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Sample records for decreases cerebral amyloid

  1. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Emerging Concepts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) involves cerebrovascular amyloid deposition and is classified into several types according to the amyloid protein involved. Of these, sporadic amyloid β-protein (Aβ)-type CAA is most commonly found in older individuals and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebrovascular Aβ deposits accompany functional and pathological changes in cerebral blood vessels (CAA-associated vasculopathies). CAA-associated vasculopathies lead to development of hemorrhagic lesions [lobar intracerebral macrohemorrhage, cortical microhemorrhage, and cortical superficial siderosis (cSS)/focal convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)], ischemic lesions (cortical infarction and ischemic changes of the white matter), and encephalopathies that include subacute leukoencephalopathy caused by CAA-associated inflammation/angiitis. Thus, CAA is related to dementia, stroke, and encephalopathies. Recent advances in diagnostic procedures, particularly neuroimaging, have enabled us to establish a clinical diagnosis of CAA without brain biopsies. Sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods, such as gradient-echo T2* imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging, are useful for detecting cortical microhemorrhages and cSS. Amyloid imaging with amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, such as Pittsburgh Compound B, can detect CAA, although they cannot discriminate vascular from parenchymal amyloid deposits. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid markers may be useful, including levels of Aβ40 for CAA and anti-Aβ antibody for CAA-related inflammation. Moreover, cSS is closely associated with transient focal neurological episodes (TFNE). CAA-related inflammation/angiitis shares pathophysiology with amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) induced by Aβ immunotherapies in AD patients. This article reviews CAA and CAA-related disorders with respect to their epidemiology, pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features, biomarkers, diagnosis

  2. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 911) if you have sudden loss of movement , sensation, vision, or speech. Alternative Names Amyloidosis - cerebral; CAA; Congophilic angiopathy Images Amyloidosis on the fingers Arteries of the brain References Kase CS, Shoamanesh A. Intracerebral hemorrhage. In: Daroff ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Dementia, familial Danish Genetic Testing Registry: Hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, Icelandic type Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (2 links) Johns Hopkins Medicine: ...

  4. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a disorder characterized by amyloid deposition in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical arteries, arterioles, and less often capillaries and veins of the central nervous system. CAA occurs mostly as a sporadic condition in the elderly, its incidence associating with advancing age. All sporadic CAA cases are due to deposition of amyloid-β, originating from proteolytic cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein. Hereditary forms of CAA are generally familial (and therefore rare in the general population), more severe and earlier in onset. CAA-related lobar intracerebral hemorrhage is the most well-studied clinical condition associated with brain amyloid deposition. Despite ever increasing understanding of CAA pathogenesis and availability of reliable clinical and diagnostic tools, preventive and therapeutic options remain very limited. Further research efforts are required in order to identify biological targets for novel CAA treatment strategies. We present a systematic review of existing evidence regarding the epidemiology, genetics, pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management of CAA. PMID:21519520

  5. Taxifolin inhibits amyloid-β oligomer formation and fully restores vascular integrity and memory in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Maki, Takakuni; Hattori, Yorito; Ito, Hideki; Mizuno, Katsuhiko; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Kalaria, Raj N; Fukushima, Masanori; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ihara, Masafumi

    2017-04-04

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) induces various forms of cerebral infarcts and hemorrhages from vascular amyloid-β accumulation, resulting in acceleration of cognitive impairment, which is currently untreatable. Soluble amyloid-β protein likely impairs cerebrovascular integrity as well as cognitive function in early stage Alzheimer's disease. Taxifolin, a flavonol with strong anti-oxidative and anti-glycation activities, has been reported to disassemble amyloid-β in vitro but the in vivo relevance remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether taxifolin has therapeutic potential in attenuating CAA, hypothesizing that inhibiting amyloid-β assembly may facilitate its clearance through several elimination pathways. Vehicle- or taxifolin-treated Tg-SwDI mice (commonly used to model CAA) were used in this investigation. Cognitive and cerebrovascular function, as well as the solubility and oligomerization of brain amyloid-β proteins, were investigated. Spatial reference memory was assessed by water maze test. Cerebral blood flow was measured with laser speckle flowmetry and cerebrovascular reactivity evaluated by monitoring cerebral blood flow changes in response to hypercapnia. Significantly reduced cerebrovascular pan-amyloid-β and amyloid-β1-40 accumulation was found in taxifolin-treated Tg-SwDI mice compared to vehicle-treated counterparts (n = 5). Spatial reference memory was severely impaired in vehicle-treated Tg-SwDI mice but normalized after taxifolin treatment, with scoring similar to wild type mice (n = 10-17). Furthermore, taxifolin completely restored decreased cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity in Tg-SwDI mice (n = 4-6). An in vitro thioflavin-T assay showed taxifolin treatment resulted in efficient inhibition of amyloid-β1-40 assembly. In addition, a filter trap assay and ELISA showed Tg-SwDI mouse brain homogenates exhibited significantly reduced levels of amyloid-β oligomers in vivo after taxifolin treatment (n

  6. Ischemic brain injury in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    van Veluw, Susanne J; Greenberg, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a common form of cerebral small vessel disease and an important risk factor for intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment. While the majority of research has focused on the hemorrhagic manifestation of CAA, its ischemic manifestations appear to have substantial clinical relevance as well. Findings from imaging and pathologic studies indicate that ischemic lesions are common in CAA, including white-matter hyperintensities, microinfarcts, and microstructural tissue abnormalities as detected with diffusion tensor imaging. Furthermore, imaging markers of ischemic disease show a robust association with cognition, independent of age, hemorrhagic lesions, and traditional vascular risk factors. Widespread ischemic tissue injury may affect cognition by disrupting white-matter connectivity, thereby hampering communication between brain regions. Challenges are to identify imaging markers that are able to capture widespread microvascular lesion burden in vivo and to further unravel the etiology of ischemic tissue injury by linking structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities to their underlying pathophysiology and histopathology. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of ischemic brain injury in CAA will be a key step toward new interventions to improve long-term cognitive outcomes for patients with CAA. PMID:25944592

  7. APOE and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy in Community Dwelling Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Boyle, Patricia A.; Nag, Sukriti; Leurgans, Sue; Buchman, Aron S.; Wilson, Robert S.; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Farfel, Jose M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Bennett, David A.; Schneider, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Both cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Alzheimer’s disease pathology involve abnormal β-amyloid processing. We aim to elucidate the relationship of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes with amyloid angiopathy in the presence of variable amounts of Alzheimer’s pathology. Data came from 1,062 autopsied subjects from two community-based studies of aging. Common neuropathologies including Alzheimer’s disease and amyloid angiopathy were assessed using uniform methods. APOE was genotyped by sequencing the two polymorphisms in codons 112 and 158 of exon 4. We examined the associations of APOE with amyloid angiopathy using ordinal logistic regression analyses, controlling for demographics and subsequently Alzheimer’s and other common pathologies. Moderate to severe amyloid angiopathy was identified in 35.2% (n=374) of the subjects. 15.3% (n=162) of the subjects were APOE ε2 carriers and 26.1% (n=277) ε4 carriers. Adjusting for demographics, the presence of ε4 allele, but not ε2, was associated with more severe amyloid angiopathy. After further adjustment for Alzheimer’s pathology, both ε2 (odds ratio 1.707, 95% confidence interval 1.236–2.358, p=0.001) and ε4 (odds ratio 2.284, 95% confidence interval 1.730–3.014, p<0.001) were independently associated with amyloid angiopathy. The results were confirmed by path analysis. Further, APOE ε4 carriers, but not ε2 carriers, were more likely to have capillary amyloid angiopathy. Accounting for capillary involvement did not alter the APOE associations with amyloid angiopathy. We conclude that both APOE ε2 and ε4 alleles are associated with more severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and the direct effect of ε2 is masked by the allele’s negative association with comorbid Alzheimer’s pathology. APOE ε4, but not ε2, is associated with capillary amyloid angiopathy. PMID:26341746

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Anti-Amyloid-β Autoantibodies and Amyloid PET in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy-Related Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Iragui, María; Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Alcolea, Daniel; Piazza, Fabrizio; Morenas-Rodriguez, Estrella; Antón-Aguirre, Sofía; Sala, Isabel; Clarimon, Jordi; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Camacho, Valle; Sampedro, Frederic; Munuera, Josep; Nuñez-Marin, Fidel; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Blesa, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    We report a biomarker and genetic evaluation of four patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri) treated with corticosteroids. Patients presented with focal symptomatology and cognitive impairment. MRI revealed cortical microbleeds and asymmetrical hyperintense white matter lesions (WML). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker analyses showed increased anti-Aβ autoantibodies, t-Tau, and p-Tau and decreased Aβ40 and Aβ42. After treatment, focal symptomatology disappeared, and WML and anti-Aβ autoantibodies decreased. The APOEɛ4 allele was overrepresented. Florbetapir-PET showed cortical deposition with lower retention in swollen areas. In the case of suspected CAA-ri, both CSF anti-Aβ autoantibodies levels and Florbetapir-PET could provide highly useful data to guide the correct diagnosis.

  9. Angiotensin type 1a receptor deficiency decreases amyloid β-protein generation and ameliorates brain amyloid pathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Matsumoto, Yukino; Murakami, Saki; Sugakawa, Yusuke; Kami, Ayako; Tanabe, Chiaki; Maeda, Tomoji; Michikawa, Makoto; Komano, Hiroto; Zou, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by neuronal loss and cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) and lowering the generation of Aβ is a pivotal approach in the strategy of Alzheimer’s disease treatment. Midlife hypertension is a major risk factor for the future onset of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease and the use of some antihypertensive drugs may decrease the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. However, it is largely unknown how the blood pressure regulation system is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Here we found that the deficiency of angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1a), a key receptor for regulating blood pressure, significantly decreased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. The lack of AT1a inhibited the endocleavage of presenilin-1 (PS1), which is essential for γ-secretase complex formation and Aβ generation. Notably, the ligand of AT1a, angiotensin II, enhanced Aβ generation, PS1 endocleavage and γ-secretase complex formation. Our results suggest that AT1a activation is closely associated with Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation by regulating γ-secretase complex formation. Thus, removal of life style factors or stresses that stimulate AT1a to elevate blood pressure may decrease Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation, thereby preventing the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26154270

  10. The Cerebrovascular Basement Membrane: Role in the Clearance of β-amyloid and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Alan W. J.; Carare, Roxana O.; Schreiber, Stefanie; Hawkes, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the walls of cerebral blood vessels, is observed in the majority of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains and is thought to be due to a failure of the aging brain to clear Aβ. Perivascular drainage of Aβ along cerebrovascular basement membranes (CVBMs) is one of the mechanisms by which Aβ is removed from the brain. CVBMs are specialized sheets of extracellular matrix that provide structural and functional support for cerebral blood vessels. Changes in CVBM composition and structure are observed in the aged and AD brain and may contribute to the development and progression of CAA. This review summarizes the properties of the CVBM, its role in mediating clearance of interstitial fluids and solutes from the brain, and evidence supporting a role for CVBM in the etiology of CAA. PMID:25285078

  11. Prevalence of Cerebral Amyloid Pathology in Persons Without Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Willemijn J.; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Knol, Dirk L.; Tijms, Betty M.; Scheltens, Philip; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cerebral amyloid-β aggregation is an early pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD), starting decades before dementia onset. Estimates of the prevalence of amyloid pathology in persons without dementia are needed to understand the development of AD and to design prevention studies. OBJECTIVE To use individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid pathology as measured with biomarkers in participants with normal cognition, subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). DATA SOURCES Relevant biomarker studies identified by searching studies published before April 2015 using the MEDLINE and Web of Science databases and through personal communication with investigators. STUDY SELECTION Studies were included if they provided individual participant data for participants without dementia and used an a priori defined cutoff for amyloid positivity. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Individual records were provided for 2914 participants with normal cognition, 697 with SCI, and 3972 with MCI aged 18 to 100 years from 55 studies. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prevalence of amyloid pathology on positron emission tomography or in cerebrospinal fluid according to AD risk factors (age, apolipoprotein E [APOE] genotype, sex, and education) estimated by generalized estimating equations. RESULTS The prevalence of amyloid pathology increased from age 50 to 90 years from 10% (95% CI, 8%-13%) to 44% (95% CI, 37%-51%) among participants with normal cognition; from 12% (95% CI, 8%-18%) to 43% (95% CI, 32%-55%) among patients with SCI; and from 27% (95% CI, 23%-32%) to 71% (95% CI, 66%-76%) among patients with MCI. APOE-ε4 carriers had 2 to 3 times higher prevalence estimates than noncarriers. The age at which 15% of the participants with normal cognition were amyloid positive was approximately 40 years for APOEε4ε4 carriers, 50 years for ε2ε4 carriers, 55 years for ε3ε4 carriers, 65 years for ε3ε3 carriers, and

  12. Mutation of the Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid Gene in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage, Dutch Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Efrat; Carman, Mark D.; Fernandez-Madrid, Ivan J.; Power, Michael D.; Lieberburg, Ivan; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Bots, Gerard Th. A. M.; Luyendijk, Willem; Frangione, Blas

    1990-06-01

    An amyloid protein that precipitates in the cerebral vessel walls of Dutch patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis is similar to the amyloid protein in vessel walls and senile plaques in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Cloning and sequencing of the two exons that encode the amyloid protein from two patients with this amyloidosis revealed a cytosine-to-guanine transversion, a mutation that caused a single amino acid substitution (glutamine instead of glutamic acid) at position 22 of the amyloid protein. The mutation may account for the deposition of this amyloid protein in the cerebral vessel walls of these patients, leading to cerebral hemorrhages and premature death.

  13. Tumoral Presentation of Homonymous Hemianopia and Prosopagnosia in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy-Related Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hainline, Clotilde; Rucker, Janet C; Zagzag, David; Golfinos, John G; Lui, Yvonne W; Liechty, Benjamin; Warren, Floyd A; Balcer, Laura J; Galetta, Steven L

    2017-03-01

    While cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a common cause of lobar hemorrhage, rarely it may be associated with an inflammatory response, thought to be incited by amyloid deposits. We report a 73-year-old woman with an extensive cancer history who presented with tumor-like lesions and symptoms of homonymous hemianopia and prosopagnosia. Found to have cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation proven by brain biopsy, she was treated successfully with immunosuppression.

  14. 18F-AV-1451 PET Imaging in Three Patients with Probable Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Cho, Hanna; Werring, David J; Jang, Young Kyoung; Kim, Yeo Jin; Lee, Jin San; Lee, Juyoun; Jun, Soomin; Park, Seongbeom; Ryu, Young Hoon; Choi, Jae Yong; Cho, Young Seok; Moon, Seung Hwan; Na, Duk L; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Seo, Sang Won

    2017-03-06

    Cerebrovascular deposition of amyloid-β, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), is associated with MRI findings of lobar hemorrhage, cerebral microbleeds, and cortical superficial siderosis. Although pathological studies suggest that tau may co-localize with vascular amyloid, this has not yet been investigated in CAA in vivo. Three patients with probable CAA underwent 11C-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET or 18F-florbetaben PET to evaluate amyloid burden, and 18F-AV-1451 PET to evaluate paired helical filament tau burden. Regions that had cerebral microbleeds or cortical superficial siderosis largely overlapped with those showing increased 18F-AV-1451 and increased 11C-PiB uptake. Our preliminary study raised the possibility that lobar cerebral microbleeds, and cortical superficial siderosis, which are characteristic markers of vascular amyloid, may be associated with local production of paired helical filament tau.

  15. Reducing Available Soluble β-Amyloid Prevents Progression of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Julia L.; Prada, Claudia M.; Fine, Sara J.; Garcia-Alloza, Monica; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Arbel-Ornath, Michal; Greenberg, Steven M.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Frosch, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical blood vessels of the brain, is a major cause of intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment, and is commonly associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). CAA progression, as measured in transgenic mice by longitudinal imaging with multiphoton microscopy, occurs in a predictable linear manner. The dynamics of Aβ deposition in and clearance from vascular walls and their relationship to the concentration of Aβ in the brain is poorly understood. We manipulated Aβ levels in the brain using 2 approaches: peripheral clearance via administration of the amyloid binding “peripheral sink” protein gelsolin, and direct inhibition of its formation via administration of LY-411575, a small molecule γ-secretase inhibitor. We found that gelsolin and LY-411575 both reduced the rate of CAA progression in Tg2576 mice from untreated rates of 0.58 ± 0.15% and 0.52 ± 0.09% to 0.11 ± 0.18% (p = 0.04) and −0.17 ± 0.09% (p < 0.001) of affected vessel per day, respectively, in the absence of an immune response. CAA progression was also halted when gelsolin was combined with LY-411575 (−0.004 ± 0.10%, p < 0.003). These data suggest that CAA progression can be prevented with non-immune approaches that may reduce the availability of soluble Aβ, but without evidence of substantial amyloid clearance from vessels. PMID:23095848

  16. Cerebral vascular amyloid seeds drive amyloid β-protein fibril assembly with a distinct anti-parallel structure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Fu, Ziao; Dass, Sharmila; Kotarba, AnnMarie E.; Davis, Judianne; Smith, Steven O.; Van Nostrand, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ), a condition known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), is a common pathological feature of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Familial Aβ mutations, such as Dutch-E22Q and Iowa-D23N, can cause severe cerebrovascular accumulation of amyloid that serves as a potent driver of vascular cognitive impairment and dementia. The distinctive features of vascular amyloid that underlie its unique pathological properties remain unknown. Here, we use transgenic mouse models producing CAA mutants (Tg-SwDI) or overproducing human wild-type Aβ (Tg2576) to demonstrate that CAA-mutant vascular amyloid influences wild-type Aβ deposition in brain. We also show isolated microvascular amyloid seeds from Tg-SwDI mice drive assembly of human wild-type Aβ into distinct anti-parallel β-sheet fibrils. These findings indicate that cerebrovascular amyloid can serve as an effective scaffold to promote rapid assembly and strong deposition of Aβ into a unique structure that likely contributes to its distinctive pathology. PMID:27869115

  17. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy Pathology and Cognitive Domains in Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitakis, Zoe; Leurgans, Sue E.; Wang, Zhenxin; Wilson, Robert S.; Bennett, David A.; Schneider, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) to cognitive domains in older community-dwelling persons with and without dementia. Methods Subjects were 404 persons in the Religious Orders Study, a cohort study of aging, who underwent annual clinical evaluations, including 19 neuropsychological tests from which 5 cognitive domain and global summary scores were derived, and brain autopsy at time-of-death (mean age-at-death 86). Using amyloid-β immunostaining, CAA severity was graded in 5 regions (midfrontal, inferior temporal, angular, calcarine, and hippocampal cortices), as 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe, and 4 = very severe. Because severity was related across regions (all rs > 0.63), and almost all persons had some CAA, we averaged regional CAA scores and created class variable predictors for no-to-minimal (<0.5), mild-to-moderate (0.5-2.5) and moderate-to-very severe CAA (>2.5). Results CAA was very common (84.9%; 94 had no-to-minimal, 233 mild-to-moderate, and 76 moderate-to-very severe disease) and was related to AD pathology (rs = 0.68). In linear regression analyses controlling for age, sex, education, AD pathology, infarcts, and Lewy bodies, moderate-to-very severe CAA was associated with lower perceptual speed (p = 0.012) and episodic memory (p = 0.047), but not semantic memory, working memory, visuospatial skills, or a composite of all cognitive measures. No associations of mild-to-moderate CAA with cognition were found. Dementia did not modify these findings. Interpretation CAA pathology is very common in older community-dwelling persons and is associated with AD pathology. Moderate-to-very severe CAA, but not mild-to-moderate CAA, is associated with lower performance in specific cognitive domains, most notably perceptual speed, separately from the effect of AD pathology. PMID:21387377

  18. Pseudotumoral presentation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy–related inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ronsin, Solène; Deiana, Gianluca; Geraldo, Ana Filipa; Durand-Dubief, Françoise; Thomas-Maisonneuve, Laure; Formaglio, Maïté; Desestret, Virginie; Meyronet, David; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Berthezène, Yves; Ducray, François

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the clinical and radiologic features that should raise suspicion for the pseudotumoral presentation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy–related inflammation (CAA-I). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the characteristics of 5 newly diagnosed and 23 previously reported patients in whom the CAA-I imaging findings were initially interpreted as CNS neoplasms. Results: Most cases (85%) occurred in patients >60 years old. The clinical characteristics at presentation included subacute cognitive decline (50%), confusion (32%), focal deficits (32%), seizures (25%), and headaches (21%). Brain MRI demonstrated infiltrative white matter lesions that exhibited a loco-regional mass effect without parenchymal enhancement (93%). In general, these findings were interpreted as low-grade glioma or lymphoma. Eighteen patients (64%) underwent a biopsy, which was nondiagnostic in 4 patients (14%), and 6 patients (21%) underwent a surgical resection. The primary reason for the misinterpretation of the imaging findings was the absence of T2*-weighted gradient recalled echo (T2*-GRE) sequences on initial imaging (89%). When subsequently performed (39%), the T2*-GRE sequences demonstrated multiple characteristic cortical and subcortical microhemorrhages in all cases. Perfusion MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), which were performed on a subset of patients, indicated markedly reduced relative cerebral blood flow and a normal metabolic ratio. Conclusion: The identification of one or several nonenhancing space-occupying lesions, especially in elderly patients presenting with cognitive impairment, should raise suspicion for the pseudotumoral presentation of CAA-I and lead to T2*-GRE sequences. Perfusion MRI and MRS appear to be useful techniques for the differential diagnosis of this entity. PMID:26850981

  19. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  20. Amyloid imaging as a biomarker for cerebral β-amyloidosis and risk prediction for Alzheimer dementia.

    PubMed

    Klunk, William E

    2011-12-01

    Since the introduction of amyloid imaging nearly 10 years ago, this technique has gained widespread use and acceptance. More recently, published reports have begun to appear in which amyloid imaging is used to detect the effects of antiamyloid therapies. This review will consider the issues involved in the use of amyloid imaging in the development and evaluation of drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Current evidence regarding the postmortem correlates of in vivo amyloid imaging data are considered. The application of amyloid imaging to screening subjects for trials and use as an outcome measure is discussed in light of longitudinal changes in the in vivo amyloid signal. While the bulk of this review is directed at symptomatic patients with dementia, consideration is given to the use of amyloid imaging in nondemented subjects as well. Similarities and differences of cerebral amyloid assessment by amyloid imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measurements are delineated and an agenda for further research to improve the applicability of amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) to clinical trials is proposed.

  1. Hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, Down syndrome and the Boston criteria.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębski, Karol; Kacperska, Magdalena Justyna; Majos, Agata; Grodzka, Magdalena; Głąbiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    A stroke, or a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) is a life-threatening condition which often results in permanent or significant disability in the adult population. Several classifications of CVAs exist, one of them being based on the mechanism of injury of brain tissue: ischemic (85-90%) and hemorrhagic (10-15%). In a hemorrhagic stroke an intercranial bleeding occurs, leading to the formation of a focal hematoma typically located in the basal ganglia of the brain (approx. 45% of cases). A common yet underestimated cause of intracerebral hemorrhage is cerebral small vessel disease with microhemorrhages, including the cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). This condition is associated with the deposition of amyloid-beta in arterial walls (in soft meninges, subcortical areas and the cerebral cortex). Research has shown that causes of hemorrhagic changes in the brain include genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome. The association is caused by the so-called 'gene dosage effect', as the gene for the precursor protein for amyloid-beta is located in chromosome 21. We wish to present the case of a 60 year old patient with Down syndrome who suffered a hemorrhagic stroke without antecedent hypertension. Based on the history taken, diagnostic imaging and the source literature, a diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy as the source of the bleeding was made (however it must be noted that without a full post-mortem examination, the Boston criteria allow only for a 'probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy' diagnosis to be made). The authors hereby also report the need to modify the Boston criteria for cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

  2. Amyloid-β peptide absence in short term effects on kinase activity of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ianiski, Francine R; Rech, Virginia C; Nishihira, Vivian S K; Alves, Catiane B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Luchese, Cristiane

    2016-01-01

    Considering that Alzheimer's disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease worldwide, we investigated the activities of three key kinases: creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase and adenylate kinase in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease model. Male adult Swiss mice received amyloid-β or saline. One day after, mice were treated with blank nanocapsules (17 ml/kg) or meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules (5 mg/kg) or free meloxicam (5 mg/kg). Treatments were performed on alternating days, until the end of the experimental protocol. In the fourteenth day, kinases activities were performed. Amyloid-β did not change the kinases activity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice. However, free meloxicam decrease the creatine kinase activity in mitochondrial-rich fraction in the group induced by amyloid-β, but for the cytosolic fraction, it has raised in the activity of pyruvate kinase activity in cerebral cortex. Further, meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules administration reduced adenylate kinase activity in the hippocampus of mice injected by amyloid-β. In conclusion we observed absence in short-term effects in kinases activities of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex using amyloid-β peptide model. These findings established the foundation to further study the kinases in phosphoryltransfer network changes observed in the brains of patients post-mortem with Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy Burden Associated with Leukoaraiosis:a PET/MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Gurol, M. Edip; Viswanathan, Anand; Gidicsin, Christopher; Hedden, Trey; Ramirez-Martinez, Sergi; Dumas, Andrew; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Ayres, Alison M.; Auriel, Eitan; van Etten, Ellis; Becker, Alex; Carmasin, Jeremy; Schwab, Kristin; Rosand, Jonathan; Johnson, Keith A.; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that vascular amyloid contributes to chronic brain ischemia, therefore amyloid burden measured by Pittsburgh Compound B retention on PET (PiB-PET) would correlate with the extent of MRI white matter hyperintensities (WMHor leukoaraiosis) in patients with high vascular amyloid deposition (Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy, CAA) but not high parenchymal amyloid deposition (Alzheimer’s Disease, AD; Mild Cognitive Impairment, MCI) or healthy elderly (HE). Methods Fourty-two non-demented CAA patients, 50 HE subjects and 43 AD/MCI patients had brain MRI and PiB-PET. Multivariate linear regression was used to assess the independent association between PiB retention and WMD volume controlling for age, gender, apolipoprotein E genotype, and vascular risk factors within each group. Results CAA patients were younger than HE and AD (68±10 vs 73.3±7 and 74±7.4, p<0.01) but had higher amounts of WMH (medians: 21ml vs 3.2ml and 10.8ml respectively, p<0.05 for both comparisons). Global PiB retention and WMH showed strong correlation (rho=0.52, p<0.001) in the CAA group but not in HE or AD. These associations did not change in the multivariate models. Lobar microbleed count, another marker of CAA severity also remained as an independent predictor of WMH volume. Interpretation Our results indicate that amyloid burden in CAA subjects (with primarily vascular amyloid) but not AD subjects (with primarily parenchymal amyloid) independently correlate with WMH volume. These findings support the idea that vascular amyloid burden directly contributes to chronic cerebral ischemia and highlights the possible utility of amyloid imaging as a marker of CAA severity. PMID:23424091

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Palmqvist, Sebastian; Mattsson, Niklas; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent (18)F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1-4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer's disease dementia. The results were replicated after adjustments of different factors and when using different cut-offs for amyloid-β abnormality

  5. Visualization of microhemorrhages with optical histology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Patrick; Crouzet, Christian; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Choi, Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a neurovascular disease that is strongly associated with an increase in the number and size of spontaneous microhemorrhages. Conventional methods, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), can detect microhemorrhages while positron emission tomography (PET) with Pittsburgh Compound B can detect amyloid deposits. MRI and PET can separately demonstrate the presence of microhemorrhages and CAA in affected brains in vivo; however, there is still a lack of strong evidence for the direct involvement of CAA in the presence of microhemorrhage formation. In this study, we use optical histology, a method which combines histochemical staining, chemical optical clearing, and optical imaging, in a Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease to enable simultaneous, co-registered three-dimensional visualization of cerebral microvasculature, microhemorrhages, and amyloid deposits. Our data strongly suggest that microhemorrhages are localized within the brain regions affected by amyloid deposits. All but two observed microhemorrhages (n=18) were closely localized with vessels affected by CAA whereas no microhemorrhages or amyloid deposits were observed in wild type mouse brain sections. Our data also suggest that the predominant type of CAA-related microhemorrhage is associated with leaky or ruptured hemorrhagic microvasculature within the hippocampus and cerebral cortex rather than occluded ischemic microvasculature. The proposed optical histology method will allow future studies about the relationship between CAA and microhemorrhages during disease development and in response to treatment strategies.

  6. Correlation of Cerebral Microbleed Distribution to Amyloid Burden in Patients with Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsin-Hsi; Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Ya-Fang; Tang, Sung-Chun; Lee, Bo-Ching; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2017-01-01

    The underlying pathology of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) with mixed lobar and deep distribution remains contentious. The aim of this study was to correlate CMBs distribution to β-amyloid burden in patients with primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Fourty-seven ICH patients underwent magnetic resonance susceptibility-weighted imaging and 11C-Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography. The amyloid burden was expressed as standardized uptake value ratio with reference to cerebellum, and presented as median (interquartile range). Patients were categorized into the lobar, mixed (both lobar and deep regions), and deep types of CMB. Comparing the lobar (17%), mixed (59.6%) and deep (23.4%) CMB types, the global amyloid burden was significantly higher in the mixed type than the deep type (1.10 [1.03–1.25] vs 1.00 [0.97–1.09], p = 0.011), but lower than in the lobar type (1.48 [1.18–1.50], p = 0.048). On multivariable analysis, the ratio of lobar to deep CMB number was positively correlated with global (p = 0.028) and occipital (p = 0.031) amyloid burden. In primary ICH, patients with lobar and mixed CMB types are associated with increased amyloid burden than patients with deep type. The ratio of lobar to deep CMB number is an independent indicator of cerebral β-amyloid deposition. PMID:28303922

  7. Aging and cerebrovascular dysfunction: contribution of hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vasilevko, Vitaly; Passos, Giselle F; Quiring, Daniel; Head, Elizabeth; Kim, Richard C; Fisher, Mark; Cribbs, David H

    2010-10-01

    Age-related cerebrovascular dysfunction contributes to ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs), microbleeds, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and cognitive decline. Importantly, there is increasing recognition that this dysfunction plays a critical secondary role in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Atherosclerosis, hypertension, and CAA are the most common causes of blood-brain barrier (BBB) lesions. The accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in the cerebrovascular system is a significant risk factor for ICH and has been linked to endothelial transport failure and blockage of perivascular drainage. Moreover, recent anti-Aβ immunotherapy clinical trials demonstrated efficient clearance of parenchymal amyloid deposits but have been plagued by CAA-associated adverse events. Although management of hypertension and atherosclerosis can reduce the incidence of ICH, there are currently no approved therapies for attenuating CAA. Thus, there is a critical need for new strategies that improve BBB function and limit the development of β-amyloidosis in the cerebral vasculature.

  8. Preliminary Investigation of Cerebral Blood Flow and Amyloid Burden in Veterans With and Without Combat-Related Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ponto, Laura L Boles; Brashers-Krug, Thomas M; Pierson, Ronald K; Menda, Yusuf; Acion, Laura; Watkins, G Leonard; Sunderland, John J; Koeppel, Julie A; Jorge, Ricardo E

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine global and regional cerebral blood flow and amyloid burden in combat veterans with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI). Cerebral blood flow (in milliliters per minute per 100 mL) was measured by quantitative [(15)O]water, and amyloid burden was measured by [(11)C]PIB imaging. Mean global cerebral blood flow was significantly lower in veterans with TBI compared with non-TBI veterans. There were essentially no differences between groups for globally normalized regional cerebral blood flow. Amyloid burden did not differ between TBI and non-TBI veterans. Veterans who have suffered a TBI have significantly lower cerebral blood flow than non-TBI controls but did not manifest increased levels of amyloid, globally or regionally.

  9. Deposition of amyloid β in the walls of human leptomeningeal arteries in relation to perivascular drainage pathways in cerebral amyloid angiopathy☆

    PubMed Central

    Keable, Abby; Fenna, Kate; Yuen, Ho Ming; Johnston, David A.; Smyth, Neil R.; Smith, Colin; Salman, Rustam Al-Shahi; Samarasekera, Neshika; Nicoll, James A.R.; Attems, Johannes; Kalaria, Rajesh N.; Weller, Roy O.; Carare, Roxana O.

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the walls of cerebral arteries as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) suggests an age-related failure of perivascular drainage of soluble Aβ from the brain. As CAA is associated with Alzheimer's disease and with intracerebral haemorrhage, the present study determines the unique sequence of changes that occur as Aβ accumulates in artery walls. Paraffin sections of post-mortem human occipital cortex were immunostained for collagen IV, fibronectin, nidogen 2, Aβ and smooth muscle actin and the immunostaining was analysed using Image J and confocal microscopy. Results showed that nidogen 2 (entactin) increases with age and decreases in CAA. Confocal microscopy revealed stages in the progression of CAA: Aβ initially deposits in basement membranes in the tunica media, replaces first the smooth muscle cells and then the connective tissue elements to leave artery walls completely or focally replaced by Aβ. The pattern of development of CAA in the human brain suggests expansion of Aβ from the basement membranes to progressively replace all tissue elements in the artery wall. Establishing this full picture of the development of CAA is pivotal in understanding the clinical presentation of CAA and for developing therapies to prevent accumulation of Aβ in artery walls. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26327684

  10. Amyloid deposition after cerebral hypoperfusion: evidenced on [(18)F]AV-45 positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Lun; Lin, Kun-Ju; Ho, Meng-Yang; Chang, Yeu-Jhy; Chang, Chien-Hung; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Lee, Tsong-Hai

    2012-08-15

    Animal studies have shown that cerebral hypoperfusion may be associated with amyloid plaque accumulation. Amyloid plaque is known to be associated with dementia and [(18)F]AV-45 is a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand that binds to extracelluar plaques. We hypothesized that demented patients with cerebral hypoperfusion may have increased [(18)F]AV-45 uptake. Five demented patients with cerebral hypoperfusion due to unilateral carotid artery stenosis (CAS) were examined with [(18)F]AV-45 PET, and the results were compared with six elderly controls. The standard uptake value ratio (SUVR) of each region of interest (ROI) was created using whole cerebellum as the reference region. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for obtaining structural information. Patients with dementia and unilateral CAS had a higher global [(18)F]AV-45 SUVR (1.34 ± 0.06) as compared with controls (1.10 ± 0.04, p=0.0043), especially over the frontal, temporal, precuneus, anterior cingulate and occipital regions. The statistical distribution maps revealed a significantly increased [(18)F]AV-45 SUVR in the medial frontal, caudate, thalamus, posterior cingulate, occipital and middle and superior temporal regions ipsilateral to the side of CAS (p<0.01). The present study found that cerebral [(18)F]AV-45 binding is increased in demented patients with CAS, and its distribution is lateralized to the CAS side, suggesting that amyloid-related dementia may occur under cerebral hypoperfusion.

  11. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  12. Imaging of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy with Bivalent 99mTc-Hydroxamamide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iikuni, Shimpei; Ono, Masahiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Kenji; Yoshimura, Masashi; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Okamoto, Yoko; Ihara, Masafumi; Saji, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), characterized by the deposition of amyloid aggregates in the walls of cerebral vasculature, is a major factor in intracerebral hemorrhage and vascular cognitive impairment and is also associated closely with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We previously reported 99mTc-hydroxamamide (99mTc-Ham) complexes with a bivalent amyloid ligand showing high binding affinity for β-amyloid peptide (Aβ(1–42)) aggregates present frequently in the form in AD. In this article, we applied them to CAA-specific imaging probes, and evaluated their utility for CAA-specific imaging. In vitro inhibition assay using Aβ(1–40) aggregates deposited mainly in CAA and a brain uptake study were performed for 99mTc-Ham complexes, and all 99mTc-Ham complexes with an amyloid ligand showed binding affinity for Aβ(1–40) aggregates and very low brain uptake. In vitro autoradiography of human CAA brain sections and ex vivo autoradiography of Tg2576 mice were carried out for bivalent 99mTc-Ham complexes ([99mTc]SB2A and [99mTc]BT2B), and they displayed excellent labeling of Aβ depositions in human CAA brain sections and high affinity and selectivity to CAA in transgenic mice. These results may offer new possibilities for the development of clinically useful CAA-specific imaging probes based on the 99mTc-Ham complex.

  13. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy-Related Inflammation: Report of a Case with Very Difficult Therapeutic Management

    PubMed Central

    Crosta, Francesca; Orlandi, Berardino; De Santis, Federica; Passalacqua, Gianni; DiFrancesco, Jacopo C.; Piazza, Fabrizio; Catalucci, Alessia; Desideri, Giovambattista; Marini, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri) results from autoimmune response to beta-amyloid deposits in cerebral vessels. Its clinical course and complications have seldom been described in literature. Case Report. In a patient presenting with delirium and left hemiparesis the diagnosis of CAA-ri was supported by the finding of elevated anti-amyloid autoantibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Steroid therapy produced significant improvements in clinical and investigational assessments, but after two months, it caused Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. After steroid therapy discontinuation the patient presented a rapidly progressive dementia, Guillain-Barré syndrome, new cerebral ischemic lesions, and thrombosis of the right cephalic and subclavian veins that were treated with subcutaneous heparin. After a week the patient died because of brain hemorrhage. Conclusion. This case suggests caution in steroid therapy discontinuation and antithrombotic therapy administration in patients with CAA-ri. The CSF search of anti-amyloid autoantibodies could be helpful to support the diagnosis. PMID:26351601

  14. Platelets in the Alzheimer's disease brain: do they play a role in cerebral amyloid angiopathy?

    PubMed

    Kniewallner, Kathrin M; Ehrlich, Daniela; Kiefer, Andreas; Marksteiner, Josef; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by extracellular beta-amyloid plaques and intracellular tau tangles. AD-related pathology is often accompanied by vascular changes. The predominant vascular lesions in AD are cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and arteriosclerosis. Platelets circulate along the vessel wall responding immediately to vascular injury. The aim of the present study was to explore the presence and migration of platelets (thrombocytes) to sites of small vascular bleedings and/or to beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. We infused fluorescently labeled red PKH26 mouse platelets into transgenic Alzheimer mice overexpressing APP with Swedish/Dutch/Iowa mutations (APP_SDI) and explored if platelets migrate into the brain. Further we studied whether platelets accumulate in the vicinity of β-amyloid plaques. Our animal data shows that infused platelets are found in the liver and partly in the lung, while in the brain platelets were visible to a minor degree. In mice, we did not observe a significant association of platelets with beta-amyloid plaques or vessels. In the brain of Alzheimer postmortem patients platelets could be detected by immunohistochemistry for CD41 and CD62P, but the majority was found in vessels with or without beta-amyloid load, and only a few single platelets migrated deeper into the brain. Our findings suggest that platelets do not migrate into the brains of Alzheimer disease but are concentrated in brain vessels.

  15. Association between Cerebral Amyloid Deposition and Clinical Factors Including Cognitive Function in Geriatric Depression: Pilot Study Using Amyloid Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Geum; Kong, Eun-Jung; Cheon, Eun-Jin; Kim, Hae-Won; Koo, Bon-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between cerebral amyloid deposition and overall clinical factors including cognitive functions in geriatric depression by using 18F-florbetaben positron emission tomography. Thirteen subjects aged over 60 years who had a history of major depressive disorder and also had subjective memory complaint were included. Of all subjects, 3 subjects judged as amyloid positive, and the others judged as amyloid negative. Their memory, visuospatial functions and attention abilities were negatively correlated with amyloid deposition in specific brain regions, but their language and recognition abilities were not correlated with any region. The amyloid deposition of the whole brain region was significantly negatively correlated with immediate memory. PMID:27776391

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1–4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer’s disease dementia. The results were replicated after

  17. Multiple intracranial hemorrhages in a normotensive demented patient: A probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Chitsaz, Ahmad; Norouzi, Rasul; Marashi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Salimianfard, Marzieh; Fard, Salman Abbasi

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the most common cause of lobar intracerebral hemorrhage. Repeated bleeding may be presented with vascular dementia. We have reported a 68-year-old normotensive demented patient with probable CAA presented with hemiparesia, headache and vomiting. According to the experience of this case, it is recommended to consider CAA for normotensive elderly patients presented with multiple and superficial intracerebral hemorrhage.

  18. Multiple intracranial hemorrhages in a normotensive demented patient: A probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chitsaz, Ahmad; Norouzi, Rasul; Marashi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Salimianfard, Marzieh; Fard, Salman Abbasi

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the most common cause of lobar intracerebral hemorrhage. Repeated bleeding may be presented with vascular dementia. We have reported a 68-year-old normotensive demented patient with probable CAA presented with hemiparesia, headache and vomiting. According to the experience of this case, it is recommended to consider CAA for normotensive elderly patients presented with multiple and superficial intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:23248664

  19. Rapidly Sequential and Fatal Hemorrhaging in a Case of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bulwa, Zachary B.; Ward, G. Carter; Kramer, Owen N.; Rao, Birju; Wichter, Melvin

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 63 Final Diagnosis: Cerebral amyloid angiopathy Symptoms: Altered mental state • aphasia • hemiplegia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an increasingly recognized cause of lobar intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and cognitive impairment in the aging population. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebral microbleeds is the most reliable option for clinical diagnosis of suspected CAA. The pathophysiology of microbleeds and ICH in CAA is not well understood, but it is thought to be the result of vessel weakening and rupture secondary to amyloid deposition. Little evidence has been established pertaining to the time course of recurrent CAA-related microbleeds or larger hemorrhages. Although several risk factors have been associated with an increased risk of ICH in CAA, there are no current treatment guidelines for recurrent hemorrhaging in CAA. Case Report: We present a rare case of rapidly sequential and fatal lobar hemorrhaging in the setting of suspected CAA, diagnosed by numerous microbleeds on MRI, compounded by the use of subcutaneous heparin in a 63-year-old female patient. Conclusions: This case broadens our understanding of a rarely identified progression of CAA and illustrates the need for further investigation of the use of subcutaneous heparin in the setting of probable CAA. PMID:27853131

  20. Neprilysin protects against cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Aβ-induced degeneration of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Miners, James Scott; Kehoe, Patrick; Love, Seth

    2011-09-01

    Neprilysin (NEP), which degrades amyloid-β (Aβ), is expressed by neurons and cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (CVSMCs). NEP immunolabeling is reduced within cerebral blood vessels of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). We have now measured NEP enzyme activity in leptomeningeal and purified cerebral cortical blood vessel preparations from control and AD patients with and without CAA. Measurements were adjusted for smooth muscle actin (SMA) to control for variations in CVSMC content. NEP activity was reduced in CAA, in both controls and AD. In leptomeningeal vessels, NEP activity was related to APOE genotype, being highest in ε2-positive and lowest in ε4-positive brains. To assess the role of NEP in protecting CVSMCs from Aβ toxicity, we measured cell death in primary human adult CVSMCs exposed to Aβ(1-40) , Aβ(1-42) or Aβ(1-40(Dutch variant)) . Aβ(1-42) was most cytotoxic to CVSMCs. Aβ(1-42) -mediated cell death was increased following siRNA-mediated knockdown or thiorphan-mediated inhibition of NEP activity; conversely Aβ(1-42) -mediated cytotoxicity was reduced by the addition of somatostatin and NEP over-expression following transfection with NEP cDNA. Our findings suggest that NEP protects CVSMCs from Aβ toxicity and protects cerebral blood vessels from the development and complications of CAA.

  1. Curcumin Reduces Amyloid Fibrillation of Prion Protein and Decreases Reactive Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Fen; Yu, Kun-Hua; Jheng, Cheng-Ping; Chung, Raymond; Lee, Cheng-I

    2013-01-01

    Misfolding and aggregation into amyloids of the prion protein (PrP) is responsible for the development of fatal transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. Various studies on curcumin demonstrate promise for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and inhibition of PrPres accumulation. To evaluate the effect of curcumin on amyloid fibrillation of prion protein, we first investigated the effect of curcumin on mouse prion protein (mPrP) in a cell-free system. Curcumin reduced the prion fibril formation significantly. Furthermore, we monitored the change in apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level upon curcumin treatment in mouse neuroblastoma cells (N2a). Curcumin effectively rescues the cells from apoptosis and decreases the ROS level caused by subsequent co-incubation with prion amyloid fibrils. The assays in cell-free mPrP and in N2a cells of this work verified the promising effect of curcumin on the prevention of transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25437204

  2. Cerebral β-amyloid deposition predicts HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in APOE ε4 carriers

    PubMed Central

    Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Moore, David J.; Gouaux, Ben; Soontornniyomkij, Benchawanna; Tatro, Erick T.; Umlauf, Anya; Masliah, Eliezer; Levine, Andrew J.; Singer, Elyse J.; Vinters, Harry V.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Morgello, Susan; Cherner, Mariana; Grant, Igor; Achim, Cristian L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele enhances cerebral accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) and is a major risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We hypothesized that HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) would be associated with the APOE ε4 genotype and cerebral Aβ deposition. Design Clinico-pathological study of HIV-infected adults from four prospective cohorts in the U.S. National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium. Methods We used multivariable logistic regressions to model outcomes (Aβ plaques [immunohistochemistry] and HAND [standard criteria]) on predictors (APOE ε4 [allelic discrimination assay], older age [≥ 50 years], Aβ plaques, and their two-way interactions) and co-morbid factors. Results Isocortical Aβ deposits generally occurred as diffuse plaques and mild to moderate amyloid angiopathy. Isocortical phospho-Tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary lesions were sparse. The APOE ε4 and older age were independently associated with the presence of Aβ plaques (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 10.16 and 5.77 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.89–35.76 and 1.91–17.48], P=0.0003 and 0.0019, respectively, n=96). The probability of HAND was increased in the presence of Aβ plaques among APOE ε4 carriers (adjusted OR 30.00 [95% CI 1.41–638.63], P=0.029, n=15), but not in non-ε4 carriers (n=57). Conclusion The APOE ε4 and older age increased the likelihood of cerebral Aβ plaque deposition in HIV-infected adults. Generally Aβ plaques in HIV brains were immunohistologically different from those in symptomatic AD brains. Nonetheless, Aβ plaques were associated with HAND among APOE ε4 carriers. The detection of APOE ε4 genotype and cerebral Aβ deposition biomarkers may be useful in identifying living HAND subjects who could benefit from Aβ-targeted therapies. PMID:23018443

  3. p75NTR antagonistic cyclic peptide decreases the size of beta amyloid-induced brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L; Stewart, Kenneth B; Qureshi, Nazer H; Kowall, Neil W; Gilchrest, Barbara A

    2008-12-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75(NTR) antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Abeta and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75(NTR). In vivo injections of Abeta into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Abeta and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Abeta to p75(NTR) may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. p75NTR Antagonistic Cyclic Peptide Decreases the Size of β Amyloid-Induced Brain Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L.; Stewart, Kenneth B.; Qureshi, Nazer H.; Kowall, Neil W.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75NTR antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Aβ and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75NTR. In vivo injections of Aβ into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Aβ and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Aβ to p75NTR may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18807174

  5. Anti-Aβ Autoantibodies in Amyloid Related Imaging Abnormalities (ARIA): Candidate Biomarker for Immunotherapy in Alzheimer’s Disease and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C.; Longoni, Martina; Piazza, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) represent the major severe side effect of amyloid-beta (Aβ) immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Early biomarkers of ARIA represent an important challenge to ensure safe and beneficial effects of immunotherapies, given that different promising clinical trials in prodromal and subjects at risk for AD are underway. The recent demonstration that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) anti-Aβ autoantibodies play a key role in the development of the ARIA-like events characterizing cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation generated great interest in the field of immunotherapy. Herein, we critically review the growing body of evidence supporting the monitoring of CSF anti-Aβ autoantibody as a promising candidate biomarker for ARIA in clinical trials. PMID:26441825

  6. New Therapeutic Approaches for Alzheimer’s Disease and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Satoshi; Ihara, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown a strong relationship between Alzheimer’s disease (AD), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and cerebrovascular disease. Cognitive impairment in AD patients can result from cortical microinfarcts associated with CAA, as well as the synaptic and neuronal disturbances caused by cerebral accumulations of β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau proteins. The pathophysiology of AD may lead to a toxic chain of events consisting of Aβ overproduction, impaired Aβ clearance, and brain ischemia. Insufficient removal of Aβ leads to development of CAA and plays a crucial role in sporadic AD cases, implicating promotion of Aβ clearance as an important therapeutic strategy. Aβ is mainly eliminated by three mechanisms: (1) enzymatic/glial degradation, (2) transcytotic delivery, and (3) perivascular drainage (3-“d” mechanisms). Enzymatic degradation may be facilitated by activation of Aβ-degrading enzymes such as neprilysin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and insulin-degrading enzyme. Transcytotic delivery can be promoted by inhibition of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which mediates transcytotic influx of circulating Aβ into brain. Successful use of the RAGE inhibitor TTP488 in Phase II testing has led to a Phase III clinical trial for AD patients. The perivascular drainage system seems to be driven by motive force generated by cerebral arterial pulsations, suggesting that vasoactive drugs can facilitate Aβ clearance. One of the drugs promoting this system is cilostazol, a selective inhibitor of type 3 phosphodiesterase. The clearance of fluorescent soluble Aβ tracers was significantly enhanced in cilostazol-treated CAA model mice. Given that the balance between Aβ synthesis and clearance determines brain Aβ accumulation, and that Aβ is cleared by several pathways stated above, multi-drugs combination therapy could provide a mainstream cure for sporadic AD. PMID:25368578

  7. Magnetic Resonance Q Mapping Reveals a Decrease in Microvessel Density in the arcAβ Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ielacqua, Giovanna D.; Schlegel, Felix; Füchtemeier, Martina; Xandry, Jael; Rudin, Markus; Klohs, Jan

    2016-01-01

    . We further demonstrated a region-specific association between parenchymal and vascular deposition of β-amyloid and decreased vascular density, without a correlation with the amount of Aβ deposition. We found that Q mapping was more suitable than the hemodynamic read-outs to detect amyloid-related degeneration of the cerebral microvasculature. PMID:26834622

  8. Magnetic Resonance Q Mapping Reveals a Decrease in Microvessel Density in the arcAβ Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Schlegel, Felix; Füchtemeier, Martina; Xandry, Jael; Rudin, Markus; Klohs, Jan

    2015-01-01

    reduction of microvessel density in the old arcAβ mice. We further demonstrated a region-specific association between parenchymal and vascular deposition of β-amyloid and decreased vascular density, without a correlation with the amount of Aβ deposition. We found that Q mapping was more suitable than the hemodynamic read-outs to detect amyloid-related degeneration of the cerebral microvasculature.

  9. Iron transport across the blood-brain barrier: development, neurovascular regulation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2015-02-01

    There are two barriers for iron entry into the brain: (1) the brain-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and (2) the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we review the literature on developmental iron accumulation by the brain, focusing on the transport of iron through the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the BBB. We review the iron trafficking proteins which may be involved in the iron flux across BMVEC and discuss the plausible mechanisms of BMVEC iron uptake and efflux. We suggest a model for how BMVEC iron uptake and efflux are regulated and a mechanism by which the majority of iron is trafficked across the developing BBB under the direct guidance of neighboring astrocytes. Thus, we place brain iron uptake in the context of the neurovascular unit of the adult brain. Last, we propose that BMVEC iron is involved in the aggregation of amyloid-β peptides leading to the progression of cerebral amyloid angiopathy which often occurs prior to dementia and the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Oligomerization of beta-amyloid of the Alzheimer's and the Dutch-cerebral-haemorrhage types.

    PubMed Central

    Sian, A K; Frears, E R; El-Agnaf, O M; Patel, B P; Manca, M F; Siligardi, G; Hussain, R; Austen, B M

    2000-01-01

    A novel ELISA has been developed which detects oligomerization of beta-amyloid (A beta). Oligomerization, fibrillization and neurotoxicity of native A beta associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) type has been compared with E22Q A beta (amyloid beta-protein containing residues 1--40 with the native Glu at residue 22 changed to Gln) implicated in Dutch cerebral haemorrhage disease. Solutions of A beta rapidly yield soluble oligomers in a concentration-dependent manner, which are detected by the ELISA, and by size-exclusion gel chromatography. Conformational changes from disordered to beta-sheet occur more slowly than oligomerization, and fibrils are produced after prolonged incubation. The E22Q A beta oligomerizes, changes conformation and fibrillizes more rapidly than the native form and produces shorter stubbier fibrils. Aged fibrillar preparations of E22Q A beta are more potent than aged fibrils of native A beta in inducing apoptotic changes and toxic responses in human neuroblastoma cell lines, whereas low-molecular-mass oligomers in briefly incubated solutions are much less potent. The differences in the rates of oligomerization of the two A beta forms, their conformational behaviour over a range of pH values, and NMR data reported elsewhere, are consistent with a molecular model of oligomerization in which strands of A beta monomers initially overcome charge repulsion to form dimers in parallel beta-sheet arrangement, stabilized by intramolecular hydrophobic interactions, with amino acids of adjacent chains in register. PMID:10861242

  11. Iron transport across the blood-brain barrier; Development, neurovascular regulation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    There are two barriers for iron entry into the brain: 1) the brain-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and 2) the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we review the literature on developmental iron accumulation by the brain, focusing on the transport of iron through the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the BBB. We review the iron trafficking proteins which may be involved in the iron flux across BMVEC and discuss the plausible mechanisms of BMVEC iron uptake and efflux. We suggest a model for how BMVEC iron uptake and efflux are regulated and a mechanism by which the majority of iron is trafficked across the developing BBB under the direct guidance of neighboring astrocytes. Thus, we place brain iron uptake in the context of the neurovascular unit of the adult brain. Last, we propose that BMVEC iron is involved in the aggregation of amyloid-β peptides leading to the progression of cerebral amyloid angiopathy which often occurs prior to dementia and the onset of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25355056

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition reduces oxidative stress associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy in vivo in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alloza, Monica; Prada, Claudia; Lattarulo, Carli; Fine, Sara; Borrelli, Laura A; Betensky, Rebecca; Greenberg, Steven M; Frosch, Matthew P; Bacskai, Brian J

    2009-06-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), characterized by extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) deposits in vessel walls, is present in the majority of cases of Alzheimer's disease and is a major cause of hemorrhagic stroke. Although the molecular pathways activated by vascular Abeta are poorly understood, extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and Abeta-induced oxidative stress appear to play important roles. We adapted fluorogenic assays for MMP activity and reactive oxygen species generation for use in vivo. Using multiphoton microscopy in APPswe/PS1dE9 and Tg-2576 transgenic mice, we observed strong associations between MMP activation, oxidative stress, and CAA deposition in leptomeningeal vessels. Antioxidant treatment with alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl-nitrone reduced oxidative stress associated with CAA (approximately 50% reduction) without affecting MMP activation. Conversely, a selection of agents that inhibit MMP by different mechanisms of action, including minocycline, simvastatin, and GM6001, reduced not only CAA-associated MMP activation (approximately 30-40% reduction) but also oxidative stress (approximately 40% reduction). The inhibitors of MMP did not have direct antioxidant effects. Treatment of animals with alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl-nitrone or minocycline did not have a significant effect on CAA progression rates. These data suggest a close association between Abeta-related MMP activation and oxidative stress in vivo and raise the possibility that treatment with MMP inhibitors may have beneficial effects by indirectly reducing the oxidative stress associated with CAA.

  13. Statins Decrease Neuroinflammation and Prevent Cognitive Impairment after Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Patricia A.; Estato, Vanessa; da Silva, Tathiany I.; d'Avila, Joana C.; Siqueira, Luciana D.; Assis, Edson F.; Bozza, Patricia T.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Tibiriça, Eduardo V.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe manifestation of Plasmodium falciparum infection in children and non-immune adults. Previous work has documented a persistent cognitive impairment in children who survive an episode of CM that is mimicked in animal models of the disease. Potential therapeutic interventions for this complication have not been investigated, and are urgently needed. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely prescribed for cardiovascular diseases. In addition to their effects on the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, statins have pleiotropic immunomodulatory activities. Here we tested if statins would prevent cognitive impairment in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Six days after infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) mice displayed clear signs of CM and were treated with chloroquine, or chloroquine and lovastatin. Intravital examination of pial vessels of infected animals demonstrated a decrease in functional capillary density and an increase in rolling and adhesion of leukocytes to inflamed endothelium that were reversed by treatment with lovastatin. In addition, oedema, ICAM-1, and CD11b mRNA levels were reduced in lovastatin-treated PbA-infected mice brains. Moreover, HMOX-1 mRNA levels are enhanced in lovastatin-treated healthy and infected brains. Oxidative stress and key inflammatory chemokines and cytokines were reduced to non-infected control levels in animals treated with lovastatin. Fifteen days post-infection cognitive dysfunction was detected by a battery of cognition tests in animals rescued from CM by chloroquine treatment. In contrast, it was absent in animals treated with lovastatin and chloroquine. The outcome was similar in experimental bacterial sepsis, suggesting that statins have neuroprotective effects in severe infectious syndromes in addition to CM. Statin treatment prevents neuroinflammation and blood brain barrier dysfunction in experimental CM and related conditions that are associated with

  14. Schisandrin B protects PC12 cells by decreasing the expression of amyloid precursor protein and vacuolar protein sorting 35★

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Mingmin; Mao, Shanping; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Qian; Pan, Gaofeng; Fu, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    PC12 cell injury was induced using 20 μM amyloid β-protein 25–35 to establish a model of Alzheimer's disease. The cells were then treated with 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assays and Hoechst 33342 staining results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the survival rate of PC12 cells injured by amyloid β-protein 25–35 gradually increased and the rate of apoptosis gradually decreased. Reverse transcription-PCR, immunocytochemical staining and western blot results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the mRNA and protein expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein were gradually decreased. Vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein showed a consistent trend for change. These findings suggest that 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B antagonizes the cellular injury induced by amyloid β-protein 25–35 in a dose-dependent manner. This may be caused by decreasing the expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein. PMID:25745458

  15. Alzheimer-related decrease in CYFIP2 links amyloid production to tau hyperphosphorylation and memory loss

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sachin Suresh; Mizuno, Keiko; Ghosh, Anshua; Aziz, Wajeeha; Troakes, Claire; Daoud, Jason; Golash, Vidushi; Noble, Wendy; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Characteristic features of Alzheimer’s disease are memory loss, plaques resulting from abnormal processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), and presence of neurofibrillary tangles and dystrophic neurites containing hyperphosphorylated tau. Currently, it is not known what links these abnormalities together. Cytoplasmic FMR1 interacting protein 2 (CYFIP2) has been suggested to regulate mRNA translation at synapses and this may include local synthesis of APP and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, a kinase that can phosphorylate tau. Further, CYFIP2 is part of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-family verprolin-homologous protein complex, which has been implicated in actin polymerization at synapses, a process thought to be required for memory formation. Our previous studies on p25 dysregulation put forward the hypothesis that CYFIP2 expression is reduced in Alzheimer’s disease and that this contributes to memory impairment, abnormal APP processing and tau hyperphosphorylation. Here, we tested this hypothesis. First, in post-mortem tissue CYFIP2 expression was reduced by ∼50% in severe Alzheimer’s hippocampus and superior temporal gyrus when normalized to expression of a neuronal or synaptic marker protein. Interestingly, there was also a trend for decreased expression in mild Alzheimer’s disease hippocampus. Second, CYFIP2 expression was reduced in old but not in young Tg2576 mice, a model of familial Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, we tested the direct impact of reduced CYFIP2 expression in heterozygous null mutant mice. We found that in hippocampus this reduced expression causes an increase in APP and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) protein, but not mRNA expression, and elevates production of amyloid-β42. Reduced CYFIP2 expression also increases alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II protein expression, and this is associated with hyperphosphorylation of tau at serine-214. The reduced expression also

  16. Acat1 knockdown gene therapy decreases amyloid-β in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephanie R; Chang, Catherine Cy; Dogbevia, Godwin; Bryleva, Elena Y; Bowen, Zachary; Hasan, Mazahir T; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Both genetic inactivation and pharmacological inhibition of the cholesteryl ester synthetic enzyme acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) have shown benefit in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we aimed to test the potential therapeutic applications of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Acat1 gene knockdown in AD mice. We constructed recombinant AAVs expressing artificial microRNA (miRNA) sequences, which targeted Acat1 for knockdown. We demonstrated that our AAVs could infect cultured mouse neurons and glia and effectively knockdown ACAT activity in vitro. We next delivered the AAVs to mouse brains neurosurgically, and demonstrated that Acat1-targeting AAVs could express viral proteins and effectively diminish ACAT activity in vivo, without inducing appreciable inflammation. We delivered the AAVs to the brains of 10-month-old AD mice and analyzed the effects on the AD phenotype at 12 months of age. Acat1-targeting AAV delivered to the brains of AD mice decreased the levels of brain amyloid-β and full-length human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP), to levels similar to complete genetic ablation of Acat1. This study provides support for the potential therapeutic use of Acat1 knockdown gene therapy in AD.

  17. Amyloid-β peptide on sialyl-Lewis(X)-selectin-mediated membrane tether mechanics at the cerebral endothelial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Askarova, Sholpan; Sun, Zhe; Sun, Grace Y; Meininger, Gerald A; Lee, James C-M

    2013-01-01

    Increased deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) at the cerebral endothelial cell (CEC) surface has been implicated in enhancement of transmigration of monocytes across the brain blood barrier (BBB) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy (QIM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) with cantilevers biofunctionalized by sialyl-Lewis(x) (sLe(x)) were employed to investigate Aβ-altered mechanics of membrane tethers formed by bonding between sLe(x) and p-selectin at the CEC surface, the initial mechanical step governing the transmigration of monocytes. QIM results indicated the ability for Aβ to increase p-selectin expression at the cell surface and promote actin polymerization in both bEND3 cells (immortalized mouse CECs) and human primary CECs. AFM data also showed the ability for Aβ to increase cell stiffness and adhesion probability in bEND3 cells. On the contrary, Aβ lowered the overall force of membrane tether formation (Fmtf ), and produced a bimodal population of Fmtf , suggesting subcellular mechanical alterations in membrane tethering. The lower Fmtf population was similar to the results obtained from cells treated with an F-actin-disrupting drug, latrunculin A. Indeed, AFM results also showed that both Aβ and latrunculin A decreased membrane stiffness, suggesting a lower membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, a factor resulting in lower Fmtf . In addition, these cerebral endothelial alterations induced by Aβ were abrogated by lovastatin, consistent with its anti-inflammatory effects. In sum, these results demonstrated the ability for Aβ to enhance p-selectin expression at the CEC surface and induce cytoskeleton reorganization, which in turn, resulted in changes in membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion and membrane tethering, mechanical factors important in transmigration of monocytes through the BBB.

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow estimated by early PiB uptake is reduced in mild cognitive impairment and associated with age in an amyloid-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Gietl, Anton F; Warnock, Geoffrey; Riese, Florian; Kälin, Andrea M; Saake, Antje; Gruber, Esmeralda; Leh, Sandra E; Unschuld, Paul G; Kuhn, Felix P; Burger, Cyrill; Mu, Linjing; Seifert, Burkhardt; Nitsch, Roger M; Schibli, Roger; Ametamey, Simon M; Buck, Alfred; Hock, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Early uptake of [(11)C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (ePiB, 0-6 minutes) estimates cerebral blood flow. We studied ePiB in 13 PiB-negative and 10 PiB-positive subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 23) and 11 PiB-positive and 74 PiB-negative cognitively healthy elderly control subjects (HCS, n = 85) in 6 bilateral volumes of interest: posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), hippocampus (hipp), temporoparietal region, superior parietal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus (parahipp), and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) for the associations with cognitive status, age, amyloid deposition, and apolipoprotein E ε4-allele. We observed no difference in ePiB between PiB-positive and -negative subjects and carriers and noncarriers. EPiB decreased with age in PiB-positive subjects in bilateral superior parietal gyrus, bilateral temporoparietal region, right IFG, right PCC, and left parahippocampal gyrus but not in PiB-negative subjects. MCI had lower ePiB than HCS (left PCC, left IFG, and left and right hipp). Lowest ePiB values were found in MCI of 70 years and older, who also displayed high cortical PiB binding. This suggests that lowered regional cerebral blood flow indicated by ePiB is associated with age in the presence but not in the absence of amyloid pathology.

  19. Caffeine reverses cognitive impairment and decreases brain amyloid-beta levels in aged Alzheimer's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Arendash, Gary W; Mori, Takashi; Cao, Chuanhai; Mamcarz, Malgorzata; Runfeldt, Melissa; Dickson, Alexander; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Tane, Jun; Citron, Bruce A; Lin, Xiaoyang; Echeverria, Valentina; Potter, Huntington

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that Alzheimer's disease (AD) transgenic mice given a moderate level of caffeine intake (the human equivalent of 5 cups of coffee per day) are protected from development of otherwise certain cognitive impairment and have decreased hippocampal amyloid-beta (Abeta) levels due to suppression of both beta-secretase (BACE1) and presenilin 1 (PS1)/gamma-secretase expression. To determine if caffeine intake can have beneficial effects in "aged" APPsw mice already demonstrating cognitive impairment, we administered caffeine in the drinking water of 18-19 month old APPsw mice that were impaired in working memory. At 4-5 weeks into caffeine treatment, those impaired transgenic mice given caffeine (Tg/Caff) exhibited vastly superior working memory compared to the continuing impairment of control transgenic mice. In addition, Tg/Caff mice had substantially reduced Abeta deposition in hippocampus (decrease 40%) and entorhinal cortex (decrease 46%), as well as correlated decreases in brain soluble Abeta levels. Mechanistically, evidence is provided that caffeine suppression of BACE1 involves the cRaf-1/NFkappaB pathway. We also determined that caffeine concentrations within human physiological range effectively reduce active and total glycogen synthase kinase 3 levels in SweAPP N2a cells. Even with pre-existing and substantial Abeta burden, aged APPsw mice exhibited memory restoration and reversal of AD pathology, suggesting a treatment potential of caffeine in cases of established AD.

  20. Mapping the landscape of cerebral amyloid angiopathy research: an informetric analysis perspective.

    PubMed

    Charidimou, Andreas; Fox, Zoe; Werring, David J; Song, Min

    2016-03-01

    To quantitatively analyse the research output and major trends in the field of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) over six decades, from 1954 to 2014, using advanced informetrics methods, we systematically identified CAA-related articles from PubMed, collected metadata and performed productivity analysis, copublication analysis, and network and content analysis over defined time periods. Linear regression was used to investigate these relationships. Changes in CAA research themes (2000-2014) were defined using a topic modelling technique. A total of 2340 CAA papers were published between 1954 and 2014. The mean number (3.03; 95% CI 2.62 to 3.45; p<0.0001) and mean rate (0.13%; 95% CI 0.11% to 0.15%; p<0.0001) of CAA publications increased yearly. Analysis of copublication networks over 5-year periods from 1990 to 2014, revealed a great increase in the total number of connected investigators publishing on CAA (coefficient 16.74; 95% CI 14 to 19.49; p<0.0001) as well as the interactions between them (coefficient 73.53; 95% CI 52.03 to 89.03; p<0.0001). Further analysis of the network characteristics showed that in the past 15 years, copublication networks became not only larger, but also more connected and coherent. Content analysis identified 16 major CAA research themes and their differential evolution in the past 15 years, with the following main trends: (A) limited focus on vascular cognitive impairment; (B) a shift in emphasis towards neuroimaging, cerebral microbleeds and diagnostic aspects and away from pathological aspects; and (3) a reduced emphasis on basic biology apart from an increased focus on mouse models and perivascular drainage. Our study reveals the rapidly developing nature of the CAA research landscape, providing a novel quantitative and objective basis for identifying unmet needs and new directions. Our findings support the idea of a collaborative culture in the field, encouraging international research initiatives.

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid-induced amelioration on impairment of memory learning in amyloid beta-infused rats relates to the decreases of amyloid beta and cholesterol levels in detergent-insoluble membrane fractions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio; Hossain, Shahdat; Agdul, Haqu; Shido, Osamu

    2005-12-30

    We investigated the effects of dietary administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3) on the levels of amyloid beta (A beta) peptide (1-40) and cholesterol in the nonionic detergent Triton 100 x-insoluble membrane fractions (DIFs) of the cerebral cortex and, also, on learning-related memory in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats infused with A beta peptide (1-40) into the cerebral ventricle. The infusion increased the levels of A beta peptide and cholesterol in the DIFs concurrently with a significant increase in reference memory errors (measured by eight-arm radial-maze tasks) compared with those of vehicle rats. Conversely, the dietary administration of DHA to AD-model rats decreased the levels of A beta peptide and cholesterol in the DIFs, with the decrease being more prominent in the DHA-administered rats. Regression analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between A beta peptide and each of cholesterol, palmitic acid and stearic acid, and between the number of reference memory errors and each of cholesterol, palmitic, stearic and oleic acid; moreover, a significant negative correlation was observed between the number of reference memory errors and the molar ratio of DHA to palmitic plus stearic acid. These results suggest that DHA-induced protection of memory deficits in AD-model rats is related to the interactions of cholesterol, palmitic acid or stearic acid with A beta peptides in DIFs where DHA ameliorates these interactions.

  2. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an ARIA before the tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lizana, Eva; Carmona-Iragui, María; Alcolea, Daniel; Gómez-Choco, Manuel; Vilaplana, Eduard; Sánchez-Saudinós, María B; Clarimón, Jordi; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Munuera, Josep; Gelpi, Ellen; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; de Juan-Delago, Manel; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Montaner, Joan; Ois, Angel; Amaro, Sergi; Blesa, Rafael; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) in elderly patients is a rare entity that has been associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and intracerebral hematomas (ICH). To characterize this entity and to study these associations, 22 patients over 60 with cSAH were included in a multicenter ambispective cohort study. Clinical data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, APOE genotyping, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers were evaluated. Results were compared with data from healthy controls (HC), non-cSAH CAA patients (CAAo), and Alzheimer disease patients. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented with transient sensory or motor symptoms. At follow-up (median 30.7 months), 5 patients had died, 6 survivors showed functional disability (modified Rankins Scale (mRS)>2), and 12 cognitive impairment. Four patients had prior ICH and six had an ICH during follow-up. CSF-Aß40 and Aß42 levels were lower in cSAH and CAAo compared with HC. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented an APOE-ɛ2 overrepresentation and CAAo had an APOE-ɛ4 overrepresentation. On MRI, all patients fulfilled CAA-modified Boston criteria and 9 showed cortical ischemia in the surrounding cortex or the vicinity of superficial siderosis. The neuropathologic study, available in one patient, showed severe CAA and advanced Alzheimer-type pathology. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the elderly is associated with cognitive impairment and lobar ICH occurrence. Our findings support the existence of an underlying CAA pathology. PMID:25735919

  3. Colocalization of cerebral iron with Amyloid beta in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, J. M. G.; Li, X.; Hua, J.; Schreiner, S. J.; Steininger, S. C.; Quevenco, F. C.; Wyss, M.; Gietl, A. F.; Treyer, V.; Leh, S. E.; Buck, F.; Nitsch, R. M.; Pruessmann, K. P.; van Zijl, P. C. M.; Hock, C.; Unschuld, P. G.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) MRI at 7 Tesla and 11-Carbon Pittsburgh-Compound-B PET were used for investigating the relationship between brain iron and Amyloid beta (Aβ) plaque-load in a context of increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), as reflected by the Apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE-e4) allele and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in elderly subjects. Carriers of APOE-e4 with normal cognition had higher cortical Aβ-plaque-load than non-carriers. In MCI an association between APOE-e4 and higher Aβ-plaque-load was observable both for cortical and subcortical brain-regions. APOE-e4 and MCI was also associated with higher cortical iron. Moreover, cerebral iron significantly affected functional coupling, and was furthermore associated with increased Aβ-plaque-load (R2-adjusted = 0.80, p < 0.001) and APOE-e4 carrier status (p < 0.001) in MCI. This study confirms earlier reports on an association between increased brain iron-burden and risk for neurocognitive dysfunction due to AD, and indicates that disease-progression is conferred by spatial colocalization of brain iron deposits with Aβ-plaques. PMID:27748454

  4. Colocalization of cerebral iron with Amyloid beta in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, J M G; Li, X; Hua, J; Schreiner, S J; Steininger, S C; Quevenco, F C; Wyss, M; Gietl, A F; Treyer, V; Leh, S E; Buck, F; Nitsch, R M; Pruessmann, K P; van Zijl, P C M; Hock, C; Unschuld, P G

    2016-10-17

    Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) MRI at 7 Tesla and 11-Carbon Pittsburgh-Compound-B PET were used for investigating the relationship between brain iron and Amyloid beta (Aβ) plaque-load in a context of increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), as reflected by the Apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE-e4) allele and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in elderly subjects. Carriers of APOE-e4 with normal cognition had higher cortical Aβ-plaque-load than non-carriers. In MCI an association between APOE-e4 and higher Aβ-plaque-load was observable both for cortical and subcortical brain-regions. APOE-e4 and MCI was also associated with higher cortical iron. Moreover, cerebral iron significantly affected functional coupling, and was furthermore associated with increased Aβ-plaque-load (R(2)-adjusted = 0.80, p < 0.001) and APOE-e4 carrier status (p < 0.001) in MCI. This study confirms earlier reports on an association between increased brain iron-burden and risk for neurocognitive dysfunction due to AD, and indicates that disease-progression is conferred by spatial colocalization of brain iron deposits with Aβ-plaques.

  5. Cerebral Palsy Symptoms in Children Decreased Following Massage Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Diego, Miguel; Manigat, Natasha; Seoanes, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Twenty young children (mean age = 32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine…

  6. Elongation of the C-terminal domain of an anti-amyloid β single-chain variable fragment increases its thermodynamic stability and decreases its aggregation tendency.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Hernández, Geovanny; Marin-Argany, Marta; Blasco-Moreno, Bernat; Bonet, Jaume; Oliva, Baldo; Villegas, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) immunotherapy is considered a promising approach to Alzheimer disease treatment. In contrast to the use of complete antibodies, administration of single-chain variable fragments (scFv) has not been associated with either meningoencephalitis or cerebral hemorrhage. ScFv-h3D6 is known to preclude cytotoxicity of the Aβ 1-42 peptide by removing its oligomers from the amyloid pathway. As is the case for other scFv molecules, the recombinant production of scFv-h3D6 is limited by its folding and stability properties. Here, we show that its urea-induced unfolding pathway is characterized by the presence of an intermediate state composed of the unfolded VL domain and the folded VH domain, which suggests the VL domain as a target for thermodynamic stability redesign. The modeling of the 3D structure revealed that the VL domain, located at the C-terminal of the molecule, was ending before its latest β-strand was completed. Three elongation mutants, beyond VL-K107, showed increased thermodynamic stability and lower aggregation tendency, as determined from urea denaturation experiments and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Because the mutants maintained the capability of removing Aβ-oligomers from the amyloid pathway, we expect these traits to increase the half-life of scFv-h3D6 in vivo and, consequently, to decrease the effective doses. Our results led to the improvement of a potential Alzheimer disease treatment and may be extrapolated to other class-I scFv molecules of therapeutic interest.

  7. Possible involvement of NO/NOS signaling in hippocampal amyloid-beta production induced by transient focal cerebral ischemia in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Wang, Wei; Wang, Che; Tang, Yi-Yuan

    2010-02-12

    In the present study, to define the roles of nitric oxide (NO) signaling in amyloid-beta (A beta) production after transient cerebral ischemia, extracellular levels of NO and A beta were monitored by intracerebral microdialysis in the hippocampus of aged rats exposed to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/R). The results indicated that 1-h MCAO significantly upregulated hippocampal NO and A beta levels. In addition, the NO elevation preceded the A beta changes. The Western blotting suggested that acute hypoperfusion could increase the expression of beta-secretase 1 (BACE1) but not BACE2. The enhanced NO concentration in acute stage of MCAO/R was coincident with increased eNOS expression, while in subacute stage was coincident with increased iNOS and nNOS. Our results also indicated that pretreatment of L-NAME, one non-selective NOS inhibitor could decrease the BACE1 expression, reverse both NO and A beta changes and rescue the delayed neuronal death. These preliminary findings indicated that activation of NOS/NO signaling system could trigger A beta production through BACE1 pathway during acute ischemic episode. The present data may be important in understanding, at least in part, the pathological role of NO/NOS system involved in hippocampal A beta production and neuronal damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia.

  8. 99mTc(CO)3-Labeled Benzothiazole Derivatives Preferentially Bind Cerebrovascular Amyloid: Potential Use as Imaging Agents for Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jianhua; Cui, Mengchao; Dai, Jiapei; Liu, Boli

    2015-08-03

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a disorder affecting the elderly that is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in blood vessel walls of the brain. A series of 99mTc(CO)3-labeled benzothiazole derivatives as potential SPECT imaging probes for cerebrovascular Aβ deposition is reported. Rhenium surrogate displayed high affinities to Aβ aggregates with Ki values ranging from 106 to 42 nM, and they strongly stained Aβ deposits in transgenic mice (Tg) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In vitro autoradiography on brain sections of Tg and AD patients confirmed that [99mTc]24 possessed sufficient affinity for Aβ plaques, and [99mTc]24 could only label Aβ deposition in blood vessels but not Aβ plaques in the parenchyma of the brain of AD patients. Moreover, [99mTc]24 possessed favorable initial uptake (1.21% ID/g) and fast blood washout (blood2 min/blood60 min=23) in normal mice. These preliminary results suggest that [99mTc]24 may be used as an Aβ imaging probe for the detection of CAA.

  9. Early-Phase 11C-PiB PET in Amyloid Angiopathy-Related Symptomatic Cerebral Hemorrhage: Potential Diagnostic Value?

    PubMed

    Farid, Karim; Hong, Young T; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Fryer, Tim D; Menon, David K; Warburton, Elizabeth A; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Although late-phase (>35min post-administration) 11C-PiB-PET has good sensitivity in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), its specificity is poor due to frequently high uptake in healthy aged subjects. By detecting perfusion-like abnormalities, early-phase 11C-PiB-PET might add diagnostic value. Early-frame (1-6min) 11C-PiB-PET was obtained in 11 non-demented patients with probable CAA-related symptomatic lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (70±7yrs), 9 age-matched healthy controls (HCs) and 10 HCs <55yrs. There was a significant decrease in early-phase atrophy-corrected whole-cortex SUV relative to cerebellar vermis (SUVR) in the CAA vs age-matched HC group. None of the age-matched controls fell below the lower 95% confidence limit derived from the young HCs, while 6/11 CAA patients did (sensitivity = 55%, specificity = 100%). Combining both early- and late-phase 11C-PiB data did not change the sensitivity and specificity of late-phase PiB, but combined early- and late-phase positivity entails a very high suspicion of underlying Aβ-related clinical disorder, i.e., CAA or Alzheimer disease (AD). In order to clarify this ambiguity, we then show that the occipital/posterior cingulate ratio is markedly lower in CAA than in AD (N = 7). These pilot data suggest that early-phase 11C-PiB-PET may not only add to late-phase PiB-PET with respect to the unclear situation of late-phase positivity, but also help differentiate CAA from AD.

  10. Distribution of precursor amyloid-. beta. -protein messenger RNA in human cerebral cortex: relationship to neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.A.; Higgins, G.A.; Young, W.G.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Wilson, M.C.; Morrison, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP), two neuropathological markers of Alzheimer disease, may both contain peptide fragments derived from the human amyloid ..beta.. protein. However, the nature of the relationship between NFT and NP and the source of the amyloid ..beta.. proteins found in each have remained unclear. The authors used in situ hybridization techniques to map the anatomical distribution of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the neocortex of brains from three subjects with no known neurologic disease and from five patients with Alzheimer disease. In brains from control subjects, positively hybridizing neurons were present in cortical regions and layers that contain a high density of neuropathological markers in Alzheimer disease, as well as in those loci that contain NP but few NFT. Quantitative analyses of in situ hybridization patterns within layers III and V of the superior frontal cortex revealed that the presence of high numbers of NFT in Alzheimer-diseased brains was associated with a decrease in the number of positively hybridizing neurons compared to controls and Alzheimer-diseased brains with few NFT. These findings suggest that the expression of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA may be a necessary but is clearly not a sufficient prerequisite for NFT formation. In addition, these results may indicate that the amyloid ..beta.. protein, present in NP in a given region or layer of cortex, is not derived from the resident neuronal cell bodies that express the mRNA for the precursor protein.

  11. Detection of cerebral amyloid angiopathy by 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and amyloid positron emission tomography in a patient with subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Kida, Hirotaka; Satoh, Masayuki; Ii, Yuichiro; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Maeda, Masayuki; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2017-01-01

    The patient was an 81-year-old man who had been treated for hypertension for several decades. In 2012, he developed gait disturbance and mild amnesia. One year later, his gait disturbance worsened, and he developed urinary incontinence. Conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging using T 2 -weighted images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery showed multiple lacunar infarctions. These findings fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia. However, susceptibility weighted imaging showed multiple lobar microbleeds in the bilateral occipitoparietal lobes, and double inversion recovery and 3-D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images on 3-T magnetic resonance imaging revealed cortical microinfarctions in the left parietal-temporo-occipito region. Pittsburgh compound B-positron emission tomography revealed diffuse uptake in the cerebral cortex. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease. The use of the double inversion recovery and susceptibility weighted imaging on 3-T magnetic resonance imaging may be a supplemental strategy for diagnosing cerebral amyloid angiopathy, which is closely associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Role of hypotension in decreasing cerebral blood flow in porcine endotoxemia

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.F.; Breslow, M.J.; Shapiro, R.M.; Traystman, R.J. )

    1987-10-01

    The role of reduced arterial blood pressure (MAP) in decreasing cerebral blood flow (CBF) during endotoxemia was studied in pentobarbital-anesthetized pigs. Microspheres were used to measure regional CBF changes during MAP manipulations in animals with and without endotoxin. Endotoxin decreased MAP to 50 mmHg and decreased blood flow to the cortex and cerebellum without affecting cerebral cortical oxygen consumption (CMRo{sub 2}). Elevating MAP from 50 to 70 mmHg during endotoxemia with norepinephrine did not change cortical blood flow or CMRo{sub 2} but increased cerebellar blood flow. Brain stem blood flow was not affected by endotoxin or norepinephrine. When MAP was decreased to 50 mmHg by hemorrhage without endotoxin, no change in blood flow to cortex, cerebellum, or brain stem was observed from base-line levels. These results suggest that decreased MAP below a lower limit for cerebral autoregulation does not account for the decreased CBF observed after endotoxin.

  13. Development of Cerebral Microbleeds in the APP23-Transgenic Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy—A 9.4 Tesla MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Björn; Venus, Alexander; Heiler, Patrick; Schad, Lothar; Ebert, Anne; Hennerici, Michael G.; Grudzenski, Saskia; Fatar, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) around cerebral arteries and capillaries and leads to an increased risk for vascular dementia, spontaneous lobar hemorrhage, convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and transient focal neurological episodes, which might be an indicator of imminent spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. In CAA cerebral microbleeds (cMBs) with a cortical/juxtacortical distribution are frequently observed in standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo MRI of transgenic mouse models of CAA may serve as a useful tool to investigate translational aspects of the disease. Materials and Methods: APP23-transgenic mice demonstrate cerebrovascular Aβ deposition with subsequent neuropathological changes characteristic for CAA. We performed a 9.4 Tesla high field MRI study using T2, T2* and time of flight-magnetic resonance angiograpy (TOF-MRA) sequences in APP23-transgenic mice and wildtype (wt) littermates at the age of 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 months, respectively. Numbers, size, and location of cMBs are reported. Results: T2* imaging demonstrated cMBs (diameter 50–300 μm) located in the neocortex and, to a lesser degree, in the thalamus. cMBs were detected at the earliest at 16 months of age. Numbers increased exponentially with age, with 2.5 ± 2 (median ± interquartilrange) at 16 months, 15 ± 6 at 20 months, and 31.5 ± 17 at 24 months of age, respectively. Conclusion: We report the temporal and spatial development of cMBs in the aging APP23-transgenic mouse model which develops characteristic pathological patterns known from human CAA. We expect this mouse model to serve as a useful tool to non-invasively monitor mid- and longterm translational aspects of CAA and to investigate experimental therapeutic strategies in longitudinal studies. PMID:27458375

  14. beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease is found in cerebral and spinal cord vascular malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, M. N.; Merz, P.; Bennett-Gray, J.; Menezes, A. H.; Goeken, J. A.; Schelper, R. L.; Wisniewski, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    Congo/Red deposition with birefringence to polarized light was demonstrated focally in cerebrovascular malformations removed surgically from 4 older patients (ages 85, 74, 74, and 63), and in a spinal cord vascular malformation in a 76-year-old patient. Lesser degrees of Congophilic change were observed in cerebrovascular malformations screened from 4 of 10 patients between the ages of 30 and 59. No Congophilic change was seen in 10 cerebrovascular malformations removed from patients under 30 years of age. Congophilic areas in all cases decorated with W-2 and 85/45 polyclonal antibodies raised to peptide sequences of cerebrovascular beta-amyloid and beta-amyloid of senile plaques from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the amyloid in these vascular malformations is immunologically related to beta-amyloid protein. This finding provides another indication that vascular beta-amyloid deposition is not specific for Alzheimer's disease and suggests that an existing abnormality of vessels may be a predisposing factor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2A Figure 2B Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3293463

  15. Reduced nitric oxide bioavailability mediates cerebroarterial dysfunction independent of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Mario; Shi, Yi; Keller, Stephan; Savarese, Gianluigi; Akhmedov, Alexander; Derungs, Rebecca; Spescha, Remo D; Kulic, Luka; Nitsch, Roger M; Lüscher, Thomas F; Camici, Giovanni G

    2017-02-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), cerebral arteries, in contrast to cerebral microvessels, show both cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) -dependent and -independent vessel wall pathology. However, it remains unclear whether CAA-independent vessel wall pathology affects arterial function, thereby chronically reducing cerebral perfusion, and, if so, which mechanisms mediate this effect. To this end, we assessed the ex vivo vascular function of the basilar artery and a similar-sized peripheral artery (femoral artery) in the Swedish-Arctic (SweArc) transgenic AD mouse model at different disease stages. Furthermore, we used quantitative immunohistochemistry to analyze CAA, endothelial morphology, and molecular pathways pertinent to vascular relaxation. We found that endothelium-dependent, but not smooth muscle-dependent, vasorelaxation was significantly impaired in basilar and femoral arteries of 15-mo-old SweArc mice compared with that of age-matched wild-type and 6-mo-old SweArc mice. This impairment was accompanied by significantly reduced levels of cyclic GMP, indicating a reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. However, no age- and genotype-related differences in oxidative stress as measured by lipid peroxidation were observed. Although parenchymal capillaries, arterioles, and arteries showed abundant CAA in the 15-mo-old SweArc mice, no CAA or changes in endothelial morphology were detected histologically in the basilar and femoral artery. Thus our results suggest that, in this AD mouse model, dysfunction of large intracranial, extracerebral arteries important for brain perfusion is mediated by reduced NO bioavailability rather than by CAA. This finding supports the growing body of evidence highlighting the therapeutic importance of targeting the cerebrovasculature in AD.

  16. Midlife adiposity predicts earlier onset of Alzheimer's dementia, neuropathology and presymptomatic cerebral amyloid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Y-F; An, Y; Bilgel, M; Wong, D F; Troncoso, J C; O'Brien, R J; Breitner, J C; Ferruci, L; Resnick, S M; Thambisetty, M

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how midlife risk factors influence age at onset (AAO) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may provide clues to delay disease expression. Although midlife adiposity predicts increased incidence of AD, it is unclear whether it affects AAO and severity of Alzheimer's neuropathology. Using a prospective population-based cohort, Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), this study aims to examine the relationships between midlife body mass index (BMI) and (1) AAO of AD (2) severity of Alzheimer's neuropathology and (3) fibrillar brain amyloid deposition during aging. We analyzed data on 1394 cognitively normal individuals at baseline (8643 visits; average follow-up interval 13.9 years), among whom 142 participants developed incident AD. In two subsamples of BLSA, 191 participants underwent autopsy and neuropathological assessment, and 75 non-demented individuals underwent brain amyloid imaging. Midlife adiposity was derived from BMI data at 50 years of age. We find that each unit increase in midlife BMI predicts earlier onset of AD by 6.7 months (P=0.013). Higher midlife BMI was associated with greater Braak neurofibrillary but not CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease) neuritic plaque scores at autopsy overall. Associations between midlife BMI and brain amyloid burden approached statistical significance. Thus, higher midlife BMI was also associated with greater fibrillar amyloid measured by global mean cortical distribution volume ratio (P=0.075) and within the precuneus (left, P=0.061; right, P=0.079). In conclusion, midlife overweight predicts earlier onset of AD and greater burden of Alzheimer's neuropathology. A healthy BMI at midlife may delay the onset of AD.

  17. Cerebral blood flow decreases with time whereas cerebral oxygen consumption remains stable during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Prough, D.S.; Rogers, A.T.; Stump, D.A.; Roy, R.C.; Cordell, A.R.; Phipps, J.; Taylor, C.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Recent investigations demonstrate that cerebral blood flow (CBF) progressively declines during hypothermic, nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). If CBF declines because of brain cooling, the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2) should decline in parallel with the reduction in CBF. Therefore we studied the response of CBF, the cerebral arteriovenous oxygen content difference (A-VDcereO2) and CMRO2 as a function of the duration of CPB in humans. To do this, we compared the cerebrovascular response to changes in the PaCO2. Because sequential CBF measurements using xenon 133 (133Xe) clearance must be separated by 15-25 min, we hypothesized that a time-dependent decline in CBF would accentuate the CBF reduction caused by a decrease in PaCO2, but would blunt the CBF increase associated with a rise in PaCO2. We measured CBF in 25 patients and calculated the cerebral arteriovenous oxygen content difference using radial arterial and jugular venous bulb blood samples. Patients were randomly assigned to management within either a lower (32-48 mm Hg) or higher (50-71 mm Hg) range of PaCO2 uncorrected for temperature. Each patient underwent two randomly ordered sets of measurements, one at a lower PaCO2 and the other at a higher PaCO2 within the respective ranges. Cerebrovascular responsiveness to changes in PaCO2 was calculated as specific reactivity (SR), the change in CBF divided by the change in PaCO2, expressed in mL.100 g-1.min-1.mm Hg-1.

  18. β-amyloid decreases detectable endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human erythrocytes: a role for membrane acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Misiti, Francesco; Carelli-Alinovi, Cristiana; Sampaolese, Beatrice; Giardina, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    Until few years ago, many studies of Alzheimer's disease investigated the effects of this syndrome in the central nervous system. Only recently, the detection of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) in the blood has evidenced the necessity to extend studies on extraneuronal cells, particularly on erythrocytes. Aβ is also present in brain capillaries, where it interacts with the erythrocytes, inducing several metabolic and functional alterations. Recently, functionally active endothelial type nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was discovered in human erythrocytes. The goal of the present study was to evidence the effect of Aβ on erythrocyte eNOS. We found that Aβ following to 24-h exposure causes a decrease in the immune staining of erythrocyte eNOS. Concurrently, Aβ alters erythrocyte cell morphology, decreases nitrites and nitrates levels, and affects membrane acetylcholinesterase activity. Propidium, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, was able to reverse the effects elicited by Aβ. These events could contribute to the vascular alterations associated with Alzheimer's disease disease.

  19. Novel Bivalent 99mTc-Complex with N-Methyl-Substituted Hydroxamamide as Probe for Imaging of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Iikuni, Shimpei; Ono, Masahiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Masashi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ihara, Masafumi; Saji, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by the deposition of amyloid aggregates in the walls of the cerebral vasculature. Recently, the development of molecular imaging probes targeting CAA has been attracting much attention. We previously reported the 99mTc-hydroxamamide (99mTc-Ham) complex with a bivalent benzothiazole scaffold as a binding moiety for amyloid aggregates ([99mTc]BT2) and its utility for CAA-specific imaging. However, the simultaneous generation of two radiolabeled complexes derived from the geometric isomers was observed in the 99mTc-labeling reaction. It was recently reported that the complexation reaction of 99Tc with N-methyl-substituted Ham provided a single 99Tc-Ham complex consisting of two N-methylated Ham ligands with marked stability. In this article, we designed and synthesized a novel N-methylated bivalent 99mTc-Ham complex ([99mTc]MBT2) and evaluated its utility for CAA-specific imaging. N-Methyl substitution of [99mTc]BT2 prevented the generation of its isomer in the 99mTc-labeling reaction. Enhanced in vitro stability of [99mTc]MBT2 as compared with [99mTc]BT2 was observed. [99mTc]MBT2 showed very low brain uptake, which is favorable for CAA-specific imaging. An in vitro inhibition assay using β-amyloid aggregates and in vitro autoradiographic examination of brain sections from a Tg2576 mouse and a CAA patient showed a decline in the binding affinity for amyloid aggregates due to N-methylation of the 99mTc-Ham complex. These results suggest that the scaffold of the 99mTc-Ham complex may play important roles in the in vitro stability and the binding affinity for amyloid aggregates. PMID:27689870

  20. Pomegranate juice decreases amyloid load and improves behavior in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Richard E; Shah, Aartie; Fagan, Anne M; Schwetye, Katherine E; Parsadanian, Maia; Schulman, Risa N; Finn, Mary Beth; Holtzman, David M

    2006-12-01

    Although there are no proven ways to delay onset or slow progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), studies suggest that diet can affect risk. Pomegranates contain very high levels of antioxidant polyphenolic substances as compared to other fruits and vegetables. Polyphenols have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. We asked whether dietary supplementation with pomegranate juice (PJ) would influence behavior and AD-like pathology in a transgenic mouse model. Transgenic mice (APP(sw)/Tg2576) received either PJ or sugar water control from 6 to 12.5 months of age. PJ-treated mice learned water maze tasks more quickly and swam faster than controls. Mice treated with PJ had significantly less (approximately 50%) accumulation of soluble Abeta42 and amyloid deposition in the hippocampus as compared to control mice. These results suggest that further studies to validate and determine the mechanism of these effects, as well as whether substances in PJ may be useful in AD, should be considered.

  1. Hyperglycemia aggravates decreases of PEA-15 and its two phosphorylated forms in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    SUNG, Jin-Hee; KOH, Phil-Ok

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic health disorder and an important risk factor for stroke. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes 15 (PEA-15) is a multifunctional protein modulating cell proliferation, survival, apoptosis and glucose metabolism. This study investigated whether diabetes modulates the expression of PEA-15 and two phosphorylated forms (Ser 104 and Ser 116) in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced brain injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administrated with streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) and were underwent right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) 4 weeks after streptozotocin injection. Brain tissues were collected 24 hr after MCAO and stained using triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Western blot analysis was performed to elucidate the expression of PEA-15 and two phosphorylated forms (Ser 104 and Ser 116) in right cerebral cortex. Infarct volume during MCAO injury was severely increased in diabetic animals compared to non-diabetic animals. We identified the decrease in PEA-15 in animals that underwent MCAO using proteomic approach. PEA-15 expression during MCAO was strongly decreased in diabetic animals compared to non-diabetic animals. Western blots analysis confirmed that diabetes exacerbated the decrease in PEA-15 expression after MCAO. Moreover, decrease in expression of phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 104 and Ser 116) was greater in diabetic than in non-diabetic animals. These results suggested that a diabetic condition may aggravate brain damage through decreasing expression of PEA-15 and phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 104 and Ser 116) in ischemic brain injury. PMID:28216548

  2. Cerebral white matter lesions – associations with Aβ isoforms and amyloid PET

    PubMed Central

    van Westen, Danielle; Lindqvist, Daniel; Blennow, Kaj; Minthon, Lennart; Nägga, Katarina; Stomrud, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Small vessel disease (SVD) and amyloid deposition may promote each other, with a potential association between SVD and altered production or clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) affecting its cleavage products. We investigated the relationship between SVD, multiple isoforms of Aβ in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cortical Aβ in 831 subjects with cognitive performance ranging from normal to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (the Swedish BioFINDER study). SVD was estimated as white matter lesions (WML) and lacunes. 18F-flutemetamol PET was performed in 321 subjects. Lower CSF levels of Aβ38 and Aβ40 were consistently associated with increased WML in all subgroups, while lower levels of CSF Aβ42 were associated with WML mainly in AD. CSF Aβ38 and Aβ40 were associated with regional WML in all regions, while CSF Aβ42 was associated with temporal WML only. A composite measure of 18F-flutemetamol uptake was not associated with WML, and regional 18F-flutemetamol uptake only with temporal WML. Lacunes were not associated with Aβ isoforms nor 18F-flutemetamol uptake. Our results suggest that WML may be associated with alterations in the production or clearance of Aβ species, particularly of Aβ38 and Aβ40. However, in AD cases, Aβ42 pathology might be associated with WML, especially in the temporal lobe. PMID:26856756

  3. Review: cerebral amyloid angiopathy, prion angiopathy, CADASIL and the spectrum of protein elimination failure angiopathies (PEFA) in neurodegenerative disease with a focus on therapy.

    PubMed

    Carare, R O; Hawkes, C A; Jeffrey, M; Kalaria, R N; Weller, R O

    2013-10-01

    Failure of elimination of proteins from the brain is a major feature in many neurodegenerative diseases. Insoluble proteins accumulate in brain parenchyma and in walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a descriptive term for amyloid in vessel walls. Here, we adopt the term protein elimination failure angiopathy (PEFA) to focus on mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of a spectrum of disorders that exhibit both unique and common features of protein accumulation in blood vessel walls. We review (a) normal pathways and mechanisms by which proteins and other soluble metabolites are eliminated from the brain along 100- to 150-nm-thick basement membranes in walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries that serve as routes for lymphatic drainage of the brain; (b) a spectrum of proteins involved in PEFA; and (c) changes that occur in artery walls and contribute to failure of protein elimination. We use accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ), prion protein and granular osmiophilic material (GOM) in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) as examples of different factors involved in the aetiology and pathogenesis of PEFA. Finally, we discuss how knowledge of factors involved in PEFA may help to focus on new therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. When Aβ (following immunotherapy) and prion protein are released from brain parenchyma they deposit in walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries; GOM in CADASIL accumulates primarily in artery walls. Therefore, the focus of therapy for protein clearance in neurodegenerative disease should perhaps be on facilitating perivascular elimination of proteins and reducing PEFA.

  4. Sleep apnea termination decreases cerebral blood volume: a near-infrared spectroscopy case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Jaakko; Noponen, Tommi; Salmi, Tapani; Toppila, Jussi; Meriläinen, Pekka

    2009-07-01

    Medical near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used to estimate cerebral haemodynamic changes non-invasively. Sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder where repetitive pauses in breathing decrease the quality of sleep and exposes the individual to various health problems. We have measured oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin concentration changes during apneic events in sleep from the forehead of one subject using NIRS and used principal component analysis to extract extracerebral and cortical haemodynamic changes from NIRS signals. Comparison of NIRS signals with EEG, bioimpedance, and pulse oximetry data suggests that termination of apnea leads to decreases in cerebral blood volume and flow that may be related to neurological arousal via neurovascular coupling.

  5. Decreased IDE and IGF2 expression but increased Aβ40 in the cerebral cortex of mouse pups by early life lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Yang, Guojun; Wang, Yueying; Qiao, Mingwu; Zhang, Pingan; Shao, Jianfeng; Yang, Guoyu

    2016-03-01

    As the abbreviation of plumbum and a chemical symbol for lead, Pb produces neurotoxic effects, which result into an impairment of learning and memory and other neurological dysfunctions. However, the mechanism of neurotoxicity of Pb exposure is unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of maternal lead exposure on expression of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE),insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and beta amyloid protein 40 (Aβ40) in the cerebral cortex of mice offspring. Lead exposure initiated from beginning of gestation to weaning. Lead acetate administered in drinking solutions was dissolved in distilled deionized water at the concentrations of 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.5% groups respectively. On the 21st postnatal day, On the PND21, the learning and memory ability were tested by water maze test and the Pb levels were also determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The expression of IDE, IGF2 and Aβ40 in cerebral cortex was examined by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and western blotting. The lead levels in blood and cerebral cortex of all lead exposure groups were significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). In water maze test, the performances of 0.5% and 1% lead exposure groups were worse than that of the control group (P<0.05).The expression of IDE and IGF2 was decreased, but Aβ40 was increased in lead exposed groups than that of the control group (P<0.05). The decreased expression of IDE and IGF2 and increased expression of Aβ40 in the cerebral cortex of pups may contribute to the neurotoxicity associated with maternal Pb exposure.

  6. Nicotinamide attenuates the decrease of astrocytic phosphoprotein PEA-15 in focal cerebral ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Koh, Phil-Ok

    2012-03-01

    Nicotinamide exerts neuroprotective effects against focal cerebral ischemic injury. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes 15 (PEA-15) is prominently expressed in astrocytes that exert broad anti-apoptotic functions. This study investigated whether nicotinamide modulates PEA-15 and levels of two phosphorylated PEA-15 (Serine 104 and 116) in an animal model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced injury. Adult male rats were treated with vehicle or nicotinamide (500 mg/kg) 2 hr after the onset of MCAO and cerebral cortices were collected at 24 hr after MCAO. In a proteomic approach, MCAO induced decreases of PEA-15 levels, while nicotinamide treatment attenuated the injury-induced decrease in PEA-15. The results of Western blot analysis suggest that nicotinamide prevented injury-induced reduction in phospho-PEA-15 (Serine 104) and phospho-PEA-15 (Serine 116) levels. The phosphorylation of PEA-15 exerts anti-apoptotic functions, and reduction of PEA-15 phosphorylation leads to apoptotic cell death. These results suggest that nicotinamide exerts a neuroprotective effect by attenuating the injury-induced decreases of PEA-15 and phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 104 and Ser 116) proteins.

  7. Electromagnetic treatment to old Alzheimer's mice reverses β-amyloid deposition, modifies cerebral blood flow, and provides selected cognitive benefit.

    PubMed

    Arendash, Gary W; Mori, Takashi; Dorsey, Maggie; Gonzalez, Rich; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated physiologic and cognitive effects of "long-term" electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure in humans or animals. Our recent studies have provided initial insight into the long-term impact of adulthood EMF exposure (GSM, pulsed/modulated, 918 MHz, 0.25-1.05 W/kg) by showing 6+ months of daily EMF treatment protects against or reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's transgenic (Tg) mice, while even having cognitive benefit to normal mice. Mechanistically, EMF-induced cognitive benefits involve suppression of brain β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation/deposition in Tg mice and brain mitochondrial enhancement in both Tg and normal mice. The present study extends this work by showing that daily EMF treatment given to very old (21-27 month) Tg mice over a 2-month period reverses their very advanced brain Aβ aggregation/deposition. These very old Tg mice and their normal littermates together showed an increase in general memory function in the Y-maze task, although not in more complex tasks. Measurement of both body and brain temperature at intervals during the 2-month EMF treatment, as well as in a separate group of Tg mice during a 12-day treatment period, revealed no appreciable increases in brain temperature (and no/slight increases in body temperature) during EMF "ON" periods. Thus, the neuropathologic/cognitive benefits of EMF treatment occur without brain hyperthermia. Finally, regional cerebral blood flow in cerebral cortex was determined to be reduced in both Tg and normal mice after 2 months of EMF treatment, most probably through cerebrovascular constriction induced by freed/disaggregated Aβ (Tg mice) and slight body hyperthermia during "ON" periods. These results demonstrate that long-term EMF treatment can provide general cognitive benefit to very old Alzheimer's Tg mice and normal mice, as well as reversal of advanced Aβ neuropathology in Tg mice without brain heating. Results further underscore the potential for EMF treatment

  8. The load of amyloid-β oligomers is decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sancesario, Giulia M; Cencioni, Maria T; Esposito, Zaira; Borsellino, Giovanna; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Martorana, Alessandro; Battistini, Luca; Sorge, Roberto; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Bernardi, Giorgio; Bernardini, Sergio; Sancesario, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are heterogeneous and instable compounds of variable molecular weight. Flow cytometry and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based methods allow the simultaneous detection of Aβ oligomers with low and high molecular weight in their native form. We evaluated whether an estimate of different species of Aβ oligomers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with or without dilution with RIPA buffer could be more useful in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) than the measurement of Aβ42 monomers, total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau). Increased t-tau (p < 0.01) and p-tau (p < 0.01), and decreased Aβ42 (p < 0.01), were detected in the CSF of patients with AD (n = 46), compared to patients with other dementia (OD) (n = 35) or with other neurological disorders (OND) (n = 56). In native CSF (n = 137), the levels of Aβ oligomers were lower (p < 0.05) in AD than in OD and OND patients; in addition, the ratio Aβ oligomers/p-tau was lower in AD than in OD (p < 0.01) and OND (p < 0.05) patients, yielding a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 64%. However, in CSF diluted with RIPA (n = 30), Aβ oligomers appeared higher (p < 0.05) in AD than in OND patients, suggesting they become partially disaggregated and more easily detectable after RIPA. In conclusion, FRET analysis in native CSF is essential to correctly determine the composition of Aβ oligomers. In this experimental setting, the simultaneous estimate of low and high molecular weight Aβ oligomers is as useful as the other biomarkers in the diagnosis of AD. The low amount of Aβ oligomers detected in native CSF of AD may be inversely related to their levels in the brain, as occurs for Aβ monomers, representing a biomarker for the amyloid pathogenic cascade.

  9. Replacement of brain-resident myeloid cells does not alter cerebral amyloid-β deposition in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Varvel, Nicholas H.; Grathwohl, Stefan A.; Degenhardt, Karoline; Resch, Claudia; Bosch, Andrea; Jucker, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Immune cells of myeloid lineage are encountered in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain, where they cluster around amyloid-β plaques. However, assigning functional roles to myeloid cell subtypes has been problematic, and the potential for peripheral myeloid cells to alleviate AD pathology remains unclear. Therefore, we asked whether replacement of brain-resident myeloid cells with peripheral monocytes alters amyloid deposition in two mouse models of cerebral β-amyloidosis (APP23 and APPPS1). Interestingly, early after repopulation, infiltrating monocytes neither clustered around plaques nor showed Trem2 expression. However, with increasing time in the brain, infiltrating monocytes became plaque associated and also Trem2 positive. Strikingly, however, monocyte repopulation for up to 6 mo did not modify amyloid load in either model, independent of the stage of pathology at the time of repopulation. Our results argue against a long-term role of peripheral monocytes that is sufficiently distinct from microglial function to modify cerebral β-amyloidosis. Therefore, myeloid replacement by itself is not likely to be effective as a therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:26458770

  10. Binding of curcumin to senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the aged brain of various animals and to neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's brain.

    PubMed

    Mutsuga, Mayu; Chambers, James Kenn; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Tei, Meina; Makibuchi, Takao; Mizorogi, Tatsuya; Takashima, Akihiko; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The binding of curcumin to senile plaques (SPs) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) was examined in the aged brain of various animal species and a human patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD), together with its binding to neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Brain sections were immunostained with anti-amyloid β protein 1-42 (Aβ42) and anti-amyloid β protein 1-40 (Aβ40) antibodies. These sections were also stained with alkaline Congo red, periodic acid-methenamine silver (PAM), and curcumin (0.009% curcumin solution) with or without formic acid pretreatment. The sections from the AD brain were also immunostained for anti-paired helical filament-tau (PHF-tau), and were stained with Gallyas silver for NFTs. Some SPs in the AD, monkey, dog, bear, and amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse (APP Tg-mouse) brains contained congophilic materials, and were intensely positive for curcumin. In addition, curcumin labeled some diffuse SPs negative for Congo red in the AD, monkey, bear, and APP Tg-mouse brains. In all animals, CAA was intensely positive for both Congo red and curcumin. The specific curcumin staining activity was lost by formic acid pretreatment. In the AD brain, NFTs positive for PHF-tau and Gallyas silver were moderately stained with curcumin. These findings indicate that curcumin specifically binds to the aggregated Aβ molecules in various animals, and further to phosphorylated tau protein, probably according to its conformational nature.

  11. Vascular pathology in Alzheimer disease: correlation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and arteriosclerosis/lipohyalinosis with cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Orantes, Mario; Wiestler, Otmar D

    2003-12-01

    Sporadic, late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) constitutes the most frequent cause of dementia in the elderly population. AD-related pathology is often accompanied by vascular changes. The predominant vascular lesions in AD are cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and arteriosclerosis/lipohyalinosis (AS/LH). The present study was carried out to examine the coincidence of these small vessel pathologies during the development of cognitive deficits, amyloid beta-protein (A beta) deposition, and neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation in sporadic late-onset AD. We correlated the clinical dementia rating (CDR) score, the sequential extension of AD-related A beta deposition into different parts of the brain, and the extension of NFTs to involve more brain regions with the distribution of CAA and AS/LH in 52 human autopsy brains. The extension of CAA and AS/LH to involve different areas of the brain was associated with a rise of CDR scores and an increase in the extension of A beta deposition and NFT generation. AD cases showed a higher number of regions with CAA and AS/LH compared to nondemented patients with AD-related pathology and controls. Moreover, we demonstrated a hierarchical sequence in which the different regions of the brain exhibited CAA and AS/LH-affected vessels, allowing the distinction of 3 stages in the development of CAA and AS/LH. The first stage of CAA involved leptomeningeal and neocortical vessels. The second stage was characterized by additional A beta deposition in allocortical and midbrain vessels. Finally, in a third stage, CAA was observed in the basal ganglia, the thalamus, and in the lower brainstem. In contrast, AS/LH initially affected the basal ganglia in stage A. In stage B this pathology made inroads into the deep white matter, the leptomeningeal arteries of the cortex, the cerebellum, and into the thalamus. Stage C was characterized by AS/LH in brainstem vessels. Our results demonstrate widespread CAA and AS/LH to be associated with the

  12. PiB Fails to Map Amyloid Deposits in Cerebral Cortex of Aged Dogs with Canine Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fast, Rikke; Rodell, Anders; Gjedde, Albert; Mouridsen, Kim; Alstrup, Aage K; Bjarkam, Carsten R; West, Mark J; Berendt, Mette; Møller, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Dogs with Canine Cognitive Dysfunction (CCD) accumulate amyloid beta (Aβ) in the brain. As the cognitive decline and neuropathology of these old dogs share features with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the relation between Aβ and cognitive decline in animal models of cognitive decline is of interest to the understanding of AD. However, the sensitivity of the biomarker Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) to the presence of Aβ in humans and in other mammalian species is in doubt. To test the sensitivity and assess the distribution of Aβ in dog brain, we mapped the brains of dogs with signs of CCD (n = 16) and a control group (n = 4) of healthy dogs with radioactively labeled PiB ([(11)C]PiB). Structural magnetic resonance imaging brain scans were obtained from each dog. Tracer washout analysis yielded parametric maps of PiB retention in brain. In the CCD group, dogs had significant retention of [(11)C]PiB in the cerebellum, compared to the cerebral cortex. Retention in the cerebellum is at variance with evidence from brains of humans with AD. To confirm the lack of sensitivity, we stained two dog brains with the immunohistochemical marker 6E10, which is sensitive to the presence of both Aβ and Aβ precursor protein (AβPP). The 6E10 stain revealed intracellular material positive for Aβ or AβPP, or both, in Purkinje cells. The brains of the two groups of dogs did not have significantly different patterns of [(11)C]PiB binding, suggesting that the material detected with 6E10 is AβPP rather than Aβ. As the comparison with the histological images revealed no correlation between the [(11)C]PiB and Aβ and AβPP deposits in post-mortem brain, the marked intracellular staining implies intracellular involvement of amyloid processing in the dog brain. We conclude that PET maps of [(11)C]PiB retention in brain of dogs with CCD fundamentally differ from the images obtained in most humans with AD.

  13. Voxel-wise relationships between distribution volume ratio and cerebral blood flow: implications for analysis of β-amyloid images

    PubMed Central

    Sojkova, Jitka; Goh, Joshua; Bilgel, Murat; Landman, Bennett; Yang, Xue; Zhou, Yun; An, Yang; Beason-Held, Lori L.; Kraut, Michael A.; Wong, Dean F.; Resnick, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of β-amyloid (Aβ) in vivo is often accomplished using the distribution volume ratio (DVR), based on a simplified reference tissue model. We investigated the local relationships between DVR and cerebral blood flow (CBF), as well as relative blood flow (R1), in nondemented older adults. Methods Fifty-five nondemented participants (mean age 78.5 years) in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging underwent 15O-H2O PET CBF and dynamic 11C-PiB-PET. 15O-H2O PET images were normalized and smoothed using SPM. A simplified reference tissue model with linear regression and spatial constraints was used to generate parametric DVR images. The DVR images were regressed on CBF images on a voxel-by-voxel basis using robust Biological Parametric Mapping, adjusting for age and sex (FDR p=0.05, k=50). DVR images were also regressed on R1 images, a measure of the transport rate constant from vascular space to tissue. All analyses were performed in the entire sample, and in high and low tertiles of mean cortical DVR. Results Voxel-based analyses showed that increased DVR is associated with increased CBF in frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortices. However, this association appears to spare regions that typically show early β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition. A more robust relationship between DVR and CBF was observed in the lowest tertile of DVR, i.e., negligible cortical Aβ load, compared to the highest tertile of cortical DVR and Aβ load. Spatial distributions of the DVR-CBF and DVR-R1 correlations showed similar patterns. No reliable negative voxel-wise relationships between DVR and CBF or R1 were observed. Conclusion Robust associations between DVR and CBF at negligible Aβ levels, together with similar spatial distributions of DVR-CBF and DVR-R1 correlations, suggest that regional distribution of DVR reflects blood flow and tracer influx rather than pattern of Aβ deposition in those with minimal Aβ load. DVR-CBF associations in individuals with higher DVR

  14. MR microscopy of human amyloid-β deposits: characterization of parenchymal amyloid, diffuse plaques, and vascular amyloid.

    PubMed

    Nabuurs, Rob J A; Natté, Remco; de Ronde, Fenna M; Hegeman-Kleinn, Ingrid; Dijkstra, Jouke; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Webb, Andrew G; Rozemuller, Annemieke J; van Buchem, Mark A; van der Weerd, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral deposits of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) form the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). In the brain, Aβ can aggregate as insoluble fibrils present in amyloid plaques and vascular amyloid, or as diffuse plaques consisting of mainly non-fibrillar Aβ. Previously, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be capable of detecting individual amyloid plaques, not only via the associated iron, but also Aβ itself has been suggested to be responsible for a decrease in the image intensity. In this current study we aim to investigate the MRI properties of the different cerebral Aβ deposits including diffuse plaques and vascular amyloid. Postmortem 60-μm-thick brain sections of AD, CAA, and Down's syndrome patients, known to contain Aβ, were studied. High resolution T2*- and T2-weighted MRI scans and quantitative relaxation maps were acquired using a microcoil on a Bruker 9.4T MRI system. Specific MRI characteristics of each type of Aβ deposit were examined by co-registration of the MRI with Congo Red and Aβ-immunostainings of the same sections. Our results show that only fibrillar Aβ, present in both vascular and parenchymal amyloid, induced a significant change in T2* and T2 values. However, signal changes were not as consistent for all of the vessels affected by CAA, irrespective of possible dyshoric changes. In contrast, the non-fibrillar diffuse plaques did not create any detectable MRI signal changes. These findings are relevant for the interpretation and further development of (quantitative) MRI methods for the detection and follow-up of AD and CAA.

  15. Cerebral microbleeds topography and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Shams, Sara; Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Charidimou, Andreas; Li, Xiaozhen; Shams, Mana; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cavallin, Lena; Aspelin, Peter; Wiberg-Kristoffersen, Maria; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds, a marker of small vessel disease, are thought to be of importance in cognitive impairment. We aimed to study topographical distribution of cerebral microbleeds, and their involvement in disease pathophysiology, reflected by cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers; 1039 patients undergoing memory investigation underwent lumbar puncture and a brain magnetic resonance imaging scan. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were analyzed for amyloid β(Aβ)42, total tau(T-tau), tau phosphorylated at threonine 18(P-tau) and cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratios. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences were evaluated for small vessel disease markers, including cerebral microbleeds, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes. Low Aβ42 levels were associated with lobar cerebral microbleeds in the whole cohort and Alzheimer's disease ( P < 0.001). High cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratios were seen with increased number of cerebral microbleeds in the brainstem ( P < 0.001). There were tendencies for increased Aβ42 levels and decreased Tau levels with deep and infratentorial cerebral microbleeds ( P < 0.05). Lobar cerebral microbleeds were associated with white matter hyperintensities and lacunes ( P < 0.001). Probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related cerebral microbleeds were associated with low Aβ42 levels and lacunes, whereas probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-unrelated cerebral microbleeds were associated with white matter hyperintensities ( P < 0.001). Our findings show that cerebral microbleed distribution is associated with different patterns of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, supporting different pathogenesis of deep/infratentorial and lobar cerebral microbleeds.

  16. Relative increase in Alzheimer's disease of soluble forms of cerebral Abeta amyloid protein precursor containing the Kunitz protease inhibitory domain.

    PubMed

    Moir, R D; Lynch, T; Bush, A I; Whyte, S; Henry, A; Portbury, S; Multhaup, G; Small, D H; Tanzi, R E; Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L

    1998-02-27

    Although a number of studies have examined amyloid precursor protein (APP) mRNA levels in Alzheimer's disease (AD), no clear consensus has emerged as to whether the levels of transcripts for isoforms containing a Kunitz protease inhibitory (KPI)-encoded region are increased or decreased in AD. Here we compare AD and control brain for the relative amounts of APP protein containing KPI to APP protein lacking this domain. APP protein was purified from the soluble subcellular fraction and Triton X-100 membrane pellet extract of one hemisphere of AD (n = 10), normal (n = 7), and neurological control (n = 5) brains. The amount of KPI-containing APP in the purified protein samples was determined using two independent assay methods. The first assay exploited the inhibitory action of KPI-containing APP on trypsin. The second assay employed reflectance analysis of Western blots. The proportion of KPI-containing forms of APP in the soluble subcellular fraction of AD brains is significantly elevated (p < 0.01) compared with controls. Species containing a KPI domain comprise 32-41 and 76-77% of purified soluble APP from control and AD brains, respectively. For purified membrane-associated APP, 72-77 and 65-82% of control and AD samples, respectively, contain a KPI domain. Since KPI-containing species of APP may be more amyloidogenic (Ho, L., Fukuchi, K., and Yonkin, S. G. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 30929-30934), our findings support an imbalance of isoforms as one possible mechanism for amyloid deposition in sporadic AD.

  17. Neurotensin decreases high affinity [3H]-ouabain binding to cerebral cortex membranes.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Carina; Ordieres, María Graciela López; Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez de Lores

    2011-12-10

    Previous work from this laboratory showed the ability of neurotensin to inhibit synaptosomal membrane Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, the effect being blocked by SR 48692, a non-peptidic antagonist for high affinity neurotensin receptor (NTS1) [López Ordieres and Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz 2000; 2001]. To further study neurotensin interaction with Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, peptide effect on high affinity [(3)H]-ouabain binding was studied in cerebral cortex membranes. It was observed that neurotensin modified binding in a dose-dependent manner, leading to 80% decrease with 1 × 10(-4)M concentration. On the other hand, the single addition of 1 × 10(-6)M, 1 × 10(-5)M and 1 × 10(-4)M SR 48692 (Sanofi-Aventis, U.S., Inc.) decreased [(3)H]-ouabain binding (in %) to 87 ± 16; 74 ± 16 and 34 ± 17, respectively. Simultaneous addition of neurotensin and SR 48692 led to additive or synergic effects. Partial NTS2 agonist levocabastine inhibited [(3)H]-ouabain binding likewise. Saturation assays followed by Scatchard analyses showed that neurotensin increased K(d) value whereas failed to modify B(max) value, indicating a competitive type interaction of the peptide at Na(+), K(+)-ATPase ouabain site. At variance, SR 48692 decreased B(max) value whereas it did not modify K(d) value. [(3)H]-ouabain binding was also studied in cerebral cortex membranes obtained from rats injected i. p. 30 min earlier with 100 μg and 250 μg/kg SR 48692. It was observed that the 250 μg/kg SR 48692 dose led to 19% decrease in basal [(3)H]-ouabain binding. After SR 48692 treatments, addition of 1 × 10(-6)M led to additive or synergic effect. Results suggested that [(3)H]-ouabain binding inhibition by neurotensin hardly involves NTS1 receptor.

  18. Increased cerebral extracellular adenosine and decreased PGE2 during ethanol-induced inhibition of FBM.

    PubMed

    Watson, C S; White, S E; Homan, J H; Kimura, K A; Brien, J F; Fraher, L; Challis, J R; Bocking, A D

    1999-04-01

    Adenosine and PGE2 are neuromodulators, both of which inhibit fetal breathing movements (FBM). Although circulating PGE2 has been implicated as a mediator of ethanol-induced inhibition of FBM in the late-gestation ovine fetus, a role for adenosine has not been examined. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of maternal ethanol infusion on ovine fetal cerebral extracellular fluid adenosine and PGE2 concentrations by using in utero microdialysis and to relate any changes to ethanol-induced inhibition of FBM. Dialysate samples were obtained from the fetal parietal cortex over 70 h after surgery to determine steady-state extracellular fluid adenosine and PGE2 concentrations. On each of postoperative days 3 and 4, after a 2-h baseline period, ewes received a 1-h infusion of ethanol (1 g/kg maternal body wt) or an equivalent volume of saline, and the fetus was monitored for a further 11 h with 30-min dialysate samples collected throughout. Immediately after surgery, dialysate PGE2 and adenosine concentrations were 3.7 +/- 0.7 and 296 +/- 127 nM, respectively. PGE2 did not change over the 70 h, whereas adenosine decreased to 59 +/- 14 nM (P < 0.05) at 4 h and then remained unchanged. Ethanol decreased dialysate PGE2 concentration for 2 h (3.3 +/- 0.3 to 1.9 +/- 0.4 nM; P < 0.05) and increased adenosine concentration for 6 h (87 +/- 13 to a maximum of 252 +/- 59 nM, P < 0.05). Ethanol decreased FBM incidence from 47 +/- 7 to 16 +/- 5% (P < 0.01) for 8 h. Saline infusion did not change dialysate adenosine or PGE2 concentrations or FBM incidence. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that fetal cerebral adenosine, and not PGE2, is the primary mediator of ethanol-induced inhibition of FBM at 123 days of gestation in sheep.

  19. Decreased proteolytic activity of the mitochondrial amyloid-β degrading enzyme, PreP peptidasome, in Alzheimer's disease brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Alikhani, Nyosha; Guo, Lan; Yan, Shiqiang; Du, Heng; Pinho, Catarina Moreira; Chen, John Xi; Glaser, Elzbieta; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), the neurotoxic peptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been shown in brain mitochondria of AD patients and of AD transgenic mouse models. The presence of Aβ in mitochondria leads to free radical generation and neuronal stress. Recently, we identified the presequence protease, PreP, localized in the mitochondrial matrix in mammalian mitochondria as the novel mitochondrial Aβ-degrading enzyme. In the present study, we examined PreP activity in the mitochondrial matrix of the human brain's temporal lobe, an area of the brain highly susceptible to Aβ accumulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We found significantly lower hPreP activity in AD brains compared with non-AD age-matched controls. By contrast, in the cerebellum, a brain region typically spared from Aβ accumulation, there was no significant difference in hPreP activity when comparing AD samples to non-AD controls. We also found significantly reduced PreP activity in the mitochondrial matrix of AD transgenic mouse brains (Tg mAβPP and Tg mAβPP/ABAD) when compared to non-transgenic aged-matched mice. Furthermore, mitochondrial fractions isolated from AD brains and Tg mAβPP mice had higher levels of 4-hydroxynonenal, an oxidative product, as compared with those from non-AD and nonTg mice. Accordingly, activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly reduced in the AD mitochondria. These findings suggest that decreased PreP proteolytic activity, possibly due to enhanced ROS production, contributes to Aβ accumulation in mitochondria leading to the mitochondrial toxicity and neuronal death that is exacerbated in AD. Clearance of mitochondrial Aβ by PreP may thus be of importance in the pathology of AD.

  20. Cerebral Blood Flow and Aβ-Amyloid Estimates by WARM Analysis of [(11)C]PiB Uptake Distinguish among and between Neurodegenerative Disorders and Aging.

    PubMed

    Rodell, Anders B; O'Keefe, Graeme; Rowe, Christopher C; Villemagne, Victor L; Gjedde, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background: We report results of the novel Washout Allometric Reference Method (WARM) that uses estimates of cerebral blood flow and amyloid load from the same [(11)C]Pittsburgh Compound B ([(11)C]PiB) retention maps in brain to distinguish between patients with different forms dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, and healthy volunteers. The method introduces two approaches to the identification of brain pathology related to amyloid accumulation, (1) a novel analysis of amyloid binding based on the late washout of the tracer from brain tissue, and (2) the simultaneous estimation of absolute cerebral blood flow indices (sCBF) from the early accumulation of the tracer in brain tissue. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that a change of cerebral blood flow is correlated with the degree of tracer [(11)C]PiB retention, reflecting dendritic spine pathology and consequent inhibition of brain energy metabolism and reduction of blood flow by neurovascular coupling in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Methods: Previously reported images of [(11)C]PiB retention in brain of 29 subjects with cognitive impairment or dementia [16 Alzheimer's Disease (AD), eight subjects with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), five patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), five patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 29 age-matched healthy control subjects (HC)], underwent analysis of PiB delivery and retention by means of WARM for quantitation of [(11)C]PiB's binding potentials (BPND) and correlated surrogate cerebral blood flow (sCBF) estimates, based on the [(11)C]PiB images, compared to estimates by conventional Standard Uptake Value Ratio (SUVR) of [(11)C]PiB retention with cerebellum gray matter as reference. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) revealed the power of discrimination among estimates. Results: For AD, the discriminatory power of [(11)C]PiB binding potential (BPND) by WARM exceeded the power of SUVR that in turn exceeded the

  1. Cerebral Blood Flow and Aβ-Amyloid Estimates by WARM Analysis of [11C]PiB Uptake Distinguish among and between Neurodegenerative Disorders and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rodell, Anders B.; O’Keefe, Graeme; Rowe, Christopher C.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Background: We report results of the novel Washout Allometric Reference Method (WARM) that uses estimates of cerebral blood flow and amyloid load from the same [11C]Pittsburgh Compound B ([11C]PiB) retention maps in brain to distinguish between patients with different forms dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, and healthy volunteers. The method introduces two approaches to the identification of brain pathology related to amyloid accumulation, (1) a novel analysis of amyloid binding based on the late washout of the tracer from brain tissue, and (2) the simultaneous estimation of absolute cerebral blood flow indices (sCBF) from the early accumulation of the tracer in brain tissue. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that a change of cerebral blood flow is correlated with the degree of tracer [11C]PiB retention, reflecting dendritic spine pathology and consequent inhibition of brain energy metabolism and reduction of blood flow by neurovascular coupling in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: Previously reported images of [11C]PiB retention in brain of 29 subjects with cognitive impairment or dementia [16 Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), eight subjects with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), five patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), five patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 29 age-matched healthy control subjects (HC)], underwent analysis of PiB delivery and retention by means of WARM for quantitation of [11C]PiB’s binding potentials (BPND) and correlated surrogate cerebral blood flow (sCBF) estimates, based on the [11C]PiB images, compared to estimates by conventional Standard Uptake Value Ratio (SUVR) of [11C]PiB retention with cerebellum gray matter as reference. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) revealed the power of discrimination among estimates. Results: For AD, the discriminatory power of [11C]PiB binding potential (BPND) by WARM exceeded the power of SUVR that in turn exceeded the power of s

  2. Cerebral blood flow velocity and cranial fluid volume decrease during +Gz acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Puma, S. C.; Hargens, A. R.; Murthy, G.; Warkander, D.; Lundgren, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity and cranial fluid volume, which is defined as the total volume of intra- and extracranial fluid, were measured using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and rheoencephalography, respectively, in humans during graded increase of +Gz acceleration (onset rate: 0.1 G/s) without straining maneuvers. Gz acceleration was terminated when subjects' vision decreased to an angle of less than or equal to 60 degrees, which was defined as the physiological end point. In five subjects, mean CBF velocity decreased 48% from a baseline value of 59.4 +/- 11.2 cm/s to 31.0 +/- 5.6 cm/s (p<0.01) with initial loss of peripheral vision at 5.7 +/- 0.9 Gz. On the other hand, systolic CBF velocity did not change significantly during increasing +Gz acceleration. Cranial impedance, which is proportional to loss of cranial fluid volume, increased by 2.0 +/- 0.8% above the baseline value at the physiological end point (p<0.05). Both the decrease of CBF velocity and the increase of cranial impedance correlated significantly with Gz. These results suggest that +Gz acceleration without straining maneuvers decreases CBF velocity to half normal and probably causes a caudal fluid shift from both intra- and extracranial tissues.

  3. Anxiety symptoms, cerebral amyloid burden and memory decline in healthy older adults without dementia: 3-year prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert H; Scott, J Cobb; Neumeister, Alexander; Lim, Yen Ying; Ames, David; Ellis, Kathryn A; Harrington, Karra; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Szoeke, Cassandra; Martins, Ralph N; Masters, Colin L; Villemagne, Victor L; Rowe, Christopher C; Maruff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although beta-amyloid, anxiety and depression have linked cross-sectionally to reduced memory function in healthy older adults without dementia, prospective data evaluating these associations are lacking. Using data an observational cohort study of 178 healthy older adults without dementia followed for 3 years, we found that anxiety symptoms significantly moderated the relationship between beta-amyloid level and decline in verbal (Cohen's d = 0.65) and episodic (Cohen's d = 0.38) memory. Anxiety symptoms were additionally linked to greater decline in executive function, irrespective of beta-amyloid and other risk factors. These findings suggest that interventions to mitigate anxiety symptoms may help delay memory decline in otherwise healthy older adults with elevated beta-amyloid.

  4. Decreased oxygen saturation in asymmetrically prominent cortical veins in patients with cerebral ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shuang; Utriainen, David; Tang, Jin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xuesong; Shen, Wen; Haacke, E Mark; Lu, Guangming

    2014-12-01

    Decreased oxygen saturation in asymmetrically prominent cortical veins (APCV) seen in ischemic stroke has been hypothesized to correlate with an increase of de-oxygenated hemoglobin. Our goal is to quantify magnetic susceptibility to define APCV by establishing a cutoff above which the deoxyhemoglobin levels are considered abnormal. A retrospective study was conducted on 26 patients with acute ischemic stroke in one cerebral hemisphere that exhibited APCV with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) was used to calculate the magnetic susceptibility of the cortical veins. A paired t-test was used to compare the susceptibility of the cortical veins in the left and right hemispheres for healthy controls as well as in the contralateral hemisphere for stroke patients with APCV. The change in oxygen saturation in the APCV relative to the contralateral side was calculated after thresholding the susceptibility using the mean plus two standard deviations of the contralateral side for each individual. The thresholded susceptibility value of the APCVs in the stroke hemisphere was 254±48 ppb which was significantly higher (p<0.05) than that in the contralateral hemisphere (123±12 ppb) and in healthy controls (125±8 ppb). There was a decrease of oxygen saturation in the APCV ranging from 16% to 44% relative to the veins of the contralateral hemisphere. In conclusion, APCV seen in SWI correspond to reduced levels of oxygen saturation and these abnormal veins can be identified using a susceptibility threshold on the QSM data.

  5. Methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits improves memory impairment by decreasing brain oxidative stress in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hritcu, Lucian; Noumedem, Jaurès A; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Kuete, Victor; Mihasan, Marius

    2014-04-01

    The present study analyzed the possible memory-enhancing and antioxidant proprieties of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum L. fruits (50 and 100 mg/kg, orally, for 21 days) in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The memory-enhancing effects of the plant extract were studied by means of in vivo (Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using superoxide dismutase-, catalase-, glutathione peroxidase-specific activities and the total content of reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl levels. The amyloid beta(1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of spontaneous alternations percentage within Y-maze task and increase of working memory and reference memory errors within radial arm-maze task. Administration of the plant extract significantly improved memory performance and exhibited antioxidant potential. Our results suggest that the plant extract ameliorates amyloid beta(1-42)-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  6. Decreased and Increased Anisotropy along Major Cerebral White Matter Tracts in Preterm Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shachar, Michal; Feldman, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    Premature birth is highly prevalent and associated with neurodevelopmental delays and disorders. Adverse outcomes, particularly in children born before 32 weeks of gestation, have been attributed in large part to white matter injuries, often found in periventricular regions using conventional imaging. To date, tractography studies of white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm have evaluated only a limited number of tracts simultaneously. The current study compares diffusion properties along 18 major cerebral white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm (n = 27) and full term (n = 19), using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. We found that compared to the full term group, the preterm group had significantly decreased FA in segments of the bilateral uncinate fasciculus and anterior segments of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Additionally, the preterm group had significantly increased FA in segments of the right and left anterior thalamic radiations, posterior segments of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and the right and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Increased FA in the preterm group was generally associated with decreased radial diffusivity. These findings indicate that prematurity-related white matter differences in later childhood and adolescence do not affect all tracts in the periventricular zone and can involve both decreased and increased FA. Differences in the patterns of radial diffusivity and axial diffusivity suggest that the tissue properties underlying group FA differences may vary within and across white matter tracts. Distinctive diffusion properties may relate to variations in the timing of injury in the neonatal period, extent of white matter dysmaturity and/or compensatory processes in childhood. PMID:26560745

  7. Tetrahydrohyperforin decreases cholinergic markers associated with amyloid-β plaques, 4-hydroxynonenal formation, and caspase-3 activation in AβPP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Francisco J; Zolezzi, Juan M; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Godoy, Juan A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities, amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, neurofibrillary tangle deposition, synaptic alterations, and oxidative injury. In AD patients, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is low in most regions of the brain, but increased within and around amyloid plaques, where it accelerates the Aβ assembly into oligomers and fibrils, increasing its neurotoxicity. Tetrahydrohyperforin (THH), a semi-synthetic derivative of hyperforin, reduces tau phosphorylation and Aβ accumulation in AD mouse models. In the present study, we examined the effects of THH on Aβ-AChE complexes, α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChR), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) adducts, caspase-3 activation, and spatial memory in young AβPPSwe/PSEN1ΔE9 (AβPP/PS1) transgenic mice, in order to evaluate its potential preventive effects on the development of the disease. We report here that treatment with THH prevents the association of AChE to different types of amyloid plaques; partially restores the brain distribution of AChE molecular forms; increases α7-nAChR levels in the hippocampus of treated mice; decreases the amount of these receptors in amyloid plaques; and reduces the oxidative damage, evidenced by 4-HNE adduct formation and caspase-3 activation on AβPP/PS1 mice brain; demonstrating the neuroprotective properties of THH. Finally, we found that the acute treatment of hippocampal neurons with THH, in the presence of Aβ-AChE complexes, prevents 4-HNE adduct formation and caspase-3 activation. Our data support a therapeutic potential of THH for the treatment of AD.

  8. Folic acid deficiency enhances abeta accumulation in APP/PS1 mice brain and decreases amyloid-associated miRNAs expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Tian, Tian; Qin, Shanchun; Li, Wen; Zhang, Xumei; Wang, Xuan; Gao, Yuxia; Huang, Guowei

    2015-12-01

    Recent efforts have revealed the microRNA (miRNA) pathways in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have revealed an association between folic acid deficiency and AD risk. However, the effects of folic acid deficiency on miRNA expression in AD animals have not been observed. We aimed to find if folic acid deficiency may enhance amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition and regulate amyloid-associated miRNAs and their target genes expression in APP/PS1 mice. APP/PS1 mice and N2a cells were treated with folic acid-deficient diet or medium. Cognitive function of mice was assessed using the Morris water maze. miRNA profile was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array. Different expressional miRNAs were validated by real-time PCR. The deposition of Aβ plaques was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. APP and BACE1 proteins in mice brain and N2a cells were determined by Western blot. Folic acid deficiency aggravated amyloid pathology in AD mice. The AD+FD group showed shorter time spent in the target zone during the probe test. Analysis of miRNAs predicted to target these genes revealed several miRNA candidates that were differentially modulated by folic acid deficiency. In APP/PS1 mice brains and N2a cells with folic acid-deficient treatment, miR-106a-5p, miR-200b-3p and miR-339-5p were down-regulated, and their target genes APP and BACE1 were up-regulated. In conclusion, folic acid deficiency can enhance Aβ accumulation in APP/PS1 mice brain and decrease amyloid-associated miRNAs expression.

  9. Fasudil Decreases Lesion Burden in a Murine Model of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, David A.; Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Stockton, Rebecca A.; Liu, Feifei; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Awad, Issam A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are characterized by grossly dilated capillaries, associated with vascular leak and hemorrhage, and occur in sporadic or inherited (autosomal dominant) forms with mutations in one of three gene loci (CCM 1, 2 or 3). We previously reported that the CCM1 protein (KRIT1) localizes to endothelial cell-cell junctions and loss of KRIT1 leads to junctional instability associated with activation of RhoA and its effector Rho kinase (ROCK). Although ROCK inhibition has been proposed as potential therapy for CCM, there has been no demonstration of a therapeutic effect on CCM lesion genesis in vivo. Methods Our recently generated a model of CCM1 disease (Ccm1+/−Msh2−/−) was treated with ROCK inhibitor fasudil (100 mg/kg/day administered in drinking water from weaning to 5 months of age), or placebo, and blindly assessed CCM lesion burden by systematic survey of animals’ brains. For comparison, we also assessed therapeutic effect in previously described Ccm2+/−Trp53−/− mice, treated with the same dose and duration of fasudil and placebo. Results Fasudil treated Ccm1+/−Msh2−/− mice had a significantly decreased prevalence of CCM lesions compared to placebo controls. Lesions in treated animals were smaller and less likely associated with hemorrhage, inflammation and endothelial proliferation, and exhibited decreased expression of ROCK activation biomarkers. A therapeutic effect was also documented in Ccm2+/−Trp53−/− mice. Conclusion This represents the first report of therapeutic benefit of pharmacological therapy in development and progression of CCMs, and indicates that ROCK activation is a critical step in CCM lesion genesis and maturation. PMID:22034008

  10. A 3'-UTR polymorphism in the oxidized LDL receptor 1 gene increases Abeta40 load as cerebral amyloid angiopathy in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Tian, Jinzhou; Pritchard, Antonia; Lendon, Corinne; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Mann, David M A

    2006-01-01

    It is presently unclear whether polymorphic variations in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1), or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), genes act as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we have investigated the extent of amyloid beta protein (Abeta) deposition as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) or senile plaques (SP) in relationship to OLR1 +1071 and +1073 polymorphisms and LRP1 C766T polymorphism in patients with AD There was an increased Abeta40 load as CAA, but not as SP, in frontal cortex of AD patients carrying OLR1+1073 CC genotype, compared to those with CT, TT or CT+TT genotypes, but only in those individuals without apolipoprotein (APOE) epsilon4 allele. No differences in total Abeta or Abeta42 load as CAA or SP between OLR1+1073 genotypes was seen, nor were there any differences between OLR1+1071 and LRP1 genotypes for any measure of Abeta. Present data suggests that homozygosity for the C allele for OLR1+1073 polymorphism, selectively in individuals without APOE epsilon4 allele, may impair clearance of Abeta, and particularly Abeta40, from the brain across the blood-brain barrier, leading to its 'diversion' into perivascular drainage channels, thereby increasing the severity of CAA in such persons.

  11. Decreased GABA receptor in the cerebral cortex of epileptic rats: effect of Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstact Background Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex, maintains the inhibitory tones that counter balances neuronal excitation. When this balance is perturbed, seizures may ensue. Methods In the present study, alterations of the general GABA, GABAA and GABAB receptors in the cerebral cortex of the epileptic rat and the therapeutic application of Bacopa monnieri were investigated. Results Scatchard analysis of [3H]GABA, [3H]bicuculline and [3H]baclofen in the cerebral cortex of the epileptic rat showed significant decrease in Bmax (P < 0.001) compared to control. Real Time PCR amplification of GABA receptor subunits such as GABAAά1, GABAAγ, GABAAδ, GABAB and GAD where down regulated (P < 0.001) in epileptic rats. GABAAά5 subunit and Cyclic AMP responsible element binding protein were up regulated. Confocal imaging study confirmed the decreased GABA receptors in epileptic rats. Epileptic rats have deficit in radial arm and Y maze performance. Conclusions Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A treatment reverses epilepsy associated changes to near control suggesting that decreased GABA receptors in the cerebral cortex have an important role in epileptic occurrence; Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A have therapeutic application in epilepsy management. PMID:22364254

  12. Inhalation of coriander volatile oil increased anxiolytic-antidepressant-like behaviors and decreased oxidative status in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cioanca, Oana; Hritcu, Lucian; Mihasan, Marius; Trifan, Adriana; Hancianu, Monica

    2014-05-28

    The present study analyzed the possible anxiolytic, antidepressant and antioxidant proprieties of inhaled coriander volatile oil extracted from Coriandrum sativum var. microcarpum in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of inhaled coriander volatile oil were studied by means of in vivo (elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using catalase specific activity and the total content of the reduced glutathione. The beta-amyloid (1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of the locomotor activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming and immobility times within forced swimming test. Exposure to coriander volatile oil significantly improved these parameters, suggesting anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects. Moreover, coriander volatile oil decreased catalase activity and increased glutathione level in the hippocampus. Our results suggest that multiple exposures to coriander volatile oil can be useful as a mean to counteract anxiety, depression and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease conditions.

  13. FLZ Alleviates the Memory Deficits in Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease via Decreasing Beta-Amyloid Production and Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kong, Xiang-Chen; Tai, Wen-Jiao; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide and mainly characterized by the aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau. FLZ is a novel synthetic derivative of natural squamosamide and has been proved to improve memory deficits in dementia animal models. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of FLZ’s neuroprotective effect in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice and SH-SY5Y (APPwt/swe) cells. The results showed that treatment with FLZ significantly improved the memory deficits of APP/PS1 transgenic mice and decreased apoptosis of SH-SY5Y (APPwt/swe) cells. FLZ markedly attenuated Aβ accumulation and tau phosphorylation both in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistic study showed that FLZ interfered APP processing, i.e., FLZ decreased β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) phosphorylation, APP-carboxy-terminal fragment (APP-CTF) production and β-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression. These results indicated that FLZ reduced Aβ production through inhibiting amyloidogenic pathway. The mechanistic study about FLZ’s inhibitory effect on tau phosphorylation revealed t the involvement of Akt/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathway. FLZ treatment increased Akt activity and inhibited GSK3β activity both in vivo and in vitro. The inhibitory effect of FLZ on GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation was suppressed by inhibiting Akt activity, indicating that Akt/GSK3β pathway might be the possible mechanism involved in the inhibitory effect of FLZ on tau hyperphosphorylation. These results suggested FLZ might be a potential anti-AD drug as it not only reduced Aβ production via inhibition amyloidogenic APP processing pathway, but also attenuated tau hyperphosphoylation mediated by Akt/GSK3β. PMID:24223757

  14. Topography of Cortical Microbleeds in Alzheimer's Disease with and without Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: A Post-Mortem 7.0-Tesla MRI Study.

    PubMed

    De Reuck, J; Auger, F; Durieux, N; Deramecourt, V; Cordonnier, C; Pasquier, F; Maurage, C A; Leys, D; Bordet, R

    2015-11-01

    Cortical microbleeds (CMBs) detected on T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered as a possible hallmark of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla MRI study investigates whether topographic differences exist in Alzheimer's brains without (AD) and with CAA (AD-CAA). The distribution of CMBs in thirty-two post-mortem brains, consisting of 12 AD, 8 AD-CAA and 12 controls, was mutually compared on T2*-GRE MRI of six coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere. The mean numbers of CMBs were determined in twenty-two different gyri. As a whole there was a trend of more CMBs on GRE MRI in the prefrontal section of the AD, the AD-CAA as well as of the control brains. Compared to controls AD brains had significantly more CMBs in the superior frontal, the inferior temporal, the rectus and the cinguli gyrus, and in the insular cortex. In AD-CAA brains CMBs were increased in all gyri with exception of the medial parietal gyrus and the hippocampus. AD-CAA brains showed a highly significant increase of CMBs in the inferior parietal gyrus (p value: 0.001) and a significant increase in the precuneus and the cuneus (p value: 0.01) compared to the AD brains. The differences in topographic distribution of CMBs between AD and AD-CAA brains should be further investigated on MRI in clinically suspected patients.

  15. Targeted suppression of claudin-5 decreases cerebral oedema and improves cognitive outcome following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew; Hanrahan, Finnian; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Kelly, Michael E; Kiang, Anna-Sophia; Humphries, Marian M; Nguyen, Anh T H; Ozaki, Ema; Keaney, James; Blau, Christoph W; Kerskens, Christian M; Cahalan, Stephen D; Callanan, John J; Wallace, Eugene; Grant, Gerald A; Doherty, Colin P; Humphries, Peter

    2012-05-22

    Traumatic brain injury is the leading cause of death in children and young adults globally. Malignant cerebral oedema has a major role in the pathophysiology that evolves after severe traumatic brain injury. Added to this is the significant morbidity and mortality from cerebral oedema associated with acute stroke, hypoxic ischemic coma, neurological cancers and brain infection. Therapeutic strategies to prevent cerebral oedema are limited and, if brain swelling persists, the risks of permanent brain damage or mortality are greatly exacerbated. Here we show that a temporary and size-selective modulation of the blood-brain barrier allows enhanced movement of water from the brain to the blood and significantly impacts on brain swelling. We also show cognitive improvement in mice with focal cerebral oedema following administration in these animals of short interfering RNA directed against claudin-5. These observations may have profound consequences for early intervention in cases of traumatic brain injury, or indeed any neurological condition where cerebral oedema is the hallmark pathology.

  16. Rhein lysinate decreases the generation of β-amyloid in the brain tissues of Alzheimer's disease model mice by inhibiting inflammatory response and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Hu, Gang; Xu, Rong; Qiao, Yue; Wu, He-Ping; Ding, Xun; Duan, Peng; Tu, Ping; Lin, Ya-Jun

    2013-07-01

    The protective effect of rhein lysinate (RHL) on Alzheimer's disease (AD) was explored in senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAMP8) mice. SAMP8 mice without treatment were used as the AD-positive control, and senescence-accelerated-resistant mice were used as the AD-negative control. In this study, 4-month-old male SAMP8 mice were orally administered 25 and 50 mg/kg RHL in drinking water for 6 months. The results of brain tissue enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were demonstrated that compared with SAMP8 group, β-amyloid1-40 and β-amyloid1-42 were reduced; the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin 6 of brain tissues were also significantly decreased; however, the level of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) was increased in the RHL-treated group. Compared with SAMP8 group, the ROS levels and malondialdehyde levels were decreased; however, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels were increased in the brain tissues of SAMP8 25 and 50 mg/kg RHL-treated groups. In conclusion, the reduction of Aβ induced by RHL was related to the increase of SIRT1 and the inhibition of the inflammatory response and oxidative stress in SAMP8 mice. It might be a promising biological therapeutic drug for AD.

  17. Amyloid Precursor Protein in the Cerebral Cortex is Rapidly and Persistently Induced by Loss of Subcortical Innervation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    IS. NUMBER OF PAGES Amyloid precursor protein; nucleus basalis of Meynert; 5 Alzheimer disease , Acetylcholine 16. PRICE’CODE 17. SECURITY...observed in Alzheimer disease . Dawley rats (-225-250 g) purchased from Charles River Breeding Laboratories were subcortically lesioned at the Among...the most prominent features of Alzheimer disease following sites: (i) unilateral lesions of the nbM with (AD) are profound deficits in cortical

  18. No Decrease in Muscle Strength after Botulinum Neurotoxin-A Injection in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Eek, Meta N.; Himmelmann, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity and muscle weakness is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Spasticity can be treated with botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A), but this drug has also been reported to induce muscle weakness. Our purpose was to describe the effect on muscle strength in the lower extremities after BoNT-A injections in children with CP. A secondary aim was to relate the effect of BoNT-A to gait pattern and range of motion. Twenty children with spastic CP were included in the study, 8 girls and 12 boys (mean age 7.7 years). All were able to walk without support, but with increased muscle tone interfering with motor function and gait pattern. Sixteen children had unilateral spastic CP and four bilateral spastic CP. Twenty-four legs received injections with BoNT-A in the plantar flexor muscles. The children were tested before treatment, around 6 weeks after at the peak effect of BoNT-A, and at 6 months after treatment, with measurement of muscle strength, gait analysis, and range of motion. There were no differences in muscle strength in plantar flexors of treated legs at peak effect compared to baseline. Six months after treatment, there was still no change in untreated plantar flexor muscles, but an increasing trend in plantar flexor strength in legs treated with BoNT-A. Parents reported positive effects in all children, graded as: small in three children, moderate in eight, and large in nine children. The gait analysis showed a small improvement in knee extension at initial contact, and there was a small increase in passive range of motion for ankle dorsiflexion. Two children had a period with transient weakness and pain. We found that voluntary force production in plantar flexor muscles did not decrease after BoNT-A, instead there was a trend to increased muscle strength at follow-up. The increase may be explained as an effect of the blocking of involuntary nerve impulses, leading to an opportunity to using and training the muscles with voluntary control. Adequate

  19. Decreased Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Pediatric Mild TBI: An MRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; West, John D.; Bailey, Jessica N.; Westfall, Daniel R.; Xiao, Hui; Arnold, Todd W.; Kersey, Patrick A.; Saykin, Andrew J.; McDonald, Brenna C.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated cerebral blood flow (CBF) in chronic pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging perfusion. mTBI patients showed lower CBF than controls in bilateral frontotemporal regions, with no between-group cognitive differences. Findings suggest ASL may be useful to assess functional abnormalities in pediatric mTBI. PMID:25649779

  20. Decreased cerebral metabolism in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) with stroke and its possible improvement by Solcoseryl.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Y; Yamamoto, Y; Senga, Y; Isogai, M; Shimizu, H; Yamori, Y

    1991-01-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) was decreased in SHRSP with stroke compared with normotensive Wistar rats. The decrement of LCGU was less in Solcoseryl-treated SHRSP with stroke than that in saline-treated SHRSP with stroke and these brain areas where LCGU was less damaged, in Solcoseryl-treated SHRSP were consistent with the important functioning sites of emotion, motor movement and memory. The result suggests that Solcoseryl may be useful for metabolic improvement of the brain damage after stroke.

  1. Treadmill exercise decreases amyloid-β burden possibly via activation of SIRT-1 signaling in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jung-Hoon; Kang, Eun-Bum; Oh, Yoo-Sung; Yang, Dae-Seung; Cho, Joon-Yong

    2017-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) correlates significantly with progressive cognitive deficits, a main symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although treadmill exercise reduces Aβ levels, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects are not fully understood. We hypothesize that treadmill exercise decreases Aβ production and alleviates cognitive deficits by activating the non-amyloidogenic pathway via SIRT-1 signaling. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive deficits and alleviated neurotoxicity. Most importantly, treadmill exercise increased SIRT-1 level, which subsequently resulted in increased ADAM-10 level by down-regulation of ROCK-1 and upregulation of RARβ, ultimately facilitating the non-amyloidogenic pathway. Treadmill exercise-induced activation in SIRT-1 level also elevated PGC-1α level and reduced BACE-1 and C-99 level, resulting in inhibition of the amyloidogenic pathway. Treadmill exercise may thus inhibit Aβ production via upregulation of SIRT-1, which biases amyloid precursor protein processing toward the non-amyloidogenic pathway. This study provides novel and valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms possibly by which treadmill exercise reduces Aβ production.

  2. A Human Monoclonal IgG That Binds Aβ Assemblies and Diverse Amyloids Exhibits Anti-Amyloid Activities In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    O'Nuallain, Brian; Puligedda, Rama Devudu; Ondrejcak, Tomas; Adekar, Sharad P.; Chen, Cindy; Cruz, Pedro E.; Rosario, Awilda M.; Macy, Sallie; Mably, Alexandra J.; Walsh, Dominic M.; Vidal, Ruben; Solomon, Alan; Brown, Daniel; Rowan, Michael J.; Golde, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD) are degenerative neurological diseases characterized by amyloid pathology. Normal human sera contain IgG antibodies that specifically bind diverse preamyloid and amyloid proteins and have shown therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. We cloned one of these antibodies, 3H3, from memory B cells of a healthy individual using a hybridoma method. 3H3 is an affinity-matured IgG that binds a pan-amyloid epitope, recognizing both Aβ and λ Ig light chain (LC) amyloids, which are associated with AD and primary amyloidosis, respectively. The pan-amyloid-binding properties of 3H3 were demonstrated using ELISA, immunohistochemical studies, and competition binding assays. Functional studies showed that 3H3 inhibits both Aβ and LC amyloid formation in vitro and abrogates disruption of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by AD-patient-derived soluble Aβ in vivo. A 3H3 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) retained the binding specificity of the 3H3 IgG and, when expressed in the brains of transgenic mice using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, decreased parenchymal Aβ amyloid deposition in TgCRND8 mice and ADan (Danish Amyloid) cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the mouse model of FDD. These data indicate that naturally occurring human IgGs can recognize a conformational, amyloid-specific epitope and have potent anti-amyloid activities, providing a rationale to test their potential as antibody therapeutics for diverse neurological and other amyloid diseases. PMID:25904780

  3. Prolonged diet induced obesity has minimal effects towards brain pathology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy: implications for studying obesity-brain interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Freeman, Linnea R; Pepping, Jennifer K; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) occurs in nearly every individual with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome, and is the second largest cause of intracerebral hemorrhage. Mouse models of CAA have demonstrated evidence for increased gliosis contributing to CAA pathology. Nearly two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, with little known about the effects of obesity on the brain, although increasingly the vasculature appears to be a principle target of obesity effects on the brain. In the current study we describe for the first time whether diet induced obesity (DIO) modulates glial reactivity, amyloid levels, and inflammatory signaling in a mouse model of CAA. In these studies we identify surprisingly that DIO does not significantly increase Aβ levels, astrocyte (GFAP) or microglial (IBA-1) gliosis in the CAA mice. However, within the hippocampal gyri a localized increase in reactive microglia were increased in the CA1 and stratum oriens relative to CAA mice on a control diet. DIO was observed to selectively increase IL-6 in CAA mice, with IL-1β and TNF-α not increased in CAA mice in response to DIO. Taken together, these data show that prolonged DIO has only modest effects towards Aβ in a mouse model of CAA, but appears to elevate some localized microglial reactivity within the hippocampal gyri and selective markers of inflammatory signaling. These data are consistent with the majority of the existing literature in other models of Aβ pathology, which surprisingly show a mixed profile of DIO effects towards pathological processes in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease. The importance for considering the potential impact of ceiling effects in pathology within mouse models of Aβ pathogenesis, and the current experimental limitations for DIO in mice to fully replicate metabolic dysfunction present in human obesity, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Animal Models of Disease.

  4. Ischemic brain injury decreases dynamin-like protein 1 expression in a middle cerebral artery occlusion animal model and glutamate-exposed HT22 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ah-Ram

    2016-01-01

    Dynamin-like protein I (DLP-1) is an important mitochondrial fission and fusion protein that is associated with apoptotic cell death in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we investigated DLP-1 expression in a focal cerebral ischemia animal model and glutamate-exposed hippocampal-derived cell line. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was surgically induced in adult male rats to induce focal cerebral ischemic injury. Brain tissues were collected 24 hours after the onset of MCAO. MCAO induces an increase in infarct volume and histopathological changes in the cerebral cortex. We identified a decrease in DLP-1 in the cerebral cortices of MCAO-injured animals using a proteomic approach and Western blot analysis. Moreover, glutamate treatment significantly decreased DLP-1 expression in a hippocampal-derived cell line. The decrease in DLP-1 indicates mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus, these results suggest that neuronal cell injury induces a decrease in DLP-1 levels and consequently leads to neuronal cell death. PMID:28053612

  5. Adenosine mediates decreased cerebral metabolic rate and increased cerebral blood flow during acute moderate hypoxia in the near-term fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Blood, Arlin B; Hunter, Christian J; Power, Gordon G

    2003-12-15

    Exposure of the fetal sheep to moderate to severe hypoxic stress results in both increased cortical blood flow and decreased metabolic rate. Using intravenous infusion of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist that is permeable to the blood brain barrier, we examine the role of adenosine A1 receptors in mediating cortical blood flow and metabolic responses to moderate hypoxia. The effects of DPCPX blockade are compared to controls as well as animals receiving intravenous 8-(p-sulfophenyl)-theophylline) (8-SPT), a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist which has been found to be blood brain barrier impermeable. Laser Doppler flow probes, tissue PO2, and thermocouples were implanted in the cerebral cortices of near-term fetal sheep. Catheters were placed in the brachial artery and sagittal sinus vein for collection of samples for blood gas analysis. Three to seven days later responses to a 30-min period of fetal hypoxemia (arterial PO2 10-12 mmHg) were studied with administration of 8-SPT, DPCPX, or vehicle. Cerebral metabolic rate was determined by calculation of both brain heat production and oxygen consumption. In response to hypoxia, control experiments demonstrated a 42 +/- 7 % decrease in cortical heat production and a 35 +/- 10 % reduction in oxygen consumption. In contrast, DPCPX infusion during hypoxia resulted in no significant change in brain heat production or oxygen consumption, suggesting the adenosine A1 receptor is involved in lowering metabolic rate during hypoxia. The decrease in cerebral metabolic rate was not altered by 8-SPT infusion, suggesting that the response is not mediated by adenosine receptors located outside the blood brain barrier. In response to hypoxia, control experiments demonstrated a 35 +/- 7 % increase in cortical blood flow. DPCPX infusion did not change this increase in cortical blood flow, however 8-SPT infusion attenuated increases in flow, indicating that hypoxic

  6. Cerebral Blood Flow and Glucose Metabolism Measured With Positron Emission Tomography Are Decreased in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    van Golen, Larissa W.; Huisman, Marc C.; Ijzerman, Richard G.; Hoetjes, Nikie J.; Schwarte, Lothar A.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Diamant, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Subclinical systemic microvascular dysfunction exists in asymptomatic patients with type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that microangiopathy, resulting from long-standing systemic hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, may be generalized to the brain, resulting in changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism in these patients. We performed dynamic [15O]H2O and [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose brain positron emission tomography scans to measure CBF and cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu), respectively, in 30 type 1 diabetic patients and 12 age-matched healthy controls after an overnight fast. Regions of interest were automatically delineated on coregistered magnetic resonance images and full kinetic analysis was performed. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were higher in patients versus controls. Total gray matter CBF was 9%, whereas CMRglu was 21% lower in type 1 diabetic subjects versus control subjects. We conclude that at real-life fasting glucose and insulin levels, type 1 diabetes is associated with decreased resting cerebral glucose metabolism, which is only partially explained by the decreased CBF. These findings suggest that mechanisms other than generalized microangiopathy account for the altered CMRglu observed in well-controlled type 1 diabetes. PMID:23530004

  7. Amyloid fibrils in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Icelandic type is a variant of gamma-trace basic protein (cystatin C).

    PubMed Central

    Ghiso, J; Jensson, O; Frangione, B

    1986-01-01

    A gamma-trace variant protein is the major constituent of the amyloid fibrils in patients from Iceland with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis. The protein consists of 110 residues and is similar to human urinary gamma-trace basic protein (or cystatin C) beginning at its 11th amino-terminal residue. It has an amino acid substitution (glutamine for leucine) at position 58 (position 68 in gamma-trace numbering), which is near the proposed active site of related proteins--namely, cysteine protease inhibitors and kininogens. It is postulated that a point mutation has occurred, leading to the production of an unusual protein that is abnormally degraded, bound, and/or precipitated. Alternatively, gamma-trace basic protein may be genetically polymorphic, and the variant described here may represent an as-yet-undiscovered isotype or an allelic form that is linked to, but not responsible for, the deposition disease. Our data on the structure of a gamma-trace variant protein suggests that its gene expresses a polyprotein precursor in which active peptides are flanked by basic amino acid residues that permit cleavage to liberate small internal peptides. It is likely that the nucleotide sequence coding for Arg-Xaa and Lys-Xaa repeated several times in the molecule may function as alternative splicing sites for mRNA processing. Images PMID:3517880

  8. Murine cerebrovascular cells as a cell culture model for cerebral amyloid angiopathy: isolation of smooth muscle and endothelial cells from mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Sebastien A; Sahoo, Susmita; Jung, Sonia S; Levy, Efrat

    2012-01-01

    The use of murine cerebrovascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells has not been widely employed as a cell culture model for the investigation of cellular mechanisms involved in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Difficulties in isolation and propagation of murine cerebrovascular cells and insufficient yields for molecular and cell culture studies have deterred investigators from using mice as a source for cerebrovascular cells in culture. Instead, cerebrovascular cells from larger mammals are preferred and several methods describing the isolation of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human, canine, rat, and guinea pig have been published. In recent years, several transgenic mouse lines showing CAA pathology have been established; consequently murine cerebrovascular cells derived from these animals can serve as a key cellular model to study CAA. Here, we describe a procedure for isolating murine microvessels that yields healthy smooth muscle and endothelial cell populations and produce sufficient material for experimental purposes. Murine smooth muscle cells isolated using this protocol exhibit the classic "hill and valley" morphology and are immunoreactive for the smooth muscle cell marker α-actin. Endothelial cells display a "cobblestone" pattern phenotype and show the characteristic immunostaining for the von Willebrand factor and the factor VIII-related antigen. In addition, we describe methods designed to preserve these cells by storage in liquid nitrogen and reestablishing viable cell cultures. Finally, we compare our methods with protocols designed to isolate and maintain human cerebrovascular cell cultures.

  9. Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging detection of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related microvascular alterations using superparamagnetic iron oxide particles in APP transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease: application to passive Abeta immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Gérard, Christelle; Abramowski, Dorothée; Cannet, Catherine; Staufenbiel, Matthias

    2011-01-19

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a common feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). More advanced stages are accompanied by microhemorrhages and vasculitis. Peripheral blood-borne macrophages are intimately linked to cerebrovascular pathology coincident with AD. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to noninvasively study microvascular lesions in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse AD models. Foci of signal attenuation were detected in cortical and thalamic brain regions of aged APP23 mice. Their strength and number was considerably enhanced by intravenous administration of iron oxide nanoparticles, which are taken up by macrophages through absorptive endocytosis, 24 h before image acquisition. The number of cortical sites displaying signal attenuation increased with age. Histology at these sites demonstrated the presence of iron-containing macrophages in the vicinity of CAA-affected blood vessels. A fraction of the sites additionally showed thickened vessel walls and vasculitis. Consistent with the visualization of CAA-associated lesions, MRI detected a much smaller number of attenuated signal sites in APP23xPS45 mice, for which a strong presenilin mutation caused a shift toward amyloid β(42), thus reducing vascular amyloid. Similar results were obtained with APP24 and APP51 mice, which develop significantly less CAA and microvascular pathology than APP23. In a longitudinal study, we noninvasively demonstrated the reinforced formation of microvascular pathology during passive amyloid β immunotherapy of APP23 mice. Histology confirmed that foci of signal attenuation reflected an increase in CAA-related lesions. Our data demonstrate that MRI has the sensitivity to noninvasively monitor the development of vascular pathology and its possible enhancement by amyloid β immunotherapy in transgenic mice modeling AD.

  10. 3-N-butylphthalide improves neuronal morphology after chronic cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wanhong; Luo, Chao; Wang, Jue; Gong, Jian; Li, Bin; Gong, Yingxia; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hanqin

    2014-01-01

    3-N-butylphthalide is an effective drug for acute ischemic stroke. However, its effects on chronic cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal injury remain poorly understood. Therefore, this study ligated bilateral carotid arteries in 15-month-old rats to simulate chronic cerebral ischemia in aged humans. Aged rats were then intragastrically administered 3-n-butylphthalide. 3-N-butylphthalide administration improved the neuronal morphology in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia, increased choline acetyltransferase activity, and decreased malondialdehyde and amyloid beta levels, and greatly improved cognitive function. These findings suggest that 3-n-butylphthalide alleviates oxidative stress caused by chronic cerebral ischemia, improves cholinergic function, and inhibits amyloid beta accumulation, thereby improving cerebral neuronal injury and cognitive deficits. PMID:25206879

  11. Thioredoxin-80 is a product of alpha-secretase cleavage that inhibits amyloid-beta aggregation and is decreased in Alzheimer's disease brain

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Bea, Francisco; Akterin, Susanne; Persson, Torbjörn; Mateos, Laura; Sandebring, Anna; Avila-Cariño, Javier; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Angel; Sundström, Erik; Holmgren, Arne; Winblad, Bengt; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) is an endogenous dithiol reductant and antioxidant that was shown to be decreased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) neurons. A truncated form of Trx1, thioredoxin 80 (Trx80), was reported to be secreted from monocytes having cytokine activity. Here, we show that Trx80 is present in human brain in an aggregated form. Trx80 localizes mainly to neurons and is dramatically decreased in AD brains. Trx80 levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) correlate with those of the classical AD biomarkers amyloid-β (Aβ) 1–42 and total tau. Moreover, Trx80 measurements in CSF discriminate between patients with stable mild cognitive impairment, prodomal AD and mild AD. We report that ADAM10 and 17, two α-secretases processing the Aβ precursor protein, are responsible for Trx80 generation. In contrast to the periphery, Trx80 has no pro-inflammatory effects in glia, either by itself or in combination with Aβ or apolipoprotein E. Instead, Trx80 inhibits Aβ(1–42) aggregation and protects against its toxicity. Thus, a reduction in Trx80 production would result in increased Aβ polymerization and enhanced neuronal vulnerability. Our data suggest that a deficit in Trx80 could participate in AD pathogenesis. PMID:22933306

  12. Decreased microvascular cerebral blood flow assessed by diffuse correlation spectroscopy after repetitive concussions in mice.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Erin M; Miller, Benjamin F; Golinski, Julianne M; Sadeghian, Homa; McAllister, Lauren M; Vangel, Mark; Ayata, Cenk; Meehan, William P; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Whalen, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Repetitive concussions are associated with long-term cognitive dysfunction that can be attenuated by increasing the time intervals between concussions; however, biomarkers of the safest rest interval between injuries remain undefined. We hypothesize that deranged cerebral blood flow (CBF) is a candidate biomarker for vulnerability to repetitive concussions. Using a mouse model of human concussion, we examined the effect of single and repetitive concussions on cognition and on an index of CBF (CBFi) measured with diffuse correlation spectroscopy. After a single mild concussion, CBFi was reduced by 35±4% at 4 hours (P<0.01 versus baseline) and returned to preinjury levels by 24 hours. After five concussions spaced 1 day apart, CBFi was also reduced from preinjury levels 4 hours after each concussion but had returned to preinjury levels by 72 hours after the final concussion. Interestingly, in this repetitive concussion model, lower CBFi values measured both preinjury and 4 hours after the third concussion were associated with worse performance on the Morris water maze assessed 72 hours after the final concussion. We conclude that low CBFi measured either before or early on in the evolution of injury caused by repetitive concussions could be a useful predictor of cognitive outcome.

  13. Decreased norepinephrine (NE) uptake in cerebral cortex and inferior colliculus of genetically epilepsy prone (GEP) rats

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.A.; Rigler-Daugherty, S.K.; Long, G.; Jobe, P.C.; Wade, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    GEP rats are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to seizures caused by a variety of stimuli, most notably sound. Pharmacological treatments that reduce the synaptic concentration of NE increase seizure severity in GEP rats while elevations in NE have the opposite effect. GEP rats also display a widespread deficit in brain NE concentration suggesting that their increased seizure susceptibility is related to a deficit in noradrenergic transmission. The authors have compared the kinetics of /sup 3/H-NE uptake in the P/sub 2/ synaptosomal fraction isolated from the cerebral cortex of normal and GEP-rats. Although the apparent Kms were not significantly different (Normal +/- SEM:0.37 +/- 0.13..mu..M; GEP +/- SEM: 0.29 +/- 0.07..mu..M), the Vmax for GEP rats was 48% lower than that of normal rats (Normal +/- SEM: 474 +/- 45 fmole/mg/4min; GEP +/- SEM: 248 +/- 16 fmole/mg/4min). Because of the possible role of the inferior colliculus (IC) in the initiation of sound-induced seizures in GEP rats, the authors measured synaptosomal NE uptake in the IC using a NE concentration of 50 nM. The IC synaptosomal NE uptake was found to be 35% lower in GEP than in normal rats. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a deficit in noradrenergic transmission is related to the increased seizure susceptibility of GEP rats.

  14. Depletion of vitamin E increases amyloid beta accumulation by decreasing its clearances from brain and blood in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yoichiro; Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Yamamoto, Naoki; Takahashi, Tsubura; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Jishage, Kou-Ichi; Yamada, Hiromi; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Yokota, Shigefumi; Piao, Wenying; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Saido, Takaomi C; Yanagisawa, Katsuhiko; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2009-11-27

    Increased oxidative damage is a prominent and early feature in Alzheimer disease. We previously crossed Alzheimer disease transgenic (APPsw) model mice with alpha-tocopherol transfer protein knock-out (Ttpa(-/-)) mice in which lipid peroxidation in the brain was significantly increased. The resulting double-mutant (Ttpa(-/-)APPsw) mice showed increased amyloid beta (Abeta) deposits in the brain, which was ameliorated with alpha-tocopherol supplementation. To investigate the mechanism of the increased Abeta accumulation, we here studied generation, degradation, aggregation, and efflux of Abeta in the mice. The clearance of intracerebral-microinjected (125)I-Abeta(1-40) from brain was decreased in Ttpa(-/-) mice to be compared with wild-type mice, whereas the generation of Abeta was not increased in Ttpa(-/-)APPsw mice. The activity of an Abeta-degrading enzyme, neprilysin, did not decrease, but the expression level of insulin-degrading enzyme was markedly decreased in Ttpa(-/-) mouse brain. In contrast, Abeta aggregation was accelerated in Ttpa(-/-) mouse brains compared with wild-type brains, and well known molecules involved in Abeta transport from brain to blood, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) and p-glycoprotein, were up-regulated in the small vascular fraction of Ttpa(-/-) mouse brains. Moreover, the disappearance of intravenously administered (125)I-Abeta(1-40) was decreased in Ttpa(-/-) mice with reduced translocation of LRP-1 in the hepatocytes. These results suggest that lipid peroxidation due to depletion of alpha-tocopherol impairs Abeta clearances from the brain and from the blood, possibly causing increased Abeta accumulation in Ttpa(-/-)APPsw mouse brain and plasma.

  15. Is perivetricular hyperintensity region caused by decreased cerebral blood flow?; assessment by {sup 15}O-PET study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminaga, T.; Hayashida, K.; Ishida, Y.

    1994-05-01

    The clinical significance of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism has not been established in patients who had periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study is to correlate the results of rCBF and oxygen metabolism by positron emission tomography (PET) with PVH by MRI. The subjects were 27 patients; 16 patient (group I) (male; 7, female; 9, age; 56.8{plus_minus}18.6) with PVH and age matched 11 patients (group II) (male; 6, female; 5, age; 55.3{plus_minus}13.6) without PVH. {sup 15}O-PET study was carried out by Headtome IV and rCBF, cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) of PVH and cerebellum was calculated. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained in all patients. Angiography was performed over 11 patients. The mean rCBF of group I in PVH (28.5{plus_minus}7.5 ml/100g/min) was significantly (p<0.01) lower than that of group II (38.6{plus_minus}5.7). The mean rCBF of group I and group II in cerebellum were 49.5{plus_minus}9.9 ml/100g/min and 50.2{plus_minus}8.9 respectively. There was no significant difference on CMRO{sub 2} and OEF between group I and group II. In MRI examination, PVH was detected in all group I patients and multiple high intensities were also detected in 7 patients of group I and 4 patients of group II on T2-weighted images. No significant stenosis (more than 75%) was detected in 11 patients by angiography. These data strongly indicate that PVH might be caused by decreased cerebral blood flow.

  16. Effect of general anesthesia on serum β-amyloid protein and regional cerebral oxygen saturation of elderly patients after subtotal gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peng; Wang, Hua; Mu, Lei; Ding, Xuemei; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of general anesthesia on serum β-amyloid protein (Aβ) and regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2) of elderly patients after subtotal gastrectomy. From June, 2014 to December, 2015, among 168 patients undergoing subtotal gastrectomy, the Mini-Mental State Examination and Montreal Cognitive Assessment was administered the day prior to surgery and the second and ninth days after the operation. In addition, we administered the tests to 168 healthy adult volunteers (healthy controls) who were treated in our hospital medical center in the same period. Near-infrared spectroscopy technology was used for continuous monitoring of the intraoperative rSO2, and the mean of intraoperative rSO2 was then calculated. Of the 168 patients, 28 developed postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) and the remaining 140 patients were normal (control). The ELISA method was used to test the expression levels of serum Aβ in the three groups and statistical analyses were conducted. Serum Aβ level in the POCD group was significantly higher than that in the control and healthy control groups, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The rSO2 level in the patients with POCD was significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05). The correlation analysis with Aβ as an independent variable and other factors as dependent variables revealed that the serum Aβ level negatively correlated with rSO2 (r=−1.6749, P<0.05). The combined Aβ and rSO2 may be useful for the diagnosis and prevention of POCD after subtotal gastrectomy under general anesthesia. PMID:28101151

  17. Erratum: Development, appraisal, validation and implementation of a consensus protocol for the assessment of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in post-mortem brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth; Chalmers, Katy; Ince, Paul; Esiri, Margaret; Attems, Johannes; Kalaria, Raj; Jellinger, Kurt; Yamada, Masahito; McCarron, Mark; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona; Greenberg, Steven; Mann, David; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin

    2015-01-01

    In a collaboration involving 11 groups with research interests in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), we used a two-stage process to develop and in turn validate a new consensus protocol and scoring scheme for the assessment of CAA and associated vasculopathic abnormalities in post-mortem brain tissue. Stage one used an iterative Delphi-style survey to develop the consensus protocol. The resultant scoring scheme was tested on a series of digital images and paraffin sections that were circulated blind to a number of scorers. The scoring scheme and choice of staining methods were refined by open-forum discussion. The agreed protocol scored parenchymal and meningeal CAA on a 0-3 scale, capillary CAA as present/absent and vasculopathy on 0-2 scale, in the 4 cortical lobes that were scored separately. A further assessment involving three centres was then undertaken. Neuropathologists in three centres (Bristol, Oxford and Sheffield) independently scored sections from 75 cases (25 from each centre) and high inter-rater reliability was demonstrated. Stage two used the results of the three-centre assessment to validate the protocol by investigating previously described associations between APOE genotype (previously determined), and both CAA and vasculopathy. Association of capillary CAA with or without arteriolar CAA with APOE ε4 was confirmed. However APOE ε2 was also found to be a strong risk factor for the development of CAA, not only in AD but also in elderly non-demented controls. Further validation of this protocol and scoring scheme is encouraged, to aid its wider adoption to facilitate collaborative and replication studies of CAA.[This corrects the article on p. 19 in vol. 3, PMID: 24754000.].

  18. Development, appraisal, validation and implementation of a consensus protocol for the assessment of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in post-mortem brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth; Chalmers, Katy; Ince, Paul; Esiri, Margaret; Attems, Johannes; Jellinger, Kurt; Yamada, Masahito; McCarron, Mark; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona; Greenberg, Steven; Mann, David; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin

    2014-01-01

    In a collaboration involving 11 groups with research interests in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), we used a two-stage process to develop and in turn validate a new consensus protocol and scoring scheme for the assessment of CAA and associated vasculopathic abnormalities in post-mortem brain tissue. Stage one used an iterative Delphi-style survey to develop the consensus protocol. The resultant scoring scheme was tested on a series of digital images and paraffin sections that were circulated blind to a number of scorers. The scoring scheme and choice of staining methods were refined by open-forum discussion. The agreed protocol scored parenchymal and meningeal CAA on a 0-3 scale, capillary CAA as present/absent and vasculopathy on 0-2 scale, in the 4 cortical lobes that were scored separately. A further assessment involving three centres was then undertaken. Neuropathologists in three centres (Bristol, Oxford and Sheffield) independently scored sections from 75 cases (25 from each centre) and high inter-rater reliability was demonstrated. Stage two used the results of the three-centre assessment to validate the protocol by investigating previously described associations between APOE genotype (previously determined), and both CAA and vasculopathy. Association of capillary CAA with or without arteriolar CAA with APOE ε4 was confirmed. However APOE ε2 was also found to be a strong risk factor for the development of CAA, not only in AD but also in elderly non-demented controls. Further validation of this protocol and scoring scheme is encouraged, to aid its wider adoption to facilitate collaborative and replication studies of CAA.

  19. Protective effects of astragalosides on dexamethasone and Aβ25-35 induced learning and memory impairments due to decrease amyloid precursor protein expression in 12-month male rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Zu; Wu, Wang-Yang; Huang, Da-Ke; Yin, Yan-Yan; Kan, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xin; Yao, Yu-You; Li, Wei-Ping

    2012-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder of the elderly characterized by learning and memory impairment. Stress level glucocorticoids (GCs) and β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide deposition are found to be correlated with dementia progression in patients with AD. The astragalosides (AST) was extracted from traditional Chinese herb Astragalus membranaceous. In this study, 12 months male rats were treated with Aβ(25-35) (10 μg/rat, hippocampal CA1 injection) and dexamethasone (DEX, 1.5mg/kg, ig) and AST (8, 16 and 32 mg/kg, ig) or ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1, 5 mg/kg, ig) for 14 days. We investigated the protective effect of AST against DEX+Aβ(25-35) injury in rats and its mechanisms of action. Our results indicate that DEX+Aβ(25-35) can induce learning and memory impairments and increase APP and Aβ(1-40) expression. AST (16, 32 mg/kg) or Rg1 (5mg/kg) treatment significantly improve learning and memory, down-regulate the mRNA levels of APP and β-secretase, decrease expression of APP and Aβ(1-40) in hippocampus. The results indicated that DEX might increase hippocampal vulnerability to Aβ(25-35) and highlight the potential neuronal protection of AST.

  20. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion causes decrease of O-GlcNAcylation, hyperphosphorylation of tau and behavioral deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Gu, Jin-hua; Dai, Chun-ling; Liu, Qun; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is one of the causes of vascular dementia (VaD) and is also an etiological factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, how CCH causes cognitive impairment and contributes to Alzheimer’s pathology is poorly understood. Here we produced a mouse model of CCH by unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO) and studied the behavioral changes and brain abnormalities in mice 2.5 months after UCCAO. We found that CCH caused significant short-term memory deficits and mild long-term spatial memory impairment, as well as decreased level of protein O-GlcNAcylation, increased level of tau phosphorylation, dysregulated synaptic proteins and insulin signaling, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the effects of CCH on memory and cognition and the likely link between AD and VaD. PMID:24575038

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Ependymal Ciliary Loss Decreases Cerebral Spinal Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Guoxiang; Elkind, Jaclynn A.; Kundu, Suhali; Smith, Colin J.; Antunes, Marcelo B.; Tamashiro, Edwin; Kofonow, Jennifer M.; Mitala, Christina. M.; Stein, Sherman C.; Grady, M. Sean; Einhorn, Eugene; Cohen, Noam A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) afflicts up to 2 million people annually in the United States and is the primary cause of death and disability in young adults and children. Previous TBI studies have focused predominantly on the morphological, biochemical, and functional alterations of gray matter structures, such as the hippocampus. However, little attention has been given to the brain ventricular system, despite the fact that altered ventricular function is known to occur in brain pathologies. In the present study, we investigated anatomical and functional alterations to mouse ventricular cilia that result from mild TBI. We demonstrate that TBI causes a dramatic decrease in cilia. Further, using a particle tracking technique, we demonstrate that cerebrospinal fluid flow is diminished, thus potentially negatively affecting waste and nutrient exchange. Interestingly, injury-induced ventricular system pathology resolves completely by 30 days after injury as ependymal cell ciliogenesis restores cilia density to uninjured levels in the affected lateral ventricle. PMID:24749541

  2. Cerebral Oedema, Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and the Decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity in the Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus are Prevented by Dexamethasone in an Animal Model of Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luciana; Galant, Leticia S; Dall'Igna, Dhébora M; Kolling, Janaina; Siebert, Cassiana; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Wyse, Angela T S; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-08-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare metabolic disorder associated with acute and chronic brain dysfunction. This condition has been shown to lead to macroscopic cerebral alterations that are visible on imaging studies. Cerebral oedema is widely considered to be detrimental for MSUD patients; however, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated whether acute administration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) causes cerebral oedema, modifies the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, affects the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and alters the levels of cytokines in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of 10-day-old rats. Additionally, we investigated the influence of concomitant administration of dexamethasone on the alterations caused by BCAA. Our results showed that the animals submitted to the model of MSUD exhibited an increase in the brain water content, both in the cerebral cortex and in the hippocampus. By investigating the mechanism of cerebral oedema, we discovered an association between H-BCAA and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and the permeability of the BBB to small molecules. Moreover, the H-BCAA administration increases Il-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, whereas IL-10 levels were decreased in the hippocampus. Interestingly, we showed that the administration of dexamethasone successfully reduced cerebral oedema, preventing the inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, BBB breakdown and the increase in the cytokines levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dexamethasone can improve the acute cerebral oedema and brain injury associated with high levels of BCAA, either through a direct effect on brain capillary Na(+),K(+)-ATPase or through a generalized effect on the permeability of the BBB to all compounds.

  3. Contributions of degradation and brain-to-blood elimination across the blood–brain barrier to cerebral clearance of human amyloid-β peptide(1-40) in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shingo; Matsumiya, Kohta; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Kamiie, Junichi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to estimate the relative contributions of degradation and brain-to-blood elimination processes to the clearance of microinjected human amyloid-β peptide(1-40) (hAβ(1-40)) from mouse cerebral cortex, using a solid-phase extraction method together with a newly developed ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) quantitation method for intact hAβ(1-40). The clearance rate constant of hAβ(1-40) in mouse cerebral cortex was determined to be 3.21 × 10−2/min under conditions where the saturable brain-to-blood elimination process across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) was expected to be saturated. Thus, this clearance rate constant should mainly reflect degradation. The [125I]hAβ(1-40) elimination rate across the BBB under nonsaturating conditions was determined to be 1.48 × 10−2/min. Inhibition studies suggested that processes sensitive to insulin and phosphoramidon, which inhibit neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, and endothelin-converting enzyme, are involved not only in degradation, but also in elimination of hAβ(1-40). In conclusion, our results suggest a dominant contribution of degradation to cerebral hAβ(1-40) clearance, and also indicate that a sequential process of degradation and elimination of degradation products is involved in cerebral hAβ(1-40) clearance. PMID:23963369

  4. Caudolateral orbitofrontal regional cerebral blood flow is decreased in abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects in two separate cohorts.

    PubMed

    Adinoff, Bryon; Braud, Jacquelyn; Devous, Michael D; Harris, Thomas S

    2012-11-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is crucial for the inhibition of extraneous stimuli, evaluation of aversive information and emotional regulation-all behaviors impaired in cocaine addiction. Previous studies suggest that cocaine-addicted subjects have decreased basal activity in the OFC. In this study, we examined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during a saline infusion in two independent populations of abstinent cocaine- (and mostly nicotine-) addicted (n=33 and 26) and healthy control (n=35 and 20) men and women. Isolated rCBF decreases (P<0.001) were observed in the left caudolateral OFC, as well as left superior temporal cortex, in cocaine-addicted subjects relative to controls in both cohorts and bilaterally in the combined cohort. An anatomically defined region of the caudolateral OFC showed similar findings and were evident in both male and female addicted subjects. The reliability of these findings across two cohorts reveals a functional disruption in the lateral OFC, a brain region implicated in the evaluation of behavior-terminating stimuli. This may contribute to an addicted individual's persistent drug use despite negative consequences.

  5. Methylene Blue Modulates β-Secretase, Reverses Cerebral Amyloidosis, and Improves Cognition in Transgenic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takashi; Koyama, Naoki; Segawa, Tatsuya; Maeda, Masahiro; Maruyama, Nobuhiro; Kinoshita, Noriaki; Hou, Huayan; Tan, Jun; Town, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) proteolysis is required for production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that comprise β-amyloid plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, we tested whether the experimental agent methylene blue (MB), used for treatment of methemoglobinemia, might improve AD-like pathology and behavioral deficits. We orally administered MB to the aged transgenic PSAPP mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis and evaluated cognitive function and cerebral amyloid pathology. Beginning at 15 months of age, animals were gavaged with MB (3 mg/kg) or vehicle once daily for 3 months. MB treatment significantly prevented transgene-associated behavioral impairment, including hyperactivity, decreased object recognition, and defective spatial working and reference memory, but it did not alter nontransgenic mouse behavior. Moreover, brain parenchymal and cerebral vascular β-amyloid deposits as well as levels of various Aβ species, including oligomers, were mitigated in MB-treated PSAPP mice. These effects occurred with inhibition of amyloidogenic APP proteolysis. Specifically, β-carboxyl-terminal APP fragment and β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 protein expression and activity were attenuated. Additionally, treatment of Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing human wild-type APP with MB significantly decreased Aβ production and amyloidogenic APP proteolysis. These results underscore the potential for oral MB treatment against AD-related cerebral amyloidosis by modulating the amyloidogenic pathway. PMID:25157105

  6. Prion Protein Is Decreased in Alzheimer's Brain and Inversely Correlates with BACE1 Activity, Amyloid-β Levels and Braak Stage

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Isobel J.; Miners, J. Scott; Glennon, Elizabeth B. C.; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Love, Seth; Kellett, Katherine A. B.; Hooper, Nigel M.

    2013-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). PrPC decreases amyloid-β (Aβ) production, which is involved in AD pathogenesis, by inhibiting β-secretase (BACE1) activity. Contactin 5 (CNTN5) has also been implicated in the development of AD by a genome-wide association study. Here we measured PrPC and CNTN5 in frontal cortex samples from 24 sporadic AD and 24 age-matched control brains and correlated the expression of these proteins with markers of AD. PrPC was decreased in sporadic AD compared to controls (by 49%, p = 0.014) but there was no difference in CNTN5 between sporadic AD and controls (p = 0.217). PrPC significantly inversely correlated with BACE1 activity (rs = −0.358, p = 0.006), Aβ load (rs = −0.456, p = 0.001), soluble Aβ (rs = −0.283, p = 0.026) and insoluble Aβ (rs = −0.353, p = 0.007) and PrPC also significantly inversely correlated with the stage of disease, as indicated by Braak tangle stage (rs = −0.377, p = 0.007). CNTN5 did not correlate with Aβ load (rs = 0.040, p = 0.393), soluble Aβ (rs = 0.113, p = 0.223) or insoluble Aβ (rs = 0.169, p = 0.125). PrPC was also measured in frontal cortex samples from 9 Down's syndrome (DS) and 8 age-matched control brains. In contrast to sporadic AD, there was no difference in PrPC in the DS brains compared to controls (p = 0.625). These data are consistent with a role for PrPC in regulating Aβ production and indicate that brain PrPC level may be important in influencing the onset and progression of sporadic AD. PMID:23577068

  7. Pharmacological removal of serum amyloid P component from intracerebral plaques and cerebrovascular Aβ amyloid deposits in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Millar, David J.; Richard-Londt, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Human amyloid deposits always contain the normal plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP), owing to its avid but reversible binding to all amyloid fibrils, including the amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils in the cerebral parenchyma plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). SAP promotes amyloid fibril formation in vitro, contributes to persistence of amyloid in vivo and is also itself directly toxic to cerebral neurons. We therefore developed (R)-1-[6-[(R)-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl]pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (CPHPC), a drug that removes SAP from the blood, and thereby also from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in patients with AD. Here we report that, after introduction of transgenic human SAP expression in the TASTPM double transgenic mouse model of AD, all the amyloid deposits contained human SAP. Depletion of circulating human SAP by CPHPC administration in these mice removed all detectable human SAP from both the intracerebral and cerebrovascular amyloid. The demonstration that removal of SAP from the blood and CSF also removes it from these amyloid deposits crucially validates the strategy of the forthcoming ‘Depletion of serum amyloid P component in Alzheimer's disease (DESPIAD)’ clinical trial of CPHPC. The results also strongly support clinical testing of CPHPC in patients with CAA. PMID:26842068

  8. β-Secretase-1 elevation in aged monkey and Alzheimer's disease human cerebral cortex occurs around vasculature in partnership with multisystem axon terminal pathogenesis and β-amyloid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yan; Xiong, Kun; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Feng, Jia-Chun; Clough, Richard W.; Struble, Robert G.; Patrylo, Peter R.; Chu, Yaping; Kordower, Jeffrey H.; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common dementia-causing disorder in the elderly, which may relate to multiple risk factors and is pathologically featured by cerebral hypometabolism, paravascular β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, neuritic dystrophy and intra-neuronal aggregation of phosphorylated-tau. To explore potential pathogenic link among some of these lesions, we examined β-secretase-1 (BACE1) alteration relative to Aβ deposition, neuritic pathology and vascular organization in aged monkey and AD human cerebral cortex. Western blot analyses detected increased levels of BACE1 proteins and β-site-cleavage amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragments in plaque-bearing human and monkey cortex relative to controls. In immunohistochemistry, locally elevated BACE1 immunoreactivity (IR) occurred in AD but not in control human cortex, with a trend of increased overall density among cases with greater plaque pathology. In double labeling preparations, BACE1 IR colocalized with immunolabeling for Aβ but not for phosphorylated tau. In perfusion-fixed monkey cortex, locally increased BACE1 IR co-existed with intra-axonal and extracellular Aβ IR among virtually all neuritic plaques ranging from primitive to typical cored forms. This BACE1 labeling localized to swollen/sprouting axon terminals that might co-express one or another neuronal phenotype marker (GABAergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic or catecholaminergic). Importantly, these BACE1-labeled dystrophic axons resided near or in direct contact with blood vessels. These finds implicate that plaque formation in AD or normal aging primates relate to a multisystem axonal pathogenesis that occurs in partnership with potential vascular or metabolic deficit. The data provide a tangible mechanistic explanation as to why senile plaques are present preferentially near cerebral vasculature. PMID:20726888

  9. Decreased cholinergic function in the cerebral cortex of hypoxic neonatal rats: role of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Smijin, S; Chinthu, R; Paulose, C S

    2012-01-15

    Molecular processes regulating cholinergic functions play an important role in the control of respiration under hypoxia. Cholinergic alterations and its further complications in learning and memory due to hypoxic insult in neonatal rats and the effect of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine resuscitation was evaluated in the present study. Receptor binding and gene expression studies were done in the cerebral cortex to analyze the changes in total muscarinic receptors, muscarinic M1, M2, M3 receptors and the enzymes involved in acetylcholine metabolism - choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholine esterase. Neonatal hypoxia decreased total muscarinic receptors with reduced muscarinic M1, M2 and M3 receptor genes. The reduction in acetylcholine metabolism is indicated by the down regulated choline acetyltransferase and up regulated acetylcholine esterase expression. These cholinergic disturbances were reversed to near control in glucose resuscitated hypoxic neonates. The adverse effects of immediate oxygenation and epinephrine administration are also reported. This has immense clinical significance in establishing a proper resuscitation for the management of neonatal hypoxia.

  10. [The use of the transcranial micropolarization method for decreasing the manifestations of hyperkinesis in patients with infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, O V; Pinchuk, D Iu; Pisar'kova, E V; Sheliakin, A M; Sirbiladze, K T

    1993-01-01

    Transcranial micropolarization was used in the treatment of children with hyperkinetic form of infantile cerebral paralysis. The method was found to be more effective than various stereotaxic interventions on the brain or routine physiotherapy. Transcranial micropolarization exposure resulted in alleviation of hyperkinesis, posture-tonic reflexes, in improvement of active movements of the joints, supporting system, etc. Clinical status of patients exposed to this treatment modality improved by six times as against those treated traditionally. Clinical data and data of stimulation electromyography permit us to suggest a possible effect of transcranial micropolarization on the function of cerebral subcortical structures in patients with hyperkinetic form of infantile cerebral paralysis.

  11. Neuritic Plaques and Cerebrovascular Amyloid in Alzheimer Disease are Antigenically Related

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Caine W.; Quaranta, Vito; Glenner, George G.

    1985-12-01

    A synthetic peptide (Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser-Gly-Tyr), homologous to the amino terminus of a protein purified from cerebrovascular amyloid (β protein), induced antibodies in BALB/c mice that were used immunohistochemically to stain not only amyloid-laden cerebral vessels but neuritic plaques as well. These findings suggest that the amyloid in neuritic plaques shares antigenic determinants with β protein of cerebral vessels. Since the amino acid compositions of plaque amyloid and cerebrovascular amyloid are similar, it is likely that plaque amyloid also consists of β protein. This possibility suggests a model for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease involving β protein.

  12. Evaluation of near infrared spectroscopy for detecting the β blocker-induced decrease in cerebral oxygenation during hemodilution in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Tadayoshi; Morita, Koji; Sato, Shigehito

    2015-12-01

    β blockers reduce cerebral oxygenation after acute hemodilution and may contribute to the incidence of stroke when used perioperatively. The goal of the study was to investigate whether cerebral tissue oxygenation using near infrared spectroscopy can detect the β blocker-induced decrease in cerebral oxygenation depending on the severity of hemodilution and/or the dose of β blockers. Animals were anesthetized with 2% isoflurane and randomly assigned to a landiolol or esmolol group. After baseline measurement, landiolol or esmolol was administered at 40 µg/kg/min for 20 min, increased to 200 µg/kg/min for 20 min, and then stopped. Hemodynamic and arterial variables and the tissue oxygenation index (TOI) were recorded at each β blocker dose. Two stages of hemodilution were sequentially induced by repeated hemorrhage of 600 ml (33% of estimated blood volume) and infusion of the same volume of hydroxyethylstarch. During each stage, landiolol or esmolol was similarly administered and measurements were made. Landiolol and esmolol both dose-dependently decreased heart rate, mean arterial pressure and cardiac output, depending on the severity of hemodilution. Landiolol at 40 µg/kg/min was almost equivalent in potency to 200 µg/kg/min esmolol for decreasing HR before hemodilution. Based on the TOI, short-acting β blockers reduced cerebral oxygenation in a dose-dependent manner during hemodilution, and oxygenation returned to the baseline level after drug infusion was stopped. TOI may be useful for identification of a decrease in cerebral oxygenation for patients receiving β blockade during surgery associated with major bleeding.

  13. Decreased expression of transient receptor potential channels in cerebral vascular tissue from patients after hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Suess, Olaf; Liu, Ying; Tepel, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent data indicate that transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels play an important role in hypertension. Now, we tested the hypothesis that TRP expression is altered in human cerebral vascular tissue in patients who had experienced hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPC6, TRPM4, TRPM6, and TRPM7 channels were detected in cerebral vascular tissue by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Control cerebral vascular tissue was obtained from normotensive patients who underwent neurosurgical operation because of brain tumor. To examine a possible relation between the expression of TRP expression and hypoxic conditions caused by the intracerebral bleeding, we examined the expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1a (HIF1a). Transcripts of TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPM6, and HIF1a were significantly reduced in cerebral vascular tissue from patients after hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage compared to controls. TRPC3 mRNA correlated well with the expression of HIF1a mRNA (r(2) = 0.59; p = 0.01). TRPC3 expression is associated with hypertension and hypoxic conditions in human cerebral vascular tissue.

  14. Estradiol reduces activity of the blood-brain barrier Na-K-Cl cotransporter and decreases edema formation in permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martha E; Lam, Tina I; Tran, Lien Q; Foroutan, Shahin; Anderson, Steven E

    2006-10-01

    Estrogen has been shown to protect against stroke-induced brain damage, yet the mechanism is unknown. During the early hours of stroke, cerebral edema forms as increased transport of Na and Cl from blood into brain occurs across an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB). We showed previously that a luminal BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter is stimulated by hypoxia and arginine vasopressin (AVP), factors present during cerebral ischemia, and that inhibition of the cotransporter by intravenous bumetanide greatly reduces edema in rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The present study was conducted to determine whether estrogen protects in stroke at least in part by reducing activity of the BBB cotransporter, thereby decreasing edema formation. Ovariectomized rats were subjected to 210 mins of permanent MCAO after 7-day or 30-min pretreatment with 17beta-estradiol and then brain swelling and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were assessed as measures of brain edema and lesion volume, respectively. Diffusion-weighed imaging was used to monitor permanent MCAO-induced decreases in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, an index of changes in brain water distribution and mobility. Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity of cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) was assessed as bumetanide-sensitive K influx and cotransporter abundance by Western blot analysis after estradiol treatment. Estradiol significantly decreased brain swelling and lesion volume and attenuated the decrease in ADC values during permanent MCAO. Estradiol also abolished CMEC cotransporter stimulation by chemical hypoxia or AVP and decreased cotransporter abundance. These findings support the hypothesis that estrogen attenuates stimulation of BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity, reducing edema formation during stroke.

  15. RAC1 inhibition targets amyloid precursor protein processing by gamma-secretase and decreases Abeta production in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Désiré, Laurent; Bourdin, Jérôme; Loiseau, Nadia; Peillon, Hélène; Picard, Virginie; De Oliveira, Catherine; Bachelot, Florence; Leblond, Bertrand; Taverne, Thierry; Beausoleil, Eric; Lacombe, Sandrine; Drouin, Dominique; Schweighoffer, Fabien

    2005-11-11

    beta-Amyloid peptides (Abeta) that form the senile plaques of Alzheimer disease consist mainly of 40- and 42-amino acid (Abeta 40 and Abeta 42) peptides generated from the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Generation of Abeta involves beta-secretase and gamma-secretase activities and is regulated by membrane trafficking of the proteins involved in Abeta production. Here we describe a new small molecule, EHT 1864, which blocks the Rac1 signaling pathways. In vitro, EHT 1864 blocks Abeta 40 and Abeta 42 production but does not impact sAPPalpha levels and does not inhibit beta-secretase. Rather, EHT 1864 modulates APP processing at the level of gamma-secretase to prevent Abeta 40 and Abeta 42 generation. This effect does not result from a direct inhibition of the gamma-secretase activity and is specific for APP cleavage, since EHT 1864 does not affect Notch cleavage. In vivo, EHT 1864 significantly reduces Abeta 40 and Abeta 42 levels in guinea pig brains at a threshold that is compatible with delaying plaque accumulation and/or clearing the existing plaque in brain. EHT 1864 is the first derivative of a new chemical series that consists of candidates for inhibiting Abeta formation in the brain of AD patients. Our findings represent the first pharmacological validation of Rac1 signaling as a target for developing novel therapies for Alzheimer disease.

  16. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid Inhibition by HET0016 Offers Neuroprotection, Decreases Edema, and Increases Cortical Cerebral Blood Flow in a Pediatric Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Jafar Sadik B; Poloyac, Samuel M; Kochanek, Patrick M; Alexander, Henry; Tudorascu, Dana L; Clark, Robert Sb; Manole, Mioara D

    2015-11-01

    Vasoconstrictive and vasodilatory eicosanoids generated after cardiac arrest (CA) may contribute to cerebral vasomotor disturbances and neurodegeneration. We evaluated the balance of vasodilator/vasoconstrictor eicosanoids produced by cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism, and determined their role on cortical perfusion, functional outcome, and neurodegeneration after pediatric asphyxial CA. Cardiac arrest of 9 and 12 minutes was induced in 16- to 18-day-old rats. At 5 and 120 minutes after CA, we quantified the concentration of CYP eicosanoids in the cortex and subcortical areas. In separate rats, we inhibited 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthesis after CA and assessed cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF), neurologic deficit score, neurodegeneration, and edema. After 9 minutes of CA, vasodilator eicosanoids markedly increased versus sham. Conversely, after 12 minutes of CA, vasoconstrictor eicosanoid 20-HETE increased versus sham, without compensatory increases in vasodilator eicosanoids. Inhibition of 20-HETE synthesis after 12 minutes of CA decreased cortical 20-HETE levels, increased CBF, reduced neurologic deficits at 3 hours, and reduced neurodegeneration and edema at 48 hours versus vehicle-treated rats. In conclusion, cerebral vasoconstrictor eicosanoids increased after a pediatric CA of 12 minutes. Inhibition of 20-HETE synthesis improved cortical perfusion and short-term neurologic outcome. These results suggest that alterations in CYP eicosanoids have a role in cerebral hypoperfusion and neurodegeneration after CA and may represent important therapeutic targets.

  17. Cold-water immersion decreases cerebral oxygenation but improves recovery after intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Minett, G M; Duffield, R; Billaut, F; Cannon, J; Portus, M R; Marino, F E

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effects of post-exercise cooling on recovery of neuromuscular, physiological, and cerebral hemodynamic responses after intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat. Nine participants underwent three post-exercise recovery trials, including a control (CONT), mixed-method cooling (MIX), and cold-water immersion (10 °C; CWI). Voluntary force and activation were assessed simultaneously with cerebral oxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy) pre- and post-exercise, post-intervention, and 1-h and 24-h post-exercise. Measures of heart rate, core temperature, skin temperature, muscle damage, and inflammation were also collected. Both cooling interventions reduced heart rate, core, and skin temperature post-intervention (P < 0.05). CWI hastened the recovery of voluntary force by 12.7 ± 11.7% (mean ± SD) and 16.3 ± 10.5% 1-h post-exercise compared to MIX and CONT, respectively (P < 0.01). Voluntary force remained elevated by 16.1 ± 20.5% 24-h post-exercise after CWI compared to CONT (P < 0.05). Central activation was increased post-intervention and 1-h post-exercise with CWI compared to CONT (P < 0.05), without differences between conditions 24-h post-exercise (P > 0.05). CWI reduced cerebral oxygenation compared to MIX and CONT post-intervention (P < 0.01). Furthermore, cooling interventions reduced cortisol 1-h post-exercise (P < 0.01), although only CWI blunted creatine kinase 24-h post-exercise compared to CONT (P < 0.05). Accordingly, improvements in neuromuscular recovery after post-exercise cooling appear to be disassociated with cerebral oxygenation, rather reflecting reductions in thermoregulatory demands to sustain force production.

  18. Decreased damage from transient focal cerebral ischemia by transfusion of zero-link hemoglobin polymers in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Toshiaki; Nemoto, Masaaki; Kwansa, Herman; Sampei, Kenji; Habeeb, Murtuza; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Bucci, Enrico; Koehler, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Transfusion of large polymers of hemoglobin avoids the peripheral extravasation and hypertension associated with crosslinked tetrameric hemoglobin transfusion and may be more effective in rescuing brain from focal ischemia. Effects of transfusion of high-oxygen affinity, bovine hemoglobin polymers of different weight ranges were determined. Methods Hypervolemic exchange transfusion was performed during two hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Results Compared to transfusion with a 5% albumin solution or no transfusion, infarct volume was reduced 40% by transfusion of a 6% solution containing hemoglobin polymers in the nominal range 500–14000 kDa. Infarct volume was not significantly reduced by transfusion of a lower concentration of 2–3% of this size range of polymers, 6% hemoglobin solutions without removal of polymers <500 kDa or >14000 kDa, or crosslinked hemoglobin tetramers with normal oxygen affinity. Exchange transfusion with the 6% solution of the 500–14000 kDa hemoglobin polymers did not improve the distribution of cerebral blood flow during focal ischemia and, in mice without ischemia, did not affect flow to brain or other major organs. Conclusion An intermediate size range of polymerized bovine hemoglobin possessing high oxygen affinity appears optimal for rescuing mouse brain from transient focal cerebral ischemia. A minimum concentration of a 6% solution is required, the rescue is superior to that obtained with crosslinked tetrameric hemoglobin possessing normal oxygen affinity, and tissue salvage is not associated with increased blood flow. This polymer solution avoids the adverse effects of severe renal and splanchnic vasoconstriction seen with crosslinked tetrameric hemoglobin. PMID:18988905

  19. Hacking the code of amyloid formation: the amyloid stretch hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems.

  20. Fast and slow components of cerebral blood flow response to step decreases in end-tidal PCO2 in humans.

    PubMed

    Poulin, M J; Liang, P J; Robbins, P A

    1998-08-01

    This study examined the dynamics of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow response to hypocapnia in humans (n = 6) by using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. In a control protocol, end-tidal PCO2 (PETCO2) was held near eucapnia (1.5 Torr above resting) for 40 min. In a hypocapnic protocol, PETCO2 was held near eucapnia for 10 min, then at 15 Torr below eucapnia for 20 min, and then near eucapnia for 10 min. During both protocols, subjects hyperventilated throughout and PETCO2 and end-tidal PO2 were controlled by using the dynamic end-tidal forcing technique. Beat-by-beat values were calculated for the intensity-weighted mean velocity (VIWM), signal power (P), and their instantaneous product (P.VIWM). A simple model consisting of a delay, gain terms, time constants (tauf,on, tauf, off) and baseline levels of flow for the on- and off-transients, and a gain term (gs) and time constant (taus) for a second slower component was fitted to the hypocapnic protocol. The cerebral blood flow response to hypocapnia was characterized by a significant (P < 0.001) slow progressive adaptation in P.VIWM, with gs = 1.26 %/Torr and taus = 427 s, that persisted throughout the hypocapnic period. Finally, the responses at the onset and relief of hypocapnia were asymmetric (P < 0.001), with tauf,on (6.8 s) faster than tauf,off (14.3 s).

  1. Age-Dependent Decrease and Alternative Splicing of Methionine Synthase mRNA in Human Cerebral Cortex and an Accelerated Decrease in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Christina R.; Hodgson, Nathaniel W.; Trivedi, Malav S.; Abdolmaleky, Hamid M.; Persico, Antonio M.; Lintas, Carla; De La Monte, Suzanne; Deth, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    The folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS) is highly sensitive to cellular oxidative status, and lower MS activity increases production of the antioxidant glutathione, while simultaneously decreasing more than 200 methylation reactions, broadly affecting metabolic activity. MS mRNA levels in postmortem human cortex from subjects across the lifespan were measured and a dramatic progressive biphasic decrease of more than 400-fold from 28 weeks of gestation to 84 years was observed. Further analysis revealed alternative splicing of MS mRNA, including deletion of folate-binding domain exons and age-dependent deletion of exons from the cap domain, which protects vitamin B12 (cobalamin) from oxidation. Although three species of MS were evident at the protein level, corresponding to full-length and alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts, decreasing mRNA levels across the lifespan were not associated with significant changes in MS protein or methionine levels. MS mRNA levels were significantly lower in autistic subjects, especially at younger ages, and this decrease was replicated in cultured human neuronal cells by treatment with TNF-α, whose CSF levels are elevated in autism. These novel findings suggest that rather than serving as a housekeeping enzyme, MS has a broad and dynamic role in coordinating metabolism in the brain during development and aging. Factors adversely affecting MS activity, such as oxidative stress, can be a source of risk for neurological disorders across the lifespan via their impact on methylation reactions, including epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:23437274

  2. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist decreases the number of necrotic neurons in rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. H.; Liu, K. F.; Relton, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    Marked increases in the brain expression of interleukin (IL)-1 have been reported in rats after permanent occlusion of a large cerebral artery. Interactions between endothelial cells and leukocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several types of ischemic injury to the myocardium and other organs. In this study we asked whether inhibiting the effects of IL-1 would affect the outcome of an experimental brain infarct. Adult male Wistar rats (n = 13) with permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery were given IL-1 receptor antagonist. A second group (n = 13) with the same type of brain injury was given a placebo. A third group, subjected to a sham operation, was given either IL-1 receptor antagonist (n = 2) or a placebo (n = 2). Experiments were terminated after either 24 hours or 7 days. Compared with the control group, animals treated with IL-1 receptor antagonist improved their neurological score (P < 0.05), experienced less pronounced changes in body weight (P < 0.05), and had fewer necrotic neurons (P < 0.001) and fewer leukocytes in the ischemic hemisphere (P < 0.001) as well as a smaller area of pallor (P < 0.05) in the ischemis hemisphere. The results suggest that inhibiting the proinflammatory effects of IL-1 with a receptor antagonist is an effective way of influencing the leukocyte responses elicited by an arterial occlusion. Such leukocyte inhibition seemingly attenuates the number of necrotic neurons resulting from the occlusion of a large brain artery. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:7485410

  3. Amyloid-β(25-35), an amyloid-β(1-42) surrogate, and proinflammatory cytokines stimulate VEGF-A secretion by cultured, early passage, normoxic adult human cerebral astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Whitfield, James; Bonafini, Clara; Chakravarthy, Balu; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular angiopathy affects late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) brains by possibly increasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). A expression, thereby stimulating endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Indeed, VEGF-A gene upregulation, with increased VEGF-A protein content of reactive astrocytes and microglia, occurs in LOAD brains, and neovascularization was observed one week after injecting amyloid-β (Aβ)(1-42) into rat hippocampus. We have now found, with cultured 'normoxic' normal adult human astrocytes (NAHAs), that fibrillar Aβ(25-35) (an active Aβ(1-42) fragment) or a cytokine mixture (the (CM)-trio (interleukin [IL]-1β+interferon [IFN]-γ+tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α), or pair (IFN-γ+TNF-α) like those produced in LOAD brains) stimulates the nuclear translocation of stabilized hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α protein and its binding to VEGF-A hypoxia-response elements; the mRNA synthesis for three VEGF-A splice variants (121, 165, 189); and the secretion of VEGF-A165. The CM-trio was the most powerful stimulus, IFN-γ+TNF-α was less potent, and other cytokine pairs or single cytokines or Aβ(35-25) were ineffective. While Aβ(25-35) did not change HIF-1β protein levels, the CM-trio increased both HIF-1α and HIF-1β protein levels, thereby giving an earlier and stronger stimulus to VEGF-A secretion by NAHAs. Thus, increased VEGF-A secretion from astrocytes stimulated by Aβ(1-42) and by microglia-released cytokines might restore angiogenesis and Aβ(1-42) vascular clearance.

  4. Behavioral differences in an elevated plus-maze: correlation between anxiety and decreased number of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors in mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Rägo, L; Kiivet, R A; Harro, J; Pŏld, M

    1988-06-01

    In an elevated plus-maze model of anxiety mice treated with the benzodiazepine inverse agonist DMCM (0.5-1.5 mg/kg i.p.) spent significantly less time on the open arms and showed the decreased number of open arm entries. The opposite i.e. increased time spent on the open arms and the higher number of open arm entries was registered after diazepam (1.5 mg/kg). The results are consistent with the results obtained in the other animal tests and support the idea that this procedure is suitable for detecting anxiolytic/anxiogenic effects of benzodiazepine receptor ligands. After testing of 84 mice in an elevated plus-maze substantial differences were detected between the individuals. According to the behavioral response two subgroups of animals with DMCM or diazepam like exploratory activity (as compared to the whole group data) termed as "anxious" or "non-anxious", respectively, were chosen for further binding studies. "Anxious" animals had significantly lower numbers of 3H-flunitrazepam and 3H-muscimol binding sites as compared to "non-anxious" animals in cerebral cortex but not in cerebellum. No differences in the affinity were found between the two groups studied. The results indicate that behavioral anxiety in mice is in correlation with the decreased number of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors in cerebral cortex.

  5. Characterization of new polyclonal antibodies specific for 40 and 42 amino acid-long amyloid beta peptides: their use to examine the cell biology of presenilins and the immunohistochemistry of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy cases.

    PubMed Central

    Barelli, H.; Lebeau, A.; Vizzavona, J.; Delaere, P.; Chevallier, N.; Drouot, C.; Marambaud, P.; Ancolio, K.; Buxbaum, J. D.; Khorkova, O.; Heroux, J.; Sahasrabudhe, S.; Martinez, J.; Warter, J. M.; Mohr, M.; Checler, F.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the main histological lesion is a proteinaceous deposit, the senile plaque, which is mainly composed of a peptide called A beta. The aggregation process is thought to occur through enhanced concentration of A beta 40 or increased production of the more readily aggregating 42 amino acid-long A beta 42 species. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Specificity of the antibodies was assessed by dot blot, Western blot, ELISA, and immunoprecipitation procedures on synthetic and endogenous A beta produced by secreted HK293 cells. A beta and p3 production by wild-type and mutated presenilin 1-expressing cells transiently transfected with beta APP751 was monitored after metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation procedures. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on brains of sporadic and typical cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy (CAA) cases. RESULTS: Dot and Western blot analyses indicate that IgG-purified fractions of antisera recognize native and denaturated A beta s. FCA3340 and FCA 3542 display full specificity for A beta 40 and A beta 42, respectively. Antibodies immunoprecipitate their respective synthetic A beta species but also A beta s and their related p3 counterparts endogenously secreted by transfected human kidney 293 cells. This allowed us to show that mutations on presenilin 1 triggered similar increased ratios of A beta 42 and its p 342 counterpart over total A beta and p3. ELISA assays allow detection of about 25-50 pg/ml of A beta s and remain linear up to 750 to 1500 pg/ml without any cross-reactivity. FCA18 and FCA3542 label diffuse and mature plaques of a sporadic AD case whereas FCA3340 only reveals the mature lesions and particularly labels their central dense core. In a CAA case, FCA18 and FCA3340 reveal leptomeningeal and cortical arterioles whereas FCA3542 only faintly labels such structures. CONCLUSIONS: Polyclonal antibodies exclusively recognizing A beta 40 (FCA 3340) or A beta 42 (FCA3542) were obtained. These

  6. Purinergic 2Y1 receptor stimulation decreases cerebral edema and reactive gliosis in a traumatic brain injury model.

    PubMed

    Talley Watts, Lora; Sprague, Shane; Zheng, Wei; Garling, R Justin; Jimenez, David; Digicaylioglu, Murat; Lechleiter, James

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children and young adults. Neuroprotective agents that may promote repair or counteract damage after injury do not currently exist. We recently reported that stimulation of the purinergic receptor subtype P2Y(1)R using 2-methylthioladenosine 5' diphosphate (2MeSADP) significantly reduced cytotoxic edema induced by photothrombosis. Here, we tested whether P2Y(1)R stimulation was neuroprotective after TBI. A controlled closed head injury model was established for mice using a pneumatic impact device. Brains were harvested at 1, 3, or 7 days post-injury and assayed for morphological changes by immunocytochemistry, Western blot analysis, and wet/dry weight. Cerebral edema and expression of both aquaporin type 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were increased at all time points examined. Immunocytochemical measurements in both cortical and hippocampal slices also revealed significant neuronal swelling and reactive gliosis. Treatment of mice with 2MeSADP (100 μM) or MRS2365 (100 μM) 30 min after trauma significantly reduced all post-injury symptoms of TBI including edema, neuronal swelling, reactive gliosis, and AQ4 expression. The neuroprotective effect was lost in IP(3)R2-/- mice treated with 2MeSADP. Immunocytochemical labeling of brain slices confirmed that P2Y(1)R expression was defined to cortical and hippocampal astrocytes, but not neurons. Taken together, the data show that stimulation of astrocytic P2Y(1)Rs significantly reduces brain injury after acute trauma and is mediated by the IP(3)-signaling pathway. We suggest that enhancing astrocyte mitochondrial metabolism offers a promising neuroprotective strategy for a broad range of brain injuries.

  7. ApoER2 expression increases Aβ production while decreasing Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) endocytosis: Possible role in the partitioning of APP into lipid rafts and in the regulation of γ-secretase activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Rodrigo A; Barría, Maria Ines; Lee, Jiyeon; Cam, Judy; Araya, Claudia; Escudero, Claudia A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, Maria-Paz

    2007-01-01

    Background The generation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) through the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies highlight APP endocytosis and localization to lipid rafts as important events favoring amyloidogenic processing. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these events are poorly understood. ApoER2 is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) family exhibiting slow endocytosis rate and a significant association with lipid rafts. Despite the important neurophysiological roles described for ApoER2, little is known regarding how ApoER2 regulates APP trafficking and processing. Results Here, we demonstrate that ApoER2 physically interacts and co-localizes with APP. Remarkably, we found that ApoER2 increases cell surface APP levels and APP association with lipid rafts. The increase of cell surface APP requires the presence of ApoER2 cytoplasmic domain and is a result of decreased APP internalization rate. Unexpectedly, ApoER2 expression correlated with a significant increase in Aβ production and reduced levels of APP-CTFs. The increased Aβ production was dependent on the integrity of the NPxY endocytosis motif of ApoER2. We also found that expression of ApoER2 increased APP association with lipid rafts and increased γ-secretase activity, both of which might contribute to increased Aβ production. Conclusion These findings show that ApoER2 negatively affects APP internalization. However, ApoER2 expression stimulates Aβ production by shifting the proportion of APP from the non-rafts to the raft membrane domains, thereby promoting β-secretase and γ-secretase mediated amyloidogenic processing and also by incrementing the activity of γ-secretase. PMID:17620134

  8. Lactuside B decreases aquaporin-4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression in the hippocampus and striatum following cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, PING-FA; ZHAN, HE-QIN; LI, SHENG-YING; LIU, RUI-LI; YAN, FU-LIN; CUI, TAI-ZHEN; YANG, YU-PING; LI, PENG; WANG, XIN-YAO

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of lactuside B (LB) on aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and caspase-3 mRNA expression in the hippocampus and the striatum following cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Cerebral I/R injury was established in Sprague-Dawley rats by occluding the middle cerebral artery for 2 h and then inducing reperfusion. Rats in the I/R + LB groups were treated with various doses of LB following reperfusion. Neurological deficit scores and brain water content were obtained to determine the pharmacodynamics of LB. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the expression levels of AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA in the hippocampus and the striatum. The results of the present study indicate that LB decreased the neurological deficit scores and the brain water content. In the hippocampus, AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly downregulated in the I/R + LB groups at 24 and 72 h following drug administration, compared with those in the I/R group (P<0.05). In the striatum, LB was also shown to significantly reduce AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression levels at 24 and 72 h following drug administration, compared with those in the I/R group (P<0.05). The effects became stronger as the LB dose was increased. The most significant reductions in AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression were noted in the I/R + LB 25 mg/kg and I/R + LB 50 mg/kg groups at 72 h following drug administration. The results of the present study show that LB is capable of significantly downregulating AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression in the hippocampus and striatum following cerebral I/R injury in rats. The mechanism by which LB improved ischaemic brain injury may be associated with changes in AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression in the hippocampus and the striatum. PMID:24520266

  9. Quantitative 3D In Silico Modeling (q3DISM) of Cerebral Amyloid-beta Phagocytosis in Rodent Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Guillot-Sestier, Marie-Victoire; Weitz, Tara M; Town, Terrence

    2016-12-26

    Neuroinflammation is now recognized as a major etiological factor in neurodegenerative disease. Mononuclear phagocytes are innate immune cells responsible for phagocytosis and clearance of debris and detritus. These cells include CNS-resident macrophages known as microglia, and mononuclear phagocytes infiltrating from the periphery. Light microscopy has generally been used to visualize phagocytosis in rodent or human brain specimens. However, qualitative methods have not provided definitive evidence of in vivo phagocytosis. Here, we describe quantitative 3D in silico modeling (q3DISM), a robust method allowing for true 3D quantitation of amyloid-β (Aβ) phagocytosis by mononuclear phagocytes in rodent Alzheimer's Disease (AD) models. The method involves fluorescently visualizing Aβ encapsulated within phagolysosomes in rodent brain sections. Large z-dimensional confocal datasets are then 3D reconstructed for quantitation of Aβ spatially colocalized within the phagolysosome. We demonstrate the successful application of q3DISM to mouse and rat brains, but this methodology can be extended to virtually any phagocytic event in any tissue.

  10. Overexpression of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 1 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A in Nerve Cells Confers Resistance to Amyloid β and Other Toxins by Decreasing Mitochondrial Respiration and Reactive Oxygen Species Production*

    PubMed Central

    Newington, Jordan T.; Rappon, Tim; Albers, Shawn; Wong, Daisy Y.; Rylett, R. Jane; Cumming, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that nerve cell lines selected for resistance to amyloid β (Aβ) peptide exhibit elevated aerobic glycolysis in part due to increased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA). Here, we show that overexpression of either PDK1 or LDHA in a rat CNS cell line (B12) confers resistance to Aβ and other neurotoxins. Treatment of Aβ-sensitive cells with various toxins resulted in mitochondrial hyperpolarization, immediately followed by rapid depolarization and cell death, events accompanied by increased production of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, cells expressing either PDK1 or LDHA maintained a lower mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased ROS production with or without exposure to toxins. Additionally, PDK1- and LDHA-overexpressing cells exhibited decreased oxygen consumption but maintained levels of ATP under both normal culture conditions and following Aβ treatment. Interestingly, immunoblot analysis of wild type mouse primary cortical neurons treated with Aβ or cortical tissue extracts from 12-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice showed decreased expression of LDHA and PDK1 when compared with controls. Additionally, post-mortem brain extracts from patients with Alzheimer disease exhibited a decrease in PDK1 expression compared with nondemented patients. Collectively, these findings indicate that key Warburg effect enzymes play a central role in mediating neuronal resistance to Αβ or other neurotoxins by decreasing mitochondrial activity and subsequent ROS production. Maintenance of PDK1 or LDHA expression in certain regions of the brain may explain why some individuals tolerate high levels of Aβ deposition without developing Alzheimer disease. PMID:22948140

  11. AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Susan C.; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, or clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This chapter reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. PMID:23239211

  12. Peripheral administration of the soluble TNF inhibitor XPro1595 modifies brain immune cell profiles, decreases beta-amyloid plaque load, and rescues impaired long-term potentiation in 5xFAD mice.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Kathryn P; Sompol, Pradoldej; Kannarkat, George T; Chang, Jianjun; Sniffen, Lindsey; Wildner, Mary E; Norris, Christopher M; Tansey, Malú G

    2017-06-01

    Clinical and animal model studies have implicated inflammation and peripheral immune cell responses in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Peripheral immune cells including T cells circulate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy adults and are found in the brains of AD patients and AD rodent models. Blocking entry of peripheral macrophages into the CNS was reported to increase amyloid burden in an AD mouse model. To assess inflammation in the 5xFAD (Tg) mouse model, we first quantified central and immune cell profiles in the deep cervical lymph nodes and spleen. In the brains of Tg mice, activated (MHCII(+), CD45(high), and Ly6C(high)) myeloid-derived CD11b(+) immune cells are decreased while CD3(+) T cells are increased as a function of age relative to non-Tg mice. These immunological changes along with evidence of increased mRNA levels for several cytokines suggest that immune regulation and trafficking patterns are altered in Tg mice. Levels of soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor (sTNF) modulate blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and are increased in CSF and brain parenchyma post-mortem in AD subjects and Tg mice. We report here that in vivo peripheral administration of XPro1595, a novel biologic that sequesters sTNF into inactive heterotrimers, reduced the age-dependent increase in activated immune cells in Tg mice, while decreasing the overall number of CD4(+) T cells. In addition, XPro1595 treatment in vivo rescued impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) measured in brain slices in association with decreased Aβ plaques in the subiculum. Selective targeting of sTNF may modulate brain immune cell infiltration, and prevent or delay neuronal dysfunction in AD.

  13. Withdrawal from fixed-dose injection of methamphetamine decreases cerebral levels of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol and induces the expression of anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Nobue; Kitanaka, Junichi; Tatsuta, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Koh-ichi; Watabe, Kaname; Nishiyama, Nobuyoshi; Morita, Yoshio; Takemura, Motohiko

    2010-05-01

    A variety of drug treatment regimens have been proposed to model the dysphoric state observed during methamphetamine (METH) withdrawal in rats, but little has been established in experiments using mice. In male ICR mice, a fixed-dose injection regimen of METH (1.0 or 2.5 mg/kg, i.p., twice daily for 10 consecutive days) induced a significant decrease in the time spent in open arms in an elevated plus maze after 5 days of drug abstinence. Under an escalating-dose injection regimen (0.2-2.0 mg/kg, i.p., 3 times daily for 4 days, total: 15 mg/kg/animal) or continuous subcutaneous administration with osmotic mini-pumps (15 or 76 mg/kg of METH for 2 weeks), no significant behavioral change was observed after 5 days of drug abstinence, compared with control animals. Reduced gains in body weight were observed during repeated treatment with METH in the fixed-dose injection and mini-pump treatment regimens, but not the escalating-dose injection regimen. HPLC analysis revealed significant decreases in the level of cerebral 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, a norepinephrine metabolite, and norepinephrine turnover, which may be attributed to the expression of anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze. These observations suggest that the mice treated with a fixed-dose of METH may model the anxiety-related behavior observed in the dysphoric state induced by METH withdrawal in humans.

  14. Diphenyl diselenide, a simple organoselenium compound, decreases methylmercury-induced cerebral, hepatic and renal oxidative stress and mercury deposition in adult mice.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Andressa Sausen; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Rotta, Mariana dos Santos; Bohrer, Denise; Mörschbächer, Vanessa; Puntel, Robson Luís; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2009-04-06

    Oxidative stress has been pointed out as an important molecular mechanism in methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication. At low doses, diphenyl diselenide ((PhSe)2), a structurally simple organoselenium compound, has been shown to possess antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. Here we have examined the possible in vivo protective effect of diphenyl diselenide against the potential pro-oxidative effects of MeHg in mouse liver, kidney, cerebrum and cerebellum. The effects of MeHg exposure (2 mg/(kg day) of methylmercury chloride 10 ml/kg, p.o.), as well as the possible antagonist effect of diphenyl diselenide (1 and 0.4 mg/(kg day); s.c.) on body weight gain and on hepatic, cerebellar, cerebral and renal levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), non-protein thiols (NPSH), ascorbic acid content, mercury concentrations and activities of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were evaluated after 35 days of treatment. MeHg caused an increase in TBARS and decreased NPSH levels in all tissues. MeHg also induced a decrease in hepatic ascorbic acid content and in renal GPx and CAT activities. Diphenyl diselenide (1 mg/kg) conferred protection against MeHg-induced hepatic and renal lipid peroxidation and at both doses prevented the reduction in hepatic NPSH levels. Diphenyl diselenide also conferred a partial protection against MeHg-induced oxidative stress (TBARS and NPSH) in liver and cerebellum. Of particular importance, diphenyl diselenide decreased the deposition of Hg in cerebrum, cerebellum, kidney and liver. The present results indicate that diphenyl diselenide can protect against some toxic effects of MeHg in mice. This protection may be related to its antioxidant properties and its ability to reduce Hg body burden. We posit that formation of a selenol intermediate, which possesses high nucleophilicity and high affinity for MeHg, accounts for the ability of diphenyl diselenide to ameliorate Me

  15. Dissociation of ERK and Akt signaling in endothelial cell angiogenic responses to {beta}-amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Magrane, Jordi; Christensen, Rial A.; Rosen, Kenneth M.; Veereshwarayya, Vimal; Querfurth, Henry W. . E-mail: hquerf01@granite.tufts.edu

    2006-04-15

    Cerebrovascular deposits of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) peptides are found in Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy with stroke or dementia. Dysregulations of angiogenesis, the blood-brain barrier and other critical endothelial cell (EC) functions have been implicated in aggravating chronic hypoperfusion in AD brain. We have used cultured ECs to model the effects of {beta}-amyloid on the activated phosphorylation states of multifunctional serine/threonine kinases since these are differentially involved in the survival, proliferation and migration aspects of angiogenesis. Serum-starved EC cultures containing amyloid-{beta} peptides underwent a 2- to 3-fold increase in nuclear pyknosis. Under growth conditions with sublethal doses of {beta}-amyloid, loss of cell membrane integrity and inhibition of cell proliferation were observed. By contrast, cell migration was the most sensitive to A{beta} since inhibition was significant already at 1 {mu}M (P = 0.01, migration vs. proliferation). In previous work, intracellular A{beta} accumulation was shown toxic to ECs and Akt function. Here, extracellular A{beta} peptides do not alter Akt activation, resulting instead in proportionate decreases in the phosphorylations of the MAPKs: ERK1/2 and p38 (starting at 1 {mu}M). This inhibitory action occurs proximal to MEK1/2 activation, possibly through interference with growth factor receptor coupling. Levels of phospho-JNK remained unchanged. Addition of PD98059, but not LY294002, resulted in a similar decrease in activated ERK1/2 levels and inhibition of EC migration. Transfection of ERK1/2 into A{beta}-poisoned ECs functionally rescued migration. The marked effect of extracellular A{beta} on the migration component of angiogenesis is associated with inhibition of MAPK signaling, while Akt-dependent cell survival appears more affected by cellular A{beta}.

  16. Decreased cerebral cortical serotonin transporter binding in ecstasy users: a positron emission tomography/[11C]DASB and structural brain imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Jason; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Tong, Junchao; McCluskey, Tina; Wilkins, Diana; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey; Mundo, Emanuela; Wilson, Alan A.; Rusjan, Pablo M.; Saint-Cyr, Jean A.; Guttman, Mark; Collins, D. Louis; Shapiro, Colin; Warsh, Jerry J.; Boileau, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Animal data indicate that the recreational drug ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) can damage brain serotonin neurons. However, human neuroimaging measurements of serotonin transporter binding, a serotonin neuron marker, remain contradictory, especially regarding brain areas affected; and the possibility that structural brain differences might account for serotonin transporter binding changes has not been explored. We measured brain serotonin transporter binding using [11C] N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio) benzylamine in 50 control subjects and in 49 chronic (mean 4 years) ecstasy users (typically one to two tablets bi-monthly) withdrawn from the drug (mean 45 days). A magnetic resonance image for positron emission tomography image co-registration and structural analyses was acquired. Hair toxicology confirmed group allocation but also indicated use of other psychoactive drugs in most users. Serotonin transporter binding in ecstasy users was significantly decreased throughout all cerebral cortices (range –19 to –46%) and hippocampus (–21%) and related to the extent of drug use (years, maximum dose), but was normal in basal ganglia and midbrain. Substantial overlap was observed between control and user values except for insular cortex, in which 51% of ecstasy user values fell below the lower limit of the control range. Voxel-based analyses confirmed a caudorostral gradient of cortical serotonin transporter binding loss with occipital cortex most severely affected. Magnetic resonance image measurement revealed no overall regional volume differences between groups; however, a slight left-hemispheric biased cortical thinning was detected in methamphetamine-using ecstasy users. The serotonin transporter binding loss was not related to structural changes or partial volume effect, use of other stimulant drugs, blood testosterone or oestradiol levels, major serotonin transporter gene promoter polymorphisms, gender, psychiatric status, or self

  17. Cerebrolysin reduces amyloid-β deposits, apoptosis and autophagy in the thalamus and improves functional recovery after cortical infarction.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shihui; Zhang, Jian; Dang, Chao; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Yusheng; Li, Jingjing; Fan, Yuhua; Pei, Zhong; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2014-02-15

    Focal cerebral infarction causes amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits and secondary thalamic neuronal degeneration. The present study aimed to determine the protective effects of Cerebrolysin on Aβ deposits and secondary neuronal damage in thalamus after cerebral infarction. At 24h after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) or saline as control was once daily administered for consecutive 13 days by intraperitoneal injection. Sensory function and secondary thalamic damage were assessed with adhesive-removal test, Nissl staining and immunofluorescence at 14 days after MCAO. Aβ deposits, activity of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), apoptosis and autophagy were determined by TUNEL staining, immunofluorescence and immunoblot. The results showed that Cerebrolysin significantly improved sensory deficit compared to controls (p<0.05). Aβ deposits and BACE1 were obviously reduced by Cerebrolysin, which was accompanied by decreases in neuronal loss and astroglial activation compared to controls (all p < 0.05). Coincidently, Cerebrolysin markedly inhibited cleaved caspase-3, conversion of LC3-II, downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax in the ipsilateral thalamus compared to controls (all p<0.05). These findings suggest that Cerebrolysin reduces Aβ deposits, apoptosis and autophagy in the ipsilateral thalamus, which may be associated with amelioration of secondary thalamic damage and functional recovery after cerebral infarction.

  18. Pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures are associated with Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity decrease and alpha subunit phosphorylation state in the mice cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Marquezan, Bárbara P; Funck, Vinícius R; Oliveira, Clarissa V; Pereira, Letícia M; Araújo, Stífani M; Zarzecki, Micheli S; Royes, Luiz Fernando F; Furian, Ana Flávia; Oliveira, Mauro S

    2013-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and phosphorylation state of the catalytic α subunit are altered by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures. PTZ (30, 45 or 60 g/kg, i.p.) was administered to adult male Swiss mice, and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and phosphorylation state were measured in the cerebral cortex 15 min after PTZ administration. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity significantly decreased after PTZ-induced seizures (60 mg/kg). Immunoreactivity of phosphorylated Ser943 at α subunit was increased after PTZ-induced seizures. A significant positive correlation between Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and latency to myoclonic jerks and generalized seizures was found. Conversely, a strong negative correlation between Ser943 phosphorylation and latency to generalized seizures was detected. Given the role of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase as a major regulator of brain excitability, Ser943 at Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α subunit may represent a potentially valuable new target for drug development for seizure disorders.

  19. Fish oil supplementation associated with decreased cellular degeneration and increased cellular proliferation 6 weeks after middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Michaela C; Howells, David W; Crewther, David P; Carey, Leeanne M; Crewther, Sheila G

    2015-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-LC-PUFAs) are both neuroprotective and have antidepressive effects. However the influence of dietary supplemented n-3-LC-PUFAs on inflammation-related cell death and proliferation after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo)-induced stroke is unknown. We have previously demonstrated that anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors are reduced in n-3-LC-PUFA-fed MCAo animals. Thus in the present study, male hooded Wistar rats were exposed to MCAo or sham surgeries and examined behaviorally 6 weeks later, prior to euthanasia and examination of lesion size, cell death and proliferation in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis region of the hippocampus of the ipsilesional hemispheres, and the thalamus of the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres. Markers of cell genesis and cell degeneration in the hippocampus or thalamus of the ipsilesional hemisphere did not differ between surgery and diet groups 6 weeks post MCAo. Dietary supplementation with n-3-LC-PUFA decreased cell degeneration and increased cell proliferation in the thalamic region of the contralesional hemisphere. MCAo-associated cell degeneration in the hippocampus and thalamus positively correlated with anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors previously reported in these animals. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory n-3-LC-PUFA supplementation appears to have cellular protective effects after MCAo in the rat, which may affect behavioral outcomes.

  20. Effects of lovastatin and pravastatin on amyloid processing and inflammatory response in TgCRND8 brain.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Neelima B; Siegel, George J; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2004-10-01

    Previous studies suggest that treatment with statins reduce beta amyloid (Abeta) deposition in brains of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may reduce the prevalence of AD in humans. Since lipophilicity influences the biological efficacy of statins, we compared the effects of lovastatin, a lipophilic statin, to effects of the hydrophilic pravastatin on amyloid processing and inflammatory responses in brain. Three-month old TgCRND8 mice expressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (mHuAPP) were treated daily with various doses of either statin. After 1 month, levels of cerebral soluble and fibrillar Abeta peptides, soluble sAPPalpha, and inflammatory cytokines were measured. Both statins caused dose-dependent reductions in total Abeta peptides with parallel increases in total sAPPalpha. At all doses, slightly greater effects were observed with lovastatin than with pravastatin. In contrast, only lovastatin significantly increased levels of IL-1beta and of TNFalpha in a dose-dependent manner. Lovastatin, but not pravastatin, decreased succinic dehydrogenase and increased lactate dehydrogenase activities in skeletal muscle and increased TUNEL staining in liver. Our data demonstrate that both statins shift the balance of APP processing from excessive beta-toward the normal alpha-cleavage while reducing the total amyloid burden in TgCRND8 brain and that lovastatin, but not pravastatin, potentiates cerebral inflammation and is associated with liver and muscle histotoxicity in these animals. These data show that pravastatin can reduce amyloid burden without potentiating inflammatory responses in brain and, therefore, may have a wider dose-range of safety than have lipophilic statins in the treatment or prevention of AD.

  1. New insights concerning insulin synthesis and its secretion in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex: amyloid-β1-42-induced reduction of proinsulin level via glycogen synthase kinase-3β.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takayuki; Toyoshima-Aoyama, Fumiyo; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Maruta, Toyoaki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Koshida, Tomohiro; Yonaha, Tetsu; Wada, Akihiko; Sawaguchi, Akira; Murakami, Manabu

    2014-02-01

    The reduction of insulin levels in hippocampal areas is associated with Alzheimer's disease. The present study using rat brain explores the mechanisms of insulin synthesis and secretion, as well as amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ(1-42))-induced reduction of proinsulin expression. After confirming the expression of insulin mRNA and proinsulin in rat brain, we visualized and analyzed the motion of insulin secretion in rat hippocampal neurons using pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (pHluorin) fused to the insulin. In the rat hippocampal neurons expressing insulin-pHluorin, time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed the appearance of fluorescent spots induced by depolarization after stimulation with 50 mM KCl. In these fluorescent spots, Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2), which is the regulator of the dense-core vesicle involving neuronal peptides, was co-localized with insulin-pHluorin. However, Aβ(1-42)-induced reduction of proinsulin in rat hippocampal neurons was inhibited by treatment with lithium and transfection with glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) siRNA. These results demonstrate that synthesized insulin is secreted from rat hippocampal and cortical neuron's dense-core vesicles, and that activation of GSK-3β in Aβ(1-42)-induced Alzheimer's model hippocampal neurons decreases the insulin synthesis.

  2. Peripherally Applied Synthetic Tetrapeptides HAEE and RADD Slow Down the Development of Cerebral β-Amyloidosis in AβPP/PS1 Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Cheglakov, Ivan B; Ovsepyan, Armen A; Mediannikov, Oleg Y; Morozov, Alexander O; Telegin, Georgy B; Kozin, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    Two tetrapeptides, HAEE and RADD, which are ionic-complementary to the primary zinc recognition site of amyloid-β (Aβ), have been reported to inhibit zinc-induced dimerization of the Aβ metal-binding domain and slow Aβ aggregation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate the impact of HAEE and RADD on the development of cerebral β-amyloidosis in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. We have found chronic intravenous administration of each peptide results in significant decrease of amyloid plaque burden in the treated mice.

  3. Plasma β-amyloid in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Janelidze, Shorena; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Westen, Danielle; Jeromin, Andreas; Song, Linan; Hanlon, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Baker, David; Blennow, Kaj; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of amyloid biomarkers in clinical practice would be accelerated if such biomarkers could be measured in blood. We analyzed plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 in a cohort of 719 individuals (the Swedish BioFINDER study), including patients with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and cognitively healthy elderly, using a ultrasensitive immunoassay (Simoa platform). There were weak positive correlations between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels for both Aβ42 and Aβ40, and negative correlations between plasma Aβ42 and neocortical amyloid deposition (measured with PET). Plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 were reduced in AD dementia compared with all other diagnostic groups. However, during the preclinical or prodromal AD stages (i.e. in amyloid positive controls, SCD and MCI) plasma concentration of Aβ42 was just moderately decreased whereas Aβ40 levels were unchanged. Higher plasma (but not CSF) levels of Aβ were associated with white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. In summary, plasma Aβ is overtly decreased during the dementia stage of AD indicating that prominent changes in Aβ metabolism occur later in the periphery compared to the brain. Further, increased levels of Aβ in plasma are associated with vascular disease. PMID:27241045

  4. Age-related spatial cognitive impairment is correlated with a decrease in ChAT in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and forebrain of SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Chen, Hong; Sun, Xiaojiang

    2009-05-01

    At present, the mechanisms underlying cognitive disorders remain unclear. The senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) prone/8 (P8) has been proposed as a useful model for the study of aging, and SAM resistant/1 (R1) is its control as a normal aging strain. The purpose of this study was to investigate choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression in SAM brain. The age-related decline of learning and memory ability in P8 mice (4, 8 and 12 months old, n=10 for each group) was proved in Morris water maze test (MWM). After the behavioral test, protein and mRNA levels of ChAT were determined in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and forebrain by means of immunostaining, Western blotting, and real time quantitative PCR (QPCR). Comparing with 4-month-old P8 and R1, 8- and 12-month-old P8 showed age-related cognitive impairment in MWM test. The latencies of the 4-month-old P8 in a hidden platform trial were significantly shorter, and the retention time was significantly longer than that of the older P8 groups. In addition, significantly low level of ChAT protein was observed in older P8 groups. Comparing with the 4-month-old P8, ChAT mRNA in the 12-month-old P8 declined significantly in all three regions of P8 brain. Pearson correlation test showed that the latencies in the MWM were positively correlated with the level of ChAT in P8. Such phenomenon could not be detected in normal aging R1 mice. These findings suggest that the decrease of ChAT in P8 mice was responsible for the age-related learning and memory impairments in some sense.

  5. White matter hyperintensities predict amyloid increase in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grimmer, Timo; Faust, Maximilian; Auer, Florian; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Förstl, Hans; Henriksen, Gjermund; Perneczky, Robert; Sorg, Christian; Yousefi, Behrooz H; Drzezga, Alexander; Kurz, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    Impaired amyloid clearance probably contributes to increased amyloid deposition in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Diminished perivascular drainage due to cerebral small-vessel disease (CSVD) has been proposed as a cause of reduced amyloid clearance. White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are considered to reflect CSVD and can be measured using fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Amyloid deposition can be determined in vivo using Pittsburgh compound B ([11C]PiB) positron emission tomography (PET). We aimed to elucidate the association between WMH and the progression of amyloid deposition in patients with AD. Twenty-two patients with probable AD underwent FLAIR-MRI and [11C]PiB-PET examinations at baseline (BL) and after a mean follow-up (FU) interval of 28 months. The relationship between BL-WMH and the progression of cerebral amyloid between BL and FU was examined using a regions-of-interest (ROI) approach. The region-specific variability of this relationship was analyzed using a voxel-based method. The longitudinal analysis revealed a statistically significant association between the amount of BL-WMH and the progression of amyloid load between BL and FU (p = 0.006, adjusted R2 = 0.375, standardized coefficient β = 0.384). The association was particularly observed in parieto-occipital regions and tended to be closer in regions adjacent to the brain surface. According to our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study in human being supporting the hypothesis that impaired amyloid clearance along perivascular drainage pathways may contribute to β-amyloid deposition in sporadic AD. The extent of WMH might be a relevant factor to be assessed in antiamyloid drug trials.

  6. Methods to monitor monocytes-mediated amyloid-beta uptake and phagocytosis in the context of adjuvanted immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Hallé, Maxime; Tribout-Jover, Pascale; Lanteigne, Anne-Marie; Boulais, Jonathan; St-Jean, Julien R; Jodoin, Rachel; Girouard, Marie-Pier; Constantin, Florin; Migneault, Annik; Renaud, Frédéric; Didierlaurent, Arnaud M; Mallett, Corey P; Burkhart, David; Pilorget, Anthony; Palmantier, Rémi; Larocque, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Antibody-mediated capture of amyloid-beta (Aβ) in peripheral blood was identified as an attractive strategy to eliminate cerebral toxic amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and murine models. Alternatively, defective capacity of peripheral monocytes to engulf Aβ was reported in individuals with AD. In this report, we developed different approaches to investigate cellular uptake and phagocytosis of Aβ, and to examine how two immunological devices--an immunostimulatory Adjuvant System and different amyloid specific antibodies--may affect these biological events. Between one and thirteen months of age, APPswe X PS1.M146V (TASTPM) AD model mice had decreasing concentrations of Aβ in their plasma. In contrast, the proportion of blood monocytes containing Aβ tended to increase with age. Importantly, the TLR-agonist containing Adjuvant System AS01B primed monocytes to promote de novo Aβ uptake capacity, particularly in the presence of anti-Aβ antibodies. Biochemical experiments demonstrated that cells achieved Aβ uptake and internalization followed by Aβ degradation via mechanisms that required effective actin polymerization and proteolytic enzymes such as insulin-degrading enzyme. We further demonstrated that both Aβ-specific monoclonal antibodies and plasma from Aβ-immunized mice enhanced the phagocytosis of 1 μm Aβ-coated particles. Together, our data highlight a new biomarker testing to follow amyloid clearance within the blood and a mechanism of Aβ uptake by peripheral monocytes in the context of active or passive immunization, and emphasize on novel approaches to investigate this phenomenon.

  7. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end.

  8. Amyloid burden in cognitively normal elderly is associated with preferential hippocampal subfield volume loss

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Phillip J.; Shou, Haochang; Benzinger, Tammie; Marcus, Daniel; Durbin, Tony; Morris, John C.; Sheline, Yvette I.

    2015-01-01

    The earliest sites of brain atrophy in Alzheimer’s disease are in the medial temporal lobe, following widespread cerebral cortical amyloid deposition. We assessed 74 cognitively normal participants with clinical measurements, Aβ-PET imaging, MRI, and a newly developed technique for MRI-based hippocampal subfield segmentation to determine the differential association of amyloid deposition and hippocampal subfield volume. Compared to amyloid-negative participants, amyloid-positive participants had significantly smaller hippocampal tail, presubiculum, subiculum, and total hippocampal gray matter volumes. We conclude that, prior to the development of cognitive impairment, atrophy in particular hippocampal subfields (HS) occurs preferentially with Aβ accumulation. PMID:25428255

  9. Amyloid Beta as a Modulator of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Brewer, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is associated with synapse loss, memory dysfunction and pathological accumulation of amyloid beta in plaques. However, an exclusively pathological role for amyloid beta is being challenged by new evidence for an essential function of amyloid beta at the synapse. Amyloid beta protein exists in different assembly states in the central nervous system and plays distinct roles ranging from synapse and memory formation to memory loss and neuronal cell death. Amyloid beta is present in the brain of symptom-free people where it likely performs important physiological roles. New evidence indicates that synaptic activity directly evokes the release of amyloid beta at the synapse. At physiological levels, amyloid beta is a normal, soluble product of neuronal metabolism that regulates synaptic function beginning early in life. Monomeric amyloid beta 40 and 42 are the predominant forms required for synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. With age, some assemblies of amyloid beta are associated with synaptic failure and Alzheimer’s disease pathology, possibly targeting the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor through the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), mitochondrial amyloid-β alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) and cyclophilin D. But emerging data suggests a distinction between age effects on the target response in contrast to the assembly state or the accumulation of the peptide. Both aging and beta amyloid independently decrease neuronal plasticity. Our laboratory has reported that amyloid beta, glutamate and lactic acid are each increasingly toxic with neuron age. The basis of the age-related toxicity partly resides in age-related mitochondrial dysfunction and an oxidative shift in mitochondrial and cytoplasmic redox potential. In turn, signaling through phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (pERK) is affected along with an age-independent increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (p

  10. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Membrane Interactions: Effects of Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxue; St Clair, Johnna R; London, Erwin; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2017-01-17

    Amyloid formation by islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) contributes to β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Perturbation of the β-cell membrane may contribute to IAPP-induced toxicity. We examine the effects of lipid composition, salt, and buffer on IAPP amyloid formation and on the ability of IAPP to induce leakage of model membranes. Even low levels of anionic lipids promote amyloid formation and membrane permeabilization. Increasing the percentage of the anionic lipids, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (POPS) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho(1'-rac-glycerol), enhances the rate of amyloid formation and increases the level of membrane permeabilization. The choice of zwitterionic lipid has no noticeable effect on membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation but in most cases affects leakage, which tends to decrease in the following order: 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine > 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine > sphingomyelin. Uncharged lipids that increase the level of membrane order weaken the ability of IAPP to induce leakage. Leakage is due predominately to pore formation rather than complete disruption of the vesicles under the conditions used in these studies. Cholesterol at or below physiological levels significantly reduces the rate of vesicle-catalyzed IAPP amyloid formation and decreases the susceptibility to IAPP-induced leakage. The effects of cholesterol on amyloid formation are masked by 25 mol % POPS. Overall, there is a strong inverse correlation between the time to form amyloid and the extent of vesicle leakage. NaCl reduces the rate of membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation by anionic vesicles, but accelerates amyloid formation in solution. The implications for IAPP membrane interactions are discussed, as is the possibility that the loss of phosphatidylserine asymmetry enhances IAPP amyloid formation and membrane damage in vivo via a positive feedback loop.

  11. An amyloid lung

    PubMed Central

    Zundel, W. E.; Prior, A. P.

    1971-01-01

    A 55-year-old housewife died from an illness characterized by progressive respiratory incapacity. Changes were confined to the lungs and consisted of a diffuse infiltration by amyloid. No adequate cause was found for this amyloid, and we suggest that this is a case of primary alveolar septal amyloidosis. Images PMID:5559913

  12. A bifunctional curcumin analogue for two-photon imaging and inhibiting crosslinking of amyloid beta in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Yuan, Peng; Li, Yuyan; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Grutzendler, Jaime; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2014-10-09

    In this report, we designed a highly bright bifunctional curcumin analogue CRANAD-28. In vivo two-photon imaging suggested that CRANAD-28 could penetrate the blood brain barrier (BBB) and label plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathies (CAAs). We also demonstrated that this imaging probe could inhibit the crosslinking of amyloid beta induced either by copper or by natural conditions.

  13. Contrasting effects of nanoparticle-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation.

    PubMed

    Radic, Slaven; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been experimentally found to either promote or inhibit amyloid aggregation of proteins, but the molecular mechanisms for such complex behaviors remain unknown. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effects of varying the strength of nonspecific NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation of a model protein, the amyloid-beta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, with increasing NP-peptide attraction, amyloid aggregation on the NP surface was initially promoted due to increased local protein concentration on the surface and destabilization of the folded state. However, further increase of NP-peptide attraction decreased the stability of amyloid fibrils and reduced their lateral diffusion on the NP surface necessary for peptide conformational changes and self-association, thus prohibiting amyloid aggregation. Moreover, we found that the relative concentration between protein and NPs also played an important role in amyloid aggregation. With a high NP/protein ratio, NPs that intrinsically promote protein aggregation may display an inhibitive effect by depleting the proteins in solution while having a low concentration of the proteins on each NP's surface. Our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study offers a molecular mechanism for delineating the contrasting and seemingly conflicting effects of NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation and highlights the potential of tailoring anti-aggregation nanomedicine against amyloid diseases.

  14. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Human Endothelial Cells from β-Amyloid Uptake and Oxidative Stress-Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Prado, Mario; Frontiñán, Javier; Santiago-Mora, Raquel; Peinado, Juan Ramón; Parrado-Fernández, Cristina; Gómez-Almagro, María Victoria; Moreno, María; López-Domínguez, José Alberto; Villalba, José Manuel; Alcaín, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease appear in advances stages, once neuronal damage arises. Nevertheless, recent studies demonstrate that in early asymptomatic stages, ß-amyloid peptide damages the cerebral microvasculature through mechanisms that involve an increase in reactive oxygen species and calcium, which induces necrosis and apoptosis of endothelial cells, leading to cerebrovascular dysfunction. The goal of our work is to study the potential preventive effect of the lipophilic antioxidant coenzyme Q (CoQ) against ß-amyloid-induced damage on human endothelial cells. We analyzed the protective effect of CoQ against Aβ-induced injury in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using fluorescence and confocal microscopy, biochemical techniques and RMN-based metabolomics. Our results show that CoQ pretreatment of HUVECs delayed Aβ incorporation into the plasma membrane and mitochondria. Moreover, CoQ reduced the influx of extracellular Ca2+, and Ca2+ release from mitochondria due to opening the mitochondrial transition pore after β-amyloid administration, in addition to decreasing O2.− and H2O2 levels. Pretreatment with CoQ also prevented ß-amyloid-induced HUVECs necrosis and apoptosis, restored their ability to proliferate, migrate and form tube-like structures in vitro, which is mirrored by a restoration of the cell metabolic profile to control levels. CoQ protected endothelial cells from Aβ-induced injury at physiological concentrations in human plasma after oral CoQ supplementation and thus could be a promising molecule to protect endothelial cells against amyloid angiopathy. PMID:25272163

  15. Pregnancy prevents hypertensive remodeling and decreases myogenic reactivity in posterior cerebral arteries from Dahl salt-sensitive rats: a role in eclampsia?

    PubMed

    Aukes, Annet M; Vitullo, Lisa; Zeeman, Gerda G; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2007-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that pregnancy prevents protective hypertension-induced remodeling of cerebral arteries using nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition to raise mean arterial pressure (MAP). In the present study, we investigated whether this effect of pregnancy was specific to NOS inhibition by using the Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat as a model of hypertension. Nonpregnant (n = 16) and late-pregnant (n = 17) Dahl SS rats were fed either a high-salt diet (8% NaCl) to raise blood pressure or a low-salt diet (<0.7% NaCl). Third-order posterior cerebral arteries were isolated and pressurized in an arteriograph chamber to measure active responses to pressure and passive remodeling. Several vessels from each group were stained for protein gene product 9.5 to determine perivascular nerve density. Blood pressure was elevated in both groups on high salt. The elevated MAP was associated with significantly smaller active and passive diameters (P < 0.05) and inward remodeling in the nonpregnant hypertensive group only. Whereas no structural changes were observed in the late-pregnant hypertensive animals, both late-pregnant groups had diminished myogenic reactivity (P < 0.05). Nerve density in both the late-pregnant groups was significantly greater when compared with the nonpregnant groups, suggesting that pregnancy has a trophic influence on perivascular innervation of the posterior cerebral artery. However, hypertension lowered the nerve density in both nonpregnant and late-pregnant animals. It therefore appears that pregnancy has an overall effect to prevent hypertension-induced remodeling regardless of the mode of hypertension. This effect may predispose the brain to autoregulatory breakthrough, hyperperfusion, and eclampsia when MAP is elevated.

  16. Engineering theranostic nanovehicles capable of targeting cerebrovascular amyloid deposits.

    PubMed

    Agyare, Edward K; Jaruszewski, Kristen M; Curran, Geoffry L; Rosenberg, Jens T; Grant, Samuel C; Lowe, Val J; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Paravastu, Anant K; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2014-07-10

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by the deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) proteins within the walls of the cerebral vasculature with subsequent aggressive vascular inflammation leading to recurrent hemorrhagic strokes. The objective of the study was to develop theranostic nanovehicles (TNVs) capable of a) targeting cerebrovascular amyloid; b) providing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast for the early detection of CAA; and c) treating cerebrovascular inflammation resulting from CAA. The TNVs comprised of a polymeric nanocore made from Magnevist (MRI contrast agent) conjugated chitosan. The nanocore was also loaded with cyclophosphamide (CYC), an immunosuppressant shown to reduce the cerebrovascular inflammation in CAA. Putrescine modified F(ab')2 fragment of anti-amyloid antibody, IgG4.1 (pF(ab')24.1) was conjugated to the surface of the nanocore to target cerebrovascular amyloid. The average size of the control chitosan nanoparticles (conjugated with albumin and are devoid of Magnevist, CYC, and pF(ab')24.1) was 164±1.2 nm and that of the TNVs was 239±4.1 nm. The zeta potential values of the CCNs and TNVs were 21.6±1.7 mV and 11.9±0.5 mV, respectively. The leakage of Magnevist from the TNVs was a modest 0.2% over 4 days, and the CYC release from the TNVs followed Higuchi's model that describes sustained drug release from polymeric matrices. The studies conducted in polarized human microvascular endothelial cell monolayers (hCMEC/D3) in vitro as well as in mice in vivo have demonstrated the ability of TNVs to target cerebrovascular amyloid. In addition, the TNVs provided contrast for imaging cerebrovascular amyloid using MRI and single photon emission computed tomography. Moreover, the TNVs were shown to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production by the Aβ challenged blood brain barrier (BBB) endothelium more effectively than the cyclophosphamide alone.

  17. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  18. Multiple low-dose infusions of human umbilical cord blood cells improve cognitive impairments and reduce amyloid-β-associated neuropathology in Alzheimer mice.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Donna; Deng, Juan; Giunta, Brian; Hou, Huayan; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Mori, Takashi; Ehrhart, Jared; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun

    2013-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive age-related dementia in the elderly and the fourth major cause of disability and mortality in that population. The disease is pathologically characterized by deposition of β-amyloid plaques neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Current strategies for the treatment of AD are symptomatic only. As such, they are less than efficacious in terms of significantly slowing or halting the underlying pathophysiological progression of the disease. Modulation by cell therapy may be new promising disease-modifying therapy. Recently, we showed reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) levels/β-amyloid plaques and associated astrocytosis following low-dose infusions of mononuclear human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs). Our current study extended our previous findings by examining cognition via (1) the rotarod test, (2) a 2-day version of the radial-arm water maze test, and (3) a subsequent observation in an open pool platform test to characterize the effects of monthly peripheral HUCBC infusion (1×10(6) cells/μL) into the transgenic PSAPP mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis (bearing mutant human APP and presenilin-1 transgenes) from 6 to 12 months of age. We show that HUCBC therapy correlates with decreased (1) cognitive impairment, (2) Aβ levels/β-amyloid plaques, (3) amyloidogenic APP processing, and (4) reactive microgliosis after a treatment of 6 or 10 months. As such, this report lays the groundwork for an HUCBC therapy as potentially novel alternative to oppose AD at the disease-modifying level.

  19. Progressive decrease in N-acetylaspartate/Creatine ratio in a teenager with type 1 diabetes and repeated episodes of ketoacidosis without clinically apparent cerebral edema: Evidence for permanent brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wootton-Gorges, S L; Buonocore, M H; Caltagirone, R A; Kuppermann, N; Glaser, N S

    2010-04-01

    Recent data suggest that DKA may contribute to cognitive impairment in children with type 1 DM. We measured the NAA/Cr ratio in a teenager during and following 2 separate episodes of DKA without clinically apparent cerebral edema. The NAA/Cr ratio decreased during DKA and improved following recovery. However, the NAA/Cr value was lower after the second episode of DKA (1.76) than after the first (1.97). These findings provide support for the hypothesis that neuronal injury may result from DKA.

  20. When amyloids become prions.

    PubMed

    Sabate, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The conformational diseases, linked to protein aggregation into amyloid conformations, range from non-infectious neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), to highly infectious ones, such as human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). They are commonly known as prion diseases. However, since all amyloids could be considered prions (from those involved in cell-to-cell transmission to those responsible for real neuronal invasion), it is necessary to find an underlying cause of the different capacity to infect that each of the proteins prone to form amyloids has. As proposed here, both the intrinsic cytotoxicity and the number of nuclei of aggregation per cell could be key factors in this transmission capacity of each amyloid.

  1. When amyloids become prions

    PubMed Central

    Sabate, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The conformational diseases, linked to protein aggregation into amyloid conformations, range from non-infectious neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), to highly infectious ones, such as human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). They are commonly known as prion diseases. However, since all amyloids could be considered prions (from those involved in cell-to-cell transmission to those responsible for real neuronal invasion), it is necessary to find an underlying cause of the different capacity to infect that each of the proteins prone to form amyloids has. As proposed here, both the intrinsic cytotoxicity and the number of nuclei of aggregation per cell could be key factors in this transmission capacity of each amyloid. PMID:24831240

  2. Brain Accumulation of Amyloid-beta in Non-Alzheimer Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Primavera, James; Lu, Bing-Xun; Riskind, Peter J.; Iulian, Maria; De La Monte, Suzanne M.

    1999-10-01

    We report an unusual case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) marked by extensive cerebral amyloid-beta deposition in small and medium-size vessels, capillaries, and perivascular plaques in the cerebral cortex, and in most leptomeningeal vessels. Despite considerable cerebral amyloidosis, the patient remained cognitively intact until death. For comparison with other neuro-degenerative diseases and normal aging, we assessed the densities of amyloid-beta-immunoreactive cortical vessels and plaques in matched frontal and temporal lobe sections from archival uncomplicated cases of Alzheimer's disease (N=10), Pick's disease (PkD; N=4), Parkinson's disease (PD; N=6), Diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD; N=7), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP; N=5), multiple systems atrophy (MSA; N=4), ALS (N=7), or normal aging (N=10) by semi-quantitative grading (0 to 3+). Moderate (2+) or abundant (3+) cerebrovascular amyloid-beta immunoreactivity was detected in 8/10 AD, 3/7 DLBD, 3/6 PD, 1 each with PSP or PkD, and 2/10 controls. Moderate or abundant densities of amyloid-beta-immunoreactive diffuse plaques were detected in all cases of AD or DLBD, 4/6 with PD, 3/5 with PSP, and 2/10 controls. Moderate or abundant amyloid-beta-immunoreactive mature (dense core) plaques were present in all cases of AD or DLBD, and 3 each with PD or PSP. Importantly, amyloid-beta-immunoreactivity was not observed in the 4 MSA or 7 archival ALS cases. This study demonstrates that prominent amyloid-beta accumulation in cerebral vessels and plaques occurs frequently in AD, DLBD, PSP, and PD, but not in ALS or MSA, indicating that the case described is unique. The lack of cognitive impairment in the case presented argues against the idea that extensive amyloid-beta deposition in the brain causes dementia.

  3. Highly potent soluble amyloid-β seeds in human Alzheimer brain but not cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kaeser, Stephan A.; Maia, Luis F.; Portelius, Erik; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Winkler, David T.; Maetzler, Walter; Keyvani, Kathy; Spitzer, Philipp; Wiltfang, Jens; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Jucker, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    The soluble fraction of brain samples from patients with Alzheimer’s disease contains highly biologically active amyloid-β seeds. In this study, we sought to assess the potency of soluble amyloid-β seeds derived from the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Soluble Alzheimer’s disease brain extracts were serially diluted and then injected into the hippocampus of young, APP transgenic mice. Eight months later, seeded amyloid-β deposition was evident even when the hippocampus received subattomole amounts of brain-derived amyloid-β. In contrast, cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Alzheimer’s disease, which contained more than 10-fold higher levels of amyloid-β peptide than the most concentrated soluble brain extracts, did not induce detectable seeding activity in vivo. Similarly, cerebrospinal fluid from aged APP-transgenic donor mice failed to induce cerebral amyloid-β deposition. In comparison to the soluble brain fraction, cerebrospinal fluid largely lacked N-terminally truncated amyloid-β species and exhibited smaller amyloid-β-positive particles, features that may contribute to the lack of in vivo seeding by cerebrospinal fluid. Interestingly, the same cerebrospinal fluid showed at least some seeding activity in an in vitro assay. The present results indicate that the biological seeding activity of soluble amyloid-β species is orders of magnitude greater in brain extracts than in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:25212850

  4. Amyloid-β and Astrocytes Interplay in Amyloid-β Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Batarseh, Yazan S.; Duong, Quoc-Viet; Mousa, Youssef M.; Al Rihani, Sweilem B.; Elfakhri, Khaled; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology is known to promote chronic inflammatory responses in the brain. It was thought previously that Aβ is only associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome. However, studies have shown its involvement in many other neurological disorders. The role of astrocytes in handling the excess levels of Aβ has been highlighted in the literature. Astrocytes have a distinctive function in both neuronal support and protection, thus its involvement in Aβ pathological process may tip the balance toward chronic inflammation and neuronal death. In this review we describe the involvement of astrocytes in Aβ related disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and frontotemporal dementia. PMID:26959008

  5. Red mold rice ameliorates impairment of memory and learning ability in intracerebroventricular amyloid beta-infused rat by repressing amyloid beta accumulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Lin; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Wang, Jyh-Jye; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) damaged neurons and further resulted in dementia. Monascus-fermented red mold rice (RMR), a traditional Chinese medicine as well as health food, includes monacolins (with the same function as statins) and multifunctional metabolites. In this study, ethanol extract of RMR (RE) was used to evaluate neuroprotection against Abeta40 neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Furthermore, the effects of dietary administration of RMR on memory and learning abilities are confirmed in an animal model of AD rats infused with Abeta40 into the cerebral ventricle. During continuous Abeta40 infusion for 28 days, the rats of test groups were administered RMR or lovastatin. Memory and learning abilities were evaluated in the water maze and passive avoidance tasks. After sacrifice, cerebral cortex and hippocampus were collected for the examination of AD risk factors. The in vitro results clearly indicate that RE provides stronger neuroprotection in rescuing cell viability as well as repressing inflammatory response and oxidative stress. RMR administration potently reverses the memory deficit in the memory task. Abeta40 infusion increases acetylcholinesterase activity, reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation and decreases total antioxidant status and superoxide dismutase activity in brain, but these damages were potently reversed by RMR administration, and the protection was more significant than that with lovastatin administration. The protection provided by RMR is able to prevent Abeta fibrils from being formed and deposited in hippocampus and further decrease Abeta40 accumulation, even though Abeta40 solution was infused into brain continuously.

  6. In situ hybridization of nucleus basalis neurons shows increased. beta. -amyloid mRNA in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.L.; Golde, T.E.; Usiak, M.F.; Younkin, L.H.; Younkin, S.G.

    1988-02-01

    To determine which cells within the brain produce ..beta..-amyloid mRNA and to assess expression of the ..beta..-amyloid gene in Alzheimer disease, the authors analyzed brain tissue from Alzheimer and control patients by in situ hybridization. The results demonstrate that ..beta..-amyloid mRNA is produced by neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and cerebral cortex and that nuclues basalis perikarya from Alzheimer patients consistently hybridize more ..beta..-amyloid probe than those from controls. These observations support the hypothesis that increased expression of the ..beta..-amyloid gene plays an important role in the deposition of amyloid in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease.

  7. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  9. Characterization of amyloid in equine recurrent uveitis as AA amyloid.

    PubMed

    Ostevik, L; de Souza, G A; Wien, T N; Gunnes, G; Sørby, R

    2014-01-01

    Two horses with chronic uveitis and histological lesions consistent with equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) were examined. Microscopical findings in the ciliary body included deposits of amyloid lining the non-pigmented epithelium, intracytoplasmic, rod-shaped, eosinophilic inclusions and intraepithelial infiltration of T lymphocytes. Ultrastructural examination of the ciliary body of one horse confirmed the presence of abundant extracellular deposits of non-branching fibrils (9-11 nm in diameter) consistent with amyloid. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong positive labelling for AA amyloid and mass spectrometry showed the amyloid to consist primarily of serum amyloid A1 in both cases. The findings suggest that localized, intraocular AA amyloidosis may occur in horses with ERU.

  10. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  11. Targeting vascular amyloid in arterioles of Alzheimer disease transgenic mice with amyloid β protein antibody-coated nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Poduslo, Joseph F; Hultman, Kristi L; Curran, Geoffry L; Preboske, Gregory M; Chamberlain, Ryan; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Garwood, Michael; Jack, Clifford R; Wengenack, Thomas M

    2011-08-01

    The relevance of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and dementia in general emphasizes the importance of developing novel targeting approaches for detecting and treating cerebrovascular amyloid (CVA) deposits. We developed a nanoparticle-based technology that uses a monoclonal antibody against fibrillar human amyloid-β42 that is surface coated onto a functionalized phospholipid monolayer. We demonstrate that this conjugated nanoparticle binds to CVA deposits in arterioles of AD transgenic mice (Tg2576) after infusion into the external carotid artery using 3 different approaches. The first 2 approaches use a blood vessel enrichment of homogenized brain and a leptomeningeal vessel preparation from thin tangential brain slices from the surface of the cerebral cortex. Targeting of CVA by the antibody-coated nanoparticle was visualized using fluorescent lissamine rhodamine-labeled phospholipids in the nanoparticles, which were compared with fluorescent staining of the endothelial cells and amyloid deposits using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The third approach used high-field strength magnetic resonance imaging of antibody-coated iron oxide nanoparticles after infusion into the external carotid artery. Dark foci of contrast enhancement in cortical arterioles were observed in T2*-weighted images of ex vivo AD mouse brains that correlated histologically with CVA deposits. The targeting ability of these nanoparticles to CVA provides opportunities for the prevention and treatment of CAA.

  12. Nanomaterials for reducing amyloid cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Yu, Yue; Wang, Chen-Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2013-07-26

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. The progress on anti-amyloid functions of various nanomaterials including inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials and biomolecular aggregates, is reviewed and discussed. The main functionalization strategies for general nanoparticle modifications are reviewed for potential applications of targeted therapeutics. The interaction mechanisms between amyloid peptides and nanomaterials are discussed from the perspectives of dominant interactions and kinetics. The encapsulation of anti-amyloid drugs, targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and drug delivery crossing blood brain barrier by application of nanomaterials would also improve the therapeutics of amyloid diseases.

  13. Young to Middle-Aged Dogs with High Amyloid-β Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid are Impaired on Learning in Standard Cognition tests

    PubMed Central

    Borghys, Herman; Van Broeck, Bianca; Dhuyvetter, Deborah; Jacobs, Tom; de Waepenaert, Katja; Erkens, Tim; Brooks, Melissa; Thevarkunnel, Sandy; Araujo, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding differences in Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers before the pathology becomes evident can contribute to an improved understanding of disease pathogenesis and treatment. A decrease in amyloid-β (Aβ)42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suggested to be a biomarker for Aβ deposition in brain. However, the relevance of CSF Aβ levels prior to deposition is not entirely known. Dogs are similar to man with respect to amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP)-processing, age-related amyloid plaque deposition, and cognitive dysfunction. In the current study, we evaluated the relation between CSF Aβ42 levels and cognitive performance in young to middle-aged dogs (1.5–7 years old). Additionally, CSF sAβPPα and sAβPPβ were measured to evaluate AβPP processing, and CSF cytokines were measured to determine the immune status of the brain. We identified two groups of dogs showing consistently low or high CSF Aβ42 levels. Based on prior studies, it was assumed that at this age no cerebral amyloid plaques were likely to be present. The cognitive performance was evaluated in standard cognition tests. Low or high Aβ concentrations coincided with low or high sAβPPα, sAβPPβ, and CXCL-1 levels, respectively. Dogs with high Aβ concentrations showed significant learning impairments on delayed non-match to position (DNMP), object discrimination, and reversal learning compared to dogs with low Aβ concentrations. Our data support the hypothesis that high levels of CSF Aβ in dogs coincide with lower cognitive performance prior to amyloid deposition. Further experiments are needed to investigate this link, as well as the relevance with respect to Alzheimer’s disease pathology progression. PMID:28035921

  14. Young to Middle-Aged Dogs with High Amyloid-β Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid are Impaired on Learning in Standard Cognition tests.

    PubMed

    Borghys, Herman; Van Broeck, Bianca; Dhuyvetter, Deborah; Jacobs, Tom; de Waepenaert, Katja; Erkens, Tim; Brooks, Melissa; Thevarkunnel, Sandy; Araujo, Joseph A

    2017-01-01

    Understanding differences in Alzheimer's disease biomarkers before the pathology becomes evident can contribute to an improved understanding of disease pathogenesis and treatment. A decrease in amyloid-β (Aβ)42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suggested to be a biomarker for Aβ deposition in brain. However, the relevance of CSF Aβ levels prior to deposition is not entirely known. Dogs are similar to man with respect to amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP)-processing, age-related amyloid plaque deposition, and cognitive dysfunction. In the current study, we evaluated the relation between CSF Aβ42 levels and cognitive performance in young to middle-aged dogs (1.5-7 years old). Additionally, CSF sAβPPα and sAβPPβ were measured to evaluate AβPP processing, and CSF cytokines were measured to determine the immune status of the brain. We identified two groups of dogs showing consistently low or high CSF Aβ42 levels. Based on prior studies, it was assumed that at this age no cerebral amyloid plaques were likely to be present. The cognitive performance was evaluated in standard cognition tests. Low or high Aβ concentrations coincided with low or high sAβPPα, sAβPPβ, and CXCL-1 levels, respectively. Dogs with high Aβ concentrations showed significant learning impairments on delayed non-match to position (DNMP), object discrimination, and reversal learning compared to dogs with low Aβ concentrations. Our data support the hypothesis that high levels of CSF Aβ in dogs coincide with lower cognitive performance prior to amyloid deposition. Further experiments are needed to investigate this link, as well as the relevance with respect to Alzheimer's disease pathology progression.

  15. ABCA7 Mediates Phagocytic Clearance of Amyloid-β in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Fu, YuHong; Hsiao, Jen-Hsiang T; Paxinos, George; Halliday, Glenda M; Kim, Woojin Scott

    2016-09-06

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by dementia and abnormal deposits of aggregated amyloid-β in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed that ABCA7 is strongly associated with AD. In vitro evidence suggests that the role of ABCA7 is related to phagocytic activity. Deletion of ABCA7 in a mouse model of AD exacerbates cerebral amyloid-β plaque load. However, the biological role of ABCA7 in AD brain pathogenesis is unknown. We show that ABCA7 is highly expressed in microglia and when monocytes are differentiated into macrophages. We hypothesized that ABCA7 plays a protective role in the brain that is related to phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β. We isolated microglia and macrophages from Abca7-/- and wild type mice and tested them for their capacity to phagocytose amyloid-β oligomers. We found that the phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β was substantially reduced in both microglia and macrophages from Abca7-/- mice compared to wild type mice. Consistent with these results, in vivo phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β oligomers in the hippocampus was reduced in Abca7-/- mice. Furthermore, ABCA7 transcription was upregulated in AD brains and in amyloidogenic mouse brains specifically in the hippocampus as a response to the amyloid-β pathogenic state. Together these results indicate that ABCA7 mediates phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β in the brain, and reveal a mechanism by which loss of function of ABCA7 increases the susceptibility to AD.

  16. Toxicity of substrate-bound amyloid peptides on vascular smooth muscle cells is enhanced by homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Mok, Su San; Turner, Bradley J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Barrow, Colin J; Small, David H

    2002-06-01

    Tauhe main component of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in Alzheimer's disease is the amyloid-beta protein (Abeta), a 4-kDa polypeptide derived from the beta-amyloid protein precursor (APP). The accumulation of Abeta in the basement membrane has been implicated in the degeneration of adjacent vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). However, the mechanism of Abeta toxicity is still unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of substrate-bound Abeta on VSMC in culture. The use of substrate-bound proteins in cell culture mimics presentation of the proteins to cells as if bound to the basement membrane. Substrate-bound Abeta peptides were found to be toxic to the cells and to increase the rate of cell death. This toxicity was dependent on the length of time the peptide was allowed to 'age', a process by which Abeta is induced to aggregate over several hours to days. Oxidative stress via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release was not involved in the toxic effect, as no decrease in toxicity was observed in the presence of catalase. However, substrate-bound Abeta significantly reduced cell adhesion compared to cells grown on plastic alone, indicating that cell-substrate adhesion may be important in maintaining cell viability. Abeta also caused an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. This increase in apoptosis was accompanied by activation of caspase-3. Homocysteine, a known risk factor for cerebrovascular disease, increased Abeta-induced toxicity and caspase-3 activation in a dose-dependent manner. These studies suggest that Abeta may activate apoptotic pathways to cause loss of VSMC in CAA by inhibiting cell-substrate interactions. Our studies also suggest that homocysteine, a known risk factor for other cardiovascular diseases, could also be a risk factor for hemorrhagic stroke associated with CAA.

  17. Origins of amyloid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amyloid-β plaques are a defining characteristic of Alzheimer Disease. However, Amyloid-β deposition is also found in other forms of dementia and in non-pathological contexts. Amyloid-β deposition is variable among vertebrate species and the evolutionary emergence of the amyloidogenic property is currently unknown. Evolutionary persistence of a pathological peptide sequence may depend on the functions of the precursor gene, conservation or mutation of nucleotides or peptide domains within the precursor gene, or a species-specific physiological environment. Results In this study, we asked when amyloidogenic Amyloid-β first arose using phylogenetic trees constructed for the Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene family and by modeling the potential for Amyloid-β aggregation across species in silico. We collected the most comprehensive set of sequences for the Amyloid-β Precursor Protein family using an automated, iterative meta-database search and constructed a highly resolved phylogeny. The analysis revealed that the ancestral gene for invertebrate and vertebrate Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene families arose around metazoic speciation during the Ediacaran period. Synapomorphic frequencies found domain-specific conservation of sequence. Analyses of aggregation potential showed that potentially amyloidogenic sequences are a ubiquitous feature of vertebrate Amyloid-β Precursor Protein but are also found in echinoderm, nematode, and cephalochordate, and hymenoptera species homologues. Conclusions The Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene is ancient and highly conserved. The amyloid forming Amyloid-β domains may have been present in early deuterostomes, but more recent mutations appear to have resulted in potentially unrelated amyoid forming sequences. Our results further highlight that the species-specific physiological environment is as critical to Amyloid-β formation as the peptide sequence. PMID:23627794

  18. Mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bumjoon; Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Sang Woo; Eom, Kilho

    2015-01-14

    Amyloid fibrils have recently received attention due to their remarkable mechanical properties, which are highly correlated with their biological functions. We have studied the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils as a function of their length scales by using atomistic simulations. It is shown that the length of amyloid fibrils plays a role in their deformation and fracture mechanisms in such a way that the competition between shear and bending deformations is highly dependent on the fibril length, and that as the fibril length increases, so does the bending strength of the fibril while its shear strength decreases. The dependence of rupture force for amyloid fibrils on their length is elucidated using the Bell model, which suggests that the rupture force of the fibril is determined from the hydrogen bond rupture mechanism that critically depends on the fibril length. We have measured the toughness of amyloid fibrils, which is shown to depend on the fibril length. In particular, the toughness of the fibril with its length of ∼3 nm is estimated to be ∼30 kcal mol(-1) nm(-3), comparable to that of a spider silk crystal with its length of ∼2 nm. Moreover, we have shown the important effect of the pulling rate on the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibril. It is found that as the pulling rate increases, so does the contribution of the shear effect to the elastic deformation of the amyloid fibril with its length of <10 nm. However, we found that the deformation mechanism of the amyloid fibril with its length of >15 nm is almost independent of the pulling rate. Our study sheds light on the role of the length scale of amyloid fibrils and the pulling rate in their mechanical behaviors and properties, which may provide insights into how the excellent mechanical properties of protein fibrils can be determined.

  19. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  20. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Targeting Oxidative Stress as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, T. Michael; Miller, Alyson A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major contributor to stroke, and a leading cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Despite the devastating effects of cerebral SVD, the pathogenesis of cerebral SVD is still not completely understood. Moreover, there are no specific pharmacological strategies for its prevention or treatment. Cerebral SVD is characterized by marked functional and structural abnormalities of the cerebral microcirculation. The clinical manifestations of these pathological changes include lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds. The main purpose of this review is to discuss evidence implicating oxidative stress in the arteriopathy of both non-amyloid and amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) forms of cerebral SVD and its most important risk factors (hypertension and aging), as well as its contribution to cerebral SVD-related brain injury and cognitive impairment. We also highlight current evidence of the involvement of the NADPH oxidases in the development of oxidative stress, enzymes that are a major source of reactive oxygen species in the cerebral vasculature. Lastly, we discuss potential pharmacological strategies for oxidative stress in cerebral SVD, including some of the historical and emerging NADPH oxidase inhibitors. PMID:27014073

  1. Hemi-ovariectomies promote a decrease in the dendritic lengths of CA1 and CA3 neurons: A dimorphic effect of the cerebral hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Durán, Dolores Adriana Bravo; Silva Gómez, Adriana Berenice; Rosas, Ana Coral Gutiérrez; Trujillo, Angélica

    2017-03-03

    Certain structures of the central nervous system (CNS) are morphologically and functionally related to the ovaries. Ovariectomy has been used to study the functional role of the ovaries in the CNS, as well as the role of the CNS on the reproductive system. In the present study, the effects of left and right hemi-ovariectomy on the morphology of pyramidal neurons from the CA1 and CA3 regions of the ventral hippocampus were studied. During the estrus phase, female Long-Evans rats underwent either left and right hemi-ovariectomies or left and right sham surgeries. Three estrous cycles later, the animals were sacrificed, and their brains were processed in Golgi-Cox stain and analyzed by the Sholl method to calculate the dendritic length of the CA1 and CA3 neurons of the left and right hemispheres. The results indicate that the dendritic lengths of the basilar and apical arbors of the CA1 neurons from the left hemisphere were shorter after both left and right hemi-ovariectomy, while the CA1 neurons from the right hemisphere were not affected by either procedure. However, the basilar dendritic arbors of the CA3 neurons from both hemispheres were affected by right hemi-ovariectomy. The spine density only decreased in the apical arbors in the CA3 neurons from the left hemisphere of rats that underwent right hemi-ovariectomy. This study's results indicate that hemi-ovariectomy in adult rats changes in the morphology of the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons in the ventral hippocampus and that there are dimorphic responses between the hemispheres.

  2. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases.

    PubMed

    Ankarcrona, M; Winblad, B; Monteiro, C; Fearns, C; Powers, E T; Johansson, J; Westermark, G T; Presto, J; Ericzon, B-G; Kelly, J W

    2016-08-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases, current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with passive and active immunotherapy, and small molecules to inhibit Aβ formation and aggregation or to enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However, the underlying pathology is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide as fibrils and oligomers, which are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. The transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases compromising multiple organ systems, caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, nonamyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as a promising treatment.

  3. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  4. Inhibitory Activities of Antioxidant Flavonoids from Tamarix gallica on Amyloid Aggregation Related to Alzheimer's and Type 2 Diabetes Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ben Hmidene, Asma; Hanaki, Mizuho; Murakami, Kazuma; Irie, Kazuhiro; Isoda, Hiroko; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of amyloid aggregation is promising for the treatment of age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Ten antioxidant flavonoids isolated from the medicinal halophyte Tamarix gallica were tested for their amyloid aggregation inhibition potential. Glucuronosylated flavonoids show relatively strong inhibitory activity of Amyloid β (Aβ) and human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) aggregation compared to their aglycone analogs. Structure-activity relationship of the flavonoids suggests that the catechol moiety is important for amyloid aggregation inhibition, while the methylation of the carboxyl group in the glucuronide moiety and of the hydroxyl group in the aglycone flavonoids decreased it.

  5. Extra-Virgin Olive Oil Attenuates Amyloid-β and Tau Pathologies in the Brains of TgSwDI Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qosa, Hisham; Mohamed, Loqman A.; Batarseh, Yazan S.; Alqahtani, Saeed; Ibrahim, Baher; LeVine, Harry; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2015-01-01

    Extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) is one of the main elements of Mediterranean diet. Several studies have suggested that EVOO has several health promoting effects that could protect from and decrease the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this study, we investigated the effect of consumption of EVOO-enriched diet on amyloid- and tau- related pathological alterations that are associated with the progression of AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in TgSwDI mice. Feeding mice with EVOO-enriched diet for 6 months, beginning at an age before amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation starts, has significantly reduced total Aβ and tau brain levels with a significant improvement in mouse cognitive behavior. This reduction in brain Aβ was explained by the enhanced Aβ clearance pathways and reduced brain production of Aβ via modulation of APP processing. On the other hand, although feeding mice with EVOO-enriched diet for 3 months, beginning at an age after Aβ accumulation starts, showed improved clearance across the BBB and significant reduction in Aβ levels, it did not affect tau levels or improve cognitive functions of TgSwDI mouse. Collectively, results of this study suggest the long-term consumption of EVOO-containing diet starting at early age provides a protective effect against AD and its related disorder CAA. PMID:26344778

  6. Genetic ablation of luteinizing hormone receptor improves the amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Li, Xian; Yuan, Fangping; Lin, Ling; Cook, Christine L; Rao, Ch V; Lei, Zhenmin

    2010-03-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) plays an essential pathophysiologic role in Alzheimer disease, and elevation of luteinizing hormone (LH) levels during aging has been implicated in its pathogenesis. To assess the effect of LH receptor deficiency on Abeta accumulation, we generated a bigenic mouse model, APPsw(+)/Lhr(-/-), which expresses human amyloid precursor protein (APPsw) in the background of LH receptor (Lhr) knockout. Genetic ablation of Lhr resulted in a significant decrease in the number of Abeta plaques and protein content in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in both male and female mice. Accordingly, several Abeta deposition-related neuropathologic features and functionally relevant molecules were markedly improved, including decreased astrogliosis, reductions of elevated phosphorylated tau, c-fos, alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and restoration of the altered neuropeptide Y receptors Y1 and Y2. Diminution of Abeta accumulation in the absence of LH receptor supports the contention that dysregulation of LH may impact the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. The APPsw(+)/Lhr(-/-) mouse may be a useful tool for advancing understanding of the role of LH-mediated events in Alzheimer disease and a model in which to test therapeutic interventions.

  7. Amyloids: from Pathogenesis to Function.

    PubMed

    Nizhnikov, A A; Antonets, K S; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    2015-09-01

    The term "amyloids" refers to fibrillar protein aggregates with cross-β structure. They have been a subject of intense scrutiny since the middle of the previous century. First, this interest is due to association of amyloids with dozens of incurable human diseases called amyloidoses, which affect hundreds of millions of people. However, during the last decade the paradigm of amyloids as pathogens has changed due to an increase in understanding of their role as a specific variant of quaternary protein structure essential for the living cell. Thus, functional amyloids are found in all domains of the living world, and they fulfill a variety of roles ranging from biofilm formation in bacteria to long-term memory regulation in higher eukaryotes. Prions, which are proteins capable of existing under the same conditions in two or more conformations at least one of which having infective properties, also typically have amyloid features. There are weighty reasons to believe that the currently known amyloids are only a minority of their real number. This review provides a retrospective analysis of stages in the development of amyloid biology that during the last decade resulted, on one hand, in reinterpretation of the biological role of amyloids, and on the other hand, in the development of systems biology of amyloids, or amyloidomics.

  8. Post-mortem histopathology underlying β-amyloid PET imaging following flutemetamol F 18 injection.

    PubMed

    Ikonomovic, Milos D; Buckley, Chris J; Heurling, Kerstin; Sherwin, Paul; Jones, Paul A; Zanette, Michelle; Mathis, Chester A; Klunk, William E; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Ironside, James; Ismail, Azzam; Smith, Colin; Thal, Dietmar R; Beach, Thomas G; Farrar, Gill; Smith, Adrian P L

    2016-12-12

    In vivo imaging of fibrillar β-amyloid deposits may assist clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), aid treatment selection for patients, assist clinical trials of therapeutic drugs through subject selection, and be used as an outcome measure. A recent phase III trial of [(18)F]flutemetamol positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in 106 end-of-life subjects demonstrated the ability to identify fibrillar β-amyloid by comparing in vivo PET to post-mortem histopathology. Post-mortem analyses demonstrated a broad and continuous spectrum of β-amyloid pathology in AD and other dementing and non-dementing disease groups. The GE067-026 trial demonstrated 91% sensitivity and 90% specificity of [(18)F]flutemetamol PET by majority read for the presence of moderate or frequent plaques. The probability of an abnormal [(18)F]flutemetamol scan increased with neocortical plaque density and AD diagnosis. All dementia cases with non-AD neurodegenerative diseases and those without histopathological features of β-amyloid deposits were [(18)F]flutemetamol negative. Majority PET assessments accurately reflected the amyloid plaque burden in 90% of cases. However, ten cases demonstrated a mismatch between PET image interpretations and post-mortem findings. Although tracer retention was best associated with amyloid in neuritic plaques, amyloid in diffuse plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy best explain three [(18)F]flutemetamol positive cases with mismatched (sparse) neuritic plaque burden. Advanced cortical atrophy was associated with the seven false negative [(18)F]flutemetamol images. The interpretation of images from pathologically equivocal cases was associated with low reader confidence and inter-reader agreement. Our results support that amyloid in neuritic plaque burden is the primary form of β-amyloid pathology detectable with [(18)F]flutemetamol PET imaging. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01165554. Registered June 21, 2010; NCT02090855. Registered March 11, 2014.

  9. Oleocanthal Enhances Amyloid-β Clearance from the Brains of TgSwDI Mice and in Vitro across a Human Blood-Brain Barrier Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Numerous clinical and preclinical studies have suggested several health promoting effects for the dietary consumption of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) that could protect and decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Moreover, recent studies have linked this protective effect to oleocanthal, a phenolic secoiridoid component of EVOO. This protective effect of oleocanthal against AD has been related to its ability to prevent amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau aggregation in vitro, and enhance Aβ clearance from the brains of wild type mice in vivo; however, its effect in a mouse model of AD is not known. In the current study, we investigated the effect of oleocanthal on pathological hallmarks of AD in TgSwDI, an animal model of AD. Mice treatment for 4 weeks with oleocanthal significantly decreased amyloid load in the hippocampal parenchyma and microvessels. This reduction was associated with enhanced cerebral clearance of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Further mechanistic studies demonstrated oleocanthal to increase the expression of important amyloid clearance proteins at the BBB including P-glycoprotein and LRP1, and to activate the ApoE-dependent amyloid clearance pathway in the mice brains. The anti-inflammatory effect of oleocanthal in the brains of these mice was also obvious where it was able to reduce astrocytes activation and IL-1β levels. Finally, we could recapitulate the observed protective effect of oleocanthal in an in vitro human-based model, which could argue against species difference in response to oleocanthal. In conclusion, findings from in vivo and in vitro studies provide further support for the protective effect of oleocanthal against the progression of AD. PMID:26348065

  10. Brain Endothelial Cells Produce Amyloid β from Amyloid Precursor Protein 770 and Preferentially Secrete the O-Glycosylated Form*

    PubMed Central

    Kitazume, Shinobu; Tachida, Yuriko; Kato, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Honda, Takashi; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Wada, Yoshinao; Saito, Takashi; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain is closely associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). Aβ is generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the actions of β- and γ-secretases. In addition to Aβ deposition in the brain parenchyma, deposition of Aβ in cerebral vessel walls, termed cerebral amyloid angiopathy, is observed in more than 80% of AD individuals. The mechanism for how Aβ accumulates in blood vessels remains largely unknown. In the present study, we show that brain endothelial cells expressed APP770, a differently spliced APP mRNA isoform from neuronal APP695, and produced Aβ40 and Aβ42. Furthermore, we found that the endothelial APP770 had sialylated core 1 type O-glycans. Interestingly, Ο-glycosylated APP770 was preferentially processed by both α- and β-cleavage and secreted into the media, suggesting that O-glycosylation and APP processing involved related pathways. By immunostaining human brain sections with an anti-APP770 antibody, we found that APP770 was expressed in vascular endothelial cells. Because we were able to detect O-glycosylated sAPP770β in human cerebrospinal fluid, this unique soluble APP770β has the potential to serve as a marker for cortical dementias such as AD and vascular dementia. PMID:20952385

  11. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Foster, Carmen M.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils. PMID:26393799

  12. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Foster, Carmen M.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  13. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    DOE PAGES

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; ...

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presencemore » of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.« less

  14. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a cocktail of compounds

  15. Role of gut microbiota and nutrients in amyloid formation and pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pistollato, Francesca; Sumalla Cano, Sandra; Elio, Iñaki; Masias Vergara, Manuel; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota might be associated with the onset of certain human pathologies, such as Alzheimer disease, a neurodegenerative syndrome associated with cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β fibrils. It has been shown that bacteria populating the gut microbiota can release significant amounts of amyloids and lipopolysaccharides, which might play a role in the modulation of signaling pathways and the production of proinflammatory cytokines related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Additionally, nutrients have been shown to affect the composition of the gut microbiota as well as the formation and aggregation of cerebral amyloid-β. This suggests that modulating the gut microbiome and amyloidogenesis through specific nutritional interventions might prove to be an effective strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of Alzheimer disease. This review examines the possible role of the gut in the dissemination of amyloids, the role of the gut microbiota in the regulation of the gut-brain axis, the potential amyloidogenic properties of gut bacteria, and the possible impact of nutrients on modulation of microbiota composition and amyloid formation in relation to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

  16. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Philip S.; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  17. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  18. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Said, Gerard

    2011-12-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathies (FAPs) are a group of life-threatening multisystem disorders transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Nerve lesions are induced by deposits of amyloid fibrils, most commonly due to mutated transthyretin (TTR). Less often the precursor of amyloidosis is mutant apolipoprotein A-1 or gelsolin. The first identified cause of FAP-the TTR Val30Met mutation-is still the most common of more than 100 amyloidogenic point mutations identified worldwide. The penetrance and age at onset of FAP among people carrying the same mutation vary between countries. The symptomatology and clinical course of FAP can be highly variable. TTR FAP typically causes a nerve length-dependent polyneuropathy that starts in the feet with loss of temperature and pain sensations, along with life-threatening autonomic dysfunction leading to cachexia and death within 10 years on average. TTR is synthesised mainly in the liver, and liver transplantation seems to have a favourable effect on the course of neuropathy, but not on cardiac or eye lesions. Oral administration of tafamidis meglumine, which prevents misfolding and deposition of mutated TTR, is under evaluation in patients with TTR FAP. In future, patients with FAP might benefit from gene therapy; however, genetic counselling is recommended for the prevention of all types of FAP.

  19. Autoregulated paracellular clearance of amyloid-β across the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Keaney, James; Walsh, Dominic M.; O’Malley, Tiernan; Hudson, Natalie; Crosbie, Darragh E.; Loftus, Teresa; Sheehan, Florike; McDaid, Jacqueline; Humphries, Marian M.; Callanan, John J.; Brett, Francesca M.; Farrell, Michael A.; Humphries, Peter; Campbell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is essential for maintaining brain homeostasis and protecting neural tissue from damaging blood-borne agents. The barrier is characterized by endothelial tight junctions that limit passive paracellular diffusion of polar solutes and macromolecules from blood to brain. Decreased brain clearance of the neurotoxic amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Whereas transport of Aβ across the BBB can occur via transcellular endothelial receptors, the paracellular movement of Aβ has not been described. We show that soluble human Aβ(1–40) monomers can diffuse across the paracellular pathway of the BBB in tandem with a decrease in the tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin in the cerebral vascular endothelium. In a murine model of AD (Tg2576), plasma Aβ(1–40) levels were significantly increased, brain Aβ(1–40) levels were decreased, and cognitive function was enhanced when both claudin-5 and occludin were suppressed. Furthermore, Aβ can cause a transient down-regulation of claudin-5 and occludin, allowing for its own paracellular clearance across the BBB. Our results show, for the first time, the involvement of the paracellular pathway in autoregulated Aβ movement across the BBB and identify both claudin-5 and occludin as potential therapeutic targets for AD. These findings also indicate that controlled modulation of tight junction components at the BBB can enhance the clearance of Aβ from the brain. PMID:26491725

  20. Theoretical impact of Florbetapir (18F) amyloid imaging on diagnosis of alzheimer dementia and detection of preclinical cortical amyloid.

    PubMed

    Beach, Thomas G; Schneider, Julie A; Sue, Lucia I; Serrano, Geidy; Dugger, Brittany N; Monsell, Sarah E; Kukull, Walter

    2014-10-01

    In 2012, florbetapir (F) (Amyvid) received US Food and Drug Administration approval as a diagnostic agent for detecting neuritic (β-amyloid) plaques in living patients. Although such approval is specifically not extended to the use of florbetapir as a single definitive diagnostic test for Alzheimer disease dementia (ADD), it is of considerable importance to examine its potential in this regard. To estimate the ability of florbetapir amyloid imaging to detect specified densities of postmortem-identified neuritic plaques, we used the data of Clark et al [Clark CM, Pontecorvo MJ, Beach TG, et al. Cerebral PET with florbetapir compared with neuropathology at autopsy for detection of neuritic amyloid-beta plaques: A prospective cohort study. Lancet Neurol 2012;11:669-78]. We then used the data of Beach et al [Beach TG, Monsell SE, Phillips LE, et al. Accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease at National Institute on Aging Alzheimer Disease Centers, 2005-2010. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 2012;71:266-73], derived from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center, to estimate the fraction of subjects who would have been called florbetapir-positive and, among these, the fraction of subjects who would also meet neuropathologic criteria for the presence of ADD. The accuracy of a positive florbetapir β-amyloid scan for the detection of neuropathologically defined ADD is estimated at between 69% and 95% sensitivity and between 83% and 89% specificity. From the same National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center data set, 144 subjects were recorded as having normal cognition. Among these, 84 (58%) had at least sparse neuritic plaques at autopsy and, among these, florbetapir imaging was estimated to detect 47 (56%). These findings suggest that amyloid imaging may significantly improve the clinical identification of ADD.

  1. Post-mortem assessment of hypoperfusion of cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Taya; Miners, Scott; Love, Seth

    2015-04-01

    Perfusion is reduced in the cerebral neocortex in Alzheimer's disease. We have explored some of the mechanisms, by measurement of perfusion-sensitive and disease-related proteins in post-mortem tissue from Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and age-matched control brains. To distinguish physiological from pathological reduction in perfusion (i.e. reduction exceeding the decline in metabolic demand), we measured the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein induced under conditions of tissue hypoxia through the actions of hypoxia-inducible factors, and the myelin associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 (MAG:PLP1) ratio, which declines in chronically hypoperfused brain tissue. To evaluate possible mechanisms of hypoperfusion, we also measured the levels of amyloid-β40, amyloid-β42, von Willebrand factor (VWF; a measure of microvascular density) and the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin 1 (EDN1); we assayed the activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), which catalyses the production of another potent vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II; and we scored the severity of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and determined the Braak tangle stage. VEGF was markedly increased in frontal and parahippocampal cortex in Alzheimer's disease but only slightly and not significantly in vascular dementia. In frontal cortex the MAG:PLP1 ratio was significantly reduced in Alzheimer's disease and even more so in vascular dementia. VEGF but not MAG:PLP1 increased with Alzheimer's disease severity, as measured by Braak tangle stage, and correlated with amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β42: amyloid-β40 but not amyloid-β40. Although MAG:PLP1 tended to be lowest in cortex from patients with severe small vessel disease or cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neither VEGF nor MAG:PLP1 correlated significantly with the severity of structural vascular pathology (small vessel disease, cerebral amyloid angiopathy or VWF

  2. Absence of beta-amyloid in cortical cataracts of donors with and without Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Michael, Ralph; Rosandić, Jurja; Montenegro, Gustavo A; Lobato, Elvira; Tresserra, Francisco; Barraquer, Rafael I; Vrensen, Gijs F J M

    2013-01-01

    Eye lenses from human donors with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD) were studied to evaluate the presence of amyloid in cortical cataract. We obtained 39 lenses from 21 postmortem donors with AD and 15 lenses from age-matched controls provided by the Banco de Ojos para Tratamientos de la Ceguera (Barcelona, Spain). For 17 donors, AD was clinically diagnosed by general physicians and for 4 donors the AD diagnosis was neuropathologically confirmed. Of the 21 donors with AD, 6 had pronounced bilateral cortical lens opacities and 15 only minor or no cortical opacities. As controls, 7 donors with pronounced cortical opacities and 8 donors with almost transparent lenses were selected. All lenses were photographed in a dark field stereomicroscope. Histological sections were analyzed using a standard and a more sensitive Congo red protocol, thioflavin staining and beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry. Brain tissue from two donors, one with cerebral amyloid angiopathy and another with advanced AD-related changes and one cornea with lattice dystrophy were used as positive controls for the staining techniques. Thioflavin, standard and modified Congo red staining were positive in the control brain tissues and in the dystrophic cornea. Beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry was positive in the brain tissues but not in the cornea sample. Lenses from control and AD donors were, without exception, negative after Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid immunohistochemical staining. The results of the positive control tissues correspond well with known observations in AD, amyloid angiopathy and corneas with lattice dystrophy. The absence of staining in AD and control lenses with the techniques employed lead us to conclude that there is no beta-amyloid in lenses from donors with AD or in control cortical cataracts. The inconsistency with previous studies of Goldstein et al. (2003) and Moncaster et al. (2010), both of which demonstrated positive Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid

  3. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  4. Prevalence of Amyloid PET Positivity in Dementia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Knol, Dirk L.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non–AD dementia. OBJECTIVE To use individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid positivity on PET in a wide variety of dementia syndromes. DATA SOURCES The MEDLINE and Web of Science databases were searched from January 2004 to April 2015 for amyloid PET studies. STUDY SELECTION Case reports and studies on neurological or psychiatric diseases other than dementia were excluded. Corresponding authors of eligible cohorts were invited to provide individual participant data. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Data were provided for 1359 participants with clinically diagnosed AD and 538 participants with non–AD dementia. The reference groups were 1849 healthy control participants (based on amyloid PET) and an independent sample of 1369 AD participants (based on autopsy). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Estimated prevalence of positive amyloid PET scans according to diagnosis, age, and apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 status, using the generalized estimating equations method. RESULTS The likelihood of amyloid positivity was associated with age and APOE ε4 status. In AD dementia, the prevalence of amyloid positivity decreased from age 50 to 90 years in APOE ε4 noncarriers(86%[95%CI,73%–94%]at 50 years to 68% [95% CI,57%–77%] at 90 years; n = 377) and to a lesser degree in APOE ε4 carriers (97% [95% CI, 92%–99%] at 50 years to 90% [95% CI, 83%–94%] at 90 years; n = 593; P < .01). Similar associations of age and APOE ε4 with amyloid positivity were observed in participants with AD dementia at autopsy. In most non–AD dementias, amyloid positivity increased with both age (from 60 to 80 years) and APOE ε4 carriership. Total ParticipantsAmyloid Positivity, % (95% CI) Age 60 yAge 80

  5. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  6. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions. PMID:26218890

  7. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  8. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  9. Novel effects of FCCP [carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone] on amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Connop, B P; Thies, R L; Beyreuther, K; Ida, N; Reiner, P B

    1999-04-01

    Amyloidogenic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Because it has been suggested that catabolic processing of the APP holoprotein occurs in acidic intracellular compartments, we studied the effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) and the H+-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 on APP catabolism in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing either wild-type or "Swedish" mutant APP. Unlike bafilomycin A1, which inhibits beta-amyloid production in cells expressing mutant but not wild-type APP, FCCP inhibited beta-amyloid production in both cell types. Moreover, the effects of FCCP were independent of alterations in total cellular APP levels or APP maturation, and the concentrations used did not alter either cellular ATP levels or cell viability. Bafilomycin A1, which had no effect on beta-amyloid production in wild-type cells, inhibited endocytosis of fluorescent transferrin, whereas concentrations of FCCP that inhibited beta-amyloid production in these cells had no effect on endosomal function. Thus, in wild-type-expressing cells it appears that the beta-amyloid peptide is not produced in the classically defined endosome. Although bafilomycin A1 decreased beta-amyloid release from cells expressing mutant APP but not wild-type APP, it altered lysosomal function in both cell types, suggesting that in normal cells beta-amyloid is not produced in the lysosome. Although inhibition of beta-amyloid production by bafilomycin A1 in mutant cells may occur via changes in endosomal/lysosomal pH, our data suggest that FCCP inhibits wild-type beta-amyloid production by acting on a bafilomycin A1-insensitive acidic compartment that is distinct from either the endosome or the lysosome.

  10. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Colver, Allan; Fairhurst, Charles; Pharoah, Peter O D

    2014-04-05

    The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3·5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefit for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to influence brain plasticity could yield significant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention.

  11. Clinicopathologic and 11C-Pittsburgh compound B implications of Thal amyloid phase across the Alzheimer's disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    Murray, Melissa E; Lowe, Val J; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Liesinger, Amanda M; Cannon, Ashley; Przybelski, Scott A; Rawal, Bhupendra; Parisi, Joseph E; Petersen, Ronald C; Kantarci, Kejal; Ross, Owen A; Duara, Ranjan; Knopman, David S; Jack, Clifford R; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-05-01

    Thal amyloid phase, which describes the pattern of progressive amyloid-β plaque deposition in Alzheimer's disease, was incorporated into the latest National Institute of Ageing - Alzheimer's Association neuropathologic assessment guidelines. Amyloid biomarkers (positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid) were included in clinical diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease dementia published by the National Institute of Ageing - Alzheimer's Association and the International Work group. Our first goal was to evaluate the correspondence of Thal amyloid phase to Braak tangle stage and ante-mortem clinical characteristics in a large autopsy cohort. Second, we examined the relevance of Thal amyloid phase in a prospectively-followed autopsied cohort who underwent ante-mortem (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B imaging; using the large autopsy cohort to broaden our perspective of (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B results. The Mayo Clinic Jacksonville Brain Bank case series (n = 3618) was selected regardless of ante-mortem clinical diagnosis and neuropathologic co-morbidities, and all assigned Thal amyloid phase and Braak tangle stage using thioflavin-S fluorescent microscopy. (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B studies from Mayo Clinic Rochester were available for 35 participants scanned within 2 years of death. Cortical (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B values were calculated as a standard uptake value ratio normalized to cerebellum grey/white matter. In the high likelihood Alzheimer's disease brain bank cohort (n = 1375), cases with lower Thal amyloid phases were older at death, had a lower Braak tangle stage, and were less frequently APOE-ε4 positive. Regression modelling in these Alzheimer's disease cases, showed that Braak tangle stage, but not Thal amyloid phase predicted age at onset, disease duration, and final Mini-Mental State Examination score. In contrast, Thal amyloid phase, but not Braak tangle stage or cerebral amyloid angiopathy predicted (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B

  12. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  13. Cognitive and cortical plasticity deficits correlate with altered amyloid-β CSF levels in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Francesco; Rossi, Silvia; Sancesario, Giulia; Codecà, Claudia; Mataluni, Giorgia; Monteleone, Fabrizia; Buttari, Fabio; Kusayanagi, Hajime; Castelli, Maura; Motta, Caterina; Studer, Valeria; Bernardi, Giorgio; Koch, Giacomo; Bernardini, Sergio; Centonze, Diego

    2011-02-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is of frequent observation in multiple sclerosis (MS). It is associated with gray matter pathology, brain atrophy, and altered connectivity, and recent evidence showed that acute inflammation can exacerbate mental deficits independently of the primary functional system involved. In this study, we measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid-β(1-42) and τ protein in MS and in clinically isolated syndrome patients, as both proteins have been associated with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In AD, amyloid-β(1-42) accumulates in the brain as insoluble extracellular plaques, possibly explaining why soluble amyloid-β(1-42) is reduced in the CSF of these patients. In our sample of MS patients, amyloid-β(1-42) levels were significantly lower in patients cognitively impaired (CI) and were inversely correlated with the number of Gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) lesions at the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Positive correlations between amyloid-β(1-42) levels and measures of attention and concentration were also found. Furthermore, abnormal neuroplasticity of the cerebral cortex, explored with θ burst stimulation (TBS), was observed in CI patients, and a positive correlation was found between amyloid-β(1-42) CSF contents and the magnitude of long-term potentiation-like effects induced by TBS. No correlation was conversely found between τ protein concentrations and MRI findings, cognitive parameters, and TBS effects in these patients. Together, our results indicate that in MS, central inflammation is able to alter amyloid-β metabolism by reducing its concentration in the CSF and leading to impairment of synaptic plasticity and cognitive function.

  14. Loss of proteostasis induced by amyloid beta peptide in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Oliveira, Catarina R; Pereira, Cláudia F; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2014-06-01

    Abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition to neurotoxic effects, Aβ also damages brain endothelial cells (ECs) and may thus contribute to the degeneration of cerebral vasculature, which has been proposed as an early pathogenic event in the course of AD and is able to trigger and/or potentiate the neurodegenerative process and cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying Aβ-induced endothelial dysfunction are not completely understood. Here we hypothesized that Aβ impairs protein quality control mechanisms both in the secretory pathway and in the cytosol in brain ECs, leading cells to death. In rat brain RBE4 cells, we demonstrated that Aβ1-40 induces the failure of the ER stress-adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), deregulates the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) decreasing overall proteasome activity with accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and impairs the autophagic protein degradation pathway due to failure in the autophagic flux, which culminates in cell demise. In conclusion, Aβ deregulates proteostasis in brain ECs and, as a consequence, these cells die by apoptosis.

  15. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweers, K. K. M.; Bennink, M. L.; Subramaniam, V.

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils.

  16. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Douglas M; Koulov, Atanas V; Alory-Jost, Christelle; Marks, Michael S; Balch, William E; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2006-01-01

    Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin) may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  17. Microbial Manipulation of the Amyloid Fold

    PubMed Central

    DePas, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are encased in a protein, DNA and polysaccharide matrix that protects the community, promotes interactions with the environment, and helps cells to adhere together. The protein component of these matrices is often a remarkably stable, β-sheet-rich polymer called amyloid. Amyloids form ordered, self-templating fibers that are highly aggregative, making them a valuable biofilm component. Some eukaryotic proteins inappropriately adopt the amyloid fold and these misfolded protein aggregates disrupt normal cellular proteostasis, which can cause significant cytotoxicity. Indeed, until recently amyloids were considered solely the result of protein misfolding. However, research over the past decade has revealed how various organisms have capitalized on the amyloid fold by developing sophisticated biogenesis pathways that coordinate gene expression, protein folding, and secretion so that amyloid-related toxicities are minimized. How microbes manipulate amyloids, by augmenting their advantageous properties and by reducing their undesirable properties, will be the subject of this review. PMID:23108148

  18. Appetite - decreased

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Ovarian cancer Stomach cancer Pancreatic cancer Other causes of decreased appetite include: Chronic liver disease Chronic kidney disease Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Dementia Heart failure ...

  19. Amyloid Features and Neuronal Toxicity of Mature Prion Fibrils Are Highly Sensitive to High Pressure*

    PubMed Central

    El Moustaine, Driss; Perrier, Veronique; Van Ba, Isabelle Acquatella-Tran; Meersman, Filip; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Lange, Reinhard; Torrent, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Prion proteins (PrP) can aggregate into toxic and possibly infectious amyloid fibrils. This particular macrostructure confers on them an extreme and still unexplained stability. To provide mechanistic insights into this self-assembly process, we used high pressure as a thermodynamic tool for perturbing the structure of mature amyloid fibrils that were prepared from recombinant full-length mouse PrP. Application of high pressure led to irreversible loss of several specific amyloid features, such as thioflavin T and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate binding, alteration of the characteristic proteinase K digestion pattern, and a significant decrease in the β-sheet structure and cytotoxicity of amyloid fibrils. Partial disaggregation of the mature fibrils into monomeric soluble PrP was observed. The remaining amyloid fibrils underwent a change in secondary structure that led to morphologically different fibrils composed of a reduced number of proto-filaments. The kinetics of these reactions was studied by recording the pressure-induced dissociation of thioflavin T from the amyloid fibrils. Analysis of the pressure and temperature dependence of the relaxation rates revealed partly unstructured and hydrated kinetic transition states and highlighted the importance of collapsing and hydrating inter- and intramolecular cavities to overcome the high free energy barrier that stabilizes amyloid fibrils. PMID:21357423

  20. Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Marsden, P D; Bruce-Chwatt, L J

    1975-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is an acute diffuse encephalopathy associated only with Plasmodium falciparum. It is probably a consequence of the rapid proliferation of the parasites in the body of man in relation to red cell invasion, and results in stagnation of blood flow in cerebralcapillaries with thromobotic occlusion of large numbers of cerebral capillaries. The subsequent cerebral pathology is cerebral infarction with haemorrhage and cerebral oedema. The wide prevalence of P. falciparum in highly endemic areas results in daily challenges to patients from several infected mosquitoes. It is thus important to understand the characteristics of P. falciparum, since this is one of the most important protozoan parasites of man and severe infection from it constitutes one of the few real clinical emergencies in tropical medicine. One of the more important aspects of the practice of medicine in the tropics is to establish a good understanding of the pattern of medical practice in that area. This applies to malaria as well as to other diseases. The neophyte might be somewhat surprised to learn, for example that an experienced colleague who lives in a holoendemic malarious area such as West Africa, sees no cerebral malaria. But the explanation is simple when the doctor concerned has a practice which involves treating adults only. Cerebral malaria is rare in adults, because in highly endemic areas, by the age of 1 year most of the infants in a group under study have already experienced their first falciparum infection. By the time they reach adult life, they have a solid immunity against severe falciparum infections. In fact, "clinical malaria" could occur in such a group under only two circumstances: 1) in pregnancy, a patent infection with P. falciparum might develop, probably due to an IgG drain across the placenta to the foetus;2) in an individual who has constantly taken antimalarials and who may have an immunity at such a low level that when antimalarial therapy is interrupted

  1. [Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage. Dementia with cystatin C amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, E; Jóhannesson, G

    1990-01-01

    Nineteen cases of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis with cerebral haemorrhage are described. The first haemorrhage occurred between the ages of 20 and 41 years and the period of survival varied from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a striking clinical symptom in 17 of the patients and in two cases dementia was the first sign. At the last examination severe dementia and pronounced pathological EEG were established in the majority of the patients. Infiltration of amyloid substance positive for anti-cystatin C was found in the proximity of the blood vessels and in their walls. Lesions in the cerebral microvascular system together with haemorrhages and infarcts caused thereby were considered to be an adequate explanation of the dementia in these patients. In view of the discovery of amyloid discharges in tissues outside the CNS it is adjudged more correct to use the name Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloidosis (HCCA).

  2. Topographic distribution of scrapie amyloid-immunoreactive plaques in chronic wasting disease in captive mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus).

    PubMed

    Guiroy, D C; Williams, E S; Yanagihara, R; Gajdusek, D C

    1991-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a progressive neurological disorder of captive mule deer, black-tailed deer, hybrids of mule deer and white-tailed deer and Rocky Mountain elk, is characterized neuropathologically by widespread spongiform change of the neuropil, intracytoplasmic vacuolation in neuronal perikarya and astrocytic hypertrophy and hyperplasia. We report the topographic distribution of amyloid plaques reactive to antibodies prepared against scrapie amyloid in CWD-affected captive mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus). Scrapie amyloid-immunoreactive plaques were found in the cerebral gray and white matter, in deep subcortical nuclei, in isolation or in clusters in areas of vacuolation, and perivascularly, in subpial and subependymal regions. In the cerebellum, immunoreactive amyloid plaques were observed in the molecular, pyramidal and granular layers. Scrapie amyloid-immunoreactive deposits were also seen in neuronal perikarya. Furthermore, amyloid plaques in CWD-affected captive mule deer were alcianophilic at 0.3 M magnesium chloride indicating the presence of weakly to moderately sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Our data corroborate that CWD in captive mule deer belongs to the subacute virus spongiform encephalopathies.

  3. Attenuation of β-Amyloid Deposition and Neurotoxicity by Chemogenetic Modulation of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant neural hyperactivity has been observed in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may be a driving force in the progression of amyloid pathology. Evidence for this includes the findings that neural activity may modulate β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide secretion and experimental stimulation of neural activity can increase amyloid deposition. However, whether long-term attenuation of neural activity prevents the buildup of amyloid plaques and associated neural pathologies remains unknown. Using viral-mediated delivery of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs), we show in two AD-like mouse models that chronic intermittent increases or reductions of activity have opposite effects on Aβ deposition. Neural activity reduction markedly decreases Aβ aggregation in regions containing axons or dendrites of DREADD-expressing neurons, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Importantly, activity attenuation is associated with a reduction in axonal dystrophy and synaptic loss around amyloid plaques. Thus, modulation of neural activity could constitute a potential therapeutic strategy for ameliorating amyloid-induced pathology in AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A novel chemogenetic approach to upregulate and downregulate neuronal activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice was implemented. This led to the first demonstration that chronic intermittent attenuation of neuronal activity in vivo significantly reduces amyloid deposition. The study also demonstrates that modulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) release can occur at both axonal and dendritic fields, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Activity reductions also led to attenuation of the synaptic pathology associated with amyloid plaques. Therefore, chronic attenuation of neuronal activity could constitute a novel therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:26758850

  4. Mixed oligomers and monomeric amyloid-β disrupts endothelial cells integrity and reduces monomeric amyloid-β transport across hCMEC/D3 cell line as an in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; LeVine, Harry; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-09-01

    Senile amyloid plaques are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the severity of clinical symptoms of AD is weakly correlated with the plaque load. AD symptoms severity is reported to be more strongly correlated with the level of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) assemblies. Formation of soluble Aβ assemblies is stimulated by monomeric Aβ accumulation in the brain, which has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Studies tend to focus on the neurotoxicity of specific Aβ species. There are relatively few studies investigating toxic effects of Aβ on the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We hypothesized that a soluble Aβ pool more closely resembling the in vivo situation composed of a mixture of Aβ40 monomer and Aβ42 oligomer would exert higher toxicity against hCMEC/D3 cells as an in vitro BBB model than either component alone. We observed that, in addition to a disruptive effect on the endothelial cells integrity due to enhancement of the paracellular permeability of the hCMEC/D3 monolayer, the Aβ mixture significantly decreased monomeric Aβ transport across the cell culture model. Consistent with its effect on Aβ transport, Aβ mixture treatment for 24h resulted in LRP1 down-regulation and RAGE up-regulation in hCMEC/D3 cells. The individual Aβ species separately failed to alter Aβ clearance or the cell-based BBB model integrity. Our study offers, for the first time, evidence that a mixture of soluble Aβ species, at nanomolar concentrations, disrupts endothelial cells integrity and its own transport across an in vitro model of the BBB.

  5. Pittsburgh compound B imaging and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β in a multicentre European memory clinic study

    PubMed Central

    Leuzy, Antoine; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Hasselbalch, Steen G.; Rinne, Juha O.; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Otto, Markus; Lleó, Alberto; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Santana, Isabel; Johansson, Jarkko; Anderl-Straub, Sarah; von Arnim, Christine A. F.; Beer, Ambros; Blesa, Rafael; Fortea, Juan; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Portelius, Erik; Pannee, Josef; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between data on cerebral amyloidosis, derived using Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and (i) multi-laboratory INNOTEST enzyme linked immunosorbent assay derived cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of amyloid-β42; (ii) centrally measured cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 using a Meso Scale Discovery enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; and (iii) cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 centrally measured using an antibody-independent mass spectrometry-based reference method. Moreover, we examined the hypothesis that discordance between amyloid biomarker measurements may be due to interindividual differences in total amyloid-β production, by using the ratio of amyloid-β42 to amyloid-β40. Our study population consisted of 243 subjects from seven centres belonging to the Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease Initiative, and included subjects with normal cognition and patients with mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and vascular dementia. All had Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography data, cerebrospinal fluid INNOTEST amyloid-β42 values, and cerebrospinal fluid samples available for reanalysis. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were reanalysed (amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β40) using Meso Scale Discovery electrochemiluminescence enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technology, and a novel, antibody-independent, mass spectrometry reference method. Pittsburgh compound B standardized uptake value ratio results were scaled using the Centiloid method. Concordance between Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry reference measurement procedure findings and Pittsburgh compound B was high in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease, while more variable results were observed for cognitively normal and non-Alzheimer’s disease groups. Agreement between Pittsburgh compound B classification and Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry

  6. Pittsburgh compound B imaging and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β in a multicentre European memory clinic study.

    PubMed

    Leuzy, Antoine; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rinne, Juha O; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Otto, Markus; Lleó, Alberto; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Santana, Isabel; Johansson, Jarkko; Anderl-Straub, Sarah; von Arnim, Christine A F; Beer, Ambros; Blesa, Rafael; Fortea, Juan; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Portelius, Erik; Pannee, Josef; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between data on cerebral amyloidosis, derived using Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and (i) multi-laboratory INNOTEST enzyme linked immunosorbent assay derived cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of amyloid-β42; (ii) centrally measured cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 using a Meso Scale Discovery enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; and (iii) cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 centrally measured using an antibody-independent mass spectrometry-based reference method. Moreover, we examined the hypothesis that discordance between amyloid biomarker measurements may be due to interindividual differences in total amyloid-β production, by using the ratio of amyloid-β42 to amyloid-β40 Our study population consisted of 243 subjects from seven centres belonging to the Biomarkers for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease Initiative, and included subjects with normal cognition and patients with mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and vascular dementia. All had Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography data, cerebrospinal fluid INNOTEST amyloid-β42 values, and cerebrospinal fluid samples available for reanalysis. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were reanalysed (amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β40) using Meso Scale Discovery electrochemiluminescence enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technology, and a novel, antibody-independent, mass spectrometry reference method. Pittsburgh compound B standardized uptake value ratio results were scaled using the Centiloid method. Concordance between Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry reference measurement procedure findings and Pittsburgh compound B was high in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, while more variable results were observed for cognitively normal and non-Alzheimer's disease groups. Agreement between Pittsburgh compound B classification and Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry reference

  7. Cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Newton, C.; Hien, T. T.; White, N.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral malaria may be the most common non-traumatic encephalopathy in the world. The pathogenesis is heterogenous and the neurological complications are often part of a multisystem dysfunction. The clinical presentation and pathophysiology differs between adults and children. Recent studies have elucidated the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and raised possible interventions. Antimalarial drugs, however, remain the only intervention that unequivocally affects outcome, although increasing resistance to the established antimalarial drugs is of grave concern. Artemisinin derivatives have made an impact on treatment, but other drugs may be required. With appropriate antimalarial drugs, the prognosis of cerebral malaria often depends on the management of other complications—for example, renal failure and acidosis. Neurological sequelae are increasingly recognised, but further research on the pathogenesis of coma and neurological damage is required to develop other ancillary treatments.

 PMID:10990500

  8. β-Amyloid-evoked apoptotic cell death is mediated through MKK6-p66shc pathway.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Muneesa; Parray, Arif A; Baba, Rafia A; Bhat, Hina F; Bhat, Sehar S; Mushtaq, Umar; Andrabi, Khurshid I; Khanday, Firdous A

    2014-03-01

    We have previously shown the involvement of p66shc in mediating apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate the novel mechanism of β-Amyloid-induced toxicity in the mammalian cells. β-Amyloid leads to the phosphorylation of p66shc at the serine 36 residue and activates MKK6, by mediating the phosphorylation at serine 207 residue. Treatment of cells with antioxidants blocks β-Amyloid-induced serine phosphorylation of MKK6, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and hence protected cells against β-Amyloid-induced cell death. Our results indicate that serine phosphorylation of p66shc is carried out by active MKK6. MKK6 knock-down resulted in decreased serine 36 phosphorylation of p66shc. Co-immunoprecipitation results demonstrate a direct physical association between p66shc and WT MKK6, but not with its mutants. Increase in β-Amyloid-induced ROS production was observed in the presence of MKK6 and p66shc, when compared to triple mutant of MKK6 (inactive) and S36 mutant of p66shc. ROS scavengers and knock-down against p66shc, and MKK6 significantly decreased the endogenous level of active p66shc, ROS production, and cell death. Finally, we show that the MKK6-p66shc complex mediates β-Amyloid-evoked apoptotic cell death.

  9. Prenatal high-fat diet alters the cerebrovasculature and clearance of β-amyloid in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Cheryl A; Gentleman, Steve M; Nicoll, James Ar; Carare, Roxana O

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the extracellular spaces of the brain as plaques and in the walls of blood vessels as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Failure of perivascular drainage of Aβ along cerebrovascular basement membranes contributes to the development of CAA. Mid-life hypercholesterolaemia is a risk factor for the development of AD. Maternal obesity is associated with the development of obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia in adulthood, suggesting that the risk for AD and CAA may also be influenced by the early-life environment. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that early-life exposure to a high-fat diet results in changes to the cerebrovasculature and failure of Aβ clearance from the brain. We also assessed whether vascular Aβ deposition is greater in the brains of aged humans with a history of hyperlipidaemia, compared to age-matched controls with normal lipidaemia. Using a mouse model of maternal obesity, we found that exposure to a high-fat diet during gestation and lactation induced changes in multiple components of the neurovascular unit, including a down-regulation in collagen IV, fibronectin and apolipoprotein E, an up-regulation in markers of astrocytes and perivascular macrophages and altered blood vessel morphology in the brains of adult mice. Sustained high-fat diet over the entire lifespan resulted in additional decreases in levels of pericytes and impaired perivascular clearance of Aβ from the brain. In humans, vascular Aβ load was significantly increased in the brains of aged individuals with a history of hypercholesterolaemia. These results support a critical role for early dietary influence on the brain vasculature across the lifespan, with consequences for the development of age-related cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Acute cerebral vascular accident associated with hyperperfusion.

    PubMed

    Soin, J S; Burdine, J A

    1976-01-01

    Cerebral radionuclide angiography can demonstrate decreased or normal radioactivity in the affected region during the arterial phase in patients who have sustained a cerebral vascular accident and thus enhances the diagnostic specificity of the static brain image. In an occasional patient, however, a seemingly paradoxical pattern of regional hyperperfusion with a return to normal or subnormal perfusion following the acute phase has been observed. This phenomenon, called "luxury perfusion," has been defined using intra-arterial 133Xe for semiquantitative cerebral blood flow measurements and should be kept in mind as a potentially misleading cerebral imaging pattern.

  11. Amyloid Structures as Biofilm Matrix Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Lasa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Recent insights into bacterial biofilm matrix structures have induced a paradigm shift toward the recognition of amyloid fibers as common building block structures that confer stability to the exopolysaccharide matrix. Here we describe the functional amyloid systems related to biofilm matrix formation in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and recent knowledge regarding the interaction of amyloids with other biofilm matrix components such as extracellular DNA (eDNA) and the host immune system. In addition, we summarize the efforts to identify compounds that target amyloid fibers for therapeutic purposes and recent developments that take advantage of the amyloid structure to engineer amyloid fibers of bacterial biofilm matrices for biotechnological applications. PMID:27185827

  12. Insight into Amyloid Structure Using Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Ashley A.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of amyloids in the brain. One prominent form of amyloid is composed of repeating units of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Over the past decade, it has become clear that these Aβ amyloids are not homogeneous; rather, they are composed of a series of structures varying in their overall size and shape and the number of Aβ peptides they contain. Recent theories suggest that these different amyloid conformations may play distinct roles in disease, although their relative contributions are still being discovered. Here, we review how chemical probes, such as congo red, thioflavin T and their derivatives, have been powerful tools for better understanding amyloid structure and function. Moreover, we discuss how design and deployment of conformationally selective probes might be used to test emerging models of AD. PMID:21457473

  13. Amyloid deposition in 2 feline thymomas.

    PubMed

    Burrough, E R; Myers, R K; Hostetter, S J; Fox, L E; Bayer, B J; Felz, C L; Waller, K R; Whitley, E M

    2012-07-01

    Two cases of feline thymoma with amyloid deposition were encountered between 1982 and 2010. Neoplastic cells were separated by abundant, pale eosinophilic, homogeneous material that was congophilic and birefringent. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were connected by desmosomes, and the extracellular deposits were composed of nonbranching, hollow-cored fibrils, 8-10 nm in diameter. In the case with sufficient archived tissue for additional sections, the amyloid remained congophilic following potassium permanganate incubation, and the neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for pancytokeratin. The histologic, histochemical, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features of both neoplasms are consistent with epithelial-predominant thymoma with the unusual feature of intratumoral amyloid deposition. The affinity of the amyloid for Congo red following potassium permanganate incubation is consistent with non-AA amyloid. The ultrastructural findings were consistent with amyloid production by the neoplastic epithelial cells.

  14. Docosahexaenoic Acid Reduces Amyloid β Production via Multiple Pleiotropic Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Marcus O. W.; Kuchenbecker, Johanna; Grösgen, Sven; Burg, Verena K.; Hundsdörfer, Benjamin; Rothhaar, Tatjana L.; Friess, Petra; de Wilde, Martijn C.; Broersen, Laus M.; Penke, Botond; Péter, Mária; Vígh, László; Grimm, Heike S.; Hartmann, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is characterized by accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) generated by β- and γ-secretase processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The intake of the polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been associated with decreased amyloid deposition and a reduced risk in Alzheimer disease in several epidemiological trials; however, the exact underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here, we systematically investigate the effect of DHA on amyloidogenic and nonamyloidogenic APP processing and the potential cross-links to cholesterol metabolism in vivo and in vitro. DHA reduces amyloidogenic processing by decreasing β- and γ-secretase activity, whereas the expression and protein levels of BACE1 and presenilin1 remain unchanged. In addition, DHA increases protein stability of α-secretase resulting in increased nonamyloidogenic processing. Besides the known effect of DHA to decrease cholesterol de novo synthesis, we found cholesterol distribution in plasma membrane to be altered. In the presence of DHA, cholesterol shifts from raft to non-raft domains, and this is accompanied by a shift in γ-secretase activity and presenilin1 protein levels. Taken together, DHA directs amyloidogenic processing of APP toward nonamyloidogenic processing, effectively reducing Aβ release. DHA has a typical pleiotropic effect; DHA-mediated Aβ reduction is not the consequence of a single major mechanism but is the result of combined multiple effects. PMID:21324907

  15. Arterial spin labeling imaging reveals widespread and Aβ-independent reductions in cerebral blood flow in elderly apolipoprotein epsilon-4 carriers.

    PubMed

    Michels, Lars; Warnock, Geoffrey; Buck, Alfred; Macauda, Gianluca; Leh, Sandra E; Kaelin, Andrea M; Riese, Florian; Meyer, Rafael; O'Gorman, Ruth; Hock, Christoph; Kollias, Spyros; Gietl, Anton F

    2016-03-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow are an essential feature of Alzheimer's disease and have been linked to apolipoprotein E-genotype and cerebral amyloid-deposition. These factors could be interdependent or influence cerebral blood flow via different mechanisms. We examined apolipoprotein E-genotype, amyloid beta-deposition, and cerebral blood flow in amnestic mild cognitive impairment using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI in 27 cognitively normal elderly and 16 amnestic mild cognitive impairment participants. Subjects underwent Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography and apolipoprotein E-genotyping. Global cerebral blood flow was lower in apolipoprotein E ɛ4-allele carriers (apolipoprotein E4+) than in apolipoprotein E4- across all subjects (including cognitively normal participants) and within the group of cognitively normal elderly. Global cerebral blood flow was lower in subjects with mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal. Subjects with elevated cerebral amyloid-deposition (PiB+) showed a trend for lower global cerebral blood flow. Apolipoprotein E-status exerted the strongest effect on global cerebral blood flow. Regional analysis indicated that local cerebral blood flow reductions were more widespread for the contrasts apolipoprotein E4+ versus apolipoprotein E4- compared with the contrasts PiB+ versus PiB- or mild cognitive impairment versus cognitively normal. These findings suggest that apolipoprotein E-genotype exerts its impact on cerebral blood flow at least partly independently from amyloid beta-deposition, suggesting that apolipoprotein E also contributes to cerebral blood flow changes outside the context of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Arterial spin labeling imaging reveals widespread and Aβ-independent reductions in cerebral blood flow in elderly apolipoprotein epsilon-4 carriers

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, Geoffrey; Buck, Alfred; Macauda, Gianluca; Leh, Sandra E; Kaelin, Andrea M; Riese, Florian; Meyer, Rafael; O’Gorman, Ruth; Hock, Christoph; Kollias, Spyros; Gietl, Anton F

    2015-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow are an essential feature of Alzheimer’s disease and have been linked to apolipoprotein E-genotype and cerebral amyloid-deposition. These factors could be interdependent or influence cerebral blood flow via different mechanisms. We examined apolipoprotein E-genotype, amyloid beta-deposition, and cerebral blood flow in amnestic mild cognitive impairment using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI in 27 cognitively normal elderly and 16 amnestic mild cognitive impairment participants. Subjects underwent Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography and apolipoprotein E-genotyping. Global cerebral blood flow was lower in apolipoprotein E ɛ4-allele carriers (apolipoprotein E4+) than in apolipoprotein E4− across all subjects (including cognitively normal participants) and within the group of cognitively normal elderly. Global cerebral blood flow was lower in subjects with mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal. Subjects with elevated cerebral amyloid-deposition (PiB+) showed a trend for lower global cerebral blood flow. Apolipoprotein E-status exerted the strongest effect on global cerebral blood flow. Regional analysis indicated that local cerebral blood flow reductions were more widespread for the contrasts apolipoprotein E4+ versus apolipoprotein E4− compared with the contrasts PiB+ versus PiB− or mild cognitive impairment versus cognitively normal. These findings suggest that apolipoprotein E-genotype exerts its impact on cerebral blood flow at least partly independently from amyloid beta-deposition, suggesting that apolipoprotein E also contributes to cerebral blood flow changes outside the context of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26661143

  17. Surgical considerations about amyloid goiter.

    PubMed

    García Villanueva, Augusto; García Villanueva, María Jesús; García Villanueva, Mercedes; Rojo Blanco, Roberto; Collado Guirao, María Vicenta; Cabañas Montero, Jacobo; Beni Pérez, Rafael; Moreno Montes, Irene

    2013-05-01

    Amyloidosis is an uncommon syndrome consisting of a number of disorders having in common an extracellular deposit of fibrillary proteins. This results in functional and structural changes in the affected organs, depending on deposit location and severity. Amyloid infiltration of the thyroid gland may occur in 50% and up to 80% of patients with primary and secondary amyloidosis respectively. Amyloid goiter (AG) is a true rarity, usually found associated to secondary amyloidosis. AG may require surgical excision, usually because of compressive symptoms. We report the case of a patient with a big AG occurring in the course of a secondary amyloidosis associated to polyarticular onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis who underwent total thyroidectomy. Current literature is reviewed, an attempt is made to provide action guidelines, and some surgical considerations on this rare condition are given.

  18. The yin and yang of amyloid aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Falsone, S Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Intra- and extra-cellular amyloid protein fibers are traditionally coupled to a series of devastating and incurable neurodegenerative disorders. Since the discovery of physiologically useful amyloids, our attention has been shifting from pure pathology to function, as amyloid aggregation seems to constitute a basis for the functional and dynamic assembly of biological structures. The following article summarizes how the cell profits from such an unconventional high-risk aggregation at the rim of physiologic utility and pathologic catastrophe. PMID:28031869

  19. The Human Disease-Associated Aβ Amyloid Core Sequence Forms Functional Amyloids in a Fungal Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Rameau, Rachele D.; Jackson, Desmond N.; Beaussart, Audrey; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is increasing evidence that many amyloids in living cells have physiological functions. On the surfaces of fungal cells, amyloid core sequences in adhesins can aggregate into 100- to 1,000-nm-wide patches to form high-avidity adhesion nanodomains on the cell surface. The nanodomains form through interactions that have amyloid-like properties: binding of amyloid dyes, perturbation by antiamyloid agents, and interaction with homologous sequences. To test whether these functional interactions are mediated by typical amyloid interactions, we substituted an amyloid core sequence, LVFFA, from human Aβ protein for the native sequence IVIVA in the 1,419-residue Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. The chimeric protein formed cell surface nanodomains and mediated cellular aggregation. The native sequence and chimeric adhesins responded similarly to the amyloid dye thioflavin T and to amyloid perturbants. However, unlike the native protein, the nanodomains formed by the chimeric protein were not force activated and formed less-robust aggregates under flow. These results showed the similarity of amyloid interactions in the amyloid core sequences of native Als5p and Aβ, but they also highlighted emergent properties of the native sequence. Also, a peptide composed of the Aβ amyloid sequence flanked by amino acids from the adhesin formed two-dimensional sheets with sizes similar to the cell surface patches of the adhesins. These results inform an initial model for the structure of fungal cell surface amyloid nanodomains. PMID:26758179

  20. Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in patients of Dutch origin is related to Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    van Duinen, S.G.; Castano, E.M.; Prelli, F.; Bots, G.T.A.B.; Luyendijk, W.; Frangione, B.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in Dutch patients is an autosomal dominant form of vascular amyloidosis restricted to the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Clinically the disease is characterized by cerebral hemorrhages leading to an early death. Immunohistochemical studies of five patients revealed that the vascular amyloid deposits reacted intensely with an antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide homologous to the Alzheimer disease-related ..beta..-protein. Silver stain-positive, senile plaque-like structures were also labeled by the antiserum, yet these lesions lacked the dense amyloid cores present in typical plaques of Alzheimer disease. No neurofibrillary tangles were present. Amyloid fibrils were purified from the leptomeningeal vessels of one patient who clinically had no signs of dementia. The protein had a molecular weight of approx. 4000 and its partial amino acid sequence to position 21 showed homology to the ..beta..-protein of Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. These results suggest that hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Dutch origin is pathogenetically related to Alzheimer disease and support the concept that the initial amyloid deposition in this disorder occurs in the vessel walls before damaging the brain parenchyma. Thus, deposition of ..beta..-protein in brain tissue seems to be related to a spectrum of diseases involving vascular syndromes, progressive dementia, or both.

  1. Reduction of β-amyloid deposits by γ-secretase inhibitor is associated with the attenuation of secondary damage in the ipsilateral thalamus and sensory functional improvement after focal cortical infarction in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yusheng; Xing, Shihui; Zhang, Jian; Li, Jingjing; Li, Chuo; Pei, Zhong; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2011-02-01

    Abnormal β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits in the thalamus have been reported after cerebral cortical infarction. In this study, we investigated the association of Aβ deposits, with the secondary thalamic damage after focal cortical infarction in rats. Thirty-six stroke-prone renovascular hypertensive rats were subjected to distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and then randomly divided into MCAO, vehicle, and N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) groups and 12 sham-operated rats as control. The DAPT was administered orally at 72 hours after MCAO. Seven days after MCAO, sensory function, neuron loss, and glial activation and proliferation were evaluated using adhesive removal test, Nissl staining, and immunostaining, respectively. Thalamic Aβ accumulation was evaluated using immunostaining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with vehicle group, the ipsilateral thalamic Aβ, neuronal loss, glial activation and proliferation, and the mean time to remove the stimulus from right forepaw significantly decreased in DAPT group. The mean time to remove the stimulus from the right forepaw and thalamic Aβ burden were both negatively correlated with the number of thalamic neurons. These findings suggest that Aβ deposits are associated with the secondary thalamic damage. Reduction of thalamic Aβ by γ-secretase inhibitor may attenuate the secondary damage and improve sensory function after cerebral cortical infarction.

  2. Decreasing amyloid toxicity through an increased rate of aggregation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cp06765d. The data supporting the publication can be accessed at https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.6653. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Sonzini, Silvia; Stanyon, Helen F.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid β is one of the peptides involved in the onset of Alzheimer's disease, yet the structure of the toxic species and its underlying mechanism remain elusive on account of the dynamic nature of the Aβ oligomerisation process. While it has been reported that incubation of Amyloid β (1–42) sequences (Aβ42) lead to formation of aggregates that vary in morphology and toxicity, we demonstrate that addition of a discrete macrocyclic host molecule, cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]), substantially reduces toxicity in the neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y. The macrocycle preferentially targets Phe residues in Aβ42 complexing them in a 2 : 1 fashion in neighboring peptide strands. A small but significant structural ‘switch’ occurs, which induces an increased aggregation rate, suggesting a different cell-uptake mechanism for Aβ42 in the presence of CB[8]. Dramatically increasing the rate of Aβ42 aggregation with CB[8] bypasses the toxic, oligomeric state offering an alternative approach to counter Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27982149

  3. [Cerebral proteolysis of amiloid-b peptide: relevance of insulin-degrading enzyme in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Leal, María Celeste; Fernandez Gamba, Agata; Morelli, Laura; Castaño, Eduardo M

    2009-01-01

    The global increase in life expectancy turns Alzheimer's disease (AD) into a growing problem. One of the distinctive features of AD is the excessive accumulation of amyloid-b (Ab) peptide in the brain. In recent years, a concept that has gained strength is that degradation of Ab by proteases in situ is an important mechanism that prevents cerebral peptide accumulation. Biochemical and genetic data have shown that insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) participates in Ab and insulin homeostasis. IDE expression and activity are significantly decreased in AD brains compared to age-matched controls. Also, IDE is deposited with Ab in senile plaques and blood vessels, indicating a gross conformational change as a consequence of diverse post-translational mechanisms. These alterations in IDE distribution and activity may result in insufficient degradation of Ab and insulin, promoting the formation of Ab oligomers and hormone resistance. Both processes might play a fundamental part in neurodegeneration. The study of the clearance mechanisms of cerebral Ab will not only aid in the understanding AD pathogenesis but will also allow a better interpretation of ongoing clinical trials and the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  4. Review: history of the amyloid fibril.

    PubMed

    Sipe, J D; Cohen, A S

    2000-06-01

    Rudolph Virchow, in 1854, introduced and popularized the term amyloid to denote a macroscopic tissue abnormality that exhibited a positive iodine staining reaction. Subsequent light microscopic studies with polarizing optics demonstrated the inherent birefringence of amyloid deposits, a property that increased intensely after staining with Congo red dye. In 1959, electron microscopic examination of ultrathin sections of amyloidotic tissues revealed the presence of fibrils, indeterminate in length and, invariably, 80 to 100 A in width. Using the criteria of Congophilia and fibrillar morphology, 20 or more biochemically distinct forms of amyloid have been identified throughout the animal kingdom; each is specifically associated with a unique clinical syndrome. Fibrils, also 80 to 100 A in width, have been isolated from tissue homogenates using differential sedimentation or solubility. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the fibrils to be ordered in the beta pleated sheet conformation, with the direction of the polypeptide backbone perpendicular to the fibril axis (cross beta structure). Because of the similar dimensions and tinctorial properties of the fibrils extracted from amyloid-laden tissues and amyloid fibrils in tissue sections, they have been assumed to be identical. However, the spatial relationship of proteoglycans and amyloid P component (AP), common to all forms of amyloid, to the putative protein only fibrils in tissues, has been unclear. Recently, it has been suggested that, in situ, amyloid fibrils are composed of proteoglycans and AP as well as amyloid proteins and thus resemble connective tissue microfibrils. Chemical and physical definition of the fibrils in tissues will be needed to relate the in vitro properties of amyloid protein fibrils to the pathogenesis of amyloid fibril formation in vivo.

  5. Immunohistochemical analysis of constituents of senile plaques and cerebro-vascular amyloid in aged dogs.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Nakayama, H; Tateyama, S; Goto, N

    1992-10-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis of constituents of senile plaques and cerebro-vascular amyloid in the brain of aged dogs was performed using antisera against beta protein, cystatin C, ubiquitin, tau, and neurofilament (NF). All types of senile plaques and cerebro-vascular amyloid in aged dogs were labeled by anti-beta protein serum. Cystatin C immunoreactivity was detected in neuronal cell bodies, primitive or classical plaques, and amyloid deposited around cerebral capillaries, but not in diffuse plaques and amyloid deposited in the media tunica of cerebro-meningeal arterioles. Ubiquitin-positive granules distributed widely in both gray and white matter of aged dogs, while they were very small in number in young dogs. Swollen neurites-like materials in primitive plaques or classical plaques were immunoreactive for anti-ubiquitin serum. Tau immunostaining labeled commonly axons and several neuronal or glial cells after hydrate autoclave pretreatment. Tau-positive components were observed very rarely in the corona of classical plaques. Most of swollen neurites-like structures of primitive or classical plaques were not reactive for anti-NF serum, and only a few plaques contained small numbers of NF-positive elements.

  6. β-Amyloid is associated with aberrant metabolic connectivity in subjects with mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Felix; Charil, Arnaud; Zijdenbos, Alex P; Evans, Alan C; Bedell, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies using [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) have identified a well-defined pattern of glucose hypometabolism in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The assessment of the metabolic relationship among brain regions has the potential to provide unique information regarding the disease process. Previous studies of metabolic correlation patterns have demonstrated alterations in AD subjects relative to age-matched, healthy control subjects. The objective of this study was to examine the associations between β-amyloid, apolipoprotein E ɛ4 (APOE ɛ4) genotype, and metabolic correlations patterns in subjects diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Mild cognitive impairment subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study were categorized into β-amyloid-low and β-amyloid-high groups, based on quantitative analysis of [18F]florbetapir PET scans, and APOE ɛ4 non-carriers and carriers based on genotyping. We generated voxel-wise metabolic correlation strength maps across the entire cerebral cortex for each group, and, subsequently, performed a seed-based analysis. We found that the APOE ɛ4 genotype was closely related to regional glucose hypometabolism, while elevated, fibrillar β-amyloid burden was associated with specific derangements of the metabolic correlation patterns. PMID:24736891

  7. Tackling amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer’s disease with A2V variants of Amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Colombo, Laura; Rossi, Alessandro; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Virgilio, Tommaso; Palamara, Luisa; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Campagnani, Ilaria; Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) exploiting the properties of a natural variant of Amyloid-β (Aβ) carrying the A2V substitution, which protects heterozygous carriers from AD by its ability to interact with wild-type Aβ, hindering conformational changes and assembly thereof. As prototypic compound we designed a six-mer mutated peptide (Aβ1-6A2V), linked to the HIV-related TAT protein, which is widely used for brain delivery and cell membrane penetration of drugs. The resulting molecule [Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D)] revealed strong anti-amyloidogenic effects in vitro and protected human neuroblastoma cells from Aβ toxicity. Preclinical studies in AD mouse models showed that short-term treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) inhibits Aβ aggregation and cerebral amyloid deposition, but a long treatment schedule unexpectedly increases amyloid burden, although preventing cognitive deterioration. Our data support the view that the AβA2V-based strategy can be successfully used for the development of treatments for AD, as suggested by the natural protection against the disease in human A2V heterozygous carriers. The undesirable outcome of the prolonged treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) was likely due to the TAT intrinsic attitude to increase Aβ production, avidly bind amyloid and boost its seeding activity, warning against the use of the TAT carrier in the design of AD therapeutics. PMID:26864599

  8. Tackling amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease with A2V variants of Amyloid-β.

    PubMed

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Colombo, Laura; Rossi, Alessandro; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Virgilio, Tommaso; Palamara, Luisa; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Campagnani, Ilaria; Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2016-02-11

    We developed a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) exploiting the properties of a natural variant of Amyloid-β (Aβ) carrying the A2V substitution, which protects heterozygous carriers from AD by its ability to interact with wild-type Aβ, hindering conformational changes and assembly thereof. As prototypic compound we designed a six-mer mutated peptide (Aβ1-6A2V), linked to the HIV-related TAT protein, which is widely used for brain delivery and cell membrane penetration of drugs. The resulting molecule [Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D)] revealed strong anti-amyloidogenic effects in vitro and protected human neuroblastoma cells from Aβ toxicity. Preclinical studies in AD mouse models showed that short-term treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) inhibits Aβ aggregation and cerebral amyloid deposition, but a long treatment schedule unexpectedly increases amyloid burden, although preventing cognitive deterioration. Our data support the view that the AβA2V-based strategy can be successfully used for the development of treatments for AD, as suggested by the natural protection against the disease in human A2V heterozygous carriers. The undesirable outcome of the prolonged treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) was likely due to the TAT intrinsic attitude to increase Aβ production, avidly bind amyloid and boost its seeding activity, warning against the use of the TAT carrier in the design of AD therapeutics.

  9. Oxidative stress and mitochondria-mediated cell death mechanisms triggered by the familial Danish dementia ADan amyloid.

    PubMed

    Todd, Krysti; Ghiso, Jorge; Rostagno, Agueda

    2016-01-01

    Familial Danish Dementia (FDD), an early-onset non-amyloid-β (Aβ) cerebral amyloidosis, is neuropathologically characterized by widespread cerebral amyloid angiopathy, parenchymal amyloid and preamyloid deposits, as well as neurofibrillary degeneration indistinguishable to that seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The main amyloid subunit composing FDD lesions, a 34-amino acid de-novo generated peptide ADan, is the direct result of a genetic defect at the 3'-end of the BRI2 gene and the physiologic action of furin-like proteolytic processing at the C-terminal region of the ADan precursor protein. We aimed to study the impact of the FDD mutation, the additional formation of the pyroglutamate (pE) posttranslational modification as well as the relevance of C-terminal truncations -all major components of the heterogeneous FDD deposits- on the structural and neurotoxic properties of the molecule. Our data indicates that whereas the mutation generated a β-sheet-rich hydrophobic ADan subunit of high oligomerization/fibrillization propensity and the pE modification further enhanced these properties, C-terminal truncations had the opposite effect mostly abolishing these features. The potentiation of pro-amyloidogenic properties correlated with the initiation of neuronal cell death mechanisms involving oxidative stress, perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and downstream activation of caspase-mediated apoptotic pathways. The amyloid-induced toxicity was inhibited by targeting specific components of these detrimental cellular pathways, using reactive oxygen scavengers and monoclonal antibodies recognizing the pathological amyloid subunit. Taken together, the data indicate that the FDD mutation and the pE posttranslational modification are both primary elements driving intact ADan into an amyloidogenic/neurotoxic pathway while truncations at the C-terminus eliminate the pro-amyloidogenic characteristics of the molecule

  10. Betaine suppressed Aβ generation by altering amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiu-Ping; Qian, Xiang; Xie, Yue; Qi, Yan; Peng, Min-Feng; Zhan, Bi-Cui; Lou, Zheng-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Betaine was an endogenous catabolite of choline, which could be isolated from vegetables and marine products. Betaine could promote the metabolism of homocysteine in healthy subjects and was used for hyperlipidemia, coronary atherosclerosis, and fatty liver in clinic. Recent findings shown that Betaine rescued neuronal damage due to homocysteine induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) like pathological cascade, including tau hyperphosphorylation and amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition. Aβ was derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and was a triggering factor for AD pathological onset. Here, we demonstrated that Betaine reduced Aβ levels by altering APP processing in N2a cells stably expressing Swedish mutant of APP. Betaine increased α-secretase activity, but decreased β-secretase activity. Our data indicate that Betaine might play a protective role in Aβ production.

  11. ESCRTs regulate amyloid precursor protein sorting in multivesicular bodies and intracellular amyloid-β accumulation.

    PubMed

    Edgar, James R; Willén, Katarina; Gouras, Gunnar K; Futter, Clare E

    2015-07-15

    Intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is a key feature of early Alzheimer's disease and precedes the appearance of Aβ in extracellular plaques. Aβ is generated through proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), but the intracellular site of Aβ production is unclear. APP has been localized to multivesicular bodies (MVBs) where sorting of APP onto intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) could promote amyloidogenic processing, or reduce Aβ production or accumulation by sorting APP and processing products to lysosomes for degradation. Here, we show that APP localizes to the ILVs of a subset of MVBs that also traffic EGF receptor (EGFR), and that it is delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Depletion of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) components, Hrs (also known as Hgs) or Tsg101, inhibited targeting of APP to ILVs and the subsequent delivery to lysosomes, and led to increased intracellular Aβ accumulation. This was accompanied by dramatically decreased Aβ secretion. Thus, the early ESCRT machinery has a dual role in limiting intracellular Aβ accumulation through targeting of APP and processing products to the lysosome for degradation, and promoting Aβ secretion.

  12. Characterization of Amyloid Cores in Prion Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Fernández, Maria Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Navarro, Susanna; de Groot, Natalia S.; Serpell, Louise; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids consist of repetitions of a specific polypeptide chain in a regular cross-β-sheet conformation. Amyloid propensity is largely determined by the protein sequence, the aggregation process being nucleated by specific and short segments. Prions are special amyloids that become self-perpetuating after aggregation. Prions are responsible for neuropathology in mammals, but they can also be functional, as in yeast prions. The conversion of these last proteins to the prion state is driven by prion forming domains (PFDs), which are generally large, intrinsically disordered, enriched in glutamines/asparagines and depleted in hydrophobic residues. The self-assembly of PFDs has been thought to rely mostly on their particular amino acid composition, rather than on their sequence. Instead, we have recently proposed that specific amyloid-prone sequences within PFDs might be key to their prion behaviour. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these amyloid stretches inside the PFDs of the canonical Sup35, Swi1, Mot3 and Ure2 prions. These sequences self-assemble efficiently into highly ordered amyloid fibrils, that are functionally competent, being able to promote the PFD amyloid conversion in vitro and in vivo. Computational analyses indicate that these kind of amyloid stretches may act as typical nucleating signals in a number of different prion domains. PMID:27686217

  13. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  14. Amyloid beta-protein and lipid rafts: focused on biogenesis and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Araki, Wataru; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is thought to play a key role in the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three secretases (β-, γ-, and α-secretase) are proteases that control the production of Aβ from amyloid precursor protein. Increasing evidence suggests that cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains termed 'lipid rafts' are involved in the biogenesis and accumulation of Aβ as well as Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity. γ-Secretase is enriched in lipid rafts, which are considered an important site for Aβ generation. Additionally, Aβ-degrading peptidases located in lipid rafts, such as neprilysin, appear to play a role in Aβ catabolism. This mini-review focuses on the roles of lipid rafts in the biogenesis and catabolism of Aβ, covering recent research on the relationship between lipid rafts and the three secretases or Aβ-degrading peptidases. Furthermore, the significance of lipid rafts in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity is briefly summarized.

  15. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation.

  16. Chiral recognition in amyloid fiber growth.

    PubMed

    Torbeev, Vladimir; Grogg, Marcel; Ruiz, Jérémy; Boehringer, Régis; Schirer, Alicia; Hellwig, Petra; Jeschke, Gunnar; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Insoluble amyloid fibers represent a pathological signature of many human diseases. To treat such diseases, inhibition of amyloid formation has been proposed as a possible therapeutic strategy. d-Peptides, which possess high proteolytic stability and lessened immunogenicity, are attractive candidates in this context. However, a molecular understanding of chiral recognition phenomena for d-peptides and l-amyloids is currently incomplete. Here we report experiments on amyloid growth of individual enantiomers and their mixtures for two distinct polypeptide systems of different length and structural organization: a 44-residue covalently-linked dimer derived from a peptide corresponding to the [20-41]-fragment of human β2-microglobulin (β2m) and the 99-residue full-length protein. For the dimeric [20-41]β2m construct, a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide-labeled constructs and (13) C-isotope edited FT-IR spectroscopy of (13) C-labeled preparations was used to show that racemic mixtures precipitate as intact homochiral fibers, i.e. undergo spontaneous Pasteur-like resolution into a mixture of left- and right-handed amyloids. In the case of full-length β2m, the presence of the mirror-image d-protein affords morphologically distinct amyloids that are composed largely of enantiopure domains. Removal of the l-component from hybrid amyloids by proteolytic digestion results in their rapid transformation into characteristic long straight d-β2m amyloids. Furthermore, the full-length d-enantiomer of β2m was found to be an efficient inhibitor of l-β2m amyloid growth. This observation highlights the potential of longer d-polypeptides for future development into inhibitors of amyloid propagation. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Reduction of Abeta amyloid pathology in APPPS1 transgenic mice in the absence of gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Harach, T; Marungruang, N; Duthilleul, N; Cheatham, V; Mc Coy, K D; Frisoni, G; Neher, J J; Fåk, F; Jucker, M; Lasser, T; Bolmont, T

    2017-02-08

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in the western world, however there is no cure available for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Despite clinical and experimental evidence implicating the intestinal microbiota in a number of brain disorders, its impact on Alzheimer's disease is not known. To this end we sequenced bacterial 16S rRNA from fecal samples of Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse model and found a remarkable shift in the gut microbiota as compared to non-transgenic wild-type mice. Subsequently we generated germ-free APP transgenic mice and found a drastic reduction of cerebralamyloid pathology when compared to control mice with intestinal microbiota. Importantly, colonization of germ-free APP transgenic mice with microbiota from conventionally-raised APP transgenic mice increased cerebral Aβ pathology, while colonization with microbiota from wild-type mice was less effective in increasing cerebral Aβ levels. Our results indicate a microbial involvement in the development of Abeta amyloid pathology, and suggest that microbiota may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Reduction of Abeta amyloid pathology in APPPS1 transgenic mice in the absence of gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Harach, T.; Marungruang, N.; Duthilleul, N.; Cheatham, V.; Mc Coy, K. D.; Frisoni, G.; Neher, J. J.; Fåk, F.; Jucker, M.; Lasser, T.; Bolmont, T.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia in the western world, however there is no cure available for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Despite clinical and experimental evidence implicating the intestinal microbiota in a number of brain disorders, its impact on Alzheimer’s disease is not known. To this end we sequenced bacterial 16S rRNA from fecal samples of Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse model and found a remarkable shift in the gut microbiota as compared to non-transgenic wild-type mice. Subsequently we generated germ-free APP transgenic mice and found a drastic reduction of cerebralamyloid pathology when compared to control mice with intestinal microbiota. Importantly, colonization of germ-free APP transgenic mice with microbiota from conventionally-raised APP transgenic mice increased cerebral Aβ pathology, while colonization with microbiota from wild-type mice was less effective in increasing cerebral Aβ levels. Our results indicate a microbial involvement in the development of Abeta amyloid pathology, and suggest that microbiota may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28176819

  19. Yuzu extract prevents cognitive decline and impaired glucose homeostasis in β-amyloid-infused rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Hwang, Jin Taek; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Moon, Na Rang; Park, Sunmin

    2013-07-01

    Our preliminary study revealed that dementia induced by β-amyloid accumulation impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis (unpublished). We therefore evaluated whether long-term oral consumption of yuzu (Citrus junos Tanaka) extract improves cognitive dysfunction and glucose homeostasis in β-amyloid-induced rats. Male rats received hippocampal CA1 infusions of β-amyloid (25-35) [plaque forming β-amyloid; Alzheimer disease (AD)] or β-amyloid (35-25) [non-plaque forming β-amyloid; C (non-Alzheimer disease control)] at a rate of 3.6 nmol/d for 14 d. AD rats were divided into 2 dietary groups that received either 3% lyophilized 70% ethanol extracts of yuzu (AD-Y) or 3% dextrin (AD-C) in high-fat diets (43% energy as fat). The AD-C group exhibited greater hippocampal β-amyloid deposition, which was not detected in the C group, and attenuated hippocampal insulin signaling. Yuzu treatment prevented β-amyloid accumulation, increased tau phosphorylation, and attenuated hippocampal insulin signaling observed in AD-C rats. Consistent with β-amyloid accumulation, the AD-C rats experienced cognitive dysfunction, which was prevented by yuzu. AD-C rats gained less weight than did C rats due to decreased feed consumption, and yuzu treatment prevented the decrease in feed consumption. Serum glucose concentrations were higher in AD-C than in C rats at 40-120 min after glucose loading during an oral-glucose-tolerance test, but not at 0-40 min. Serum insulin concentrations were highly elevated in AD-C rats but not enough to lower serum glucose to normal concentrations, indicating that rats in the AD-C group had insulin resistance and a borderline diabetic state. Although AD-C rats were profoundly insulin resistant, AD-Y rats exhibited normal first and second phases of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and secretion. In conclusion, yuzu treatment prevented the cognitive dysfunction and impaired energy and glucose homeostasis induced by β-amyloid infusion.

  20. Encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis for cerebral proliferative angiopathy with cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kono, Kenichi; Terada, Tomoaki

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral proliferative angiopathy (CPA) is a rare clinical entity. This disorder is characterized by diffuse vascular abnormalities with intermingled normal brain parenchyma, and is differentiated from classic arteriovenous malformations. The management of CPA in patients presenting with nonhemorrhagic neurological deficits due to cerebral ischemia is challenging and controversial. The authors report a case of adult CPA with cerebral ischemia in which neurological deficits were improved after encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS). A 28-year-old man presented with epilepsy. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography showed a diffuse vascular network (CPA) in the right hemisphere. Antiepileptic medications were administered. Four years after the initial onset of epilepsy, the patient's left-hand grip strength gradually decreased over the course of 1 year. The MRI studies showed no infarcts, but technetium-99m-labeled ethyl cysteinate dimer ((99m)Tc-ECD) SPECT studies obtained with acetazolamide challenge demonstrated hypoperfusion and severely impaired cerebrovascular reactivity over the affected hemisphere. This suggested that the patient's neurological deficits were associated with cerebral ischemia. The authors performed EDAS for cerebral ischemia, and the patient's hand grip strength gradually improved after the operation. Follow-up angiography studies obtained 7 months after the operation showed profound neovascularization through the superficial temporal artery and the middle meningeal artery. A SPECT study showed slight improvement of hypoperfusion at the focal region around the right motor area, indicating clinical improvement from the operation. The authors conclude that EDAS may be a treatment option for CPA-related hypoperfusion.

  1. Age and Amyloid Effects on Human CNS Amyloid-Beta Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Bruce W.; Elbert, Donald L.; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Kasten, Tom; Ovod, Vitaliy; Ma, Shengmei; Xiong, Chengjie; Chott, Robert; Yarasheski, Kevin; Sigurdson, Wendy; Zhang, Lily; Goate, Alison; Phil, D.; Benzinger, Tammie; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David; Bateman, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Age is the single greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease with the incidence doubling every 5 years after age 65. However, our understanding of the mechanistic relationship between increasing age and the risk for Alzheimer’s disease is currently limited. We therefore sought to determine the relationship between age, amyloidosis, and amyloid-beta kinetics in the central nervous system (CNS) of humans Methods Amyloid-beta kinetics were analyzed in 112 participants and compared to the ages of participants and the amount of amyloid deposition. Results We found a highly significant correlation between increasing age and slowed amyloid-beta turnover rates (2.5-fold longer half-life over five decades of age). In addition, we found independent effects on amyloid-beta42 kinetics specifically in participants with amyloid deposition. Amyloidosis was associated with a higher (>50%) irreversible loss of soluble amyloid-beta42 and a 10-fold higher amyloid-beta42 reversible exchange rate. Interpretation These findings reveal a mechanistic link between human aging and the risk of amyloidosis which may be due to a dramatic slowing of amyloid-beta turnover, increasing the likelihood of protein misfolding that leads to deposition. Alterations in amyloid-beta kinetics associated with aging and amyloidosis suggest opportunities for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. More generally, this study provides an example of how changes in protein turnover kinetics can be used to detect physiologic and pathophysiologic changes and may be applicable to other proteinopathies. PMID:26040676

  2. Natural polyphenols binding to amyloid: a broad class of compounds to treat different human amyloid diseases.

    PubMed

    Ngoungoure, Viviane L Ndam; Schluesener, Jan; Moundipa, Paul F; Schluesener, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are a large group of phytonutrients found in herbal beverages and foods. They have manifold biological activities, including antioxidative, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Interestingly, some polyphenols bind to amyloid and substantially ameliorate amyloid diseases. Misfolding, aggregation, and accumulation of amyloid fibrils in tissues or organs leads to a group of disorders, called amyloidoses. Prominent diseases are Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, but there are other, less well-known diseases wherein accumulation of misfolded protein is a prominent feature. Amyloidoses are a major burden to public health. In particular, Alzheimer's disease shows a strong increase in patient numbers. Accelerated development of effective therapies for amyloidoses is a necessity. A viable strategy can be the prevention or reduction of protein misfolding, thus reducing amyloid build-up by restoring the cellular aggretome. Amyloid-binding polyphenols affect amyloid formation on various levels, e.g. by inhibiting fibril formation or steering oligomer formation into unstructured, nontoxic pathways. Consequently, preclinical studies demonstrate reduction of amyloid-formation by polyphenols. Amyloid-binding polyphenols might be suitable lead structures for development of imaging agents for early detection of disease and monitoring amyloid deposition. Intake of dietary polyphenols might be relevant to the prevention of amyloidoses. Nutraceutical strategies might be a way to reduce amyloid diseases.

  3. [Plasma osmolarity and cerebral volume].

    PubMed

    Boulard, G

    2001-02-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, the osmolarity of extracellular fluids (ECFs) and natremia are controlled by two regulatory mechanisms modulating the water balance and sodium outflow from information collected by the osmoreceptors and baroreceptors, respectively. As well, under normal physiological conditions, water and electrolytes of brain ECFs are secreted by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Furthermore, isotonicity is present on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. In the event of systemic osmolarity disorders, water transport subject to osmosis laws occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier. In the case of plasmatic hyperosmolarity cerebral dehydration is observed, while cerebral edema occurs in the contrary case. However, plasmatic osmolarity disorders have less effect on the cerebral volume when their introduction is slow. Experimentation in acute conditions shows that measured variations of the cerebral water content are lower than calculated variations, thus suggesting the existence of an adaptive mechanism, that is, the cerebral osmoregulation which limits the variation of the volume of brain cells by modulating their osmoactive molecule content. These osmoactive molecules are, on the one hand, the electrolytes, which are early and rapidly mobilized, and, on the other hand, the organic osmoles (amino acids, etc.), whose secretion is slower and delayed. This phenomenon should be taken into account in the treatment of osmolarity disorders. Thus, the related-risk of treatment for natremia disorders is therapeutic reversal of the osmotic gradient at the level of the blood-brain barrier. This reversal, which corresponds to a second osmotic stress, requires the implementation of a new procedure of cerebral osmoregulation in the opposite direction of the preceding one. As successive osmotic stresses decrease the effectiveness of brain osmoregulation, the risk for cerebral dehydration and pontine myelinolysis increases when the treatment

  4. Reelin protects against amyloid β toxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Philips, Gary T.; Wasser, Catherine R.; Durakoglugil, Murat S.; Masiulis, Irene; Upadhaya, Ajeet; Pohlkamp, Theresa; Coskun, Cagil; Kotti, Tiina; Steller, Laura; Hammer, Robert E.; Frotscher, Michael; Bock, Hans H.; Herz, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia in people over the age of 65. The predominant genetic risk factor for AD is the ε4 allele encoding apolipoprotein E (ApoE4). The secreted glycoprotein Reelin, which is a physiological ligand for the multifunctional ApoE receptors Apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (Apoer2) and very low-density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr), enhances synaptic plasticity. We have previously shown that the presence of ApoE4 renders neurons unresponsive to Reelin by impairing the recycling of the receptors, thereby decreasing its protective effects against amyloid β (Aβ) oligomer-induced synaptic toxicity in vitro. Here, we show that when Reelin was knocked out in adult mice, these mice behaved normally without overt learning or memory deficits. However, they were strikingly sensitive to amyloid-induced synaptic suppression, and had profound memory and learning disabilities at very low amounts of amyloid deposition. Our findings highlight the physiological importance of Reelin in protecting the brain against Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction and memory impairment. PMID:26152694

  5. Increased gene expression of Alzheimer disease beta-amyloid precursor protein in senescent cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Adler, M J; Coronel, C; Shelton, E; Seegmiller, J E; Dewji, N N

    1991-01-01

    The pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in the brains of patients. Plaque cores contain a 4- to 5-kDa amyloid beta-protein fragment which is also found in the cerebral blood vessels of affected individuals. Since amyloid deposition in the brain increases with age even in normal people, we sought to establish whether the disease state bears a direct relationship with normal aging processes. As a model for biological aging, the process of cellular senescence in vitro was used. mRNA levels of beta-amyloid precursor protein associated with Alzheimer disease were compared in human fibroblasts in culture at early passage and when the same fibroblasts were grown to senescence after more than 52 population doublings. A dramatic increase in mRNA was observed in senescent IMR-90 fibroblasts compared with early-passage cells. Hybridization of mRNA from senescent and early proliferating fibroblasts with oligonucleotide probes specific for the three alternatively spliced transcripts of the gene gave similar results, indicating an increase during senescence of all three forms. A similar, though more modest, increase in message levels was also observed in early-passage fibroblasts made quiescent by serum deprivation; with repletion of serum, however, the expression returned to previous low levels. ELISAs were performed on cell extracts from senescent, early proliferating, and quiescent fibroblasts, and quiescent fibroblasts repleted with serum for over 48 hr, using polyclonal antibodies to a synthetic peptide of the beta-amyloid precursor. The results confirmed that the differences in mRNA expression were partially reflected at the protein level. Regulated expression of beta-amyloid precursor protein may be an important determinant of growth and metabolic responses to serum and growth factors under physiological as well as pathological conditions.

  6. Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor improves long-term memory in APP/PS1 transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease as well as in wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Susanna; Lindholm, Päivi; Galli, Emilia; Lahtinen, Hanna-Maija; Koivisto, Henna; Hämäläinen, Elina; Saarma, Mart; Tanila, Heikki

    2015-09-15

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) protects and repairs dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease, which motivated us to investigate its therapeutic effect in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We employed an established APP/PS1 mouse model of AD and gave intrahippocampal injections of CDNF protein or CDNF transgene in an AAV2 viral vector to 1-year-old animals. We performed a behavioral test battery 2 weeks after the injections and collected tissue samples after the 3-week test period. Intrahippocampal CDNF-therapy improved long-term memory in both APP/PS1 mice and wild-type controls, but did not affect spontaneous exploration, object neophobia or early stages of spatial learning. The memory improvement was not associated with decreased brain amyloid load or enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis. Intracranial CDNF treatment has beneficial effects on long-term memory and is well tolerated. The CDNF molecular mechanisms of action on memory await further studies.

  7. Downregulation of amyloid precursor protein inhibits neurite outgrowth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein expressed in several cell types. In the nervous system, APP is expressed by glial and neuronal cells, and several lines of evidence suggest that it plays a role in normal and pathological phenomena. To address the question of the actual function of APP in normal developing neurons, we undertook a study aimed at blocking APP expression using antisense oligonucleotides. Oligonucleotide internalization was achieved by linking them to a vector peptide that translocates through biological membranes. This original technique, which is very efficient and gives direct access to the cell cytosol and nucleus, allowed us to work with extracellular oligonucleotide concentrations between 40 and 200 nM. Internalization of antisense oligonucleotides overlapping the origin of translation resulted in a marked but transient decrease in APP neosynthesis that was not observed with the vector peptide alone, or with sense oligonucleotides. Although transient, the decrease in APP neosynthesis was sufficient to provoke a distinct decrease in axon and dendrite outgrowth by embryonic cortical neurons developing in vitro. The latter decrease was not accompanied by changes in the spreading of the cell bodies. A single exposure to coupled antisense oligonucleotides at the onset of the culture was sufficient to produce significant morphological effects 6, 18, and 24 h later, but by 42 h, there were no remaining significant morphologic changes. This report thus demonstrates that amyloid precursor protein plays an important function in the morphological differentiation of cortical neurons in primary culture. PMID:7876315

  8. Combined thioflavin T-Congo red fluorescence assay for amyloid fibril detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girych, Mykhailo; Gorbenko, Galyna; Maliyov, Ivan; Trusova, Valeriya; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Saito, Hiroyuki; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most powerful tools for the detection and structural characterization of the pathogenic protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils. The traditional approaches to the identification and quantification of amyloid fibrils are based on monitoring the fluorescence changes of the benzothiazole dye thioflavin T (ThT) and absorbance changes of the azo dye Congo red (CR). In routine screening it is usually sufficient to perform only the ThT and CR assays, but both of them, when used separately, could give false results. Moreover, fibrillization kinetics can be measured only by ThT fluorescence, while the characteristic absorption spectra and birefringence of CR represent more rigid criteria for the presence of amyloid fibrils. Therefore, it seemed reasonable to use both these dyes simultaneously, combining the advantages of each technique. To this end, we undertook a detailed analysis of the fluorescence spectral behavior of these unique amyloid tracers upon their binding to amyloid fibrils from lysozyme, insulin and an N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I with Iowa mutation. The fluorescence measurements revealed several criteria for distinguishing between fibrillar and monomeric protein states: (i) a common drastic increase in ThT fluorescence intensity; (ii) a sharp decrease in ThT fluorescence upon addition of CR; (iii) an appearance of the maximum at 535-540 nm in the CR excitation spectra; (iv) increase in CR fluorescence intensity at 610 nm. Based on these findings we designed a novel combined ThT-CR fluorescence assay for amyloid identification. Such an approach not only strengthens the reliability of the ThT assay, but also provides new opportunities for structural characterization of amyloid fibrils.

  9. Spatially controlled amyloid reactions using organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Hammarström, Per; Berggren, Magnus; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2010-10-04

    Abnormal protein aggregates, so called amyloid fibrils, are mainly known as pathological hallmarks of a wide range of diseases, but in addition these robust well-ordered self-assembled natural nanostructures can also be utilized for creating distinct nanomaterials for bioelectronic devices. However, current methods for producing amyloid fibrils in vitro offer no spatial control. Herein, we demonstrate a new way to produce and spatially control the assembly of amyloid-like structures using an organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) to pump distinct cations to a reservoir containing a negatively charged polypeptide. The morphology and kinetics of the created proteinaceous nanomaterials depends on the ion and current used, which we leveraged to create layers incorporating different conjugated thiophene derivatives, one fluorescent (p-FTAA) and one conducting (PEDOT-S). We anticipate that this new application for the OEIP will be useful for both biological studies of amyloid assembly and fibrillogenesis as well as for creating new bioelectronic nanomaterials and devices.

  10. Effects of Huanglian-Jie-Du-Tang and Its Modified Formula on the Modulation of Amyloid-β Precursor Protein Processing in Alzheimer's Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Durairajan, Siva Sundara Kumar; Huang, Ying-Yu; Yuen, Pui-Yee; Chen, Lei-Lei; Kwok, Ka-Yan; Liu, Liang-Feng; Song, Ju-Xian; Han, Quan-Bin; Xue, Lei; K. Chung, Sookja; Huang, Jian-Dong; Baum, Larry; Senapati, Sanjib; Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    Huanglian-Jie-Du-Tang (HLJDT) is a famous traditional Chinese herbal formula that has been widely used clinically to treat cerebral ischemia. Recently, we found that berberine, a major alkaloid compound in HLJDT, reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in an Alzheimer’s disease (AD) mouse model. In this study, we compared the effects of HLJDT, four single component herbs of HLJDT (Rhizoma coptidis (RC), Radix scutellariae (RS), Cortex phellodendri (CP) and Fructus gardenia (FG)) and the modified formula of HLJDT (HLJDT-M, which is free of RS) on the regulatory processing of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) in an in vitro model of AD. Here we show that treatment with HLJDT-M and its components RC, CP, and the main compound berberine on N2a mouse neuroblastoma cells stably expressing human APP with the Swedish mutation (N2a-SwedAPP) significantly decreased the levels of full-length APP, phosphorylated APP at threonine 668, C-terminal fragments of APP, soluble APP (sAPP)-α and sAPPβ-Swedish and reduced the generation of Aβ peptide in the cell lysates of N2a-SwedAPP. HLJDT-M showed more significant APP- and Aβ- reducing effects than berberine, RC or CP treatment alone. In contrast, HLJDT, its component RS and the main active compound of RS, baicalein, strongly increased the levels of all the metabolic products of APP in the cell lysates. The extract from FG, however, did not influence APP modulation. Interestingly, regular treatment of TgCRND8 APP transgenic mice with baicalein exacerbated the amyloid plaque burden, APP metabolism and Aβ production. Taken together, these data provide convincing evidence that HLJDT and baicalein treatment can increase the amyloidogenic metabolism of APP which is at least partly responsible for the baicalein-mediated Aβ plaque increase in the brains of TgCRND8 mice. On the other hand, HLJDT-M significantly decreased all the APP metabolic products including Aβ. Further study of HLJDT-M for therapeutic use in treating AD is

  11. Anti-amyloid precursor protein immunoglobulins inhibit amyloid-β production by steric hindrance.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rhian S; Liddell, J Eryl; Kidd, Emma J

    2011-01-01

    The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases results in the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease. We raised two monoclonal antibodies, 2B3 and 2B12, that recognize the β-secretase cleavage site on APP but not Aβ. We hypothesized that these antibodies would reduce Aβ levels via steric hindrance of β-secretase. Both antibodies decreased extracellular Aβ levels from astrocytoma cells, but 2B3 was more potent than 2B12. Levels of soluble sAPPα from the nonamyloidogenic α-secretase pathway and intracellular APP were not affected by either antibody nor were there any effects on cell viability. 2B3 exhibited a higher affinity for APP than 2B12 and its epitope appeared to span the cleavage site, whereas 2B12 bound slightly upstream. Both of these factors probably contribute to its greater effect on Aβ levels. After 60 min incubation at pH 4.0, most 2B3 and 2B12 remained bound to their antigen, suggesting that the antibodies will remain bound to APP in the acidic endosomes where β-secretase cleavage probably occurs. Only 2B3 and 2B12, but not control antibodies, inhibited the cleavage of sAPPα by β-secretase in a cell-free assay where the effects of antibody internalization and intracellular degradation were excluded. 2B3 virtually abolished this cleavage. In addition, levels of C-terminal APP fragments, generated following β-secretase cleavage (βCTF), were significantly reduced in cells after incubation with 2B3. These results strongly suggest that anti-cleavage site IgGs can generically reduce Aβ levels via inhibition of β-secretase by steric hindrance and may provide a novel alternative therapy for Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  13. Amyloid imaging in prodromal Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Patients with mild cognitive impairment are at an increased risk of progression to Alzheimer's disease. However, not all patients with mild cognitive impairment progress, and it is difficult to accurately identify those patients who are in the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease. In a recent paper, Koivunen and colleagues report that Pittsburgh compound-B, an amyloid-beta positron emission tomography ligand, predicts the progression of patients with mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease. Of 29 subjects with mild cognitive impairment, 21 (72%) had a positive Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography baseline scan. In their study, 15 of these 21 (71%) patients progressed to Alzheimer's disease, whilst only 1 out of 8 (12.5%) Pittsburgh compound-B-negative patients with mild cognitive impairment did so. Moreover, in these mild cognitive impairment patients, the overall amyloid burden increased approximately 2.5% during the follow-up period. This is consistent with other longitudinal amyloid imaging studies that found a similar increase in amyloid deposition over time in patients with mild cognitive impairment. These studies together challenge current theories that propose a flattening of the increase of brain amyloid deposition already in the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease. These findings may have important implications for the design of future clinical trials aimed at preventing progression to Alzheimer's disease by lowering the brain amyloid-beta burden in patients with mild cognitive impairment. PMID:21936965

  14. Fibril Fragmentation Enhances Amyloid Cytotoxicity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gosal, Walraj S.; Homans, Steve W.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity. PMID:19808677

  15. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  16. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  17. Prion protein amyloid: separation of scrapie infectivity from PrP polymers.

    PubMed

    Wille, H; Baldwin, M A; Cohen, F E; DeArmond, S J; Prusiner, S B

    1996-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) undergoes a profound conformational change when the cellular isoform (PrPc) is converted into the scrapie form (PrPSc). Limited proteolysis of PrPSc produces PrP27-30 which readily polymerizes into amyloid. To study the structure of PrP amyloid, we employed organic solvents that perturb protein conformation. 1,1,1,3,3,3-Hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP), which promotes alpha-helix formation, modified the ultrastructure of rod-shaped PrP amyloids, producing flattened ribbons with a more regular substructure. As the concentration of HFIP was increased, the beta-sheet content and proteinase K resistance of PrP27-30 as well as prion infectivity diminished. HFIP reversibly decreased the binding of Congo red dye to the rods, whereas inactivation of prion infectivity was irreversible. In contrast to 10% HFIP, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-propanol (TFIP) did not inactivate prion infectivity but, similarly to HFIP, TFIP did alter the morphology of the rods and abolished Congo red binding. Our studies separate prion infectivity from the amyloid properties of PrP27-30 and underscore the dependence of prion infectivity on PrPSc conformation. Our results also demonstrate that the specific beta-sheet-rich structures required for prion infectivity are different from those needed for amyloid formation.

  18. Separation of scrapie prion infectivity from PrP amyloid polymers.

    PubMed

    Wille, H; Zhang, G F; Baldwin, M A; Cohen, F E; Prusiner, S B

    1996-06-21

    The prion protein (PrP) undergoes a profound conformational change when the cellular isoform (PrPC) is converted into the scrapie form (PrPSc). Limited proteolysis of PrPsc produces PrP 27-30 which readily polymerizes into amyloid. To study the structure of PrP amyloid, we employed organic solvents that perturb protein conformation. Hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP), which promotes alpha-helix formation, modified the ultrastructure of rod-shaped PrP amyloids; flattened ribbons with a more regular substructure were found. As the concentration of HFIP was increased, the beta-sheet content and proteinase K resistance of PrP 27-30 as well as prion infectivity diminished. HFIP reversibly decreased the binding of Congo red dye to the rods while inactivation of prion infectivity was irreversible. In contrast to 10% HFIP, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-propanol (TFIP) did not inactivate prion infectivity but like HFIP, TFIP did alter the morphology of the rods and abolish Congo red binding. This study separates prion infectivity from the amyloid properties of PrP 27-30 and underscores the dependence of prion infectivity on PrPSc conformation. The results also demonstrate that the specific beta-sheet-rich structures required for prion infectivity can be differentiated from those needed for amyloid formation as determined by Congo red binding.

  19. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  20. Primary amyloid goiter mimicking rapid growing thyroid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Joung, Kyong Hye; Park, Jae-Yong; Kim, Koon Soon; Koo, Bon Seok

    2014-02-01

    Amyloid accumulation in the thyroid gland leading to a clinically detectable mass, known as amyloid goiter, is a rare condition associated with primary amyloidosis. Moreover, a localized primary amyloid goiter involving only the thyroid gland is rarer still. Here, we report a patient with a localized primary amyloid goiter that had grown rapidly, causing dysphagia and dyspnea on exercise, and confused us with malignancy such as anaplastic carcinoma. After surgery, no further symptoms occurred. A diagnosis of amyloid goiter was established on microscopic examination. In patients with a rapidly enlarging thyroid gland presenting with dysphagia, dyspnea, or hoarseness, amyloid goiter and malignancy should both be suspected, even when systemic amyloidosis is not suspected.

  1. Cerebral Microbleeds: A Review of Clinical, Genetic, and Neuroimaging Associations

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Paul A.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Ellis, Kathryn A.; Desmond, Patricia M.; Masters, Colin L.; Rowe, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (microbleeds) are small, punctuate hypointense lesions seen in T2* Gradient-Recall Echo (GRE) and Susceptibility-Weighted (SWI) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences, corresponding to areas of hemosiderin breakdown products from prior microscopic hemorrhages. They occur in the setting of impaired small vessel integrity, commonly due to either hypertensive vasculopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Microbleeds are more prevalent in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and in those with both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. However they are also found in asymptomatic individuals, with increasing prevalence with age, particularly in carriers of the Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele. Other neuroimaging findings that have been linked with microbleeds include lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI, and increased cerebral β-amyloid burden using 11C-PiB Positron Emission Tomography. The presence of microbleeds has been suggested to confer increased risk of incident intracerebral hemorrhage – particularly in the setting of anticoagulation – and of complications of immunotherapy for AD. Prospective data regarding the natural history and sequelae of microbleeds are currently limited, however there is a growing evidence base that will serve to inform clinical decision-making in the future. PMID:24432010

  2. Cerebral Hypoperfusion Precedes Nausea During Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Schlegel, Todd T.; Black, F. Owen; Wood, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Nausea and motion sickness are important operational concerns for aviators and astronauts. Understanding underlying mechanisms associated with motion sickness may lead to new treatments. The goal of this work was to determine if cerebral blood flow changes precede the development of nausea in motion sick susceptible subjects. Cerebral flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres) and end-tidal CO2 were measured while subjects were rotated on a centrifuge (250 degrees/sec). Following 5 min of rotation, subjects were translated 0.504 m off-center, creating a +lGx centripetal acceleration in the nasal-occipital plane. Ten subjects completed the protocol without symptoms while 5 developed nausea (4 while 6ff-center and 1 while rotating on-center). Prior to nausea, subjects had significant increases in blood pressure (+13plus or minus 3 mmHg, P less than 0.05) and cerebrovascular resistance (+46 plus or minus 17%, P less than 0.05) and decreases in cerebral flow velocity both in the second (-13 plus or minus 4%) and last minute (-22 plus or minus 5%) before symptoms (P less than 0.05). In comparison, controls demonstrated no change in blood pressure or cerebrovascular resistance in the last minute of off-center rotation and only a 7 plus or minus 2% decrease in cerebral flow velocity. All subjects had significant hypocapnia (-3.8 plus or minus 0.4 mmHg, P less than 0.05), however this hypocapnia could not fully explain the cerebral hypoperfusion associated with the development of nausea. These data indicate that reductions in cerebral blood flow precede the development of nausea. Further work is necessary to determine what role cerebral hypoperfusion plays in motion sickness and whether cerebral hypoperfusion can be used to predict the development of nausea in susceptible individuals.

  3. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  4. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  5. Trehalose Alters Subcellular Trafficking and the Metabolism of the Alzheimer-associated Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    PubMed

    Tien, Nguyen T; Karaca, Ilker; Tamboli, Irfan Y; Walter, Jochen

    2016-05-13

    The disaccharide trehalose is commonly considered to stimulate autophagy. Cell treatment with trehalose could decrease cytosolic aggregates of potentially pathogenic proteins, including mutant huntingtin, α-synuclein, and phosphorylated tau that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we demonstrate that trehalose also alters the metabolism of the Alzheimer disease-related amyloid precursor protein (APP). Cell treatment with trehalose decreased the degradation of full-length APP and its C-terminal fragments. Trehalose also reduced the secretion of the amyloid-β peptide. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed that trehalose alters the subcellular distribution and decreases the degradation of APP C-terminal fragments in endolysosomal compartments. Trehalose also led to strong accumulation of the autophagic marker proteins LC3-II and p62, and decreased the proteolytic activation of the lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D. The combined data indicate that trehalose decreases the lysosomal metabolism of APP by altering its endocytic vesicular transport.

  6. Amyloid Imaging in Mild Cognitive Impairment Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, David A.; Price, Julie C.; Saxton, Judy A.; Snitz, Beth E.; James, Jeffrey A.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Cohen, Ann D.; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Mathis, Chester A.; Klunk, William E.; DeKosky, Steven T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We utilized the amyloid imaging ligand Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) to determine the presence of AD pathology in different MCI subtypes and to relate elevated PiB binding to other markers of early AD and longitudinal outcome. Methods Twenty-six patients with MCI – 13 single domain amnestic-MCI (sd a-MCI), 6 multiple domain amnestic-MCI (md a-MCI), and 7 non-amnestic MCI (na-MCI) – underwent PiB imaging. Twenty-three had clinical follow-up [21.2 ± 16.0 (SD) months] subsequent to their PiB scan. Results Using cutoffs established from a control cohort, 14 (54%) had elevated levels of PiB retention and were considered “amyloid-positive.” All subtypes were associated with a significant proportion of amyloid-positive patients (6/13 sd a-MCI, 5/6 md a-MCI, 3/7 na-MCI). There were no obvious differences in the distribution of PiB retention in the na-MCI group despite their atypical early AD phenotype. Predictors of conversion to clinical AD in a-MCI, including poorer episodic memory, increased age, and medial temporal atrophy, were found in the amyloid-positive relative to amyloid-negative a-MCI patients. Longitudinal follow-up revealed 5/13 amyloid-positive patients, but 0/10 amyloid-negative patients, converted to clinical AD. Further, 3/10 amyloid-negative patients “reverted to normal” on follow-up. Interpretation These data support the notion that amyloid-positive patients are likely to have early AD and that the use of amyloid imaging may have an important role in determining which patients are likely to benefit from disease-specific therapies. In addition, our data is consistent with longitudinal studies suggesting that a significant percentage of all MCI subtypes will develop clinical AD. PMID:19475670

  7. Preferential Transport Theory for Beta-Amyloid Clearance from the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Schaffer, David; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The failure to clear beta-amyloid from the aging brain leads to its accumulation within the walls of arteries and to Alzheimer's disease. However, the transport mechanism for beta-amyloid clearance is not well understood. In this study, we propose a preferential transport theory for flow within the vascular walls in the cerebral arterial basement membrane. The flow conduit within the arterial basement membrane is modeled as an annulus between deformable concentric cylinders filled with an incompressible, single-phase Newtonian fluid. The transport is driven by arterial lumen deformation induced by heart pulsations superimposed with reflected boundary waves. Our theory predicts that while the overall arterial wave propagation is in the same direction as the blood flow toward the capillaries, a reverse flow in the basement membrane can be preferentially induced toward larger arteries. This has been suggested as a potential clearance pathway for beta-amyloid. We estimate the magnitude of the reverse transport through a control volume analysis which is corroborated by numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Bench-top experiments to validate our computational models are presented.

  8. Endogenous murine Aβ increases amyloid deposition in APP23 but not in APPPS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Jasmin; Morales-Corraliza, Jose; Stolz, Julia; Skodras, Angelos; Radde, Rebecca; Duma, Carmen C; Eisele, Yvonne S; Mazzella, Matthew J; Wong, Harrison; Klunk, William E; Nilsson, K Peter R; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Mathews, Paul M; Jucker, Mathias; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M

    2015-07-01

    Endogenous murine amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is expressed in most Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease but its contribution to β-amyloidosis remains unclear. We demonstrate ∼ 35% increased cerebral Aβ load in APP23 transgenic mice compared with age-matched APP23 mice on an App-null background. No such difference was found for the much faster Aβ-depositing APPPS1 transgenic mouse model between animals with or without the murine App gene. Nevertheless, both APP23 and APPPS1 mice codeposited murine Aβ, and immunoelectron microscopy revealed a tight association of murine Aβ with human Aβ fibrils. Deposition of murine Aβ was considerably less efficient compared with the deposition of human Aβ indicating a lower amyloidogenic potential of murine Aβ in vivo. The amyloid dyes Pittsburgh Compound-B and pentamer formyl thiophene acetic acid did not differentiate between amyloid deposits consisting of human Aβ and deposits of mixed human-murine Aβ. Our data demonstrate a differential effect of murine Aβ on human Aβ deposition in different APP transgenic mice. The mechanistically complex interaction of human and mouse Aβ may affect pathogenesis of the models and should be considered when models are used for translational preclinical studies.

  9. Age and amyloid-related alterations in default network habituation to stimulus repetition

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Patrizia; Hedden, Trey; Becker, John A.; Sullivan, Caroline; Putcha, Deepti; Rentz, Dorene; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa. A.

    2011-01-01

    The neural networks supporting encoding of new information are thought to decline with age, although mnemonic techniques such as repetition may enhance performance in older individuals. Accumulation of amyloid-β, one hallmark pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), may contribute to functional alterations in memory networks measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) prior to onset of cognitive impairment. We investigated the effects of age and amyloid burden on fMRI activity in the default network and hippocampus during repetitive encoding. Older individuals, particularly those with high amyloid burden, demonstrated decreased task-induced deactivation in the posteromedial cortices during initial stimulus presentation and failed to modulate fMRI activity in response to repeated trials, whereas young subjects demonstrated a stepwise decrease in deactivation with repetition. The hippocampus demonstrated similar patterns across the groups, showing task-induced activity that decreased in response to repetition. These findings demonstrate that age and amyloid have dissociable functional effects on specific nodes within a distributed memory network, and suggest that functional brain changes may begin far in advance of symptomatic AD. PMID:21334099

  10. Increased Amyloid-β Peptide-Induced Memory Deficits in Phospholipid Transfer Protein (PLTP) Gene Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Desrumaux, Catherine; Pisoni, Amandine; Meunier, Johann; Deckert, Valérie; Athias, Anne; Perrier, Véronique; Villard, Vanessa; Lagrost, Laurent; Verdier, Jean-Michel; Maurice, Tangui

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is recognized as one of the earliest and most intense pathological processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the antioxidant vitamin E has been shown to efficiently prevent amyloid plaque formation and neurodegeneration. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) has a major role in vitamin E transfers in vivo, and PLTP deficiency in mice is associated with reduced brain vitamin E levels. To determine the impact of PLTP on amyloid pathology in vivo, we analyzed the vulnerability of PLTP-deficient (PLTP-KO) mice to the toxic effects induced by intracerebroventricular injection of oligomeric amyloid-β25–35 (Aβ25–35) peptide, a non-transgenic model of AD. Under basal conditions, PLTP-KO mice showed increased cerebral oxidative stress, increased brain Aβ1–42 levels, and a lower expression of the synaptic function marker synaptophysin, as compared with wild-type mice. This PLTP-KO phenotype was associated with increased memory impairment 1 week after Aβ25–35 peptide injection. Restoration of brain vitamin E levels in PLTP-KO mice through a chronic dietary supplementation prevented Aβ25–35-induced memory deficits and reduced cerebral oxidative stress and toxicity. We conclude that PLTP, through its ability to deliver vitamin E to the brain, constitutes an endogenous neuroprotective agent. Increasing PLTP activity may offer a new way to develop neuroprotective therapies. PMID:23303044

  11. A Simulation Model of Periarterial Clearance of Amyloid-β from the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Diem, Alexandra K.; Tan, Mingyi; Bressloff, Neil W.; Hawkes, Cheryl; Morris, Alan W. J.; Weller, Roy O.; Carare, Roxana O.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain indicates failure of elimination of Aβ from the brain with age and Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is a variety of mechanisms for elimination of Aβ from the brain. They include the action of microglia and enzymes together with receptor-mediated absorption of Aβ into the blood and periarterial lymphatic drainage of Aβ. Although the brain possesses no conventional lymphatics, experimental studies have shown that fluid and solutes, such as Aβ, are eliminated from the brain along 100 nm wide basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries. This lymphatic drainage pathway is reflected in the deposition of Aβ in the walls of human arteries with age and AD as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Initially, Aβ diffuses through the extracellular spaces of gray matter in the brain and then enters basement membranes in capillaries and arteries to flow out of the brain. Although diffusion through the extracellular spaces of the brain has been well characterized, the exact mechanism whereby perivascular elimination of Aβ occurs has not been resolved. Here we use a computational model to describe the process of periarterial drainage in the context of diffusion in the brain, demonstrating that periarterial drainage along basement membranes is very rapid compared with diffusion. Our results are a validation of experimental data and are significant in the context of failure of periarterial drainage as a mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of AD as well as complications associated with its immunotherapy. PMID:26903861

  12. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Activation by Resveratrol Modulates Amyloid-β Peptide Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giliberto, Luca; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Wu, Qingli; Simon, James E.; Janle, Elsa M.; Lobo, Jessica; Ferruzzi, Mario G.; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition into cerebral amyloid plaques. The natural polyphenol resveratrol promotes anti-aging pathways via the activation of several metabolic sensors, including the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Resveratrol also lowers Aβ levels in cell lines; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for this effect is largely unknown. Moreover, the bioavailability of resveratrol in the brain remains uncertain. Here we show that AMPK signaling controls Aβ metabolism and mediates the anti-amyloidogenic effect of resveratrol in non-neuronal and neuronal cells, including in mouse primary neurons. Resveratrol increased cytosolic calcium levels and promoted AMPK activation by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β. Direct pharmacological and genetic activation of AMPK lowered extracellular Aβ accumulation, whereas AMPK inhibition reduced the effect of resveratrol on Aβ levels. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited the AMPK target mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) to trigger autophagy and lysosomal degradation of Aβ. Finally, orally administered resveratrol in mice was detected in the brain where it activated AMPK and reduced cerebral Aβ levels and deposition in the cortex. These data suggest that resveratrol and pharmacological activation of AMPK have therapeutic potential against Alzheimer disease. PMID:20080969

  13. A Simulation Model of Periarterial Clearance of Amyloid-β from the Brain.

    PubMed

    Diem, Alexandra K; Tan, Mingyi; Bressloff, Neil W; Hawkes, Cheryl; Morris, Alan W J; Weller, Roy O; Carare, Roxana O

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain indicates failure of elimination of Aβ from the brain with age and Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is a variety of mechanisms for elimination of Aβ from the brain. They include the action of microglia and enzymes together with receptor-mediated absorption of Aβ into the blood and periarterial lymphatic drainage of Aβ. Although the brain possesses no conventional lymphatics, experimental studies have shown that fluid and solutes, such as Aβ, are eliminated from the brain along 100 nm wide basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries. This lymphatic drainage pathway is reflected in the deposition of Aβ in the walls of human arteries with age and AD as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Initially, Aβ diffuses through the extracellular spaces of gray matter in the brain and then enters basement membranes in capillaries and arteries to flow out of the brain. Although diffusion through the extracellular spaces of the brain has been well characterized, the exact mechanism whereby perivascular elimination of Aβ occurs has not been resolved. Here we use a computational model to describe the process of periarterial drainage in the context of diffusion in the brain, demonstrating that periarterial drainage along basement membranes is very rapid compared with diffusion. Our results are a validation of experimental data and are significant in the context of failure of periarterial drainage as a mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of AD as well as complications associated with its immunotherapy.

  14. Autonomic control of cerebral circulation: exercise.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2008-12-01

    On the basis of measurement techniques that require steady-state hemodynamic conditions when the measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is being obtained, cerebral autoregulation (CA) maintains CBF stable over a wide range of cerebral perfusion pressures. When an acute (or dynamic) change in cerebral perfusion pressure (seconds) is imposed, CBF is not maintained. For example, after thigh cuff occlusion, its release induces an acute drop in arterial blood pressure (ABP). The sharp decrease in CBF indicates that CA was unable to respond to the dynamic (or rapid) changes in cerebral perfusion pressure. Therefore, control mechanisms of arterial pressure with short time constants must contribute importantly to CBF regulation. In order for CA to be effective, the cerebral perfusion pressure must lie within an autoregulatory range of perfusion pressures. The traditional thinking is that changes in sympathetic tone have a limited effect on CBF at rest. However, moderate- to heavy-intensity exercise causes only moderate increases in CBF despite large increases in sympathetic activity and ABP. Animal studies demonstrate that increases in sympathetic nerve activity cause cerebral vasoconstriction and protection against disruption of the blood-brain barrier. These findings suggest that the regulation of CBF during exercise is modulated not only by CA but also by autonomic nervous system and the arterial baroreflex-mediated control of the systemic circulation.

  15. Antagonistic effects of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzymes 1 and 2 on beta-amyloid peptide production in cells.

    PubMed

    Basi, Guriqbal; Frigon, Normand; Barbour, Robin; Doan, Tam; Gordon, Grace; McConlogue, Lisa; Sinha, Sukanto; Zeller, Michelle

    2003-08-22

    The deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in the brain is a pathologic feature of Alzheimer's disease. The beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), an integral membrane aspartyl protease responsible for cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the beta-site, promotes A beta production. A second integral membrane aspartyl protease related to BACE1, referred to as beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 2 (BACE2) has also been demonstrated to cleave APP at the beta-cleavage site in transfected cells. The role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production remains unresolved. We investigated the role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production in cells by selective inactivation of its transcripts using RNA interference. We are able to reduce steady state levels for mRNA for each enzyme by >85%, and protein amounts by 88-94% in cells. Selective inactivation of BACE1 by RNA interference results in decreased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells, as expected. Selective inactivation of BACE2 by RNAi results in increased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells. Simultaneous targeting of both enzymes by RNA interference does not have any net effect on A beta released from cells. Our observations of changes in APP metabolism and A beta are consistent with a role of BACE2 in suppressing A beta production in cells that co-express both enzymes.

  16. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K.; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  17. Amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Kung-Ta; Wang, Jung-Hao; Lee, Lily Y-L; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2009-01-28

    More than 20 unrelated proteins can form amyloid fibrils in vivo which are related to various diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, prion disease, and systematic amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils are an ordered protein aggregate with a lamellar cross-beta structure. Enhancing amyloid clearance is one of the targets of the therapy of these amyloid-related diseases. Although there is debate on whether the toxicity is due to amyloids or their precursors, research on the degradation of amyloids may help prevent or alleviate these diseases. In this study, we explored the amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase, a fibrinolytic subtilisin-like serine protease, and determined the optimal conditions for amyloid hydrolysis. This ability is shared by proteinase K and subtilisin Carlsberg, but not by trypsin or plasmin.

  18. Superresolution Imaging of Amyloid Fibrils with Binding-Activated Probes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding into amyloid-like aggregates underlies many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, insights into the structure and function of these amyloids will provide valuable information on the pathological mechanisms involved and aid in the design of improved drugs for treating amyloid-based disorders. However, determining the structure of endogenous amyloids at high resolution has been difficult. Here we employ binding-activated localization microscopy (BALM) to acquire superresolution images of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils with unprecedented optical resolution. We propose that BALM imaging can be extended to study the structure of other amyloids, for differential diagnosis of amyloid-related diseases and for discovery of drugs that perturb amyloid structure for therapy. PMID:23594172

  19. Early and progressive deficit of neuronal activity patterns in a model of local amyloid pathology in mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Koukouli, Fani; Rooy, Marie; Maskos, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The condition predominantly affects the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and is characterized by the spread of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). But soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers have also been identified to accumulate in the brains of AD patients and correlate with cognitive dysfunction more than the extent of plaque deposition. Here, we developed an adeno-associated viral vector expressing the human mutated amyloid precursor protein (AAV-hAPP). Intracranial injection of the AAV into the prefrontal cortex (PFC) allowed the induction of AD-like deficits in adult mice, thereby modelling human pathology. AAV-hAPP expression caused accumulation of Aβ oligomers, microglial activation, astrocytosis and the gradual formation of amyloid plaques and NFTs. In vivo two-photon imaging revealed an increase in neuronal activity, a dysfunction characteristic of the pathology, already during the accumulation of soluble oligomers. Importantly, we found that Aβ disrupts the synchronous spontaneous activity of neurons in PFC that, as in humans, is characterized by ultraslow fluctuation patterns. Our work allowed us to track brain activity changes during disease progression and provides new insight into the early deficits of synchronous ongoing brain activity, the “default network”, in the presence of Aβ peptide. PMID:27999185

  20. P3 beta-amyloid peptide has a unique and potentially pathogenic immunohistochemical profile in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, L. S.; Murphy, G. M.; Forno, L. S.; Catalano, R.; Cordell, B.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of beta-amyloid in brain tissue is characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A naturally occurring derivative of the beta-amyloid peptide, p3, possesses all of the structural determinants required for fibril assembly and neurotoxicity. p3-specific antibodies were used to examine the distribution of this peptide in brain. p3 reactivity was absent or sparse in aged non-AD brains but was prevalent in selected areas of AD brain in diffuse deposits and in a subset of dystrophic neurites. p3-reactive dystrophic neurites were found both independent in the neuropil and associated with plaques. Little or no reactivity was observed to amyloid cores in classical plaques or to amyloid in the cerebral vasculature. The exclusive appearance of p3 reactivity in AD brain plus the selective localization of p3 reactivity to abnormal structures in the temporal lobe limbic system suggests that p3 may be a contributing factor to AD pathology. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8701997

  1. Ibuprofen and lipoic acid diamide as co-drug with neuroprotective activity: pharmacological properties and effects in beta-amyloid (1-40) infused Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, A; Sozio, P; Cerasa, L S; Iannitelli, A; Cataldi, A; Zara, S; Giorgioni, G; Nasuti, C

    2010-01-01

    Both oxidative stress and inflammation are elevated in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients, but their pathogenic significance still remains unclear. Current evidence support the hypothesis that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antioxidant therapy might protect against the development of Alzheimer's disease, and ibuprofen has the strongest epidemiological support. In the present work our attention was focused on (R)-alpha-lipoic acid considered as a potential neuroprotective agent in Alzheimer's disease therapy. In particular, we investigated a new co-drug (1) obtained by joining (R)-alpha-lipoic acid and ibuprofen via a diamide bond, for evaluating its potential to antagonize the deleterious structural and cognitive effects of beta-amyloid (1-40) in an infused Alzheimer's disease rat model. Our results indicated that infusion of beta-amyloid (1-40) impairs memory performance through a progressive cognitive deterioration; however, ibuprofen and co-drug 1 seemed to protect against behavioural detriment induced by simultaneous administration of beta-amyloid (1-40) protein. The obtained data were supported by the histochemical findings of the present study: beta-amyloid protein was less expressed in 1-treated than in ibuprofen and (R)-alpha-lipoic acid alone-treated cerebral cortex. Taken together, the present findings suggest that co-drug 1 treatment may protect against the cognitive dysfunction induced by intracerebroventricular infusion of beta-amyloid (1-40) in rats. Thus, co-drug 1 could prove useful as a tool for controlling Alzheimer's disease-induced cerebral amyloid deposits and behavioural deterioration.

  2. Brain amyloid-β oligomers in ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lesné, Sylvain E; Sherman, Mathew A; Grant, Marianne; Kuskowski, Michael; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; Ashe, Karen H

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease begins about two decades before the onset of symptoms or neuron death, and is believed to be caused by pathogenic amyloid-β aggregates that initiate a cascade of molecular events culminating in widespread neurodegeneration. The microtubule binding protein tau may mediate the effects of amyloid-β in this cascade. Amyloid plaques comprised of insoluble, fibrillar amyloid-β aggregates are the most characteristic feature of Alzheimer's disease. However, the correspondence between the distribution of plaques and the pattern of neurodegeneration is tenuous. This discrepancy has stimulated the investigation of other amyloid-β aggregates, including soluble amyloid-β oligomers. Different soluble amyloid-β oligomers have been studied in several mouse models, but not systematically in humans. Here, we measured three amyloid-β oligomers previously described in mouse models-amyloid-β trimers, Aβ*56 and amyloid-β dimers-in brain tissue from 75 cognitively intact individuals, ranging from young children to the elderly, and 58 impaired subjects with mild cognitive impairment or probable Alzheimer's disease. As in mouse models, where amyloid-β trimers appear to be the fundamental amyloid-β assembly unit of Aβ*56 and are present in young mice prior to memory decline, amyloid-β trimers in humans were present in children and adolescents; their levels rose gradually with age and were significantly above baseline in subjects in their 70s. Aβ*56 levels were negligible in children and young adults, rose significantly above baseline in subjects in their 40s and increased steadily thereafter. Amyloid-β dimers were undetectable until subjects were in their 60s; their levels then increased sharply and correlated with plaque load. Remarkably, in cognitively intact individuals we found strong positive correlations between Aβ*56 and two pathological forms of soluble tau (tau-CP13 and tau-Alz50), and negative correlations between Aβ*56 and two postsynaptic

  3. Surface Effects on Amyloid Fibril Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, Brad; Simons, Janet; Leonenko, Zoya

    2009-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are insoluble aggregates composed of proteins in beta-sheet conformation, which are implicated in at least 20 diseases for which no cure is currently available. Although fibril plaque formation is associated with biological membranes in vivo, most of earlier research on fibrillogenesis has been performed in a solution phase, in which only a protein-protein interactions are considered. On the other hand, the surface of plasma membrane could provide the environment in which amyloid forming proteins could cluster. In order to get an insight into the understanding of the effect of the surface of plasma membrane, and the surfaces in general, on amyloid fibril formation, we used Atomic force microscopy to study binding of amyloid beta 1-42 peptide and amyloid fibril formation on model surfaces, such as chemically modified positively charged, negatively charged and hydrophobic substrates. The results show that structure, size and amount of larger fibrils and smaller aggregates depend on the type of surface, and differ from aggregation observed in solution.

  4. Chirality and chiroptical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Chirality of amyloid fibrils-linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein chains-often manifests in morphological traits such as helical twist visible in atomic force microscopy and in chiroptical properties accessible to vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). According to recent studies the relationship between molecular chirality of polypeptide building blocks and superstructural chirality of amyloid fibrils may be more intricate and less deterministic than previously assumed. Several puzzling experimental findings have put into question earlier intuitive ideas on: 1) the bottom-up chirality transfer upon amyloidogenic self-assembly, and 2) the structural origins of chiroptical properties of protein aggregates. For example, removal of a single amino acid residue from an amyloidogenic all-L peptide was shown to reverse handedness of fibrils. On the other hand, certain types of amyloid aggregates revealed surprisingly strong VCD spectra with the sign and shape dependent on the conditions of fibrillation. Hence, microscopic and chiroptical studies have highlighted chirality as one more aspect of polymorphism of amyloid fibrils. This brief review is intended to outline the current state of research on amyloid-like fibrils from the perspective of their structural and superstructural chirality and chiroptical properties.

  5. Investigation of the inhibitory effects of TiO(2) on the β-amyloid peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mukhtar H; Byrne, John A; Keyes, Tia E

    2014-06-01

    TiO2 thin films are of great interest as biocompatible coatings and also as photocatalytic self-cleaning and antimicrobial coatings. In this work we used β-amyloid as a model for infectious protein to investigate the attachment and photocatalytic degradation. TiO2 films were prepared on stainless steel substrates using magnetron sputtering. The films were characterised before and after exposure to β-amyloid (1-42), using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and AFM. The TiO2 film was mostly composed of the anatase phase with a relatively high surface roughness. The presence of Raman peaks at 1668cm(-1) and 1263cm(-1), with the XPS spectral feature for nitrogen at 400eV, confirmed the adsorption of amyloid on surface. Following exposure of the β-amyloid contaminated TiO2 to UV-B irradiation a slight shift of amide modes was observed. Furthermore, the amide I spectra show an overall decrease in α-helix content with presence of a minor peak around 1591cm(-1), which is related to tryptophanyl and tyrosinyl radicals, which can lead to conformational change of β-amyloid. The C1s band at 292.2eV suggests the formation of free carboxylic acid. The loss in the crucial structure of β-amyloid leads to reduce the fibril formation, thought to be induced through a photocatalytic process.

  6. Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence supports a role for brain gangliosides in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Recently we deciphered the ganglioside-recognition code controlling specific ganglioside binding to Alzheimer's β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) peptide and Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein. Cracking this code allowed us to engineer a short chimeric Aβ/α-synuclein peptide that recognizes all brain gangliosides. Here we show that ganglioside-deprived neural cells do no longer sustain the formation of zinc-sensitive amyloid pore channels induced by either Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein, as assessed by single-cell Ca(2+) fluorescence microscopy. Thus, amyloid channel formation, now considered a key step in neurodegeneration, is a ganglioside-dependent process. Nanomolar concentrations of chimeric peptide competitively inhibited amyloid pore formation induced by Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein in cultured neural cells. Moreover, this peptide abrogated the intracellular calcium increases induced by Parkinson's-associated mutant forms of α-synuclein (A30P, E46K and A53T). The chimeric peptide also prevented the deleterious effects of Aβ1-42 on synaptic vesicle trafficking and decreased the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spontaneous activity in rat hippocampal slices. Taken together, these data show that the chimeric peptide has broad anti-amyloid pore activity, suggesting that a common therapeutic strategy based on the prevention of amyloid-ganglioside interactions is a reachable goal for both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  7. Cosolute effects on amyloid aggregation in a nondiffusion limited regime: intrinsic osmolyte properties and the volume exclusion principle.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brian; Rosenthal, Joseph; Zheng, Zhongli; Isaacson, David; Zhu, Yingxi; Belfort, Georges

    2015-04-14

    The effects of cosolutes on amyloid aggregation kinetics in vivo are critical and not fully understood. To explore the effects of cosolute additives, the in vitro behavior of destabilizing and stabilizing osmolytes with polymer cosolutes on the aggregation of a model amyloid, human insulin, is probed using experiments coupled with an amyloid aggregation reaction model. The destabilizing osmolyte, guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl), induces biphasic behavior on the amyloid aggregation rate exhibited by an enhancement of the aggregation kinetics at low concentrations of GuHCl (<0.6 M) and a reduction in kinetics at higher GuHCl concentrations. Stabilizing osmolytes, glycerol, sorbitol and trimethylamine N-oxide, slow the rate of aggregation by reducing the rate of monomer unfolding. Polymer cosolutes, polyvinylpyrrolidone 3.5 kDa and 40 kDa, delay amyloid aggregation mainly through a decrease in the nucleation reaction. These results are in good agreement with the volume exclusion principle for polymer crowding and supports the need to include conformational rearrangement of monomers prior to nucleation. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrate that amyloid aggregation is nondiffusion limited, except during fibril accumulation in the presence of high concentrations of long chain polymers. Lastly, the neutral surface area of osmolytes correlates well with the time to initiate fibril formation, tlag, which implicates an intrinsic osmolyte property underlying preferential interactions.

  8. Mitochondrial Targeted Antioxidant in Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ejaz; Donovan, Tucker; Yujiao, Lu; Zhang, Quanguang

    There has been much evidence suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in mitochondria during cerebral ischemia play a major role in programming the senescence of organism. Antioxidants dealing with mitochondria slow down the appearance and progression of symptoms in cerebral ischemia and increase the life span of organisms. The mechanisms of mitochondrial targeted antioxidants, such as SKQ1, Coenzyme Q10, MitoQ, and Methylene blue, include increasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, decreasing production of ROS and increasing antioxidant defenses, providing benefits in neuroprotection following cerebral ischemia. A number of studies have shown the neuroprotective role of these mitochondrial targeted antioxidants in cerebral ischemia. Here in this short review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction, and the protective role of mitochondrial targeted antioxidants.

  9. On the Heat Stability of Amyloid-Based Biological Activity: Insights from Thermal Degradation of Insulin Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Malka, Iwona; Bożycki, Łukasz; Nieznańska, Hanna; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Formation of amyloid fibrils in vivo has been linked to disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and prion-associated transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. One of the characteristic features of amyloid fibrils is the high thermodynamic stability relative both to native and disordered states which is also thought to underlie the perplexingly remarkable heat resistance of prion infectivity. Here, we are comparing high-temperature degradation of native and fibrillar forms of human insulin. Decomposition of insulin amyloid has been studied under helium atmosphere and in the temperature range from ambient conditions to 750°C using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry coupled to mass spectrometry. While converting native insulin into amyloid does upshift onset of thermal decomposition by ca. 75°C, fibrils remain vulnerable to covalent degradation at temperatures below 300°C, as reflected by mass spectra of gases released upon heating of amyloid samples, as well as morphology and infrared spectra of fibrils subjected to incubation at 250°C. Mass spectra profiles of released gases indicate that degradation of fibrils is much more cooperative than degradation of native insulin. The data show no evidence of water of crystallization trapped within insulin fibrils. We have also compared untreated and heated amyloid samples in terms of capacity to seed daughter fibrils. Kinetic traces of seed-induced insulin fibrillation have shown that the seeding potency of amyloid samples decreases significantly already after exposure to 200°C, even though corresponding electron micrographs indicated persisting fibrillar morphology. Our results suggest that amyloid-based biological activity may not survive extremely high temperature treatments, at least in the absence of other stabilizing factors. PMID:24466022

  10. Conformation and topology of amyloid beta-protein adsorbed on a tethered artificial membrane probed by surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Haipeng; Ritz, Sandra; Knoll, Wolfgang; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2009-10-01

    Progressive depositions of cerebral amyloid are primary neuropathologic features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The amyloid is composed of a 39-42 amino acid peptide called the amyloid beta-protein (Abeta). Repeated investigation suggests that the conformational transition of Abeta from alpha-helix or random coil to beta-sheet structure plays a key role in the inappropriate accumulation of cerebral amyloid plaques. In this manuscript, we describe a fluorescence-based immunoassay technology to investigate the conformation and topology of Abeta peptides interacting with peptide-tethered planar lipid bilayers. Dual monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) labelled with fluorophores were employed to recognise a linear N- and a beta-sheet C-terminus of Abeta peptides on the model membrane, respectively. Kinetics of antibody-Abeta binding were determined by surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The conformational transition of Abeta by melatonin, a defined beta-sheet breaker, was probed using paired monoclonal antibodies. The Abeta interaction with the membrane was evaluated by carefully analyzing the change in kinetic/affinity parameters in the presence or absence of melatonin. These results show that SPFS can be used to examine conformational transition of Abeta on an artificial membrane, providing a novel and versatile platform for conveniently monitoring protein-membrane interaction and screening for new beta-sheet breakers.

  11. Shear-Induced Amyloid Formation in the Brain: I. Potential Vascular and Parenchymal Processes

    PubMed Central

    Trumbore, Conrad N.

    2016-01-01

    Shear distortion of amyloid-beta (Aβ) solutions accelerates amyloid cascade reactions that may yield different toxic oligomers than those formed in quiescent solutions. Recent experiments indicate that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) containing Aβ flow through narrow brain perivascular pathways and brain parenchyma. This paper suggests that such flow causes shear distortion of Aβ molecules involving conformation changes that may be one of the initiating events in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease. Aβ shearing can occur in or around brain arteries and arterioles and is suggested as the origin of cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposits in cerebrovascular walls. Comparatively low flow rates of ISF within the narrow extracellular spaces (ECS) of the brain parenchyma are suggested as a possible initiating factor in both the formation of neurotoxic Aβ42 oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Aβ42 in slow-flowing ISF can gain significant shear energy at or near the walls of tortuous brain ECS flow paths, promoting the formation of a shear-distorted, excited state hydrophobic Aβ42* conformation. This Aβ42* molecule could possibly be involved in one of two paths, one involving rapid adsorption to a brain membrane surface, ultimately forming neurotoxic oligomers on membranes, and the other ultimately forming plaque within the ECS flow pathways. Rising Aβ concentrations combined with shear at or near critical brain membranes are proposed as contributing factors to Alzheimer’s disease neurotoxicity. These hypotheses may be applicable in other neurodegenerative diseases, including tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies, in which shear-distorted proteins also may form in the brain ECS. PMID:27567812

  12. Shear-Induced Amyloid Formation in the Brain: I. Potential Vascular and Parenchymal Processes.

    PubMed

    Trumbore, Conrad N

    2016-09-06

    Shear distortion of amyloid-beta (Aβ) solutions accelerates amyloid cascade reactions that may yield different toxic oligomers than those formed in quiescent solutions. Recent experiments indicate that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) containing Aβ flow through narrow brain perivascular pathways and brain parenchyma. This paper suggests that such flow causes shear distortion of Aβ molecules involving conformation changes that may be one of the initiating events in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ shearing can occur in or around brain arteries and arterioles and is suggested as the origin of cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposits in cerebrovascular walls. Comparatively low flow rates of ISF within the narrow extracellular spaces (ECS) of the brain parenchyma are suggested as a possible initiating factor in both the formation of neurotoxic Aβ42 oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Aβ42 in slow-flowing ISF can gain significant shear energy at or near the walls of tortuous brain ECS flow paths, promoting the formation of a shear-distorted, excited state hydrophobic Aβ42* conformation. This Aβ42* molecule could possibly be involved in one of two paths, one involving rapid adsorption to a brain membrane surface, ultimately forming neurotoxic oligomers on membranes, and the other ultimately forming plaque within the ECS flow pathways. Rising Aβ concentrations combined with shear at or near critical brain membranes are proposed as contributing factors to Alzheimer's disease neurotoxicity. These hypotheses may be applicable in other neurodegenerative diseases, including tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies, in which shear-distorted proteins also may form in the brain ECS.

  13. Longitudinal influence of microglial activation and amyloid on neuronal function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Okello, Aren A; Brooks, David J; Edison, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Amyloid deposition, tangle formation, neuroinflammation and neuronal dysfunction are pathological processes involved in Alzheimer's disease. However, the relative role of these processes in driving disease progression is still unclear. The aim of this positron emission tomography study was to: (i) investigate longitudinal changes of microglial activation, amyloid and glucose metabolism; and (ii) assess the temporospatial relationship between these three processes in Alzheimer's disease. A group of eight patients with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (66 ± 4.8 years) and 14 healthy controls (65 ± 5.5 years) underwent T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging, along with (11)C-(R)-PK11195, (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans for microglial activation, amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism. All patients were followed-up with repeated magnetic resonance imaging and three positron emission tomography scans after 16 months. Parametric maps were interrogated using region of interest analysis, Statistical Parametric Mapping, and between-group correlation analysis at voxel-level using Biological Parametric Mapping. At baseline, patients with Alzheimer's disease showed significantly increased microglial activation compared to the control subjects. During follow-up, for the first time, we found that while there is a progressive reduction of glucose metabolism, there was a longitudinal increase of microglial activation in the majority of the patients with Alzheimer's disease. Voxel-wise correlation analysis revealed that microglial activation in patients with Alzheimer's disease was positively correlated with amyloid deposition and inversely correlated with regional cerebral metabolic rate at voxel level over time. Even though one of the limitations of this study is the lack of longitudinal follow-up of healthy control subjects, this study demonstrates that there is persistent neuroinflammation throughout the Alzheimer

  14. Periventricular leukomalacia is decreasing in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tokio; Goto, Tatenobu; Ueda, Hiroko; Ito, Koichi; Kakita, Hiroki; Nagasaki, Rika; Mizuno, Keisuke; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kato, Ineko; Togari, Hajime

    2012-07-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia is recognized as the leading cause of cerebral palsy in preterm infants. To clarify the prevalence of periventricular leukomalacia and cerebral palsy in Japan, a nationwide survey was performed. The prevalence of periventricular leukomalacia in the group of surviving preterm infants of gestational ages less than 33 weeks born in 2007 was 2.7% (78/2883) on ultrasound diagnosis, and 3.3% (92/2824) on magnetic resonance imaging. The prevalence of cerebral palsy was 4.3% (125/2883) on clinical diagnosis. In our previous study, the prevalences of periventricular leukomalacia in 1990-1991, 1993-1994, 1996, and 1999 were 4.8%, 4.9%, 4.9%, and 5.3% on ultrasound, and 7.9%, 7.7%, 6.9%, and 7.3% on magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. The prevalence of periventricular leukomalacia has decreased significantly in Japan.

  15. Reply to comment on “An antidepressant decreases CSF Aβ production in healthy individuals and in transgenic AD mice”

    PubMed Central

    Sheline, Yvette I.; West, Tim; Yarasheski, Kevin; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Hettinger, Jane C.; Tripoli, Danielle L.; Xiong, Chengjie; Frederiksen, Christine; Grzelak, Monica V.; Bateman, Randall J.; Morris, John C.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Cirrito, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Possible reasons for why a new study could not replicate our finding that the serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram decreased amyloid β concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid of healthy volunteers. PMID:25540323

  16. Cannabidiol promotes amyloid precursor protein ubiquitination and reduction of beta amyloid expression in SHSY5YAPP+ cells through PPARγ involvement.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, Caterina; Steardo, Luca; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The amyloidogenic cascade is regarded as a key factor at the basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. The aberrant cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) induces an increased production and a subsequent aggregation of beta amyloid (Aβ) peptide in limbic and association cortices. As a result, altered neuronal homeostasis and oxidative injury provoke tangle formation with consequent neuronal loss. Cannabidiol (CBD), a Cannabis derivative devoid of psychotropic effects, has attracted much attention because it may beneficially interfere with several Aβ-triggered neurodegenerative pathways, even though the mechanism responsible for such actions remains unknown. In the present research, the role of CBD was investigated as a possible modulating compound of APP processing in SHSY5Y(APP+) neurons. In addition, the putative involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) was explored as a candidate molecular site responsible for CBD actions. Results indicated the CBD capability to induce the ubiquitination of APP protein which led to a substantial decrease in APP full length protein levels in SHSY5Y(APP+) with the consequent decrease in Aβ production. Moreover, CBD promoted an increased survival of SHSY5Y(APP+) neurons, by reducing their long-term apoptotic rate. Obtained results also showed that all, here observed, CBD effects were dependent on the selective activation of PPARγ.

  17. Hypothermia reduces cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Busija, D.W.; Leffler, C.W. )

    1987-10-01

    The authors examined effects of hypothermia on cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in anesthetized, newborn pigs (1-4 days old). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. Regional CBF ranged from 44 to 66 ml{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}, and cerebral metabolic rate was 1.94 {plus minus} 0.23 ml O{sub 2}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1} during normothermia (39{degree}C). Reduction of rectal temperature to 34-35{degree}C decreased CBF and cerebral metabolic rate 40-50%. In another group of piglets, they examined responsiveness of the cerebral circulation to arterial hypercapnia during hypothermia. Although absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic CBF were reduced by hypothermia and absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic cerebrovascular resistance were increased, the percentage changes from control in these variables during hypercapnia were similar during normothermia and hypothermia. In another group of animals that were maintained normothermic and exposed to two episodes of hypercapnia, there was no attenuation of cerebrovascular dilation during the second episode. They conclude that hypothermia reduces CBF secondarily to a decrease in cerebral metabolic rate and that percent dilator responsiveness to arterial hypercapnia is unaltered when body temperature is reduced.

  18. Posttherapeutic cerebral radionecrosis: a complication of head and neck tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Araoz, C.; Weems, A.M.

    1981-12-01

    Patients with treated head and neck cancer may have focal neurologic symptoms and personality changes due to delayed cerebral radionecrosis. A history of past treatment should direct the physician to consider these lesions in the differential diagnosis. Craniotomy is the management recommended. Histopathologic changes include fibrotic response of the meninges with pleomorphic and vacuolated fibroblasts, capillary hyperplasia, reactive astrocytes, and fibrosis of the blood vessels. Amyloid is deposited in the arteriolar walls and extracellular space. Ischemic, autoimmune, or vascular mechanisms, and glial alterations have all been considered in the pathogensis of delayed cerebral radionecrosis. Some researchers have concluded that chemotherapeutic agents, such as methotrexate, may contribute to its production.

  19. Molecular Structure of Amyloid Fibrils Controls the Relationship between Fibrillar Size and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Jin; Savtchenko, Regina; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2011-01-01

    Background According to the prevailing view, soluble oligomers or small fibrillar fragments are considered to be the most toxic species in prion diseases. To test this hypothesis, two conformationally different amyloid states were produced from the same highly pure recombinant full-length prion protein (rPrP). The cytotoxic potential of intact fibrils and fibrillar fragments generated by sonication from these two states was tested using cultured cells. Methodology/Principal Findings For one amyloid state, fibril fragmentation was found to enhance its cytotoxic potential, whereas for another amyloid state formed within the same amino acid sequence, the fragmented fibrils were found to be substantially less toxic than the intact fibrils. Consistent with the previous studies, the toxic effects were more pronounced for cell cultures expressing normal isoform of the prion protein (PrPC) at high levels confirming that cytotoxicity was in part PrPC-dependent. Silencing of PrPC expression by small hairpin RNAs designed to silence expression of human PrPC (shRNA-PrPC) deminished the deleterious effects of the two amyloid states to a different extent, suggesting that the role of PrPC-mediated and PrPC-independent mechanisms depends on the structure of the aggregates. Conclusions/Significance This work provides a direct illustration that the relationship between an amyloid's physical dimension and its toxic potential is not unidirectional but is controlled by the molecular structure of prion protein (PrP) molecules within aggregated states. Depending on the structure, a decrease in size of amyloid fibrils can either enhance or abolish their cytotoxic effect. Regardless of the molecular structure or size of PrP aggregates, silencing of PrPC expression can be exploited to reduce their deleterious effects. PMID:21625461

  20. Brazilin inhibits amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis, remodels amyloid fibrils and reduces amyloid cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wen-Jie; Guo, Jing-Jing; Gao, Ming-Tao; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Han, Yi-Fan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Jiang, Shaoyi; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers, the main neurotoxic species, are predominantly formed from monomers through a fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Herein, we virtually screened an in-house library of natural compounds and discovered brazilin as a dual functional compound in both Aβ42 fibrillogenesis inhibition and mature fibril remodeling, leading to significant reduction in Aβ42 cytotoxicity. The potent inhibitory effect of brazilin was proven by an IC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.3 μM, which was smaller than that of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Phase III clinical trials and about one order of magnitude smaller than those of curcumin and resveratrol. Most importantly, it was found that brazilin redirected Aβ42 monomers and its mature fibrils into unstructured Aβ aggregates with some β-sheet structures, which could prevent both the primary nucleation and the fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Molecular simulations demonstrated that brazilin inhibited Aβ42 fibrillogenesis by directly binding to Aβ42 species via hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding and remodeled mature fibrils by disrupting the intermolecular salt bridge Asp23-Lys28 via hydrogen bonding. Both experimental and computational studies revealed a different working mechanism of brazilin from that of known inhibitors. These findings indicate that brazilin is of great potential as a neuroprotective and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Long-term dantrolene treatment reduced intraneuronal amyloid in aged Alzheimer triple transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Yang, Bin; Liu, Chunxia; Liang, Ge; Liu, Weixia; Pickup, Stephen; Meng, Qingcheng; Tian, Yuke; Li, Shitong; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F; Wei, Huafeng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the long-term treatment of dantrolene on amyloid and tau neuropathology, brain volume, and cognitive function in aged triple transgenic Alzheimer (3xTg-AD) mice. Fifteen-month old 3xTg-AD mice and wild-type controls were treated with oral dantrolene (5 mg/kg) or vehicle control twice a week for 6 months. Learning and memory were examined using the Morris Water Maze at 21 and 22 months of age. After the behavioral testing, hippocampal and cortical brain volumes were calculated with magnetic resonance imaging and motor function was evaluated using the rotorod. The amyloid burden and tau neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus were determined using immunohistochemistry. We found that dantrolene significantly decreased the intraneuronal amyloid accumulation by as much as 76% compared with its corresponding vehicle control, together with a trend to reduce phosphorylated tau in the hippocampus. No significant differences could be detected in hippocampal or cortical brain volume, motor function or cognition among all experimental groups, indicating that the mice were still presymptomatic for Alzheimer disease. Thus, presymptomatic and long-term dantrolene treatment significantly decreased the intraneuronal amyloid burden in aged 3xTg-AD mice before significant changes in brain volume, or cognition.

  2. Intraaortic Balloon Pump Counterpulsation and Cerebral Autoregulation: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    baseline. During inflation-ratio reduction, cerebral blood flow irregularities reduced over time, whilst cerebral blood flow variability at end-diastole decreased in patients with cardiogenic shock. Conclusions Weaning counterpulsation from 1:1 to 1:3 inflation ratio leads to a progressive reduction in time delays between systolic blood pressure and peak cerebral blood flow velocities suggesting that although preserved, there is a significant delay in the establishment of cerebral autoregulatory mechanisms. In addition, cerebral blood flow irregularities (i.e. surrogate of flow adaptability) decrease and a loss of cerebral blood flow chaotic pattern occurs during the end-diastolic phase of each beat in patients with cardiogenic shock. PMID:20226065

  3. A connection between the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, autophagy, and cerebral amyloidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Soskić, Vukić; Klemm, Martina; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Schwall, Gerhard P; Poznanović, Slobodan; Stegmann, Werner; Groebe, Karlfried; Zengerling, Helmut; Schoepf, Rainer; Burnet, Michael; Schrattenholz, André

    2008-06-01

    In a drug reprofiling attempt, we explored novel neuroprotective properties of 4-azasteroids by synthesizing chemical affinity tags capturing adenine nucleotide translocator-1, as a potential target. Dutasteride inhibits the mitochondrial transition pore and induces an increase of autophagosomal structures in human cell lines. In vivo, a surprising reduction of the beta-amyloid plaque load in a model for cerebral amyloidosis appears to connect release of neurotoxic peptides, mitochondrial apoptosis and autophagy.

  4. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  5. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of human islet amyloid polypeptides: an insight into amyloid peptides' connection with antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Qian; Chen, Jin-Chun; Cui, Yi-Xian; Zhou, Bing; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2012-07-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) shows an antimicrobial activity towards two types of clinically relevant bacteria. The potency of hIAPP varies with its aggregation states. Circular dichroism was employed to determine the interaction between hIAPP and bacteria lipid membrane mimic. The antimicrobial activity of each aggregate species is associated with their ability to induce membrane disruption. Our findings provide new evidence revealing the antimicrobial activity of amyloid peptide, which suggest a possible connection between amyloid peptides and antimicrobial peptides.

  7. Can Alzheimer disease be prevented by amyloid-β immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lemere, Cynthia A.; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has become a major therapeutic target in AD on the basis of pathological, biochemical and genetic evidence that supports a role for this molecule in the disease process. Active and passive Aβ immunotherapies have been shown to lower cerebral Aβ levels and improve cognition in animal models of AD. In humans, dosing in the phase II clinical trial of the AN1792 Aβ vaccine was stopped when ~6% of the immunized patients developed meningoencephalitis. However, some plaque clearance and modest clinical improvements were observed in patients following immunization. As a result of this study, at least seven passive Aβ immunotherapies are now in clinical trials in patients with mild to moderate AD. Several second-generation active Aβ vaccines are also in early clinical trials. On the basis of preclinical studies and the limited data from clinical trials, Aβ immunotherapy might be most effective in preventing or slowing the progression of AD when patients are immunized before or in the very earliest stages of disease onset. Biomarkers for AD and imaging technology have improved greatly over the past 10 years and, in the future, might be used to identify presymptomatic, at-risk individuals who might benefit from Aβ immunization. PMID:20140000

  8. Can Alzheimer disease be prevented by amyloid-beta immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Lemere, Cynthia A; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-02-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide has become a major therapeutic target in AD on the basis of pathological, biochemical and genetic evidence that supports a role for this molecule in the disease process. Active and passive Abeta immunotherapies have been shown to lower cerebral Abeta levels and improve cognition in animal models of AD. In humans, dosing in the phase II clinical trial of the AN1792 Abeta vaccine was stopped when approximately 6% of the immunized patients developed meningoencephalitis. However, some plaque clearance and modest clinical improvements were observed in patients following immunization. As a result of this study, at least seven passive Abeta immunotherapies are now in clinical trials in patients with mild to moderate AD. Several second-generation active Abeta vaccines are also in early clinical trials. On the basis of preclinical studies and the limited data from clinical trials, Abeta immunotherapy might be most effective in preventing or slowing the progression of AD when patients are immunized before or in the very earliest stages of disease onset. Biomarkers for AD and imaging technology have improved greatly over the past 10 years and, in the future, might be used to identify presymptomatic, at-risk individuals who might benefit from Abeta immunization.

  9. Alzheimer's disease and blood-brain barrier function - Why have anti-β-amyloid therapies failed to prevent dementia progression?

    PubMed Central

    Pahnke, Jens; Walker, Lary C.; Scheffler, Katja; Krohn, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Proteopathies of the brain are defined by abnormal, disease-inducing protein deposition that leads to functional abrogation and death of neurons. Immunization trials targeting the removal of amyloid-β plaques in Alzheimer's disease have so far failed to stop the progression of dementia, despite autopsy findings of reduced plaque load. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the relationship between AD pathology and blood-brain barrier function, and propose that the activation of the excretion function of the blood-brain barrier might help to achieve better results in trials targeting the dissolution of cerebral amyloid-β aggregates. We further discuss a possible role of oligomers in limiting the efficacy of immunotherapy. PMID:19481107

  10. In vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging of amyloid-β plaques with a dicyanoisophorone-based probe.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Zhou, Lin-Fu; Li, Yu-Kun; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Yan, Jin-Wu; Zhang, Lei

    2017-04-08

    A dicyanoisophorone-based probe with two-photon absorption and NIR emission was developed for the in vivo fluorescence imaging of amyloid-β plaques, which exhibited high selectivity toward Aβ aggregates over other intracellular proteins. The detection limit was calculated to be as low as 109 nM. In vivo imaging studies indicated that the probe could penetrate the blood-brain barrier and label Aβ plaques in the living transgenic mice, and its specific binding to cerebral Aβ plaques was further confirmed by one- and two-photon ex vivo fluorescence imaging. All these results featured its promising application prospects for amyloid-β sensing in basic research and biomedical research.

  11. In vitro and in vivo insulin amyloid degradation mediated by Serratiopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Metkar, Sanjay Kisan; Girigoswami, Agnishwar; Murugesan, Ramachandran; Girigoswami, Koyeli

    2017-01-01

    A transition of amyloidogenic protein by alternative folding pathway under certain conditions leads to the formation of protease resistant amyloid fibrils, having predominantly cross β structure. These amyloids are related to various neurodegenerative diseases and clearance of such amyloids may be a therapeutic approach for amyloid-related diseases. Insulin, that can form amyloids, is widely used as a model amyloidogenic protein for the study of various amyloid related diseases. In this study, insulin amyloids were formed in vitro and the potential of Serratiopeptidase (SP), a fibrinolytic-like serine protease, towards the dissociation of insulin amyloids was explored. The dissociation of the amyloids was demonstrated using in vitro and in vivo using zebrafish model. The amyloid dissociation property was compared with a standard amyloid dissociating enzyme nattokinase (NK). SP shows better amyloid dissociation ability than NK and therefore, SP can be considered as amyloid dissociating agent with potential as a drug candidate for different amyloid related disorders.

  12. Amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) exhibits stronger zinc-dependent neuronal adhesion than amyloid precursor protein and APLP2.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Magnus C; Schauenburg, Linda; Thompson-Steckel, Greta; Dunsing, Valentin; Kaden, Daniela; Voigt, Philipp; Schaefer, Michael; Chiantia, Salvatore; Kennedy, Timothy E; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its paralogs, amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APLP2, are metalloproteins with a putative role both in synaptogenesis and in maintaining synapse structure. Here, we studied the effect of zinc on membrane localization, adhesion, and secretase cleavage of APP, APLP1, and APLP2 in cell culture and rat neurons. For this, we employed live-cell microscopy techniques, a microcontact printing adhesion assay and ELISA for protein detection in cell culture supernatants. We report that zinc induces the multimerization of proteins of the amyloid precursor protein family and enriches them at cellular adhesion sites. Thus, zinc facilitates the formation of de novo APP and APLP1 containing adhesion complexes, whereas it does not have such influence on APLP2. Furthermore, zinc-binding prevented cleavage of APP and APLPs by extracellular secretases. In conclusion, the complexation of zinc modulates neuronal functions of APP and APLPs by (i) regulating formation of adhesion complexes, most prominently for APLP1, and (ii) by reducing the concentrations of neurotrophic soluble APP/APLP ectodomains. Earlier studies suggest a function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family proteins in neuronal adhesion. We report here that adhesive function of these proteins is tightly regulated by zinc, most prominently for amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1). Zinc-mediated APLP1 multimerization, which induced formation of new neuronal contacts and decreased APLP1 shedding. This suggests that APLP1 could function as a zinc receptor processing zinc signals to stabilized or new neuronal contacts.

  13. Amyloids or prions? That is the question.

    PubMed

    Sabate, Raimon; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Batlle, Cristina; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Despite major efforts devoted to understanding the phenomenon of prion transmissibility, it is still poorly understood how this property is encoded in the amino acid sequence. In recent years, experimental data on yeast prion domains allow to start at least partially decrypting the sequence requirements of prion formation. These experiments illustrate the need for intrinsically disordered sequence regions enriched with a particularly high proportion of glutamine and asparagine. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that these regions strike a balance between sufficient amyloid nucleation propensity on the one hand and disorder on the other, which ensures availability of the amyloid prone regions but entropically prevents unwanted nucleation and facilitates brittleness required for propagation.

  14. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  15. Amyloids or prions? That is the question

    PubMed Central

    Sabate, Raimon; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Batlle, Cristina; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite major efforts devoted to understanding the phenomenon of prion transmissibility, it is still poorly understood how this property is encoded in the amino acid sequence. In recent years, experimental data on yeast prion domains allow to start at least partially decrypting the sequence requirements of prion formation. These experiments illustrate the need for intrinsically disordered sequence regions enriched with a particularly high proportion of glutamine and asparagine. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that these regions strike a balance between sufficient amyloid nucleation propensity on the one hand and disorder on the other, which ensures availability of the amyloid prone regions but entropically prevents unwanted nucleation and facilitates brittleness required for propagation. PMID:26039159

  16. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  17. Flavonol-rich dark cocoa significantly decreases plasma endothelin-1 and improves cognition in urban children.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Cross, Janet V; Engle, Randall; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Gómez-Garza, Gilberto; Jewells, Valerie; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Solorio, Edelmira; Chao, Chih-Kai; Zhu, Hongtu; Mukherjee, Partha S; Ferreira-Azevedo, Lara; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution exposures are linked to systemic inflammation, cardiovascular and respiratory morbidity and mortality, neuroinflammation and neuropathology in young urbanites. In particular, most Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) children exhibit subtle cognitive deficits, and neuropathology studies show 40% of them exhibiting frontal tau hyperphosphorylation and 51% amyloid-β diffuse plaques (compared to 0% in low pollution control children). We assessed whether a short cocoa intervention can be effective in decreasing plasma endothelin 1 (ET-1) and/or inflammatory mediators in MCMA children. Thirty gram of dark cocoa with 680 mg of total flavonols were given daily for 10.11 ± 3.4 days (range 9-24 days) to 18 children (10.55 years, SD = 1.45; 11F/7M). Key metabolite ratios in frontal white matter and in hippocampus pre and during cocoa intervention were quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. ET-1 significantly decreased after cocoa treatment (p = 0.0002). Fifteen children (83%) showed a marginally significant individual improvement in one or both of the applied simple short memory tasks. Endothelial dysfunction is a key feature of exposure to particulate matter (PM) and decreased endothelin-1 bioavailability is likely useful for brain function in the context of air pollution. Our findings suggest that cocoa interventions may be critical for early implementation of neuroprotection of highly exposed urban children. Multi-domain nutraceutical interventions could limit the risk for endothelial dysfunction, cerebral hypoperfusion, neuroinflammation, cognitive deficits, structural volumetric detrimental brain effects, and the early development of the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  18. Flavonol-rich dark cocoa significantly decreases plasma endothelin-1 and improves cognition in urban children

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Cross, Janet V.; Engle, Randall; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Gómez-Garza, Gilberto; Jewells, Valerie; Weili, Lin; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Solorio, Edelmira; Chao, Chih-kai; Zhu, Hongtu; Mukherjee, Partha S.; Ferreira-Azevedo, Lara; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution exposures are linked to systemic inflammation, cardiovascular and respiratory morbidity and mortality, neuroinflammation and neuropathology in young urbanites. In particular, most Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) children exhibit subtle cognitive deficits, and neuropathology studies show 40% of them exhibiting frontal tau hyperphosphorylation and 51% amyloid-β diffuse plaques (compared to 0% in low pollution control children). We assessed whether a short cocoa intervention can be effective in decreasing plasma endothelin 1 (ET-1) and/or inflammatory mediators in MCMA children. Thirty gram of dark cocoa with 680 mg of total flavonols were given daily for 10.11 ± 3.4 days (range 9–24 days) to 18 children (10.55 years, SD = 1.45; 11F/7M). Key metabolite ratios in frontal white matter and in hippocampus pre and during cocoa intervention were quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. ET-1 significantly decreased after cocoa treatment (p = 0.0002). Fifteen children (83%) showed a marginally significant individual improvement in one or both of the applied simple short memory tasks. Endothelial dysfunction is a key feature of exposure to particulate matter (PM) and decreased endothelin-1 bioavailability is likely useful for brain function in the context of air pollution. Our findings suggest that cocoa interventions may be critical for early implementation of neuroprotection of highly exposed urban children. Multi-domain nutraceutical interventions could limit the risk for endothelial dysfunction, cerebral hypoperfusion, neuroinflammation, cognitive deficits, structural volumetric detrimental brain effects, and the early development of the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:23986703

  19. Neuroprotective effect of the aminoestrogen prolame against impairment of learning and memory skills in rats injected with amyloid-β-25-35 into the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Limón, Daniel; Díaz, Alfonso; Hernandez, Monserrat; Fernandez-G, Juan M; Torres-Martínez, Ana C; Pérez-Severiano, Francisca; Rendón-Huerta, Erika P; Montaño, Luis F; Guevara, Jorge

    2012-06-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the deposition of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) in senile plaques and cerebral vasculature. Its neurotoxic mechanisms are associated with the generation of oxidative stress and reactive astrogliosis that cause neuronal death and memory impairment. Estrogens reduce the rate of Azheimer's disease because of their antioxidant activity. Prolame (N-(3-hydroxy-1,3,5(10)-estratrien-17β-yl)-3-hydroxypropylamine) is an aminoestrogen with estrogenic and antithrombotic effects. In our study we evaluated the role of prolame on Aβ(25-35)-caused oxidative stress, reactive astrogliosis, and impairment of spatial memory(.) The Aβ(25-35) (100 μM/μl) or vehicle was injected into the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus of the rat. The subcutaneous injection of prolame (400 μl, 50 nM) or sesame oil (400 μl) started 1 day before the Aβ(25-35) injection and was continued for another 29 days. The results showed a significant impairment of spatial memory evident 30 days after the Aβ(25-35) injection. The prolame treatment significantly reduced spatial-memory impairment and decreased lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species, and reactive gliosis. It also restored the eNOS and nNOS expression to normal levels. In conclusion the aminoestrogen prolame should be considered as an alternative in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Longitudinal study of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid proteins and apolipoprotein E in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pirttilä, T; Koivisto, K; Mehta, P D; Reinikainen, K; Kim, K S; Kilkku, O; Heinonen, E; Soininen, H; Riekkinen, P; Wisniewski, H M

    1998-06-12

    Levels of soluble amyloid beta protein (sAbeta), amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) and apolipoprotein E (apoE) were examined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained twice, at baseline and after 3-year follow-up, from 25 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). Levels of sAbeta and apoE from patients with the apoE4 allele decreased with time, whereas the levels were similar in patients without apoE4 allele. Changes of sAbeta and apoE concentrations correlated significantly with those of mini-mental state examination (MMSE) scores. Levels of sAbeta did not change with time in patients with mild dementia, whereas they decreased significantly in patients with moderate dementia. ApoE concentrations decreased in both groups whereas APP levels were similar. We conclude that measurements of CSF sAbeta and apoE levels may be helpful in monitoring progression of the disease.

  1. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  2. Increased body temperature accelerates aggregation of the Leu-68-->Gln mutant cystatin C, the amyloid-forming protein in hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamson, M; Grubb, A

    1994-01-01

    Hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy is a dominantly inherited disorder, characterized by dementia, paralysis, and death from cerebral hemorrhage in early adult life. A variant of the cysteine proteinase inhibitor, cystatin C, is deposited as amyloid in the tissues of the patients and their spinal-fluid level of cystatin C is abnormally low. The disease-associated Leu-68-->Gln mutant (L68Q) cystatin C has been produced in an Escherichia coli expression system and isolated by use of denaturing buffers, immunosorption, and gel filtration. Parallel physicochemical and functional investigations of L68Q-cystatin C and wild-type cystatin C revealed that both proteins effectively inhibit the cysteine proteinase cathepsin B (equilibrium constants for dissociation, 0.4 and 0.5 nM, respectively) but differ considerably in their tendency to dimerize and form aggregates. While wild-type cystatin C is monomeric and functionally active even after prolonged storage at elevated temperatures, L68Q-cystatin C starts to dimerize and lose biological activity immediately after it is transferred to a nondenaturing buffer. The dimerization of L68Q-cystatin C is highly temperature-dependent, with a rise in incubation temperature from 37 to 40 degrees C resulting in a 150% increase in dimerization rate. The aggregation at physiological concentrations is likewise increased at 40 compared to 37 degrees C, by approximately 60%. These properties of L68Q-cystatin C have bearing upon our understanding of the pathophysiological process of hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy. They might also be of clinical relevance, since medical intervention to abort febrile periods of carriers of the disease trait may reduce the in vivo formation of L68Q-cystatin C aggregates. Images PMID:8108423

  3. Aberrant protein expression in cerebral cortex of fetus with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Engidawork, E; Gulesserian, T; Fountoulakis, M; Lubec, G

    2003-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common birth defect associated with mental retardation. Identifying proteins that are aberrantly expressed therefore helps to understand how chromosomal imbalance leads to subnormal intelligence in Down syndrome. In the present study, we generated a fetal brain map with the use of an analytical method based on two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry and searched the proteome for differential protein expression. Among 49 proteins analyzed in seven control and nine Down syndrome fetuses, we found 11 proteins that have been deregulated in cerebral cortex of fetal Down syndrome. While double-strand break repair protein rad 21 homologue, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit 5, mixed lineage leukemia septin-like fusion protein-B and heat shock protein 75 were increased; beta-amyloid precursor-like protein 1, tropomyosin 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion oncoprotein type 2, Nck adaptor protein 2, Src homology domain growth factor receptor bound 2-like endophilin B2, beta tubulin, septin 7 and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells 140 were decreased. The current data suggest that misexpression of proteins that have functions ranging from signaling to cellular structural organization could contribute to or reflect brain dysgenesis in Down syndrome.

  4. Formation of Amyloid Fibers by Monomeric Light Chain Variable Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Brumshtein, Boris; Esswein, Shannon R.; Landau, Meytal; Ryan, Christopher M.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Phillips, Martin L.; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic light chain amyloidosis is a lethal disease characterized by excess immunoglobulin light chains and light chain fragments composed of variable domains, which aggregate into amyloid fibers. These fibers accumulate and damage organs. Some light chains induce formation of amyloid fibers, whereas others do not, making it unclear what distinguishes amyloid formers from non-formers. One mechanism by which sequence variation may reduce propensity to form amyloid fibers is by shifting the equilibrium toward an amyloid-resistant quaternary structure. Here we identify the monomeric form of the Mcg immunoglobulin light chain variable domain as the quaternary unit required for amyloid fiber assembly. Dimers of Mcg variable domains remain stable and soluble, yet become prone to assemble into amyloid fibers upon disassociation into monomers. PMID:25138218

  5. Structure and function of amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Carlos; Colombres, Marcela; Nuñez, Marco Tulio; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2004-12-01

    This review is focused on the structure and function of Alzheimer's amyloid deposits. Amyloid formation is a process in which normal well-folded cellular proteins undergo a self-assembly process that leads to the formation of large and ordered protein structures. Amyloid deposition, oligomerization, and higher order polymerization, and the structure adopted by these assemblies, as well as their functional relationship with cell biology are underscored. Numerous efforts have been directed to elucidate these issues and their relation with senile dementia. Significant advances made in the last decade in amyloid structure, dynamics and cell biology are summarized and discussed. The mechanism of amyloid neurotoxicity is discussed with emphasis on the Wnt signaling pathway. This review is focused on Alzheimer's amyloid fibrils in general and has been divided into two parts dealing with the structure and function of amyloid.

  6. Amyloid fibril formation by macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuel, Hilal A. . E-mail: hilal.lashuel@epfl.ch; Aljabari, Bayan; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Metz, Christine N.; Leng Lin; Callaway, David J.E.; Bucala, Richard

    2005-12-16

    We demonstrate herein that human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed in the brain and not previously considered to be amyloidogenic, forms amyloid fibrils similar to those derived from the disease associated amyloidogenic proteins {beta}-amyloid and {alpha}-synuclein. Acid denaturing conditions were found to readily induce MIF to undergo amyloid fibril formation. MIF aggregates to form amyloid-like structures with a morphology that is highly dependent on pH. The mechanism of MIF amyloid formation was probed by electron microscopy, turbidity, Thioflavin T binding, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and analytical ultracentrifugation. The fibrillar structures formed by MIF bind Congo red and exhibit the characteristic green birefringence under polarized light. These results are consistent with the notion that amyloid fibril formation is not an exclusive property of a select group of amyloidogenic proteins, and contribute to a better understanding of the factors which govern protein conformational changes and amyloid fibril formation in vivo.

  7. Islet amyloid polypeptide forms rigid lipid-protein amyloid fibrils on supported phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-02-08

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms fibrillar amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and its misfolding and aggregation are thought to contribute to beta-cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that IAPP fibrillization is strongly influenced by lipid membranes and, vice versa, that the membrane architecture and integrity are severely affected by amyloid growth. Here, we report direct fluorescence microscopic observations of the morphological transformations accompanying IAPP fibrillization on the surface of supported lipid membranes. Within minutes of application in submicromolar concentrations, IAPP caused extensive remodeling of the membrane including formation of defects, vesiculation, and tubulation. The effects of IAPP concentration, ionic strength, and the presence of amyloid seeds on the bilayer perturbation and peptide aggregation were examined. Growth of amyloid fibrils was visualized using fluorescently labeled IAPP or thioflavin T staining. Two-color imaging of the peptide and membranes revealed that the fibrils were initially composed of the peptide only, and vesiculation occurred in the points where growing fibers touched the lipid membrane. Interestingly, after 2-5 h of incubation, IAPP fibers became "wrapped" by lipid membranes derived from the supported membrane. Progressive increase in molecular-level association between amyloid and membranes in the maturing fibers was confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy.

  8. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  9. Immunoglobulin light chains, glycosaminoglycans and amyloid.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Kisilevsky, R.; Biosciences Division; Queen's Univ.

    2000-03-01

    Immunoglobulin light chains are the precursor proteins for fibrils that are formed during primary amyloidosis and in amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma. As found for the approximately 20 currently described forms of focal, localized, or systemic amyloidoses, light chain-related fibrils extracted from physiological deposits are invariably associated with glycosaminoglycans, predominantly heparan sulfate. Other amyloid-related proteins are either structurally normal, such as g2-microglobulin and islet amyloid polypeptide, fragments of normal proteins such as serum amyloid A protein or the precursor protein of the g peptide involved in Alzheimer's disease, or are inherited forms of single amino acid variants of a normal protein such as found in the familial forms of amyloid associated with transthyretin. In contrast, the primary structures of light chains involved in fibril formation exhibit extensive mutational diversity rendering some proteins highly amyloidogenic and others non-pathological. The interactions between light chains and glycosaminoglycans are also affected by amino acid variation and may influence the clinical course of disease by enhancing fibril stability and contributing to resistance to protease degradation. Relatively little is currently known about the mechanisms by which glycosaminoglycans interact with light chains and light-chain fibrils. It is probable that future studies of this uniquely diverse family of proteins will continue o shed light on the processes of amyloidosis, and contribute as well to a greater understanding of the normal physiological roles of glycosaminoglycans.

  10. Serum amyloid P inhibits dermal wound healing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The repair of open wounds depends on granulation tissue formation and contraction, which is primarily mediated by myofibroblasts. A subset of myofibroblasts originates from bone-marrow-derived monocytes which differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. Serum amyloid P (SAP) inhibits ...

  11. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-06

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs have been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  12. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs thave been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  13. Amyloid fibril networks nucleated under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzli, Kiersten; Love, Brian

    2013-03-01

    The process of amyloid fibril formation is of interest due to the link between these self-aggregating proteins and the progression of neurodegenerative disease. More recently, research has been directed at the exploitation of self-assembly properties of amyloid proteins for use as templates for nanowires and fibrillar networks. Insulin is an ideal protein for these purposes due to the ease of aggregation, as well as the large aspect ratio and high chemical stability of the produced fibrils. Insulin in pH 2 solution quickly forms aggregates in the presence of 65 °C heat. We have investigated the effect of oscillatory shear on the nucleation and growth of amyloid fibrillar networks using rheology and TEM to characterize the mechanical properties and structure of the network respectively. We contrast networks nucleated under oscillatory shear with networks nucleated in static and agitated conditions, and discuss network properties in the context of use in templating nanostructures. We find that the structural characteristics of the formed networks, including the density of fibrils, are affected by shear during the nucleation phase of amyloid growth.

  14. Phenylbutyric acid reduces amyloid plaques and rescues cognitive behavior in AD transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jesse C; Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Ladiges, Warren C

    2011-06-01

    Trafficking through the secretory pathway is known to regulate the maturation of the APP-cleaving secretases and APP proteolysis. The coupling of stress signaling and pathological deterioration of the brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD) supports a mechanistic connection between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and neurodegeneration. Consequently, small molecular chaperones, which promote protein folding and minimize ER stress, might be effective in delaying or attenuating the deleterious progression of AD. We tested this hypothesis by treating APPswePS1delta9 AD transgenic mice with the molecular chaperone phenylbutyric acid (PBA) for 14 months at a dose of 1 mg PBA g(-1) of body weight in the drinking water. Phenylbutyric acid treatment increased secretase-mediated APP cleavage, but was not associated with any increase in amyloid biosynthesis. The PBA-treated AD transgenic mice had significantly decreased incidence and size of amyloid plaques throughout the cortex and hippocampus. There was no change in total amyloid levels suggesting that PBA modifies amyloid aggregation or pathogenesis independently of biogenesis. The decrease in amyloid plaques was paralleled by increased memory retention, as PBA treatment facilitated cognitive performance in a spatial memory task in both wild-type and AD transgenic mice. The molecular mechanism underlying the cognitive facilitation of PBA is not clear; however, increased levels of both metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors, as well as ADAM10 and TACE, were observed in the cortex and hippocampus of PBA-treated mice. The data suggest that PBA ameliorates the cognitive and pathological features of AD and supports the investigation of PBA as a therapeutic for AD.

  15. The Alzheimer's Amyloid-Degrading Peptidase, Neprilysin: Can We Control It?

    PubMed Central

    Nalivaeva, N. N.; Belyaev, N. D.; Zhuravin, I. A.; Turner, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) postulates that accumulation in the brain of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is the primary trigger for neuronal loss specific to this pathology. In healthy brain, Aβ levels are regulated by a dynamic equilibrium between Aβ release from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its removal by perivascular drainage or by amyloid-degrading enzymes (ADEs). During the last decade, the ADE family was fast growing, and currently it embraces more than 20 members. There are solid data supporting involvement of each of them in Aβ clearance but a zinc metallopeptidase neprilysin (NEP) is considered as a major ADE. NEP plays an important role in brain function due to its role in terminating neuropeptide signalling and its decrease during ageing or after such pathologies as hypoxia or ischemia contribute significantly to the development of AD pathology. The recently discovered mechanism of epigenetic regulation of NEP by the APP intracellular domain (AICD) opens new avenues for its therapeutic manipulation and raises hope for developing preventive strategies in AD. However, consideration needs to be given to the diverse physiological roles of NEP. This paper critically evaluates general biochemical and physiological functions of NEP and their therapeutic relevance. PMID:22900228

  16. Clinical effect of white matter network disruption related to amyloid and small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jin; Im, Kiho; Kwon, Hunki; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Changsoo; Kim, Yeo Jin; Jung, Na-Yeon; Cho, Hanna; Ye, Byoung Seok; Noh, Young; Kim, Geon Ha; Ko, En-Da; Kim, Jae Seung; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Jae Hong; Ewers, Michael; Weiner, Michael W.; Na, Duk L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We tested our hypothesis that the white matter network might mediate the effect of amyloid and small vessel disease (SVD) on cortical thickness and/or cognition. Methods: We prospectively recruited 232 patients with cognitive impairment. Amyloid was assessed using Pittsburgh compound B–PET. SVD was quantified as white matter hyperintensity volume and lacune number. The regional white matter network connectivity was measured as regional nodal efficiency by applying graph theoretical analysis to diffusion tensor imaging data. We measured cortical thickness and performed neuropsychological tests. Results: SVD burden was associated with decreased nodal efficiency in the bilateral frontal, lateral temporal, lateral parietal, and occipital regions. Path analyses showed that the frontal nodal efficiency mediated the effect of SVD on the frontal atrophy and frontal-executive dysfunction. The temporoparietal nodal efficiency mediated the effect of SVD on the temporoparietal atrophy and memory dysfunction. However, Pittsburgh compound B retention ratio affected cortical atrophy and cognitive impairment without being mediated by nodal efficiency. Conclusions: We suggest that a disrupted white matter network mediates the effect of SVD, but not amyloid, on specific patterns of cortical atrophy and/or cognitive impairment. Therefore, our findings provide insight to better understand how amyloid and SVD burden can give rise to brain atrophy or cognitive impairment in specific patterns. PMID:26062629

  17. CSF beta-amyloid levels are altered in narcolepsy: a link with the inflammatory hypothesis?

    PubMed

    Liguori, Claudio; Placidi, Fabio; Albanese, Maria; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Izzi, Francesca; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Bernardini, Sergio; Romigi, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by hypocretin deficiency due to the loss of hypothalamic orexinergic neurons, and is associated with both the human leucocyte antigen DQB1*06:02 and the T cell receptor polymorphism. The above relationship suggests autoimmune/inflammatory processes underlying the loss of orexinergic neurons in narcolepsy. To test the autoimmune/inflammatory hypothesis by means of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of beta-amyloid1-42 and/or total tau proteins in a sample of narcoleptic patients, we analysed 16 narcoleptic patients and 16 healthy controls. Beta-amyloid1-42 CSF levels were significantly lower in narcoleptic patients compared with healthy controls. We also documented pathologically low levels of CSF beta-amyloid1-42 (<500 pg mL(-1) ) in six of 16 narcoleptic patients (37.5%). We hypothesize that the significant decrease of the CSF beta-amyloid1-42 levels in narcoleptic patients may support both the inflammatory/autoimmune hypothesis as the basis of the pathogenesis of narcolepsy and the prevalence of an 'amyloidogenic' pathway caused by the deficiency of the alpha-secretases enzymes.

  18. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  19. Is Vasomotion in Cerebral Arteries Impaired in Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Farkas, Eszter; Martin, Chris; Venneri, Annalena; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis of a vascular component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been indicated as key elements of this pathway. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder, frequent in AD, characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in cerebral blood vessel walls. CAA is associated with loss of vascular integrity, resulting in impaired regulation of cerebral circulation, and increased susceptibility to cerebral ischemia, microhemorrhages, and white matter damage. Vasomotion— the spontaneous rhythmic modulation of arterial diameter, typically observed in arteries/arterioles in various vascular beds including the brain— is thought to participate in tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery regulation. Vasomotion is impaired in adverse conditions such as hypoperfusion and hypoxia. The perivascular and glymphatic pathways of Aβ clearance are thought to be driven by the systolic pulse. Vasomotion produces diameter changes of comparable amplitude, however at lower rates, and could contribute to these mechanisms of Aβ clearance. In spite of potential clinical interest, studies addressing cerebral vasomotion in the context of AD/CAA are limited. This study reviews the current literature on vasomotion, and hypothesizes potential paths implicating impaired cerebral vasomotion in AD/CAA. Aβ and oxidative stress cause vascular tone dysregulation through direct effects on vascular cells, and indirect effects mediated by impaired neurovascular coupling. Vascular tone dysregulation is further aggravated by cholinergic deficit and results in depressed cerebrovascular reactivity and (possibly) impaired vasomotion, aggravating regional hypoperfusion and promoting further Aβ and oxidative stress accumulation. PMID:25720414

  20. Decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the bilateral thalami and medulla oblongata determined by an easy Z-score (eZIS) analysis of (99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT images in a case of MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichi; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Asano, Takahiko; Hatano, Taku; Tatsumi, Shinsui; Satoh, Katsuya; Kimura, Akio; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2015-11-15

    We report a case of autopsy-verified MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) in a 46-year-old patient with a 16-month history of abnormal behavior, progressive dementia, insomnia, and speech disturbances without family history. Neurological examination revealed progressive dementia, frontal signs, insomnia, speech disturbance, gait disturbance and bilaterally exaggerated tendon reflexes. Both brain MRI and cerebrospinal fluid examinations, including 14-3-3 protein, yielded normal results. An easy Z-score (eZIS) analysis for (99m)Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer-single photon emission computed tomography ((99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT) revealed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the bilateral thalami and medulla oblongata. PRNP gene analysis revealed methionine homozygosity at codon 129 without mutation. Neuropathological examinations revealed severe neuronal loss, gliosis, and hypertrophic astrocytosis in the medial thalamus and inferior olivary nucleus. A slight depletion of Purkinje cells was observed. PrP immunostaining showed no obvious PrP deposits in the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, or brainstem; however, mild synaptic-type PrP deposits with some smaller plaque-like structures were only partially observed in the localized region of the frontal lobe with the spongiform change. Western blot analyses of protease-resistant PrP showed a type 2 pattern. In conclusion, eZIS analysis of (99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT images is useful for detecting both thalamic and medullary lesions. This is the first case of medullary lesions detected in a live patient with MM2-thalamic-type sCJD using SPECT.

  1. Clinically different stages of Alzheimer's disease associated by amyloid deposition with [11C]-PIB PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Hatashita, Shizuo; Yamasaki, Hidetomo

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether [11C]-PIB PET detects underlying amyloid deposition at clinically different stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and preclinical dementia. The Japanese cohort of 214 subjects underwent cognitive testing and 60-min dynamic [11C]-PIB PET. [11C]-PIB data were acquired from 35-60 min after injection. Regions of interest were defined on co-registered MRI. Distribution volume ratios (DVR) of PIB retention were determined using Logan graphical analysis. All 56 patients with AD showed a robust increase in PIB retention in cortical areas (typical PIB AD-pattern). A mean DVR value in 11 patients with moderate AD (CDR: 2.1 ± 0.4) showed significantly higher PIB retention (2.38 ± 0.42, p < 0.01) than amyloid-negative healthy control (HC) subjects. The DVR values in 23 patients with very mild AD (CDR: 0.5) and 22 patients with mild AD (CDR: 1.0) were 2.32 ± 0.45 and 2.34 ± 0.42, respectively, similar to moderate AD. In contrast, 28 (48%) of the 58 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients (MMSE: 27.3 ± 1.7) showed a typical AD-like pattern with a DVR value of 2.07 ± 0.34. Further, 17 (18%) of 91 HC subjects had a typical AD-like pattern with a DVR value of 2.06 ± 0.28. They did not significantly differ from very mild AD. The prevalence of AD among the 53 amyloid positive patients aged 75 years or older increased greatly to 74% whereas that of amyloid positive HC decreased by only 9% and amyloid positive MCI by 17%. Prodromal AD and AD dementia is identified, based on cognitive function and amyloid deposition by PIB PET imaging. Further, the cortical amyloid deposition could be detected at preclinical stage of AD.

  2. Postradiation regional cerebral blood flow in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Cerveny, T.J.; Hampton, J.D.

    1986-06-01

    Early transient incapacitation (ETI) is the complete cessation of performance during the first 30 min after radiation exposure and performance decrement (PD) is a reduction in performance at the same time. Supralethal doses of radiation have been shown to produce a marked decrease in regional cerebral blood flow in primates concurrent with hypotension and a dramatic release of mast cell histamine. In an attempt to elucidate mechanisms underlying the radiation-induced ETI/PD phenomenon and the postradiation decrease in cerebral blood flow, primates were exposed to 100 Gy (1 Gy = 100 rads), whole-body, gamma radiation. Pontine and cortical blood flows were measured by hydrogen clearance, before and after radiation exposure. Systemic blood pressures were determined simultaneously. Systemic arterial histamine levels were determined preradiation and postradiation. Data obtained indicated that radiated animals showed a decrease in blood flow of 63% in the motor cortex and 51% in the pons by 10 min postradiation. Regional cerebral blood flow of radiated animals showed a slight recovery 20 min postradiation, followed by a fall to the 10 min nadir by 60 min postradiation. Immediately, postradiation systemic blood pressure fell 67% and remained at that level for the remainder of the experiment. Histamine levels in the radiated animals increased a hundredfold 2 min postradiation. This study indicates that regional cerebral blood flow decreases postradiation with the development of hypotension and may be associated temporally with the postradiation release of histamine.

  3. A potential function for neuronal exosomes: sequestering intracerebral amyloid-β peptide.

    PubMed

    Yuyama, Kohei; Sun, Hui; Usuki, Seigo; Sakai, Shota; Hanamatsu, Hisatoshi; Mioka, Tetsuo; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Okada, Megumi; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Fujitani, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-02

    Elevated amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in brain contributes to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. We demonstrated the presence of exosome-associated Aβ in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cynomolgus monkeys and APP transgenic mice. The levels of exosome-associated Aβ notably decreased in the CSF of aging animals. We also determined that neuronal exosomes, but not glial exosomes, had abundant glycosphingolipids and could capture Aβ. Infusion of neuronal exosomes into brains of APP transgenic mice decreased Aβ and amyloid depositions, similarly to what reported previously on neuroblastoma-derived exosomes. These findings highlight the role of neuronal exosomes in Aβ clearance, and suggest that their downregulation might relate to Aβ accumulation and, ultimately, the development of AD pathology.

  4. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Cerdà-Esteve, M; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Chillaron, J J; Pont-Sunyer, C; Cucurella, G; Fernández, M; Goday, A; Cano-Pérez, J F; Rodríguez-Campello, A; Roquer, J

    2008-06-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in critically neurological patients. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW) is defined as a renal loss of sodium during intracranial disease leading to hyponatremia and a decrease in extracellular fluid volume. The pathogenesis of this disorder is still not completely understood. Sympathetic responses as well as some natriuretic factors play a role in this syndrome. Distinction between SIADH and CSW might be difficult. The essential point is the volemic state. It is necessary to rule out other intermediate causes. Treatment requires volume replacement and maintenance of a positive salt balance. Mineral corticoids may be useful in complicated cases.

  5. Amyloid β induces adhesion of erythrocytes to endothelial cells and affects endothelial viability and functionality.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kiko, Takehiro; Kuriwada, Satoko; Miyazawa, Taiki; Kimura, Fumiko; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) might mediate the adhesion of erythrocytes to the endothelium which could disrupt the properties of endothelial cells. We provide evidence here that Aβ actually induced the binding of erythrocytes to endothelial cells and decreased endothelial viability, perhaps by the generation of oxidative and inflammatory stress. These changes are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Elucidating the Role of Disulfide Bond on Amyloid Formation and Fibril Reversibility of Somatostatin-14

    PubMed Central

    Anoop, Arunagiri; Ranganathan, Srivastav; Dhaked, Bhagwan Das; Jha, Narendra Nath; Pratihar, Supriya; Ghosh, Saikat; Sahay, Shruti; Kumar, Santosh; Das, Subhadeep; Kombrabail, Mamata; Agarwal, Kumud; Jacob, Reeba S.; Singru, Praful; Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K.

    2014-01-01

    The storage of protein/peptide hormones within subcellular compartments and subsequent release are crucial for their native function, and hence these processes are intricately regulated in mammalian systems. Several peptide hormones were recently suggested to be stored as amyloids within endocrine secretory granules. This leads to an apparent paradox where storage requires formation of aggregates, and their function requires a supply of non-aggregated peptides on demand. The precise mechanism behind amyloid formation by these hormones and their subsequent release remain an open question. To address this, we examined aggregation and fibril reversibility of a cyclic peptide hormone somatostatin (SST)-14 using various techniques. After proving that SST gets stored as amyloid in vivo, we investigated the role of native structure in modulating its conformational dynamics and self-association by disrupting the disulfide bridge (Cys3–Cys14) in SST. Using two-dimensional NMR, we resolved the initial structure of somatostatin-14 leading to aggregation and further probed its conformational dynamics in silico. The perturbation in native structure (S-S cleavage) led to a significant increase in conformational flexibility and resulted in rapid amyloid formation. The fibrils formed by disulfide-reduced noncyclic SST possess greater resistance to denaturing conditions with decreased monomer releasing potency. MD simulations reveal marked differences in the intermolecular interactions in SST and noncyclic SST providing plausible explanation for differential aggregation and fibril reversibility observed experimentally in these structural variants. Our findings thus emphasize that subtle changes in the native structure of peptide hormone(s) could alter its conformational dynamics and amyloid formation, which might have significant implications on their reversible storage and secretion. PMID:24782311

  7. Insoluble Off-Pathway Aggregates as Crowding Agents during Amyloid Fibril Formation.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Rosa; Villar-Alvarez, Eva; Taboada, Pablo; Rocha, Fernando A; Damas, Ana M; Martins, Pedro M

    2017-03-08

    The study of drug candidates for the treatment of amyloidosis and neurodegenerative diseases frequently involves in vitro measurements of amyloid fibril formation. Macromolecular crowding and off-pathway aggregation (OPA) are, by different reasons, two important phenomena affecting the scalability of amyloid inhibitors and their successful application in vivo. On the one hand, the cellular milieu is crowded with macromolecules that drastically increase the effective (thermodynamic) concentration of the amyloidogenic protein. On the other hand, off-pathway aggregates, rather than amyloid fibrils, are increasingly appointed as causative agents of toxicity. The present contribution reveals that insoluble off-pathway aggregates of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) are a peculiar type of crowding agents that, unlike classical macromolecular crowders, decrease the thermodynamic concentration of protein. Illustrating this effect, OPA is shown to resume after lowering the fraction of insoluble aggregates at a constant soluble HEWL concentration. Protein depletion and thioflavin-T fluorescence progress curves indicate that OPA rebirth is not accompanied by additional amyloid fibril formation. The crystallization-like model extended to account for OPA and time-dependent activity coefficients is able to fit multiple kinetic results using a single set of three parameters describing amyloid nucleation, autocatalytic growth, and off-pathway nucleation. The list of fitted results notably includes the cases of aggregation rebirth and all types of progress curves measured for different HEWL concentrations. The quantitative challenges posed by macromolecular crowding and OPA find here a unified response with broader implications for the development of on- and off-pathway inhibitors.

  8. Development and characterization of a TAPIR-like mouse monoclonal antibody to amyloid-beta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Hara, Hideo; Makifuchi, Takao; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    Tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody was better related to the effect of immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) than ELISA antibody. Here we used a hybridoma technique to develop a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid-beta (Abeta) mouse monoclonal antibody. The obtained monoclonal antibody, 3.4A10, was an IgG2b isotype and recognized N-terminal portion of Abeta1-42 without binding denatured or native amyloid-beta protein precursor. It had higher affinity to Abeta1-42 than to Abeta1-40 by Biacore affinity analysis and stained preferably the peripheral part of senile plaques and recognized the plaque core less than 4G8. It inhibited the Abeta1-42 fibril formation as well as degraded pre-aggregated Abeta1-42 peptide in a thioflavin T fluorescence spectrophotometry assay. The in vivo studies showed that 3.4A10 treatment decreased amyloid burden compared to the control group and significantly reduced Abeta42 levels rather than Abeta40 levels in brain lysates as well as the Abeta*56 oligomer (12mer) in TBS fraction of the brain lysates. 3.4A10 entered brain and decorated some plaques, which is surrounded by more Iba1-positive microglia. 3.4A10 therapy did not induce lymphocytic infiltration and obvious increase in microhemorrhage. We conclude that 3.4A10 is a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid monoclonal antibody, and has a potential of therapeutic application for AD.

  9. Myo-inositol changes precede amyloid pathology and relate to APOE genotype in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Sundgren, Pia C.; Strandberg, Olof; Zetterberg, Henrik; Minthon, Lennart; Blennow, Kaj; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Westman, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to test whether in vivo levels of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) metabolites myo-inositol (mI), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and choline are abnormal already during preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD), relating these changes to amyloid or tau pathology, and functional connectivity. Methods: In this cross-sectional multicenter study (a subset of the prospective Swedish BioFINDER study), we included 4 groups, representing the different stages of predementia AD: (1) cognitively healthy elderly with normal CSF β-amyloid 42 (Aβ42), (2) cognitively healthy elderly with abnormal CSF Aβ42, (3) patients with subjective cognitive decline and abnormal CSF Aβ42, (4) patients with mild cognitive decline and abnormal CSF Aβ42 (Ntotal = 352). Spectroscopic markers measured in the posterior cingulate/precuneus were considered alongside known disease biomarkers: CSF Aβ42, phosphorylated tau, total tau, [18F]-flutemetamol PET, f-MRI, and the genetic risk factor APOE. Results: Amyloid-positive cognitively healthy participants showed a significant increase in mI/creatine and mI/NAA levels compared to amyloid-negative healthy elderly (p < 0.05). In amyloid-positive healthy elderly, mI/creatine and mI/NAA correlated with cortical retention of [18F] flutemetamol tracer ( = 0.44, p = 0.02 and = 0.51, p = 0.01, respectively). Healthy elderly APOE ε4 carriers with normal CSF Aβ42 levels had significantly higher mI/creatine levels (p < 0.001) than ε4 noncarriers. Finally, elevated mI/creatine was associated with decreased functional connectivity within the default mode network (rpearson = −0.16, p = 0.02), independently of amyloid pathology. Conclusions: mI levels are elevated already at asymptomatic stages of AD. Moreover, mI/creatine concentrations were increased in healthy APOE ε4 carriers with normal CSF Aβ42 levels, suggesting that mI levels may reveal regional brain consequences of APOE ε4 before detectable amyloid pathology. PMID:27164711

  10. Combined Treatment with a BACE Inhibitor and Anti-Aβ Antibody Gantenerumab Enhances Amyloid Reduction in APPLondon Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozmen, Laurence; Caruso, Antonello; Narquizian, Robert; Hilpert, Hans; Jacobsen, Bjoern; Terwel, Dick; Tanghe, An

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic approaches for prevention or reduction of amyloidosis are currently a main objective in basic and clinical research on Alzheimer‘s disease. Among the agents explored in clinical trials are anti-Aβ peptide antibodies and secretase inhibitors. Most anti-Aβ antibodies are considered to act via inhibition of amyloidosis and enhanced clearance of existing amyloid, although secretase inhibitors reduce the de novo production of Aβ. Limited information is currently available on the efficacy and potential advantages of combinatorial antiamyloid treatment. We performed a chronic study in APPLondon transgenic mice that received treatment with anti-Aβ antibody gantenerumab and BACE inhibitor RO5508887, either as mono- or combination treatment. Treatment aimed to evaluate efficacy on amyloid progression, similar to preexisting amyloidosis as present in Alzheimer's disease patients. Mono-treatments with either compound caused a dose-dependent reduction of total brain Aβ and amyloid burden. Combination treatment with both compounds significantly enhanced the antiamyloid effect. The observed combination effect was most pronounced for lowering of amyloid plaque load and plaque number, which suggests effective inhibition of de novo plaque formation. Moreover, significantly enhanced clearance of pre-existing amyloid plaques was observed when gantenerumab was coadministered with RO5508887. BACE inhibition led to a significant time- and dose-dependent decrease in CSF Aβ, which was not observed for gantenerumab treatment. Our results demonstrate that combining these two antiamyloid agents enhances overall efficacy and suggests that combination treatments may be of clinical relevance. PMID:25164658

  11. A Cultivated Form of a Red Seaweed (Chondrus crispus), Suppresses β-Amyloid-Induced Paralysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sangha, Jatinder Singh; Wally, Owen; Banskota, Arjun H.; Stefanova, Roumiana; Hafting, Jeff T.; Critchley, Alan T.; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    We report here the protective effects of a methanol extract from a cultivated strain of the red seaweed, Chondrus crispus, against β-amyloid-induced toxicity, in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans, expressing human Aβ1-42 gene. The methanol extract of C. crispus (CCE), delayed β-amyloid-induced paralysis, whereas the water extract (CCW) was not effective. The CCE treatment did not affect the transcript abundance of amy1; however, Western blot analysis revealed a significant decrease of Aβ species, as compared to untreated worms. The transcript abundance of stress response genes; sod3, hsp16.2 and skn1 increased in CCE-treated worms. Bioassay guided fractionation of the CCE yielded a fraction enriched in monogalactosyl diacylglycerols (MGDG) that significantly delayed the onset of β-amyloid-induced paralysis. Taken together, these results suggested that the cultivated strain of C. crispus, whilst providing dietary nutritional value, may also have significant protective effects against β-amyloid-induced toxicity in C. elegans, partly through reduced β-amyloid species, up-regulation of stress induced genes and reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:26492254

  12. Amyloid plaque structure and cell surface interactions of β-amyloid fibrils revealed by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Han, Shen; Kollmer, Marius; Markx, Daniel; Claus, Stephanie; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2017-02-27

    The deposition of amyloid fibrils as plaques is a key feature of several neurodegenerative diseases including in particular Alzheimer's. This disease is characterized, if not provoked, by amyloid aggregates formed from Aβ peptide that deposit inside the brain or are toxic to neuronal cells. We here used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to determine the fibril network structure and interactions of Aβ fibrils within a cell culture model of Alzheimer's disease. STEM images taken from the formed Aβ amyloid deposits revealed three main types of fibril network structures, termed amorphous meshwork, fibril bundle and amyloid star. All three were infiltrated by different types of lipid inclusions from small-sized exosome-like structures (50-100 nm diameter) to large-sized extracellular vesicles (up to 300 nm). The fibrils also presented strong interactions with the surrounding cells such that fibril bundles extended into tubular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Amyloid formation in the cell model was previously found to have an intracellular origin and we show here that it functionally destroys the integrity of the intracellular membranes as it leads to lysosomal leakage. These data provide a mechanistic link to explain why intracellular fibril formation is toxic to the cell.

  13. Amyloid plaque structure and cell surface interactions of β-amyloid fibrils revealed by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shen; Kollmer, Marius; Markx, Daniel; Claus, Stephanie; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid fibrils as plaques is a key feature of several neurodegenerative diseases including in particular Alzheimer’s. This disease is characterized, if not provoked, by amyloid aggregates formed from Aβ peptide that deposit inside the brain or are toxic to neuronal cells. We here used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to determine the fibril network structure and interactions of Aβ fibrils within a cell culture model of Alzheimer’s disease. STEM images taken from the formed Aβ amyloid deposits revealed three main types of fibril network structures, termed amorphous meshwork, fibril bundle and amyloid star. All three were infiltrated by different types of lipid inclusions from small-sized exosome-like structures (50–100 nm diameter) to large-sized extracellular vesicles (up to 300 nm). The fibrils also presented strong interactions with the surrounding cells such that fibril bundles extended into tubular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Amyloid formation in the cell model was previously found to have an intracellular origin and we show here that it functionally destroys the integrity of the intracellular membranes as it leads to lysosomal leakage. These data provide a mechanistic link to explain why intracellular fibril formation is toxic to the cell. PMID:28240273

  14. Direct observation of amyloid nucleation under nanomechanical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varongchayakul, Nitinun

    Self-assembly of amyloid nanofiber is associated with functional and pathological processes such as in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite intensive studies, stochastic nature of the process has made it difficult to elucidate molecular mechanisms for the key amyloid nucleation. Here, we investigated the amyloid nucleation of silk-elastin-like peptide (SELP) using time-lapse lateral force microscopy (LFM). By repeated scanning a single line on a SELP-coated mica surface, we observed sudden stepwise height increases, corresponds to nucleation of an amyloid fiber. The lateral force profiles followed either a worm-like chain model or an exponential function, suggesting that the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip stretches a single or multiple SELP molecules along the scanning direction, serves as the template for further self-assembly perpendicular to the scan direction. Such mechanically induced nucleation of amyloid fibrils allows positional and directional control of amyloid assembly in vitro , which we demonstrate by generating single nanofibers at predetermined nucleation sites.

  15. Extension of the generic amyloid hypothesis to nonproteinaceous metabolite assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Shaham-Niv, Shira; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Schnaider, Lee; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several major human diseases. Although the formation of these supramolecular entities has previously been associated with proteins and peptides, it was later demonstrated that even phenylalanine, a single amino acid, can form fibrils that have amyloid-like biophysical, biochemical, and cytotoxic properties. Moreover, the generation of antibodies against these assemblies in phenylketonuria patients and the correlating mice model suggested a pathological role for the assemblies. We determine that several other metabolites that accumulate in metabolic disorders form ordered amyloid-like ultrastructures, which induce apoptotic cell death, as observed for amyloid structures. The formation of amyloid-like assemblies by metabolites implies a general phenomenon of amyloid formation, not limited to proteins and peptides, and offers a new paradigm for metabolic diseases. PMID:26601224

  16. Atomic View of a Toxic Amyloid Small Oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Park, Jiyong; Zhao, Minglei; Pensalfini, Anna; Soriaga, Angela B.; Landau, Meytal; Teng, Poh K.; Cascio, Duilio; Glabe, Charles; Eisenberg, David

    2012-04-30

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein {alpha}{beta} crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: {beta}-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the {beta}-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.

  17. [Hippocampal and cognitive alterations precede amyloid deposition in a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Beauquis, Juan; Vinuesa, Angeles; Pomilio, Carlos; Pavía, Patricio; Saravia, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    Although there is strong evidence about neuronal and glial disturbances at advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease, less attention has been directed to early, preamyloid changes that could contribute to the progression of the disease. We evaluated neuronal and glial morphological changes and behavioral disturbances in PDAPP-J20 transgenic (Tg) mice, carrying mutated human APP gene (amyloid precursor protein), at 5 months of age, before brain amyloid deposition occurs. Using NeuN immunohistochemistry we found decreased numbers of pyramidal and granular neurons in the hippocampus associated with a reduction of hippocampal volume in Tg mice compared with controls. Neurogenesis was impaired, evidenced by means of DCX immunohistochemistry in the dentate gyrus. In the CA3 region we found a decreased density of synaptophysin, suggesting synaptic disturbance, but no changes were found in CA1 synaptic spine density. Using confocal microscopy we observed decreased number and cell complexity of GFAP+ astrocytes, indicating potential glial atrophy. Cognitive impairment (novel location recognition test) and increased anxiety (open field) were detected in Tg mice, associated with more c-Fos+ nuclei in the amygdala, possibly indicating a role for emotionality in early stages of the disease. The study of early alterations in the course of amyloid pathology could contribute to the development of diagnostic and preventive strategies.

  18. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Thomas Michael

    2008-12-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most prevalent cause of persisting motor function impairment with a frequency of about 1/500 births. In developed countries, the prevalence rose after introduction of neonatal intensive care, but in the past decade, this trend has reversed. A recent international workshop defined cerebral palsy as "a group of permanent disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occurred in the developing fetal or infant brain." In a majority of cases, the predominant motor abnormality is spasticity; other forms of cerebral palsy include dyskinetic (dystonia or choreo-athetosis) and ataxic cerebral palsy. In preterm infants, about one-half of the cases have neuroimaging abnormalities, such as echolucency in the periventricular white matter or ventricular enlargement on cranial ultrasound. Among children born at or near term, about two-thirds have neuroimaging abnormalities, including focal infarction, brain malformations, and periventricular leukomalacia. In addition to the motor impairment, individuals with cerebral palsy may have sensory impairments, cognitive impairment, and epilepsy. Ambulation status, intelligence quotient, quality of speech, and hand function together are predictive of employment status. Mortality risk increases incrementally with increasing number of impairments, including intellectual, limb function, hearing, and vision. The care of individuals with cerebral palsy should include the provision of a primary care medical home for care coordination and support; diagnostic evaluations to identify brain abnormalities, severity of neurologic and functional abnormalities, and associated impairments; management of spasticity; and care for associated problems such as nutritional deficiencies, pain, dental care, bowel and bladder continence, and orthopedic complications. Current strategies to decrease the risk of cerebral palsy include interventions to

  19. Ovine colostrum nanopeptide affects amyloid beta aggregation.

    PubMed

    Janusz, Maria; Woszczyna, Mirosław; Lisowski, Marek; Kubis, Adriana; Macała, Józefa; Gotszalk, Teodor; Lisowski, Józef

    2009-01-05

    A colostral proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP) consisting of over 30 peptides shows beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients when administered in the form of sublinqual tablets called Colostrinin. The aim of the present studies was to investigate whether nanopeptide fragment of PRP (NP) - one of the PRP complex components can affect aggregation of amyloid beta (Abeta1-42). The effect of NP on Abeta aggregation was studied using Thioflavin T (ThT) binding, atomic force microscopy, and analyzing circular dichroism spectra. Results presented suggest that NP can directly interact with amyloid beta, inhibit its aggregation and disrupt existing aggregates acting as a beta sheet breaker and reduce toxicity induced by aggregated forms of Abeta.

  20. ACAT inhibition and amyloid beta reduction.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Raja; Kovacs, Dora M

    2010-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Accumulation and deposition of the beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide generated from its larger amyloid precursor protein (APP) is one of the pathophysiological hallmarks of AD. Intracellular cholesterol was shown to regulate Abeta production. Recent genetic and biochemical studies indicate that not only the amount, but also the distribution of intracellular cholesterol is critical to regulate Abeta generation. Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT) is a family of enzymes that regulates the cellular distribution of cholesterol by converting membrane cholesterol into hydrophobic cholesteryl esters for cholesterol storage and transport. Using pharmacological inhibitors and transgenic animal models, we and others have identified ACAT1 as a potential therapeutic target to lower Abeta generation and accumulation. Here we discuss data focusing on ACAT inhibition as an effective strategy for the prevention and treatment of AD.

  1. Inhibition of Alzheimer amyloid β aggregation by polyvalent trehalose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshiko; You, Chouga; Ohnishi, Reiko

    2008-04-01

    A glycopolymer carrying trehalose was found to suppress the formation of amyloid fibrils from the amyloid β peptide (1-42) (Aβ), as evaluated by thioflavin T assay and atomic force microscopy. Glycopolymers carrying sugar alcohols also changed the aggregation properties of Aβ, and the inhibitory effect depended on the type of sugar and alkyl side chain. Neutralization activity was confirmed by in vitro assay using HeLa cells. The glycopolymer carrying trehalose strongly inhibited amyloid formation and neutralized cytotoxicity.

  2. Inhibition of Alzheimer amyloid β aggregation by polyvalent trehalose.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshiko; You, Chouga; Ohnishi, Reiko

    2008-04-01

    A glycopolymer carrying trehalose was found to suppress the formation of amyloid fibrils from the amyloid β peptide (1-42) (Aβ), as evaluated by thioflavin T assay and atomic force microscopy. Glycopolymers carrying sugar alcohols also changed the aggregation properties of Aβ, and the inhibitory effect depended on the type of sugar and alkyl side chain. Neutralization activity was confirmed by in vitro assay using HeLa cells. The glycopolymer carrying trehalose strongly inhibited amyloid formation and neutralized cytotoxicity.

  3. Technical aspects of amyloid imaging for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Edison, Paul; Hinz, Rainer; Brooks, David J

    2011-08-31

    [11C]Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography has now been extensively used to evaluate the amyloid load in different types of dementia and has become a powerful research tool in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present short review we discuss the properties of amyloid imaging agent [11C]Pittsburgh Compound B, the different modalities of molecular imaging, image processing and data analysis, and newer amyloid imaging agents.

  4. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells contribute to the reduction of amyloid-β deposits and the improvement of synaptic transmission in a mouse model of pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jae-sung; Jin, Hee Kyung; Lee, Jong Kil; Richardson, Jill C; Carter, Janet E

    2013-06-01

    The remarkable potentiality of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) after transplantation to models of neurological disease and injury has been described. We have previously published data confirming the influence of BM-MSCs on β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model. However, therapeutic approaches in neurological diseases such as AD, including those for BM-MSCs, are increasingly centered on the potential for prophylactic therapy in pro-dromal states where the underlying cause of the disease is apparent but functional deficits are not. In order to investigate whether BM-MSCs could have a beneficial effect in high-risk pre-dementia AD individuals, we treated young AD mice, at an age at which they display neuropathological, but not cognitive features of AD. Following a single intra-cerebral injection of BM-MSCs, interestingly, we found a significant decrease in the cerebral Aβ deposition compared with controls treated with PBS that was sustained up to 2 months post-injection. Expression of dynamin 1 and Synapsin 1, key pre-synaptic proteins associated with synaptic transmission, which are typically decreased in brains of AD patients, were considerably enhanced in the brains of AD mice treated with BM-MSCs and this response was sustained beyond 2 months. These data demonstrate that BM-MSCs produce an acute reduction in Aβ deposits and facilitate changes in key proteins required for synaptic transmission. These findings suggest that BM-MSC transplantation warrants further investigation as a potential therapy for early intervention in pro-dromal AD.

  5. An update on the amyloid hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Christopher B; Eckman, Elizabeth A

    2007-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease. To rationally develop novel therapeutic and/or preventative agents for AD, an understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of this complex disease is necessary. This article examines the evidence for the amyloid hypothesis of AD pathogenesis and discusses how it relates to the neurological and neuropathological features of AD, the known genetic risk factors and causative mutations, and the heightened risk associated with advanced age.

  6. Vincamine Alleviates Amyloid-β 25–35 Peptides-induced Cytotoxicity in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jianfeng; Qu, Qiumin; Qiao, Jin; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Vincamine is a plant alkaloid used clinically as a peripheral vasodilator that increases cerebral blood flow and oxygen and glucose utilization by neural tissue to combat the effect of aging. The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the influence of vincamine on amyloid-β 25–35 (Aβ25–35) induced cytotoxicity, to gain a better understanding of the neuroprotective effects of this clinically used anti-Alzheimer's disease drug. Materials and Methods: Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring malondialdehyde, glutathione, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. Cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell apoptosis detection was performed using an Annexin-V-FITC Apoptosis Detection Kit. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using an ROS Assay Kit. Western blot detection was carried out to detect the protein expression. Results: Our studies showed that pretreatment with vincamine could reduce Aβ25–35 induced oxidative stress. Vincamine markedly inhibited cell apoptosis dose-dependently. More importantly, vincamine increased the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and Bcl-2 family protein ratios on preincubation with cells for 2 h. Conclusion: Above observation led us to assume that one possible mechanism of vincamine protects Aβ25-35-induced cell death could be through upregulation of SOD and activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. SUMMARY Vincamine ameliorates amyloid-β 25–35 (Aβ25–35) peptides induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cellsVincamine reduces Aβ 25–35 peptides induced apoptosis of PC12 cellsVincamine activates the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt pathwayVincamine up-regulates the superoxide dismutase. Abbreviation used: Aβ25-35: Amyloid-β 25-35; AD: Alzheimer's disease; BCA: Bicinchoninic acid; GSH: glutathione; PBS: Phosphate buffered solution; SDS: Sodium dodecylsulphate; SOD: Superoxide dismutase PMID:28216895

  7. Microglia, Amyloid, and Glucose Metabolism in Parkinson's Disease with and without Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Edison, Paul; Ahmed, Imtiaz; Fan, Zhen; Hinz, Rainer; Gelosa, Giorgio; Ray Chaudhuri, K; Walker, Zuzana; Turkheimer, Federico E; Brooks, David J

    2013-01-01

    [11C](R)PK11195-PET measures upregulation of translocator protein, which is associated with microglial activation, [11C]PIB-PET is a marker of amyloid, while [18F]FDG-PET measures cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRGlc). We hypothesize that microglial activation is an early event in the Parkinson's disease (PD) spectrum and is independent of the amyloid pathology. The aim of this study is to evaluate in vivo the relationship between microglial activation, amyloid deposition, and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) and PD subjects without dementia. Here, we evaluated 11 PDD subjects, 8 PD subjects without dementia, and 24 control subjects. Subjects underwent T1 and T2 MRI, [11C](R)PK11195, [18F]FDG, and [11C]PIB PET scans. Parametric maps of [11C](R)PK11195 binding potential, rCMRGlc, and [11C]PIB uptake were interrogated using region of interest and SPM (statistical parametric mapping) analysis. The PDD patients showed a significant increase of microglial activation in anterior and posterior cingulate, striatum, frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital cortical regions compared with the controls. The PD subjects also showed a statistically significant increase in microglial activation in temporal, parietal, and occipital regions. [11C]PIB uptake was marginally increased in PDD and PD. There was a significant reduction in glucose metabolism in PDD and PD. We have also demonstrated pixel-by-pixel correlation between mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score and microglial activation, and MMSE score and rCMRGlc. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that cortical microglial activation and reduced glucose metabolism can be detected early on in this disease spectrum. Significant microglial activation may be a factor in driving the disease process in PDD. Given this, agents that affect microglial activation could have an influence on disease progression. PMID:23303049

  8. Evidence for Novel [beta]-Sheet Structures in Iowa Mutant [beta]-Amyloid Fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Meredith, Stephen C.

    2009-07-24

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of {beta}-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-A{beta}40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10{sup -3} min{sup -1} and 1.07 x 10{sup -4} min{sup -1} for D23N-A{beta}40 and the wild-type peptide WT-A{beta}40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-{beta} pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 {angstrom} and a broad reflection at 9.4 {angstrom}, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-A{beta}40 fibrils (10.4 {angstrom}). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel {beta}-sheet structure commonly found in WT-A{beta}40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel {beta}-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through 13C-13C and 15N-13C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  9. Microglia, amyloid, and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease with and without dementia.

    PubMed

    Edison, Paul; Ahmed, Imtiaz; Fan, Zhen; Hinz, Rainer; Gelosa, Giorgio; Ray Chaudhuri, K; Walker, Zuzana; Turkheimer, Federico E; Brooks, David J

    2013-05-01

    [(11)C](R)PK11195-PET measures upregulation of translocator protein, which is associated with microglial activation, [(11)C]PIB-PET is a marker of amyloid, while [(18)F]FDG-PET measures cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRGlc). We hypothesize that microglial activation is an early event in the Parkinson's disease (PD) spectrum and is independent of the amyloid pathology. The aim of this study is to evaluate in vivo the relationship between microglial activation, amyloid deposition, and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) and PD subjects without dementia. Here, we evaluated 11 PDD subjects, 8 PD subjects without dementia, and 24 control subjects. Subjects underwent T1 and T2 MRI, [(11)C](R)PK11195, [(18)F]FDG, and [(11)C]PIB PET scans. Parametric maps of [(11)C](R)PK11195 binding potential, rCMRGlc, and [(11)C]PIB uptake were interrogated using region of interest and SPM (statistical parametric mapping) analysis. The PDD patients showed a significant increase of microglial activation in anterior and posterior cingulate, striatum, frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital cortical regions compared with the controls. The PD subjects also showed a statistically significant increase in microglial activation in temporal, parietal, and occipital regions. [(11)C]PIB uptake was marginally increased in PDD and PD. There was a significant reduction in glucose metabolism in PDD and PD. We have also demonstrated pixel-by-pixel correlation between mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score and microglial activation, and MMSE score and rCMRGlc. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that cortical microglial activation and reduced glucose metabolism can be detected early on in this disease spectrum. Significant microglial activation may be a factor in driving the disease process in PDD. Given this, agents that affect microglial activation could have an influence on disease progression.

  10. Cryptotanshinone, a compound from Salvia miltiorrhiza modulates amyloid precursor protein metabolism and attenuates beta-amyloid deposition through upregulating alpha-secretase in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhengrong; Zhang, Fangyan; Tao, Liang; Zheng, Wenhua; Cao, Yingnan; Wang, Zhaohe; Tang, Shu; Le, Kang; Chen, Shaorui; Pi, Rongbiao; Liu, Peiqing

    2009-03-13

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is cleaved enzymatically by non-amyloidogenic and amyloidogenic pathways. alpha-Secretase cleaves APP within beta-amyloid protein (Abeta) sequence, resulting in the release of a secreted fragment of APP (sAPPalpha) and precluding Abeta generation. Cryptotanshinone (CTS), an active component of the medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been shown to improve learning and memory in several pharmacological models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the effects of CTS on the Abeta plaque pathology and the APP processing in AD are unclear. Here we reported that CTS strongly attenuated amyloid plaque deposition in the brain of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. In addition, CTS significantly improved spatial learning and memory in APP/PS1 mice assessed by the Morris water maze testing. To define the exact molecular mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of CTS, we investigated the effects of the CTS on APP processing in rat cortical neuronal cells overexpressing Swedish mutant human APP695. CTS was found to decrease Abeta generation in concentration-dependent (0-10muM) manner. Interestingly, the N-terminal APP cleavage product, sAPPalpha was markedly increased by CTS. Further study showed that alpha-secretase activity was increased by CTS. Taken together, our results suggested CTS improved the cognitive ability in AD transgenic mice and promoted APP metabolism toward the non-amyloidogenic products pathway in rat cortical neuronal cells. CTS shows a promising novel way for the therapy of AD.

  11. HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF THE AMYLOID FIBRIL

    PubMed Central

    Shirahama, Tsuranobu; Cohen, Alan S.

    1967-01-01

    The ultrastructural organization of the fibrous component of amyloid has been analyzed by means of high resolution electron microscopy of negatively stained isolated amyloid fibrils and of positively stained amyloid fibrils in thin tissue sections. It was found that a number of subunits could be resolved according to their dimensions. The following structural organization is proposed. The amyloid fibril, the fibrous component of amyloid as seen in electron microscopy of thin tissue sections, consists of a number of filaments aggregated side-by-side. These amyloid filaments are approximately 75–80 A in diameter and consist of five (or less likely six) subunits (amyloid protofibrils) which are arranged parallel to each other, longitudinal or slightly oblique to the long axis of the filament. The filament has often seemed to disperse into several longitudinal rows. The amyloid protofibril is about 25–35 A wide and appears to consist of two or three subunit strands helically arranged with a 35–50-A repeat (or, less likely, is composed of globular subunits aggregated end-to-end). These amyloid subprotofibrillar strands measure approximately 10–15 A in diameter. PMID:6036530

  12. Benzothiazole-Based Neutral Ratiometric Fluorescence Sensor for Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Mora, Aruna K; Murudkar, Sushant; Alamelu, A; Singh, Prabhat K; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Nath, Sukhendu

    2016-11-07

    Early detection of amyloid fibrils is very important for the timely diagnosis of several neurological diseases. Thioflavin-T (ThT) is a gold standard fluorescent probe for amyloid fibrils and has been used for the last few decades. However, due to its positive charge, ThT is incapable of crossing the blood-brain barrier and cannot be used for in vivo imaging of fibrils. In the present work, we synthesized a neutral ThT derivative, 2-[2'-Me,4'-(dimethylamino)phenyl]benzothiazole (2Me-DABT), which showed a strong affinity towards the amyloid fibrils. On association with the amyloid fibrils, 2Me-DABT not only showed a large increase in its emission intensity, but also, unlike ThT, a large blueshift in its emission spectrum was observed. Thus, unlike ThT, 2Me-DABT is a potential candidate for the ratiometric sensor of the amyloid fibrils. Detailed photophysical properties of 2Me-DABT in amyloid fibrils and different solvent media were studied to understand its sensory activity. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies suggested that the sites of localization for ThT and 2Me-DABT in amyloid fibrils are not same and their average distance of separation in amyloid fibrils was determined. The experimental data was nicely supported by molecular docking studies, which confirmed the binding of 2Me-DABT in the inner core of the amyloid fibrils.

  13. Pramipexole prevents neurotoxicity induced by oligomers of beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Uberti, Daniela; Bianchi, Irene; Olivari, Luca; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Canonico, PierLuigi; Memo, Maurizio

    2007-08-27

    Here we demonstrate that pramipexole, an antiparkinsonian dopamine receptor agonist drug, exerts neuroprotective effects against beta-amyloid neurotoxicity. Using a specific protocol to test individually oligomers, fibrils, or unaggregated amyloid beta-peptide, we found pramipexole able to protect cells against oligomers and fibrils. Unaggregated amyloid beta-peptide was found unable to cause cell death. Fibrils and oligomers were also found to produce elevated amount of free radicals, and this effect was prevented by pramipexole. We propose pramipexole may become in the future a coadjuvant in the treatment of neuropathologies, besides Parkinson's disease, where amyloid beta-peptide-mediated oxidative injury exerts a relevant role.

  14. Specific Chaperones and Regulatory Domains in Control of Amyloid Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Landreh, Michael; Rising, Anna; Presto, Jenny; Jörnvall, Hans; Johansson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, but only about 30 amyloids are linked to disease, whereas some proteins form physiological amyloid-like assemblies. This raises questions of how the formation of toxic protein species during amyloidogenesis is prevented or contained in vivo. Intrinsic chaperoning or regulatory factors can control the aggregation in different protein systems, thereby preventing unwanted aggregation and enabling the biological use of amyloidogenic proteins. The molecular actions of these chaperones and regulators provide clues to the prevention of amyloid disease, as well as to the harnessing of amyloidogenic proteins in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:26354437

  15. Peptide Detection of Fungal Functional Amyloids in Infected Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sherman, Melissa C.; Lysak, Nataliya; Filonenko, Alexandra; Richards, Hazel; Sobonya, Richard E.; Klotz, Stephen A.; Lipke, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    Many fungal cell adhesion proteins form functional amyloid patches on the surface of adhering cells. The Candida albicans Agglutinin-like sequence (Als) adhesins are exemplars for this phenomenon, and have amyloid forming sequences that are conserved between family members. The Als5p amyloid sequence mediates amyloid fibril formation and is critical for cell adhesion and biofilm formation, and is also present in the related adhesins Als1p and Als3p. We have developed a fluorescent peptide probe containing the conserved Als amyloid-forming sequence. This peptide bound specifically to yeast expressing Als5p, but not to cells lacking the adhesin. The probe bound to both yeast and hyphal forms of C. albicans. Δals1/Δals3 single and double deletion strains exhibited reduced fluorescence, indicating that probe binding required expression of these proteins. Additionally, the Als peptide specifically stained fungal cells in abscesses in autopsy sections. Counterstaining with calcofluor white showed colocalization with the amyloid peptide. In addition, fungi in autopsy sections derived from the gastrointestinal tract showed colocalization of the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T and the fluorescent peptide. Collectively, our data demonstrate that we can exploit amyloid sequence specificity for detection of functional amyloids in situ. PMID:24465872

  16. Partial Volume Correction in Quantitative Amyloid Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Ances, Beau M.; Bateman, Randall J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Aldea, Patricia; Cash, Lisa; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Farrar, Angela M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M.; Klunk, William; Price, Julie C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Schofield, Peter R.; Buckles, Virginia; Morris, John C.; Benzinger, Tammie. LS.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition. PMID:25485714

  17. Iatrogenic amyloid polyneuropathy after domino liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mnatsakanova, Diana; Živković, Saša A

    2017-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been used in treatment of transthyretin amyloidosis, and some patients undergo domino liver transplantation (DLT) with explanted liver being transplanted to another patient with liver failure as the liver is otherwise usually functionally normal. Until end of 2015, there were 1154 DLT performed worldwide. DLT for transthyretin amyloidosis is associated with the risk of developing de novo systemic amyloidosis and amyloid neuropathy, and the risk may be greater with some non-Val30Met mutations. De novo amyloid neuropathy has been described in up to 23% of transplant recipients. Neuropathy may be preceded by asymptomatic amyloid deposition in various tissues and symptoms of neuropathy started after a median of 7 years following DLT (5.7 ± 3.2 years; range 2 mo to 10 years). Typical initial symptoms include neuropathic pain and sensory loss, while dysautonomia usually starts later. Progression of neuropathy may necessitate liver re-transplantation, and subsequent improvement of neuropathy has been reported in some patients. Explant allograft recipients need close monitoring for signs of systemic amyloidosis, neuropathy and dysautonomia as progressive symptoms may require re-transplantation. PMID:28217248

  18. Cooperative Hydrogen Bonding in Amyloid Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsemekhman, Kiril L.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Eisenberg, Dvaid; Baker, David

    2007-04-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's and prion diseases, are each associated with unbranched protein fibrils. Each fibril is made of a particular protein, yet they share common properties. One such property is nucleation-dependent fibril growth. Monomers of amyloid-forming proteins can remain in dissolved form for long periods, before rapidly assembly into fibrils. The lag before growth has been attributed to slow kinetics of formation of a nucleus, on which other molecules can deposit to form the fibril. We have explored the energetics of fibril formation, based on the known molecular structure of a fibril-forming peptide from the yeast prion, Sup35, using both classical and quantum (density functional theory) methods. We find that the energetics of fibril formation for the first three layers are cooperative using both methods. This cooperativity is consistent with the observation that formation of amyloid fibrils involves slow nucleation and faster growth.

  19. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE PAGES

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmore » and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.« less

  20. Amyloid beta toxicity dependent upon endothelial cell state

    PubMed Central

    Balcells, Mercedes; Wallins, Joseph S.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), a peptide family produced and deposited in neurons and endothelial cells (EC), is found at subnanomolar concentrations in the plasma of healthy individuals. Simple conformational changes produce a form of Aβ Aβ42, which creates toxic plaque in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. Oxidative stress induced blood brain barrier degeneration has been proposed as a key factor for Aβ42 toxicity, but cannot account for lack of injury from the same peptide in healthy tissues. We hypothesized that cell state mediates Aβ effect. Thus, we examined the viability of aortic EC, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and epithelial cells (EPI) in different states in the presence of Aβ secreted from transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). Aβ was more toxic to all cell types when they were subconfluent. Subconfluent EC sprouted and SMC and EPI were inhibited by Aβ. Confluent EC were virtually resistant to Aβ and suppressed Aβ production by Aβ+CHO. Products of subconfluent EC overcame this resistant state, stimulating the production and toxicity of Aβ42. Confluent EC overgrew ~35% beyond their quiescent state in the presence of Aβ conditioned in media from subconfluent EC. These findings imply that Aβ42 may well be even more cytotoxic to cells in injured or growth states and potentially explain the variable and potent effects of this protein. One may now need to consider tissue and cell state in addition to local concentration of and exposure duration to Aβ. The specific interactions of Aβ and EC in a state-dependent fashion may help understand further the common and divergent forms of vascular and cerebral toxicity of Aβ and the spectrum of AD. PMID:18601976

  1. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets — protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores

    PubMed Central

    Arbor, Sage C.; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  2. Amyloid precursor protein and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Poomy; Sliker, Bailee; Peters, Haley L.; Tuli, Amit; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Smits, Kaitlin; Purohit, Abhilasha; Singh, Rakesh K.; Dong, Jixin; Batra, Surinder K.; Coulter, Donald W.; Solheim, Joyce C.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its family members amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) are type 1 transmembrane glycoproteins that are highly conserved across species. The transcriptional regulation of APP and APLP2 is similar but not identical, and the cleavage of both proteins is regulated by phosphorylation. APP has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease causation, and in addition to its importance in neurology, APP is deregulated in cancer cells. APLP2 is likewise overexpressed in cancer cells, and APLP2 and APP are linked to increased tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. In this present review, we discuss the unfolding account of these APP family members’ roles in cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:26840089

  3. Polarization properties of amyloid-beta plaques in Alzheimer's disease (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Ricken, Gerda; Pircher, Michael; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2016-03-01

    In histopathological practice, birefringence is used for the identification of amyloidosis in numerous tissues. Amyloid birefringence is caused by the parallel arrangement of fibrous protein aggregates. Since neurodegenerative processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are also linked to the formation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques, optical methods sensitive to birefringence may act as non-invasive tools for Aβ identification. At last year's Photonics West, we demonstrated polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) imaging of ex vivo cerebral tissue of advanced stage AD patients. PS-OCT provides volumetric, structural imaging based on both backscatter contrast and tissue polarization properties. In this presentation, we report on polarization-sensitive neuroimaging along with numerical simulations of three-dimensional Aβ plaques. High speed PS-OCT imaging was performed using a spectral domain approach based on polarization maintaining fiber optics. The sample beam was interfaced to a confocal scanning microscope arrangement. Formalin-fixed tissue samples as well as thin histological sections were imaged. For comparison to the PS-OCT results, ray propagation through plaques was modeled using Jones analysis and various illumination geometries and plaque sizes. Characteristic polarization patterns were found. The results of this study may not only help to understand PS-OCT imaging of neuritic Aβ plaques but may also have implications for polarization-sensitive imaging of other fibrillary structures.

  4. Amyloid precursor protein mRNA levels in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Preece, Paul; Virley, David J; Costandi, Moheb; Coombes, Robert; Moss, Stephen J; Mudge, Anne W; Jazin, Elena; Cairns, Nigel J

    2004-03-17

    Insoluble beta-amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain are proteolytically derived from the membrane bound amyloid precursor protein (APP). The APP gene is differentially spliced to produce isoforms that can be classified into those containing a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (K(+), APP(751), APP(770), APRP(365) and APRP(563)), and those without (K(-), APP(695) and APP(714)). Given the hypothesis that Abeta is a result of aberrant catabolism of APP, differential expression of mRNA isoforms containing protease inhibitors might play an active role in the pathology of AD. We took 513 cerebral cortex samples from 90 AD and 81 control brains and quantified the mRNA isoforms of APP with TaqMan real-time RT-PCR. After adjustment for age at death, brain pH and gender we found a change in the ratio of KPI(+) to KPI(-) mRNA isoforms of APP. Three separate probes, designed to recognise only KPI(+) mRNA species, gave increases of between 28% and 50% in AD brains relative to controls (p=0.002). There was no change in the mRNA levels of KPI-(APP 695) (p=0.898). Therefore, whilst KPI-mRNA levels remained stable the KPI(+) species increased specifically in the AD brains.

  5. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... palsy — causes a problem with balance and depth perception Since cerebral palsy affects muscle control and coordination, ... fluid into the lungs) gastroesophageal reflux (spitting up) speech problems drooling tooth decay sleep disorders osteoporosis (weak, ...

  6. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sports-Related Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Cerebral contusions are bruises of the brain, ... object or pushed-in bone fragment from a skull fracture. Motor vehicle crashes and blows to the ...

  7. Early alterations in functional connectivity and white matter structure in a transgenic mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Joanes; Schroeter, Aileen; He, Pan; Tanadini, Matteo; Keist, Ruth; Krstic, Dimitrije; Konietzko, Uwe; Klohs, Jan; Nitsch, Roger M; Rudin, Markus

    2014-10-08

    Impairment of brain functional connectivity (FC) is thought to be an early event occurring in diseases with cerebral amyloidosis, such as Alzheimer's disease. Regions sustaining altered functional networks have been shown to colocalize with regions marked with amyloid plaques burden suggesting a strong link between FC and amyloidosis. Whether the decline in FC precedes amyloid plaque deposition or is a consequence thereof is currently unknown. The sequence of events during early stages of the disease is difficult to capture in humans due to the difficulties in providing an early diagnosis and also in view of the heterogeneity among patients. Transgenic mouse lines overexpressing amyloid precursor proteins develop cerebral amyloidosis and constitute an attractive model system for studying the relationship between plaque and functional changes. In this study, ArcAβ transgenic and wild-type mice were imaged using resting-state fMRI methods across their life-span in a cross-sectional design to analyze changes in FC in relation to the pathology. Transgenic mice show compromised development of FC during the first months of postnatal life compared with wild-type animals, resulting in functional impairments that affect in particular the sensory-motor cortex already in preplaque stage. These functional alterations were accompanied by structural changes as reflected by reduced fractional anisotropy values, as derived from diffusion tensor imaging. Our results suggest cerebral amyloidosis in mice is preceded by impairment of neuronal networks and white matter structures. FC analysis in mice is an attractive tool for studying the implications of impaired neuronal networks in models of cerebral amyloid pathology.

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model expressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the Arctic mutation.

    PubMed

    Rönnbäck, Annica; Pavlov, Pavel F; Mansory, Mansorah; Gonze, Prisca; Marlière, Nicolas; Winblad, Bengt; Graff, Caroline; Behbahani, Homira

    2016-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain is an important event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have used a transgenic mouse model expressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the Arctic mutation to investigate whether Aβ deposition is correlated with mitochondrial functions in these animals. We found evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (i.e., decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage) at 6 months of age, when the mice showed very mild Aβ deposition. More pronounced mitochondrial abnormalities were present in 24-month-old TgAPParc mice with more extensive Aβ pathology. This study demonstrates for the first time mitochondrial dysfunction in transgenic mice with a mutation within the Aβ peptide (the Arctic APP mutation), and confirms previous studies suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress is an early event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. This study demonstrates mitochondrial dysfunction in transgenic mice with a mutation within the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide (the Arctic amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutation). We found evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (i.e. decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative DNA damage) at 6 months of age, when very mild Aβ deposition is present in the mice. Also, the cytochrome c (COX) activity was significantly decreased in mitochondria from transgenic mice at 24 months of age.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of amyloid plaques using hollow manganese oxide nanoparticles conjugated with antibody aβ1-40 in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Ha, Tae Lin; Im, Geun Ho; Yang, Jehoon; Seo, Sang Won; Lee, In Su; Lee, Jung Hee

    2013-01-09

    In this study, we have shown the feasibility of hollow manganese oxide nanoparticles (HMON) conjugated with an antibody of Aβ1-40 peptide (abAβ40) (HMON-abAβ40) for MRI of amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. MR brain images in APP/PS1 transgenic mice and their nontransgenic littermates were acquired using a 7.0 T MRI system before, and 24 and 72 h after an injection of HMON-abAβ40. After the injection of HMON-abAβ40, we found hyperenhanced spots in the frontal cortex area on T1-weighted MR images for transgenic mice, which corresponded qualitatively to amyloid plaques detected by thioflavin-S staining. For quantitative analysis, percent MR signal changes in six brain regions (olfactory cortex, frontal cortex, cerebral cortex, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex) were compared between transgenic and wild-type mice. We found significant increases in the percent MR signal changes in the olfactory cortex, frontal cortex, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus, but there were no significant differences in the thalamus and cerebellar cortex for transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. This unique strategy allowed us to detect brain regions subjected to amyloid