.01). The highest decrease was noticed in the ChCl+Vit C+Se-treated group, with AHR decreased to the normal level. This group also showed the highest decrease in airway inflammation (p<0.001), IL-4 and IL-5 (p<0.001), IgE and IgG1 (p<0.001), NF-κB (p<0.001), and 8-isoprostane levels (p<0.001). Glutathione peroxidase activity, which was decreased significantly in CE-immunized mice, was restored to normal levels in this group (p<0.001). IL-10 level was decreased in CE-immunized mice and was restored to normal by combination treatment. The combination treatment induced FOXP3(+) cells in splenocyte culture, responsible for the upregulation of IL-10. In conclusion, the combination of choline chloride, vitamin C, and selenium via the intranasal route reduces AHR, inflammation, and oxidative stress, probably by causing IL-10 production by FOXP

  16. Changes in airway permeability and responsiveness after exposure to ozone. [Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, W.M.; Delehunt, J.C.; Yerger, L.; Marchette, B.; Oliver, W. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    The relationship between airway responsiveness and the permeability of histamine through the airways in conscious sheep after exposure to ozone (O/sub 3/ was examined). Airway responsiveness was assessed by measuring the change from baseline in mean pulmonary flow resistance following a controlled 2-min inhalation challenge with 1% histamine, containing 200 ..mu..Ci/ml of (/sup 3/H)histamine. The rate of appearance of the (/sup 3/H)histamine in the plasma during inhalation challenge was used to estimate airway permeability. To perturb the airways, conscious sheep were exposed to either 0.5 or 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ for 2 hr via an endotracheal tube. Airway responsiveness and airway permeability were measured prior to and 1 day after exposure. In six sheep exposed to 0.5 ppm O/sub 3/, increased airway responsiveness and airway permeability were obseved 1 day after exposure. Four of seven sheep exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ had enhanced airway responsiveness and airway permeability, while the remaining three sheep showed corresponding decreases in airway responsiveness and airway permeability. Since the O/sub 3/-induced directional changes in airway responsiveness paralleled the directional changes in airway permeability in both the positive and negative directions, it was concluded that changes in airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine following exposure to O/sub 3/ may be related to concomitant changes in airway permeability to this agent.

  17. A pathogenic role for the integrin CD103 in experimental allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Fear, Vanessa S; Lai, Siew Ping; Zosky, Graeme R; Perks, Kara L; Gorman, Shelley; Blank, Fabian; von Garnier, Christophe; Stumbles, Philip A; Strickland, Deborah H

    2016-11-01

    The integrin CD103 is the αE chain of integrin αEβ7 that is important in the maintenance of intraepithelial lymphocytes and recruitment of T cells and dendritic cells (DC) to mucosal surfaces. The role of CD103 in intestinal immune homeostasis has been well described, however, its role in allergic airway inflammation is less well understood. In this study, we used an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced, CD103-knockout (KO) BALB/c mouse model of experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD) to investigate the role of CD103 in disease expression, CD4(+) T-cell activation and DC activation and function in airways and lymph nodes. We found reduced airways hyper-responsiveness and eosinophil recruitment to airways after aerosol challenge of CD103 KO compared to wild-type (WT) mice, although CD103 KO mice showed enhanced serum OVA-specific IgE levels. Following aerosol challenge, total numbers of effector and regulatory CD4(+) T-cell subsets were significantly increased in the airways of WT but not CD103 KO mice, as well as a lack of DC recruitment into the airways in the absence of CD103. While total airway DC numbers, and their in vivo allergen capture activity, were essentially normal in steady-state CD103 KO mice, migration of allergen-laden airway DC to draining lymph nodes was disrupted in the absence of CD103 at 24 h after aerosol challenge. These data support a role for CD103 in the pathogenesis of EAAD in BALB/c mice through local control of CD4(+) T cell and DC subset recruitment to, and migration from, the airway mucosa during induction of allergic inflammation.

  18. The Diagnosis and Management of Airway Complications Following Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Amit K; Folch, Erik; Khandhar, Sandeep J; Channick, Colleen L; Santacruz, Jose F; Mehta, Atul C; Nathan, Steven D

    2017-03-05

    Airway complications following lung transplantation result in considerable morbidity and are associated with a mortality of 2-4 percent. The incidence of lethal and non-lethal airway complications has decreased since the early experiences with double- and single-lung transplantation. The most common risk factor associated with post-lung transplant airway complications is anastomotic ischemia. Airway complications include development of exophytic granulation tissue, bronchial stenosis, bronchomalacia, airway fistula, endobronchial infection, and anastomotic dehiscence. The broadening array of bronchoscopic therapies has enhanced treatment options for lung transplant recipients with airway complications. This article reviews the risk factors, clinical manifestations, and treatments of airway complications following lung transplantation, and provides our expert opinion where evidence is lacking.

  19. Soluble ADAM33 initiates airway remodeling to promote susceptibility for allergic asthma in early life

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Elizabeth R.; Kelly, Joanne F.C.; Howarth, Peter H.; Wilson, David I.; Holgate, Stephen T.; Davies, Donna E.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airways disease that usually begins in early life and involves gene-environment interactions. Although most asthma exhibits allergic inflammation, many allergic individuals do not have asthma. Here, we report how the asthma gene a disintegrin and metalloprotease 33 (ADAM33) acts as local tissue susceptibility gene that promotes allergic asthma. We show that enzymatically active soluble ADAM33 (sADAM33) is increased in asthmatic airways and plays a role in airway remodeling, independent of inflammation. Furthermore, remodeling and inflammation are both suppressed in Adam33-null mice after allergen challenge. When induced in utero or added ex vivo, sADAM33 causes structural remodeling of the airways, which enhances postnatal airway eosinophilia and bronchial hyperresponsiveness following subthreshold challenge with an aeroallergen. This substantial gene-environment interaction helps to explain the end-organ expression of allergic asthma in genetically susceptible individuals. Finally, we show that sADAM33-induced airway remodeling is reversible, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeting ADAM33 in asthma. PMID:27489884

  20. Airway hyper- or hyporeactivity to inhaled spasmogens 24 h after ovalbumin challenge of sensitized guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C. A.; Broadley, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    reproducibility of the responses. 6. In further experiments, guinea-pigs were exposed to inhalation of 5-HT (50 micrograms ml-1) or MCh (300 micrograms ml-1) 24 h before atropine (10 micrograms, 100 micrograms or 1 mg ml-1) and again at 0.5 to 1.5 h afterwards. Atropine, antagonized the 5-HT- and MCh-induced bronchoconstrictions over the same antagonist dose-range. This suggests that the bronchoconstriction induced in the conscious guinea-pig by 5-HT is mediated primarily via muscarinic receptors, possibly by a vagal reflex. The inhibition of the responses to 5-HT and MCh by OA challenge would therefore appear to be related to interference with a common cholinergic pathway for these spasmogens. 7. In summary, airway hyperresponsiveness was evident at 24 h after OA challenge as measured by an enhanced bronchoconstrictor response to inhaled U-46619. When 5-HT or MCh were used as the spasmogens, an opposing decrease in responsiveness was observed. This was presumed to be due to an inhibition of cholinergic pathways by the OA challenge. Adenosine caused a bronchoconstriction in the sensitized animals but this was not enhanced by the OA challenge. PMID:8581268

  1. Airway responsiveness, respiratory symptoms, and exposures to soluble oil mist in mechanical workers.

    PubMed Central

    Massin, N; Bohadana, A B; Wild, P; Goutet, P; Kirstetter, H; Toamain, J P

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the relation between measured levels of exposure to soluble oil mists in a plant manufacturing ball bearings, and both respiratory symptoms and airway responsiveness in the workforce. METHODS: 114 male workers exposed to oil mist and 55 unexposed male controls from nearby factories were studied. Soluble oil mist concentrations were measured with area samplers. Respiratory symptoms were assessed by questionnaire and measurement of airway responsiveness to methacholine with an abbreviated method. Subjects were labelled positive to methacholine airway challenge (MAC+) if forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) fell by > or = 20%. The linear dose-response slope was calculated as the percentage fall in FEV1 at the last dose divided by the total dose given. RESULTS: Geometric mean concentrations of oil mists ranged from 0.65 mg/m3 (GSD 1.29) to 2.20 mg/m3 (GSD 1.55) based on 92 measurements obtained from 1979-93. The prevalence of chronic cough or phlegm, bouts of bronchitis, and dyspnoea was greater among exposed workers than among controls (odds ratio (OR) 4.64, P = 0.002 for chronic cough and phlegm). After adjustment for smoking and age, dyspnoea was significantly related to an index of cumulative exposure to oil mist (OR 1.44, P = 0.006/10 y.mg/m3). The proportion of MAC+ subjects was similar in the two groups. However, after adjustment for baseline FEV1 and age, the dose-response slope was significantly steeper among exposed workers than among controls (P = 0.01), a finding indicating airway hyperresponsiveness in the exposed workers. Furthermore, the dose-response slope was significantly related to baseline FEV1, age, and, after adjustment for FEV1, the index of cumulative exposure to oil (P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Subjects with exposure to soluble oil mist in the metal industry are at risk of developing both respiratory symptoms and airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:9038798

  2. Promotion of airway anastomotic microvascular regeneration and alleviation of airway ischemia by deferoxamine nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wen; Sung, Yon K.; Sun, Wenchao; Hsu, Joe L.; Manickam, Sathish; Wagh, Dhananjay; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Semenza, Gregg L.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Airway tissue ischemia and hypoxia in human lung transplantation is a consequence of the sacrifice of the bronchial circulation during the surgical procedure and is a major risk factor for the development of airway anastomotic complications. Augmented expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α promotes microvascular repair and alleviates allograft ischemia and hypoxia. Deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) is an FDA-approved iron chelator which has been shown to upregulate cellular HIF-1α. Here, we developed a nanoparticle formulation of DFO that can be topically applied to airway transplants at the time of surgery. In a mouse orthotopic tracheal transplant (OTT) model, the DFO nanoparticle was highly effective in enhancing airway microvascular perfusion following transplantation through the production of the angiogenic factors, placental growth factor (PLGF) and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1. The endothelial cells in DFO treated airways displayed higher levels of p-eNOS and Ki67, less apoptosis, and decreased production of perivascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to vehicle-treated airways. In summary, a DFO formulation topically-applied at the time of surgery successfully augmented airway anastomotic microvascular regeneration and the repair of alloimmune-injured microvasculature. This approach may be an effective topical transplant-conditioning therapy for preventing airway complications following clinical lung transplantation. PMID:24161166

  3. Increase in non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness as an early marker of bronchial response to occupational agents during specific inhalation challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, O.; Delwiche, J. P.; Jamart, J.; Van de Weyer, R.

    1996-01-01

    agents, especially in subjects removed from workplace exposure for a long time. Non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness should be systematically assessed after specific inhalation challenges in the absence of changes in airway calibre. PMID:8711673

  4. Automated airway evaluation system for multi-slice computed tomography using airway lumen diameter, airway wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Lerallut, Jean-Francois

    2006-03-01

    Pulmonary diseases such as bronchiectasis, asthma, and emphysema are characterized by abnormalities in airway dimensions. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) has become one of the primary means to depict these abnormalities, as the availability of high-resolution near-isotropic data makes it possible to evaluate airways at oblique angles to the scanner plane. However, currently, clinical evaluation of airways is typically limited to subjective visual inspection only: systematic evaluation of the airways to take advantage of high-resolution data has not proved practical without automation. We present an automated method to quantitatively evaluate airway lumen diameter, wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratios. In addition, our method provides 3D visualization of these values, graphically illustrating the location and extent of disease. Our algorithm begins by automatic airway segmentation to extract paths to the distal airways, and to create a map of airway diameters. Normally, airway diameters decrease as paths progress distally; failure to taper indicates abnormal dilatation. Our approach monitors airway lumen diameters along each airway path in order to detect abnormal profiles, allowing even subtle degrees of pathologic dilatation to be identified. Our method also systematically computes the broncho-arterial ratio at every terminal branch of the tree model, as a ratio above 1 indicates potentially abnormal bronchial dilatation. Finally, the airway wall thickness is computed at corresponding locations. These measurements are used to highlight abnormal branches for closer inspection, and can be summed to compute a quantitative global score for the entire airway tree, allowing reproducible longitudinal assessment of disease severity. Preliminary tests on patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis demonstrated rapid identification of lack of tapering, which also was confirmed by corresponding demonstration of elevated broncho-arterial ratios.

  5. WORLD TRADE CENTER FINE PARTICULATE MATTER CAUSES RESPIRATORY TRACT HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    World Trade Center Fine Particulate Matter Causes Respiratory Tract Hyperresponsiveness in Mice

    Stephen H. Gavett1, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Jerry W. Highfill1, Allen D. Ledbetter1, Lung Chi Chen2, Mitchell D. Cohen2, Jack R. Harkema3, James G. Wagner3, and Daniel L. Costa1.<...

  6. ASCORBIC ACID IS DECREASED IN INDUCED SPUTUM OF MILD ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is primarily an airways inflammatory disease, and the bronchial airways have been shown to be particularly susceptible to oxidant-induced tissue damage. The antioxidant ascorbic acid (AA) plays an essential role in defending against oxidant attack in the airways. Decreased...

  7. Deletion of airway cilia results in noninflammatory bronchiectasis and hyperreactive airways

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, Sandra K.; Stenbit, Antine E.; Pasek, Raymond C.; Sas, Kelli M.; Steele, Stacy L.; Amria, May; Bunni, Marlene A.; Estell, Kimberly P.; Schwiebert, Lisa M.; Flume, Patrick; Gooz, Monika; Haycraft, Courtney J.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Miller, Caroline; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Turner, Grant A.; Sisson, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms for the development of bronchiectasis and airway hyperreactivity have not been fully elucidated. Although genetic, acquired diseases and environmental influences may play a role, it is also possible that motile cilia can influence this disease process. We hypothesized that deletion of a key intraflagellar transport molecule, IFT88, in mature mice causes loss of cilia, resulting in airway remodeling. Airway cilia were deleted by knockout of IFT88, and airway remodeling and pulmonary function were evaluated. In IFT88− mice there was a substantial loss of airway cilia on respiratory epithelium. Three months after the deletion of cilia, there was clear evidence for bronchial remodeling that was not associated with inflammation or apparent defects in mucus clearance. There was evidence for airway epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. IFT88− mice exhibited increased airway reactivity to a methacholine challenge and decreased ciliary beat frequency in the few remaining cells that possessed cilia. With deletion of respiratory cilia there was a marked increase in the number of club cells as seen by scanning electron microscopy. We suggest that airway remodeling may be exacerbated by the presence of club cells, since these cells are involved in airway repair. Club cells may be prevented from differentiating into respiratory epithelial cells because of a lack of IFT88 protein that is necessary to form a single nonmotile cilium. This monocilium is a prerequisite for these progenitor cells to transition into respiratory epithelial cells. In conclusion, motile cilia may play an important role in controlling airway structure and function. PMID:24213915

  8. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 < Ca < 0.05. This effect diminished by decrease in airways diameter. This approach will help elucidate surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  9. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  10. AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS CAUSED BY AEROSOL EXPOSURE TO RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH LEACHATE IN MICE. (R827353C008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Respiratory health of elite athletes - preventing airway injury: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Kippelen, Pascale; Fitch, Kenneth D; Anderson, Sandra Doreen; Bougault, Valerie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Rundell, Kenneth William; Sue-Chu, Malcolm; McKenzie, Donald C

    2012-06-01

    Elite athletes, particularly those engaged in endurance sports and those exposed chronically to airborne pollutants/irritants or allergens, are at increased risk for upper and lower airway dysfunction. Airway epithelial injury may be caused by dehydration and physical stress applied to the airways during severe exercise hyperpnoea and/or by inhalation of noxious agents. This is thought to initiate an inflammatory cascade/repair process that, ultimately, could lead to airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and asthma in susceptible athletes. The authors review the evidence relating to prevention or reduction of the risk of AHR/asthma development. Appropriate measures should be implemented when athletes exercise strenuously in an attempt to attenuate the dehydration stress and reduce the exposure to noxious airborne agents. Environmental interventions are the most important. Non-pharmacological strategies can assist, but currently, pharmacological measures have not been demonstrated to be effective. Whether early prevention of airway injury in elite athletes can prevent or reduce progression to AHR/asthma remains to be established.

  12. Bystander suppression of allergic airway inflammation by lung resident memory CD8+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsland, Benjamin J.; Harris, Nicola L.; Camberis, Mali; Kopf, Manfred; Hook, Sarah M.; Le Gros, Graham

    2004-04-01

    CD8+ memory T cells have recently been recognized as playing a key role in natural immunity against unrelated viral infections, a phenomenon referred to as "heterologous antiviral immunity." We now provide data that the cellular immunological interactions that underlie such heterologous immunity can play an equally important role in regulating T helper 2 immune responses and protecting mucosal surfaces from allergen-induced inflammation. Our data show that CD8+ T cells, either retained in the lung after infection with influenza virus, or adoptively transferred via the intranasal route can suppress allergic airway inflammation. The suppression is mediated by IFN-, which acts to reduce the activation level, T helper 2 cytokine production, airways hyperresponsiveness, and migration of allergen-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung, whereas the systemic and draining lymph node responses remain unchanged. Of note, adoptive transfer of previously activated transgenic CD8+ T cells conferred protection against allergic airway inflammation, even in the absence of specific-antigen. Airway resident CD8+ T cells produced IFN- when directly exposed to conditioned media from activated dendritic cells or the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18. Taken together these data indicate that effector/memory CD8+ T cells present in the airways produce IFN- after inflammatory stimuli, independent of specific-antigen, and as a consequence play a key role in modifying the degree and frequency of allergic responses in the lung.

  13. Respiratory health of elite athletes – preventing airway injury: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Kippelen, Pascale; Fitch, Kenneth D; Anderson, Sandra Doreen; Bougault, Valerie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Rundell, Kenneth William; Sue-Chu, Malcolm; McKenzie, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    Elite athletes, particularly those engaged in endurance sports and those exposed chronically to airborne pollutants/irritants or allergens, are at increased risk for upper and lower airway dysfunction. Airway epithelial injury may be caused by dehydration and physical stress applied to the airways during severe exercise hyperpnoea and/or by inhalation of noxious agents. This is thought to initiate an inflammatory cascade/repair process that, ultimately, could lead to airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and asthma in susceptible athletes. The authors review the evidence relating to prevention or reduction of the risk of AHR/asthma development. Appropriate measures should be implemented when athletes exercise strenuously in an attempt to attenuate the dehydration stress and reduce the exposure to noxious airborne agents. Environmental interventions are the most important. Non-pharmacological strategies can assist, but currently, pharmacological measures have not been demonstrated to be effective. Whether early prevention of airway injury in elite athletes can prevent or reduce progression to AHR/asthma remains to be established. PMID:22522585

  14. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Resolve Airway Inflammation, Hyperreactivity, and Histopathology in a Mouse Model of Occupational Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Itziar; Moreno, Rafael; Morell, Ferran; Muñoz, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is characterized by allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, leading to progressive airway remodeling and a concomitant decline in lung function. The management of OA remains suboptimal in clinical practice. Thus, establishing effective therapies might overcome the natural history of the disease. We evaluated the ability of human adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs), either unmodified or engineered to secrete the IL-33 decoy receptor sST2, to attenuate the inflammatory and respiratory symptoms in a previously validated mouse model of OA to ammonium persulfate (AP). Twenty-four hours after a dermal AP sensitization and intranasal challenge regimen, the animals received intravenously 1×106 cells (either hASCs or hASCs overexpressing sST2) or saline and were analyzed at 1, 3, and 6 days after treatment. The infused hASCs induced an anti-inflammatory and restorative program upon reaching the AP-injured, asthmatic lungs, leading to early reduction of neutrophilic inflammation and total IgE production, preserved alveolar architecture with nearly absent lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, negligible smooth muscle hyperplasia/hypertrophy in the peribronchiolar areas, and baseline airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine. Local sST2 overexpression barely increased the substantial efficacy displayed by unmodified hASCs. Thus, hASCs may represent a viable multiaction therapeutic capable to adequately respond to the AP-injured lung environment by resolving inflammation, tissue remodeling, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness typical of OA. PMID:24798370

  15. Ethanol Extract of Perilla frutescens Suppresses Allergen-Specific Th2 Responses and Alleviates Airway Inflammation and Hyperreactivity in Ovalbumin-Sensitized Murine Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Li-Shiuan; Lin, Bi-Fong

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of different fractions of Perilla frutescens (Pf) leaves extracted by water or ethanol on asthma. BALB/c mice sensitized intraperitoneally and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) were divided into six groups. Each group of mice was tube-feeding with 0 (control), 80 μg (PfWL), or 320 μg (PfWH) water extracts or 80 μg (PfEL) or 320 μg (PfEH) ethanol extracts of perilla leaves daily for 3 weeks. A negative control group (PBS) was neither sensitized nor treated with Pf. The effects of perilla leave extracts on allergic immune response were evaluated. The results showed that OVA-specific IL-5 and IL-13 secretions from OVA-stimulated splenocytes were significantly suppressed in the ethanol extract groups PfEL and PfEH. Serum level of anti-OVA IgE tended to be lower in the PfEH group. The inflammatory mediators, such as eotaxin and histamine, and total cells, particularly eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), were also decreased in the PfEL and the PfEH groups. Therefore, the PfEL and the PfEH groups had significantly lower methacholine-induced hyperresponsiveness (AHR). In conclusion, ethanol extracts, rather than water extract, of perilla leaves could significantly suppress Th2 responses and airway inflammation in allergic murine model of asthma. PMID:26064160

  16. Effect of Obesity on Acute Ozone-Induced Changes in Airway Function, Reactivity, and Inflammation in Adult Females

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, William D.; Ivins, Sally; Alexis, Neil E.; Wu, Jihong; Bromberg, Philip A.; Brar, Sukhdev S.; Travlos, Gregory; London, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously observed greater ozone-induced lung function decrements in obese than non-obese women. Animal models suggest that obesity enhances ozone-induced airway reactivity and inflammation. In a controlled exposure study, we compared the acute effect of randomized 0.4ppm ozone and air exposures (2 h with intermittent light exercise) in obese (N = 20) (30decrease in forced vital capacity after ozone (adjusted for the change after air exposure) was significantly greater in the obese group (12.5+/-7.5 vs. 8.0+/-5.8%, p<0.05). Post ozone exposure, 6 obese and 6 non-obese subjects responded to methacholine at ≤ 10mg/ml (the maximum dose); the degree of hyperresponsiveness was similar for the two groups. Both BMI groups showed similar and significant ozone-induced increases in sputum neutrophils. Plasma IL-6 was increased by exercise (4 hr post air exposure vs. pre) only in the obese but returned to pre-air exposure levels at 20hr post-exposure. Plasma IL-6 was significantly increased at 4hr post ozone exposure in both groups and returned to pre-exposure levels by 20h post-exposure. These results confirm our previous findings of greater post-ozone spirometric decrements in obese young women. However, acute ozone-induced airway reactivity to methacholine and airway inflammation did not differ by obesity at the exposure and exercise levels used. PMID:27513854

  17. Anesthetic concerns in a huge congenital sublingual swelling obscuring airway access

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nilesh; Bindra, Ashish; Kumar, Niraj; Yadav, Naveen; Sharma, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Presence of intraoral pathology poses a great challenge during management of pediatric airway. We report management of big intraoral cystic swelling physically occupying the entire oral cavity restricting access to airway. Preintubation aspiration of swelling was done to decrease its size and make room for airway manipulation, followed by laryngoscopy and intubation in lateral position. Airway patency is at risk in postoperative period also, in this case, though the swelling decreased in size postoperatively but presence of significant edema required placement of tongue stitch and modified nasopharyngeal airway. Case report highlights simple maneuvers to manage a difficult case. PMID:25829912

  18. Airway Response to Methacholine following Eucapnic Voluntary Hyperpnea in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bougault, Valérie; Blouin, Evelyne; Turmel, Julie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the changes in airway responsiveness to methacholine inhalation test (MIT) when performed after an eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea challenge (EVH) in athletes. Methods Two MIT preceded (visit 1) or not (visit 2) by an EVH, were performed in 28 athletes and 24 non-athletes. Twelve athletes and 13 non-athletes had airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine, and 11 athletes and 11 non-athletes had AHR to EVH (EVH+). Results The MIT PC20 post-EVH was significantly lower compared to baseline MIT PC20 by 1.3±0.7 doubling-concentrations in EVH+ athletes only (p<0.0001). No significant change was observed in EVH- athletes and EVH+/EVH- non-athletes. A significant correlation between the change in MIT PC20 post-EVH and EVH+/EVH- status and athlete/nonathlete status was found (Adjusted R2=0.26 and p<0.001). Three (11%) athletes and one (4%) non-athlete had a change in the diagnosis of AHR when MIT was performed consecutively to EVH. Conclusion The responsiveness to methacholine was increased by a previous indirect challenge in EVH+ athletes only. The mechanisms for such increase remain to be determined. MIT and EVH should ideally be performed on separate occasions as there is a small but possible risk to obtain a false-positive response to methacholine when performed immediately after the EVH. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00686491 PMID:25789614

  19. Airway arginase expression and Nω-hydroxy-nor-arginine effect on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction differentiate Lewis and Fischer rat strains.

    PubMed

    Risse, Paul-André; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Jo, Taisuke; Tsuchiya, Kimitake; Siddiqui, Sana; Martin, James G

    2014-03-15

    Innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is well modeled by two strains of rat, the hyperresponsive Fischer 344 rat and the normoresponsive Lewis rat. Arginase has been implicated in AHR associated with allergic asthma models. We addressed the role of arginase in innate AHR using the Fischer-Lewis model. In vivo arginase inhibition with N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-arginine (nor-NOHA) was evaluated on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in the Fischer and the Lewis rats. Arginase activity and mRNA expression were quantified in structural and resident cells of the proximal airway tree. The effect of nor-NOHA was evaluated on cultured tracheal smooth muscle proliferation. Fischer rats exhibited significantly greater changes in respiratory resistance and elastance in response to methacholine compared with Lewis rats. nor-NOHA reduced the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in the central airways of Lewis rats, while it did not change the innate AHR of Fischer rats. Lewis rats exhibited greater arginase activity in tracheal smooth muscle but a lower proliferation rate compared with Fischer rats. Smooth muscle proliferation was not affected by nor-NOHA in either strain of rats. The strain-specific arginase expression in the smooth muscle may contribute to the differences in sensitivity of the methacholine challenged airways of Lewis and Fischer rats to inhibition of arginase.

  20. In Utero Cigarette Smoke Affects Allergic Airway Disease But Does Not Alter the Lung Methylome

    PubMed Central

    Eyring, Kenneth R.; Pedersen, Brent S.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal and postnatal cigarette smoke exposure enhances the risk of developing asthma. Despite this as well as other smoking related risks, 11% of women still smoke during pregnancy. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal development generates long lasting differential methylation altering transcriptional activity that correlates with disease. In a house dust mite (HDM) model of allergic airway disease, we measured airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation between mice exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (FA). DNA methylation and gene expression were then measured in lung tissue. We demonstrate that HDM-treated CS mice develop a more severe allergic airway disease compared to HDM-treated FA mice including increased AHR and airway inflammation. While DNA methylation changes between the two HDM-treated groups failed to reach genome-wide significance, 99 DMRs had an uncorrected p-value < 0.001. 6 of these 99 DMRs were selected for validation, based on the immune function of adjacent genes, and only 2 of the 6 DMRs confirmed the bisulfite sequencing data. Additionally, genes near these 6 DMRs (Lif, Il27ra, Tle4, Ptk7, Nfatc2, and Runx3) are differentially expressed between HDM-treated CS mice and HDM-treated FA mice. Our findings confirm that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is sufficient to modify allergic airway disease; however, it is unlikely that specific methylation changes account for the exposure-response relationship. These findings highlight the important role in utero cigarette smoke exposure plays in the development of allergic airway disease. PMID:26642056

  1. Lung sound analysis helps localize airway inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Terufumi; Obase, Yasushi; Nagasaka, Yukio; Nakano, Hiroshi; Ishimatsu, Akiko; Kishikawa, Reiko; Iwanaga, Tomoaki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Airway inflammation can be detected by lung sound analysis (LSA) at a single point in the posterior lower lung field. We performed LSA at 7 points to examine whether the technique could identify the location of airway inflammation in patients with asthma. Patients and methods Breath sounds were recorded at 7 points on the body surface of 22 asthmatic subjects. Inspiration sound pressure level (ISPL), expiration sound pressure level (ESPL), and the expiration-to-inspiration sound pressure ratio (E/I) were calculated in 6 frequency bands. The data were analyzed for potential correlation with spirometry, airway hyperresponsiveness (PC20), and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). Results The E/I data in the frequency range of 100–400 Hz (E/I low frequency [LF], E/I mid frequency [MF]) were better correlated with the spirometry, PC20, and FeNO values than were the ISPL or ESPL data. The left anterior chest and left posterior lower recording positions were associated with the best correlations (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity: r=−0.55 and r=−0.58; logPC20: r=−0.46 and r=−0.45; and FeNO: r=0.42 and r=0.46, respectively). The majority of asthmatic subjects with FeNO ≥70 ppb exhibited high E/I MF levels in all lung fields (excluding the trachea) and V50%pred <80%, suggesting inflammation throughout the airway. Asthmatic subjects with FeNO <70 ppb showed high or low E/I MF levels depending on the recording position, indicating uneven airway inflammation. Conclusion E/I LF and E/I MF are more useful LSA parameters for evaluating airway inflammation in bronchial asthma; 7-point lung sound recordings could be used to identify sites of local airway inflammation. PMID:28392708

  2. Electrical stimulation of upper airway musculature.

    PubMed

    Smith, P L; Eisele, D W; Podszus, T; Penzel, T; Grote, L; Peter, J H; Schwartz, A R

    1996-12-01

    Investigators have postulated that pharyngeal collapse during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be alleviated by stimulating the genioglossus. The effect of electrical stimulation (ES) of the genioglossus on pharyngeal patency was examined in an isolated feline upper airway preparation and in apneic humans during sleep. We found that stimulation of the genioglossus (n = 8) and of the hypoglossal nerve (n = 1) increased maximum airflow through the isolated feline upper airway in humans during sleep. Additional findings in the isolated feline upper airway suggest that such increases in airflow were due to decreases in pharyngeal collapsibility. The evidence suggests that improvements in airflow dynamics with electrical stimulation are due to selective recruitment of the genioglossus, rather than due to nonspecific activation of the pharyngeal musculature or arousal from sleep. The implications of these results for future therapy with ES are discussed.

  3. Effect of choline chloride in allergen-induced mouse model of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, A K; Gaur, S N; Arora, N; Singh, B P

    2007-10-01

    The incidence of asthma has increased the world over, and current therapies for the disease suffer from potential side-effects. This has created an opportunity to develop novel therapeutic approaches. Here, the anti-inflammatory activity of choline was investigated in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. Choline (1 mg.kg(-1)) was administered via oral gavage or intranasally before and after ovalbumin (OVA) challenge in sensitised mice. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine was measured in the mice by whole-body plethysmography. Type-2 T-helper cell cytokine and leukotriene levels were estimated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and spleen culture supernatant by ELISA. Eosinophil peroxidase activity was also determined in the BALF supernatant. Choline treatment in sensitised mice before OVA challenge via oral/intranasal routes significantly inhibited eosinophilic airway inflammation and eosinophil peroxidase activity. It also reduced immunoglobulin E and G1 production and inhibited the release of type-2 T-helper cell cytokines and leukotrienes. However, the development of AHR was prevented effectively by intranasal choline treatment. Most importantly, choline treatment after OVA challenge by both routes could reverse established asthmatic conditions in mice by inhibiting AHR, eosinophilic airway inflammation and other inflammatory parameters. This study provides a new therapeutic approach for controlling as well as preventing asthma exacerbations.

  4. Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Protein Inhibition Attenuates Neutrophil-dominant Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Manni, Michelle L; Mandalapu, Sivanarayana; Salmeron, Andres; Lora, Jose M; Kolls, Jay K; Alcorn, John F

    2017-02-24

    Atopic asthma is a prevalent respiratory disease that is characterized by inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The complexity of this heterogeneous disorder has commanded the need to better define asthma phenotypes based on underlying molecular mechanisms of disease. Although classically viewed as a type 2-regulated disease, type 17 helper T (Th17) cells are known to be influential in asthma pathogenesis, predominantly in asthmatics with neutrophilia and severe refractory disease. Bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) chromatin adaptors serve as immunomodulators by directly regulating Th17 responses and Th17-mediated pathology in murine models of autoimmunity and infection. Based on this, we hypothesized that BET proteins may also play an essential role in neutrophil-dominant allergic airway disease. Using a murine model of neutrophil-dominant allergic airway disease, we demonstrate that BET inhibition limits pulmonary inflammation and alters the Th17-related inflammatory milieu in the lungs. In addition, inhibition of BET proteins improved lung function (specifically quasi-static lung compliance and tissue elastance) and reduced mucus production in airways. Overall, these studies show that BET proteins may have a critical role in asthma pathogenesis by altering type 17 inflammation, and thus interfering with BET-dependent chromatin signaling may provide clinical benefits to patients suffering from asthma.

  5. Calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A modulates mucin secretion and airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fen; Zhang, Hongkang; Wu, Meng; Yang, Huanghe; Kudo, Makoto; Peters, Christian J.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Solberg, Owen D.; Donne, Matthew L.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Fahy, John V.; Wolters, Paul J.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Li, Min; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Rock, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    Mucous cell hyperplasia and airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperresponsiveness are hallmark features of inflammatory airway diseases, including asthma. Here, we show that the recently identified calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) TMEM16A is expressed in the adult airway surface epithelium and ASM. The epithelial expression is increased in asthmatics, particularly in secretory cells. Based on this and the proposed functions of CaCC, we hypothesized that TMEM16A inhibitors would negatively regulate both epithelial mucin secretion and ASM contraction. We used a high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule blockers of TMEM16A-CaCC channels. We show that inhibition of TMEM16A-CaCC significantly impairs mucus secretion in primary human airway surface epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibition of TMEM16A-CaCC significantly reduces mouse and human ASM contraction in response to cholinergic agonists. TMEM16A-CaCC blockers, including those identified here, may positively impact multiple causes of asthma symptoms. PMID:22988107

  6. Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Protein Inhibition Attenuates Neutrophil-dominant Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Manni, Michelle L.; Mandalapu, Sivanarayana; Salmeron, Andres; Lora, Jose M.; Kolls, Jay K.; Alcorn, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Atopic asthma is a prevalent respiratory disease that is characterized by inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The complexity of this heterogeneous disorder has commanded the need to better define asthma phenotypes based on underlying molecular mechanisms of disease. Although classically viewed as a type 2-regulated disease, type 17 helper T (Th17) cells are known to be influential in asthma pathogenesis, predominantly in asthmatics with neutrophilia and severe refractory disease. Bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) chromatin adaptors serve as immunomodulators by directly regulating Th17 responses and Th17-mediated pathology in murine models of autoimmunity and infection. Based on this, we hypothesized that BET proteins may also play an essential role in neutrophil-dominant allergic airway disease. Using a murine model of neutrophil-dominant allergic airway disease, we demonstrate that BET inhibition limits pulmonary inflammation and alters the Th17-related inflammatory milieu in the lungs. In addition, inhibition of BET proteins improved lung function (specifically quasi-static lung compliance and tissue elastance) and reduced mucus production in airways. Overall, these studies show that BET proteins may have a critical role in asthma pathogenesis by altering type 17 inflammation, and thus interfering with BET-dependent chromatin signaling may provide clinical benefits to patients suffering from asthma. PMID:28233801

  7. Galangin Abrogates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation via Negative Regulation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Zha, Wang-Jian; Qian, Yan; Shen, Yi; Du, Qiang; Chen, Fei-Fei; Wu, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Xiao; Huang, Mao

    2013-01-01

    Persistent activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been associated with the development of asthma. Galangin, the active pharmacological ingredient from Alpinia galanga, is reported to have a variety of anti-inflammatory properties in vitro via negative regulation of NF-κB. This study aimed to investigate whether galangin can abrogate ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced airway inflammation by negative regulation of NF-κB. BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with OVA developed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. Galangin dose dependently inhibited OVA-induced increases in total cell counts, eosinophil counts, and interleukin-(IL-) 4, IL-5, and IL-13 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced serum level of OVA-specific IgE. Galangin also attenuated AHR, reduced eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell hyperplasia, and reduced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1) levels in lung tissue. Additionally, galangin blocked inhibitor of κB degradation, phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB, and p65 nuclear translocation from lung tissues of OVA-sensitized mice. Similarly, in normal human airway smooth muscle cells, galangin blocked tumor necrosis factor-α induced p65 nuclear translocation and expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, eotaxin, CXCL10, and VCAM-1. These results suggest that galangin can attenuate ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.

  8. Corticosteroids and cromolyn sodium as modulators of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    McFadden, E R

    1988-07-01

    Heightened airway reactivity is a cardinal feature of asthma and correlates with many clinical features of the illness, such as the acute response to bronchodilator drugs, the magnitude of diurnal fluctuations in lung function, and the amount of therapy required to control symptoms. Data have accumulated indicating that a reduction in airway reactivity can decrease asthma morbidity, and many advocate treating asthmatic patients prophylactically to prevent acute exacerbations from developing, rather than responding to them after they have occurred. This approach is particularly effective if it is used when the airways are being exposed to stimuli to which they are sensitive. A number of drugs have been purported to reduce airway reactivity, but the most convincing evidence supports the effects of cromolyn and inhaled and oral steroids. Although each type of drug has its own advantages and disadvantages and different modes of action, the common denominator is believed to be a reduction in the state of airway inflammation.

  9. Identification of mechanisms involved in the acute airway toxicity induced by parathion.

    PubMed

    Segura, P; Chávez, J; Montaño, L M; Vargas, M H; Delaunois, A; Carbajal, V; Gustin, P

    1999-12-01

    Organophosphates are still widely used worldwide and cause thousands of intoxications every year. In this work we investigated the mechanisms of parathion (Pth) airway toxicity, using biochemical and functional approaches. A plethysmographic technique for unrestrained guinea pigs was used to analyze Pth-induced modifications of airway mechanics and responsiveness to acetylcholine (ACh: 0.1-3.2 mg/ml, 2-min inhalation each dose). The isolated perfused rabbit lung preparation was used to study the acute effects of Pth on airway responsiveness to ACh (10(-8)-10(-3) M), histamine (10(-8)-10(-3) M) and substance P (10(-10)-10(-6) M), pulmonary acetylcholinesterase inhibition and cytochrome P450 (P450) activity, and their modifications with previous administration of Pth (1 mg/kg s.c. daily, 7 days). We found that: (1) In guinea pigs Pth (3.2-17 mg/kg i.p.) produced a dose-dependent increase in a lung resistance index (iRL), which was greatly reverted (approximately 50%) by salbutamol (2 mg/ml, 2-min inhalation, or 10 microg/kg i.p.). This salbutamol effect was transient (5-10 min), suggesting that this bronchodilator triggered additional obstructive mechanisms. (2) Pth increased the water content in lung parenchyma samples, but not in trachea or bronchi, and augmented the respiratory secretions measured through monosaccharide content in bronchoalveolar lavage. (3) The increase in iRL was greater in female animals, probably due to a higher P450 basal activity, and completely blocked by pharmacological inhibition of P450 with piperonyl butoxide (500 mg/kg i.p.). (4) In male guinea pigs a subclinical dose of Pth (10 mg/kg i.p.) induced airway hyperresponsiveness to ACh. In isolated perfused rabbit lung Pth (10(-6) M) produced airway hyperresponsiveness to ACh and histamine, the latter prevented by atropine (10(-5) M). (5) Repetitive exposure to subclinical doses (1 mg/kg s.c.) of Pth during 1 week caused approximately 80% inhibition of P450 activity in rabbits, which was

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María; Montaño, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway.

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca2+ channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  12. Can tidal breathing with deep inspirations of intact airways create sustained bronchoprotection or bronchodilation?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Brian C; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2013-08-15

    Fluctuating forces imposed on the airway smooth muscle due to breathing are believed to regulate hyperresponsiveness in vivo. However, recent animal and human isolated airway studies have shown that typical breathing-sized transmural pressure (Ptm) oscillations around a fixed mean are ineffective at mitigating airway constriction. To help understand this discrepancy, we hypothesized that Ptm oscillations capable of producing the same degree of bronchodilation as observed in airway smooth muscle strip studies requires imposition of strains larger than those expected to occur in vivo. First, we applied increasingly larger amplitude Ptm oscillations to a statically constricted airway from a Ptm simulating normal functional residual capacity of 5 cmH2O. Tidal-like oscillations (5-10 cmH2O) imposed 4.9 ± 2.0% strain and resulted in 11.6 ± 4.8% recovery, while Ptm oscillations simulating a deep inspiration at every breath (5-30 cmH2O) achieved 62.9 ± 12.1% recovery. These same Ptm oscillations were then applied starting from a Ptm = 1 cmH2O, resulting in approximately double the strain for each oscillation amplitude. When extreme strains were imposed, we observed full recovery. On combining the two data sets, we found a linear relationship between strain and resultant recovery. Finally, we compared the impact of Ptm oscillations before and after constriction to Ptm oscillations applied only after constriction and found that both loading conditions had a similar effect on narrowing. We conclude that, while sufficiently large strains applied to the airway wall are capable of producing substantial bronchodilation, the Ptm oscillations necessary to achieve those strains are not expected to occur in vivo.

  13. Can tidal breathing with deep inspirations of intact airways create sustained bronchoprotection or bronchodilation?

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Lutchen, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuating forces imposed on the airway smooth muscle due to breathing are believed to regulate hyperresponsiveness in vivo. However, recent animal and human isolated airway studies have shown that typical breathing-sized transmural pressure (Ptm) oscillations around a fixed mean are ineffective at mitigating airway constriction. To help understand this discrepancy, we hypothesized that Ptm oscillations capable of producing the same degree of bronchodilation as observed in airway smooth muscle strip studies requires imposition of strains larger than those expected to occur in vivo. First, we applied increasingly larger amplitude Ptm oscillations to a statically constricted airway from a Ptm simulating normal functional residual capacity of 5 cmH2O. Tidal-like oscillations (5–10 cmH2O) imposed 4.9 ± 2.0% strain and resulted in 11.6 ± 4.8% recovery, while Ptm oscillations simulating a deep inspiration at every breath (5–30 cmH2O) achieved 62.9 ± 12.1% recovery. These same Ptm oscillations were then applied starting from a Ptm = 1 cmH2O, resulting in approximately double the strain for each oscillation amplitude. When extreme strains were imposed, we observed full recovery. On combining the two data sets, we found a linear relationship between strain and resultant recovery. Finally, we compared the impact of Ptm oscillations before and after constriction to Ptm oscillations applied only after constriction and found that both loading conditions had a similar effect on narrowing. We conclude that, while sufficiently large strains applied to the airway wall are capable of producing substantial bronchodilation, the Ptm oscillations necessary to achieve those strains are not expected to occur in vivo. PMID:23722710

  14. Inhibition of PI3K promotes dilation of human small airways in a rho kinase‐dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Koziol‐White, Cynthia J; Yoo, Edwin J; Cao, Gaoyuan; Zhang, Jie; Papanikolaou, Eleni; Pushkarsky, Ivan; Andrews, Adam; Himes, Blanca E; Damoiseaux, Robert D; Liggett, Stephen B; Di Carlo, Dino; Kurten, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Asthma manifests as a heterogeneous syndrome characterized by airway obstruction, inflammation and hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Although the molecular mechanisms remain unclear, activation of specific PI3K isoforms mediate inflammation and AHR. We aimed to determine whether inhibition of PI3Kδ evokes dilation of airways and to elucidate potential mechanisms. Experimental Approach Human precision cut lung slices from non‐asthma donors and primary human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells from both non‐asthma and asthma donors were utilized. Phosphorylation of Akt, myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) and myosin light chain (MLC) were assessed in HASM cells following either PI3K inhibitor or siRNA treatment. HASM relaxation was assessed by micro‐pattern deformation. Reversal of constriction of airways was assessed following stimulation with PI3K or ROCK inhibitors. Key Results Soluble inhibitors or PI3Kδ knockdown reversed carbachol‐induced constriction of human airways, relaxed agonist‐contracted HASM and inhibited pAkt, pMYPT1 and pMLC in HASM. Similarly, inhibition of Rho kinase also dilated human PCLS airways and suppressed pMYPT1 and pMLC. Baseline pMYPT1 was significantly elevated in HASM cells derived from asthma donors in comparison with non‐asthma donors. After desensitization of the β2‐adrenoceptors, a PI3Kδ inhibitor remained an effective dilator. In the presence of IL‐13, dilation by a β agonist, but not PI3K inhibitor, was attenuated. Conclusion and Implications PI3Kδ inhibitors act as dilators of human small airways. Taken together, these findings provide alternative approaches to the clinical management of airway obstruction in asthma. PMID:27352269

  15. Upper airway radiographs in infants with upper airway insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, S L; Davis, S L; Gunn, T R

    1994-01-01

    Upper airway measurements in nine infants considered to be at risk of upper airway insufficiency, six of whom presented after an apnoeic episode, were compared with measurements taken in two age groups of healthy infants. Paired, inspiratory and expiratory, lateral upper airway radiographs were obtained while the infants were awake and breathing quietly. The radiographs of all nine infants demonstrated narrowing in the oropharyngeal portion of the airway during inspiration and in six infants there was ballooning of the upper airway during expiration. Seven of the nine infants subsequently experienced recurrent apnoeic episodes which required vigorous stimulation to restore breathing. Experience suggests that respiratory phase timed radiographs are a useful adjunct to the evaluation of infants who are suspected of having upper airway dysfunction. They provide information regarding both the dimensions and compliance of the upper airway as well as the site of any restriction. Images PMID:8048825

  16. Involvement of cysteinyl leukotrienes in airway smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis after repeated allergen exposure in sensitized Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Michael; Walsh, David A; Huang, Tung-Jung; Barnes, Peter J; Leonard, Thomas B; Hay, Douglas W P; Chung, K Fan

    1999-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle thickening is a characteristic feature of airway wall remodelling in chronic asthma. We have investigated the role of the leukotrienes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and epithelial cell DNA synthesis and ASM thickening following repeated allergen exposure in Brown Norway rats sensitized to ovalbumin. There was a 3 fold increase in ASM cell DNA synthesis, as measured by percentage bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, in repeatedly ovalbumin-exposed (4.1%, 3.6–4.6; mean, 95% c.i.) compared to chronically saline-exposed rats (1.3%, 0.6–2.1; P<0.001). Treatment with a 5-lipoxygenase enzyme inhibitor (SB 210661, 10 mg kg−1, p.o.) and a specific cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT1) receptor antagonist, pranlukast (SB 205312, 30 mg kg−1, p.o.), both attenuated ASM cell DNA synthesis. Treatment with a specific leukotriene B4 (BLT) receptor antagonist (SB 201146, 15 mg kg−1, p.o.) had no effect. There was also a significant, 2 fold increase in the number of epithelial cells incorporating BrdU per unit length of basement membrane after repeated allergen exposure. This response was not inhibited by treatment with SB 210661, pranlukast or SB 201146. A significant increase in ASM thickness was identified following repeated allergen exposure and this response was attenuated significantly by SB 210661, pranlukast and SB 201146. Rats exposed to chronic allergen exhibited bronchial hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine and had significant eosinophil recruitment into the lungs. Treatment with SB 210661, pranlukast or SB 201146 significantly attenuated eosinophil recruitment into the lungs, whilst having no significant effect on airway hyperresponsiveness. These data indicate that the cysteinyl leukotrienes are important mediators in allergen-induced ASM cell DNA synthesis in rats, while both LTB4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes contribute to ASM thickening and eosinophil recruitment following repeated allergen exposure. PMID:10455261

  17. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  18. Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 1a Contributes to Airway Hyperreactivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reznikov, Leah R.; Meyerholz, David K.; Adam, Ryan J.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud; Jaffer, Omar; Michalski, Andrew S.; Powers, Linda S.; Price, Margaret P.; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons innervating the airways contribute to airway hyperreactivity (AHR), a hallmark feature of asthma. Several observations suggested that acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), neuronal cation channels activated by protons, might contribute to AHR. For example, ASICs are found in vagal sensory neurons that innervate airways, and asthmatic airways can become acidic. Moreover, airway acidification activates ASIC currents and depolarizes neurons innervating airways. We found ASIC1a protein in vagal ganglia neurons, but not airway epithelium or smooth muscle. We induced AHR by sensitizing mice to ovalbumin and found that ASIC1a-/- mice failed to exhibit AHR despite a robust inflammatory response. Loss of ASIC1a also decreased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of substance P, a sensory neuropeptide secreted from vagal sensory neurons that contributes to AHR. These findings suggest that ASIC1a is an important mediator of AHR and raise the possibility that inhibiting ASIC channels might be beneficial in asthma. PMID:27820848

  19. Comparison of laryngeal mask airway vs tracheal intubation: a systematic review on airway complications.

    PubMed

    van Esch, Babette F; Stegeman, Inge; Smit, Adriana L

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has advantages over the tracheal tube (TT) in terms of incidence of cough, sore throat, laryngospasm, dysphagia, dysphonia, and blood staining. This is a systematic literature review performed at the Universtity Medical Center of Utrecht. The online databases PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials. Two independent reviewers selected relevant articles after title, abstract, and full text screening. Articles were assessed on risk of bias in accordance with the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Study results of the LMA and the TT were related to the method of selection of the device size and the method for cuff inflation. Of the 1718 unique articles, we included 19 studies which used the LMA Classic, the LMA Proseal, the Flexible Reinforced LMA, and the LMA Supreme compared with TT. After methodological inspection, data could not be pooled due to heterogeneity among the selected studies. Overall, no clear advantage of the LMA over the TT was found but the LMA Supreme was related to the lowest incidence of airway complications. In this review, no clear difference in incidence of postoperative airway complications could be demonstrated between LMA and TT. The LMA Supreme may reduce the incidence of airway complication in comparison to the TT but high quality randomized trials are recommended to further objectify if use of the LMA decreases the risk on postoperative airway complications.

  20. Electrolyte transport properties in distal small airways from cystic fibrosis pigs with implications for host defense

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Vargas Buonfiglio, Luis G.; Comellas, Alejandro P.; Thornell, Ian M.; Ramachandran, Shyam; Karp, Philip H.; Taft, Peter J.; Sheets, Kelsey; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Welsh, Michael J.; Stoltz, David A.; Zabner, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    While pathological and clinical data suggest that small airways are involved in early cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease development, little is known about how the lack of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function contributes to disease pathogenesis in these small airways. Large and small airway epithelia are exposed to different airflow velocities, temperatures, humidity, and CO2 concentrations. The cellular composition of these two regions is different, and small airways lack submucosal glands. To better understand the ion transport properties and impacts of lack of CFTR function on host defense function in small airways, we adapted a novel protocol to isolate small airway epithelial cells from CF and non-CF pigs and established an organotypic culture model. Compared with non-CF large airways, non-CF small airway epithelia cultures had higher Cl− and bicarbonate (HCO3−) short-circuit currents and higher airway surface liquid (ASL) pH under 5% CO2 conditions. CF small airway epithelia were characterized by minimal Cl− and HCO3− transport and decreased ASL pH, and had impaired bacterial killing compared with non-CF small airways. In addition, CF small airway epithelia had a higher ASL viscosity than non-CF small airways. Thus, the activity of CFTR is higher in the small airways, where it plays a role in alkalinization of ASL, enhancement of antimicrobial activity, and lowering of mucus viscosity. These data provide insight to explain why the small airways are a susceptible site for the bacterial colonization. PMID:26801568

  1. Airway-parenchyma uncoupling in nocturnal asthma.

    PubMed

    Irvin, C G; Pak, J; Martin, R J

    2000-01-01

    Airway flow resistance is well known to be dependent upon lung volume. The rise in lung volume that occurs in asthma is therefore thought to be an important mechanism that defends airway patency. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the interdependence or mechanical coupling between airways and lung parenchyma during the inflammatory processes that occur in the patient with nocturnal asthma. Five patients with documented nocturnal asthma were studied in both a vertical and a horizontal body plethysmograph. Lung volume was altered with continuous negative pressure as applied to the chest wall with a poncho cuirass in different postures and during sleep. We found during the awake phase that an increase in lung volume decreased lower pulmonary resistance (Rlp); however, within 30 min of sleep onset, functional residual capacity (FRC) fell and Rlp rose more than would be expected for the fall in FRC. Restoring FRC to presleep values either at an early (half-hour) or a late (3-h) time point did not cause Rlp to significantly fall. A second phase of the study showed that the loss of Rlp dependence on lung volume was not due to the assumption of the supine posture. Indirect measurements of lung compliance were consistent with a stiffening of the lung. We conclude that with sleep there is an immediate uncoupling of the parenchyma to the airway, resulting in a loss of interdependence that persists throughout sleep and may contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated with nocturnal asthma.

  2. Firefighting acutely increases airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Sherman, C B; Barnhart, S; Miller, M F; Segal, M R; Aitken, M; Schoene, R; Daniell, W; Rosenstock, L

    1989-07-01

    The acute effects of the products of combustion and pyrolysis on airway responsiveness among firefighters are poorly documented. To study this relationship, spirometry and methacholine challenge testing (MCT) were performed on 18 active Seattle firefighters before and 5 to 24 h after firefighting. Body plethysmography was used to measure changes in specific airway conductance (SGaw), and results of MCT were analyzed using PD35-SGaw, the cumulative dose causing a 35% decrease in SGaw. Subjects who did not react by the end of the protocol were assigned a value of 640 inhalational units, the largest cumulative dose. Fire exposure was defined as the total time (hours) spent without a self-contained breathing apparatus at the firesite and was categorized as mild (less than 1 h, n = 7), moderate (1 to 2 h, n = 5), or severe (greater than 2 h, n = 6). Mean age of the 18 firefighters was 36.7 +/- 6.7 yr (range, 25 to 51), with a mean of 9.1 +/- 7.9 active years in the trade (range, zero to 22). None was known to be asthmatic. After firefighting, FEV1 % predicted (%pred) and FEF25-75 %pred significantly decreased by means of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and 5.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively. The mean decline in PD35-SGaw after firefighting was 184.5 +/- 53.2 units (p = 0.003). This observed decline in PD35-SGaw could not be explained by decrements in prechallenge SGaw, FEV1, or FVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. The usefulness of biomarkers of airway inflammation in managing asthma.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sarita U; Long, Aidan A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of managing asthma is to maintain disease control. Current approaches to assessment of control do not include measurement of airway inflammation. This study was designed to assess the usefulness of biomarkers of airway inflammation in guiding asthma management decisions. A literature review was performed. Bronchial biopsy is a direct measure of airway inflammation but not practical for routine use. Enumeration of sputum eosinophils is very useful in guiding changes in controller medication to decrease asthma exacerbations, whereas measurement of exhaled nitric oxide has not proven to be useful in this regard. Serial measurement of airway hyperreactivity as a guide to asthma management yields inconclusive results. Use of indirect stimuli for bronchial challenge offers both practical and theoretical advantages in the assessment of airway hyperreactivity. Data on the analysis of exhaled breath condensate have not yet been studied adequately in guiding management decisions. Enumeration of sputum cell counts appears to be the most useful biomarker of airway inflammation in guiding asthma management decisions. Combined approaches using simple methods of measuring airway hyperreactivity and obtaining sputum samples hold promise for the future, particularly if rapid analysis of cellular products in sputum can be developed.

  4. Inhibition of airway surface fluid absorption by cholinergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Nam Soo; Krouse, Mauri E.; Choi, Jae Young; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    In upper airways airway surface liquid (ASL) depth and clearance rates are both increased by fluid secretion. Secretion is opposed by fluid absorption, mainly via the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. In static systems, increased fluid depth activates ENaC and decreased depth inhibits it, suggesting that secretion indirectly activates ENaC to reduce ASL depth. We propose an alternate mechanism in which cholinergic input, which causes copious airway gland secretion, also inhibits ENaC-mediated absorption. The conjoint action accelerates clearance, and the increased transport of mucus out of the airways restores ASL depth while cleansing the airways. We were intrigued by early reports of cholinergic inhibition of absorption by airways in some species. To reinvestigate this phenomenon, we studied inward short-circuit currents (Isc) in tracheal mucosa from human, sheep, pig, ferret, and rabbit and in two types of cultured cells. Basal Isc was inhibited 20–70% by the ENaC inhibitor, benzamil. Long-lasting inhibition of ENaC-dependent Isc was also produced by basolateral carbachol in all preparations except rabbit and the H441 cell line. Atropine inhibition produced a slow recovery or prevented inhibition if added before carbachol. The mechanism for inhibition was not determined and is most likely multi-factorial. However, its physiological significance is expected to be increased mucus clearance rates in cholinergically stimulated airways. PMID:26846701

  5. Effects of continuous negative airway pressure-related lung deflation on upper airway collapsibility.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Marc, I

    1993-09-01

    Continuous negative airway pressure (CNAP) causes a decrease in lung volume, which is known to increase upper airway resistance by itself. We studied how this lung volume change could modify upper airway collapsibility with five normal awake subjects. In a first trial, pressure in a nasal mask (Pm) was progressively decreased in 3- to 5-cmH2O steps (CNAP). In a second trial, changes in lung volumes resulting from CNAP were prevented by applying simultaneously an equivalent level of negative extrathoracic pressure into a poncho-type respirator [isovolumetric CNAP (CNAPisovol)]. For each trial, we examined the relationship between the maximal inspiratory airflow of each flow-limited inspiratory cycle and the corresponding Pm by least-squares linear regression analysis and determined the critical pressure. We also determined the Pm threshold corresponding to the first Pm value below which flow limitation occurred. Flow limitation was observed in each subject with CNAP but in only two subjects with CNAPisovol. In these two subjects, the Pm threshold values were -20 and -9 cmH2O with CNAP and -39 and -16 cmH2O with CNAPisovol, respectively. Critical pressures for the same two subjects were -161 and -96 cmH2O with CNAP and -202 and -197 cmH2O with CNAPisovol, respectively. We conclude that CNAP-induced decreases in lung volume increase upper airway collapsibility.

  6. Patterns of recruitment and injury in a heterogeneous airway network model

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Peter S.; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2015-01-01

    In respiratory distress, lung airways become flooded with liquid and may collapse due to surface-tension forces acting on air–liquid interfaces, inhibiting gas exchange. This paper proposes a mathematical multiscale model for the mechanical ventilation of a network of occluded airways, where air is forced into the network at a fixed tidal volume, allowing investigation of optimal recruitment strategies. The temporal response is derived from mechanistic models of individual airway reopening, incorporating feedback on the airway pressure due to recruitment. The model accounts for stochastic variability in airway diameter and stiffness across and between generations. For weak heterogeneity, the network is completely ventilated via one or more avalanches of recruitment (with airways recruited in quick succession), each characterized by a transient decrease in the airway pressure; avalanches become more erratic for airways that are initially more flooded. However, the time taken for complete ventilation of the network increases significantly as the network becomes more heterogeneous, leading to increased stresses on airway walls. The model predicts that the most peripheral airways are most at risk of ventilation-induced damage. A positive-end-expiratory pressure reduces the total recruitment time but at the cost of larger stresses exerted on airway walls. PMID:26423440

  7. Variation in Airway Responsiveness of Male C57BL/6 Mice from 5 Vendors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Herng-Yu Sucie; Mitzner, Wayne; Watson, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Mice are now the most commonly used animal model for the study of asthma. The mouse asthma model has many characteristics of the human pathology, including allergic sensitization and airway hyperresponsiveness. Inbred strains are commonly used to avoid variations due to genetic background, but variations due to rearing environment are not as well recognized. After a change in mouse vendors and a switch from C57BL/6J mice to C57BL/6N mice, we noted significant differences in airway responsiveness between the substrains. To further investigate the effect of vendor, we tested C57BL/6N mice from 3 other vendors and found significant differences between several of the substrains. To test whether this difference was due to genetic drift or rearing environment, we purchased new groups of mice from all 5 vendors, bred them in separate vendor-specific groups under uniform environmental conditions, and tested male first generation (F1) offspring at 8 to 10 wk of age. These F1 mice showed no significant differences in airway responsiveness, indicating that the rearing environment rather than genetic differences was responsible for the initial variation in pulmonary phenotype. The environmental factors that caused the phenotypic variation are unknown. However, differences between vendor in feed components, bedding type, or microbiome could have contributed. Whatever the basis, investigators using mouse models of asthma should be cautious in comparing data from mice obtained from different vendors. PMID:23043804

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cigarette smoke-induced airway hyperreactivity.

    PubMed

    Sathish, Venkatachalem; Vanoosten, Sarah Kay; Miller, Brent S; Aravamudan, Bharathi; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Vassallo, Robert; Prakash, Y S

    2013-04-01

    Enhanced airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility contributes to increased resistance to airflow in diseases such as bronchitis and asthma that occur in passive smokers exposed to secondhand smoke. Little information exists on the cellular mechanisms underlying such airway hyperreactivity. Sputum samples of patients with chronic sinusitis, bronchitis, and asthma show increased concentrations of growth factors called neurotrophins, including brain-derived growth factor (BDNF), but their physiological significance remains unknown. In human ASM, we tested the hypothesis that BDNF contributes to increased contractility with cigarette smoke exposure. The exposure of ASM to 1% or 2% cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 24 hours increased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) responses to histamine, and further potentiated the enhancing effects of a range of BDNF concentrations on such histamine responses. CSE exposure increased the expression of the both high-affinity and low-affinity neurotrophin receptors tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk)-B and p75 pan-neurotrophin receptor, respectively. Quantitative ELISA showed that CSE increased BDNF secretion by human ASM cells. BDNF small interfering (si)RNA and/or the chelation of extracellular BDNF, using TrkB-fragment crystallizable, blunted the effects of CSE on [Ca(2+)](i) responses as well as the CSE enhancement of cell proliferation, whereas TrkB siRNA blunted the effects of CSE on ASM contractility. These data suggest that cigarette smoke is a potent inducer of BDNF and TrkB expression and signaling in ASM, which then contribute to cigarette smoke-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

  9. Oroxylin A Inhibits Allergic Airway Inflammation in Ovalbumin (OVA)-Induced Asthma Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, De-Gang; Diao, Bao-Zhong; Zhou, Wen; Feng, Jia-Long

    2016-04-01

    Oroxylin A, a natural flavonoid isolated from the medicinal herb Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanism of oroxylin A on allergic inflammation in OVA-induced asthma murine model. BABL/c mice were sensitized and airway-challenged with OVA to induce asthma. Oroxylin A (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 1 h before the OVA treatment on day 21 to 23. The results showed that oroxylin A attenuated OVA-induced lung histopathologic changes, airway hyperresponsiveness, and the number of inflammatory cells. Oroxylin A also inhibited the levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and OVA-specific IgE in BALF. Furthermore, oroxylin A significantly inhibited OVA-induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, these results suggested that oroxylin A inhibited airway inflammation in OVA-induced asthma murine model by inhibiting NF-κB activation. These results suggested that oroxylin A was a potential therapeutic drug for treating allergic asthma.

  10. Impact of a Met(11)Thr single nucleotide polymorphism of surfactant protein D on allergic airway inflammation in a murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Carla; Bahlmann, Olaf; Viereck, Janika; Knudsen, Lars; Wedekind, Dirk; Hoymann, Heinz Gerd; Madsen, Jens; Thum, Thomas; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Ochs, Matthias

    2014-04-01

    The surfactant-associated proteins SP-A and D are pattern recognition molecules with collectin structure. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) exchanging a methionine (Met) for a threonine (Thr) in the amino-terminal SP-D domain influences the oligomeric structure and function of the protein. In this study, we investigated the susceptibility of mice transgenic for the human SP-D Met(11)Thr SNP to allergic airway inflammation and consequences for microRNA (miRNA, miR) expression. Mice expressing either human Met or Thr SP-D were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) in an acute model of allergic asthma. The influence of the SP-D polymorphism on the allergic airway inflammation was evaluated by lung function measurement, pulmonary inflammation parameters, morphological analysis and miRNA expression. Airway hyperresponsiveness, allergic inflammation, and mucus metaplasia were not significantly different between mice expressing one or the other allelic variant of SP-D. OVA sensitization and challenge led to significant airway hyperresponsiveness in wildtype mice and significantly lower eosinophil numbers and interleukin 5 levels in Thr SP-D mice. OVA challenge induced an upregulation of miR-21 and 155 in Thr SP-D mice and a downregulation of miR-21 in Met SP-D mice. Our results show that murine expression of human polymorphic SP-D variants does not significantly influence the severity of allergic airway inflammation. MiR-21 and 155 are differentially regulated in transgenic mice in response to allergic inflammation. Further studies are required to elucidate the impact of this SNP on inflammatory conditions of the lung.

  11. Classification of pulmonary airway disease based on mucosal color analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Melissa; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Riker, David; Ferguson, John Scott; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Airway mucosal color changes occur in response to the development of bronchial diseases including lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. These associated changes are often visualized using standard macro-optical bronchoscopy techniques. A limitation to this form of assessment is that the subtle changes that indicate early stages in disease development may often be missed as a result of this highly subjective assessment, especially in inexperienced bronchoscopists. Tri-chromatic CCD chip bronchoscopes allow for digital color analysis of the pulmonary airway mucosa. This form of analysis may facilitate a greater understanding of airway disease response. A 2-step image classification approach is employed: the first step is to distinguish between healthy and diseased bronchoscope images and the second is to classify the detected abnormal images into 1 of 4 possible disease categories. A database of airway mucosal color constructed from healthy human volunteers is used as a standard against which statistical comparisons are made from mucosa with known apparent airway abnormalities. This approach demonstrates great promise as an effective detection and diagnosis tool to highlight potentially abnormal airway mucosa identifying a region possibly suited to further analysis via airway forceps biopsy, or newly developed micro-optical biopsy strategies. Following the identification of abnormal airway images a neural network is used to distinguish between the different disease classes. We have shown that classification of potentially diseased airway mucosa is possible through comparative color analysis of digital bronchoscope images. The combination of the two strategies appears to increase the classification accuracy in addition to greatly decreasing the computational time.

  12. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  13. Loss-of-function of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase reversibly increases the severity of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aich, Jyotirmoi; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ahmad, Tanveer; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Balaram

    2012-06-06

    Inositol polyphosphate phosphatases regulate the magnitude of phosphoinositide-3 kinase signalling output. Although inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase is known to regulate phosphoinositide-3 kinase signalling, little is known regarding its role in asthma pathogenesis. Here we show that modulation of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase alters the severity of asthma. Allergic airway inflammation in mice led to calpain-mediated degradation of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase. In allergic airway inflammation models, preventing inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase degradation by inhibiting calpain activity, or overexpression of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase in mouse lungs, led to attenuation of the asthma phenotype. Conversely, knockdown of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase severely aggravated the allergic airway inflammation and the asthma phenotype. Interestingly, inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase knockdown in lungs of naive mice led to spontaneous airway hyper-responsiveness, suggesting that inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase could be vital in maintaining the lung homeostasis. We suggest that inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase has an important role in modulating inflammatory response in asthma, and thus, uncover a new understanding of the complex interplay between inositol signalling and asthma, which could provide alternative strategies in asthma management.

  14. Effects of theophylline and rolipram on antigen-induced airway responses in neonatally immunized rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Gozzard, N.; Herd, C. M.; Blake, S. M.; Holbrook, M.; Hughes, B.; Higgs, G. A.; Page, C. P.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of the xanthine, theophylline, a non-selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, and the phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE 4) inhibitor, rolipram, were evaluated in a model of antigen-induced airway responses in the allergic rabbit. 2. Adult litter-matched NZW rabbits (2.5-3.9 kg), immunized within 24 h of birth with Alternaria tenuis antigen, were pretreated twice daily for 3 days with theophylline (3 mg kg-1, i.p) or rolipram (1 mg kg-1, i.p) prior to antigen challenge (Alternaria tenuis). For each drug-treated group, a parallel group of rabbits were pretreated with the appropriate vehicle. In all groups airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 24 h before and after antigen-challenge. 3. Basal lung function in terms of resistance (RL, cmH2O 1(-1)s-1) and dynamic compliance (Cdyn, ml cmH2O-1) were unaltered by pretreatment with theophylline or rolipram compared to their respective vehicles 24 h prior to or post antigen challenge. 4. The acute bronchoconstriction induced by inhaled Alternaria tenuis aerosol was unaffected by pretreatment with theophylline or rolipram. 5. Airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled histamine was indicated by reduced RL PC50 (2.4-3.5 fold) and Cdyn PC35 (2.5-2.6 fold) values 24 h after antigen challenge. Treatment with rolipram, but not theophylline, prevented the increase in responsiveness to inhaled histamine 24 h after antigen challenge. 6. Total cells per ml of BAL fluid increased 24 h after antigen challenge due to the recruitment of neutrophils and eosinophils. Antigen-induced increases in pulmonary neutrophils were unaffected; however, eosinophils were reduced 57.5% in theophylline and 82% in rolipram-treated rabbits. 7. Inhalation of Alternaria tenuis aerosol elicits an acute bronchoconstriction, followed 24 h later by an increased responsiveness to inhaled histamine and pulmonary neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment in the immunized rabbit. With the dosing regimes used

  15. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  16. Global airway disease beyond allergy.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Peter W; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P

    2010-03-01

    Besides the anatomic continuity of the upper and lower airways, inflammation in one part of the airway influences the homeostasis of the other. The mechanisms underlying this interaction have been studied primarily in allergic disease, showing systemic immune activation, induction of inflammation at a distance, and a negative impact of nasal inflammation on bronchial homeostasis. In addition to allergy, other inflammatory conditions of the upper airways are associated with lower airway disease. Rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The impairment of purification, humidification, and warming up of the inspired air by the nose in rhinosinusitis may be responsible in part for bronchial pathology. The resolution of sinonasal inflammation via medical and/or surgical treatment is responsible for the beneficial effect of the treatment on bronchial disease. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of upper and lower airway communication beyond allergic disease.

  17. Recurrent airway obstruction: a review.

    PubMed

    Pirie, R S

    2014-05-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction is a widely recognised airway disorder, characterised by hypersensitivity-mediated neutrophilic airway inflammation and lower airway obstruction in a subpopulation of horses when exposed to suboptimal environments high in airborne organic dust. Over the past decade, numerous studies have further advanced our understanding of different aspects of the disease. These include clarification of the important inhaled airborne agents responsible for disease induction, improving our understanding of the underlying genetic basis of disease susceptibility and unveiling the fundamental immunological mechanisms leading to establishment of the classic disease phenotype. This review, as well as giving a clinical overview of recurrent airway obstruction, summarises much of the work in these areas that have culminated in a more thorough understanding of this debilitating disease.

  18. The airway microbiome and disease.

    PubMed

    Marsland, Benjamin J; Yadava, Koshika; Nicod, Laurent P

    2013-08-01

    Although traditionally thought to be sterile, accumulating evidence now supports the concept that our airways harbor a microbiome. Thus far, studies have focused upon characterizing the bacterial constituents of the airway microbiome in both healthy and diseased lungs, but what perhaps provides the greatest impetus for the exploration of the airway microbiome is that different bacterial phyla appear to dominate diseased as compared with healthy lungs. As yet, there is very limited evidence supporting a functional role for the airway microbiome, but continued research in this direction is likely to provide such evidence, particularly considering the progress that has been made in understanding host-microbe mutualism in the intestinal tract. In this review, we highlight the major advances that have been made discovering and describing the airway microbiome, discuss the experimental evidence that supports a functional role for the microbiome in health and disease, and propose how this emerging field is going to impact clinical practice.

  19. Effect of aerosol propellants and surfactants on airway resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, G. M.; Batten, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    The effects on the airways of inhalation of the vehicles used in two commercial pressurized bronchodilator aerosols were studied in 20 normal and seven asthmatic subjects. Changes in bronchial calibre due to bronchoconstriction were measured as changes in airway resistance using a constant volume whole body plethysmograph, and results were expressed as changes in the ratio Airway conductance/Thoracic gas volume (=specific airway conductance). The aerosols caused very slight bronchoconstriction in the normal subjects, with a mean decrease of 5·3% in specific airway conductance after inhalation of a spray containing sorbitol trioleate as a surface tension lowering agent, and of 9·7% after inhalation of a spray containing lecithin. This effect was prevented by prior inhalation of atropine methonitrate, and its mechanism was therefore probably a vagally mediated reflex. The bronchoconstriction was also reversed by the addition of isoprenaline to the aerosol. The asthmatic subjects showed larger mean reductions in specific airway conductance of 13% and 21% after sorbitol and lecithin respectively: the response was again prevented by atropine. We conclude that, although the aerosol vehicles cause slight bronchoconstriction, this is unlikely to be a clinical danger since it is insufficient to cause symptoms of wheezing, and is less than that caused by inhalation of a single cigarette. Moreover, the constriction is regularly converted to dilatation in both normal and asthmatic subjects by the addition of atropine or isoprenaline to the aerosol. PMID:5821624

  20. Thixotropic solutions enhance viral-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Michael P; Luner, Paul; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Philip H; Keshavjee, Shaf; Zabner, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia is inefficient in part because its receptor is absent on the apical surface of the airways. Targeting adenovirus to other receptors, increasing the viral concentration, and even prolonging the incubation time with adenovirus vectors can partially overcome the lack of receptors and facilitate gene transfer. Unfortunately, mucociliary clearance would prevent prolonged incubation time in vivo. Thixotropic solutions (TS) are gels that upon a vigorous shearing force reversibly become liquid. We hypothesized that formulating recombinant adenoviruses in TS would decrease virus clearance and thus enhance gene transfer to the airway epithelia. We found that clearance of virus-sized fluorescent beads by human airway epithelia in vitro and by monkey trachea in vivo were markedly decreased when the beads were formulated in TS compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Adenovirus formulated in TS significantly increased adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of a reporter gene in human airway epithelia in vitro and in murine airway epithelia in vivo. Furthermore, an adenovirus encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene (AdCFTR) formulated in TS was more efficient in correcting the chloride transport defect in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia than AdCFTR formulated in PBS. These data indicate a novel strategy to augment the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways that may be applicable to a number of different gene transfer vectors and could be of value in gene transfer to cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia in vivo.

  1. Sulfuric acid-induced changes in the physiology and structure of the tracheobronchial airways

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, J.M.; Schlesinger, R.B.

    1989-02-01

    Sulfuric acid aerosols occur in the ambient particulate mode due to atmospheric conversion from sulfur dioxide (SO2). This paper describes the response of the rabbit tracheobronchial tree to daily exposures to sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol, relating physiological and morphological parameters. Rabbits were exposed to filtered air (sham control) or to submicrometer-sized H2SO4 at 250 micrograms/m3 H2SO4, for 1 hr/day, 5 days/week, with sacrifices after 4, 8, and 12 months of acid (or sham) exposure; some rabbits were allowed a 3-month recovery after all exposures ended. H2SO4 produced a slowing of tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance during the first weeks of exposure; this change became significantly greater with continued exposures and did not improve after exposures ended. Airway hyperresponsiveness was evident by 4 months of acid exposure; the condition worsened by 8 months of exposure and appeared to stabilize after this time. Standard pulmonary mechanics parameters showed no significant trends with repeated acid exposure, except for a decline in dynamic lung compliance in animals exposed to acid for 12 months. Lung tissue samples obtained from exposed animals showed a shift toward a greater frequency of smaller airways compared to control, an increase in epithelial secretory cell density in smaller airways, and a shift from neutral to acidic glycoproteins in the secretory cells. The effect on airway diameter resolved after the exposures ceased, but the secretory cell response did not return to normal within the recovery period. No evidence of inflammatory cell infiltration was found due to H2SO4 exposure. Thus, significant alterations in the physiology of the tracheobronchial tree have been demonstrated due to repeated 1-hr exposures to a concentration of H2SO4 that is one-fourth the current 8-hr threshold limit value for exposure in the work environment.

  2. Persistence of Serotonergic Enhancement of Airway Response in a Model of Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian D.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Miller, Lisa A.; Wong, Emily M.

    2014-01-01

    The persistence of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and serotonergic enhancement of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction induced by ozone (O3) plus allergen has not been evaluated. If this mechanism persists after a prolonged recovery, it would indicate that early-life exposure to O3 plus allergen induces functional changes predisposing allergic individuals to asthma-related symptoms throughout life, even in the absence of environmental insult. A persistent serotonergic mechanism in asthma exacerbations may offer a novel therapeutic target, widening treatment options for patients with asthma. The objective of this study was to determine if previously documented AHR and serotonin-enhanced ASM contraction in allergic monkeys exposed to O3 plus house dust mite allergen (HDMA) persist after prolonged recovery. Infant rhesus monkeys sensitized to HDMA were exposed to filtered air (FA) (n = 6) or HDMA plus O3 (n = 6) for 5 months. Monkeys were then housed in a FA environment for 30 months. At 3 years, airway responsiveness was assessed. Airway rings were then harvested, and ASM contraction was evaluated using electrical field stimulation with and without exogenous serotonin and serotonin-subtype receptor antagonists. Animals exposed to O3 plus HDMA exhibited persistent AHR. Serotonin exacerbated the ASM contraction in the exposure group but not in the FA group. Serotonin subtype receptors 2, 3, and 4 appear to drive the response. Our study shows that AHR and serotonin-dependent exacerbation of cholinergic-mediated ASM contraction induced by early-life exposure to O3 plus allergen persist for at least 2.5 years and may contribute to a persistent asthma phenotype. PMID:24484440

  3. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures.

  4. Oral airway flow dynamics in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Amis, T C; O'Neill, N; Wheatley, J R

    1999-02-15

    1. Oral airway resistance (RO) is an important determinant of oro-nasal partitioning of airflow (e.g. during exercise and sleep); however, little is known of factors influencing its magnitude and measurement. 2. We developed a non-invasive standardized technique for measuring RO (based on a modification of posterior rhinomanometry) and examined inspiratory RO in 17 healthy male subjects (age, 36 +/- 2 years (mean +/- s.e.m.); height, 177 +/- 2 cm; weight, 83 +/- 3 kg). 3. Inspiratory RO (at 0.4 l s-1) was 0.86 +/- 0.23 cmH2O l-1 s-1 during resting mouthpiece breathing in the upright posture. RO was unaffected by assumption of the supine posture, tended to decrease with head and neck extension and increased to 1.22 +/- 0.19 cmH2O l-1 s-1 (n = 10 subjects, P < 0.01) with 40-45 deg of head and neck flexion. When breathing via a mouth-mask RO was 2.98 +/- 0.42 cmH2O l-1 s-1 (n = 7) and not significantly different from nasal airway resistance. 4. Thus, in awake healthy male subjects with constant jaw position, RO is unaffected by body posture but increases with modest degrees of head and neck flexion. This influence on upper airway patency may be important when oral route breathing is associated with alterations in head and neck position, e.g. during sleep.

  5. Appetite - decreased

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Ovarian cancer Stomach cancer Pancreatic cancer Other causes of decreased appetite include: Chronic liver disease Chronic kidney disease Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Dementia Heart failure ...

  6. Airway complications after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Machuzak, Michael; Santacruz, Jose F; Gildea, Thomas; Murthy, Sudish C

    2015-01-01

    Airway complications after lung transplantation present a formidable challenge to the lung transplant team, ranging from mere unusual images to fatal events. The exact incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the type of event, and there is still evolution of a universal characterization of the airway findings. Management is also wide-ranging. Simple observation or simple balloon bronchoplasty is sufficient in many cases, but vigilance following more severe necrosis is required for late development of both anastomotic and nonanastomotic airway strictures. Furthermore, the impact of coexisting infection, rejection, and medical disease associated with high-level immunosuppression further complicates care.

  7. Gene Delivery to the Airway

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes generation of and gene transfer to several commonly used airway models. Isolation and transduction of primary airway epithelial cells are first described. Next, the preparation of polarized airway epithelial monolayers is outlined. Transduction of these polarized cells is also described. Methods are presented for generation of tracheal xenografts as well as both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer to these xenografts. Finally, a method for in vivo gene delivery to the lungs of rodents is included. Methods for evaluating transgene expression are given in the support protocols. PMID:23853081

  8. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, are the leading cause of hospitalization of infants in the US. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) that appear to influence development of local and systemic immune response. We propose a 'risk and resilience' model in which airway microbiota are associated with an increased (risk microbiota) or decreased (resilience microbiota) incidence and severity of ARI in children. We also propose that modulating airway microbiota (e.g., from risk to resilience microbiota) during early childhood will optimize airway immunity and, thereby, decrease ARI incidence and severity in children.

  9. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  10. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  11. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  12. High glucose induces dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier through down-regulation of connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Juan; Zhou, Xiangdong; Xiao, Qian; Lü, Yang; Xia, Li

    2016-03-01

    The airway epithelium is a barrier to the inhaled antigens and pathogens. Connexin 43 (Cx43) has been found to play critical role in maintaining the function of airway epithelial barrier and be involved in the pathogenesis of the diabetic retinal vasculature, diabetes nephropathy and diabetes skin. Hyperglycemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for respiratory infections. We hypothesize that the down-regulation of Cx43 induced by HG alters the expression of tight junctions (zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin) and contributes to dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier, and Cx43 plays a critical role in the process in human airway epithelial cells (16 HBE). We show that high glucose (HG) decreased the expression of ZO-1 and occludin, disassociated interaction between Cx43 and tight junctions, and then increased airway epithelial transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and permeability by down-regulation of Cx43 in human airway epithelial cells. These observations demonstrate an important role for Cx43 in regulating HG-induced dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier. These findings may bring new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of pulmonary infection related to diabetes mellitus and lead to novel therapeutic intervention for the dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier in chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  13. COMPLIANCE MEASUREMENTS OF THE UPPER AIRWAY IN PEDIATRIC DOWN SYNDROME SLEEP APNEA PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Dhananjay Radhakrishnan; Mylavarapu, Goutham; McConnell, Keith; Fleck, Robert J.; Shott, Sally R.; Amin, Raouf S.; Gutmark, Ephraim J.

    2015-01-01

    Compliance of soft tissue and muscle supporting the upper airway are two of several factors contributing to pharyngeal airway collapse. We present a novel, minimally invasive method of estimating regional variations in pharyngeal elasticity. Magnetic resonance images for pediatric sleep apnea patients with Down syndrome (9.5 ± 4.3 years (mean age ± standard deviation)) were analyzed to segment airways corresponding to baseline (no mask pressure) and two positive pressures. A three dimensional map was created to evaluate axial and circumferential variation in radial displacements of the airway, dilated by the positive pressures. The displacements were then normalized with respect to the appropriate transmural pressure and radius of an equivalent circle to obtain a measure of airway compliance. The resulting elasticity maps indicated the least and most compliant regions of the pharynx. Airway stiffness of the most compliant region (403 ± 204 (mean ± standard deviation) Pa) decreased with severity of OSA. The non-linear response of the airway wall to CPAP was patient specific and varied between anatomical locations. We identified two distinct elasticity phenotypes. Patient phenotyping based on airway elasticity can potentially assist clinical practitioners in decision making on the treatments needed to improve airway patency. PMID:26215306

  14. The effect of asthma on the perimeter of the airway basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Elliot, John G; Budgeon, Charley A; Harji, Salima; Jones, Robyn L; James, Alan L; Green, Francis H

    2015-11-15

    When comparing the pathology of airways in individuals with and without asthma, the perimeter of the basement membrane (Pbm) is used as a marker of airway size, as it is independent of airway smooth muscle shortening or airway collapse. The extent to which the Pbm is itself altered in asthma has not been quantified. The aim of this study was to compare the Pbm from the same anatomical sites in postmortem lungs from subjects with (n = 55) and without (n = 30) asthma (nonfatal or fatal). Large and small airways were systematically sampled at equidistant "levels" from the apical segment of the left upper lobes and anterior and basal segments of the left lower lobes of lungs fixed in inflation. The length of the Pbm was estimated from cross sections of airway at each relative level. Linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationships between Pbm and sex, age, height, smoking status, airway level, and asthma group. The final model showed significant interactions between Pbm and airway level in small (<3 mm) airways, in subjects having asthma (P < 0.0001), and by sex (P < 0.0001). No significant interactions for Pbm between asthma groups were observed for larger airways (equivalent to a diameter of ∼3 mm and greater) or smoking status. Asthma is not associated with remodeling of the Pbm in large airways. In medium and small airways, the decrease in Pbm in asthma (≤20%) would not account for the published differences in wall area or area of smooth muscle observed in cases of severe asthma.

  15. Selective, tight-binding inhibitors of integrin alpha4beta1 that inhibit allergic airway responses.

    PubMed

    Lin, K c; Ateeq, H S; Hsiung, S H; Chong, L T; Zimmerman, C N; Castro, A; Lee, W C; Hammond, C E; Kalkunte, S; Chen, L L; Pepinsky, R B; Leone, D R; Sprague, A G; Abraham, W M; Gill, A; Lobb, R R; Adams, S P

    1999-03-11

    Integrin alpha4beta1 mediates leukocyte recruitment, activation, mediator release, and apoptosis inhibition, and it plays a central role in inflammatory pathophysiology. High-affinity, selective inhibitors of alpha4beta1, based on the Leu-Asp-Val (LDV) sequence from the alternatively spliced connecting segment-1 (CS-1) peptide of cellular fibronectin, are described that employ a novel N-terminal peptide "cap" strategy. One inhibitor, BIO-1211, was approximately 10(6)-fold more potent than the starting peptide and exhibited tight-binding properties (koff = 1.4 x 10(-4) s-1, KD = 70 pM), a remarkable finding for a noncovalent, small-molecule inhibitor of a protein receptor. BIO-1211 was also 200-fold selective for the activated form of alpha4beta1, and it stimulated expression of ligand-induced epitopes on the integrin beta1 subunit, a property consistent with occupancy of the receptor's ligand-binding site. Pretreatment of allergic sheep with a 3-mg nebulized dose of BIO-1211 inhibited early and late airway responses following antigen challenge and prevented development of nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness to carbachol. These results show that highly selective and potent small-molecule antagonists can be identified to integrins with primary specificity for peptide domains other than Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD); they confirm the generality of integrins as small molecule targets; and they validate alpha4beta1 as a therapeutic target for asthma.

  16. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  17. Emergence of airway smooth muscle mechanical behavior through dynamic reorganization of contractile units and force transmission pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma remains poorly understood despite significant research effort to elucidate relevant underlying mechanisms. In particular, a significant body of experimental work has focused on the effect of tidal fluctuations on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, tissues, lung slices, and whole airways to understand the bronchodilating effect of tidal breathing and deep inspirations. These studies have motivated conceptual models that involve dynamic reorganization of both cytoskeletal components as well as contractile machinery. In this article, a biophysical model of the whole ASM cell is presented that combines 1) crossbridge cycling between actin and myosin; 2) actin-myosin disconnectivity, under imposed length changes, to allow dynamic reconfiguration of “force transmission pathways”; and 3) dynamic parallel-to-serial transitions of contractile units within these pathways that occur through a length fluctuation. Results of this theoretical model suggest that behavior characteristic of experimentally observed force-length loops of maximally activated ASM strips can be explained by interactions among the three mechanisms. Crucially, both sustained disconnectivity and parallel-to-serial transitions are necessary to explain the nature of hysteresis and strain stiffening observed experimentally. The results provide strong evidence that dynamic rearrangement of contractile machinery is a likely mechanism underlying many of the phenomena observed at timescales associated with tidal breathing. This theoretical cell-level model captures many of the salient features of mechanical behavior observed experimentally and should provide a useful starting block for a bottom-up approach to understanding tissue-level mechanical behavior. PMID:24481961

  18. Emergence of airway smooth muscle mechanical behavior through dynamic reorganization of contractile units and force transmission pathways.

    PubMed

    Brook, Bindi S

    2014-04-15

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma remains poorly understood despite significant research effort to elucidate relevant underlying mechanisms. In particular, a significant body of experimental work has focused on the effect of tidal fluctuations on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, tissues, lung slices, and whole airways to understand the bronchodilating effect of tidal breathing and deep inspirations. These studies have motivated conceptual models that involve dynamic reorganization of both cytoskeletal components as well as contractile machinery. In this article, a biophysical model of the whole ASM cell is presented that combines 1) crossbridge cycling between actin and myosin; 2) actin-myosin disconnectivity, under imposed length changes, to allow dynamic reconfiguration of "force transmission pathways"; and 3) dynamic parallel-to-serial transitions of contractile units within these pathways that occur through a length fluctuation. Results of this theoretical model suggest that behavior characteristic of experimentally observed force-length loops of maximally activated ASM strips can be explained by interactions among the three mechanisms. Crucially, both sustained disconnectivity and parallel-to-serial transitions are necessary to explain the nature of hysteresis and strain stiffening observed experimentally. The results provide strong evidence that dynamic rearrangement of contractile machinery is a likely mechanism underlying many of the phenomena observed at timescales associated with tidal breathing. This theoretical cell-level model captures many of the salient features of mechanical behavior observed experimentally and should provide a useful starting block for a bottom-up approach to understanding tissue-level mechanical behavior.

  19. Bisulfite and sulfite as derivatives of sulfur dioxide alters biomechanical behaviors of airway smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Song, Aijing; Lin, Feng; Li, Jianming; Liao, Qingfeng; Liu, Enmei; Jiang, Xuemei; Deng, Linhong

    2014-02-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a common air pollutant that triggers asthmatic symptoms, but its toxicological mechanisms are not fully understood. Specifically, it is unclear how SO2 in vivo affects airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells of which the mechanics is known to ultimately mediate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) - a hallmark feature of asthma. To this end, we investigated the effects of bisulfite/sulfite (1:3 M/M in neutral fluid to simulate the in vivo derivatives of inhaled SO2 in the airways), on the viability, migration, stiffness and contractility of ASM cells cultured in vitro. The results showed that bisulfite/sulfite consistently increased viability, migration, F-actin intensity and stiffness of ASM cells in similar fashion as concentration increasing from 10(-4) to 10(-1) mmol/L. However, bisulfite/sulfite increased the ASM cell contractility induced by KCl only at the concentration between 10(-4) and 10(-3) mmol/L (p < 0.05), while having no consistent effect on that induced by histamine. At the concentration of 10(0) mmol/L, bisulfite/sulfite became acutely toxic to the ASM cells. Taken together, the data suggest that SO2 derivatives at low levels in vivo may directly increase the mass, stiffness and contractility of ASM cells, which may help understand the mechanism in which specific air pollutants contribute in vivo to the pathogenesis of asthma.

  20. Protective Roles for RGS2 in a Mouse Model of House Dust Mite-Induced Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    George, Tresa; Bell, Matthew; Chakraborty, Mainak; Siderovski, David P.; Giembycz, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    The GTPase-accelerating protein, regulator of G-protein signalling 2 (RGS2) reduces signalling from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that signal via Gαq. In humans, RGS2 expression is up-regulated by inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs) such that synergy is produced in combination. This may contribute to the superior clinical efficacy of ICS/LABA therapy in asthma relative to ICS alone. In a murine model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced airways inflammation, three weeks of intranasal HDM (25 μg, 3×/week) reduced lung function and induced granulocytic airways inflammation. Compared to wild type animals, Rgs2-/- mice showed airways hyperresponsiveness (increased airways resistance and reduced compliance). While HDM increased pulmonary inflammation observed on hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, there was no difference between wild type and Rgs2-/- animals. HDM-induced mucus hypersecretion was also unaffected by RGS2 deficiency. However, inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of Rgs2-/- animals were significantly increased (57%) compared to wild type animals and this correlated with increased granulocyte (neutrophil and eosinophil) numbers. Likewise, cytokine and chemokine (IL4, IL17, IL5, LIF, IL6, CSF3, CXCLl, CXCL10 and CXCL11) release was increased by HDM exposure. Compared to wild type, Rgs2-/- animals showed a trend towards increased expression for many cytokines/chemokines, with CCL3, CCL11, CXCL9 and CXCL10 being significantly enhanced. As RGS2 expression was unaffected by HDM exposure, these data indicate that RGS2 exerts tonic bronchoprotection in HDM-induced airways inflammation. Modest anti-inflammatory and anti-remodelling roles for RGS2 are also suggested. If translatable to humans, therapies that maximize RGS2 expression may prove advantageous. PMID:28107494

  1. Effect of oral and intravenous heparin tetrasaccharide on allergic airway responses: critical role of N-sulfation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tahir; Smith, Gregory; Abraham, William M

    2013-04-01

    We have shown that inhaled heparin (hep) oligosaccharides attenuate allergic airway responses in sheep and that this anti-allergic activity resides in a tetrasaccharide sequence. Here we determined: (a) the anti-allergic activity of oral and intravenous hep-tetrasaccharide on allergic airway responses in the sheep model of asthma; and (b) the role of N-sulfation in mediating this anti-allergic activity. Ascaris suum-induced early (EAR) and Late (LAR) airway responses and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to carbachol were measured in allergic sheep without and after treatment with different doses of oral or intravenous hep-tetrasaccharide. At doses of 0.06 mg/kg, 0.125 mg/kg, and 0.25 mg/kg, oral hep-tetrasaccharide caused a dose-dependent inhibition of EAR and LAR. Post-antigen AHR was also inhibited dose dependently. The same doses of intravenous hep-tetrasaccharide yielded comparable inhibition of EAR, LAR and AHR, confirming that orally delivered hep-tetrasaccharide has good bioavailability. The protection by hep-tetrasaccharide on EAR and LAR was dependent on N-sulfation, as N-desulfated/N-acetylated tetrasaccharide had a markedly reduced effect. However, inhibition of the post-antigen AHR was independent of N-sulfation. These results demonstrate that orally administered hep-tetrasaccharide inhibits allergic airway responses in the sheep model of asthma. Hep-tetrasaccharide has good oral bioavailability and its anti-allergic activity is critically dependent on N-sulfation of the glucosamine ring.

  2. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  3. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  4. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Methods: Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Results: Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh–Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Conclusion: Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty. PMID:26567879

  5. Arginine Vasopressin Alters Both Spontaneous and Phase-Locked Synaptic Inputs to Airway Vagal Preganglionic Neuron via Activation of V1a Receptor: Insights into Stress-Related Airway Vagal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xianxia; Chen, Xingxin; Guo, Yuhong; He, Ding; Chen, Yonghua; Xia, Chunmei; Wang, Jijiang

    2017-01-01

    The airway vagal preganglionic neurons (AVPNs) in the external formation of the nucleus ambiguus (eNA) play a major role in the vagal control of tracheobronchial smooth muscle tone and maintenance of airway resistance. The eNA receives vasopressinergic projection from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), the key node for the genesis of psychological stress. Since airway vagal excitation is reportedly to be associated with the psychological stress-induced/exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatics, arginine vasopressin (AVP) might be involved in stress-related airway vagal excitation. However, this possibility has not been validated. This study aimed to test whether and how AVP regulates AVPNs. In rhythmically active medullary slices of newborn rats, retrogradely labeled AVPNs were identified as inspiratory-activated and inspiratory-inhibited AVPNs (IA- and II-AVPNs) using patch-clamp techniques according to their inspiratory-related firing behavior and synaptic activities. The results show that under current clamp, AVP depolarized both IA- and II-AVPNs, and significantly increased their spontaneous firing rate. Under voltage clamp, AVP elicited a slow inward current, and significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in both types of AVPNs. In addition, AVP significantly enhanced the phase-locked excitatory inspiratory inward current in inspiratory-activated airway vagal preganglionic neurons (IA-AVPNs), but significantly suppressed the phase-locked inhibitory inspiratory outward current in II-AVPNs. In both types AVPNs, AVP significantly increased the frequency and amplitude of pharmacologically isolated spontaneous GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). All of the AVP-induced effects were prevented by SR49059, an antagonist of V1a receptors, but unaffected by SSR149415, an antagonist of V1b receptors. AVP did not cause significant changes in the miniature excitatory

  6. Airway management in emergency situations.

    PubMed

    Dörges, Volker

    2005-12-01

    Securing and monitoring the airway are among the key requirements of appropriate therapy in emergency patients. Failures to secure the airways can drastically increase morbidity and mortality of patients within a very short time. Therefore, the entire range of measures needed to secure the airway in an emergency, without intermediate ventilation and oxygenation, is limited to 30-40 seconds. Endotracheal intubation is often called the 'gold standard' for airway management in an emergency, but multiple failed intubation attempts do not result in maintaining oxygenation; instead, they endanger the patient by prolonging hypoxia and causing additional trauma to the upper airways. Thus, knowledge and availability of alternative procedures are also essential in every emergency setting. Given the great variety of techniques available, it is important to establish a well-planned, methodical protocol within the framework of an algorithm. This not only facilitates the preparation of equipment and the training of personnel, it also ensures efficient decision-making under time pressure. Most anaesthesia-related deaths are due to hypoxaemia when difficulty in securing the airway is encountered, especially in obstetrics during induction of anaesthesia for caesarean delivery. The most commonly occurring adverse respiratory events are failure to intubate, failure to recognize oesophageal intubation, and failure to ventilate. Thus, it is essential that every anaesthesiologist working on the labour and delivery ward is comfortable with the algorithm for the management of failed intubation. The algorithm for emergency airway management describing the sequence of various procedures has to be adapted to internal standards and to techniques that are available.

  7. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  8. Effect of P2X4R on airway inflammation and airway remodeling in allergic airway challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HONGXIA; XIA, QINGQING; FENG, XIAOQIAN; CAO, FANGYUAN; YU, HANG; SONG, YINLI; NI, XIUQIN

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptor (P2X4R) is the most widely expressed subtype of the P2XRs in the purinergic receptor family. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a ligand for this receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. ATP-P2X4R signaling is involved in pulmonary vascular remodeling, and in the proliferation and differentiation of airway and alveolar epithelial cell lines. However, the role of P2X4R in asthma remains to be elucidated. This aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of P2X4R in a murine experimental asthma model. The asthmatic model was established by the inhalation of ovalbumin (OVA) in BALB/c mice. The mice were treated with P2X4R-specific agonists and antagonists to investigate the role of this receptor in vivo. Pathological changes in the bronchi and lung tissues were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Alcian blue staining. The inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were counted, and the expression levels of P2X4R, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected using western blotting. In the OVA-challenged mice, inflammation, infiltration, collagen deposition, mucus production, and the expression levels of P2X4R and PCNA were all increased; however, the expression of α-SMA was decreased, compared with the mice in the control group. Whereas treatment with the P2X4R agonist, ATP, enhanced the allergic reaction, treatment with the P2X4R antagonist, 5-BDBD, attenuated the allergic reaction. The results suggested that ATP-P2X4R signaling may not only contribute to airway inflammation, but it may also contribute to airway remodeling in allergic asthma in mice. PMID:26648454

  9. Long term study of the effect of sodium cromoglycate on non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, C J; Breslin, A B

    1987-01-01

    A double blind, crossover study was undertaken to determine whether non-specific hyperresponsiveness in subjects with asthma was reduced by long term treatment with sodium cromoglycate and, if so, whether this was related to change in lung function. Forty four adult asthmatic subjects (41 atopic, three non-atopic) entered the one year study at intervals staggered over six months. After a baseline period to ensure that asthma control was stable subjects entered the treatment period, during which they inhaled sodium cromoglycate 20 mg four times daily or matching placebo four times daily for 16 weeks each, in random order. Response was assessed at four weekly intervals by measurement of lung function and histamine inhalation tests, from which the provocative concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20H) was calculated. The assessment included daily symptom score, morning and evening Airflow-meter readings and treatment; mean values for each treatment period and also for the final four weeks of each period were compared. There were no significant differences between placebo and sodium cromoglycate treatment for PC20H, FEV1, morning or evening flow meter readings, bronchodilator usage, or symptom scores for the group as a whole, for the 16 week period or for the final four weeks of each period. Thirteen subjects showed better morning and evening flow meter readings while taking sodium cromoglycate than while taking placebo and eight better readings with placebo than with sodium cromoglycate (p less than 0.05). Improvement in lung function did not correlate with baseline lung function or baseline PC20H, or with features of atopy. These results suggest that long term sodium cromoglycate treatment does not alter non-specific bronchial responsiveness in adult asthmatic subjects. PMID:3120345

  10. In search of childhood asthma: questionnaire, tests of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and clinical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Remes, S; Pekkanen, J; Remes, K; Salonen, R; Korppi, M

    2002-01-01

    Background: The definition or diagnosis of asthma is a challenge for both clinicians and epidemiologists. Symptom history is usually supplemented with tests of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) in spite of their uncertainty in improving diagnostic accuracy. Methods: To assess the interrelationship between respiratory symptoms, BHR, and clinical diagnosis of asthma, the respiratory symptoms of 1633 schoolchildren were screened using a questionnaire (response rate 81.2%) and a clinical study was conducted in a subsample of 247 children. Data from a free running test and a methacholine inhalation challenge test were available in 218 children. The diagnosis of asthma was confirmed by a paediatric allergist. Results: Despite their high specificity (>0.97), BHR tests did not significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy after the symptom history: area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.90 for a logistic regression model with four symptoms and 0.94 for the symptoms with free running test and methacholine inhalation challenge results. On the other hand, BHR tests had low sensitivity (0.35–0.47), whereas several symptoms had both high specificity (>0.97) and sensitivity (>0.7) in relation to clinical asthma, which makes them a better tool for asthma epidemiology than BHR. Conclusions: Symptom history still forms the basis for defining asthma in both clinical and epidemiological settings. BHR tests only marginally increased the diagnostic accuracy after symptom history had been taken into account. The diagnosis of childhood asthma should not therefore be overlooked in symptomatic cases with no objective evidence of BHR. Moreover, BHR should not be required for defining asthma in epidemiological studies. PMID:11828040

  11. Shikonin inhibits maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and suppresses allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Wang, Chien-Neng; Lai, Yu-Ting; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Chen, Hui-Chen; Cheng, Yu-Wen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Shikonin exhibits a wide range of anti-inflammatory actions. Here, we assessed its effects on maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) and on allergic reactions in a murine model of asthma. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cultured murine BM-DCs were used to investigate the effects of shikonin on expression of cell surface markers and their stimulation of T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. The therapeutic potential of shikonin was evaluated in a model of allergic airway disease. KEY RESULTS Shikonin dose-dependently inhibited expression of major histocompatibility complex class II, CD80, CD86, CCR7 and OX40L on BM-DCs, induced by a mixture of ovalbumin (OVA; 100 µg·mL−1) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP; 20 ng·mL−1). Shikonin-treated BM-DCs were poor stimulators of CD4+ T lymphocyte and induced lower levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α release by responding T-cells. After intratracheal instillation of shikonin in OVA-immunized mice, OVA challenge induced lower IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, TNF-α and eotaxin release in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid, lower IL-4 and IL-5 production in lung cells and mediastinal lymph node cells and attenuated OVA-induced lung eosinophilia and airway hyperresponsiveness. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Shikonin effectively suppressed OVA + TSLP-induced BM-DC maturation in vitro and inhibited allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of asthma, showing good potential as a treatment for allergic asthma. Also, our model provides a novel platform for screening drugs for allergic diseases. PMID:20735407

  12. [Orthodontics and the upper airway].

    PubMed

    Cobo Plana, J; de Carlos Villafranca, F; Macías Escalada, E

    2004-03-01

    One of the general aims of orthodontic treatment and of the combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery is to achieve good occlusion and aesthetic improvement, especially in cases of severe dentoskeletal deformities. However, on many occasions, the parameters of the upper airways are not taken into account when the aims of conventional treatment are fulfilled. Patients with obstructive alterations during sleep represent for the orthodontist a type of patient who differs from the normal; for them, treatment should include the objective of improving oxygen saturation. Here, functional considerations should outweigh purely aesthetic ones. It is important, when making an orthodontic, surgical or combined diagnosis for a patient, to bear in mind the impact that treatment may have on the upper airways. Good aesthetics should never be achieved for some of our patients at the expense of diminishing the capacity of their upper airways.

  13. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques.

  14. EGF-Amphiregulin Interplay in Airway Stem/Progenitor Cells Links the Pathogenesis of Smoking-Induced Lesions in the Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wu-Lin; Yang, Jing; Gomi, Kazunori; Chao, IonWa; Crystal, Ronald G.; Shaykhiev, Renat

    2017-01-01

    The airway epithelium of cigarette smokers undergoes dramatic remodeling with hyperplasia of basal cells (BC) and mucus-producing cells, squamous metaplasia, altered ciliated cell differentiation and decreased junctional barrier integrity, relevant to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. In this study, we show that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand amphiregulin (AREG) is induced by smoking in human airway epithelium as a result of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-driven squamous differentiation of airway BC stem/progenitor cells. In turn, AREG induced a unique EGFR activation pattern in human airway BC, distinct from that evoked by EGF, leading to BC- and mucous hyperplasia, altered ciliated cell differentiation and impaired barrier integrity. Further, AREG promoted its own expression and suppressed expression of EGF, establishing an autonomous self-amplifying signaling loop in airway BC relevant for promotion of EGF-independent hyperplastic phenotypes. Thus, EGF-AREG interplay in airway BC stem/progenitor cells is one of the mechanisms that mediates the interconnected pathogenesis of all major smoking-induced lesions in the human airway epithelium. PMID:27709733

  15. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids on intrinsic responsiveness and histology of airways from infant monkeys exposed to house dust mite allergen and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Plopper, Charles G.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2008-01-15

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to treat infants with asthma, some with intermittent asthma. We previously showed that exposing infant monkeys to allergen/ozone resulted in asthma-like characteristics of their airways. We evaluated the effects of ICS on histology and intrinsic responsiveness of allergen/ozone-exposed and normal infant primate airways. Infant monkeys were exposed by inhalation to (1) filtered air and saline, (2) house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + ozone and saline, (3) filtered air and ICS (budesonide) or (4) HDMA + ozone and ICS. Allergen/ozone exposures started at 1 month and ICS at 3 months of age. At 6 months of age, methacholine-induced changes in luminal area of airways in proximal and distal lung slices were determined using videomicrometry, followed by histology of the same slices. Proximal airway responsiveness was increased by allergen/ozone and by ICS. Eosinophil profiles were increased by allergen/ozone in both proximal and distal airways, an effect that was decreased by ICS in distal airways. In both allergen/ozone- and air-exposed monkeys, ICS increased the number of alveolar attachments in distal airways, decreased mucin in proximal airways and decreased epithelial volume in both airways. ICS increased smooth muscle in air-exposed animals while decreasing it in allergen/ozone-exposed animals in both airways. In proximal airways, there was a small but significant positive correlation between smooth muscle and airway responsiveness, as well as between alveolar attachments and responsiveness. ICS change morphology and function in normal airways as well as allergen/ozone-exposed airways, suggesting that they should be reserved for infants with active symptoms.

  16. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Komachi, Mayumi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Dobashi, Kunio; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Mori, Masatomo; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  17. Comments to Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Lien, Wan-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal ultrasound can be an alternative diagnostic tool in airway management, besides traditional confirmatory methods such as capnography and auscultation. The standard image is a hyperechoic air-mucosa (A-M) interface with a reverberation artifact posteriorly (comet-tail artifact). If the second A-M interface appears, which we call a "double-tract sign," esophageal intubation is considered.

  18. Upper airway obstruction during midazolam sedation: modification by nasal CPAP.

    PubMed

    Nozaki-Taguchi, N; Isono, S; Nishino, T; Numai, T; Taguchi, N

    1995-08-01

    We examined the depressant effect of midazolam on respiration in 21 healthy women undergoing lower abdominal surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Airway gas flow, airway pressure, and the sound of snoring were recorded together with arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). After spinal anaesthesia was established, subjects were deeply sedated with pentazocine 15 mg followed by incremental doses of midazolam 1 mg i.v. up to 0.1 mg.kg-1. When SpO2 decreased to < 90% or snoring and/or apnoea was observed, continuous positive airway pressure applied through the nose (nasal CPAP) was increased until the respiratory deterioration was reversed. While one patient remained free of respiratory events, the other 20 patients were successfully treated with nasal CPAP restoring normal SpO2 (95.5 +/- 1.7%) without snoring. Stepwise reduction of nasal CPAP determined the minimally effective CPAP to prevent snoring to be 5.1 +/- 2.1 cm H2O. Further reduction of nasal CPAP induced snoring in 15 patients and obstructive apnoea in five patients with the latter accompanied by a severe reduction of SpO2 (87.4 +/- 6.1%). Patients with apnoea were older than those who snored (P < 0.05. We conclude that upper airway obstruction contributes considerably to decreases in SpO2 during midazolam sedation for spinal anaesthesia.

  19. Neurophenotypes in Airway Diseases. Insights from Translational Cough Studies

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, Mark A.; Khalid, Saifudin; Wortley, Michael A.; Dockry, Rachel; Coote, Julie; Holt, Kimberley; Dubuis, Eric; Kelsall, Angela; Maher, Sarah A.; Bonvini, Sara; Woodcock, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Most airway diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are associated with excessive coughing. The extent to which this may be a consequence of increased activation of vagal afferents by pathology in the airways (e.g., inflammatory mediators, excessive mucus) or an altered neuronal phenotype is unknown. Understanding whether respiratory diseases are associated with dysfunction of airway sensory nerves has the potential to identify novel therapeutic targets. Objectives: To assess the changes in cough responses to a range of inhaled irritants in COPD and model these in animals to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Cough responses to inhaled stimuli in patients with COPD, healthy smokers, refractory chronic cough, asthma, and healthy volunteers were assessed and compared with vagus/airway nerve and cough responses in a cigarette smoke (CS) exposure guinea pig model. Measurements and Main Results: Patients with COPD had heightened cough responses to capsaicin but reduced responses to prostaglandin E2 compared with healthy volunteers. Furthermore, the different patient groups all exhibited different patterns of modulation of cough responses. Consistent with these findings, capsaicin caused a greater number of coughs in CS-exposed guinea pigs than in control animals; similar increased responses were observed in ex vivo vagus nerve and neuron cell bodies in the vagal ganglia. However, responses to prostaglandin E2 were decreased by CS exposure. Conclusions: CS exposure is capable of inducing responses consistent with phenotypic switching in airway sensory nerves comparable with the cough responses observed in patients with COPD. Moreover, the differing profiles of cough responses support the concept of disease-specific neurophenotypes in airway disease. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01297790). PMID:26741046

  20. Airflow behavior changes in upper airway caused by different head and neck positions: Comparison by computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Huang, Shi-Wei; Chen, Lian-Hua; Qi, Yang; Qiu, Yi-Min; Li, Shi-Tong

    2017-02-08

    The feasibility of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to evaluate airflow characteristics in different head and neck positions has not been established. This study compared the changes in volume and airflow behavior of the upper airway by CFD simulation to predict the influence of anatomical and physiological airway changes due to different head-neck positions on mechanical ventilation. One awake volunteer with no risk of difficult airway underwent computed tomography in neutral position, extension position (both head and neck extended), and sniffing position (head extended and neck flexed). Three-dimensional airway models of the upper airway were reconstructed. The total volume (V) and narrowest area (Amin) of the airway models were measured. CFD simulation with an Spalart-Allmaras model was performed to characterize airflow behavior in neutral, extension, and sniffing positions of closed-mouth and open-mouth ventilation. The comparison result for V was neutral decreased and velocity remained almost constant. Recirculation airflow was generated near the subglottic region in neutral and extension positions. Sniffing position improves airway patency by increasing airway volume and decreasing airway resistance, suggesting that sniffing position may be the optimal choice for mask ventilation.

  1. The Lung Microbiome and Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Susan V

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of literature has demonstrated relationships between the composition of the airway microbiota (mixed-species communities of microbes that exist in the respiratory tract) and critical features of immune response and pulmonary function. These studies provide evidence that airway inflammatory status and capacity for repair are coassociated with specific taxonomic features of the airway microbiome. Although directionality has yet to be established, the fact that microbes are known drivers of inflammation and tissue damage suggests that in the context of chronic inflammatory airway disease, the composition and, more importantly, the function, of the pulmonary microbiome represent critical factors in defining airway disease outcomes.

  2. Airway nerves: in vitro electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fox, Alyson

    2002-06-01

    Recording the activity of single airway sensory fibres or neuronal cell bodies in vitro has allowed detailed characterisation of fibre types and membrane properties. Fibre types can be identified by their conduction velocities and further studied by the application of drugs to their receptive field. C-fibres are sensitive to mechanical stimuli and a range of irritant chemicals (bradykinin, capsaicin, low pH, platelet-activating factor), whereas Adelta-fibres are relatively insensitive to chemical stimuli and appear to correlate to the rapidly adapting receptors identified in airways in vivo. Their site of origin also differs: upper airway C-fibres arise predominantly from the jugular ganglion and Adelta-fibres from the jugular and nodose ganglia. Intracellular recording from cell bodies in the ganglia has revealed a calcium-dependent potassium current common to many putative C-fibre cell bodies. This slow after hyperpolarisation current may be inhibited by stimuli that excite and sensitise C-fibres - this could be an important mechanism underlying the sensitisation of C-fibres in airway irritability.

  3. Functional expression of the TMEM16 family of calcium-activated chloride channels in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Kenneth E.; Danielsson, Jennifer; Funayama, Hiromi; Fu, Xiao Wen; Chang, Herng-Yu Sucie; Yim, Peter; Xu, Dingbang; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness is a key component in the pathophysiology of asthma. Although calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) flux has been described in many cell types, including human airway smooth muscle (HASM), the true molecular identity of the channels responsible for this chloride conductance remains controversial. Recently, a new family of proteins thought to represent the true CaCCs was identified as the TMEM16 family. This led us to question whether members of this family are functionally expressed in native and cultured HASM. We further questioned whether expression of these channels contributes to the contractile function of HASM. We identified the mRNA expression of eight members of the TMEM16 family in HASM cells and show immunohistochemical evidence of TMEM16A in both cultured and native HASM. Functionally, we demonstrate that the classic chloride channel inhibitor, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB), inhibited halide flux in cultured HASM cells. Moreover, HASM cells displayed classical electrophysiological properties of CaCCs during whole cell electrophysiological recordings, which were blocked by using an antibody selective for TMEM16A. Furthermore, two distinct TMEM16A antagonists (tannic acid and benzbromarone) impaired a substance P-induced contraction in isolated guinea pig tracheal rings. These findings demonstrate that multiple members of this recently described family of CaCCs are expressed in HASM cells, they display classic electrophysiological properties of CaCCs, and they modulate contractile tone in airway smooth muscle. The TMEM16 family may provide a novel therapeutic target for limiting airway constriction in asthma. PMID:23997176

  4. CD4+ T cells enhance the unloaded shortening velocity of airway smooth muscle by altering the contractile protein expression.

    PubMed

    Matusovsky, Oleg S; Nakada, Emily M; Kachmar, Linda; Fixman, Elizabeth D; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2014-07-15

    Abundant data indicate that pathogenesis in allergic airways disease is orchestrated by an aberrant T-helper 2 (Th2) inflammatory response. CD4(+) T cells have been localized to airway smooth muscle (ASM) in both human asthmatics and in rodent models of allergic airways disease, where they have been implicated in proliferative responses of ASM. Whether CD4(+) T cells also alter ASM contractility has not been addressed. We established an in vitro system to assess the ability of antigen-stimulated CD4(+) T cells to modify contractile responses of the Brown Norway rat trachealis muscle. Our data demonstrated that the unloaded velocity of shortening (Vmax) of ASM was significantly increased upon 24 h co-incubation with antigen-stimulated CD4(+) T cells, while stress did not change. Enhanced Vmax was dependent upon contact between the CD4(+) T cells and the ASM and correlated with increased levels of the fast (+)insert smooth muscle myosin heavy chain isoform. The levels of myosin light chain kinase and myosin light chain phosphorylation were also increased within the muscle. The alterations in mechanics and in the levels of contractile proteins were transient, both declining to control levels after 48 h of co-incubation. More permanent alterations in muscle phenotype might be attainable when several inflammatory cells and mediators interact together or after repeated antigenic challenges. Further studies will await new tissue culture methodologies that preserve the muscle properties over longer periods of time. In conclusion, our data suggest that inflammatory cells promote ASM hypercontractility in airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma.

  5. Comparison of stayers, dropouts, and newcomers in a longitudinal population study of asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness: introduction of bias?

    PubMed

    Ulrik, C S

    1995-01-01

    A random sample of children and adolescents from the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark, has been examined twice (6 years apart) with respect to asthma, allergy, and nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness. To investigate potential bias resulting from loss of baseline subjects at follow-up (dropout bias) and bias resulting from subjects entering the study at the follow-up stage (newcomer bias), stayers (subjects who participated in both examinations) were compared to dropouts and newcomers, respectively. The sample consisted of 983 subjects (aged 7-17 years at the time of the baseline study), of whom 408 (199 boys) participated in both examinations (stayers), 119 (62 boys) in the baseline study only (dropouts), and 257 (124 boys in the follow-up study only (newcomers). Thus, a total of 784 subjects (80% of the sample) were examined either once or twice. At baseline dropouts did not differ from stayers with respect to anthropometric data, smoking habits, pulmonary function, or prevalence of positive skin prick tests, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, asthma, and allergic diseases. Likewise, these variables for newcomers were not different from those of the stayers apart from a significantly higher smoking rate in newcomers (45% vs. 32%, p = 0.003). Based on these findings and the high overall response rate, it seems reasonable to assume that the group of stayers is representative of the whole sample, apart from an underestimation of the number of smokers and, therefore, an underestimation of the risks associated with smoking.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. A geranyl acetophenone targeting cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis prevents allergic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-sensitized mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Norazren; Jambari, Nuzul Nurahya; Zareen, Seema; Akhtar, Mohamad Nadeem; Shaari, Khozirah; Zamri-Saad, Mohamad; Tham, Chau Ling; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Lajis, Nordin Hj; Israf, Daud Ahmad

    2012-03-01

    Asthma is associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. The current use of corticosteroids in the management of asthma has recently raised issues regarding safety and lack of responsiveness in 5–10% of asthmatic individuals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of a non-steroidal small molecule that has cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) inhibitory activity, upon attenuation of allergic lung inflammation in an acute murine model. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and treated with several intraperitoneal doses (100, 20, 2 and 0.2 mg/kg) of 2,4,6,-trihydroxy-3-geranylacetophenone (tHGA). Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, blood and lung samples were obtained and respiratory function was measured. OVA sensitization increased pulmonary inflammation and pulmonary allergic inflammation was significantly reduced at doses of 100, 20 and 2 mg/kg with no effect at the lowest dose of 0.2 mg/kg. The beneficial effects in the lung were associated with reduced eosinophilic infiltration and reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines and cysLTs. Peripheral blood reduction of total IgE was also a prominent feature. Treatment with tHGA significantly attenuated altered airway hyperresponsiveness as measured by the enhanced pause (Penh) response to incremental doses of methacholine. These data demonstrate that tHGA, a synthetic non-steroidal small molecule, can prevent acute allergic inflammation. This proof of concept opens further avenues of research and development of tHGA as an additional option to the current armamentarium of anti-asthma therapeutics. -- Highlights: ► Safer and effective anti-asthmatic drugs are in great demand. ► tHGA is a new 5-LO/cysLT inhibitor that inhibits allergic asthma in mice. ► tHGA is a natural compound that can be synthesized. ► Doses as low as 2 mg/kg alleviate lung pathology in experimental asthma. ► tHGA is a potential drug lead for the treatment of allergic asthma.

  7. Airway malacia in children with achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Dessoffy, Kimberly E; Modaff, Peggy; Pauli, Richard M

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the frequency of airway malacia in infants and young children with achondroplasia, a population well known to be at risk for a variety of respiratory problems. We also wished to evaluate what, if any, contribution airway malacia makes to the complex respiratory issues that may be present in those with achondroplasia. Retrospective chart review of all infants and young children with achondroplasia who were assessed through the Midwest Regional Bone Dysplasia Clinics from 1985 through 2012 (n = 236) was completed. Records of comprehensive clinical examinations, polysomnographic assessments, and airway visualization were reviewed and abstracted using a data collection form. Analyses were completed comparing the group with and those without evidence for airway malacia. Thirteen of 236 patients (5.5%) were found to have airway malacia. Most of those affected had lower airway involvement (9/13). The presence of airway malacia was correlated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea as well as need for oxygen supplementation, airway surgeries and tracheostomy placement. Although estimates of the frequency of airway malacia in the general population are limited, its frequency in children with achondroplasia appears to be much higher than any published general population estimate. The presence of airway malacia appears to confound other breathing abnormalities in this population and results in the need for more invasive airway treatments.

  8. Native Small Airways Secrete Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cl− impermeability in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the cloning of the responsible channel, CF pathology has been widely attributed to a defect in epithelial Cl− transport. However, loss of bicarbonate (HCO3−) transport also plays a major, possibly more critical role in CF pathogenesis. Even though HCO3− transport is severely affected in the native pancreas, liver, and intestines in CF, we know very little about HCO3− secretion in small airways, the principle site of morbidity in CF. We used a novel, mini-Ussing chamber system to investigate the properties of HCO3− transport in native porcine small airways (∼ 1 mm φ). We assayed HCO3− transport across small airway epithelia as reflected by the transepithelial voltage, conductance, and equivalent short-circuit current with bilateral 25-mM HCO3− plus 125-mM NaGlu Ringer’s solution in the presence of luminal amiloride (10 μM). Under these conditions, because no major transportable anions other than HCO3− were present, we took the equivalent short-circuit current to be a direct measure of active HCO3− secretion. Applying selective agonists and inhibitors, we show constitutive HCO3− secretion in small airways, which can be stimulated significantly by β-adrenergic– (cAMP) and purinergic (Ca2+) -mediated agonists, independently. These results indicate that two separate components for HCO3− secretion, likely via CFTR- and calcium-activated chloride channel–dependent processes, are physiologically regulated for likely roles in mucus clearance and antimicrobial innate defenses of small airways. PMID:24224935

  9. Functional contribution of mandibular advancement to awake upper airway patency in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Tsuiki, Satoru; Ryan, C Frank; Lowe, Alan A; Inoue, Yuichi

    2007-12-01

    In the narrowed upper airway of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a neuromuscular compensatory mechanism augments the activity of the upper airway dilator muscles in defense of upper airway patency, particularly during inspiration. We hypothesized that mechanical enlargement of the upper airway by a mandibular advancement oral appliance would permit a reduction in this neuromuscular compensation during wakefulness. To test this hypothesis, we focused on changes in the cross-sectional (CS) area of the upper airway before and after emplacement of a ventrally titrated oral appliance in 12 awake OSA patients. The CS areas at the end of tidal expiration (CS area-EET) and at the nadir of intraluminal pressure during inspiration (CS area-IN) were obtained using videoendoscopy. The median apnea-hypopnea index decreased with mandibular advancement. Before mandibular advancement, there was no difference between CS area-EET and CS area-IN in the velopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. This indicates that upper airway dilator muscle activity increased during inspiration to counteract the intraluminal negative pressure of the upper airway. After mandibular advancement, CS area-EET increased in the velopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx, but CS area-IN was unchanged at any level and was less than CS area-EET in the velopharynx and oropharynx. These findings suggest that mandibular advancement enlarges the upper airway and may reduce upper airway dilator muscle activity during inspiration. We conclude that oral appliances act to return the upper airway towards a normal configuration and pattern of muscle function in OSA patients.

  10. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed.

  11. Airway remodeling in asthma: what really matters.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbach, Heinz; Wagner, Christina; Wegmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Airway remodeling is generally quite broadly defined as any change in composition, distribution, thickness, mass or volume and/or number of structural components observed in the airway wall of patients relative to healthy individuals. However, two types of airway remodeling should be distinguished more clearly: (1) physiological airway remodeling, which encompasses structural changes that occur regularly during normal lung development and growth leading to a normal mature airway wall or as an acute and transient response to injury and/or inflammation, which ultimately results in restoration of a normal airway structures; and (2) pathological airway remodeling, which comprises those structural alterations that occur as a result of either disturbed lung development or as a response to chronic injury and/or inflammation leading to persistently altered airway wall structures and function. This review will address a few major aspects: (1) what are reliable quantitative approaches to assess airway remodeling? (2) Are there any indications supporting the notion that airway remodeling can occur as a primary event, i.e., before any inflammatory process was initiated? (3) What is known about airway remodeling being a secondary event to inflammation? And (4), what can we learn from the different animal models ranging from invertebrate to primate models in the study of airway remodeling? Future studies are required addressing particularly pheno-/endotype-specific aspects of airway remodeling using both endotype-specific animal models and "endotyped" human asthmatics. Hopefully, novel in vivo imaging techniques will be further advanced to allow monitoring development, growth and inflammation of the airways already at a very early stage in life.

  12. The osmolyte xylitol reduces the salt concentration of airway surface liquid and may enhance bacterial killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabner, Joseph; Seiler, Michael P.; Launspach, Janice L.; Karp, Philip H.; Kearney, William R.; Look, Dwight C.; Smith, Jeffrey J.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-10-01

    The thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) contains antimicrobial substances that kill the small numbers of bacteria that are constantly being deposited in the lungs. An increase in ASL salt concentration inhibits the activity of airway antimicrobial factors and may partially explain the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). We tested the hypothesis that an osmolyte with a low transepithelial permeability may lower the ASL salt concentration, thereby enhancing innate immunity. We found that the five-carbon sugar xylitol has a low transepithelial permeability, is poorly metabolized by several bacteria, and can lower the ASL salt concentration in both CF and non-CF airway epithelia in vitro. Furthermore, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, xylitol sprayed for 4 days into each nostril of normal volunteers significantly decreased the number of nasal coagulase-negative Staphylococcus compared with saline control. Xylitol may be of value in decreasing ASL salt concentration and enhancing the innate antimicrobial defense at the airway surface.

  13. Arginase enzymes in isolated airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin

    SciTech Connect

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Michael S.; Kenyon, Nicholas J. Last, Jerold A.

    2009-02-01

    Arginase has been suggested to compete with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for their common substrate, L-arginine. To study the mechanisms underlying this interaction, we compared arginase expression in isolated airways and the consequences of inhibiting arginase activity in vivo with NO production, lung inflammation, and lung function in both C57BL/6 and NOS2 knockout mice undergoing ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, a mouse model of asthma. Arginases I and II were measured by western blot in isolated airways from sensitized C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin aerosol. Physiological and biochemical responses - inflammation, lung compliance, airway hyperreactivity, exhaled NO concentration, arginine concentration - were compared with the responses of NOS2 knockout mice. NOS2 knockout mice had increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity. Both arginase I and arginase II were constitutively expressed in the airways of normal C57BL/6 mice. Arginase I was up-regulated approximately 8-fold in the airways of C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin. Expression of both arginase isoforms were significantly upregulated in NOS2 knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin, with about 40- and 4-fold increases in arginases I and II, respectively. Arginine concentration in isolated airways was not significantly different in any of the groups studied. Inhibition of arginase by systemic treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a competitive inhibitor, N{omega}-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA), significantly decreased the lung inflammatory response to ovalbumin in these animals. We conclude that NOS2 knockout mice are more sensitive to ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and its sequelae than are C57BL/6 mice, as determined by increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity, and that these findings are strongly correlated with increased expression of both arginase isoforms in the airways of the

  14. Effect of hypoxia and hypercapina on the airways defence reflexes.

    PubMed

    Tatár, M; Tarkanov, I A; Korpás, J; Kulik, A M

    1987-01-01

    In experiments on 10 adult anaesthetized cats (pentobarbital 30 mg.kg-1 i.p.) the effect of stimultaneous hypoxia and hypercapnia was studied on the defence respiratory reflexes of the airways. Expiratory reflex and cough were elicited by mechanical stimulation of the airways mucosa, and the obtained values were evaluated on basis of the intrapleural pressure. Inhalation of the hypoxic-hypercapnic gas mixture (11% + 7% CO2 in N2) for 15 minutes led to a significant decrease of respiratory frequency, tidal volume and PaCO2, while pHa and PaCO2 also decreased significantly together with the intensity of the expiratory reflex and that of cough. Recent studies, showed that in the course of the effect of hypoxia (11% O2) and of hypercapnia (5% CO2), cough intensity decreased, but the change was not significant. The decrease of the intensity of respiratory defence reflexes under hypoxic-hypercapnic conditions might have been due to the changes of centrally controlling structures, or to the effector part of the reflex arc, resulting from fatigue of the respiratory muscles. The possible effect of anaesthesia exerting a significant influence on the intensity and character of airways defence reflexes could not be excluded.

  15. Arginase inhibition in airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin

    SciTech Connect

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; O'Roark, Erin M.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Last, Jerold A.

    2010-01-01

    Arginase1 and nitric oxide synthase2 (NOS2) utilize L-arginine as a substrate, with both enzymes expressed at high levels in the asthmatic lung. Inhibition of arginase in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice with the transition state inhibitor N{sup o}mega-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) significantly increased total L-arginine content in the airway compartment. We hypothesized that such an increase in L-arginine content would increase the amount of nitric oxide (NO) being produced in the airways and thereby decrease airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic influx. We further hypothesized that despite arginase inhibition, NOS2 knockout (NOS2-/-) mice would be unable to up-regulate NO production in response to allergen exposure and would demonstrate higher amounts of airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilia under conditions of arginase inhibition than C57BL/6 animals. We found that administration of nor-NOHA significantly decreased airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice, but these parameters were unchanged in ovalbumin-exposed NOS2-/- mice. Arginase1 protein content was increased in mice exposed to ovalbumin, an effect that was reversed upon nor-NOHA treatment in C57BL/6 mice. Arginase1 protein content in the airway compartment directly correlated with the degree of airway hyperreactivity in all treatment groups. NOS2-/- mice had significantly greater arginase1 and arginase2 concentrations compared to their respective C57BL/6 groups, indicating that inhibition of arginase may be dependent upon NOS2 expression. Arginase1 and 2 content were not affected by nor-NOHA administration in the NOS2-/- mice. We conclude that L-arginine metabolism plays an important role in the development of airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation. Inhibition of arginase early in the allergic inflammatory response decreases the severity of the chronic inflammatory phenotype. These effects appear to be attributable to NOS2

  16. Numerical Simulation for Mechanism of Airway Narrowing in Asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Ohba, Kenkichi

    A calculation model is proposed to examine the generation mechanism of the numerous lobes on the inner-wall of the airway in asthmatic patients and to clarify luminal occlusion of the airway inducing breathing difficulties. The basement membrane in the airway wall is modeled as a two-dimensional thin-walled shell having inertia force due to the mass, and the smooth muscle contraction effect is replaced by uniform transmural pressure applied to the basement membrane. A dynamic explicit finite element method is used as a numerical simulation method. To examine the validity of the present model, simulation of an asthma attack is performed. The number of lobes generated in the basement membrane increases when transmural pressure is applied in a shorter time period. When the remodeling of the basement membrane occurs characterized by thickening and hardening, it is demonstrated that the number of lobes decreases and the narrowing of the airway lumen becomes severe. Comparison of the results calculated by the present model with those measured for animal experiments of asthma will be possible.

  17. Oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction. Possible role in airway disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, W.J.; Martin, W.J. 2d.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of reactive species of oxygen on the airway are not well known. This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the structure and function of the airway epithelium. Tracheal rings were prepared from 200 g male rats. Damage to the airway epithelium was assayed by monitoring the ciliary beat frequency, the release of 51Cr, and histology. H2O2 at concentrations of 1.0 mM and above caused a very rapid decrease in ciliary beat frequency. After ten minutes' exposure to 1.0 mM, the ciliary beat frequency was 72 +/- 20 percent of control. Release of 51Cr was a less sensitive measure with significant release occurring after four hours of exposure to ciliotoxic concentrations of H2O2. Histologic changes were not evident within the experimental time period. All toxic effects of H2O2 were completely blocked by catalase. This study shows that H2O2 causes a rapid decline in ciliary activity and suggests that oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction could play a role in the pathogenesis of airway disease. The ciliary beat frequency provides a sensitive, physiologically relevant parameter for the in vitro study of these diseases.

  18. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers).

  19. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Rancourt, Raymond C. Veress, Livia A. Ahmad, Aftab Hendry-Hofer, Tara B. Rioux, Jacqueline S. Garlick, Rhonda B. White, Carl W.

    2013-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods: Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, was instilled into the trachea. Arterial O{sub 2} saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin–antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results: Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts was evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions: Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. - Highlights: • TFPI administration to rats after mustard inhalation reduces airway cast formation. • Inhibition of thrombin activation is the likely mechanism for limiting casts. • Rats given TFPI

  20. Role of nicotinic receptors and acetylcholine in mucous cell metaplasia, hyperplasia and airway mucus formation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Wilder, Julie A.; Mishra, Neerad C.; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Langley, Raymond J.; Singh, Shashi P.; Saeed, Ali Imran; Jaramillo, Richard J.; Gott, Katherine M.; Peña-Philippides, Juan Carlos; Harrod, Kevin S.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Buch, Shilpa; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway mucus hypersecretion is a key pathophysiological feature in number of lung diseases. Cigarette smoke/nicotine and allergens are strong stimulators of airway mucus; however, the mechanism of mucus modulation is unclear. Objectives Characterize the pathway by which cigarette smoke/nicotine regulates airway mucus and identify agents that decrease airway mucus. Methods IL-13 and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) are implicated in airway mucus. We examined the role of IL-13 and GABAARs in nicotine-induced mucus formation in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and A549 cells, and secondhand cigarette smoke and/or ovalbumin-induced mucus formation in vivo. Results Nicotine promotes mucus formation in NHBE cells; however, the nicotine-induced mucus formation is independent of IL-13 but sensitive to the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin (PIC). Airway epithelial cells express α7/α9/α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and specific inhibition or knockdown of α7- but not α9/α10-nAChRs abrogates mucus formation in response to nicotine and IL-13. Moreover, addition of acetylcholine or inhibition of its degradation increases mucus in NHBE cells. Nicotinic but not muscarinic receptor antagonists block allergen or nicotine/cigarette smoke-induced airway mucus formation in NHBE cells and/or in mouse airways. Conclusions Nicotine-induced airway mucus formation is independent of IL-13 and α7-nAChRs are critical in airway mucous cell metaplasia/hyperplasia and mucus production in response to various pro-mucoid agents, including IL-13. In the absence of nicotine, acetylcholine may be the biological ligand for α7-nAChRs to trigger airway mucus formation. α7-nAChRs are downstream of IL-13 but upstream of GABAARα2 in the MUC5AC pathway. Acetylcholine and α-7-nAChRs may serve as therapeutic targets to control airway mucus. PMID:22578901

  1. NDRG1 is important to maintain the integrity of airway epithelial barrier through claudin-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Gon, Yasuhiro; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Kozu, Yutaka; Kazumichi, Kuroda; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Takeshita, Ikuko; Oshima, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Shu

    2017-02-13

    Impairment of epithelial barrier integrity caused by environmental triggers is associated with the pathogenesis of airway inflammation. Using human airway epithelial cells, we attempted to identify molecule(s) that promote airway epithelial barrier integrity. Microarray analyses were conducted using the Affimetrix human whole genome gene chip, and we identified the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) gene, which was induced during the development of the epithelial cell barrier. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong NDRG1 expression in ciliated epithelial cells in nasal tissues sampled from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and the low expression of NDRG1 was observed in goblet cells or damaged epithelial cells. NDRG1 gene knockdown with its specific siRNA decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance and increased the dextran permeability. Immunocytochemistry revealed that NDRG1 knockdown disrupted tight junctions of airway epithelial cells. Next, we analyzed the effects of NDRG1 knockdown on the expression of tight and adhesion junction molecules. NDRG1 knockdown significantly decreased only claudin-9 expression, but did not decrease other claudin family molecules, such as E-cadherin, and ZO-1, -2, or -3. Knockdown of claudin-9 markedly impaired the barrier function in airway epithelial cells. These results suggest that NDRG1 is important for the barrier integrity in airway epithelial cells.

  2. Generation of Pig Airways using Rules Developed from the Measurements of Physical Airways

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Md Khurshidul; Mansy, Hansen A.

    2017-01-01

    Background A method for generating bronchial tree would be helpful when constructing models of the tree for benchtop experiments as well as for numerical modeling of flow or sound propagation in the airways. Early studies documented the geometric details of the human airways that were used to develop methods for generating human airway tree. However, methods for generating animal airway tree are scarcer. Earlier studies suggested that the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. Hence, using algorithms for the human airways may not be accurate in generating models of animal airway geometry. Objective The objective of this study is to develop an algorithm for generating pig airway tree based on the geometric details extracted from the physical measurements. Methods In the current study, measured values of branch diameters, lengths and bifurcation angles and rotation of bifurcating planes were used to develop an algorithm that is capable of generating a realistic pig airway tree. Results The generation relations between parent and daughter branches were found to follow certain trends. The diameters and the length of different branches were dependent on airway generations while the bifurcation angles were primarily dependent on bifurcation plane rotations. These relations were sufficient to develop rules for generating a model of the pig large airways. Conclusion The results suggested that the airway tree generated from the algorithm can provide an approximate geometric model of pig airways for computational and benchtop studies. PMID:28255517

  3. Airway and Parenchymal Strains during Bronchoconstriction in the Precision Cut Lung Slice

    PubMed Central

    Hiorns, Jonathan E.; Bidan, Cécile M.; Jensen, Oliver E.; Gosens, Reinoud; Kistemaker, Loes E. M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Butler, Jim P.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Brook, Bindi S.

    2016-01-01

    The precision-cut lung slice (PCLS) is a powerful tool for studying airway reactivity, but biomechanical measurements to date have largely focused on changes in airway caliber. Here we describe an image processing tool that reveals the associated spatio-temporal changes in airway and parenchymal strains. Displacements of sub-regions within the PCLS are tracked in phase-contrast movies acquired after addition of contractile and relaxing drugs. From displacement maps, strains are determined across the entire PCLS or along user-specified directions. In a representative mouse PCLS challenged with 10−4M methacholine, as lumen area decreased, compressive circumferential strains were highest in the 50 μm closest to the airway lumen while expansive radial strains were highest in the region 50–100 μm from the lumen. However, at any given distance from the airway the strain distribution varied substantially in the vicinity of neighboring small airways and blood vessels. Upon challenge with the relaxant agonist chloroquine, although most strains disappeared, residual positive strains remained a long time after addition of chloroquine, predominantly in the radial direction. Taken together, these findings establish strain mapping as a new tool to elucidate local dynamic mechanical events within the constricting airway and its supporting parenchyma. PMID:27559314

  4. Cigarette smoke extract inhibits expression of peroxiredoxin V and increases airway epithelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Serikov, Vladimir B; Leutenegger, Christian; Krutilina, Raisa; Kropotov, Andrei; Pleskach, Nadezhda; Suh, Jung H; Tomilin, Nikolay V

    2006-01-01

    Inhaled cigarette smoke induces oxidative stress in the epithelium of airways. Peroxiredoxin V (PRXV) is a potent antioxidant protein, highly expressed in cells of the airway epithelium. The goal of our study was to determine whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) influenced expression of this protein in airway epithelia in vivo and in vitro. In Sprague-Dawley rats, we determined effects of CSE on airway epithelial permeability, mRNA levels and expression of PRXV protein. Exposure of isolated tracheal segment in vitro to 20% CSE for 4 h resulted in development of increased permeability to albumin, significantly reduced mRNA levels for PRXV, and reduced amounts of PRXV protein in the epithelium. In cultures of the airway epithelial cell lines (Calu-3, JME), primary airway cell culture (cow), and alveolar epithelial cells A549, CSE also significantly decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and expression of PRXV protein, and induced glutathione and protein oxidation. To demonstrate functional importance of PRXV, we exposed clones of HeLa cells with siRNA-downregulated PRXV to hydrogen peroxide, which resulted in increased rate of cell death and protein oxidation. CSE directly downregulates expression of functionally important antioxidant enzyme PRXV in the epithelial cells of airways, which represents one pathophysiological mechanism of cigarette smoke toxicity.

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus predisposes mice to augmented allergic airway responses via IL-13-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, N W; Tekkanat, K K; Berlin, A; Hogaboam, C M; Miller, A; Evanoff, H; Lincoln, P; Maassab, H

    2001-07-15

    The development of severe childhood asthma may be influenced by several factors including environmental and infectious stimuli. The causal relationship between infectious viral responses, such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and severe asthma during early childhood is unclear. In these studies, the ability for an initial RSV infection to exacerbate and promote a more severe asthmatic-type response was investigated by combining established murine models of disease. We examined the ability of RSV to induce exacerbation of allergic disease over a relatively long period, leading to development of severe airway responses including airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. The preferential production of IL-13 during a primary RSV infection appears to play a critical role for the exacerbation of cockroach allergen-induced disease. The depletion of IL-13 during RSV infections inhibited the exacerbation and acceleration of severe allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. This was indicated by decreases in airway hyperreactivity and changes in lung chemokine production. These data suggest that the airway responses during asthma can be greatly affected by a previous RSV infection, even when infection occurs before allergen sensitization. Overall, infection of the airways with RSV can induce an IL-13-dependent change in airway function and promotes an environment that contributes to the development of severe allergic asthmatic responses.

  6. Bromelain exerts anti-inflammatory effects in an ovalbumin-induced murine model of allergic airway disease ☆

    PubMed Central

    Secor, Eric R.; Carson, William F.; Cloutier, Michelle M.; Guernsey, Linda A.; Schramm, Craig M.; Wu, Carol A.; Thrall, Roger S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Bromelain, a clinically used pineapple extract and natural product, has reported anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of bromelain treatment in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model of allergic airway disease (AAD). Methods To establish AAD, mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal (i.p.) OVA/alum and challenged with daily OVA aerosols. Mice were treated i.p. with either saline, 2 or 6 mg/kg bromelain, twice daily for four consecutive days. Bronchoalveolar lavage leukocytes and cytokines, lung histology, airway hyperresponsiveness, and lymphocyte populations via flow cytometry were compared between groups. Results Bromelain treatment of AAD mice resulted in reduced total BAL leukocytes, eosinophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratio, and IL-13. Conclusion Bromelain attenuated development of AAD while altering CD4+ to CD8+ T lymphocyte populations. The reduction in AAD outcomes suggests that bromelain may have similar effects in the treatment of human asthma and hypersensitivity disorders. PMID:16337164

  7. Florfenicol inhibits allergic airway inflammation in mice by p38 MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of GATA 3.

    PubMed

    Xinxin, Ci; Chi, Chen; Xiao, Chu; Xue, Xu; Yongjun, Yang; Junqing, Cui; Xuming, Deng

    2011-02-01

    Florfenicol has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory activity. However, its possible use for asthma has not yet been studied. First we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of florfenicol using mice asthma model. BALB/c mice were immunized and challenged by ovalbumin. Treatment with florfenicol caused a marked reduction in inflammatory cells and three Th2 type cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of mice. The levels of ovalbumin-specific IgE and airway hyperresponsiveness were significantly altered after treatment with florfenicol. Histological studies using H&E and AB-PAS staining demonstrate that florfenicol substantially inhibited ovalbumin-induced inflammatory cells infiltration in lung tissue and goblet cell hyperplasia in the airway. These results were similar to those obtained with dexamethasone treatment. We then investigated which signal transduction mechanisms could be implicated in florfenicol activity. Our results suggested that the protective effect of florfenicol was mediated by the inhibition of the p38 MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of GATA 3.

  8. Activation of Store-Operated Calcium Entry in Airway Smooth Muscle Cells: Insight from a Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Croisier, Huguette; Tan, Xiahui; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F.; Sanderson, Michael J.; Sneyd, James; Brook, Bindi S.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular dynamics of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) mediate ASMC contraction and proliferation, and thus play a key role in airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and remodelling in asthma. We evaluate the importance of store-operated entry (SOCE) in these dynamics by constructing a mathematical model of ASMC signaling based on experimental data from lung slices. The model confirms that SOCE is elicited upon sufficient depletion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), while receptor-operated entry (ROCE) is inhibited in such conditions. It also shows that SOCE can sustain agonist-induced oscillations in the absence of other influx. SOCE up-regulation may thus contribute to AHR by increasing the oscillation frequency that in turn regulates ASMC contraction. The model also provides an explanation for the failure of the SERCA pump blocker CPA to clamp the cytosolic of ASMC in lung slices, by showing that CPA is unable to maintain the SR empty of . This prediction is confirmed by experimental data from mouse lung slices, and strongly suggests that CPA only partially inhibits SERCA in ASMC. PMID:23936056

  9. Oral administration of Enterococcus faecalis FK-23 suppresses Th17 cell development and attenuates allergic airway responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; An, Jun; Shimada, Takashi; Liu, Shuang; Maeyama, Kazutaka

    2012-08-01

    Evidence is increasing that oral administration of probiotics can attenuate asthmatic responses both in murine models and clinical trials. T-helper 17 (Th17) cells, a subset of CD4+ T cells have been implicated as having an important role in the development of several allergic disorders, but the relationship between oral administration of probiotics and Th17 development has not been well studied. BALB/c mice were given lysed Enterococcus faecalis FK-23 (LFK) orally for 28 days. After sensitization by subcutaneous injection of ovalbumin (OVA) on Days 14 and 21 and 1% OVA inhalation on Days 25, 26 and 27, they were challenged with a 5% OVA aerosol on Day 28. Twenty-four hours later, airway resistance and accumulation of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were determined. Ιnterleukin (IL)-17-expressing CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from lung, spleen and lamina propria of the intestine were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of IL-6 and TGF-β mRNA was assessed by real-time PCR. Increases in airway hyperresponsiveness, and numbers of total leukocytes and mast cells in BALF induced by OVA challenge were significantly suppressed by oral administration of LFK. The increased percentage of IL-17-expressing CD4+ cells from lung, spleen and intestine in OVA-challenged mice was reduced following LFK treatment. We conclude that the oral administration of LFK suppresses the asthmatic response and that this is associated with attenuation of Th17 cell development.

  10. Recent trends in airway management

    PubMed Central

    Karlik, Joelle; Aziz, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal intubation remains a life-saving procedure that is typically not difficult for experienced providers in routine conditions. Unfortunately, difficult intubation remains challenging to predict and intubation conditions may make the event life threatening. Recent technological advances aim to further improve the ease, speed, safety, and success of intubation but have not been fully investigated. Video laryngoscopy, though proven effective in the difficult airway, may result in different intubation success rates in various settings and in different providers’ hands. The rescue surgical airway remains a rarely used but critical skill, and research continues to investigate optimal techniques. This review highlights some of the new thoughts and research on these important topics. PMID:28299194

  11. Adrenal androgen hyperresponsiveness to adrenocorticotropin in women with acne and/or hirsutism: adrenal enzyme defects and exaggerated adrenarche.

    PubMed

    Lucky, A W; Rosenfield, R L; McGuire, J; Rudy, S; Helke, J

    1986-05-01

    To determine the adrenal contribution to elevated plasma androgens in 31 young hyperandrogenemic women with acne and/or hirsutism, we compared their responses to ACTH with those of 14 normal women. Each subject was given a low dose (10 micrograms/m2) of synthetic ACTH-(1-24) (Cortrosyn) after administration of 1.5 mg dexamethasone the night before the test. Thirty and 60 min responses of plasma 17 alpha-hydroxypregnenolone (17-Preg), 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, (17-prog), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione, 11-deoxycortisol, and cortisol were measured. Eighteen (58%) patients had increased responses of at least one 17-ketosteroid or adrenal androgen precursor. All patients had cortisol responses within the range of those of the 14 normal subjects. Nine patients (29%) had evidence of steroid biosynthetic enzyme deficiencies, either mild congenital adrenal hyperplasia or the heterozygote state; after ACTH, 4 of these patients had elevated 17-prog in the range of values in heterozygote carriers of 21-hydroxylase deficiency, 2 had elevated levels of 11-deoxycortisol compatible with 11 beta-hydroxylase deficiency, and 3 had elevated levels of 17-Preg and DHEA, suggestive of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency. Another 9 subjects (29%) had 17-ketosteroid (DHEA and/or androstenedione) hyperresponsiveness to ACTH with associated elevated 17-Preg responses. As a group, their patterns suggested relatively deficient 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and relatively hyperactive C lyase without impairment of cortisol secretion. This pattern resembles exaggerated adrenarche, and we postulate that these 9 patients have hyperplasia of the zona reticularis. Neither basal levels of plasma androgens (free testosterone and DHEA sulfate) nor menstrual history predicted which patients would have abnormal ACTH responses. Although 5 of 11 (45%) patients with acne alone had abnormal responses to ACTH, 10 of 14 patients with acne and hirsutism (71%) had abnormal

  12. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™).

    PubMed

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Saini, Vikas

    2014-10-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer's defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not identifiable on external inspection of transparent shaft. We suggest that such as non-transparent laryngeal mask, a transparent LM airway should also be inspected looking inside the lumen with naked eyes or by using a probe to rule out any manufacturing defect before its insertion.

  13. A prebiotic galactooligosaccharide mixture reduces severity of hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction and markers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Neil C; Johnson, Michael A; Shaw, Dominick E; Spendlove, Ian; Vulevic, Jelena; Sharpe, Graham R; Hunter, Kirsty A

    2016-09-01

    Gut microbes have a substantial influence on systemic immune function and allergic sensitisation. Manipulation of the gut microbiome through prebiotics may provide a potential strategy to influence the immunopathology of asthma. This study investigated the effects of prebiotic Bimuno-galactooligosaccharide (B-GOS) supplementation on hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB), a surrogate for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and airway inflammation. A total of ten adults with asthma and HIB and eight controls without asthma were randomised to receive 5·5 g/d of either B-GOS or placebo for 3 weeks separated by a 2-week washout period. The peak fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) following eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) defined HIB severity. Markers of airway inflammation were measured at baseline and after EVH. Pulmonary function remained unchanged in the control group. In the HIB group, the peak post-EVH fall in FEV1 at day 0 (-880 (sd 480) ml) was unchanged after placebo, but was attenuated by 40 % (-940 (sd 460) v. -570 (sd 310) ml, P=0·004) after B-GOS. In the HIB group, B-GOS reduced baseline chemokine CC ligand 17 (399 (sd 140) v. 323 (sd 144) pg/ml, P=0·005) and TNF-α (2·68 (sd 0·98) v. 2·18 (sd 0·59) pg/ml, P=0·040) and abolished the EVH-induced 29 % increase in TNF-α. Baseline C-reactive protein was reduced following B-GOS in HIB (2·46 (sd 1·14) v. 1·44 (sd 0·41) mg/l, P=0·015) and control (2·16 (sd 1·02) v. 1·47 (sd 0·33) mg/l, P=0·050) groups. Chemokine CC ligand 11 and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide remained unchanged. B-GOS supplementation attenuated airway hyper-responsiveness with concomitant reductions in markers of airway inflammation associated with HIB.

  14. Divergent mechanisms for the insulin resistant and hyperresponsive glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted and refed rats. Alterations in both glucose transporter number and intrinsic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, B B; Simpson, I A; Cushman, S W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fasting and refeeding on the glucose transport response to insulin in isolated rat adipose cells have been examined using 3-O-methylglucose transport in intact cells and cytochalasin B binding and Western blotting in subcellular membrane fractions. After a 72-h fast, basal glucose transport activity decreases slightly and insulin-stimulated activity decreases greater than 85%. Following 48 h of fasting, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity is diminished from 3.9 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 fmol/cell per min (mean +/- SEM). Similarly, the concentrations of glucose transporters are reduced with fasting in both the plasma membranes from insulin-stimulated cells from 38 +/- 5 to 18 +/- 3 pmol/mg of membrane protein and the low density microsomes from basal cells from 68 +/- 8 to 34 +/- 9 pmol/mg of membrane protein. Ad lib. refeeding for 6 d after a 48-h fast results in up to twofold greater maximally insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity compared with the control level (7.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.5 +/- 0.2 fmol/cell per min), before returning to baseline at 10 d. However, the corresponding concentration of glucose transporters in the plasma membranes is restored only to the control level (45 +/- 5 vs. 50 +/- 5 pmol/mg of membrane protein). Although the concentration of glucose transporters in the low density microsomes of basal cells remains decreased, the total number is restored to the control level due to an increase in low density microsomal protein. Thus, the insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted rats can be explained by a decreased translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane due to a depleted intracellular pool. In contrast, the insulin hyperresponsive glucose transport observed with refeeding appears to result from (a) a restored translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane from a repleted intracellular pool and (b) enhanced plasma membrane glucose transporter intrinsic activity

  15. Functional characterization of muscarinic receptors in murine airways.

    PubMed Central

    Garssen, J.; Van Loveren, H.; Gierveld, C. M.; Van der Vliet, H.; Nijkamp, F. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists considered to be selective for M1 receptors (pirenzepine; PZ), M2 receptors (AFDX-116), and for M3 receptors (4-diphenyl acetoxy N-methyl-piperidine (4-DAMP)) were used to investigate the existence of muscarinic receptors subtypes in murine airways. Atropine was used as a nonselective antagonist. The effects of these antagonists were studied upon tracheal contractions induced either by EFS (electric field stimulation) or by application of an exogenous cholinoceptor agonist (arecoline). 2. The muscarinic receptor antagonists tested inhibited arecoline-induced tracheal contractions with the following rank order of potency: 4-DAMP = atropine > pirenzepine = AFDX-116. The rank order of potency of the muscarinic antagonists used in inhibiting EFS-induced tracheal contractions was: 4-DAMP = atropine > PZ > AFDX-116. The pA2 values for these antagonists were similar when compared to the pA2 values determined in guinea-pig and bovine airway smooth muscle. 3. In addition to in vitro studies, the effects of inhalation of the different muscarinic antagonists on lung function parameters in vivo were investigated. Inhalation of 4-DAMP induced a decrease in airway resistance and an increase in lung compliance. In contrast, inhalation of AFDX-116 induced an increase in airway resistance and almost no change in lung compliance. Apart from some minor effects of atropine on airway resistance, atropine, PZ, and pilocarpine failed to induce changes in lung mechanics as determined by in vivo lung function measurements. 4. The results provide evidence for the existence of M3 receptors on murine tracheae that are involved in the contraction of tracheal smooth muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8495246

  16. Allergen-induced airway remodeling is impaired in galectin-3 deficient mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiao Na; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Kang, Bit Na; Hosseinkhani, Reza M.; Ha, Sung Gil; Frenzel, Elizabeth M.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rao, Savita P.; Sriramarao, P.

    2010-01-01

    The role played by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3 (Gal-3) in airway remodeling, a characteristic feature of asthma that leads to airway dysfunction and poor clinical outcome in humans, was investigated in a murine model of chronic allergic airway inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and Gal-3 knock-out (KO) mice were subjected to repetitive allergen challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) up to 12 weeks and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue collected after the last challenge were evaluated for cellular features associated with airway remodeling. Compared to WT mice, chronic OVA challenge in Gal-3 KO mice resulted in diminished remodeling of the airways with significantly reduced mucus secretion, sub-epithelial fibrosis, smooth muscle thickness, and peribronchial angiogenesis. The higher degree of airway remodeling in WT mice was associated with higher Gal-3 expression in the BALF as well as lung tissue. Cell counts in BALF and lung immunohistology demonstrated that eosinophil infiltration in OVA-challenged Gal-3 KO mice was significantly reduced compared to WT mice. Evaluation of cellular mediators associated with eosinophil recruitment and airway remodeling revealed that levels of eotaxin-1, IL-5, IL-13, FIZZ1 and TGF-β were substantially lower in Gal-3 KO mice. Finally, leukocytes from Gal-3 KO mice demonstrated decreased trafficking (rolling) on vascular endothelial adhesion molecules compared to WT cells. Overall, these studies demonstrate that Gal-3 is an important lectin that promotes airway remodeling via airway recruitment of inflammatory cells, specifically eosinophils, and the development of a Th2 phenotype as well as increased expression of eosinophil-specific chemokines, pro-fibrogenic and angiogenic mediators. PMID:20543100

  17. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, airway innervation, and smooth muscle are altered in Cftr null mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Luk, Catherine; Kent, Geraldine; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2006-09-01

    The amine- and peptide-producing pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) are widely distributed within the airway mucosa of mammalian lung as solitary cells and innervated clusters, neuroepithelial bodies (NEB), which function as airway O2 sensors. These cells express Cftr and hence could play a role in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We performed confocal microscopy and morphometric analysis on lung sections from Cftr-/- (null), Cftr+/+, and Cftr+/- (control) mice at developmental stages E20, P5, P9, and P30 to determine the distribution, frequency, and innervation of PNEC/NEB, innervation and cell mass of airway smooth muscle, and neuromuscular junctions using synaptic vesicle protein 2, smooth muscle actin, and synaptophysin markers, respectively. The mean number of PNEC/NEB in Cftr-/- mice was significantly reduced compared with control mice at E20, whereas comparable or increased numbers were observed postnatally. NEB cells in Cftr null mice showed a significant reduction in intracorpuscular nerve endings compared with control mice, which is consistent with an intrinsic abnormality of the PNEC system. The airways of Cftr-/- mice showed reduced density (approximately 20-30%) of smooth muscle innervation, decreased mean airway smooth muscle mass (approximately 35%), and reduced density (approximately 20%) of nerve endings compared with control mice. We conclude that the airways of Cftr-/- mice exhibit heretofore unappreciated structural alterations affecting cellular and neural components of the PNEC system and airway smooth muscle and its innervation resulting in blunted O2 sensing and reduced airway tonus. Cftr could play a role in the development of the PNEC system, lung innervation, and airway smooth muscle.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the Posterior Airway Space After Maxillomandibular Advancement For Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Waite, Peter D.; Shih, Alan M.; Cheng, Gary C.; Koomullil, Roy; Ito, Yasushi; Cure, Joel K; Harding, Susan M.; Litaker, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the soft tissue change of the upper airway after maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Materials and Methods Eight OSAS patients who required MMA were recruited into this study. All participants had pre- and post-operative computed tomography (CT) and underwent MMA by a single oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Upper airway CT data sets for these 8 participants were created with high-fidelity 3-D numerical models for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The 3-D models were simulated and analyzed to study how changes in airway anatomy affects pressure effort required for normal breathing. Airway dimensions, skeletal changes, Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI), and pressure efforts of pre- and post-operative 3-D models were compared and correlations interpreted. Results After MMA, laminar and turbulent air flow was significantly decreased at every level of the airway. The cross-sectional areas at the soft palate and tongue base were significantly increased. Conclusions This study shows that MMA increases airway dimensions by the increasing the occipital base (Base) - pogonion (Pg) distance. An increase of the Base-Pg distance showed a significant correlation with an AHI improvement and a decreased pressure effort of the upper airway. Decreasing the pressure effort will decrease the breathing workload. This improves the condition of OSAS. PMID:23642544

  19. Method for 3D Airway Topology Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Grothausmann, Roman; Kellner, Manuela; Heidrich, Marko; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Kuehnel, Mark P.; Ochs, Matthias; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    In lungs the number of conducting airway generations as well as bifurcation patterns varies across species and shows specific characteristics relating to illnesses or gene variations. A method to characterize the topology of the mouse airway tree using scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) tomograms is presented in this paper. It is used to test discrimination between two types of mice based on detected differences in their conducting airway pattern. Based on segmentations of the airways in these tomograms, the main spanning tree of the volume skeleton is computed. The resulting graph structure is used to distinguish between wild type and surfactant protein (SP-D) deficient knock-out mice. PMID:25767561

  20. Automated Lobe-Based Airway Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Suicheng; Wang, Zhimin; Siegfried, Jill M.; Wilson, David; Bigbee, William L.; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-01-01

    Regional quantitative analysis of airway morphological abnormalities is of great interest in lung disease investigation. Considering that pulmonary lobes are relatively independent functional unit, we develop and test a novel and efficient computerized scheme in this study to automatically and robustly classify the airways into different categories in terms of pulmonary lobe. Given an airway tree, which could be obtained using any available airway segmentation scheme, the developed approach consists of four basic steps: (1) airway skeletonization or centerline extraction, (2) individual airway branch identification, (3) initial rule-based airway classification/labeling, and (4) self-correction of labeling errors. In order to assess the performance of this approach, we applied it to a dataset consisting of 300 chest CT examinations in a batch manner and asked an image analyst to subjectively examine the labeled results. Our preliminary experiment showed that the labeling accuracy for the right upper lobe, the right middle lobe, the right lower lobe, the left upper lobe, and the left lower lobe is 100%, 99.3%, 99.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Among these, only two cases are incorrectly labeled due to the failures in airway detection. It takes around 2 minutes to label an airway tree using this algorithm. PMID:23093951

  1. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  2. Airway smooth muscle cell tone amplifies contractile function in the presence of chronic cyclic strain.

    PubMed

    Fairbank, Nigel J; Connolly, Sarah C; Mackinnon, James D; Wehry, Kathrin; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N

    2008-09-01

    Chronic contractile activation, or tone, in asthma coupled with continuous stretching due to breathing may be involved in altering the contractile function of airway smooth muscle (ASM). Previously, we (11) showed that cytoskeletal remodeling and stiffening responses to acute (2 h) localized stresses were modulated by the level of contractile activation of ASM. Here, we investigated if altered contractility in response to chronic mechanical strain was dependent on repeated modulation of contractile tone. Cultured human ASM cells received 5% cyclic (0.3 Hz), predominantly uniaxial strain for 5 days, with once-daily dosing of either sham, forskolin, carbachol, or histamine to alter tone. Stiffness, contractility (KCl), and "relaxability" (forskolin) were then measured as was cell alignment, myosin light-chain phosphorylation (pMLC), and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) content. Cells became aligned and baseline stiffness increased with strain, but repeated lowering of tone inhibited both effects (P < 0.05). Strain also reversed a negative tone-modulation dependence of MLCK, observed in static conditions in agreement with previous reports, with strain and tone together increasing both MLCK and pMLC. Furthermore, contractility increased 176% (SE 59) with repeated tone elevation. These findings indicate that with strain, and not without, repeated tone elevation promoted contractile function through changes in cytoskeletal organization and increased contractile protein. The ability of repeated contractile activation to increase contractility, but only with mechanical stretching, suggests a novel mechanism for increased ASM contractility in asthma and for the role of continuous bronchodilator and corticosteroid therapy in reversing airway hyperresponsiveness.

  3. Citric acid cough threshold and airway responsiveness in asthmatic patients and smokers with chronic airflow obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Auffarth, B; de Monchy, J G; van der Mark, T W; Postma, D S; Koëter, G H

    1991-01-01

    The relation between citric acid cough threshold and airway hyperresponsiveness was investigated in 11 non-smoking patients with allergic asthma (mean FEV1 94% predicted) and 25 non-atopic smokers with chronic airflow obstruction (mean FEV1 65% predicted). Cough threshold was determined on two occasions by administering doubling concentrations of citric acid. Seven of the 11 asthmatic subjects and 14 of 25 smokers with chronic airflow obstruction had a positive cough threshold on both test days. Cough threshold measurements were reproducible in both groups (standard deviation of duplicate measurements 1.2 doubling concentrations in asthma, 1.1 doubling concentrations in chronic airflow obstruction). Citric acid provocation did not cause bronchial obstruction in most patients, though four patients had a fall in FEV1 of more than 20% for a short time on one occasion only. No significant difference in cough threshold was found between the two patient groups despite differences in baseline FEV1 values. There was no significant correlation between cough threshold and the provocative concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) histamine in either group. Thus sensory nerves can be activated with a tussive agent in patients with asthma and chronic airflow obstruction without causing bronchial smooth muscle contraction. PMID:1948792

  4. Transfer of allergic airway responses with serum and lymphocytes from rats sensitized to dust mite.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A L; Winsett, D W; Costa, D L; Selgrade, M K; Gilmour, M I

    1998-06-01

    House dust mite (HDM) antigen is one of the most common allergens associated with extrinsic asthma. In a model of allergic lung disease, Brown Norway (BN) rats sensitized to HDM with alum and Bordetella pertussis adjuvants produce high levels of IgE antibody and experience bronchoconstriction, increased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to acetylcholine (ACh), and pulmonary inflammation after antigen challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these asthmatic symptoms could be transferred from sensitized animals to naive recipients via humoral or cellular factors. Syngeneic recipient rats were injected (intraperitoneally with 4 x 10(7) cells (precultured overnight with either HDM or bovine serum albumin [BSA]) from lymph nodes of sensitized or control rats, respectively. Other groups received a tail-vein injection of serum from either HDM-sensitized or control rats. Antigen challenge in rats injected with sensitized cells caused increases in pulmonary inflammation and in AHR, but no changes in immediate bronchoconstriction as compared with control recipients. Antigen challenge in serum recipients resulted in immediate bronchoconstriction but had no effect on AHR or on pulmonary inflammation. These data show that immune-mediated lung inflammation and AHR are promoted by antigen-specific lymphocytes, whereas immediate allergic responses are caused by serum factors.

  5. Clinical review: Biphasic positive airway pressure and airway pressure release ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Putensen, Christian; Wrigge, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on mechanical ventilation strategies that allow unsupported spontaneous breathing activity in any phase of the ventilatory cycle. By allowing patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome to breathe spontaneously, one can expect improvements in gas exchange and systemic blood flow, based on findings from both experimental and clinical trials. In addition, by increasing end-expiratory lung volume, as occurs when using biphasic positive airway pressure or airway pressure release ventilation, recruitment of collapsed or consolidated lung is likely to occur, especially in juxtadiaphragmatic lung legions. Traditional approaches to mechanical ventilatory support of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome require adaptation of the patient to the mechanical ventilator using heavy sedation and even muscle relaxation. Recent investigations have questioned the utility of sedation, muscle paralysis and mechanical control of ventilation. Furthermore, evidence exists that lowering sedation levels will decrease the duration of mechanical ventilatory support, length of stay in the intensive care unit, and overall costs of hospitalization. Based on currently available data, we suggest considering the use of techniques of mechanical ventilatory support that maintain, rather than suppress, spontaneous ventilatory effort, especially in patients with severe pulmonary dysfunction. PMID:15566621

  6. Distribution of airway narrowing responses across generations and at branching points, assessed in vitro by anatomical optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous histological and imaging studies have shown the presence of variability in the degree of bronchoconstriction of airways sampled at different locations in the lung (i.e., heterogeneity). Heterogeneity can occur at different airway generations and at branching points in the bronchial tree. Whilst heterogeneity has been detected by previous experimental approaches, its spatial relationship either within or between airways is unknown. Methods In this study, distribution of airway narrowing responses across a portion of the porcine bronchial tree was determined in vitro. The portion comprised contiguous airways spanning bronchial generations (#3-11), including the associated side branches. We used a recent optical imaging technique, anatomical optical coherence tomography, to image the bronchial tree in three dimensions. Bronchoconstriction was produced by carbachol administered to either the adventitial or luminal surface of the airway. Luminal cross sectional area was measured before and at different time points after constriction to carbachol and airway narrowing calculated from the percent decrease in luminal cross sectional area. Results When administered to the adventitial surface, the degree of airway narrowing was progressively increased from proximal to distal generations (r = 0.80 to 0.98, P < 0.05 to 0.001). This 'serial heterogeneity' was also apparent when carbachol was administered via the lumen, though it was less pronounced. In contrast, airway narrowing was not different at side branches, and was uniform both in the parent and daughter airways. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that the bronchial tree expresses intrinsic serial heterogeneity, such that narrowing increases from proximal to distal airways, a relationship that is influenced by the route of drug administration but not by structural variations accompanying branching sites. PMID:20092657

  7. Effects of maxillary advancement and impaction on nasal airway function.

    PubMed

    Pourdanesh, F; Sharifi, R; Mohebbi, A; Jamilian, A

    2012-11-01

    The effects of Le Fort I osteotomy on the nasal airway are controversial. This study aimed to evaluate nasal airway changes after Le Fort I. 25 patients underwent conventional Le Fort I osteotomy and were separated into three groups depending on the type of surgery they underwent. 11 patients needed maxillary impaction, 9 underwent maxillary advancement, and 5 had both maxillary impaction and advancement. Rhinological examinations, anterior rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry were carried out 1 week before surgery and 3 months after that. Wilcoxon and χ(2) tests were used for data analysis. The samples included 19 females and 6 males with a mean age of 22.4 ± 3.32 years. Rhinomanometric assessment showed that total nasal airflow was increased from 406 ± 202 ml/s to 543 ± 268 ml/s in all three groups. Significant decrease in nasal airway resistance was seen in all three groups. Acoustic rhinometry revealed a significant decrease in total nasal volume but an increase in the cross-sectional areas of isthmus nasi (IN) and inferior concha. The rhinomanometric measurements showed improvements in the total nasal airflow after Le Fort I osteotomy with alar base cinch suture in cases where the impaction was not higher than 5.5mm.

  8. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the Modulation of Airway Smooth Muscle Tone and Calcium Handling.

    PubMed

    Yocum, Gene T; Chen, Jun; Choi, Christine H; Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Dingbang; Fu, Xiao Wen; Sanderson, Michael J; Emala, Charles W

    2017-03-23

    Asthma is a common disorder characterized, in part, by airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperresponsiveness. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed on airway nerve fibers that modulates afferent signals resulting in cough, and potentially bronchoconstriction. In the present study, the TRPV1 transcript was detected by RT-PCR in primary cultured human ASM cells, and the TRPV1 protein was detected in ASM of human trachea by immunohistochemistry. Proximity ligation assays suggest that TRPV1 is expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane of human ASM cells in close association with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2. In guinea pig tracheal ring organ bath experiments, the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin led to ASM contraction, but this contraction was significantly attenuated by the sodium-channel inhibitor bupivicaine (N=4, p<0.05) and the NK-2 receptor antagonist GR 159897 (N=4, p<0.05), suggesting that this contraction is neurally-mediated. However, pretreatment of guinea pig and human ASM in organ bath experiments with the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine inhibited the maintenance phase of an acetylcholine-induced contraction (N=4, p<0.01 for both species). Similarly, capsazepine inhibited methacholine-induced contraction of peripheral airways in mouse precision-cut lung slice (PCLS) experiments (N=4-5, p<0.05). Although capsazepine did not inhibit store-operated calicum entry in mouse ASM cells in PCLS (N=4-7, p=NS), it did inhibit calcium oscillations (N=3, p<0.001). These studies suggest that TRPV1 is expressed on ASM, including the SR, but that ASM TRPV1 activation does not play a significant role in initiation of ASM contraction. However, capsazepine does inhibit maintenance of contraction, likely by inhibiting calcium oscillation.

  9. Update in the extraction of airway foreign bodies in adults

    PubMed Central

    Botana-Rial, Maribel; García-Fontán, Eva; Fernández-Villar, Alberto; Gallas Torreira, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) aspiration into the airway is lees common in adults than children. Nevertheless its incidence does not decrease through time. We present clinical relevant aspects of airway FBs on the basis of a selective review of pertinent literature retrieved by a search in the PubMed database. The most common aspirated FBs by adults are organics, especially fragments of bones and seeds. Symptoms usually are cough, chocking and dyspnea. Right localization, especially bronchus intermedius and right lower lobe, is more frequent. Chest radiography can be normal in up to 20% of the cases and FBs can be detected in 26% of the patients. FBs can safely remove in the majority of patients under flexible bronchoscopy. Surgical treatment must be reserved for cases in which bronchoscope fails or there are irreversible bronchial or lung complications. PMID:28066626

  10. Airway management: induced tension pneumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khedher; Amine, El Ghali Mohamed; Abdelbaki, Azouzi; Jihene, Ayachi; Khaoula, Meddeb; Yamina, Hamdaoui; Mohamed, Boussarsar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is not always associated with hollow viscus perforation. Such condition is called non-surgical or spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Intrathoracic causes remain the most frequently reported mechanism inducing this potentially life threatening complication. This clinical condition is associated with therapeutic dilemma. We report a case of a massive isolated pneumoperitoneum causing acute abdominal hypertension syndrome, in a 75 year female, which occurred after difficult airway management and mechanical ventilation. Emergent laparotomy yielded to full recovery. The recognition of such cases for whom surgical management can be avoided is primordial to avoid unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidity particularly in the critically ill.

  11. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  12. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  13. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  14. Upper airway resistance: species-related differences.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, N; Reinhold, P

    2010-07-01

    In veterinary medicine, upper airway resistance deserves a particular attention in equines athletes and brachycephalic dogs. Due to the anatomical peculiarities of the upper airway and/or pathological conditions, significant alterations of performance and/or well being might occur in horses and dogs. Physiological specificities and pathological changes of the lower respiratory tract deserve a major attention in other species.

  15. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  16. The critical airway in adults: The facts

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm on the indications and timing for a surgical airway in emergency as such cannot be drawn due to the multiplicity of variables and the inapplicability in the context of life-threatening critical emergency, where human brain elaborates decisions better in cluster rather than in binary fashion. In particular, in emergency or urgent scenarios, there is no clear or established consensus as to specifically who should receive a tracheostomy as a life-saving procedure; and more importantly, when. The two classical indications for emergency tracheostomy (laryngeal injury and failure to secure airway with endotracheal intubation or cricothyroidotomy) are too generic and encompass a broad spectrum of possibilities. In literature, specific indications for emergency tracheostomy are scattered and are biased, partially comprehensive, not clearly described or not homogeneously gathered. The review highlights the indications and timing for an emergency surgical airway and gives recommendations on which surgical airway method to use in critical airway. PMID:22787346

  17. Automatic measurement of oblique-oriented airway dimension at volumetric CT: effect of imaging parameters and obliquity of airway with FWHM method using a physical phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom; Song, Koun Sik; Kang, Suk-Ho

    2007-03-01

    This study is conducted to assess the influence of various CT imaging parameters and airway obliquity, such as reconstruction kernel, field of view, slice thickness, and obliquity of airway on automatic measurement of airway wall thickness with FWHM method and physical phantom. The phantom, consists of 11 poly-acryl tubes with various inner lumen diameters and thickness, was used in this study. The measured density of the wall was 150HU. The airspace outside of tube was filled with poly-urethane foam, whose density was -900HU, which is similar density of emphysema region. CT images, obtained with MDCT (Sensation 16, Siemens), was reconstructed with various reconstruction kernel (B10f, B30f, B50f, B70f and B80f), different field of views (180mm, 270mm, 360mm), and different thicknesses (0.75, 1, and 2 mm). The phantom was scanned at various oblique angles (0, 30, 45, 60 degree). Using in-house airway measurement software, central axis of oblique airway was determined by 3D thinning algorithm and CT image perpendicular to the axis was reconstructed. The luminal area, outer boundary, and wall thickness was measured by FWHM method at each image. Actual dimension of each tube and measured CT values on each CT data set was compared. Sharper reconstruction kernel, thicker image thickness, and larger oblique angle of airway axis results in decrease of measured wall thickness. There was internal interaction between imaging parameters and obliquity of airway on the accuracy of measurement. There was a threshold point of 1-mm wall thickness, below which the measurement failed to represent the change of real thickness. Even using the smaller FOV, the accuracy was not improved. Usage of standard kernel (B50f) and 0.75mm thickness results in the most accurate measurement results, which is independent of obliquity of airway. (Mean error: 0 Degree 0.067+/-0.05mm, 30 Degree 0.076+/-0.09, 45 Degree 0.074+/-0.09, 60 Degree 0.091+/-0.09). In this imaging parameters, there was no

  18. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  19. Intrathoracic airway measurement: ex-vivo validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Raab, Stephen A.; D'Souza, Neil D.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1997-05-01

    High-resolution x-ray CT (HRCT) provides detailed images of the lungs and bronchial tree. HRCT-based imaging and quantitation of peripheral bronchial airway geometry provides a valuable tool for assessing regional airway physiology. Such measurements have been sued to address physiological questions related to the mechanics of airway collapse in sleep apnea, the measurement of airway response to broncho-constriction agents, and to evaluate and track the progression of disease affecting the airways, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Significant attention has been paid to the measurements of extra- and intra-thoracic airways in 2D sections from volumetric x-ray CT. A variety of manual and semi-automatic techniques have been proposed for airway geometry measurement, including the use of standardized display window and level settings for caliper measurements, methods based on manual or semi-automatic border tracing, and more objective, quantitative approaches such as the use of the 'half-max' criteria. A recently proposed measurements technique uses a model-based deconvolution to estimate the location of the inner and outer airway walls. Validation using a plexiglass phantom indicates that the model-based method is more accurate than the half-max approach for thin-walled structures. In vivo validation of these airway measurement techniques is difficult because of the problems in identifying a reliable measurement 'gold standard.' In this paper we report on ex vivo validation of the half-max and model-based methods using an excised pig lung. The lung is sliced into thin sections of tissue and scanned using an electron beam CT scanner. Airways of interest are measured from the CT images, and also measured with using a microscope and micrometer to obtain a measurement gold standard. The result show no significant difference between the model-based measurements and the gold standard; while the half-max estimates exhibited a measurement bias and were significantly

  20. Effect of dexamethasone and ACC on bacteria-induced mucin expression in human airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria can stimulate mucin production, but excessive mucus supports bacterial infection and consequently leads to airway obstruction. Therefore, the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and the antioxidant acetyl-cysteine (ACC) on bacteria-induced mucus expression was investigated. Explanted human airway mucosa and mucoepidermoid cells (Calu-3) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PAM3 (a synthetic lipoprotein). DEX or ACC were added to either LPS- or PAM3-stimulated airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells. Mucin mRNA expression (MUC5AC) and total mucus glycoconjugates (mucin protein) were quantified using real-time PCR and periodic acid Schiff staining. LPS and PAM3 significantly increased mucin expression in airway mucosa and Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). DEX alone had no significant effect on mucin expression in airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells (P > 0.05). In contrast, DEX significantly reduced LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression in explanted mucosal tissue and mucin expression in Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). In explanted human airway mucosa ACC alone significantly increased mucin expression (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACC significantly decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression (P < 0.05). In Calu-3 cells ACC alone had no significant effect on mucin expression (P > 0.05). ACC decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression, but this effect was not significant (P > 0.05). These data suggest that DEX can effectively reduce bacteria-induced mucin expression in the airways. ACC alone may increase mucin expression in noninfected mucosa, but it decreased bacteria-induced mucin expression. Further studies are warranted to evaluate whether the effect of DEX or ACC is clinically relevant.

  1. Mitochondrial CaMKII inhibition in airway epithelium protects against allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sebag, Sara C.; Koval, Olha M.; Paschke, John D.; Winters, Christopher J.; Jaffer, Omar A.; Dworski, Ryszard; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Anderson, Mark E.; Grumbach, Isabella M.

    2017-01-01

    Excessive ROS promote allergic asthma, a condition characterized by airway inflammation, eosinophilic inflammation, and increased airway hyperreactivity (AHR). The mechanisms by which airway ROS are increased and the relationship between increased airway ROS and disease phenotypes are incompletely defined. Mitochondria are an important source of cellular ROS production, and our group discovered that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is present in mitochondria and activated by oxidation. Furthermore, mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant therapy reduced the severity of allergic asthma in a mouse model. Based on these findings, we developed a mouse model of CaMKII inhibition targeted to mitochondria in airway epithelium. We challenged these mice with OVA or Aspergillus fumigatus. Mitochondrial CaMKII inhibition abrogated AHR, inflammation, and eosinophilia following OVA and A. fumigatus challenge. Mitochondrial ROS were decreased after agonist stimulation in the presence of mitochondrial CaMKII inhibition. This correlated with blunted induction of NF-κB, the NLRP3 inflammasome, and eosinophilia in transgenic mice. These findings demonstrate a pivotal role for mitochondrial CaMKII in airway epithelium in mitochondrial ROS generation, eosinophilic inflammation, and AHR, providing insights into how mitochondrial ROS mediate features of allergic asthma. PMID:28194433

  2. Risk assessment of sleeping disorder breathing based on upper airway centerline evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsufyani, Noura; Shen, Rui; Cheng, Irene; Major, Paul

    2013-02-01

    One of the most important breathing disorders in childhood is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome which affects 2-3% of children, and the reported failure rate of surgical treatment was as high as 54%. A possible reason in respiratory complications is having reduced dimensions of the upper airway which are further compressed when muscle tone is decreased during sleep. In this study, we use Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to assess the location or cause of the airway obstruction. To date, all studies analyzing the upper airway in subjects with Sleeping Disorder Breathing were based on linear, area, or volumetric measurements, which are global computations and can easily ignore local significance. Skeletonization was initially introduced as a 3D modeling technique by which representative medial points of a model are extracted to generate centerlines for evaluations. Although centerlines have been commonly used in guiding surgical procedures, our novelty lies in comparing its geometric properties before and after surgeries. We apply 3D data refinement, registration and projection steps to quantify and localize the geometric deviation in target airway regions. Through cross validation with corresponding subjects' therapy data, we expect to quantify the tolerance threshold beyond which reduced dimensions of the upper airway are not clinically significant. The ultimate goal is to utilize this threshold to identify patients at risk of complications. Outcome from this research will also help establish a predictive model for training and to estimate treatment success based on airway measurements prior to intervention. Preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of our approach.

  3. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Strategies with Bubble Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Not All Bubbling Is the Same: The Seattle Positive Airway Pressure System.

    PubMed

    Welty, Stephen E

    2016-12-01

    Premature neonates are predisposed to complications, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). BPD is associated with long-term pulmonary and neurodevelopmental consequences. Noninvasive respiratory support with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been recommended strongly by the American Academy of Pediatrics. However, CPAP implementation has shown at least a 50% failure rate. Enhancing nasal CPAP effectiveness may decrease the need for mechanical ventilation and reduce the incidence of BPD. Bubble nasal CPAP is better than nasal CPAP using mechanical devices and the bubbling provides air exchange in distal respiratory units. The Seattle PAP system reduces parameters that assess work of breathing.

  4. Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel-3.1 blocker TRAM-34 attenuates airway remodeling and eosinophilia in a murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Girodet, Pierre-Olivier; Ozier, Annaig; Carvalho, Gabrielle; Ilina, Olga; Ousova, Olga; Gadeau, Alain-Pierre; Begueret, Hugues; Wulff, Heike; Marthan, Roger; Bradding, Peter; Berger, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    Key features of asthma include bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), eosinophilic airway inflammation, and bronchial remodeling, characterized by subepithelial collagen deposition, airway fibrosis, and increased bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) mass. The calcium-activated K(+) channel K(Ca)3.1 is expressed by many cells implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, and is involved in both inflammatory and remodeling responses in a number of tissues. The specific K(Ca)3.1 blocker 5-[(2-chlorophenyl)(diphenyl)methyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34) attenuates BSM cell proliferation, and both mast cell and fibrocyte recruitment in vitro. We aimed to examine the effects of K(Ca)3.1 blockade on BSM remodeling, airway inflammation, and BHR in a murine model of chronic asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal ovalbumin (OVA) on Days 0 and 14, and then challenged with intranasal OVA during Days 14-75. OVA-sensitized/challenged mice received TRAM-34 (120 mg/kg/day, subcutaneous) from Days -7 to 75 (combined treatment), Days -7 to 20 (preventive treatment), or Days 21 to 75 (curative treatment). Untreated mice received daily injections of vehicle (n = 8 per group). Bronchial remodeling was assessed by histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Inflammation was evaluated using bronchoalveolar lavage and flow cytometry. We also determined BHR in both conscious and anesthetized mice via plethysmography. We demonstrated that curative treatment with TRAM-34 abolishes BSM remodeling and subbasement collagen deposition, and attenuates airway eosinophilia. Although curative treatment alone did not significantly reduce BHR, the combined treatment attenuated nonspecific BHR to methacholine. This study indicates that K(Ca)3.1 blockade could provide a new therapeutic strategy in asthma.

  5. Peripheral airways obstruction in idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (primary).

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bonetti, P; Lupi-Herrera, E; Martinez-Guerra, M L; Barrios, R; Seoane, M; Sandoval, J

    1983-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the lung were studied in ten nonsmokers with idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (IPAH) (mean pulmonary artery pressure 65.7 +/- 30 mm Hg). In the routine lung test, residual volume was found to be abnormal (greater than 120 percent of the predicted) in seven patients, and measured airway resistance was normal in eight out of the ten patients. A decreased FEF 75-85 percent, abnormal values for the helium-air flow ratios and increased closing capacities were documented in eight of ten patients in whom lung elastic recoil was normal (six of ten) or increased (four of ten). These features suggest peripheral airways obstruction (PAO) which was also supported by histopathologic findings in three cases (one biopsy and two necropsies). The observed changes in lung compliance could be related to the behavior of the coupling of the air-space and vascular compartments. The etiology of PAO in IPAH patients is not known, but our results indicate that both the peripheral airways and the pulmonary circulation are affected. The knowledge of PAO in IPAH patients could help to better understand the observed V/Q inequality in this entity.

  6. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  7. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  8. Airway adequacy, head posture, and craniofacial morphology.

    PubMed

    Solow, B; Siersbaek-Nielsen, S; Greve, E

    1984-09-01

    Previous studies of different samples have demonstrated associations between craniocervical angulation and craniofacial morphology, between airway obstruction by adenoids and craniofacial morphology, and between airway obstruction and craniocervical angulation. A hypothesis to account for the different sets of associations was suggested by Solow and Kreiborg in 1977. In the present study, the three sets of associations were examined in a single group of nonpathologic subjects with no history of airway obstruction. Cephalometric radiographs taken in the natural head position and rhinomanometric recordings were obtained from twenty-four children 7 to 9 years of age. Correlations were calculated between twenty-seven morphologic, eight postural, and two airway variables. A large craniocervical angle was, on the average, seen in connection with small mandibular dimensions, mandibular retrognathism, and a large mandibular inclination. Obstructed nasopharyngeal airways (defined as a small pm-ad 2 radiographic distance and a large nasal respiratory resistance, NRR, determined rhinomanometrically) were, on the average, seen in connection with a large craniocervical angle and with small mandibular dimensions, mandibular retrognathism, a large mandibular inclination, and retroclination of the upper incisors. The observed correlations were in agreement with the predicted pattern of associations between craniofacial morphology, craniocervical angulation, and airway resistance, thus suggesting the simultaneous presence of such associations in the sample of nonpathologic subjects with no history of airway obstruction.

  9. Comparison of analysis methods for airway quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.

    2012-03-01

    Diseased airways have been known for several years as a possible contributing factor to airflow limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD). Quantification of disease severity through the evaluation of airway dimensions - wall thickness and lumen diameter - has gained increased attention, thanks to the availability of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Novel approaches have focused on automated methods of measurement as a faster and more objective means that the visual assessment routinely employed in the clinic. Since the Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) method of airway measurement was introduced two decades ago [1], several new techniques for quantifying airways have been detailed in the literature, but no approach has truly become a standard for such analysis. Our own research group has presented two alternative approaches for determining airway dimensions, one involving a minimum path and the other active contours [2, 3]. With an increasing number of techniques dedicated to the same goal, we decided to take a step back and analyze the differences of these methods. We consequently put to the test our two methods of analysis and the FWHM approach. We first measured a set of 5 airways from a phantom of known dimensions. Then we compared measurements from the three methods to those of two independent readers, performed on 35 airways in 5 patients. We elaborate on the differences of each approach and suggest conclusions on which could be defined as the best one.

  10. Liquid plug propagation in flexible microchannels: A small airway model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Fujioka, H.; Bian, S.; Torisawa, Y.; Huh, D.; Takayama, S.; Grotberg, J. B.

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effect of wall flexibility on the plug propagation and the resulting wall stresses in small airway models with experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Experimentally, a flexible microchannel was fabricated to mimic the flexible small airways using soft lithography. Liquid plugs were generated and propagated through the microchannels. The local wall deformation is observed instantaneously during plug propagation with the maximum increasing with plug speed. The pressure drop across the plug is measured and observed to increase with plug speed, and is slightly smaller in a flexible channel compared to that in a rigid channel. A computational model is then presented to model the steady plug propagation through a flexible channel corresponding to the middle plane in the experimental device. The results show qualitative agreements with experiments on wall shapes and pressure drops and the discrepancies bring up interesting questions on current field of modeling. The flexible wall deforms inward near the plug core region, the deformation and pressure drop across the plug increase with the plug speed. The wall deformation and resulting stresses vary with different longitudinal tensions, i.e., for large wall longitudinal tension, the wall deforms slightly, which causes decreased fluid stress and stress gradients on the flexible wall comparing to that on rigid walls; however, the wall stress gradients are found to be much larger on highly deformable walls with small longitudinal tensions. Therefore, in diseases such as emphysema, with more deformable airways, there is a high possibility of induced injuries on lining cells along the airways because of larger wall stresses and stress gradients.

  11. Muc5b is required for airway defence.

    PubMed

    Roy, Michelle G; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A; McElwee, Melissa M; Evans, Scott E; Boerner, Ryan M; Alexander, Samantha N; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K; Song, Alfred S; Petrova, Youlia M; Tuvim, Michael J; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S; Bowden, M Gabriela; Sisson, Joseph H; Woodruff, Prescott G; Thornton, David J; Rousseau, Karine; De la Garza, Maria M; Moghaddam, Seyed J; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R; Drouin, Scott M; Davis, C William; Terrell, Kristy A; Grubb, Barbara R; O'Neal, Wanda K; Flores, Sonia C; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A; Donnelly, Jody M; Watson, Alan M; Hennessy, Corinne E; Keith, Rebecca C; Yang, Ivana V; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M; Janssen, William J; Schwartz, David A; Boucher, Richard C; Dickey, Burton F; Evans, Christopher M

    2014-01-16

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them through mucociliary clearance (MCC). However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that mouse Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in mouse lungs, whereas Muc5ac is dispensable. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and interleukin-23 (IL-23) production was reduced in Muc5b(-/-) mice. By contrast, in mice that transgenically overexpress Muc5b, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC.

  12. Muc5b Is Required for Airway Defense

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Michelle G.; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A.; McElwee, Melissa M.; Evans, Scott E.; Boerner, Ryan M.; Alexander, Samantha N.; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K.; Song, Alfred S.; Petrova, Youlia M.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S.; Gabriela Bowden, M.; Sisson, Joseph H.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Thornton, David J.; Rousseau, Karine; De la Garza, Maria M.; Moghaddam, Seyed J.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R.; Drouin, Scott M.; William Davis, C.; Terrell, Kristy A.; Grubb, Barbara R.; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Flores, Sonia C.; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Donnelly, Jody M.; Watson, Alan M.; Hennessy, Corinne E.; Keith, Rebecca C.; Yang, Ivana V.; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.; Schwartz, David A.; Boucher, Richard C.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them via mucociliary clearance (MCC)1,2. However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases1. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus1,3. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases4-6, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in the lungs. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally7. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and IL-23 production was reduced inMuc5b−/− mice. By contrast, in Muc5b transgenic (Tg) mice, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum1,8. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%9-11. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC. PMID:24317696

  13. Muc5b is required for airway defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Michelle G.; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A.; McElwee, Melissa M.; Evans, Scott E.; Boerner, Ryan M.; Alexander, Samantha N.; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K.; Song, Alfred S.; Petrova, Youlia M.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S.; Bowden, M. Gabriela; Sisson, Joseph H.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Thornton, David J.; Rousseau, Karine; de La Garza, Maria M.; Moghaddam, Seyed J.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R.; Drouin, Scott M.; Davis, C. William; Terrell, Kristy A.; Grubb, Barbara R.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Flores, Sonia C.; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Donnelly, Jody M.; Watson, Alan M.; Hennessy, Corinne E.; Keith, Rebecca C.; Yang, Ivana V.; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.; Schwartz, David A.; Boucher, Richard C.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them through mucociliary clearance (MCC). However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that mouse Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in mouse lungs, whereas Muc5ac is dispensable. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and interleukin-23 (IL-23) production was reduced in Muc5b-/- mice. By contrast, in mice that transgenically overexpress Muc5b, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC.

  14. Airway smooth muscle growth in asthma: proliferation, hypertrophy, and migration.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Kelley; Hershenson, Marc B

    2008-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass is present in fatal and non-fatal asthma. However, little information is available regarding the cellular mechanism (i.e., hyperplasia vs. hypertrophy). Even less information exists regarding the functional consequences of airway smooth muscle remodeling. It would appear that increased airway smooth muscle mass would tend to increase airway narrowing and airflow obstruction. However, the precise effects of increased airway smooth muscle mass on airway narrowing are not known. This review will consider the evidence for airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and hypertrophy in asthma, potential functional effects, and biochemical mechanisms.

  15. Similar matrix alterations in alveolar and small airway walls of COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Remodelling in COPD has at least two dimensions: small airway wall thickening and destruction of alveolar walls. Recent studies indicate that there is some similarity between alveolar and small airway wall matrix remodelling. The aim of this study was to characterise and assess similarities in alveolar and small airway wall matrix remodelling, and TGF-β signalling in COPD patients of different GOLD stages. Methods Lung tissue sections of 14 smoking controls, 16 GOLD II and 19 GOLD IV patients were included and stained for elastin and collagens as well as hyaluronan, a glycosaminoglycan matrix component and pSMAD2. Results Elastin was significantly decreased in COPD patients not only in alveolar, but also in small airway walls. Interestingly, both collagen and hyaluronan were increased in alveolar as well as small airway walls. The matrix changes were highly comparable between GOLD stages, with collagen content in the alveolar wall increasing further in GOLD IV. A calculated remodelling index, defined as elastin divided over collagen and hyaluronan, was decreased significantly in GOLD II and further lowered in GOLD IV patients, suggesting that matrix component alterations are involved in progressive airflow limitation. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation present between the alveolar and small airway wall stainings of the matrix components, as well as for pSMAD2. No differences in pSMAD2 staining between controls and COPD patients were found. Conclusions In conclusion, remodelling in the alveolar and small airway wall in COPD is markedly similar and already present in moderate COPD. Notably, alveolar collagen and a remodelling index relate to lung function. PMID:24886452

  16. Identification of Genes Expressed by Human Airway Eosinophils after an In Vivo Allergen Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Esnault, Stephane; Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Schwantes, Elizabeth A.; Liu, Lin Ying; DeLain, Larissa P.; Hauer, Jami A.; Bochkov, Yury A.; Denlinger, Loren C.; Malter, James S.; Mathur, Sameer K.; Jarjour, Nizar N.

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanism for the contribution of eosinophils (EOS) to asthma pathophysiology is not fully understood. Genome-wide expression analysis of airway EOS by microarrays has been limited by the ability to generate high quality RNA from sufficient numbers of airway EOS. Objective To identify, by genome-wide expression analyses, a compendium of expressed genes characteristic of airway EOS following an in vivo allergen challenge. Methods Atopic, mild asthmatic subjects were recruited for these studies. Induced sputum was obtained before and 48h after a whole lung allergen challenge (WLAC). Individuals also received a segmental bronchoprovocation with allergen (SBP-Ag) 1 month before and after administering a single dose of mepolizumab (anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibody) to reduce airway EOS. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed before and 48 h after SBP-Ag. Gene expression of sputum and BAL cells was analyzed by microarrays. The results were validated by qPCR in BAL cells and purified BAL EOS. Results A total of 299 transcripts were up-regulated by more than 2-fold in total BAL cells following SBP-Ag. Mepolizumab treatment resulted in a reduction of airway EOS by 54.5% and decreased expression of 99 of the 299 transcripts. 3 of 6 post-WLAC sputum samples showed increased expression of EOS-specific genes, along with the expression of 361 other genes. Finally, the intersection of the 3 groups of transcripts (increased in BAL post SBP-Ag (299), decreased after mepolizumab (99), and increased in sputum after WLAC (365)) was composed of 57 genes characterizing airway EOS gene expression. Conclusion We identified 57 genes that were highly expressed by BAL EOS compared to unseparated BAL cells after in vivo allergen challenge. 41 of these genes had not been previously described in EOS and are thus potential new candidates to elucidate EOS contribution to airway biology. PMID:23844029

  17. Myeloid sarcoma causing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Krause, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary collection of blasts of the myeloid series that partially or totally effaces the architecture of the tissue in which it is found. These tumors have been described in many sites of the body, but the skin, lymph nodes, gastrointestinal tract, bone, soft tissue, and testes are most common. They can arise in a patient following the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia, but they may also be precursors of leukemia and should be considered diagnostic for acute myeloid leukemia. The differential diagnosis of this neoplasm includes malignant lymphoma, with which it is often mistaken, leading to diagnostic and therapeutic delays. We present the case of an 84-year-old African American man with a history of renal disease secondary to hypertension and coronary artery disease without any prior history of malignancies who presented with airway obstruction. He was diagnosed with a myeloid sarcoma of the mediastinum compressing his trachea.

  18. The Development and Application of Airway Devices in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangdong; Ma, Wuhua; Liu, Renyu; Yao, Shanglong

    2017-01-01

    Airway management is one of the most important tasks for anesthesiologists. Anesthesiologists are experts in airway management and have made tremendous contribution to the development of the airway devices. Chinese anesthesiologists have made significant contribution in introducing advanced airway management and developing innovative techniques and devices for airway management in China. This article overviews the development and application of airway devices in China as well as the dedication and contribution of Chinese experts in the development of novel airway devices. With the development of science and technology accompanied by the advanced knowledge in airway management, more effective and safe artificial airways will be developed for clinical practice. The authors believe that Chinese experts will continue their outstanding contribution to the development of innovative airway devices, systems and knowledge. PMID:28191485

  19. Pharmacology of airway afferent nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Undem, Bradley J; Carr, Michael J

    2001-01-01

    Afferent nerves in the airways serve to regulate breathing pattern, cough, and airway autonomic neural tone. Pharmacologic agents that influence afferent nerve activity can be subclassified into compounds that modulate activity by indirect means (e.g. bronchial smooth muscle spasmogens) and those that act directly on the nerves. Directly acting agents affect afferent nerve activity by interacting with various ion channels and receptors within the membrane of the afferent terminals. Whether by direct or indirect means, most compounds that enter the airspace will modify afferent nerve activity, and through this action alter airway physiology. PMID:11686889

  20. Noninvasive detection of airway constriction in awake guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Silbaugh, S.A.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Tidal volume measured by the barometric method is very sensitive to increases in compression and expansion of alveolar gas, such as would be expected to occur during airway narrowing or closure. By comparing a barometric method tidal volume signal (VT') with a reference tidal volume (VT) obtained with a head-out pressure plethysmograph, a simple index related to gas compressibility effects was calculated (VT/VT'). Changes in this index were compared with decreases in dynamic compliance (Cdyn) during histamine aerosol challenge of 15 Charles River Hartley guinea pigs. Decreases in VT/VT' occurred during all aerosol challenges and were correlated with decreases in Cdyn. Decreases in VT/VT' were most marked at Cdyn values of less than 50% of base line. At Cdyn of less than 15% of base line, VT' was 3.1-4.8 times the VT reference signal. No increase in total pulmonary resistance was noted, and Cdyn and VT/VT' returned to base line after histamine exposure was stopped. The authors conclude that gas compressibility effects become substantial during histamine-induced airway constriction in the guinea pig and that the VT/VT' ratio appears to provide a simple noninvasive method of detecting these changes.

  1. Essential Contribution of CD4+ T Cells to Antigen-Induced Nasal Hyperresponsiveness in Experimental Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Tomoe; Kaminuma, Osamu; Saeki, Mayumi; Kitamura, Noriko; Matsuoka, Kunie; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Mori, Akio; Hiroi, Takachika

    2016-01-01

    Nasal hyperresponsiveness (NHR) is a characteristic feature of allergic rhinitis (AR); however, the pathogenesis of NHR is not fully understood. In this study, during the establishment of an experimental AR model using ovalbumin-immunized and -challenged mice, augmentation of the sneezing reaction in response to nonspecific proteins as well as a chemical stimulant was detected. Whether NHR is independent of mast cells and eosinophils was determined by using mast cell- and eosinophil-deficient mice. NHR was suppressed by treatment with anti-CD4 antibody, suggesting the pivotal contribution of CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, antigen challenge to mice to which in vitro-differentiated Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells but not naïve CD4+ T cells had been adoptively transferred led to the development of equivalent NHR. Since antigen-specific IgE and IgG were not produced in these mice and since antigen-specific IgE-transgenic mice did not develop NHR even upon antigen challenge, humoral immunity would be dispensable for NHR. CD4+ T cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AR via induction of NHR, independent of IgE-, mast cell-, and eosinophil-mediated responses. PMID:26752722

  2. Estrogen effects on human airway smooth muscle involve cAMP and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2012-11-15

    Clinically observed differences in airway reactivity and asthma exacerbations in women at different life stages suggest a role for sex steroids in modulating airway function although their targets and mechanisms of action are still being explored. We have previously shown that clinically relevant concentrations of exogenous estrogen acutely decrease intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), thereby facilitating bronchodilation. In this study, we hypothesized that estrogens modulate cyclic nucleotide regulation, resulting in decreased [Ca(2+)](i) in human ASM. In Fura-2-loaded human ASM cells, 1 nM 17β-estradiol (E(2)) potentiated the inhibitory effect of the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) agonist isoproterenol (ISO; 100 nM) on histamine-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activity (KT5720; 100 nM) attenuated E(2) effects on [Ca(2+)](i). Acute treatment with E(2) increased cAMP levels in ASM cells comparable to that of ISO (100 pM). In acetylcholine-contracted airways from female guinea pigs or female humans, E(2) potentiated ISO-induced relaxation. These novel data suggest that, in human ASM, physiologically relevant concentrations of estrogens act via estrogen receptors (ERs) and the cAMP pathway to nongenomically reduce [Ca(2+)](i), thus promoting bronchodilation. Activation of ERs may be a novel adjunct therapeutic avenue in reactive airway diseases in combination with established cAMP-activating therapies such as β(2)-agonists.

  3. Diesel exhaust particles and airway inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose of review. Epidemiologic investigation has associated traffic-related air pollution with adverse human health outcomes. The capacity ofdiesel exhaust particles (DEP), a major emission source air pollution particle, to initiate an airway inflammation has subsequently been ...

  4. Airway management for cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Farag, Ehab

    2016-03-01

    Cervical spine surgery is one of the most commonly performed spine surgeries in the United States, and 90% of the cases are related to degenerative cervical spine disease (the rest to cervical spine trauma and/or instability). The airway management for cervical spine surgery represents a crucial step in the anesthetic management to avoid injury to the cervical cord. The crux for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery is maintaining the neck in a neutral position with minimal neck movement during endotracheal intubation. Therefore, the conventional direct laryngoscopy (DL) can be unsuitable for securing the upper airway in cervical spine surgery, especially in cases of cervical spine instability and myelopathy. This review discusses the most recent evidence-based facts of the main advantages and limitations of different techniques available for upper <