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Sample records for decreases excision repair

  1. Prokaryotic Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation. PMID:23457260

  2. Prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation.

  3. Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Krokan, Hans E.; Bjørås, Magnar

    2013-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) corrects DNA damage from oxidation, deamination and alkylation. Such base lesions cause little distortion to the DNA helix structure. BER is initiated by a DNA glycosylase that recognizes and removes the damaged base, leaving an abasic site that is further processed by short-patch repair or long-patch repair that largely uses different proteins to complete BER. At least 11 distinct mammalian DNA glycosylases are known, each recognizing a few related lesions, frequently with some overlap in specificities. Impressively, the damaged bases are rapidly identified in a vast excess of normal bases, without a supply of energy. BER protects against cancer, aging, and neurodegeneration and takes place both in nuclei and mitochondria. More recently, an important role of uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG2 in adaptive immunity was revealed. Furthermore, other DNA glycosylases may have important roles in epigenetics, thus expanding the repertoire of BER proteins. PMID:23545420

  4. 17alpha-Ethinylestradiol decreases expression of multiple hepatic nucleotide excision repair genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Notch, Emily G; Miniutti, Danielle M; Mayer, Gregory D

    2007-10-15

    Waterborne 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE(2)) alters hormone-mediated biological indicators in fish. These alterations include increased plasma vitellogenin, increased intersex individuals, decreased egg and sperm production, reduced gamete quality, and complete feminization of male fish. Together, these observations implicate aquatic estrogens in a broad range of detrimental effects on fish reproduction and fitness. In addition to impairing reproductive processes, EE(2) is also a strong promoter of hepatic tumor formation. Since many ubiquitous, aquatic hepatocarcinogens form DNA adducts that are preferentially repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER) processes, we hypothesized that EE(2) may exert co-carcinogenic effects by reducing an organisms ability to repair DNA adducts via this mechanism. The present study used fluorescence-based quantitative RT-PCR to examine effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of the semisynthetic estrogen, EE(2), on hepatic nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene expression. Adult male and female zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 1ng/L, 10ng/L or 100ng/L concentrations of EE(2), or to a solvent control (0.05%, v/v ethanol), for 7 days with static water renewal every 24h. Effectiveness of EE(2) exposure in the liver was confirmed by examining hepatic expression of two estrogen-responsive biomarkers, vitellogenin-1 and cytochrome P450-1A1 (CYP1A1). Quantitative analysis confirmed that exposure to 100ng/L EE(2) caused significant decreases in transcript abundance of several hepatic NER genes in male zebrafish, including XPC (>17-fold), XPA (>7-fold), XPD (>8-fold), and XPF (>8-fold). Adult female zebrafish exhibited a four-fold decreased in XPC mRNA abundance at all exposure concentrations. Decreased mRNA abundance of NER genes was also seen to a lesser degree at lower concentrations of EE(2). Adult male zebrafish showed greater reduction of hepatic NER transcript levels than their female counterparts, which is

  5. DNA excision repair at telomeres.

    PubMed

    Jia, Pingping; Her, Chengtao; Chai, Weihang

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage is caused by either endogenous cellular metabolic processes such as hydrolysis, oxidation, alkylation, and DNA base mismatches, or exogenous sources including ultraviolet (UV) light, ionizing radiation, and chemical agents. Damaged DNA that is not properly repaired can lead to genomic instability, driving tumorigenesis. To protect genomic stability, mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair mechanisms to remove and repair DNA lesions. Telomeres are composed of long tandem TTAGGG repeats located at the ends of chromosomes. Maintenance of functional telomeres is critical for preventing genome instability. The telomeric sequence possesses unique features that predispose telomeres to a variety of DNA damage induced by environmental genotoxins. This review briefly describes the relevance of excision repair pathways in telomere maintenance, with the focus on base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR). By summarizing current knowledge on excision repair of telomere damage and outlining many unanswered questions, it is our hope to stimulate further interest in a better understanding of excision repair processes at telomeres and in how these processes contribute to telomere maintenance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Nucleotide excision repair in humans

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process. PMID:26388429

  7. Nucleotide excision repair in humans.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-12-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Deficient nucleotide excision repair increases base-pair substitutions but decreases TGGC frameshifts induced by methylglyoxal in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Murata-Kamiya, N; Kaji, H; Kasai, H

    1999-06-07

    To investigate the mutation spectrum of a well-known mutagen, methylglyoxal, and the influence of nucleotide excision repair (NER) on methylglyoxal-induced mutations, we treated wild-type and NER-deficient (uvrA or uvrC) Escherichia coli strains with methylglyoxal, and analyzed mutations in the chromosomal lacI gene. In the three strains, the cell death and the mutation frequency increased according to the dose of methylglyoxal added to the culture medium. The frequencies of methylglyoxal-induced base-pair substitutions were higher in the NER-deficient strains than in the wild-type strain, in the presence and absence of mucAB gene. Paradoxically, the frequency of methylglyoxal-induced TGGC frameshifts was higher in the wild-type strain than in the NER-deficient strains. When the methylglyoxal-induced mutation spectra in the presence and absence of mucAB gene are compared, the ratios of base-pair substitutions to frameshifts were increased by the effects of mucAB gene. In the three strains, more than 75% of the base-pair substitutions occurred at G:C sites, independent of the mucAB gene. When the mucAB gene was present, G:C-->T:A transversions were predominant, followed by G:C-->A:T transitions. When the mucAB gene was absent, the predominant mutations differed in the three strains: in the wild-type and uvrC strains, G:C-->A:T transitions were predominant, followed by G:C-->T:A transversions, while in the uvrA strains, G:C-->T:A transversions were predominant, followed by G:C-->A:T transitions. These results suggest that NER may be involved in both the repair and the fixation of methylglyoxal-induced mutations.

  9. Mitochondrial base excision repair assays

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Scott; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    The main source of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal cellular metabolism. The main mtDNA lesions generated by ROS are base modifications, such as the ubiquitous 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesion; however, base loss and strand breaks may also occur. Many human diseases are associated with mtDNA mutations and thus maintaining mtDNA integrity is critical. All of these lesions are repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is now known that mammalian mitochondria have BER, which, similarly to nuclear BER, is catalyzed by DNA glycosylases, AP endonuclease, DNA polymerase (POLγ in mitochondria), and DNA ligase. This article outlines procedures for measuring oxidative damage formation and BER in mitochondria, including isolation of mitochondria from tissues and cells, protocols for measuring BER enzyme activities, gene-specific repair assays, chromatographic techniques, as well as current optimizations for detecting 8-oxoG lesions in cells by immunofluorescence. Throughout the assay descriptions we will include methodological considerations that may help optimize the assays in terms of resolution and repeatability. PMID:20188838

  10. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Schärer, Orlando D.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main pathway used by mammals to remove bulky DNA lesions such as those formed by UV light, environmental mutagens, and some cancer chemotherapeutic adducts from DNA. Deficiencies in NER are associated with the extremely skin cancer-prone inherited disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. Although the core NER reaction and the factors that execute it have been known for some years, recent studies have led to a much more detailed understanding of the NER mechanism, how NER operates in the context of chromatin, and how it is connected to other cellular processes such as DNA damage signaling and transcription. This review emphasizes biochemical, structural, cell biological, and genetic studies since 2005 that have shed light on many aspects of the NER pathway. PMID:24086042

  11. An alternative eukaryotic DNA excision repair pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, G A; Davey, S; Ferrer, J V; Martin, A M; Beach, D; Doetsch, P W

    1995-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by UV light, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, and (6-4)pyrimidine pyrimidones are known to be repaired by the process of nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, studies have demonstrated that at least two mechanisms for excising UV photo-products exist; NER and a second, previously unidentified process. Recently we reported that S. pombe contains a DNA endonuclease, SPDE, which recognizes and cleaves at a position immediately adjacent to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4)pyrimidine pyrimidones. Here we report that the UV-sensitive S. pombe rad12-502 mutant lacks SPDE activity. In addition, extracts prepared from the rad12-502 mutant are deficient in DNA excision repair, as demonstrated in an in vitro excision repair assay. DNA repair activity was restored to wild-type levels in extracts prepared from rad12-502 cells by the addition of partially purified SPDE to in vitro repair reaction mixtures. When the rad12-502 mutant was crossed with the NER rad13-A mutant, the resulting double mutant was much more sensitive to UV radiation than either single mutant, demonstrating that the rad12 gene product functions in a DNA repair pathway distinct from NER. These data directly link SPDE to this alternative excision repair process. We propose that the SPDE-dependent DNA repair pathway is the second DNA excision repair process present in S. pombe. PMID:7623848

  12. Nucleotide excision repair in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, B

    1990-01-01

    One of the best-studied DNA repair pathways is nucleotide excision repair, a process consisting of DNA damage recognition, incision, excision, repair resynthesis, and DNA ligation. Escherichia coli has served as a model organism for the study of this process. Recently, many of the proteins that mediate E. coli nucleotide excision have been purified to homogeneity; this had led to a molecular description of this repair pathway. One of the key repair enzymes of this pathway is the UvrABC nuclease complex. The individual subunits of this enzyme cooperate in a complex series of partial reactions to bind to and incise the DNA near a damaged nucleotide. The UvrABC complex displays a remarkable substrate diversity. Defining the structural features of DNA lesions that provide the specificity for damage recognition by the UvrABC complex is of great importance, since it represents a unique form of protein-DNA interaction. Using a number of in vitro assays, researchers have been able to elucidate the action mechanism of the UvrABC nuclease complex. Current research is devoted to understanding how these complex events are mediated within the living cell. PMID:2181258

  13. Base Excision Repair in the Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Doublié, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The 16.5 kb human mitochondrial genome encodes for 13 polypeptides, 22 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), unlike its nuclear counterpart, is not packaged into nucleosomes and is more prone to the adverse effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during oxidative phosphorylation. The past few decades have witnessed an increase in the number of proteins observed to translocate to the mitochondria for the purposes of mitochondrial genome maintenance. The mtDNA damage produced by ROS, if not properly repaired, leads to instability and can ultimately manifest in mitochondrial dysfunction and disease. The base excision repair (BER) pathway is employed for the removal and consequently the repair of deaminated, oxidized, and alkylated DNA bases. Specialized enzymes called DNA glycosylases, which locate and cleave the damaged base, catalyze the first step of this highly coordinated repair pathway. This review focuses on members of the four human BER DNA glycosylase superfamilies and their subcellular localization in the mitochondria and/or the nucleus, as well as summarizes their structural features, biochemical properties, and functional role in the excision of damaged bases. PMID:25754732

  14. Variation in Base Excision Repair Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David M.; Kim, Daemyung; Berquist, Brian R.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2010-01-01

    The major DNA repair pathway for coping with spontaneous forms of DNA damage, such as natural hydrolytic products or oxidative lesions, is base excision repair (BER). In particular, BER processes mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as non-bulky base modifications, abasic sites, and a range of chemically distinct single-strand breaks. Defects in BER have been linked to cancer predisposition, neurodegenerative disorders, and immunodeficiency. Recent data indicate a large degree of sequence variability in DNA repair genes and several studies have associated BER gene polymorphisms with disease risk, including cancer of several sites. The intent of this review is to describe the range of BER capacity among individuals and the functional consequences of BER genetic variants. We also discuss studies that associate BER deficiency with disease risk and the current state of BER capacity measurement assays. PMID:21167187

  15. DNA excision repair in permeable human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, W.K.; Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    U.v. irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts activated DNA repair, aspects of which were characterized in the cells after they were permeabilized. Incubation of intact cells for 20 min between irradiation and harvesting was necessary to obtain a maximum rate of reparative DNA synthesis. Cells harvested immediately after irradiation before repair was initiated displayed only a small stimulation of DNA synthesis, indicating that permeable cells have a reduced capacity to recognize pyrimidine dimers and activate repair. The distribution of sizes of DNA strands labeled during 10 min of reparative DNA synthesis resembled that of parental DNA. However, during a 60-min incubation of permeable cells at 37 degrees C, parental DNA and DNA labeled by reparative DNA synthesis were both cleaved to smaller sizes. Cleavage also occurred in unirradiated cells, indicating that endogenous nuclease was active during incubation. Repair patches synthesized in permeable cells displayed increased sensitivity to digestion by micrococcal nuclease. However, the change in sensitivity during a chase with unlabeled DNA precursors was small, suggesting that reassembly of nucleosome structure at sites of repair was impaired. To examine whether this deficiency was due to a preponderance of incomplete or unligated repair patches, 3H-labeled (repaired) DNA was purified, then digested with exonuclease III and nuclease S1 to probe for free 3' ends and single-stranded regions. About 85% of the (3H)DNA synthesized during a 10-min pulse resisted digestion, suggesting that a major fraction of the repair patches that were filled were also ligated. U.v. light-activated DNA synthesis in permeable cells, therefore, appears to represent the continuation of reparative gap-filling at sites of excision repair activated within intact cells. Gap-filling and ligation were comparatively efficient processes in permeable cells.

  16. Increased oxidative DNA damage and decreased expression of base excision repair proteins in airway epithelial cells of women who cook with biomass fuels.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bidisha; Bindhani, Banani; Saha, Hirak; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2014-09-01

    To investigate whether biomass burning causes oxidative DNA damage and alters the expression of DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins in airway cells, sputum samples were collected from 80 premenopausal rural biomass-users and 70 age-matched control women who cooked with liquefied petroleum gas. Compared with control the airway cells of biomass-users showed increased DNA damage in alkaline comet assay. Biomass-users showed higher percentage of cells expressing oxidative DNA damage marker 8-oxoguanine and lower percentages of BER proteins OGG1 and APE1 by immunocytochemical staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was doubled and level of superoxide dismutase was depleted significantly among biomass-users. The concentrations of particulate matters were higher in biomass-using households which positively correlated with ROS generation and negatively with BER proteins expressions. ROS generation was positively correlated with 8-oxoguanine and negatively with BER proteins suggesting cooking with biomass is a risk for genotoxicity among rural women in their child-bearing age. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mammalian transcription-coupled excision repair.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Wim; Fousteri, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Transcriptional arrest caused by DNA damage is detrimental for cells and organisms as it impinges on gene expression and thereby on cell growth and survival. To alleviate transcriptional arrest, cells trigger a transcription-dependent genome surveillance pathway, termed transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) that ensures rapid removal of such transcription-impeding DNA lesions and prevents persistent stalling of transcription. Defective TC-NER is causatively linked to Cockayne syndrome, a rare severe genetic disorder with multisystem abnormalities that results in patients' death in early adulthood. Here we review recent data on how damage-arrested transcription is actively coupled to TC-NER in mammals and discuss new emerging models concerning the role of TC-NER-specific factors in this process.

  18. Base excision repair capacity in informing healthspan

    PubMed Central

    Brenerman, Boris M.; Illuzzi, Jennifer L.; Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a frontline defense mechanism for dealing with many common forms of endogenous DNA damage, several of which can drive mutagenic or cell death outcomes. The pathway engages proteins such as glycosylases, abasic endonucleases, polymerases and ligases to remove substrate modifications from DNA and restore the genome back to its original state. Inherited mutations in genes related to BER can give rise to disorders involving cancer, immunodeficiency and neurodegeneration. Studies employing genetically defined heterozygous (haploinsufficient) mouse models indicate that partial reduction in BER capacity can increase vulnerability to both spontaneous and exposure-dependent pathologies. In humans, measurement of BER variation has been imperfect to this point, yet tools to assess BER in epidemiological surveys are steadily evolving. We provide herein an overview of the BER pathway and discuss the current efforts toward defining the relationship of BER defects with disease susceptibility. PMID:25355293

  19. Emerging roles for histone modifications in DNA excision repair.

    PubMed

    Mao, Peng; Wyrick, John J

    2016-11-01

    DNA repair is critical to maintain genome stability. In eukaryotic cells, DNA repair is complicated by the packaging of the DNA 'substrate' into chromatin. DNA repair pathways utilize different mechanisms to overcome the barrier presented by chromatin to efficiently locate and remove DNA lesions in the genome. DNA excision repair pathways are responsible for repairing a majority of DNA lesions arising in the genome. Excision repair pathways include nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER), which repair bulky and non-bulky DNA lesions, respectively. Numerous studies have suggested that chromatin inhibits both NER and BER in vitro and in vivo Growing evidence demonstrates that histone modifications have important roles in regulating the activity of NER and BER enzymes in chromatin. Here, we will discuss the roles of different histone modifications and the corresponding modifying enzymes in DNA excision repair, highlighting the role of yeast as a model organism for many of these studies. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Base excision repair: A critical player in many games

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    This perspective reviews the many dimensions of base excision repair from a 10,000 foot vantage point and provides one person’s view on where the field is headed. Enzyme function is considered under the lens of X-ray diffraction and single molecule studies. Base excision repair in chromatin and telomeres, regulation of expression and the role of posttranslational modifications are also discussed in the context of enzyme activities, cellular localization and interacting partners. The specialized roles that base excision repair play in transcriptional activation by active demethylation and targeted oxidation as well as how base excision repair functions in the immune processes of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination and its possible involvement in retroviral infection are also discussed. Finally the complexities of oxidative damage and its repair and its link to neurodegenerative disorders, as well as the role of base excision repair as a tumor suppressor are examined in the context of damage, repair and aging. By outlining the many base excision repair-related mysteries that have yet to be unraveled, hopefully this perspective will stimulate further interest in the field. PMID:24780558

  1. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases.

  2. Nucleotide excision repair of DNA: The very early history.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2011-07-15

    This article, taken largely from the book Correcting the Blueprint of Life: An Historical Account of the Discovery of DNA Repair Mechanisms, summarizes the very early history of the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Purification of PCNA as a nucleotide excision repair protein

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Anne F.; Sancar, Aziz

    1992-01-01

    Human cell free extracts carry out nucleotide excision repair in vitro. The extract is readily separated into two fractions by chromatography on a DEAE column. Neither the low salt (0.1 M KCl) nor the high salt (0.8 M KCl) fractions are capable of repair synthesis but the combination of the two restore the repair synthesis activity. Using the repair synthesis assay we purified a protein of 37 kDa from the high salt fraction which upon addition to the low salt fraction restores repair synthesis activity. Amino acid sequence analysis, amino acid composition and immunobloting with PCNA antibodies revealed that the 37 kDa protein is the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) known to stimulate DNA Polymerases δ and ε. By using an assay which specifically measures the excision of thymine dimers we found that PCNA is not required for the actual excision reaction per se but increases the extent of excision by enabling the excision repair enzyme to turn over catalytically. Images PMID:1352873

  4. Envisioning the molecular choreography of DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S S; Mol, C D; Hosfield, D J; Tainer, J A

    1999-02-01

    Recent breakthroughs integrate individual DNA repair enzyme structures, biochemistry and biology to outline the structural cell biology of the DNA base excision repair pathways that are essential to genome integrity. Thus, we are starting to envision how the actions, movements, steps, partners and timing of DNA repair enzymes, which together define their molecular choreography, are elegantly controlled by both the nature of the DNA damage and the structural chemistry of the participating enzymes and the DNA double helix.

  5. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Nuclear Extracts from Xenopus Oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, Eric J.; Koriazova, Lilia K.; Saxena, Jitendra K.; Spoonde, Alexander Y.

    1999-06-16

    Limited nucleotide excision repair (NER) requires at least {approx}40 proteins in extracts from purified proteins, although perhaps hundreds of proteins may influence DNA repair in cells. For efficient DNA repair in extracts, it is important to utilize a system containing large quantities of active DNA repair proteins uncontaminated with nonspecific nucleases. Unlike extracts from mammalian cells that repair {approx}2% of the input DNA, both injected Xenopus oocytes and oocyte nuclear extracts can repair {approx}100% of the input damaged DNA by NER with little or no synthesis on undamaged control substrate. Repair activity in extracts can be inactivated with antibodies and/or inhibitors, and then repair can be restored by addition of exogenous proteins. A further advantage of the Xenopus system is that results obtained from injection experiments in living cells can be compared to results obtained in nuclear extracts.

  6. Alkaline unwinding flow cytometry assay to measure nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Anderson, Kristin E; Lessard, Christopher J; Veltri, Gregory; Jacobs, David R; Folsom, Aaron R; Gross, Myron D

    2007-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER), one of the DNA repair pathways, is the primary mechanism for repair of bulky adducts caused by physical and chemical agents, such as UV radiation, cisplatin and 4-nitroquinolones. Variations in DNA repair may be a significant risk factor for several cancers, but its measurement in epidemiological studies has been hindered by the high variability, complexity and laborious nature of currently available assays. An alkaline unwinding flow cytometric assay using UV-C radiation as a DNA-damaging agent was adapted for measurement of NER-mediated breaks. This assay was based on the principle of alkaline unwinding of strand breaks in double-stranded DNA to yield single-stranded DNA with the number of strand breaks being proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This assay measured 50,000 events per sample with several samples being analyzed per specimen, thereby providing very reliable measurements, which can be performed on a large-scale basis. Using area under the curve (AUC) to quantitate amount of NER-mediated breaks, this assay was able to detect increased NER-mediated breaks with increasing doses of UV-C radiation. The assay detected NER-mediated breaks in lymphocytes from normal donors and not in xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoblastoid cell lines indicating specificity for the detection of NER-mediated breaks. The assay measured NER-mediated breaks within G(1), S and G(2)/M phases of the cell cycle; thereby decreasing variability in measurements of NER-mediated breaks due to differences in cell cycle phases. Intraindividual variability for AUC after 120 min of repair was 15% with interindividual variability being approximately 43% for cells in the G(1) phase, indicating substantial between-subject variation and relatively low within-subject variation. Thus, the alkaline unwinding flow cytometry-based assay provides a high-throughput method for the specific measurement of NER-mediated breaks in lymphocytes.

  7. Early days of DNA repair: discovery of nucleotide excision repair and homology-dependent recombinational repair.

    PubMed

    Rupp, W Dean

    2013-12-13

    The discovery of nucleotide excision repair in 1964 showed that DNA could be repaired by a mechanism that removed the damaged section of a strand and replaced it accurately by using the remaining intact strand as the template. This result showed that DNA could be actively metabolized in a process that had no precedent. In 1968, experiments describing postreplication repair, a process dependent on homologous recombination, were reported. The authors of these papers were either at Yale University or had prior Yale connections. Here we recount some of the events leading to these discoveries and consider the impact on further research at Yale and elsewhere.

  8. Reversible protein phosphorylation modulates nucleotide excision repair of damaged DNA by human cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Ariza, R R; Keyse, S M; Moggs, J G; Wood, R D

    1996-02-01

    Nucleotide excision repair of DNA in mammalian cells uses more than 20 polypeptides to remove DNA lesions caused by UV light and other mutagens. To investigate whether reversible protein phosphorylation can significantly modulate this repair mechanism we studied the effect of specific inhibitors of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases. The ability of HeLa cell extracts to carry out nucleotide excision repair in vitro was highly sensitive to three toxins (okadaic acid, microcystin-LR and tautomycin), which block PP1- and PP2A-type phosphatases. Repair was more sensitive to okadaic acid than to tautomycin, suggesting the involvement of a PP2A-type enzyme, and was insensitive to inhibitor-2, which exclusively inhibits PP1-type enzymes. In a repair synthesis assay the toxins gave 70% inhibition of activity. Full activity could be restored to toxin-inhibited extracts by addition of purified PP2A, but not PP1. The p34 subunit of replication protein A was hyperphosphorylated in cell extracts in the presence of phosphatase inhibitors, but we found no evidence that this affected repair. In a coupled incision/synthesis repair assay okadaic acid decreased the production of incision intermediates in the repair reaction. The formation of 25-30mer oligonucleotides by dual incision during repair was also inhibited by okadaic acid and inhibition could be reversed with PP2A. Thus Ser/Thr- specific protein phosphorylation plays an important role in the modulation of nucleotide excision repair in vitro.

  9. Tautomerization-dependent recognition and excision of oxidation damage in base-excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chenxu; Lu, Lining; Zhang, Jun; Yue, Zongwei; Song, Jinghui; Zong, Shuai; Liu, Menghao; Stovicek, Olivia; Gao, Yi Qin; Yi, Chengqi

    2016-01-01

    NEIL1 (Nei-like 1) is a DNA repair glycosylase guarding the mammalian genome against oxidized DNA bases. As the first enzymes in the base-excision repair pathway, glycosylases must recognize the cognate substrates and catalyze their excision. Here we present crystal structures of human NEIL1 bound to a range of duplex DNA. Together with computational and biochemical analyses, our results suggest that NEIL1 promotes tautomerization of thymine glycol (Tg)—a preferred substrate—for optimal binding in its active site. Moreover, this tautomerization event also facilitates NEIL1-catalyzed Tg excision. To our knowledge, the present example represents the first documented case of enzyme-promoted tautomerization for efficient substrate recognition and catalysis in an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. PMID:27354518

  10. Recombinant methods for screening human DNA excision repair proficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Athas, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    A method for measuring DNA excision repair in response to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field-tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiologic studies seeking to investigate associations between excision repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the belief that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) primarily is a result of the reduced capacity of patients cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. For assay, UV-irradiated non-replicating recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) indicator gene is introduced into lymphocytes using DEAE-dextran short-term transfection conditions. Exposure to UV induces transcriptionally-inactivating DNA photoproducts in the plasmid DNA which inactivate CAT gene expression. Excision repair of the damaged CAT gene is monitored indirectly as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40 hour repair/expression incubation period.

  11. Regulation of endonuclease activity in human nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Fagbemi, Adebanke F.; Orelli, Barbara; Schärer, Orlando D.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a DNA repair pathway that is responsible for removing a variety of lesions caused by harmful UV light, chemical carcinogens, and environmental mutagens from DNA. NER involves the concerted action of over 30 proteins that sequentially recognize a lesion, excise it in the form of an oligonucleotide, and fill in the resulting gap by repair synthesis. ERCC1-XPF and XPG are structure-specific endonucleases responsible for carrying out the incisions 5′ and 3′ to the damage respectively, culminating in the release of the damaged oligonucleotide. This review focuses on the recent work that led to a greater understanding of how the activities of ERCC1-XPF and XPG are regulated in NER to prevent unwanted cuts in DNA or the persistence of gaps after incision that could result in harmful, cytotoxic DNA structures. PMID:21592868

  12. Modulation of human nucleotide excision repair by 5-methylcytosines.

    PubMed

    Muheim, Regula; Buterin, Tonko; Colgate, Katharine C; Kolbanovsij, Alexander; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2003-03-25

    Previous reports showed that methylated CpG sites are primary targets of bulky lesions induced by UV radiation, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), or other environmental genotoxic agents. This study was performed to determine whether the repair of DNA damage formed preferentially at CpG dinucleotides is sensitive to 5-methylcytosine substitutions. Reactivation assays using UV- or B[a]P diol epoxide-damaged shuttle vectors established that human nucleotide excision repair enzymes are able to process fully methylated target DNA molecules. Repair reactions in human cell extracts suggested that 5-methylcytosines modulate local repair efficiency in a seemingly unpredictable manner. In fact, excision of the predominant (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-dG adduct situated in a mutational hot spot sequence (codon 273 of the p53 gene) was stimulated by CpG methylation. Interestingly, excision activity was increased by a single 5-methylcytosine residue flanking the adduct in the damaged strand, but the same stimulatory effect was also induced by a single 5-methylcytosine residue located opposite the adduct in the undamaged strand. No such stimulation was observed when the (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-dG lesion was placed in a different site containing a sequence of contiguous guanines, and strong inhibition was detected when a representative of the rare (+)-cis-anti-B[a]P-dG isomer was tested in the same assay. These results raise the possibility that 5-methylcytosines in CpG dinucleotides modulate not only the distribution of bulky DNA lesions but, at least in some cases, also the kinetics of subsequent excision repair reactions. This study confirms that the efficiency of bulky lesion repair is determined by the configuration of base pairs at damaged sites.

  13. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  14. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J A; Miller, John H; Smith, Paul E; Vorpagel, Erich R; Wong, Chung F; Zacharias, Martin W

    2006-03-03

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-β, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the • dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA • dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA • mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-β • mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  15. DNA base excision repair nanosystem engineering: model development.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, B A

    2005-01-01

    DNA base damage results from a combination of endogenous sources, (normal metabolism, increased metabolism due to obesity, stress from diseases such as arthritis and diabetes, and ischemia) and the environment (ingested toxins, ionizing radiation, etc.). If unrepaired DNA base damage can lead to diminished cell function, and potentially diseases and eventually mutations that lead to cancer. Sophisticated DNA repair mechanisms have evolved in all living cells to preserve the integrity of inherited genetic information and transcriptional control. Understanding a system like DNA repair is greatly enhanced by using engineering methods, in particular modeling interactions and using predictive simulation to analyze the impact of perturbations. We describe the use of such a "nanosystem engineering" approach to analyze the DNA base excision repair pathway in human cells, and use simulation to predict the impact of varying enzyme concentration on DNA repair capacity.

  16. How are base excision DNA repair pathways deployed in vivo?

    PubMed

    Thapar, Upasna; Demple, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the base excision repair (BER) system for DNA more than 40 years ago, new branches of the pathway have been revealed at the biochemical level by in vitro studies. Largely for technical reasons, however, the confirmation of these subpathways in vivo has been elusive. We review methods that have been used to explore BER in mammalian cells, indicate where there are important knowledge gaps to fill, and suggest a way to address them.

  17. How are base excision DNA repair pathways deployed in vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Upasna; Demple, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the base excision repair (BER) system for DNA more than 40 years ago, new branches of the pathway have been revealed at the biochemical level by in vitro studies. Largely for technical reasons, however, the confirmation of these subpathways in vivo has been elusive. We review methods that have been used to explore BER in mammalian cells, indicate where there are important knowledge gaps to fill, and suggest a way to address them. PMID:28357058

  18. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-03-22

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3'- or 5'-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5'-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2-HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5' → 3' exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1-HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5'-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2-HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1-HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5' MMR.

  19. Excision repair of pyrimidine dimers from simian virus 40 minichromosomes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.H.; Linn, S.

    1984-08-25

    The ability of DNA repair enzymes to carry out excision repair of pyrimidine dimers in SV40 minichromosomes irradiated with UV light was examined. Half of the dimers were substrate for the DNA glycosylase activity of phage T4 UV endonuclease immediately after irradiation, but this limit decreased to 27% after 2 h at 0/sup 0/C. The apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease activity of the enzyme did not incise all of the AP sites created by glycosylase, although all AP sites were substrate for HeLa AP endonuclease II. After incision by the T4 enzyme, excision was mediated by HeLa DNase V (acting with an exonuclease present in the chromatin preparation). Under physiological salt conditions, excision did not proceed beyond the damaged nucleotides in DNA or chromatin. With chromatin, 70% of the accessible dimers were removed, but at a rate slower than for DNA. Finally, HeLa DNA polymerase ..beta.. was able to fill the short gaps created after dimer excision, and these patches were sealed by T4 DNA ligase. Overall, roughly 30% of the sites incised by the endonuclease were ultimately sealed by the ligase. The resistance of some sites was due to interference with the ligase by the chromatin structure, as only 30-40% of the nicks created in chromatin by pancreatic DNase could be sealed by T4 or HeLa DNA ligases. The overall excision repair process did not disrupt the chromatin structure, since the repair label was recovered in Form I DNA present in 75 S condensed minichromosomes. Although other factors might affect the rate, it appears that the enzymes utilized could carry out excision repair of chromatin to a limit near that observed in mammalian cells in vivo.

  20. Nonuniform distribution of excision repair synthesis in nucleosome core DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, S.Y.; Smerdon, M.J.

    1985-12-17

    We have studied the distribution in nucleosome core DNA of nucleotides incorporated by excision repair synthesis occurring immediately after UV irradiation in human cells. The differences previously observed for whole nuclei between the DNase I digestion profiles of repaired DNA (following its refolding into a nucleosome structure) and bulk DNA are obtained for isolated nucleosome core particles. Analysis of the differences obtained indicates that they could reflect a significant difference in the level of repair-incorporated nucleotides at different sites within the core DNA region. To test this possibility directly, we have used exonuclease III digestion of very homogeneous sized core particle DNA to map the distribution of repair synthesis in these regions. Results indicate that in a significant fraction of the nucleosomes the 5' and 3' ends of the core DNA are markedly enhanced in repair-incorporated nucleotides relative to the central region of the core particle. A best fit analysis indicates that a good approximation of the data is obtained for a distribution where the core DNA is uniformly labeled from the 5' end to position 62 and from position 114 to the 3' end, with the 52-base central region being devoid of repair-incorporated nucleotides. This distribution accounts for all of the quantitative differences observed previously between repaired DNA and bulk DNA following the rapid phase of nucleosome rearrangement when it is assumed that linker DNA and the core DNA ends are repaired with equal efficiency and the nucleosome structure of newly repaired DNA is identical with that of bulk chromatin. The 52-base central region that is devoid of repair synthesis contains the lowest frequency cutting sites for DNase I in vitro, as well as the only internal locations where two (rather than one) histones interact with a 10-base segment of each DNA strand.

  1. Profiling base excision repair glycosylases with synthesized transition state analogs.

    PubMed

    Chu, Aurea M; Fettinger, James C; David, Sheila S

    2011-09-01

    Two base excision repair glycosylase (BER) transition state (TS) mimics, (3R,4R)-1-benzyl (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidin-3-ol (1NBn) and (3R,4R)-(hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidin-3-ol (1N), were synthesized using an improved method. Several BER glycosylases that repair oxidized DNA bases, bacterial formamidopyrimdine glycosylase (Fpg), human OG glycosylase (hOGG1) and human Nei-like glycosylase 1 (hNEIL1) exhibit exceptionally high affinity (K(d)∼pM) with DNA duplexes containing the 1NBn and 1N nucleotide. Notably, comparison of the K(d) values of both TS mimics relative to an abasic analog (THF) in duplex contexts paired opposite C or A suggest that these DNA repair enzymes use distinctly different mechanisms for damaged base recognition and catalysis despite having overlapping substrate specificities.

  2. Nucleosomes determine their own patch size in base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) processes non-helix distorting lesions (e.g., uracils and gaps) and is composed of two subpathways that differ in the number of nucleotides (nts) incorporated during the DNA synthesis step: short patch (SP) repair incorporates 1 nt and long patch (LP) repair incorporates 2–12 nts. This choice for either LP or SP repair has not been analyzed in the context of nucleosomes. Initial studies with uracil located in nucleosome core DNA showed a distinct DNA polymerase extension profile in cell-free extracts that specifically limits extension to 1 nt, suggesting a preference for SP BER. Therefore, we developed an assay to differentiate long and short repair patches in ‘designed’ nucleosomes containing a single-nucleotide gap at specific locations relative to the dyad center. Using cell-free extracts or purified enzymes, we found that DNA lesions in the nucleosome core are preferentially repaired by DNA polymerase β and there is a significant reduction in BER polymerase extension beyond 1 nt, creating a striking bias for incorporation of short patches into nucleosomal DNA. These results show that nucleosomes control the patch size used by BER. PMID:27265863

  3. Nucleotide excision repair and its interplay with transcription.

    PubMed

    van Hoffen, Anneke; Balajee, A S; van Zeeland, Albert A; Mullenders, Leon H F

    2003-11-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multistep process capable to remove a variety of DNA distorting lesions from prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. In eukaryotic cells, the process requires more than 30 proteins to perform the different steps, i.e. recognition of DNA damage, single strand incisions and excision of the lesion-containing DNA fragment and DNA repair synthesis/ligation. NER can operate via two subpathways: global genome repair (GGR) and a specialized pathway coupled to active transcription (transcription-coupled repair, TCR) and directed to DNA lesions in the transcribed strand of active genes. Both in vivo as well as in cultured cells the fast removal of transcription blocking lesions by TCR is crucial to escape from lethal effects of inhibited transcription inhibition The most delicate step in NER is the recognition of the DNA lesions in their different chromatin context and the mechanism of damage recognition in GGR and TCR is principally different and requires specific proteins. In GGR, the XPC-HR23B is essential for the formation of the incision complex. In TCR the Cockayne syndrome (CS) gene products are key players in the recognition of a stalled RNA polymerase the presumed signaling structure for repair of transcribed strands. In this study, we show that the extent of recovery of UV-inhibited transcription and TCR strictly depends on the amount of CSB protein as well as the amount of DNA damage present in the cell. This indicates that the ratio between DNA damage frequency and CSB protein concentration in the cell is rather critical for acute cellular response, i.e. recovery of inhibited transcription upon DNA damage infliction, and hence cellular survival.

  4. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  5. Low-dose formaldehyde delays DNA damage recognition and DNA excision repair in human cells.

    PubMed

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks.

  6. The Impact of Base Excision DNA Repair in Age-Related Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leandro, Giovana S.; Sykora, Peter; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2017-01-01

    The aging process and several age-related neurodegenerative disorders have been linked to elevated levels of DNA damage induced by ROS and deficiency in DNA repair mechanisms. DNA damage induced by ROS is a byproduct of cellular respiration and accumulation of damage over time, is a fundamental aspect of a main theory of aging. Mitochondria have a pivotal role in generating cellular oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with several diseases. DNA base excision repair is considered the major pathway for repair of oxidized bases in DNA both in the nuclei and in mitochondria, and in neurons this mechanism is particularly important because non-diving cells have limited back-up DNA repair mechanisms. An association between elevated oxidative stress and a decrease in BER is strongly related to the aging process and has special relevance in age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the role of DNA repair in aging, focusing on the implications of the DNA base excision repair pathways and how alterations in expression of these DNA repair proteins are related to the aging process and to age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26255938

  7. Tissue-specific accelerated aging in nucleotide excision repair deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multi-step DNA repair mechanism that removes helix-distorting modified nucleotides from the genome. NER is divided into two subpathways depending on the location of DNA damage in the genome and how it is first detected. Global genome NER identifies and repairs DNA lesions throughout the genome. This subpathway of NER primarily protects against the accumulation of mutations in the genome. Transcription-coupled (TC) NER rapidly repairs lesions in the transcribed strand of DNA that block transcription by RNA polymerase II. TC-NER prevents cell death in response to stalled transcription. Defects in NER cause three distinct human diseases: xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy. Each of these syndromes is characterized by premature onset of pathologies that overlap with those associated with old age in humans. This reveals the contribution of DNA damage to multiple age-related diseases. Tissues affected include the skin, eye, bone marrow, nervous system and endocrine axis. This review emphasizes accelerated aging associated with xeroderma pigmentosum and discusses the cause of these pathologies, either mutation accumulation or cell death as a consequence of failure to repair DNA damage. PMID:18538374

  8. Fluorogenic DNA ligase and base excision repair enzyme assays using substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Roman, Steven

    2015-05-15

    Continuing our work on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores for nucleic acid modifying enzymes, here we describe the development of such substrates for DNA ligases and some base excision repair enzymes. These substrates are hairpin-type synthetic DNA molecules with a single fluorophore located on a base close to the 3' ends, an arrangement that results in strong fluorescence quenching. When such substrates are subjected to an enzymatic reaction, the position of the dyes relative to that end of the molecules is altered, resulting in significant fluorescence intensity changes. The ligase substrates described here were 5' phosphorylated and either blunt-ended or carrying short, self-complementary single-stranded 5' extensions. The ligation reactions resulted in the covalent joining of the ends of the molecules, decreasing the quenching effect of the terminal bases on the dyes. To generate fluorogenic substrates for the base excision repair enzymes formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG), human 8-oxo-G DNA glycosylase/AP lyase (hOGG1), endonuclease IV (EndoIV), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), we introduced abasic sites or a modified nucleotide, 8-oxo-dG, at such positions that their enzymatic excision would result in the release of a short fluorescent fragment. This was also accompanied by strong fluorescence increases. Overall fluorescence changes ranged from approximately 4-fold (ligase reactions) to more than 20-fold (base excision repair reactions).

  9. New synthetic substrates of mammalian nucleotide excision repair system

    PubMed Central

    Evdokimov, Alexey; Petruseva, Irina; Tsidulko, Aleksandra; Koroleva, Ludmila; Serpokrylova, Inna; Silnikov, Vladimir; Lavrik, Olga

    2013-01-01

    DNA probes for the studies of damaged strand excision during the nucleotide excision repair (NER) have been designed using the novel non-nucleosidic phosphoramidite reagents that contain N-[6-(9-antracenylcarbamoyl)hexanoyl]-3-amino-1,2-propandiol (nAnt) and N-[6-(5(6)-fluoresceinylcarbamoyl)hexanoyl]-3-amino-1,2-propandiol (nFlu) moieties. New lesion-imitating adducts being inserted into DNA show good substrate properties in NER process. Modified extended linear nFlu– and nAntr–DNA are suitable for estimation of specific excision activity catalysed with mammalian whole-cell extracts. The following substrate activity range was revealed for the model 137-bp linear double-stranded DNA: nAnt–DNA ≈ nFlu–DNA > Chol–DNA (Chol–DNA—legitimate NER substrate that contains non-nucleoside fragment bearing cholesterol residue). In vitro assay shows that modified DNA can be a useful tool to study NER activity in whole-cell extracts. The developed approach should be of general use for the incorporation of NER-sensitive distortions into model DNAs. The new synthetic extended linear DNA containing bulky non-nucleoside modifications will be useful for NER mechanism study and for applications. PMID:23609543

  10. DNA polymerase β and PARP activities in base excision repair in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Masaoka, Aya; Horton, Julie K.; Beard, William A.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2009-01-01

    To examine base excision repair (BER) capacity in the context of living cells, we developed and applied a plasmid-based reporter assay. Non-replicating plasmids containing unique DNA base lesions were designed to express luciferase only after lesion repair had occurred, and luciferase expression in transfected cells was measured continuously during a repair period of 14 h. Two types of DNA lesions were examined: uracil opposite T reflecting repair primarily by the single-nucleotide BER sub-pathway, and the abasic site analogue tetrahydrofuran (THF) opposite C reflecting repair by long-patch BER. We found that the repair capacity for uracil-DNA in wild type mouse fibroblasts was very strong, whereas the repair capacity for THF-DNA, although strong, was slightly weaker. Repair capacity in DNA polymerase β (Pol β) null cells for uracil-DNA and THF-DNA was reduced by approximately 15% and 20%, respectively, compared to that in wild type cells. In both cases, the repair deficiency was fully complemented in Pol β null cells expressing recombinant Pol β. The effect of inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity on repair capacity was examined by treatment of cells with the inhibitor 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimide (4-AN). PARP inhibition decreased the repair capacity for both lesions in wild type cells, and this reduction was to the same level as that seen in Pol β null cells. In contrast, 4-AN had no effect on repair in Pol β null cells. The results highlight that Pol β and PARP function in the same repair pathway, but also suggest that there is repair independent of both Pol β and PARP activities. Thus, before the BER capacity of a cell can be predicted or modulated, a better understanding of Pol β and PARP activity-independent BER pathways is required. PMID:19748837

  11. Base sequence context effects on nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuqin; Patel, Dinshaw J; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2010-08-23

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a critical role in maintaining the integrity of the genome when damaged by bulky DNA lesions, since inefficient repair can cause mutations and human diseases notably cancer. The structural properties of DNA lesions that determine their relative susceptibilities to NER are therefore of great interest. As a model system, we have investigated the major mutagenic lesion derived from the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), 10S (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(2)-dG in six different sequence contexts that differ in how the lesion is positioned in relation to nearby guanine amino groups. We have obtained molecular structural data by NMR and MD simulations, bending properties from gel electrophoresis studies, and NER data obtained from human HeLa cell extracts for our six investigated sequence contexts. This model system suggests that disturbed Watson-Crick base pairing is a better recognition signal than a flexible bend, and that these can act in concert to provide an enhanced signal. Steric hinderance between the minor groove-aligned lesion and nearby guanine amino groups determines the exact nature of the disturbances. Both nearest neighbor and more distant neighbor sequence contexts have an impact. Regardless of the exact distortions, we hypothesize that they provide a local thermodynamic destabilization signal for repair.

  12. Orbitopalpebral repair after 835 excisions of malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Othon; Konofaos, Petros; Chrisostomidis, Chrisostomos; Georgiou, Panagis; Frangoulis, Marios; Champsas, Grigorios; Betsi, Evanthia; Zapantis-Fragos, Menelaos

    2005-01-01

    Repair of any defect in the eyelid depends on its size and position and the state of the surrounding tissues. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignant tumour of the eyelids, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), mixed carcinomas or basosquamous cell carcinomas (BSC), and cutaneous melanomas (CM), also invade the eyelids and periocular zones. Reconstruction of the eyelids and associated orbital structures after resection requires a complete understanding of the anatomy. The adequacy of the reconstruction is judged by the quality of functional restoration and the aesthetic appearance. The purpose of this study was to document various, simple or complex reconstructive procedures that may be used after excision of malignant tumours of the eyelids and to assess the outcome of surgical treatment.

  13. Base excision repair in chromatin: Insights from reconstituted systems

    PubMed Central

    Balliano, Angela J.; Hayes, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    The process of base excision repair has been completely reconstituted in vitro and structural and biochemical properties of the component enzymes thoroughly studied on naked DNA templates. More recent work in this field aims to understand how BER operates on the natural substrate, chromatin [1, 2]. Toward this end, a number of researchers, including the Smerdon group, have focused attention to understand how individual enzymes and reconstituted BER operate on nucleosome substrates. While nucleosomes were once thought to completely restrict access of DNA-dependent factors, the surprising finding from these studies suggests that at least some BER components can utilize target DNA bound within nucleosomes as substrates for their enzymatic processes. This data correlates well with both structural studies of these enzymes and our developing understanding of nucleosome conformation and dynamics. While more needs to be learned, these studies highlight the utility of reconstituted BER and chromatin systems to inform our understanding of in vivo biological processes. PMID:26411876

  14. Precise repair of mPing excision sites is facilitated by target site duplication derived microhomology.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, David M; Bridges, M Catherine; Strother, Ashley E; Burckhalter, Courtney E; Burnette, James M; Hancock, C Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A key difference between the Tourist and Stowaway families of miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs) is the manner in which their excision alters the genome. Upon excision, Stowaway-like MITEs and the associated Mariner elements usually leave behind a small duplication and short sequences from the end of the element. These small insertions or deletions known as "footprints" can potentially disrupt coding or regulatory sequences. In contrast, Tourist-like MITEs and the associated PIF/Pong/Harbinger elements generally excise precisely, returning the genome to its original state. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms underlying these excision differences, including the role of the host DNA repair mechanisms. The transposition of the Tourist-like element, mPing, and the Stowaway-like element, 14T32, were evaluated using yeast transposition assays. Assays performed in yeast strains lacking non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) enzymes indicated that the excision sites of both elements were primarily repaired by NHEJ. Altering the target site duplication (TSD) sequences that flank these elements reduced the transposition frequency. Using yeast strains with the ability to repair the excision site by homologous repair showed that some TSD changes disrupt excision of the element. Changing the ends of mPing to produce non-matching TSDs drastically reduced repair of the excision site and resulted in increased generation of footprints. Together these results indicate that the difference in Tourist and Stowaway excision sites results from transposition mechanism characteristics. The TSDs of both elements play a role in element excision, but only the mPing TSDs actively participate in excision site repair. Our data suggests that Tourist-like elements excise with staggered cleavage of the TSDs, which provides microhomology that facilitates precise repair. This slight modification in the transposition mechanism results in more efficient repair of

  15. The Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway Limits L1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Servant, Geraldine; Streva, Vincent A.; Derbes, Rebecca S.; Wijetunge, Madushani I.; Neeland, Marc; White, Travis B.; Belancio, Victoria P.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.; Deininger, Prescott L.

    2017-01-01

    Long interspersed elements 1 (L1) are active mobile elements that constitute almost 17% of the human genome. They amplify through a “copy-and-paste” mechanism termed retrotransposition, and de novo insertions related to these elements have been reported to cause 0.2% of genetic diseases. Our previous data demonstrated that the endonuclease complex ERCC1-XPF, which cleaves a 3′ DNA flap structure, limits L1 retrotransposition. Although the ERCC1-XPF endonuclease participates in several different DNA repair pathways, such as single-strand annealing, or in telomere maintenance, its recruitment to DNA lesions is best characterized in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. To determine if the NER pathway prevents the insertion of retroelements in the genome, we monitored the retrotransposition efficiencies of engineered L1 elements in NER-deficient cells and in their complemented versions. Core proteins of the NER pathway, XPD and XPA, and the lesion binding protein, XPC, are involved in limiting L1 retrotransposition. In addition, sequence analysis of recovered de novo L1 inserts and their genomic locations in NER-deficient cells demonstrated the presence of abnormally large duplications at the site of insertion, suggesting that NER proteins may also play a role in the normal L1 insertion process. Here, we propose new functions for the NER pathway in the maintenance of genome integrity: limitation of insertional mutations caused by retrotransposons and the prevention of potentially mutagenic large genomic duplications at the site of retrotransposon insertion events. PMID:28049704

  16. The Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway Limits L1 Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Servant, Geraldine; Streva, Vincent A; Derbes, Rebecca S; Wijetunge, Madushani I; Neeland, Marc; White, Travis B; Belancio, Victoria P; Roy-Engel, Astrid M; Deininger, Prescott L

    2017-01-01

    Long interspersed elements 1 (L1) are active mobile elements that constitute almost 17% of the human genome. They amplify through a "copy-and-paste" mechanism termed retrotransposition, and de novo insertions related to these elements have been reported to cause 0.2% of genetic diseases. Our previous data demonstrated that the endonuclease complex ERCC1-XPF, which cleaves a 3' DNA flap structure, limits L1 retrotransposition. Although the ERCC1-XPF endonuclease participates in several different DNA repair pathways, such as single-strand annealing, or in telomere maintenance, its recruitment to DNA lesions is best characterized in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. To determine if the NER pathway prevents the insertion of retroelements in the genome, we monitored the retrotransposition efficiencies of engineered L1 elements in NER-deficient cells and in their complemented versions. Core proteins of the NER pathway, XPD and XPA, and the lesion binding protein, XPC, are involved in limiting L1 retrotransposition. In addition, sequence analysis of recovered de novo L1 inserts and their genomic locations in NER-deficient cells demonstrated the presence of abnormally large duplications at the site of insertion, suggesting that NER proteins may also play a role in the normal L1 insertion process. Here, we propose new functions for the NER pathway in the maintenance of genome integrity: limitation of insertional mutations caused by retrotransposons and the prevention of potentially mutagenic large genomic duplications at the site of retrotransposon insertion events. Copyright © 2017 Servant et al.

  17. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control experiments with the denV1 excision-deficient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  18. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control, experiments with the denV/sub 1/ excision-deificient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  19. Base Excision Repair and Lesion-Dependent Subpathways for Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Svilar, David; Goellner, Eva M.; Almeida, Karen H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear and mitochondrial genomes are under continuous assault by a combination of environmentally and endogenously derived reactive oxygen species, inducing the formation and accumulation of mutagenic, toxic, and/or genome-destabilizing DNA lesions. Failure to resolve these lesions through one or more DNA-repair processes is associated with genome instability, mitochondrial dysfunction, neurodegeneration, inflammation, aging, and cancer, emphasizing the importance of characterizing the pathways and proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. This review focuses on the repair of oxidative damage–induced lesions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA mediated by the base excision repair (BER) pathway in mammalian cells. We discuss the multiple BER subpathways that are initiated by one of 11 different DNA glycosylases of three subtypes: (a) bifunctional with an associated β-lyase activity; (b) monofunctional; and (c) bifunctional with an associated β,δ-lyase activity. These three subtypes of DNA glycosylases all initiate BER but yield different chemical intermediates and hence different BER complexes to complete repair. Additionally, we briefly summarize alternate repair events mediated by BER proteins and the role of BER in the repair of mitochondrial DNA damage induced by ROS. Finally, we discuss the relation of BER and oxidative DNA damage in the onset of human disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 2491–2507. PMID:20649466

  20. Global genome nucleotide excision repair is organized into domains that promote efficient DNA repair in chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shirong; Evans, Katie; Bennett, Mark; Webster, Richard M.; Leadbitter, Matthew; Teng, Yumin; Waters, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The rates at which lesions are removed by DNA repair can vary widely throughout the genome, with important implications for genomic stability. To study this, we measured the distribution of nucleotide excision repair (NER) rates for UV-induced lesions throughout the budding yeast genome. By plotting these repair rates in relation to genes and their associated flanking sequences, we reveal that, in normal cells, genomic repair rates display a distinctive pattern, suggesting that DNA repair is highly organized within the genome. Furthermore, by comparing genome-wide DNA repair rates in wild-type cells and cells defective in the global genome–NER (GG-NER) subpathway, we establish how this alters the distribution of NER rates throughout the genome. We also examined the genomic locations of GG-NER factor binding to chromatin before and after UV irradiation, revealing that GG-NER is organized and initiated from specific genomic locations. At these sites, chromatin occupancy of the histone acetyl-transferase Gcn5 is controlled by the GG-NER complex, which regulates histone H3 acetylation and chromatin structure, thereby promoting efficient DNA repair of UV-induced lesions. Chromatin remodeling during the GG-NER process is therefore organized into these genomic domains. Importantly, loss of Gcn5 significantly alters the genomic distribution of NER rates; this has implications for the effects of chromatin modifiers on the distribution of mutations that arise throughout the genome. PMID:27470111

  1. Nucleotide excision repair in Trypanosoma brucei: specialization of transcription-coupled repair due to multigenic transcription

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Carlos R; Vieira-da-Rocha, João P; Mendes, Isabela Cecilia; Rajão, Matheus A; Marcello, Lucio; Bitar, Mainá; Drummond, Marcela G; Grynberg, Priscila; Oliveira, Denise A A; Marques, Catarina; Van Houten, Ben; McCulloch, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a highly conserved genome repair pathway acting on helix distorting DNA lesions. NER is divided into two subpathways: global genome NER (GG-NER), which is responsible for repair throughout genomes, and transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER), which acts on lesions that impede transcription. The extent of the Trypanosoma brucei genome that is transcribed is highly unusual, since most genes are organized in multigene transcription units, each transcribed from a single promoter. Given this transcription organization, we have addressed the importance of NER to T. brucei genome maintenance by performing RNAi against all predicted contributing factors. Our results indicate that TC-NER is the main pathway of NER repair, but only CSB, XPBz and XPG contribute. Moreover, we show that UV lesions are inefficiently repaired in T. brucei, perhaps due to preferential use of RNA polymerase translesion synthesis. RNAi of XPC and DDB was found to be lethal, and we show that these factors act in inter-strand cross-link repair. XPD and XPB appear only to act in transcription, not repair. This work indicates that the predominance of multigenic transcription in T. brucei has resulted in pronounced adaptation of NER relative to the host and may be an attractive drug target. PMID:24661334

  2. Base excision repair in Archaea: back to the future in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Stefano; Tell, Gianluca

    2014-09-01

    Together with Bacteria and Eukarya, Archaea represents one of the three domain of life. In contrast with the morphological difference existing between Archaea and Eukarya, these two domains are closely related. Phylogenetic analyses confirm this evolutionary relationship showing that most of the proteins involved in DNA transcription and replication are highly conserved. On the contrary, information is scanty about DNA repair pathways and their mechanisms. In the present review the most important proteins involved in base excision repair, namely glycosylases, AP lyases, AP endonucleases, polymerases, sliding clamps, flap endonucleases, and ligases, will be discussed and compared with bacterial and eukaryotic ones. Finally, possible applications and future perspectives derived from studies on Archaea and their repair pathways, will be taken into account.

  3. Hematopoietic myeloid cell differentiation diminishes nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yuki; Sato, Ayako; Mizutani, Shuki; Takagi, Masatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Myeloid cell differentiation is the process by which stem cells develop into mature monocytes or granulocytes. This process is achieved by the sequential activation of variety of genes. Disruption of this process can result in immunodeficiency, bone marrow failure syndrome, or leukemia. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the t(15;17) translocation and can be treated by a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline. This treatment can induce leukemic cell differentiation, leading to extremely high remission rates. XAB2, a molecule involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER), is downregulated during granulocyte differentiation and shows reduced expression in NB4 APL-derived cells in vitro. Differentiation of APL by ATRA treatment reduced XAB2 expression levels in vivo. These observations suggest that cellular differentiation is associated with reduced NER activity and provides new insights into combined differentiation induction. NB4 cells were more susceptible than the immature myeloid leukemic cell lines, Kasumi-3 and Kasumi-1, to the DNA interstrand crosslinking agent cisplatin.

  4. Regulation of WRN helicase activity in human base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Byungchan; Harrigan, Jeanine A; Indig, Fred E; Wilson, David M; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2004-12-17

    Werner syndrome patients are deficient in the Werner protein (WRN), which is a multifunctional nuclear protein possessing 3'-5' exonuclease and ATP-dependent helicase activities. Studies of Werner syndrome cells and biochemical studies of WRN suggest that WRN plays a role in several DNA metabolic pathways. WRN interacts with DNA polymerase beta (pol beta) and stimulates pol beta strand displacement synthesis on a base excision repair (BER) intermediate in a helicase-dependent manner. In this report, we examined the effect of the major human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) and of pol beta on WRN helicase activity. The results show that WRN alone is able to unwind several single strand break BER intermediates. However, APE1 inhibits WRN helicase activity on these intermediates. This inhibition is likely due to the binding of APE1 to nicked apurinic/apyrimidinic sites, suggesting that APE1 prevents the promiscuous unwinding of BER intermediates. This inhibitory effect was relieved by the presence of pol beta. A model involving the pol beta-mediated hand-off of WRN protein is proposed based on these results.

  5. The Fanconi Anaemia Components UBE2T and FANCM Are Functionally Linked to Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kelsall, Ian R.; Langenick, Judith; MacKay, Craig; Patel, Ketan J.; Alpi, Arno F.

    2012-01-01

    The many proteins that function in the Fanconi anaemia (FA) monoubiquitylation pathway initiate replicative DNA crosslink repair. However, it is not clear whether individual FA genes participate in DNA repair pathways other than homologous recombination and translesion bypass. Here we show that avian DT40 cell knockouts of two integral FA genes – UBE2T and FANCM are unexpectedly sensitive to UV-induced DNA damage. Comprehensive genetic dissection experiments indicate that both of these FA genes collaborate to promote nucleotide excision repair rather than translesion bypass to protect cells form UV genotoxicity. Furthermore, UBE2T deficiency impacts on the efficient removal of the UV-induced photolesion cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer. Therefore, this work reveals that the FA pathway shares two components with nucleotide excision repair, intimating not only crosstalk between the two major repair pathways, but also potentially identifying a UBE2T-mediated ubiquitin-signalling response pathway that contributes to nucleotide excision repair. PMID:22615860

  6. Chronic hypobaric hypoxia diminishes the expression of base excision repair OGG1 enzymes in spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Farias, J G; Zepeda, A; Castillo, R; Figueroa, E; Ademoyero, O T; Pulgar, V M

    2017-07-31

    Hypobaric hypoxia induces DNA damage in rat testicular cells, the production of defective spermatozoids and decreased sperm count, associated with an increase in oxidative stress. 8-Oxoguanine glycosylase (OGG1) enzymes are main members of the base excision repair (BER) system, a DNA repair mechanism. We determined the expression levels of mitochondrial and nuclear OGG1 isoforms in spermatozoa collected from cauda epididymis in rats exposed to chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) for 5, 15 and 30 days. CHH attenuates OGG1 expression in a time-dependent fashion, with a greater reduction in the mitochondrial isoform OGG1-2a (p < .05). Attenuation of the BER system may contribute to DNA damage under hypoxia exposure. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Excision repair of bulky lesions in the DNA of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R B; Grist, E

    1980-01-01

    The report examines the process of excision repair of pyrimidine dimers from uv-irradiated and chemically challenged human cells. It is shown by means of a sensitive endonuclease assay that the amount of excision observed depends upon the isotope used to label cells, and that XP heterozygotes are between normals and XPs. (ACR)

  8. Role of Rad23 and Dsk2 in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Spindle Pole Body Duplication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0310 TITLE: Role of Rad23 and Dsk2 in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Spindle Pole Body Duplication PRINCIPAL...Feb 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of Rad23 and Dsk2 in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Spindle Pole Body Duplication Sb. GRANT...Degradation, Cell Cycle, Spindle Pole Body 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON OF ABSTRACT OF

  9. An interplay of the base excision repair and mismatch repair pathways in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation (ADDM) in mammals occurs via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) by TET and/or deamination by AID/APOBEC family enzymes. The resulting 5mC derivatives are removed through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. At present, it is unclear how the cell manages to eliminate closely spaced 5mC residues whilst avoiding generation of toxic BER intermediates and whether alternative DNA repair pathways participate in ADDM. It has been shown that non-canonical DNA mismatch repair (ncMMR) can remove both alkylated and oxidized nucleotides from DNA. Here, a phagemid DNA containing oxidative base lesions and methylated sites are used to examine the involvement of various DNA repair pathways in ADDM in murine and human cell-free extracts. We demonstrate that, in addition to short-patch BER, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and uracil mispaired with guanine can be processed by ncMMR and long-patch BER with concomitant removal of distant 5mC residues. Furthermore, the presence of multiple mispairs in the same MMR nick/mismatch recognition region together with BER-mediated nick formation promotes proficient ncMMR resulting in the reactivation of an epigenetically silenced reporter gene in murine cells. These findings suggest cooperation between BER and ncMMR in the removal of multiple mismatches that might occur in mammalian cells during ADDM. PMID:26843430

  10. Delay of gap filling during nucleotide excision repair by base excision repair: the concept of competition exemplified by the effect of propolis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Tsai, Yi-Chih; Li, Pei-Yi; Liou, Chih-Chiang; Taniga, Ezhilan Sathyapriya; Chang, Dai-Wei; Mori, Toshio; Liu, Yin-Chang

    2011-08-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) consists of a sequence of events including DNA damage recognition, excision of the damage containing oligonucleotide, gap filling, and ligation. We found that gap filling during the repair of ultraviolet (UV)C-induced DNA lesions was inhibited by various compounds, e.g., amoxicillin, and mixtures, e.g., propolis, the materials that could induce oxidative DNA damage in serum-supplemented cell cultures. Such inhibitory effect was also demonstrated by the immunostaining experiment and host cell reactivation assay. In this study, we link the repair of oxidative DNA damage with the inhibition of gap filling. Our experimental evidence includes the following: (1) induction of oxidative DNA damage and inhibition of gap filling were quantitatively correlated; (2) although the repair of UV-induced DNA damage was delayed in the presence of propolis, the repair of propolis-induced oxidative DNA damage proceeded regardless of preexposure to UV radiation; (3) inhibition of gap filling by propolis was absent in base excision repair (BER)-deficient cells; (4) suppression of propolis-induced oxidative DNA damage by β-carotene abolished the inhibition of gap filling; and (5) inhibition of gap filling was also found with typical BER-inducing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, menadione, and methyl methanesulfonate. We propose that competition may occur between NER and BER, which results in delay of gap filling. Our study reveals the dominancy of BER over NER.

  11. DNA base excision repair of uracil residues in reconstituted nucleosome core particles

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Hilde; Lindahl, Tomas; Verreault, Alain

    2002-01-01

    The human base excision repair machinery must locate and repair DNA base damage present in chromatin, of which the nucleosome core particle is the basic repeating unit. Here, we have utilized fragments of the Lytechinus variegatus 5S rRNA gene containing site-specific U:A base pairs to investigate the base excision repair pathway in reconstituted nucleosome core particles in vitro. The human uracil-DNA glycosylases, UNG2 and SMUG1, were able to remove uracil from nucleosomes. Efficiency of uracil excision from nucleosomes was reduced 3- to 9-fold when compared with naked DNA, and was essentially uniform along the length of the DNA substrate irrespective of rotational position on the core particle. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the excision repair pathway of an abasic site can be reconstituted on core particles using the known repair enzymes, AP-endonuclease 1, DNA polymerase β and DNA ligase III. Thus, base excision repair can proceed in nucleosome core particles in vitro, but the repair efficiency is limited by the reduced activity of the uracil-DNA glycosylases and DNA polymerase β on nucleosome cores. PMID:12411511

  12. Base excision DNA repair in the embryonic development of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Torgasheva, Natalya A; Menzorova, Natalya I; Sibirtsev, Yurii T; Rasskazov, Valery A; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-06-21

    In actively proliferating cells, such as the cells of the developing embryo, DNA repair is crucial for preventing the accumulation of mutations and synchronizing cell division. Sea urchin embryo growth was analyzed and extracts were prepared. The relative activity of DNA polymerase, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, uracil-DNA glycosylase, 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase, and other glycosylases was analyzed using specific oligonucleotide substrates of these enzymes; the reaction products were resolved by denaturing 20% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We have characterized the profile of several key base excision repair activities in the developing embryos (2 blastomers to mid-pluteus) of the grey sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus intermedius. The uracil-DNA glycosylase specific activity sharply increased after blastula hatching, whereas the specific activity of 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase steadily decreased over the course of the development. The AP-endonuclease activity gradually increased but dropped at the last sampled stage (mid-pluteus 2). The DNA polymerase activity was high at the first cleavage division and then quickly decreased, showing a transient peak at blastula hatching. It seems that the developing sea urchin embryo encounters different DNA-damaging factors early in development within the protective envelope and later as a free-floating larva, with hatching necessitating adaptation to the shift in genotoxic stress conditions. No correlation was observed between the dynamics of the enzyme activities and published gene expression data from developing congeneric species, S. purpuratus. The results suggest that base excision repair enzymes may be regulated in the sea urchin embryos at the level of covalent modification or protein stability.

  13. Aag-initiated base excision repair promotes ischemia reperfusion injury in liver, brain, and kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Daneshmand, Ali; Mazumder, Aprotim; Allocca, Mariacarmela; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Abolhassani, Nona; Jhun, Iny; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ayata, Cenk; Samson, Leona D.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is accompanied by the release of highly reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) that damage DNA, among other cellular molecules. Base excision repair (BER) is initiated by DNA glycosylases and is crucial in repairing RONS-induced DNA damage; the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag/Mpg) excises several DNA base lesions induced by the inflammation-associated RONS release that accompanies ischemia reperfusion (I/R). Using mouse I/R models we demonstrate that Aag−/− mice are significantly protected against, rather than sensitized to, I/R injury, and that such protection is observed across three different organs. Following I/R in liver, kidney, and brain, Aag−/− mice display decreased hepatocyte death, cerebral infarction, and renal injury relative to wild-type. We infer that in wild-type mice, Aag excises damaged DNA bases to generate potentially toxic abasic sites that in turn generate highly toxic DNA strand breaks that trigger poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (Parp) hyperactivation, cellular bioenergetics failure, and necrosis; indeed, steady-state levels of abasic sites and nuclear PAR polymers were significantly more elevated in wild-type vs. Aag−/− liver after I/R. This increase in PAR polymers was accompanied by depletion of intracellular NAD and ATP levels plus the translocation and extracellular release of the high-mobility group box 1 (Hmgb1) nuclear protein, activating the sterile inflammatory response. We thus demonstrate the detrimental effects of Aag-initiated BER during I/R and sterile inflammation, and present a novel target for controlling I/R-induced injury. PMID:25349415

  14. Aag-initiated base excision repair promotes ischemia reperfusion injury in liver, brain, and kidney.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Daneshmand, Ali; Mazumder, Aprotim; Allocca, Mariacarmela; Calvo, Jennifer A; Abolhassani, Nona; Jhun, Iny; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ayata, Cenk; Samson, Leona D

    2014-11-11

    Inflammation is accompanied by the release of highly reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) that damage DNA, among other cellular molecules. Base excision repair (BER) is initiated by DNA glycosylases and is crucial in repairing RONS-induced DNA damage; the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag/Mpg) excises several DNA base lesions induced by the inflammation-associated RONS release that accompanies ischemia reperfusion (I/R). Using mouse I/R models we demonstrate that Aag(-/-) mice are significantly protected against, rather than sensitized to, I/R injury, and that such protection is observed across three different organs. Following I/R in liver, kidney, and brain, Aag(-/-) mice display decreased hepatocyte death, cerebral infarction, and renal injury relative to wild-type. We infer that in wild-type mice, Aag excises damaged DNA bases to generate potentially toxic abasic sites that in turn generate highly toxic DNA strand breaks that trigger poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (Parp) hyperactivation, cellular bioenergetics failure, and necrosis; indeed, steady-state levels of abasic sites and nuclear PAR polymers were significantly more elevated in wild-type vs. Aag(-/-) liver after I/R. This increase in PAR polymers was accompanied by depletion of intracellular NAD and ATP levels plus the translocation and extracellular release of the high-mobility group box 1 (Hmgb1) nuclear protein, activating the sterile inflammatory response. We thus demonstrate the detrimental effects of Aag-initiated BER during I/R and sterile inflammation, and present a novel target for controlling I/R-induced injury.

  15. The effect of triceps repair techniques following olecranon excision on elbow stability and extension strength: an in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Louis M; Bell, Timothy H; Johnson, James A; King, Graham J W

    2011-07-01

    To determine the effect of two types of triceps repair techniques on elbow stability and extension strength in the setting of olecranon deficiency using a cadaveric model. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric arms were tested in an elbow motion simulator, which produced active elbow extension by applying physiological loads to the tendons. Computed tomography-based surface models were used to determine cutting planes corresponding to sequential levels of olecranon resection. Both anterior and posterior triceps repairs were simulated for each level. Progressive sectioning of the olecranon increased elbow laxity for both active and passive extension (P < 0.001). Although the posterior repair resulted in greater laxity than the anterior repair for all but the 50% resection, this difference was small (less than 3°) and not statistically significant for either active (P = 0.2) or passive (P = 0.1) extension. Active extension produced less joint laxity than passive extension for both the anterior (P = 0.007) and posterior (P = 0.001) repairs. The posterior repair provided greater extension strength than the anterior repair at all applied triceps tensions and for all olecranon resections (P = 0.01). Both repairs reduced extension strength relative to the intact state (P < 0.01). Sequential olecranon excision decreased extension strength (P = 0.04); however, there were no differences between resection levels (P > 0.05). On average, there was a loss of extension strength of 24% and 30% for the posterior and anterior repairs, respectively. There was no significant difference in stability between repair techniques. Posterior repair of the triceps after olecranon excision would thus appear to be efficacious as a result of its higher triceps extension strength. However, clinical studies are needed to confirm these in vitro observations.

  16. Crosstalk between mismatch repair and base excision repair in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, Valeria; Leuzzi, Giuseppe; Basile, Giorgia; D'Errico, Mariarosaria; Fortini, Paola; Franchitto, Annapaola; Viti, Valentina; Brown, Ashley R; Parlanti, Eleonora; Pascucci, Barbara; Palli, Domenico; Giuliani, Alessandro; Palombo, Fabio; Sobol, Robert W; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2016-06-20

    DNA repair gene expression in a set of gastric cancers suggested an inverse association between the expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 and that of the base excision repair (BER) gene DNA polymerase β (Polβ). To gain insight into possible crosstalk of these two repair pathways in cancer, we analysed human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells over-expressing Polβ or Polβ active site mutants, alone or in combination with MLH1 silencing. Next, we investigated the cellular response to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the purine analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG), agents that induce lesions that are substrates for BER and/or MMR. AGS cells over-expressing Polβ were resistant to 6-TG to a similar extent as when MLH1 was inactivated while inhibition of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was required to detect resistance to MMS. Upon either treatment, the association with MLH1 down-regulation further amplified the resistant phenotype. Moreover, AGS cells mutated in Polβ were hypersensitive to both 6-TG and MMS killing and their sensitivity was partially rescued by MLH1 silencing. We provide evidence that the critical lethal lesions in this new pathway are double strand breaks that are exacerbated when Polβ is defective and relieved when MLH1 is silenced. In conclusion, we provide evidence of crosstalk between MLH1 and Polβ that modulates the response to alkylation damage. These studies suggest that the Polβ/MLH1 status should be taken into consideration when designing chemotherapeutic approaches for gastric cancer.

  17. A new nucleotide-excision-repair gene associated with the disorder trichothiodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanini, M.; Giliani, S. ); Vermuelen, W.; Weeda, G.; Hoeijmakers, H.J.; Mezzina, M.; Sarasin, A.; Harper, J.I.; Arlett, C.F.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1993-10-01

    The sun-sensitive, cancer-prone genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is associated in most cases with a defect in the ability to carry out excision repair of UV damage. Seven genetically distinct complementation groups (i.e., A-G) have been identified. A large proportion of patients with the unrelated disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD), which is characterized by hair-shaft abnormalities, as well as by physical and mental retardation, are also deficient in excision repair of UV damage. In most of these cases the repair deficiency is in the same complementation group as is XP group D. The authors report here on cells from a patient, TTD1BR, in which the repair defect complements all known XP groups (including XP-D). Furthermore, microinjection of various cloned human repair genes fails to correct the repair defect in this cell strain. The defect in TTD1BR cells is therefore in a new gene involved in excision repair in human cells. The finding of a second DNA repair gene that is associated with the clinical features of TTD argues strongly for an involvement of repair proteins in hair-shaft development. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Genome-wide kinetics of DNA excision repair in relation to chromatin state and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Adar, Sheera; Hu, Jinchuan; Lieb, Jason D; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-04-12

    We recently developed a high-resolution genome-wide assay for mapping DNA excision repair named eXcision Repair-sequencing (XR-seq) and have now used XR-seq to determine which regions of the genome are subject to repair very soon after UV exposure and which regions are repaired later. Over a time course, we measured repair of the UV-induced damage of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) (at 1, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 h) and (6-4)pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts [(6-4)PPs] (at 5 and 20 min and 1, 2, and 4 h) in normal human skin fibroblasts. Each type of damage has distinct repair kinetics. The (6-4)PPs are detected as early as 5 min after UV treatment, with the bulk of repair completed by 4 h. Repair of CPDs, which we previously showed is intimately coupled to transcription, is slower and in certain regions persists even 2 d after UV irradiation. We compared our results to the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements data regarding histone modifications, chromatin state, and transcription. For both damage types, and for both transcription-coupled and general excision repair, the earliest repair occurred preferentially in active and open chromatin states. Conversely, repair in regions classified as "heterochromatic" and "repressed" was relatively low at early time points, with repair persisting into the late time points. Damage that remains during DNA replication increases the risk for mutagenesis. Indeed, late-repaired regions are associated with a higher level of cancer-linked mutations. In summary, we show that XR-seq is a powerful approach for studying relationships among chromatin state, DNA repair, genome stability, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis.

  19. Enhanced nucleotide excision repair capacity in lung cancer cells by preconditioning with DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Ye; Park, Jeong-Min; Yi, Joo Mi; Leem, Sun-Hee; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2015-09-08

    The capacity of tumor cells for nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a major determinant of the efficacy of and resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin. Here, we demonstrate that using lesion-specific monoclonal antibodies, NER capacity is enhanced in human lung cancer cells after preconditioning with DNA-damaging agents. Preconditioning of cells with a nonlethal dose of UV radiation facilitated the kinetics of subsequent cisplatin repair and vice versa. Dual-incision assay confirmed that the enhanced NER capacity was sustained for 2 days. Checkpoint activation by ATR kinase and expression of NER factors were not altered significantly by the preconditioning, whereas association of XPA, the rate-limiting factor in NER, with chromatin was accelerated. In preconditioned cells, SIRT1 expression was increased, and this resulted in a decrease in acetylated XPA. Inhibition of SIRT1 abrogated the preconditioning-induced predominant XPA binding to DNA lesions. Taking these data together, we conclude that upregulated NER capacity in preconditioned lung cancer cells is caused partly by an increased level of SIRT1, which modulates XPA sensitivity to DNA damage. This study provides some insights into the molecular mechanism of chemoresistance through acquisition of enhanced DNA repair capacity in cancer cells.

  20. The Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway Protects Borrelia burgdorferi from Nitrosative Stress in Ixodes scapularis Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Bourret, Travis J.; Lawrence, Kevin A.; Shaw, Jeff A.; Lin, Tao; Norris, Steven J.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    2016-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi encounters a wide range of environmental conditions as it cycles between ticks of the genus Ixodes and its various mammalian hosts. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are potent antimicrobial molecules generated during the innate immune response to infection, however, it is unclear whether ROS and RNS pose a significant challenge to B. burgdorferi in vivo. In this study, we screened a library of B. burgdorferi strains with mutations in DNA repair genes for increased susceptibility to ROS or RNS in vitro. Strains with mutations in the methyl-directed mismatch repair gene mutS1 are hypersensitive to killing by ROS, while strains lacking the nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene uvrB show increased susceptibility to both ROS and RNS. Therefore, mutS1-deficient and uvrB-deficient strains were compared for their ability to complete their infectious cycle in Swiss Webster mice and I. scapularis ticks to help identify sites of oxidative and nitrosative stresses encountered by B. burgdorferi in vivo. Both mutS1 and uvrB were dispensable for infection of mice, while uvrB promoted the survival of spirochetes in I. scapularis ticks. The decreased survival of uvrB-deficient B. burgdorferi was associated with the generation of RNS in I. scapularis midguts and salivary glands during feeding. Collectively, these data suggest that B. burgdorferi must withstand cytotoxic levels of RNS produced during infection of I. scapularis ticks. PMID:27656169

  1. Differentiation-dependent p53 regulation of nucleotide excision repair in keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Li, G.; Ho, V. C.; Mitchell, D. L.; Trotter, M. J.; Tron, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    The role of the tumor suppressor p53 in repair of ultraviolet light (UV)-induced DNA damage was evaluated using a host-cell reactivation (HCR) assay. HCR determines a cell's ability to repair UV-damaged DNA through reactivation of a transfected CAT reported plasmid. Most UV damage is removed through nucleotide excision repair (NER). Primary murine keratinocytes isolated from p53-deficient and wild-type p53 mice were used in the HCR assay. The NER was reduced in p53-/- keratinocytes as compared with p53+/+ keratinocytes. The reduced DNA repair in p53-/- mice was confirmed with a radioimmunoassay comparing cyclobutane dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) photoproducts in p53+/+ and p53-/- keratinocytes after the cells were exposed to UV irradiation. Our results demonstrate that wildtype p53 plays a significant role in regulating NER. Furthermore, as there is evidence that p53 protein levels decrease after keratinocytes become differentiated, we sought to determine whether p53 plays a role in NER in differentiated keratinocytes. Differentiation of the keratinocytes by increasing the Ca2+ concentration in the culture media resulted in a marked reduction in NER equally in both p53+/+ and p53-/- groups. This finding suggests that reduced DNA repair after differentiation is p53 independent. A similar reduction in HCR was confirmed in differentiated human keratinocytes. These data, taken together, indicate that p53 or p53-regulated proteins enhance NER in basal undifferentiated keratinocytes but not in differentiated cells. As nonmelanoma skin cancers originate from the basal keratinocytes, our findings suggest that loss of p53 may contribute to the pathogenesis of this common skin cancer. PMID:9095000

  2. Regulation of base excision repair in eukaryotes by dynamic localization strategies.

    PubMed

    Swartzlander, Daniel B; Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discusses base excision repair (BER) and the known mechanisms defined thus far regulating BER in eukaryotes. Unlike the situation with nucleotide excision repair and double-strand break repair, little is known about how BER is regulated to allow for efficient and accurate repair of many types of DNA base damage in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Regulation of BER has been proposed to occur at multiple, different levels including transcription, posttranslational modification, protein-protein interactions, and protein localization; however, none of these regulatory mechanisms characterized thus far affect a large spectrum of BER proteins. This chapter discusses a recently discovered mode of BER regulation defined in budding yeast cells that involves mobilization of DNA repair proteins to DNA-containing organelles in response to genotoxic stress.

  3. Removal of N-6-methyladenine by the nucleotide excision repair pathway triggers the repair of mismatches in yeast gap-repair intermediates.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-12-01

    Gap-repair assays have been an important tool for studying the genetic control of homologous recombination in yeast. Sequence analysis of recombination products derived when a gapped plasmid is diverged relative to the chromosomal repair template additionally has been used to infer structures of strand-exchange intermediates. In the absence of the canonical mismatch repair pathway, mismatches present in these intermediates are expected to persist and segregate at the next round of DNA replication. In a mismatch repair defective (mlh1Δ) background, however, we have observed that recombination-generated mismatches are often corrected to generate gene conversion or restoration events. In the analyses reported here, the source of the aberrant mismatch removal during gap repair was examined. We find that most mismatch removal is linked to the methylation status of the plasmid used in the gap-repair assay. Whereas more than half of Dam-methylated plasmids had patches of gene conversion and/or restoration interspersed with unrepaired mismatches, mismatch removal was observed in less than 10% of products obtained when un-methylated plasmids were used in transformation experiments. The methylation-linked removal of mismatches in recombination intermediates was due specifically to the nucleotide excision repair pathway, with such mismatch removal being partially counteracted by glycosylases of the base excision repair pathway. These data demonstrate that nucleotide excision repair activity is not limited to bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions, but also targets removal of very modest perturbations in DNA structure. In addition to its effects on mismatch removal, methylation reduced the overall gap-repair efficiency, but this reduction was not affected by the status of excision repair pathways. Finally, gel purification of DNA prior to transformation reduced gap-repair efficiency four-fold in a nucleotide excision repair-defective background, indicating that the collateral

  4. The ING1b tumor suppressor facilitates nucleotide excision repair by promoting chromatin accessibility to XPA

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Wei-Hung W.; Wang Yemin; Wong, Ronald P.C.; Campos, Eric I.; Li Gang . E-mail: gangli@interchange.ubc.ca

    2007-05-01

    ING1b is the most studied ING family protein and perhaps the most ubiquitously and abundantly expressed. This protein is involved in the regulation of various biological functions ranging from senescence, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, to DNA repair. ING1b is upregulated by UV irradiation and enhances the removal of bulky nucleic acid photoproducts. In this study, we provide evidence that ING1b mediates nucleotide excision repair by facilitating the access to damaged nucleosomal DNA. We demonstrate that ING1b is not recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions but enhances nucleotide excision repair only in XPC-proficient cells, implying an essential role in early steps of the 'access, repair, restore' model. We also find that ING1b alters histone acetylation dynamics upon exposure to UV radiation and induces chromatin relaxation in microccocal nuclease digestion assay, revealing that ING1b may allow better access to nucleotide excision repair machinery. More importantly, ING1b associates with chromatin in a UV-inducible manner and facilitates DNA access to nucleotide excision repair factor XPA. Furthermore, depletion of the endogenous ING1b results to the sensitization of cells at S-phase to UV irradiation. Taken together, these observations establish a role of ING1b acting as a chromatin accessibility factor for DNA damage recognition proteins upon genotoxic injury.

  5. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Vitamin D—Relevance for Skin Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Wysokinski, Daniel; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is involved in almost all skin cancer cases, but on the other hand, it stimulates the production of pre-vitamin D3, whose active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25VD3), plays important physiological functions on binding with its receptor (vitamin D receptor, VDR). UV-induced DNA damages in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or (6-4)-pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts are frequently found in skin cancer and its precursors. Therefore, removing these lesions is essential for the prevention of skin cancer. As UV-induced DNA damages are repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER), the interaction of 1,25VD3 with NER components can be important for skin cancer transformation. Several studies show that 1,25VD3 protects DNA against damage induced by UV, but the exact mechanism of this protection is not completely clear. 1,25VD3 was also shown to affect cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in several signaling pathways, so it can be considered as a potential modulator of the cellular DNA damage response, which is crucial for mutagenesis and cancer transformation. 1,25VD3 was shown to affect DNA repair and potentially NER through decreasing nitrosylation of DNA repair enzymes by NO overproduction by UV, but other mechanisms of the interaction between 1,25VD3 and NER machinery also are suggested. Therefore, the array of NER gene functioning could be analyzed and an appropriate amount of 1.25VD3 could be recommended to decrease UV-induced DNA damage important for skin cancer transformation. PMID:27058533

  6. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Vitamin D--Relevance for Skin Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Wysokinski, Daniel; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-04-06

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is involved in almost all skin cancer cases, but on the other hand, it stimulates the production of pre-vitamin D3, whose active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25VD3), plays important physiological functions on binding with its receptor (vitamin D receptor, VDR). UV-induced DNA damages in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or (6-4)-pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts are frequently found in skin cancer and its precursors. Therefore, removing these lesions is essential for the prevention of skin cancer. As UV-induced DNA damages are repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER), the interaction of 1,25VD3 with NER components can be important for skin cancer transformation. Several studies show that 1,25VD3 protects DNA against damage induced by UV, but the exact mechanism of this protection is not completely clear. 1,25VD3 was also shown to affect cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in several signaling pathways, so it can be considered as a potential modulator of the cellular DNA damage response, which is crucial for mutagenesis and cancer transformation. 1,25VD3 was shown to affect DNA repair and potentially NER through decreasing nitrosylation of DNA repair enzymes by NO overproduction by UV, but other mechanisms of the interaction between 1,25VD3 and NER machinery also are suggested. Therefore, the array of NER gene functioning could be analyzed and an appropriate amount of 1.25VD3 could be recommended to decrease UV-induced DNA damage important for skin cancer transformation.

  7. Substrate overlap and functional competition between human nucleotide excision repair and Escherichia coli photolyase and (A)BC excision nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Sibghat-Ullah; Sancar, Z. )

    1990-06-19

    Human cell free extract prepared by the method of Manley et al. carries out repair synthesis on UV-irradiated DNA. Removal of pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation with DNA photolyase reduces repair synthesis by about 50%. With excess enzyme in the reaction mixture photolyase reduced the repair signal by the same amount even in the absence of photoreactivating light, presumably by binding to pyrimidine dimers and interfering with the binding of human damage recognition protein. Similarly, the UvrB subunit of Escherichia coli (A)BC excinuclease when loaded onto UV-irradiated or psoralen-adducted DNA inhibited repair synthesis by cell-free extract by 75-80%. The opposite was true also as HeLa cell free extract specifically inhibited the photorepair of a thymine dimer by DNA photolyase and its removal by (A)BC excinuclease. Cell-free extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A and C were equally effective in blocking the E. coli repair proteins, while extracts from complementation groups D and E were ineffective in blocking the E. coli enzyme. These results suggest that XP-D and XP-E cells are defective in the damage recognition subunits(s) of human excision nuclease.

  8. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, A.S.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhães, L.A.G.; Paoli, F.

    2015-01-01

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T4endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T4endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers:i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells,ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, andiv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers. PMID:26445337

  9. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, A S; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F

    2015-07-10

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T4 endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T4 endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers: i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells, ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, and iv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers.

  10. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, A S; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F

    2015-10-01

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T4endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T4endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers:i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells,ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, andiv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers.

  11. Studying nucleotide excision repair of mammalian DNA in a cell-free system

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    During nucleotide excision repair, a multiprotein system locates a lesion in DNA and catalyzes enzymatic cleavage of the altered strand. The damaged oligonucleotide and the incision proteins are then displaced, DNA synthesis proceeds to form a short patch using the nonmodified strand as a template, and repair is completed by a DNA ligase. Many gene products participate in these reactions, the best known of which correspond to the seven genetic complementation groups XP-A to XP-G of the disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Cells representing any of these XP groups appear to exhibit, to varying degrees, defects in the first steps of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals affected with XP are hypersensitive to sunlight; most have a predisposition to skin cancer, and some patients show severe neurological abnormalities. In addition to XP, other UV-sensitive mutants of mammalian cells are providing insight into nucleotide excision repair. Of particular interest are mutants isolated from the rodent cells, which have been assigned to 11 different complementation groups. Human genes that can correct the repair defects of rodent mutants in these complementation groups are denoted. ERCC (excision repair cross-complementing) genes are are referred to by number, ERCC1 to ERCC11. Some of these genes are proving to be equivalent to particular XP-complementing genes, while others are distinct. The process of nucleotide excision repair is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes, and functional homologues of many of the ERCC and XP genes have been identified in other organisms; studies in yeast are proving to be particularly informative.

  12. Base excision DNA repair defect in Gadd45a-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, H J; Kim, E H; Mun, J-Y; Park, S; Smith, M L; Han, S S; Seo, Y R

    2007-11-29

    As one of a number of p53-regulated genes, Gadd45a (growth arrest and DNA damage inducible gene) has been shown to delay carcinogenesis and decrease mutation frequency. Gadd45a is known to regulate nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) in response to UV radiation. Here, we report an emerging role for Gadd45a in base excision repair (BER). Gadd45a-null mouse embryo fibroblasts MEF and gadd45a-deficient human colon cancer cells exhibited slow BER after treatment with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) a pure base-damaging agent. In addition, removal of AP sites by apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor 1 (APE1/Ref1) was significantly delayed in gadd45a-null cells. Moreover, the localization of APE1/Ref1 within the nucleus was observed in gadd45a wild-type cells, whereas APE1 become mainly distributed in the cytoplasm, and there is a reduced interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in Gadd45a-deficient cells. Inasmuch as p53 has been shown to regulate BER in addition to the NER pathway, our data suggest that p53-regulated gene Gadd45a contributes to the BER response by affecting the interaction of cellular APE1/Ref1 with PCNA. Gadd45a might be a key component gene of the p53 pathway involved in protection from carcinogenic base damage and maintenance of genomic stability, although the downstream mechanism including APE1/Ref1 will need further study.

  13. Completion of excision repair patches in human cell preparations: identification of a probable mode of excision and resynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1984-03-01

    Excision repair of u.v. damage in human fibroblasts is more sensitive to inhibitors of DNA polymerase alpha (cytosine arabinoside, aphidicolin) than to an inhibitor of polymerase beta (dideoxythymidine), which indicates a greater role in repair for polymerase alpha than for polymerase beta. These inhibitors all generate shortened patches with free 3' termini; the detailed structure of these patches was investigated in permeable cells or isolated nuclei by degradation of DNA with exonuclease III and by resynthesis with DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) and T4 DNA ligase. The structure of the shortened patches appears to be a short stretch of DNA synthesized in the 5'----3' direction within a longer single-strand gap. The single-strand gap ahead of the 3' terminus can be bridged only by the combined action of polymerase and ligase. This structure implies that excision must involve removal of an oligonucleotide or widening of a gap by 5'----3' exonuclease action to produce a single-strand region wide enough to be a substrate for polymerase alpha. There is no evidence for structures generated by nick translation or strand displacement.

  14. Sensitivity of excision repair in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum variant and Cockayne's syndrome fibroblasts to inhibition by cytosine arabinoside

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1981-08-01

    Inhibition of the gap-filling, polymerizing step of excision repair by 1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) after irradiation with ultraviolet light in human diploid fibroblasts resulted in the formation of persistent DNA strand breaks in G/sub 1/, G/sub 2/, and plateau phase cells, but not in S phase cells. Addition of hydroxyurea to ara-C resulted in partial inhibition of repair in S phase cells. These observations can be explained either in terms of changing roles in repair for different DNA polymerases throughout the cell cycle or by the presence of a pool of deoxycytidine nucleotides during S phase equivalent to an external source of deoxycytidine at 50 ..mu..M concentration. A similar concentration dependence on ara-C was observed for inhibition of repair in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) variant, and Cockayne's syndrome cells. Ara-C produced a similar number of breaks in normal and Cockayne's syndrome cells. Ara-C produced a similar number of breaks in normal and Cockayne's syndrome cells but slightly more in XP variant cells. Exonuclease III and S1 nuclease independently both degraded about 50% of the /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporated into repaired regions in the presence of ara-C. Sequential digestion with both enzymes degraded nearly 90% of the repaired regions. These observations can be explained if excision repair proceeds by displacing the damaged strand so that both the /sup 3/H-labeled patch and the damaged region are still ligated to high molecular weight DNA and compete for the same complementary strand during in vitro incubation with the nucleases. The amount of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporated in DNA by repair decreased with increasing concentrations of ara-C and hydroxyurea, suggesting that the incomplete patches became shorter under these conditions. Extrapolation of the digestion kinetics with exonuclease III permits an estimate of the normal patch size of about 100 nucleotides, consistent with previous estimates.

  15. Single-nucleotide patch base excision repair of uracil in DNA by mitochondrial protein extracts.

    PubMed

    Stierum, R H; Dianov, G L; Bohr, V A

    1999-09-15

    Mammalian mitochondria contain several 16.5 kb circular DNAs (mtDNA) encoding electron transport chain proteins. Reactive oxygen species formed as byproducts from oxidative phosphorylation in these organelles can cause oxidative deamination of cytosine and lead to uracil in mtDNA. Upon mtDNA replication, these lesions, if unrepaired, can lead to mutations. Until recently, it was thought that there was no DNA repair in mitochondria, but lately there is evidence that some lesions are efficiently repaired in these organelles. In the study of nuclear DNA repair, the in vitro repair measurements in cell extracts have provided major insights into the mechanisms. The use of whole-cell extract based DNA repair methods has revealed that mammalian nuclear base excision repair (BER) diverges into two pathways: the single-nucleotide replacement and long patch repair mechanisms. Similar in vitro methods have not been available for the study of mitochondrial BER. We have established an in vitro DNA repair system supported by rat liver mitochondrial protein extract and DNA substrates containing a single uracil opposite to a guanine. Using this approach, we examined the repair pathways and the identity of the DNA polymerase involved in mitochondrial BER (mtBER). Employing restriction analysis of in vitro repaired DNA to map the repair patch size, we demonstrate that only one nucleotide is incorporated during the repair process. Thus, in contrast to BER in the nucleus, mtBER of uracil in DNA is solely accomplished by single-nucleotide replacement.

  16. Analysis of Ribonucleotide Removal from DNA by Human Nucleotide Excision Repair.

    PubMed

    Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Kemp, Michael G; Hu, Jinchuan; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-12-11

    Ribonucleotides are incorporated into the genome during DNA replication. The enzyme RNase H2 plays a critical role in targeting the removal of these ribonucleotides from DNA, and defects in RNase H2 activity are associated with both genomic instability and the human autoimmune/inflammatory disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. Whether additional general DNA repair mechanisms contribute to ribonucleotide removal from DNA in human cells is not known. Because of its ability to act on a wide variety of substrates, we examined a potential role for canonical nucleotide excision repair in the removal of ribonucleotides from DNA. However, using highly sensitive dual incision/excision assays, we find that ribonucleotides are not efficiently targeted by the human nucleotide excision repair system in vitro or in cultured human cells. These results suggest that nucleotide excision repair is unlikely to play a major role in the cellular response to ribonucleotide incorporation in genomic DNA in human cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR GENES AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County, China is among the highest in the country and has been etiologically attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NE...

  18. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR GENES AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County, China is among the highest in the country and has been etiologically attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NE...

  19. Role of ATP in UV-induced DNA excision repair in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dresler, S.L.

    1986-05-01

    In permeable human fibroblasts, UV-induced DNA excision repair is dependent on ATP, with a K/sub m/ of approximately 1 mM. Omission of ATP from the reaction mix completely inhibits damage-specific incision of DNA, but has little effect on repair patch synthesis proceeding from previously incised sites. UV-induced excision repair in permeable xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells complemented with T4 UV endonuclease is also totally dependent on ATP. Because the T4 enzyme is not ATP-dependent, ATP must be required for an endogenous activity other than the incision of damaged DNA. Alkaline elution reveals that, in the absence of ATP, T4 UV endonuclease does incise the DNA of permeable UV-irradiated XP cells, but that the incision rate is stimulated approximately 2-fold by the addition of ATP. This 2-fold stimulation of incision can not, however, be responsible for the absolute ATP dependence of excision repair in UV endonuclease-complemented XP cells. Apparently, although T4 UV endonuclease can incise damaged nuclear DNA in the absence of ATP, the incised sites must also be altered in an ATP-dependent reaction before subsequent steps of the repair process can proceed. This conclusion, coupled with the fact that ATP stimulates incision of damaged nuclear DNA by T4 UV endonuclease and is absolutely required for incision of damaged nuclear DNA by the endogenous human UV endonuclease, suggests that an important function of the early ATP-dependent step in UV-induced excision repair is to make damaged sites in DNA accessible to repair enzymes.

  20. Nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination systems commit differentially to the repair of DNA-protein crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiaki; Morishita, Soh; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Matsubara, Mayumi; Horikawa, Yusuke; Terato, Hiroaki; Salem, Amir M H; Izumi, Shunsuke; Pack, Seung Pil; Makino, Keisuke; Ide, Hiroshi

    2007-10-12

    DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs)-where proteins are covalently trapped on the DNA strand-block the progression of replication and transcription machineries and hence hamper the faithful transfer of genetic information. However, the repair mechanism of DPCs remains largely elusive. Here we have analyzed the roles of nucleotide excision repair (NER) and homologous recombination (HR) in the repair of DPCs both in vitro and in vivo using a bacterial system. Several lines of biochemical and genetic evidence show that both NER and HR commit to the repair or tolerance of DPCs, but differentially. NER repairs DPCs with crosslinked proteins of sizes less than 12-14 kDa, whereas oversized DPCs are processed exclusively by RecBCD-dependent HR. These results highlight how NER and HR are coordinated when cells need to deal with unusually bulky DNA lesions such as DPCs.

  1. Modeling the induced mutation process in bacterial cells with defects in excision repair system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugay, A. N.; Vasilyeva, M. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Parkhomenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli cells with defects in the uvrA and polA genes has been developed. The model describes in detail the reaction kinetics for the excision repair system. The number of mismatches as a result of translesion synthesis is calculated for both wild-type and mutant cells. The effect of temporal modulation of the number of single-stranded DNA during postreplication repair has been predicted. A comparison of effectiveness of different repair systems has been conducted.

  2. Accessing DNA damage in chromatin: Preparing the chromatin landscape for base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Yesenia; Hinz, John M; Smerdon, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    DNA damage in chromatin comes in many forms, including single base lesions that induce base excision repair (BER). We and others have shown that the structural location of DNA lesions within nucleosomes greatly influences their accessibility to repair enzymes. Indeed, a difference in the location of uracil as small as one-half turn of the DNA backbone on the histone surface can result in a 10-fold difference in the time course of its removal in vitro. In addition, the cell has evolved several interdependent processes capable of enhancing the accessibility of excision repair enzymes to DNA lesions in nucleosomes, including post-translational modification of histones, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and interchange of histone variants in nucleosomes. In this review, we focus on different factors that affect accessibility of BER enzymes to nucleosomal DNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of Three Surgical Methods in Treatment of Patients with Pilonidal Sinus: Modified Excision and Repair/Wide Excision/Wide Excision and Flap in RASOUL, OMID and SADR Hospitals( 2004-2007).

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Heidari, Afshin; Jafarnejad, Babak

    2013-10-01

    This study is a comparison between three methods that are frequently used for the surgical treatment of pilonidal disease all over the world: modified excision and repair, wide excision and secondary repair, and wide excision and flap. The first technique is done by our group for the first time, and has not been described previously in the literature. This is an interventional study performed at Omid, Sadr, and Rasoul Akram hospitals on patients who had undergone operation because of pilonidal sinus disease and met the inclusion criteria between 2004 and 2007. Exclusion criteria were (1) acute pilonidal sinus diseases, (2) history of pilonidal sinus surgery, (3) history of systemic diseases (DM, malignancy, etc.), and (4) pilonidal abscess. Essential information was extracted from complete medical archives. Any data not available in files or during follow-up visits (all patients supposed to be followed at least for 1 year) were gathered by a telephone interview. A total of 194 patients met the criteria and had complete archived files. Longer duration of hospital stay was found in the "wide excision and closing with flap" method comparing with two other methods (P < 0.05). Length of incapacity for work was not different between the "wide excision and modified repair" and "wide excision" (P > 0.5) methods, but longer for "wide excision and flap" in comparison with two others (P < 0.05). Healing time was significantly longer in the "wide excision" method in comparison with two other methods (P < 0.05). However, "wide excision and modified repair" method had the least healing time between all above techniques, except for length of leaving the office. All the three recurrences (1.5 %) occurred in the wide excision and flap method (P < 0.05). The frequency of postoperative complications was 2 (3.3 %) in wide excision and modified repair, 15 (18.5 %) in wide excision, and 17 (32.7 %) in wide excision and flap closure; these differences in

  4. Base excision repair activities in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Rolseth, Veslemøy; Rundén-Pran, Elise; Neurauter, Christine Gran; Yndestad, Arne; Luna, Luisa; Aukrust, Pål; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Bjørås, Magnar

    2008-06-01

    The capacity for DNA repair is likely to be one of the factors that determine the vulnerability of neurons to ischemic stress and may influence the pathological outcome of stroke. In this report, initiation of base excision repair (BER) was assessed by analysis of enzyme activity and gene expression level of DNA glycosylases and AP-endonucleases in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) - an in vitro model of stroke. Under basal conditions, AP-endonuclease activity and base removal of ethenoadenine and 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) were higher (by approximately 20-35 %) in CA3/fascia dentata (FD) than in CA1. Base removal of uracil did not differ between the two hippocampal regions, while removal of 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHU) was slightly less efficient in CA3/FD than in CA1. Analyses performed immediately after 30 min of OGD revealed a decreased AP-endonuclease activity (by approximately 20%) in CA1 as well as CA3/FD, and an increased ethenoadenine activity (by approximately 25%) in CA1. Activities for 8-oxoG, 5-OHU and uracil showed no significant changes at this time point. At 8h after OGD, none of the enzyme activities differed from control values. Real-time RT-PCR showed that transcription of DNA glycosylases, including Ogg1, Nth1, Ung, Aag, Neil1 and Neil2 were not changed in response to OGD treatment (t=0 h). The hippocampal expression of Neil2 was low compared with the other DNA glycosylases. These data indicate that CA1 has a lower capacity than CA3/FD for removal of base lesions under basal conditions. The relatively low capacity for BER in basal conditions and the apparent failure to upregulate repair of oxidative damage after OGD might contribute to the high vulnerability of CA1 to ischemic injury.

  5. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein is driven to nucleotide excision repair sites by the electrostatic potential of distorted DNA.

    PubMed

    Camenisch, Ulrike; Dip, Ramiro; Vitanescu, Mirela; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2007-12-01

    The presumed DNA-binding cleft of xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein, a key regulatory subunit of the eukaryotic nucleotide excision repair complex, displays a distinctive array of 6 positively charged amino acid side chains. Here, the molecular function of these closely spaced electropositive residues has been tested by systematic site-directed mutagenesis. After the introduction of single amino acid substitutions, the mutants were probed for protein-DNA interactions in electrophoretic mobility shift and photochemical crosslinking assays. This analysis led to the identification of a critical hot-spot for DNA substrate recognition composed of two neighboring lysines at codons 141 and 179 of the human XPA sequence. The replacement of other basic side chains in the DNA interaction domain conferred more moderate defects of substrate binding. When the function of XPA was tested as a fusion product with either mCherry or green-fluorescent protein, a glutamate substitution of one of the positively charged residues at positions 141 and 179 was sufficient to decrease DNA repair activity in human fibroblasts. Thus, the removal of a single cationic side chain abolished DNA-binding activity and significant excision repair defects could be induced by single charge inversions on the XPA surface, indicating that this molecular sensor participates in substrate recognition by monitoring the electrostatic potential of distorted DNA repair sites.

  6. Alternative Excision Repair of Ultraviolet B- and C-Induced DNA Damage in Dormant and Developing Spores of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Guadiana, Fernando H.; Barraza-Salas, Marcelo; Ramírez-Ramírez, Norma; Ortiz-Cortés, Mayte; Setlow, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) and spore photoproduct lyase DNA repair pathways are major determinants of Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to UV radiation. We report here that a putative ultraviolet (UV) damage endonuclease encoded by ywjD confers protection to developing and dormant spores of B. subtilis against UV DNA damage. In agreement with its predicted function, a His6-YwjD recombinant protein catalyzed the specific incision of UV-irradiated DNA in vitro. The maximum expression of a reporter gene fusion to the ywjD opening reading frame occurred late in sporulation, and this maximal expression was dependent on the forespore-specific RNA polymerase sigma factor, σG. Although the absence of YwjD and/or UvrA, an essential protein of the NER pathway, sensitized developing spores to UV-C, this effect was lower when these cells were treated with UV-B. In contrast, UV-B but not UV-C radiation dramatically decreased the survival of dormant spores deficient in both YwjD and UvrA. The distinct range of lesions generated by UV-C and UV-B and the different DNA photochemistry in developing and dormant spores may cause these differences. We postulate that in addition to the UvrABC repair system, developing and dormant spores of B. subtilis also rely on an alternative excision repair pathway involving YwjD to deal with the deleterious effects of various UV photoproducts. PMID:22961846

  7. FACT Assists Base Excision Repair by Boosting the Remodeling Activity of RSC

    PubMed Central

    Ouararhni, Khalid; Roulland, Yohan; Ben Simon, Elsa; Kundu, Tapas; Hamiche, Ali; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    FACT, in addition to its role in transcription, is likely implicated in both transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair and DNA double strand break repair. Here, we present evidence that FACT could be directly involved in Base Excision Repair and elucidate the chromatin remodeling mechanisms of FACT during BER. We found that, upon oxidative stress, FACT is released from transcription related protein complexes to get associated with repair proteins and chromatin remodelers from the SWI/SNF family. We also showed the rapid recruitment of FACT to the site of damage, coincident with the glycosylase OGG1, upon the local generation of oxidized DNA. Interestingly, FACT facilitates uracil-DNA glycosylase in the removal of uracil from nucleosomal DNA thanks to an enhancement in the remodeling activity of RSC. This discloses a novel property of FACT wherein it has a co-remodeling activity and strongly enhances the remodeling capacity of the chromatin remodelers. Altogether, our data suggest that FACT may acts in concert with RSC to facilitate excision of DNA lesions during the initial step of BER. PMID:27467129

  8. Frequency of intrachromosomal homologous recombination induced by UV radiation in normally repairing and excision repair-deficient human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimura, T.; Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J. ); Godwin, A.R.; Liskay, R.M. )

    1990-02-01

    To investigate the role of DNA damage and nucleotide excision repair in intrachromosomal homologous recombination, a plasmid containing duplicated copies of the gene coding for hygromycin resistance was introduced into the genome of a repair-proficient human cell line, KMST-6, and two repair-deficient lines, XP2OS(SV) from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A and XP2YO(SV) from complementation group F. Neither hygromycin-resistance gene codes for a functional enzyme because each contains an insertion/deletion mutation at a unique site, but recombination between the two defective genes can yield hygromycin-resistant cells. The rates of spontaneous recombination in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains containing the recombination substrate were found to be similar. The frequency of UV-induced recombination was determined for three of these cell strains. At low doses, the group A cell strain and the group F cell strain showed a significant increase in frequency of recombinants. The repair-proficient cell strain required 10-to 20-fold higher doses of UV to exhibit comparable increases in frequency of recombinants. These results suggest that unexcised DNA damage, rather than the excision repair process per se, stimulates such recombination.

  9. Bidirectional transcription of trinucleotide repeats: roles for excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Budworth, Helen; McMurray, Cynthia T.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Genomic instability at repetitive DNA regions in cells of the nervous system leads to a number of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases, including those with an expanded trinucleotide repeat (TNR) tract at or nearby an expressed gene. Expansion causes disease when a particular base sequence is repeated beyond the normal range, interfering with the expression or properties of a gene product. Disease severity and onset depend on the number of repeats. As the length of the repeat tract grows, so does the size of the successive expansions and the likelihood of another unstable event. In fragile X syndrome, for example, CGG repeat instability and pathogenesis are not typically observed below tracts of roughly 50 repeats, but occur frequently at or above 55 repeats, and are virtually certain above 100–300 repeats. Recent evidence points to bidirectional transcription as a new aspect of TNR instability and pathophysiology. Bidirectional transcription of TNR genes produces novel proteins and/or regulatory RNAs that influence both toxicity and epigenetic changes in TNR promoters. Bidirectional transcription of the TNR tract appears to influence aspects of its stability, gene processing, splicing, gene silencing, and chemical modification of DNAs. Paradoxically, however, some of the same effects are observed on both the expanded TNR gene and on its normal gene counterpart. In this review, we discuss the possible normal and abnormal effects of bidirectional transcription on trinucleotide repeat instability, the role of DNA repair in causing, preventing, or maintaining methylation, and chromatin environment of TNR genes. PMID:23669397

  10. The nucleotide excision repair system of Borrelia burgdorferi is the sole pathway involved in repair of DNA damage by UV light.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Chaconas, George

    2013-05-01

    To survive and avoid accumulation of mutations caused by DNA damage, the genomes of prokaryotes encode a variety of DNA repair pathways most well characterized in Escherichia coli. Some of these are required for the infectivity of various pathogens. In this study, the importance of 25 DNA repair/recombination genes for Borrelia burgdorferi survival to UV-induced DNA damage was assessed. In contrast to E. coli, where 15 of these genes have an effect on survival of UV irradiation, disruption of recombinational repair, transcription-coupled repair, methyl-directed mismatch correction, and repair of arrested replication fork pathways did not decrease survival of B. burgdorferi exposed to UV light. However, the disruption of the B. burgdorferi nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway (uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, and uvrD) resulted in a 10- to 1,000-fold increase in sensitivity to UV light. A functional NER pathway was also shown to be required for B. burgdorferi resistance to nitrosative damage. Finally, disruption of uvrA, uvrC, and uvrD had only a minor effect upon murine infection by increasing the time required for dissemination.

  11. Defining the RNaseH2 enzyme-initiated ribonucleotide excision repair pathway in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Margaret R.; Burkhart, Brett W.; Santangelo, Thomas J.; Gardner, Andrew F.

    2017-01-01

    Incorporation of ribonucleotides during DNA replication has severe consequences for genome stability. Although eukaryotes possess a number of redundancies for initiating and completing repair of misincorporated ribonucleotides, archaea such as Thermococcus rely only upon RNaseH2 to initiate the pathway. Because Thermococcus DNA polymerases incorporate as many as 1,000 ribonucleotides per genome, RNaseH2 must be efficient at recognizing and nicking at embedded ribonucleotides to ensure genome integrity. Here, we show that ribonucleotides are incorporated by the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis both in vitro and in vivo and a robust ribonucleotide excision repair pathway is critical to keeping incorporation levels low in wild-type cells. Using pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetics experiments, we also show that archaeal RNaseH2 rapidly cleaves at embedded ribonucleotides (200-450 s−1), but exhibits an ∼1,000-fold slower turnover rate (0.06–0.17 s−1), suggesting a potential role for RNaseH2 in protecting or marking nicked sites for further processing. We found that following RNaseH2 cleavage, the combined activities of polymerase B (PolB), flap endonuclease (Fen1), and DNA ligase are required to complete ribonucleotide processing. PolB formed a ribonucleotide-containing flap by strand displacement synthesis that was cleaved by Fen1, and DNA ligase sealed the nick for complete repair. Our study reveals conservation of the overall mechanism of ribonucleotide excision repair across domains of life. The lack of redundancies in ribonucleotide repair in archaea perhaps suggests a more ancestral form of ribonucleotide excision repair compared with the eukaryotic pathway. PMID:28373277

  12. Gut Microbiota Imbalance and Base Excision Repair Dynamics in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Debolina; Kidane, Dawit

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota are required for host nutrition, energy balance, and regulating immune homeostasis, however, in some cases, this mutually beneficial relationship becomes twisted (dysbiosis), and the gut flora can incite pathological disorders including colon cancer. Microbial dysbiosis promotes the release of bacterial genotoxins, metabolites, and causes chronic inflammation, which promote oxidative DNA damage. Oxidized DNA base lesions are removed by base excision repair (BER), however, the role of this altered function of BER, as well as microbiota-mediated genomic instability and colon cancer development, is still poorly understood. In this review article, we will discuss how dysbiotic microbiota induce DNA damage, its impact on base excision repair capacity, the potential link of host BER gene polymorphism, and the risk of dysbiotic microbiota mediated genomic instability and colon cancer. PMID:27471558

  13. Lower nucleotide excision repair capacity in newborns compared to their mothers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vande Loock, Kim; Decordier, Ilse; Plas, Gina; Ciardelli, Roberta; Haumont, Dominique; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of the potential vulnerability of children and newborns and protection of their health is essential, especially regarding to genotoxic compounds. Benzo(a)pyrene B(a)P a commonly found carcinogen, and its metabolite BPDE, are known to cross the placenta. To investigate how well newborns are able to cope with BPDE-induced DNA damage, a recent developed nucleotide excision repair cell phenotype assay was applied in a pilot study of 25 newborn daughters and their mothers, using the Alkaline Comet Assay and taking demographic data into account. Newborns seemed to be less able to repair BPDE-induced DNA damage since lower repair capacity levels were calculated compared to their mothers although statistical significance was not reached. Assessment of repair capacity in combination with genotypes will provide important information to support preventive strategies in neonatal care and to define science based exposure limits for pregnant women and children.

  14. p53 modulation of TFIIH-associated nucleotide excision repair activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, X W; Yeh, H; Schaeffer, L; Roy, R; Moncollin, V; Egly, J M; Wang, Z; Freidberg, E C; Evans, M K; Taffe, B G

    1995-06-01

    p53 has pleiotropic functions including control of genomic plasticity and integrity. Here we report that p53 can bind to several transcription factor IIH-associated factors, including transcription-repair factors, XPD (Rad3) and XPB, as well as CSB involved in strand-specific DNA repair, via its C-terminal domain. We also found that wild-type, but not Arg273His mutant p53 inhibits XPD (Rad3) and XPB DNA helicase activities. Moreover, repair of UV-induced dimers is slower in Li-Fraumeni syndrome cells (heterozygote p53 mutant) than in normal human cells. Our findings indicate that p53 may play a direct role in modulating nucleotide excision repair pathways.

  15. Disruption of TTDA Results in Complete Nucleotide Excision Repair Deficiency and Embryonic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Theil, Arjan F.; Nonnekens, Julie; Steurer, Barbara; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; de Wit, Jan; Lemaitre, Charlène; Marteijn, Jurgen A.; Raams, Anja; Maas, Alex; Vermeij, Marcel; Essers, Jeroen; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Vermeulen, Wim

    2013-01-01

    The ten-subunit transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) plays a crucial role in transcription and nucleotide excision repair (NER). Inactivating mutations in the smallest 8-kDa TFB5/TTDA subunit cause the neurodevelopmental progeroid repair syndrome trichothiodystrophy A (TTD-A). Previous studies have shown that TTDA is the only TFIIH subunit that appears not to be essential for NER, transcription, or viability. We studied the consequences of TTDA inactivation by generating a Ttda knock-out (Ttda−/−) mouse-model resembling TTD-A patients. Unexpectedly, Ttda−/− mice were embryonic lethal. However, in contrast to full disruption of all other TFIIH subunits, viability of Ttda−/− cells was not affected. Surprisingly, Ttda−/− cells were completely NER deficient, contrary to the incomplete NER deficiency of TTD-A patient-derived cells. We further showed that TTD-A patient mutations only partially inactivate TTDA function, explaining the relatively mild repair phenotype of TTD-A cells. Moreover, Ttda−/− cells were also highly sensitive to oxidizing agents. These findings reveal an essential role of TTDA for life, nucleotide excision repair, and oxidative DNA damage repair and identify Ttda−/− cells as a unique class of TFIIH mutants. PMID:23637614

  16. Arabidopsis ARP endonuclease functions in a branched base excision DNA repair pathway completed by LIG1.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R

    2011-11-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is an essential cellular defence mechanism against DNA damage, but it is poorly understood in plants. We used an assay that monitors repair of damaged bases and abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic, AP) sites in Arabidopsis to characterize post-excision events during plant BER. We found that Apurinic endonuclease-redox protein (ARP) is the major AP endonuclease activity in Arabidopsis cell extracts, and is required for AP incision during uracil BER in vitro. Mutant plants that are deficient in ARP grow normally but are hypersensitive to 5-fluorouracil, a compound that favours mis-incorporation of uracil into DNA. We also found that, after AP incision, the choice between single-nucleotide or long-patch DNA synthesis (SN- or LP-BER) is influenced by the 5' end of the repair gap. When the 5' end is blocked and not amenable to β-elimination, the SN sub-pathway is abrogated, and repair is accomplished through LP-BER only. Finally, we provide evidence that Arabidopsis DNA ligase I (LIG1) is required for both SN- and LP-BER. lig1 RNAi-silenced lines show very reduced uracil BER, and anti-LIG1 antibody abolishes repair in wild-type cell extracts. In contrast, knockout lig4(-/-) mutants exhibit normal BER and nick ligation levels. Our results suggest that a branched BER pathway completed by a member of the DNA ligase I family may be an ancient feature in eukaryotic species.

  17. The Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Therapy on the DNA Base Excision Repair System of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Czarny, Piotr; Merecz-Sadowska, Anna; Majchrzak, Kinga; Jabłkowski, Maciej; Szemraj, Janusz; Śliwiński, Tomasz; Karwowski, Bolesław

    2017-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can infect extrahepatic tissues, including lymphocytes, creating reservoir of the virus. Moreover, HCV proteins can interact with DNA damage response proteins of infected cells. In this article we investigated the influence of the virus infection and a new ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir ± dasabuvir ± ribavirin (OBV/PTV/r ± DSV ± RBV) anti-HCV therapy on the PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells, mainly lymphocytes) DNA base excision repair (BER) system. BER protein activity was analyzed in the nuclear and mitochondrial extracts (NE and ME) of PBMC isolated from patients before and after therapy, and from subjects without HCV, using modeled double-strand DNA, with 2'-deoxyuridine substitution as the DNA damage. The NE and ME obtained from patients before therapy demonstrated lower efficacy of 2'-deoxyuridine removal and DNA repair polymerization than those of the control group or patients after therapy. Moreover, the extracts from the patients after therapy had similar activity to those from the control group. However, the efficacy of apurinic/apyrimidinic site excision in NE did not differ between the studied groups. We postulate that infection of lymphocytes by the HCV can lead to a decrease in the activity of BER enzymes. However, the use of novel therapy results in the improvement of glycosylase activity as well as the regeneration of endonuclease and other crucial repair enzymes.

  18. Heat shock protein 70 stimulation of the deoxyribonucleic acid base excision repair enzyme polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Frances; Kozin, Elliott; Bases, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) of damaged deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a multistep process during which potentially lethal abasic sites temporarily exist. Repair of these lesions is greatly stimulated by heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), which enhances strand incision and removal of the abasic sites by human apurinic-apyrimidinic endonuclease (HAP1). The resulting single-strand gaps must then be filled in. Here, we show that Hsp70 and its 48- and 43-kDa N-terminal domains greatly stimulated filling in the single-strand gaps by DNA polymerase β, a novel finding that extends the role of Hsps in DNA repair. Incorporation of deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) to fill in single-strand gaps in DNA phagemid pBKS by DNA polymerase β was stimulated by Hsp70. Truncated proteins derived from the C-terminus of Hsp70 as well as unrelated proteins were less effective, but proteins derived from the N-terminus of Hsp70 remained efficient stimulators of DNA polymerase β repair of DNA single-strand gaps. In agreement with these results, repair of a gap in a 30-bp oligonucleotide by polymerase β also was strongly stimulated by Hsp70 although not by a truncated protein from the C-terminus of Hsp70. Sealing of the repaired site in the oligonucleotide by human DNA ligase 1 was not specifically stimulated by Hsp-related proteins. Results presented here now implicate and extend the role of Hsp70 as a partner in the enzymatic repair of damaged DNA. The participation of Hsp70 jointly with base excision enzymes improves repair efficiency by mechanisms that are not yet understood. PMID:14627201

  19. Polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes and susceptibility to colorectal cancer in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Paszkowska-Szczur, Katarzyna; Scott, Rodney J; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Dymerska, Dagmara; Gupta, Satish; van de Wetering, Thierry; Masojć, Bartłomiej; Kashyap, Aniruddh; Gapska, Paulina; Gromowski, Tomasz; Kładny, Józef; Lubiński, Jan; Dębniak, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that is associated with a severe deficiency in nucleotide excision repair. Genetic polymorphisms in XP genes may be associated with a change in DNA repair capacity, which could be associated with colorectal cancer development. We assessed the association between 94 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within seven XP genes (XPA-XPG) and the colorectal cancer risk in the Polish population. We genotyped 758 unselected patients with colorectal cancer and 1,841 healthy adults. We found that a significantly decreased risk of colorectal cancer was associated with XPC polymorphism rs2228000_CT genotype (OR 0.59; p < 0.0001) and the rs2228000_TT genotype (OR 0.29; p < 0.0001) compared to the reference genotype (CC). And an increased disease risk was associated with the XPD SNP, rs1799793_AG genotype (OR 1.44, p = 0.018) and rs1799793_AA genotype (OR 3.31, p < 0.0001) compared to the reference genotype. Haplotype analysis within XPC, XPD and XPG revealed haplotypes associated with an altered colorectal cancer risk. Stratified analysis by gender showed differences between the association of three SNPs: XPC rs2228000, XPD rs1799793 and XPD rs238406 in females and males. Association analysis between age of disease onset and polymorphisms in XPD (rs1799793) and XPC (rs2228000) revealed differences in the prevalence of these variants in patients under and over 50 years of age. Our results confirmed that polymorphisms in XPC and XPD may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer.

  20. High resolution mapping of modified DNA nucleobases using excision repair enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, D. Suzi; Ransom, Monica; Adane, Biniam; York, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    The incorporation and creation of modified nucleobases in DNA have profound effects on genome function. We describe methods for mapping positions and local content of modified DNA nucleobases in genomic DNA. We combined in vitro nucleobase excision with massively parallel DNA sequencing (Excision-seq) to determine the locations of modified nucleobases in genomic DNA. We applied the Excision-seq method to map uracil in E. coli and budding yeast and discovered significant variation in uracil content, wherein uracil is excluded from the earliest and latest replicating regions of the genome, possibly driven by changes in nucleotide pool composition. We also used Excision-seq to identify sites of pyrimidine dimer formation induced by UV light exposure, where the method could distinguish between sites of cyclobutane and 6-4 photoproduct formation. These UV mapping data enabled analysis of local sequence bias around pyrimidine dimers and suggested a preference for an adenosine downstream from 6-4 photoproducts. The Excision-seq method is broadly applicable for high precision, genome-wide mapping of modified nucleobases with cognate repair enzymes. PMID:25015380

  1. Diallyl sulfide induces the expression of nucleotide excision repair enzymes in the breast of female ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Green, Mario; Newell, Oneil; Aboyade-Cole, Ayoola; Darling-Reed, Selina; Thomas, Ronald D

    2007-01-10

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) causes DNA adducts resulting in breast cancer, whereas diallyl sulfide (DAS) inhibits cancer formation. We hypothesize that DAS induces the expression of nucleotide excision repair genes. To test this hypothesis, female ACI rats were treated for 4 days with corn oil, DES, DAS, and DAS/DES (50mg/kg). The expression of P53, Gadd45a, PCNA, and DNA polymerase delta was analyzed by real-time PCR. DES decreased the expression of P53, Gadd45a and PCNA. DAS and DAS/DES increased the expression of all four genes. These results suggest that DAS enhances the ability of breast tissue to repair DNA damage thus preventing cancer.

  2. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-11-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and such lesions can promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5'-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER.

  3. Double strand breaks in DNA inhibit nucleotide excision repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Calsou, P; Frit, P; Salles, B

    1996-11-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) was measured in human cell extracts incubated with either supercoiled or linearized damaged plasmid DNA as repair substrate. NER, as quantified by the extent of repair synthesis activity, was reduced by up to 80% in the case of linearized plasmid DNA when compared with supercoiled DNA. An excess of undamaged linearized plasmid in the repair mixture did not interfere with DNA repair synthesis activity on a supercoiled damaged plasmid, indicating a cis-acting inhibiting effect. In contrast, gaps on circular or linearized plasmids were filled in identically by the DNA polymerases operating in the extracts. When the extent of damage-dependent incision activity was measured, a approximately 70% reduction of repair incision activity by human cell extract was observed on linearized damaged plasmids. Recessed, protruding, or blunt ends were similarly inhibitory. NER activity was partly restored when the extracts were preincubated with autoimmune human sera containing antibodies against the nuclear DNA end-binding heterodimer Ku. In addition, the inhibition of repair activity on linear damaged plasmids was released in extracts from rodent cells deficient in Ku activity but not in extracts from murine scid cells devoid of Ku-associated DNA-dependent kinase activity.

  4. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and they promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5'-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER. PMID:26596511

  5. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and they promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5′-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER. PMID:26466358

  6. Age and exposure to arsenic alter base excision repair transcript levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Megan J; Kunz, Bernard A; Snow, Elizabeth T

    2010-09-01

    Arsenic (As) induces DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species. Most oxidative DNA damage is countered by base excision repair (BER), the capacity for which may be reduced in older animals. We examined whether age and consumption of As in lactational milk or drinking water influences BER gene transcript levels in mice. Lactating mothers and 24-week-old mice were exposed (24 h or 2 weeks) to As (2 or 50 p.p.m.) in drinking water. Lung tissue was harvested from adults, neonates (initially 1 week old) feeding from lactating mothers and untreated animals 1-26 weeks old. Transcripts encoding BER proteins were quantified. BER transcript levels decreased precipitously with age in untreated mice but increased in neonates whose mothers were exposed to 50 p.p.m. As for 24 h or 2 weeks. Treatment of 24-week-old mice with 2 or 50 p.p.m. As for 2 weeks decreased all transcript levels measured. Exposure to As attenuated the age-related transcript level decline for only one BER gene. We conclude that aging is associated with a rapid reduction of BER transcript levels in mice, which may contribute to decreased BER activity in older animals. Levels of As that can alter gene expression are transmitted to neonatal mice in lactational milk produced by mothers drinking water containing As, raising concerns about breastfeeding in countries having As-contaminated groundwater. Reduction of BER transcript levels in 24-week-old mice exposed to As for 2 weeks suggests As may potentiate sensitivity to itself in older animals.

  7. Mechanism of open complex and dual incision formation by human nucleotide excision repair factors.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E; Moggs, J G; Hwang, J R; Egly, J M; Wood, R D

    1997-01-01

    During nucleotide excision repair in human cells, a damaged DNA strand is cleaved by two endonucleases, XPG on the 3' side of the lesion and ERCC1-XPF on the 5' side. These structure-specific enzymes act at junctions between duplex and single-stranded DNA. ATP-dependent formation of an open DNA structure of approximately 25 nt around the adduct precedes this dual incision. We investigated the mechanism of open complex formation and find that mutations in XPB or XPD, the DNA helicase subunits of the transcription and repair factor TFIIH, can completely prevent opening and dual incision in cell-free extracts. A deficiency in XPC protein also prevents opening. The absence of RPA, XPA or XPG activities leads to an intermediate level of strand separation. In contrast, XPF or ERCC1-defective extracts open normally and generate a 3' incision, but fail to form the 5' incision. This same repair defect was observed in extracts from human xeroderma pigmentosum cells with an alteration in the C-terminal domain of XPB, suggesting that XPB has an additional role in facilitating 5' incision by ERCC1-XPF nuclease. These data support a mechanism in which TFIIH-associated helicase activity and XPC protein catalyze initial formation of the key open intermediate, with full extension to the cleavage sites promoted by the other core nucleotide excision repair factors. Opening is followed by dual incision, with the 3' cleavage made first. PMID:9351836

  8. Processing closely spaced lesions during Nucleotide Excision Repair triggers mutagenesis in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Janel-Bintz, Régine; Napolitano, Rita L; Isogawa, Asako; Fujii, Shingo; Fuchs, Robert P

    2017-07-01

    It is generally assumed that most point mutations are fixed when damage containing template DNA undergoes replication, either right at the fork or behind the fork during gap filling. Here we provide genetic evidence for a pathway, dependent on Nucleotide Excision Repair, that induces mutations when processing closely spaced lesions. This pathway, referred to as Nucleotide Excision Repair-induced Mutagenesis (NERiM), exhibits several characteristics distinct from mutations that occur within the course of replication: i) following UV irradiation, NER-induced mutations are fixed much more rapidly (t ½ ≈ 30 min) than replication dependent mutations (t ½ ≈ 80-100 min) ii) NERiM specifically requires DNA Pol IV in addition to Pol V iii) NERiM exhibits a two-hit dose-response curve that suggests processing of closely spaced lesions. A mathematical model let us define the geometry (infer the structure) of the toxic intermediate as being formed when NER incises a lesion that resides in close proximity of another lesion in the complementary strand. This critical NER intermediate requires Pol IV / Pol II for repair, it is either lethal if left unrepaired or mutation-prone when repaired. Finally, NERiM is found to operate in stationary phase cells providing an intriguing possibility for ongoing evolution in the absence of replication.

  9. Processing closely spaced lesions during Nucleotide Excision Repair triggers mutagenesis in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Isogawa, Asako; Fujii, Shingo

    2017-01-01

    It is generally assumed that most point mutations are fixed when damage containing template DNA undergoes replication, either right at the fork or behind the fork during gap filling. Here we provide genetic evidence for a pathway, dependent on Nucleotide Excision Repair, that induces mutations when processing closely spaced lesions. This pathway, referred to as Nucleotide Excision Repair-induced Mutagenesis (NERiM), exhibits several characteristics distinct from mutations that occur within the course of replication: i) following UV irradiation, NER-induced mutations are fixed much more rapidly (t ½ ≈ 30 min) than replication dependent mutations (t ½ ≈ 80–100 min) ii) NERiM specifically requires DNA Pol IV in addition to Pol V iii) NERiM exhibits a two-hit dose-response curve that suggests processing of closely spaced lesions. A mathematical model let us define the geometry (infer the structure) of the toxic intermediate as being formed when NER incises a lesion that resides in close proximity of another lesion in the complementary strand. This critical NER intermediate requires Pol IV / Pol II for repair, it is either lethal if left unrepaired or mutation-prone when repaired. Finally, NERiM is found to operate in stationary phase cells providing an intriguing possibility for ongoing evolution in the absence of replication. PMID:28686598

  10. [Effect of estrogen on nucleotide excision repair of N2a neuroblastoma cells].

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Akira; Yamamoto, Aya; Mori, Toshio; Nakamura, Yu; Morikawa, Masayuki; Yoshino, Hiroki; Kiuchi, Kuniaki; Makinodan, Manabu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2007-04-01

    Until now reduced estrogen level has been considered to affect some psychiatric symptoms, because there are sex differences in onset of Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Estrogen is associated with cognitive functions, and it has been reported to protect oxidative damage of DNA related to base excision repair (BER). Some patients with Xeroderma Pigmentosum, who have normal BER and impaired nucleotide excision repair (NER), are known to be suffering from mental retardation. Therefore we hypothesized that impaired NER was partly associated with pathology of mental disorder and investigated the effects of estrogen on NER for ultraviolet-induced DNA damage. The N2a neuroblastoma cell line was used as a representative of neuronal cells and 17p-estradiol was selected as one of the most active estrogen derivatives. There were no significant effects of 17p-estradiol on prevention of DNA damage, promotion of DNA repair, or cell survival at the concentration of 0-0.1 microM 17p-estradiol (below cytotoxicity level). These results described that estrogen might not directly affect NER except through another DNA repair system.

  11. 'Batman excision' of ventral skin in hypospadias repair, clue to aesthetic repair (point of technique).

    PubMed

    Hoebeke, P B; De Kuyper, P; Van Laecke, E

    2002-11-01

    In the hypospadiac penis the ventral skin is poorly developed, while dorsal skin is redundant. The classical Byars' flaps are a way to use the excess dorsal skin to cover the penile shaft. The appearance after Byars' flaps however is not natural. We use a more natural looking skin allocation with superior aesthetic results. The clue in this reconstruction is an inverted triangle shaped excision of ventral skin expanding over the edges of the hooded prepuce (which makes it look like Batman). After excision of the ventral skin it is possible to close the penile skin in the midline, thus mimicking the natural raphe. In case of preputial reconstruction the excised ventral skin makes the prepuce look more natural. The trend of further refining aesthetic appearance of the hypospadiac penis often neglects the penile skin reconstruction. A technique is presented by which the total penile appearances after surgery ameliorates due to better skin reconstruction.

  12. Structural and Functional Studies on Nucleotide Excision Repair From Recognition to Incision.

    SciTech Connect

    Caroline Kisker

    2001-01-01

    Maintenance of the correct genetic information is crucial for all living organisms because mutations are the primary cause of hereditary diseases, as well as cancer and may also be involved in aging. The importance of genomic integrity is underscored by the fact that 80 to 90% of all human cancers are ultimately due to DNA damage. Among the different repair mechanisms that have evolved to protect the genome, nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a universal pathway found in all organisms. NER removes a wide variety of bulky DNA adducts including the carcinogenic cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV radiation, benzo(a)pyrene-guanine adducts caused by smoking and the guanine-cisplatin adducts induced by chemotherapy. The importance of this repair mechanism is reflected by three severe inherited diseases in humans, which are due to defects in NER: xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne's syndrome and trichothiodystrophy.

  13. Impact of ribonucleotide incorporation by DNA polymerases β and λ on oxidative base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Furrer, Antonia; Rösinger, Marcel; Bertoletti, Federica; Mentegari, Elisa; Chiapparini, Giulia; Imhof, Ralph; Ziegler, Nathalie; Sturla, Shana J.; Hübscher, Ulrich; van Loon, Barbara; Maga, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a very frequent source of DNA damage. Many cellular DNA polymerases (Pols) can incorporate ribonucleotides (rNMPs) during DNA synthesis. However, whether oxidative stress-triggered DNA repair synthesis contributes to genomic rNMPs incorporation is so far not fully understood. Human specialized Pols β and λ are the important enzymes involved in the oxidative stress tolerance, acting both in base excision repair and in translesion synthesis past the very frequent oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G). We found that Pol β, to a greater extent than Pol λ can incorporate rNMPs opposite normal bases or 8-oxo-G, and with a different fidelity. Further, the incorporation of rNMPs opposite 8-oxo-G delays repair by DNA glycosylases. Studies in Pol β- and λ-deficient cell extracts suggest that Pol β levels can greatly affect rNMP incorporation opposite oxidative DNA lesions. PMID:26917111

  14. Base Excision Repair in Physiology and Pathology of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Bosshard, Matthias; Markkanen, Enni; van Loon, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Relatively low levels of antioxidant enzymes and high oxygen metabolism result in formation of numerous oxidized DNA lesions in the tissues of the central nervous system. Accumulation of damage in the DNA, due to continuous genotoxic stress, has been linked to both aging and the development of various neurodegenerative disorders. Different DNA repair pathways have evolved to successfully act on damaged DNA and prevent genomic instability. The predominant and essential DNA repair pathway for the removal of small DNA base lesions is base excision repair (BER). In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on the involvement of BER proteins in the maintenance of genetic stability in different brain regions and how changes in the levels of these proteins contribute to aging and the onset of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23203191

  15. DNA repair genes polymorphisms and genetic susceptibility to Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms in a Portuguese population: The role of base excision repair genes polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana P; Silva, Susana N; De Lima, João P; Reichert, Alice; Lima, Fernando; Júnior, Esmeraldina; Rueff, José

    2017-06-01

    The role of base excision repair (BER) genes in Philadelphia-negative (PN)-myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) susceptibility was evaluated by genotyping eight polymorphisms [apurinic/apyrimidinic endodeoxyribonuclease 1, mutY DNA glycosylase, earlier mutY homolog (E. coli) (MUTYH), 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1, PARP4 and X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1)] in a case-control study involving 133 Caucasian Portuguese patients. The results did not reveal a correlation between individual BER polymorphisms and PN-MPNs when considered as a whole. However, stratification for essential thrombocythaemia revealed i) borderline effect/tendency to increased risk when carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP); ii) decreased risk for Janus kinase 2-positive patients carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 SNP; and iii) decreased risk in females carrying at least one variant allele for MUTYH SNP. Combination of alleles demonstrated an increased risk to PN-MPNs for one specific haplogroup. These findings may provide evidence for gene variants in susceptibility to MPNs. Indeed, common variants in DNA repair genes may hamper the capacity to repair DNA, thus increasing cancer susceptibility.

  16. DNA repair genes polymorphisms and genetic susceptibility to Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms in a Portuguese population: The role of base excision repair genes polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Ana P.; Silva, Susana N.; De Lima, João P.; Reichert, Alice; Lima, Fernando; Júnior, Esmeraldina; Rueff, José

    2017-01-01

    The role of base excision repair (BER) genes in Philadelphia-negative (PN)-myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) susceptibility was evaluated by genotyping eight polymorphisms [apurinic/apyrimidinic endodeoxyribonuclease 1, mutY DNA glycosylase, earlier mutY homolog (E. coli) (MUTYH), 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1, PARP4 and X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1)] in a case-control study involving 133 Caucasian Portuguese patients. The results did not reveal a correlation between individual BER polymorphisms and PN-MPNs when considered as a whole. However, stratification for essential thrombocythaemia revealed i) borderline effect/tendency to increased risk when carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP); ii) decreased risk for Janus kinase 2-positive patients carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 SNP; and iii) decreased risk in females carrying at least one variant allele for MUTYH SNP. Combination of alleles demonstrated an increased risk to PN-MPNs for one specific haplogroup. These findings may provide evidence for gene variants in susceptibility to MPNs. Indeed, common variants in DNA repair genes may hamper the capacity to repair DNA, thus increasing cancer susceptibility. PMID:28599464

  17. 8-Oxoguanine causes neurodegeneration during MUTYH-mediated DNA base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zijing; Oka, Sugako; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Abolhassani, Nona; Nomaru, Hiroko; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Yamada, Hidetaka; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2012-01-01

    8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common DNA lesion caused by reactive oxygen species, is associated with carcinogenesis and neurodegeneration. Although the mechanism by which 8-oxoG causes carcinogenesis is well understood, the mechanism by which it causes neurodegeneration is unknown. Here, we report that neurodegeneration is triggered by MUTYH-mediated excision repair of 8-oxoG–paired adenine. Mutant mice lacking 8-oxo–2′-deoxyguanosine triphosphate–depleting (8-oxo–dGTP–depleting) MTH1 and/or 8-oxoG–excising OGG1 exhibited severe striatal neurodegeneration, whereas mutant mice lacking MUTYH or OGG1/MUTYH were resistant to neurodegeneration under conditions of oxidative stress. These results indicate that OGG1 and MTH1 are protective, while MUTYH promotes neurodegeneration. We observed that 8-oxoG accumulated in the mitochondrial DNA of neurons and caused calpain-dependent neuronal loss, while delayed nuclear accumulation of 8-oxoG in microglia resulted in PARP-dependent activation of apoptosis-inducing factor and exacerbated microgliosis. These results revealed that neurodegeneration is a complex process caused by 8-oxoG accumulation in the genomes of neurons and microglia. Different signaling pathways were triggered by the accumulation of single-strand breaks in each type of DNA generated during base excision repair initiated by MUTYH, suggesting that suppression of MUTYH may protect the brain under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:23143307

  18. Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair of Oxidatively Generated Guanine Lesions in DNA.

    PubMed

    Shafirovich, Vladimir; Kropachev, Konstantin; Anderson, Thomas; Liu, Zhi; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Martin, Brooke D; Sugden, Kent; Shim, Yoonjung; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2016-03-04

    The well known biomarker of oxidative stress, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, is more susceptible to further oxidation than the parent guanine base and can be oxidatively transformed to the genotoxic spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh) lesions. Incubation of 135-mer duplexes with single Sp or Gh lesions in human cell extracts yields a characteristic nucleotide excision repair (NER)-induced ladder of short dual incision oligonucleotide fragments in addition to base excision repair (BER) incision products. The ladders were not observed when NER was inhibited either by mouse monoclonal antibody (5F12) to human XPA or in XPC(-/-) fibroblast cell extracts. However, normal NER activity appeared when the XPC(-/-) cell extracts were complemented with XPC-RAD23B proteins. The Sp and Gh lesions are excellent substrates of both BER and NER. In contrast, 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole, a product of the oxidation of guanine in DNA by peroxynitrite, is an excellent substrate of BER only. In the case of mouse embryonic fibroblasts, BER of the Sp lesion is strongly reduced in NEIL1(-/-) relative to NEIL1(+/+) extracts. In summary, in human cell extracts, BER and NER activities co-exist and excise Gh and Sp DNA lesions, suggesting that the relative NER/BER product ratios may depend on competitive BER and NER protein binding to these lesions.

  19. DREMECELS: A Curated Database for Base Excision and Mismatch Repair Mechanisms Associated Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Ankita; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms act as a warrior combating various damaging processes that ensue critical malignancies. DREMECELS was designed considering the malignancies with frequent alterations in DNA repair pathways, that is, colorectal and endometrial cancers, associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as HNPCC). Since lynch syndrome carries high risk (~40–60%) for both cancers, therefore we decided to cover all three diseases in this portal. Although a large population is presently affected by these malignancies, many resources are available for various cancer types but no database archives information on the genes specifically for only these cancers and disorders. The database contains 156 genes and two repair mechanisms, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Other parameters include some of the regulatory processes that have roles in these disease progressions due to incompetent repair mechanisms, specifically BER and MMR. However, our unique database mainly provides qualitative and quantitative information on these cancer types along with methylation, drug sensitivity, miRNAs, copy number variation (CNV) and somatic mutations data. This database would serve the scientific community by providing integrated information on these disease types, thus sustaining diagnostic and therapeutic processes. This repository would serve as an excellent accompaniment for researchers and biomedical professionals and facilitate in understanding such critical diseases. DREMECELS is publicly available at http://www.bioinfoindia.org/dremecels. PMID:27276067

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α regulates the expression of nucleotide excision repair proteins in keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Mahfouf, Walid; Ali, Nsrein; Chemin, Cecile; Ged, Cecile; Kim, Arianna L.; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Bickers, David R.; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of DNA repair enzymes is crucial for cancer prevention, initiation, and therapy. We have studied the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the expression of the two nucleotide excision repair factors (XPC and XPD) in human keratinocytes. We show that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is involved in the regulation of XPC and XPD. Early UVB-induced downregulation of HIF-1α increased XPC mRNA expression due to competition between HIF-1α and Sp1 for their overlapping binding sites. Late UVB-induced enhanced phosphorylation of HIF-1α protein upregulated XPC mRNA expression by direct binding to a separate hypoxia response element (HRE) in the XPC promoter region. HIF-1α also regulated XPD expression by binding to a region of seven overlapping HREs in its promoter. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed putative HREs in the genes encoding other DNA repair proteins (XPB, XPG, CSA and CSB), suggesting that HIF-1α is a key regulator of the DNA repair machinery. Analysis of the repair kinetics of 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers also revealed that HIF-1α downregulation led to an increased rate of immediate removal of both photolesions but attenuated their late removal following UVB irradiation, indicating the functional effects of HIF-1α in the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage. PMID:19934262

  1. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha regulates the expression of nucleotide excision repair proteins in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Mahfouf, Walid; Ali, Nsrein; Chemin, Cecile; Ged, Cecile; Kim, Arianna L; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Bickers, David R; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of DNA repair enzymes is crucial for cancer prevention, initiation, and therapy. We have studied the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the expression of the two nucleotide excision repair factors (XPC and XPD) in human keratinocytes. We show that hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is involved in the regulation of XPC and XPD. Early UVB-induced downregulation of HIF-1alpha increased XPC mRNA expression due to competition between HIF-1alpha and Sp1 for their overlapping binding sites. Late UVB-induced enhanced phosphorylation of HIF-1alpha protein upregulated XPC mRNA expression by direct binding to a separate hypoxia response element (HRE) in the XPC promoter region. HIF-1alpha also regulated XPD expression by binding to a region of seven overlapping HREs in its promoter. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed putative HREs in the genes encoding other DNA repair proteins (XPB, XPG, CSA and CSB), suggesting that HIF-1alpha is a key regulator of the DNA repair machinery. Analysis of the repair kinetics of 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers also revealed that HIF-1alpha downregulation led to an increased rate of immediate removal of both photolesions but attenuated their late removal following UVB irradiation, indicating the functional effects of HIF-1alpha in the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage.

  2. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability.

    PubMed

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L; Paulsen, Renee D; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-12-18

    R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability; however, the mechanisms underlying R-loop-induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability.

  3. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L.; Paulsen, Renee D.; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability, however the mechanisms underlying R-loop induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability. PMID:25435140

  4. Functions of disordered regions in mammalian early base excision repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species, generated endogenously and induced as a toxic response, produce several dozen oxidized or modified bases and/or single-strand breaks in mammalian and other genomes. These lesions are predominantly repaired via the conserved base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER is initiated with excision of oxidized or modified bases by DNA glycosylases leading to formation of abasic (AP) site or strand break at the lesion site. Structural analysis by experimental and modeling approaches shows the presence of a disordered segment commonly localized at the N- or C-terminus as a characteristic signature of mammalian DNA glycosylases which is absent in their bacterial prototypes. Recent studies on unstructured regions in DNA metabolizing proteins have indicated their essential role in interaction with other proteins and target DNA recognition. In this review, we have discussed the unique presence of disordered segments in human DNA glycosylases, and AP endonuclease involved in the processing of glycosylase products, and their critical role in regulating repair functions. These disordered segments also include sites for posttranslational modifications and nuclear localization signal. The teleological basis for their structural flexibility is discussed. PMID:20714778

  5. Direct and indirect roles of RECQL4 in modulating base excision repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Schurman, Shepherd H; Hedayati, Mohammad; Wang, ZhengMing; Singh, Dharmendra K; Speina, Elzbieta; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin; Macris, Margaret; Sung, Patrick; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2009-09-15

    RECQL4 is a human RecQ helicase which is mutated in approximately two-thirds of individuals with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS), a disease characterized at the cellular level by chromosomal instability. BLM and WRN are also human RecQ helicases, which are mutated in Bloom and Werner's syndrome, respectively, and associated with chromosomal instability as well as premature aging. Here we show that primary RTS and RECQL4 siRNA knockdown human fibroblasts accumulate more H(2)O(2)-induced DNA strand breaks than control cells, suggesting that RECQL4 may stimulate repair of H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage. RTS primary fibroblasts also accumulate more XRCC1 foci than control cells in response to endogenous or induced oxidative stress and have a high basal level of endogenous formamidopyrimidines. In cells treated with H(2)O(2), RECQL4 co-localizes with APE1, and FEN1, key participants in base excision repair. Biochemical experiments indicate that RECQL4 specifically stimulates the apurinic endonuclease activity of APE1, the DNA strand displacement activity of DNA polymerase beta, and incision of a 1- or 10-nucleotide flap DNA substrate by Flap Endonuclease I. Additionally, RTS cells display an upregulation of BER pathway genes and fail to respond like normal cells to oxidative stress. The data herein support a model in which RECQL4 regulates both directly and indirectly base excision repair capacity.

  6. Cdt2-mediated XPG degradation promotes gap-filling DNA synthesis in nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chunhua; Wani, Gulzar; Zhao, Ran; Qian, Jiang; Sharma, Nidhi; He, Jinshan; Zhu, Qianzheng; Wang, Qi-En; Wani, Altaf A

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group G (XPG) protein is a structure-specific repair endonuclease, which cleaves DNA strands on the 3′ side of the DNA damage during nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG also plays a crucial role in initiating DNA repair synthesis through recruitment of PCNA to the repair sites. However, the fate of XPG protein subsequent to the excision of DNA damage has remained unresolved. Here, we show that XPG, following its action on bulky lesions resulting from exposures to UV irradiation and cisplatin, is subjected to proteasome-mediated proteolytic degradation. Productive NER processing is required for XPG degradation as both UV and cisplatin treatment-induced XPG degradation is compromised in NER-deficient XP-A, XP-B, XP-C, and XP-F cells. In addition, the NER-related XPG degradation requires Cdt2, a component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, CRL4Cdt2. Micropore local UV irradiation and in situ Proximity Ligation assays demonstrated that Cdt2 is recruited to the UV-damage sites and interacts with XPG in the presence of PCNA. Importantly, Cdt2-mediated XPG degradation is crucial to the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerase δ and DNA repair synthesis. Collectively, our data support the idea of PCNA recruitment to damage sites which occurs in conjunction with XPG, recognition of the PCNA-bound XPG by CRL4Cdt2 for specific ubiquitylation and finally the protein degradation. In essence, XPG elimination from DNA damage sites clears the chromatin space needed for the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerase δ to the damage site and completion of gap-filling DNA synthesis during the final stage of NER. PMID:25483071

  7. New design of nucleotide excision repair (NER) inhibitors for combination cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Tuszynski, Jack A; Barakat, Khaled H

    2016-04-01

    Many cancer chemotherapy agents act by targeting the DNA of cancer cells, causing substantial damage within their genome and causing them to undergo apoptosis. An effective DNA repair pathway in cancer cells can act in a reverse way by removing these drug-induced DNA lesions, allowing cancer cells to survive, grow and proliferate. In this context, DNA repair inhibitors opened a new avenue in cancer treatment, by blocking the DNA repair mechanisms from removing the chemotherapy-mediated DNA damage. In particular, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) involves more than thirty protein-protein interactions and removes DNA adducts caused by platinum-based chemotherapy. The excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1)-xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA) protein (XPA-ERCC1) complex seems to be one of the most promising targets in this pathway. ERCC1 is over expressed in cancer cells and the only known cellular function so far for XPA is to recruit ERCC1 to the damaged point. Here, we build upon our recent advances in identifying inhibitors for this interaction and continue our efforts to rationally design more effective and potent regulators for the NER pathway. We employed in silico drug design techniques to: (1) identify compounds similar to the recently discovered inhibitors, but more effective at inhibiting the XPA-ERCC1 interactions, and (2) identify different scaffolds to develop novel lead compounds. Two known inhibitor structures have been used as starting points for two ligand/structure-hybrid virtual screening approaches. The findings described here form a milestone in discovering novel inhibitors for the NER pathway aiming at improving the efficacy of current platinum-based therapy, by modulating the XPA-ERCC1 interaction.

  8. Assessment of primary, oxidative and excision repaired DNA damage in hospital personnel handling antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Villarini, Milena; Dominici, Luca; Piccinini, Renza; Fatigoni, Cristina; Ambrogi, Maura; Curti, Gianluca; Morucci, Piero; Muzi, Giacomo; Monarca, Silvano; Moretti, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified several antineoplastic drugs in Group 1 (human carcinogens), among which chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide (CP) and tamoxifen, Group 2A (probable human carcinogens), among which cisplatin, etoposide, N-ethyl- and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and Group 2B (possible human carcinogens), among which bleomycins, merphalan and mitomycin C. The widespread use of these mutagenic/carcinogenic drugs in the treatment of cancer has led to anxiety about possible genotoxic hazards to medical personnel handling these drugs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate work environment contamination by antineoplastic drugs in a hospital in Central Italy and to assess the genotoxic risks associated with antineoplastic drug handling. The study group comprised 52 exposed subjects and 52 controls. Environmental contamination was assessed by taking wipe samples from different surfaces in preparation and administration rooms and nonwoven swabs were used as pads for the surrogate evaluation of dermal exposure, 5-fluorouracil and cytarabine were chosen as markers of exposure to antineoplastic drugs in the working environment. The actual exposure to antineoplastic drugs was evaluated by determining the urinary excretion of CP. The extent of primary, oxidative and excision repaired DNA damage was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes with the alkaline comet assay. To evaluate the role, if any, of genetic variants in the extent of genotoxic effects related to antineoplastic drug occupational exposure, the study subjects were genotyped for GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 and TP53 polymorphisms. Primary DNA damage significantly increased in leukocytes of exposed nurses compared to controls. The use of personal protective equipment (i.e. gloves and/mask) was associated with a decrease in the extent of primary DNA damage.

  9. Case-control analysis of nucleotide excision repair pathway and the risk of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Pu, Xia; Wang, Wei; Matin, Surena; Tannir, Nizar M; Wood, Christopher G; Wu, Xifeng

    2008-11-01

    In this population-based case-control study with 325 Caucasian renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients and 335 controls matched to cases by age, gender and county of residence, we evaluated the associations between 13 potential functional polymorphisms in nine major nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes and RCC risk. In individual single nucleotide polymorphism analysis, after adjustment for multiple comparisons, a significantly decreased RCC risk was observed for the heterozygous genotype of XPD Asp312Asn [odds ratio (OR) = 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.43-0.90] and for the heterozygous and homozygous variant genotypes combined in a dominant model (OR = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.46-0.89). The heterozygous AG genotype of XPA 5'untranslated region was at 1.78-fold increased risk (95% CI: 1.18-2.69) and the risk reached 2.43-fold (95% CI: 1.57-3.75) for the homozygous variant GG genotype; the risk was significant both in the dominant model and in the recessive model. In joint analysis, compared with individuals with fewer than five adverse alleles, individuals with five (OR = 1.17; 95% CI: 0.71-1.93), six (OR = 1.66; 95% CI: 1.03-2.67), seven or more (OR = 1.85; 95% CI: 1.16-2.95) exhibited a progressively increased risk of RCC (P for trend = 0.004). Further, there were significant interactions between NER pathway genes and sex, hypertension and obesity (all P for interaction <0.05). Our results strongly support that common sequence variants of the NER pathway genes predispose susceptible individuals to increased risk of RCC and that the association may be modified by gender, history of hypertension and obesity. These results need to be replicated in larger studies.

  10. Isolation of the functional human excision repair gene ERCC5 by intercosmid recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Mudgett, J.S.; MacInnes, M.A. )

    1990-12-01

    The complete human nucleotide exicision repair gene ERCC5 was isolated as a functional gene on overlapping cosmids. ERCC5 corrects the excision repair deficiency of Chinese hamster ovary cell line UV135, of complementation group 5. Cosmids that contained human sequences were obtained from a UV-resistant cell line derived from UV135 cells transformed with human genomic DNA. Individually, none of the cosmids complemented the UV135 repair defect; cosmid groups were formed to represent putative human genomic regions, and specific pairs of cosmids that effectively transformed UV135 cells to UV resistance were identified. Analysis of transformants derived from the active cosmid pairs showed that the functional 32-kbp ERCC5 gene was reconstructed by homologous intercosmid recombination. The cloned human sequences exhibited 100% concordance with the locus designated genetically as ERCC5 located on human chromosome 13q. Cosmid-transformed UV135 host cells repaired cytotoxic damage to levels about 70% of normal and repaired UV-irradiated shuttle vector DNA to levels about 82% of normal.

  11. ZRF1 mediates remodeling of E3 ligases at DNA lesion sites during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Gracheva, Ekaterina; Chitale, Shalaka; Wilhelm, Thomas; Rapp, Alexander; Byrne, Jonathan; Stadler, Jens; Medina, Rebeca; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Faithful DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation elicits both the recruitment of DNA repair factors and the deposition of histone marks such as monoubiquitylation of histone H2A at lesion sites. Here, we report how a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex specific to DNA repair is remodeled at lesion sites in the global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) pathway. Monoubiquitylation of histone H2A (H2A-ubiquitin) is catalyzed predominantly by a novel E3 ligase complex consisting of DDB2, DDB1, CUL4B, and RING1B (UV–RING1B complex) that acts early during lesion recognition. The H2A-ubiquitin binding protein ZRF1 mediates remodeling of this E3 ligase complex directly at the DNA lesion site, causing the assembly of the UV–DDB–CUL4A E3 ligase complex (DDB1–DDB2–CUL4A-RBX1). ZRF1 is an essential factor in GG-NER, and its function at damaged chromatin sites is linked to damage recognition factor XPC. Overall, the results shed light on the interplay between epigenetic and DNA repair recognition factors at DNA lesion sites. PMID:27091446

  12. UV-induced DNA excision repair in rat fibroblasts during immortalization and terminal differentiation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Vijg, J.; Mullaart, E.; Berends, F.; Lohman, P.H.; Knook, D.L.

    1986-12-01

    UV-induced DNA excision repair was studied as DNA repair synthesis and dimer removal in rat fibroblast cultures, initiated from either dense or sparse inocula of primary cells grown from skin biopsies. During passaging in vitro an initial increase in DNA repair synthesis, determined both autoradiographically as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and by means of the BrdU photolysis assay as the number and average size of repair patches, was found to be associated with a morphological shift from small spindle-shaped to large pleiomorphic cells observed over the first twenty generations. In cell populations in growth crisis, a situation exclusively associated with thin-inoculum cultures in which the population predominantly consisted of large pleiomorphic cells, UDS was found to occur at a low level. After development of secondary cultures into immortal cell lines, both repair synthesis and morphology appeared to be the same as in the original primary spindle-shaped cells. At all passages the capacity to remove UV-induced pyrimidine dimers was found to be low, as indicated by the persistence of Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease-sensitive sites. These results are discussed in the context of terminal differentiation and immortalization of rat fibroblasts upon establishment in vitro.

  13. Excision repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group C cells is regulated differently in transformed cells and primary fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1988-10-14

    Excision repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group C cells occurs at about 20-30% of normal levels. In confluent fibroblasts a unique characteristic of this low repair is that it is clustered, representing very efficient repair in a small region of the genome. In SV40-transformed fibroblasts and Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes of complementation group C, however, excision repair is randomly distributed. This may be a consequence of the high rate of proliferation of both of these cell types, because random repair is also observed in rapidly proliferating group C fibroblasts. The distribution of sites that can be mended in group C cells, therefore, varies according to the transformed and proliferative state of the cells, demonstrating that transformed cells do not always exhibit repair characteristics identical to those of primary fibroblasts.

  14. Age-related neuronal degeneration: complementary roles of nucleotide excision repair and transcription-coupled repair in preventing neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Dick; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; de Waard, Monique C; Haasdijk, Elize D; Brandt, Renata; Vermeij, Marcel; Rijksen, Yvonne; Maas, Alex; van Steeg, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J

    2011-12-01

    Neuronal degeneration is a hallmark of many DNA repair syndromes. Yet, how DNA damage causes neuronal degeneration and whether defects in different repair systems affect the brain differently is largely unknown. Here, we performed a systematic detailed analysis of neurodegenerative changes in mouse models deficient in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR), two partially overlapping DNA repair systems that remove helix-distorting and transcription-blocking lesions, respectively, and that are associated with the UV-sensitive syndromes xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). TCR-deficient Csa(-/-) and Csb(-/-) CS mice showed activated microglia cells surrounding oligodendrocytes in regions with myelinated axons throughout the nervous system. This white matter microglia activation was not observed in NER-deficient Xpa(-/-) and Xpc(-/-) XP mice, but also occurred in Xpd(XPCS) mice carrying a point mutation (G602D) in the Xpd gene that is associated with a combined XPCS disorder and causes a partial NER and TCR defect. The white matter abnormalities in TCR-deficient mice are compatible with focal dysmyelination in CS patients. Both TCR-deficient and NER-deficient mice showed no evidence for neuronal degeneration apart from p53 activation in sporadic (Csa(-/-), Csb(-/-)) or highly sporadic (Xpa(-/-), Xpc(-/-)) neurons and astrocytes. To examine to what extent overlap occurs between both repair systems, we generated TCR-deficient mice with selective inactivation of NER in postnatal neurons. These mice develop dramatic age-related cumulative neuronal loss indicating DNA damage substrate overlap and synergism between TCR and NER pathways in neurons, and they uncover the occurrence of spontaneous DNA injury that may trigger neuronal degeneration. We propose that, while Csa(-/-) and Csb(-/-) TCR-deficient mice represent powerful animal models to study the mechanisms underlying myelin abnormalities in CS, neuron

  15. Base excision repair imbalance in colorectal cancer has prognostic value and modulates response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Leguisamo, Natalia M.; Gloria, Helena C.; Kalil, Antonio N.; Martins, Talita V.; Azambuja, Daniel B.

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is prevalent worldwide, and treatment often involves surgery and genotoxic chemotherapy. DNA repair mechanisms, such as base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR), may not only influence tumour characteristics and prognosis but also dictate chemotherapy response. Defective MMR contributes to chemoresistance in colorectal cancer. Moreover, BER affects cellular survival by repairing genotoxic base damage in a process that itself can disrupt metabolism. In this study, we characterized BER and MMR gene expression in colorectal tumours and the association between this repair profile with patients’ clinical and pathological features. In addition, we exploited the possible mechanisms underlying the association between altered DNA repair, metabolism and response to chemotherapy. Seventy pairs of sporadic colorectal tumour samples and adjacent non-tumour mucosal specimens were assessed for BER and MMR gene and protein expression and their association with pathological and clinical features. MMR-deficient colon cancer cells (HCT116) transiently overexpressing MPG or XRCC1 were treated with 5-FU or TMZ and evaluated for viability and metabolic intermediate levels. Increase in BER gene and protein expression is associated with more aggressive tumour features and poor pathological outcomes in CRC. However, tumours with reduced MMR gene expression also displayed low MPG, OGG1 and PARP1 expression. Imbalancing BER by overexpression of MPG, but not XRCC1, sensitises MMR-deficient colon cancer cells to 5-FU and TMZ and leads to ATP depletion and lactate accumulation. MPG overexpression alters DNA repair and metabolism and is a potential strategy to overcome 5-FU chemotherapeutic resistance in MMR-deficient CRC. PMID:28903334

  16. Defective Excision Repair of Pyrimidine Dimers in the Ultraviolet-Sensitive Escherichia coli ras− Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Walker, James R.

    1970-01-01

    The ras− mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 is sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light but only slightly sensitive to X-irradiation (1.5-fold increase). Other phenotypic properties include normal recombination ability and normal host cell reactivation ability but an abnormally high frequency of UV-induced mutation. The response of the ras− mutant to UV has been studied biochemically. After low doses of UV, the ras− mutant degraded excessive amounts of deoxyribonucleic acid, and long delays in resumption of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis occurred. Pyrimidine dimers were excised at the normal rate. Although the mutant had the capability of initiating repair replication, the process was not completed after the high UV dose required to allow detection of repair replication. The ras− mutant, after low UV doses, left three to four times as many single-strand breaks not rejoined as did the wild-type strain. PMID:4919983

  17. Phosphorylated HBO1 at UV irradiated sites is essential for nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Matsunuma, Ryoichi; Horiguchi, Ryo; Uchida, Chiharu; Nakazawa, Yuka; Motegi, Akira; Nishimoto, Koji; Sakai, Satoshi; Ohhata, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Moriwaki, Shinichi; Nishitani, Hideo; Ui, Ayako; Ogi, Tomoo; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2017-01-01

    HBO1, a histone acetyl transferase, is a co-activator of DNA pre-replication complex formation. We recently reported that HBO1 is phosphorylated by ATM and/or ATR and binds to DDB2 after ultraviolet irradiation. Here, we show that phosphorylated HBO1 at cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) sites mediates histone acetylation to facilitate recruitment of XPC at the damaged DNA sites. Furthermore, HBO1 facilitates accumulation of SNF2H and ACF1, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complex, to CPD sites. Depletion of HBO1 inhibited repair of CPDs and sensitized cells to ultraviolet irradiation. However, depletion of HBO1 in cells derived from xeroderma pigmentosum patient complementation groups, XPE, XPC and XPA, did not lead to additional sensitivity towards ultraviolet irradiation. Our findings suggest that HBO1 acts in concert with SNF2H–ACF1 to make the chromosome structure more accessible to canonical nucleotide excision repair factors. PMID:28719581

  18. Oxidized nucleotide insertion by pol β confounds ligation during base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Melike; Horton, Julie K.; Dai, Da-Peng; Stefanick, Donna F.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress in cells can lead to accumulation of reactive oxygen species and oxidation of DNA precursors. Oxidized purine nucleotides can be inserted into DNA during replication and repair. The main pathway for correcting oxidized bases in DNA is base excision repair (BER), and in vertebrates DNA polymerase β (pol β) provides gap filling and tailoring functions. Here we report that the DNA ligation step of BER is compromised after pol β insertion of oxidized purine nucleotides into the BER intermediate in vitro. These results suggest the possibility that BER mediated toxic strand breaks are produced in cells under oxidative stress conditions. We observe enhanced cytotoxicity in oxidizing-agent treated pol β expressing mouse fibroblasts, suggesting formation of DNA strand breaks under these treatment conditions. Increased cytotoxicity following MTH1 knockout or treatment with MTH1 inhibitor suggests the oxidation of precursor nucleotides. PMID:28067232

  19. Crystal structure of the DNA nucleotide excision repair enzyme UvrB from Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Machius, Mischa; Henry, Lisa; Palnitkar, Maya; Deisenhofer, Johann

    1999-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the most important DNA-repair mechanism in living organisms. In prokaryotes, three enzymes forming the UvrABC system initiate NER of a variety of structurally different DNA lesions. UvrB, the central component of this system, is responsible for the ultimate DNA damage recognition and participates in the incision of the damaged DNA strand. The crystal structure of Thermus thermophilus UvrB reveals a core that is structurally similar to core regions found in helicases, where they constitute molecular motors. Additional domains implicated in binding to DNA and various components of the NER system are attached to this central core. The architecture and distribution of DNA binding sites suggest a possible model for the DNA damage recognition process. PMID:10518516

  20. Regulation of global genome nucleotide excision repair by SIRT1 through xeroderma pigmentosum C

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Mei; Shea, Christopher R.; Guo, Xiumei; Li, Xiaoling; Soltani, Keyoumars; Han, Weinong; He, Yu-Ying

    2010-01-01

    Disruption of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway by mutations can cause xeroderma pigmentosum, a syndrome predisposing affected individuals to development of skin cancer. The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) protein is essential for initiating global genome NER by recognizing the DNA lesion and recruiting downstream factors. Here we show that inhibition of the deacetylase and longevity factor SIRT1 impairs global genome NER through suppressing the transcription of XPC in a SIRT1 deacetylase-dependent manner. SIRT1 enhances XPC expression by reducing AKT-dependent nuclear localization of the transcription repressor of XPC. Finally, we show that SIRT1 levels are significantly reduced in human skin tumors from Caucasian patients, a population at highest risk. These findings suggest that SIRT1 acts as a tumor suppressor through its role in DNA repair. PMID:21149730

  1. The role of DNA base excision repair in brain homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mansour; Morevati, Marya; Croteau, Deborah; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-08-01

    Chemical modification and spontaneous loss of nucleotide bases from DNA are estimated to occur at the rate of thousands per human cell per day. DNA base excision repair (BER) is a critical mechanism for repairing such lesions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Defective expression or function of proteins required for BER or proteins that regulate BER have been consistently associated with neurological dysfunction and disease in humans. Recent studies suggest that DNA lesions in the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments and the cellular response to those lesions have a profound effect on cellular energy homeostasis, mitochondrial function and cellular bioenergetics, with especially strong influence on neurological function. Further studies in this area could lead to novel approaches to prevent and treat human neurodegenerative disease.

  2. The role of DNA base excision repair in brain homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Mansour; Morevati, Marya; Croteau, Deborah; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical modification and spontaneous loss of nucleotide bases from DNA are estimated to occur at the rate of thousands per human cell per day. DNA base excision repair (BER) is a critical mechanism for repairing such lesions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Defective expression or function of proteins required for BER or proteins that regulate BER have been consistently associated with neurological dysfunction and disease in humans. Recent studies suggest that DNA lesions in the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments and the cellular response to those lesions have a profound effect on cellular energy homeostasis, mitochondrial function and cellular bioenergetics, with especially strong influence on neurological function. Further studies in this area could lead to novel approaches to prevent and treat human neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26002197

  3. DNA base excision repair activities in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Lior; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Mattson, Mark P.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been correlated with elevated levels of oxidative DNA damage. Base excision repair (BER) is the main repair pathway for the removal of oxidative DNA base modifications. We have recently found significant functional deficiencies in BER in brains of sporadic AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients. In this study we tested whether altered BER activities are associated with appearance of symptoms in different brain regions of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic mice harboring mutant APP alone or in combination with Tau and PS1. Our results suggest that unlike in humans, the development of AD-like pathology in the studied mouse models is not associated with deficiencies in BER. PMID:18378358

  4. Cytosine deamination and base excision repair cause R-loop-induced CAG repeat fragility and instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaofeng A; Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2017-09-18

    CAG/CTG repeats are structure-forming repetitive DNA sequences, and expansion beyond a threshold of ∼35 CAG repeats is the cause of several human diseases. Expanded CAG repeats are prone to breakage, and repair of the breaks can cause repeat contractions and expansions. In this study, we found that cotranscriptional R-loops formed at a CAG-70 repeat inserted into a yeast chromosome. R-loops were further elevated upon deletion of yeast RNaseH genes and caused repeat fragility. A significant increase in CAG repeat contractions was also observed, consistent with previous human cell studies. Deletion of yeast cytosine deaminase Fcy1 significantly decreased the rate of CAG repeat fragility and contractions in the rnh1Δrnh201Δ background, indicating that Fcy1-mediated deamination is one cause of breakage and contractions in the presence of R-loops. Furthermore, base excision repair (BER) is responsible for causing CAG repeat contractions downstream of Fcy1, but not fragility. The Rad1/XPF and Rad2/XPG nucleases were also important in protecting against contractions, but through BER rather than nucleotide excision repair. Surprisingly, the MutLγ (Mlh1/Mlh3) endonuclease caused R-loop-dependent CAG fragility, defining an alternative function for this complex. These findings provide evidence that breakage at expanded CAG repeats occurs due to R-loop formation and reveal two mechanisms for CAG repeat instability: one mediated by cytosine deamination of DNA engaged in R-loops and the other by MutLγ cleavage. Since disease-causing CAG repeats occur in transcribed regions, our results suggest that R-loop-mediated fragility is a mechanism that could cause DNA damage and repeat-length changes in human cells.

  5. Active transcriptomic and proteomic reprogramming in the C. elegans nucleotide excision repair mutant xpa-1.

    PubMed

    Arczewska, Katarzyna D; Tomazella, Gisele G; Lindvall, Jessica M; Kassahun, Henok; Maglioni, Silvia; Torgovnick, Alessandro; Henriksson, Johan; Matilainen, Olli; Marquis, Bryce J; Nelson, Bryant C; Jaruga, Pawel; Babaie, Eshrat; Holmberg, Carina I; Bürglin, Thomas R; Ventura, Natascia; Thiede, Bernd; Nilsen, Hilde

    2013-05-01

    Transcription-blocking oxidative DNA damage is believed to contribute to aging and to underlie activation of oxidative stress responses and down-regulation of insulin-like signaling (ILS) in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) deficient mice. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomic description of the Caenorhabditis elegans NER-defective xpa-1 mutant and compare the proteome and transcriptome signatures. Both methods indicated activation of oxidative stress responses, which was substantiated biochemically by a bioenergetic shift involving increased steady-state reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. We identify the lesion-detection enzymes of Base Excision Repair (NTH-1) and global genome NER (XPC-1 and DDB-1) as upstream requirements for transcriptomic reprogramming as RNA-interference mediated depletion of these enzymes prevented up-regulation of genes over-expressed in the xpa-1 mutant. The transcription factors SKN-1 and SLR-2, but not DAF-16, were identified as effectors of reprogramming. As shown in human XPA cells, the levels of transcription-blocking 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine lesions were reduced in the xpa-1 mutant compared to the wild type. Hence, accumulation of cyclopurines is unlikely to be sufficient for reprogramming. Instead, our data support a model where the lesion-detection enzymes NTH-1, XPC-1 and DDB-1 play active roles to generate a genomic stress signal sufficiently strong to result in transcriptomic reprogramming in the xpa-1 mutant.

  6. Rev1 is a base excision repair enzyme with 5′-deoxyribose phosphate lyase activity

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rajendra; Poltoratsky, Vladimir; Hou, Esther W.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    Rev1 is a member of the Y-family of DNA polymerases and is known for its deoxycytidyl transferase activity that incorporates dCMP into DNA and its ability to function as a scaffold factor for other Y-family polymerases in translesion bypass events. Rev1 also is involved in mutagenic processes during somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. In light of the mutation pattern consistent with dCMP insertion observed earlier in mouse fibroblast cells treated with a base excision repair-inducing agent, we questioned whether Rev1 could also be involved in base excision repair (BER). Here, we uncovered a weak 5′-deoxyribose phosphate (5′-dRP) lyase activity in mouse Rev1 and demonstrated the enzyme can mediate BER in vitro. The full-length Rev1 protein and its catalytic core domain are similar in their ability to support BER in vitro. The dRP lyase activity in both of these proteins was confirmed by NaBH4 reduction of the Schiff base intermediate and kinetics studies. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and deletion analysis localized the dRP lyase active site to the C-terminal segment of Rev1's catalytic core domain. These results suggest that Rev1 could serve as a backup polymerase in BER and could potentially contribute to AID-initiated antibody diversification through this activity. PMID:27683219

  7. BASE EXCISION DNA REPAIR LEVELS IN MITOCHONDRIAL LYSATES OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a senile dementia with increased incidence in older subjects (age>65 years). One of the earliest markers of AD is oxidative DNA damage. Recently it has been reported that preclinical AD patient brains show elevated levels of oxidative damage in both nuclear and mitochondrial nucleic acids. Moreover, different oxidative lesions in mitochondrial DNA are between 5–10-fold higher than in nuclear DNA in both control and AD postmortem brains. We previously showed that there is a significant loss of base excision repair (BER) components in whole tissue extracts of AD and mild cognitive impairment subjects relative to matched control subjects. However, comprehensive analysis of specific steps in base excision repair levels in mitochondrial extracts of AD patient brains is not available. In this study we mainly investigated various components of BER in mitochondrial extracts of AD and matched control postmortem brain samples. We found that the 5-hydroxyuracil (5OHU) incision and ligase activities are significantly lower in AD brains whereas the uracil incision, abasic site cleavage and dNTP incorporation activities are normal in these samples. PMID:24485507

  8. Nucleotide excision repair efficiency in quiescent human fibroblasts is modulated by circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Leonardo; Marini, Selena; Pontarin, Giovanna; Ferraro, Paola; Costa, Rodolfo; Albrecht, Urs; Celotti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER)process is crucial for maintaining genomic integrity because in many organisms, including humans, it represents the only system able to repair a wide range of DNA damage. The aim of the work was to investigate whether the efficiency of the repair of photoproducts induced by UV-light is affected by the circadian phase at which irradiation occurred. NER activity has been analyzed in human quiescent fibroblasts (in the absence of the cell cycle effect), in which circadian rhythmicity has been synchronized with a pulse of dexamethasone. Our results demonstrate that both DNA damage induction and repair efficiency are strictly dependent on the phase of the circadian rhythm at which the cells are UV-exposed. Furthermore, the differences observed between fibroblasts irradiated at different circadian times (CTs) are abolished when the clock is obliterated. In addition, we observe that chromatin structure is regulated by circadian rhythmicity. Maximal chromatin relaxation occurred at the same CT when photoproduct formation and removal were highest. Our data suggest that the circadian clock regulates both the DNA sensitivity to UV damage and the efficiency of NER by controlling chromatin condensation mainly through histone acetylation. PMID:25662220

  9. Altered DNA base excision repair profile in brain tissue and blood in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lillenes, Meryl S; Rabano, Alberto; Støen, Mari; Riaz, Tahira; Misaghian, Dorna; Møllersen, Linda; Esbensen, Ying; Günther, Clara-Cecilie; Selnes, Per; Stenset, Vidar T V; Fladby, Tormod; Tønjum, Tone

    2016-05-28

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder that is the main cause of dementia globally. AD is associated with increased oxidative stress, resulting from imbalance in production and clearance of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can damage DNA and other macromolecules, leading to genome instability and disrupted cellular functions. Base excision repair (BER) plays a major role in repairing oxidative DNA lesions. Here, we compared the expression of BER components APE1, OGG1, PARP1 and Polβ in blood and postmortem brain tissue from patients with AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls (HC). BER mRNA levels were correlated to clinical signs and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for AD. Notably, the expression of BER genes was higher in brain tissue than in blood samples. Polβ mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in the cerebellum than in the other brain regions, more so in AD patients than in HC. Blood mRNA levels of OGG1 was low and PARP1 high in MCI and AD. These findings reflect the oxidative stress-generating energy-consumption in the brain and the importance of BER in repairing these damage events. The data suggest that alteration in BER gene expression is an event preceding AD. The results link DNA repair in brain and blood to the etiology of AD at the molecular level and can potentially serve in establishing novel biomarkers, particularly in the AD prodromal phase.

  10. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage: from mechanism to disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Amy M.; Schaich, Matthew A.; Smith, Mallory S.; Flynn, Tony S.; Freudenthal, Bret. D.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species continuously assault the structure of DNA resulting in oxidation and fragmentation of the nucleobases. Both oxidative DNA damage itself and its repair mediate the progression of many prevalent human maladies. The major pathway tasked with removal of oxidative DNA damage, and hence maintaining genomic integrity, is base excision repair (BER). The aphorism that structure often dictates function has proven true, as numerous recent structural biology studies have aided in clarifying the molecular mechanisms used by key BER enzymes during the repair of damaged DNA. This review focuses on the mechanistic details of the individual BER enzymes and the association of these enzymes during the development and progression of human diseases, including cancer and neurological diseases. Expanding on these structural and biochemical studies to further clarify still elusive BER mechanisms, and focusing our efforts toward gaining an improved appreciation of how these enzymes form co-complexes to facilitate DNA repair is a crucial next step toward understanding how BER contributes to human maladies and how it can be manipulated to alter patient outcomes. PMID:28199214

  11. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A.; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A.; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Scicchitano, David A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER. PMID:26559971

  12. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Scicchitano, David A

    2016-01-08

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER.

  13. Polymorphisms in base excision repair genes: Breast cancer risk and individual radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Patrono, Clarice; Sterpone, Silvia; Testa, Antonella; Cozzi, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer among women worldwide. The aetiology and carcinogenesis of BC are not clearly defined, although genetic, hormonal, lifestyle and environmental risk factors have been established. The most common treatment for BC includes breast-conserving surgery followed by a standard radiotherapy (RT) regimen. However, radiation hypersensitivity and the occurrence of RT-induced toxicity in normal tissue may affect patients’ treatment. The role of DNA repair in cancer has been extensively investigated, and an impaired DNA damage response may increase the risk of BC and individual radiosensitivity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes may alter protein function and modulate DNA repair efficiency, influencing the development of various cancers, including BC. SNPs in DNA repair genes have also been studied as potential predictive factors for the risk of RT-induced side effects. Here, we review the literature on the association between SNPs in base excision repair (BER) genes and BC risk. We focused on X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), which plays a key role in BER, and on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, which encode three important BER enzymes that interact with XRCC1. Although no association between SNPs and radiation toxicity has been validated thus far, we also report published studies on XRCC1 SNPs and variants in other BER genes and RT-induced side effects in BC patients, emphasising that large well-designed studies are needed to determine the genetic components of individual radiosensitivity. PMID:25493225

  14. Estimating the effect of human base excision repair protein variants on the repair of oxidative DNA base damage.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed a complex association between human genetic variance and cancer risk. Quantitative biological modeling based on experimental data can play a critical role in interpreting the effect of genetic variation on biochemical pathways relevant to cancer development and progression. Defects in human DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins can reduce cellular tolerance to oxidative DNA base damage caused by endogenous and exogenous sources, such as exposure to toxins and ionizing radiation. If not repaired, DNA base damage leads to cell dysfunction and mutagenesis, consequently leading to cancer, disease, and aging. Population screens have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in many BER proteins and some have been purified and found to exhibit mild kinetic defects. Epidemiologic studies have led to conflicting conclusions on the association between single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in BER proteins and cancer risk. Using experimental data for cellular concentration and the kinetics of normal and variant BER proteins, we apply a previously developed and tested human BER pathway model to (i) estimate the effect of mild variants on BER of abasic sites and 8-oxoguanine, a prominent oxidative DNA base modification, (ii) identify ranges of variation associated with substantial BER capacity loss, and (iii) reveal nonintuitive consequences of multiple simultaneous variants. Our findings support previous work suggesting that mild BER variants have a minimal effect on pathway capacity whereas more severe defects and simultaneous variation in several BER proteins can lead to inefficient repair and potentially deleterious consequences of cellular damage.

  15. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery recruitment by the transcription-repair coupling factor involves unmasking of a conserved intramolecular interface

    PubMed Central

    Deaconescu, Alexandra M.; Sevostyanova, Anastasia; Artsimovitch, Irina; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA repair targets DNA lesions that block progression of elongating RNA polymerases. In bacteria, the transcription-repair coupling factor (TRCF; also known as Mfd) SF2 ATPase recognizes RNA polymerase stalled at a site of DNA damage, removes the enzyme from the DNA, and recruits the Uvr(A)BC nucleotide excision repair machinery via UvrA binding. Previous studies of TRCF revealed a molecular architecture incompatible with UvrA binding, leaving its recruitment mechanism unclear. Here, we examine the UvrA recognition determinants of TRCF using X-ray crystallography of a core TRCF–UvrA complex and probe the conformational flexibility of TRCF in the absence and presence of nucleotides using small-angle X-ray scattering. We demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of TRCF is inhibitory for UvrA binding, but not RNA polymerase release, and show that nucleotide binding induces concerted multidomain motions. Our studies suggest that autoinhibition of UvrA binding in TRCF may be relieved only upon engaging the DNA damage. PMID:22331906

  16. XPC is essential for nucleotide excision repair of zidovudine-induced DNA damage in human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qiangen; Beland, Frederick A.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Fang Jialong

    2011-03-01

    Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-dexoythymidine, AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, can be incorporated into DNA and cause DNA damage. The mechanisms underlying the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage are unknown. To investigate the pathways involved in the recognition and repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, human hepatoma HepG2 cells were incubated with AZT for 2 weeks and the expression of DNA damage signaling pathways was determined using a pathway-based real-time PCR array. Compared to control cultures, damaged DNA binding and nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways showed significantly increased gene expression. Further analysis indicated that AZT treatment increased the expression of genes associated with NER, including XPC, XPA, RPA1, GTF2H1, and ERCC1. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels of XPC and GTF2H1 were also significantly up-regulated. To explore further the function of XPC in the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, XPC expression was stably knocked down by 71% using short hairpin RNA interference. In the XPC knocked-down cells, 100 {mu}M AZT treatment significantly increased [{sup 3}H]AZT incorporation into DNA, decreased the total number of viable cells, increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase, induced apoptosis, and caused a more extensive G2/M cell cycle arrest when compared to non-transfected HepG2 cells or HepG2 cells transfected with a scrambled short hairpin RNA sequence. Overall, these data indicate that XPC plays an essential role in the NER repair of AZT-induced DNA damage.

  17. Nucleotide excision repair is not induced in human embryonic lung fibroblasts treated with environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Pavel; Mrhalkova, Andrea; Uhlirova, Katerina; Spatova, Milada; Rossnerova, Andrea; Libalova, Helena; Schmuczerova, Jana; Milcova, Alena; Topinka, Jan; Sram, Radim J

    2013-01-01

    The cellular response to genotoxic treatment depends on the cell line used. Although tumor cell lines are widely used for genotoxicity tests, the interpretation of the results may be potentially hampered by changes in cellular processes caused by malignant transformation. In our study we used normal human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469 cells) and tested their response to treatment with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and extractable organic matter (EOM) from ambient air particles <2.5 µm (PM2.5) collected in two Czech cities differing in levels and sources of air pollution. We analyzed multiple endpoints associated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including the levels of bulky DNA adducts and the nucleotide excision repair (NER) response [expression of XPE, XPC and XPA genes on the level of mRNA and proteins, unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS)]. EOMs were collected in the winter and summer of 2011 in two Czech cities with different levels and sources of air pollution. The effects of the studied compounds were analyzed in the presence (+S9) and absence (-S9) of the rat liver microsomal S9 fraction. The levels of bulky DNA adducts were highest after treatment with B[a]P, followed by winter EOMs; their induction by summer EOMs was weak. The induction of both mRNA and protein expression was observed, with the most pronounced effects after treatment with B[a]P (-S9); the response induced by EOMs from both cities and seasons was substantially weaker. The expression of DNA repair genes was not accompanied by the induction of UDS activity. In summary, our results indicate that the tested compounds induced low levels of DNA damage and affected the expression of NER genes; however, nucleotide excision repair was not induced.

  18. Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Not Induced in Human Embryonic Lung Fibroblasts Treated with Environmental Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Rossner, Pavel; Spatova, Milada; Rossnerova, Andrea; Libalova, Helena; Schmuczerova, Jana; Milcova, Alena; Topinka, Jan; Sram, Radim J.

    2013-01-01

    The cellular response to genotoxic treatment depends on the cell line used. Although tumor cell lines are widely used for genotoxicity tests, the interpretation of the results may be potentially hampered by changes in cellular processes caused by malignant transformation. In our study we used normal human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469 cells) and tested their response to treatment with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and extractable organic matter (EOM) from ambient air particles <2.5 µm (PM2.5) collected in two Czech cities differing in levels and sources of air pollution. We analyzed multiple endpoints associated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including the levels of bulky DNA adducts and the nucleotide excision repair (NER) response [expression of XPE, XPC and XPA genes on the level of mRNA and proteins, unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS)]. EOMs were collected in the winter and summer of 2011 in two Czech cities with different levels and sources of air pollution. The effects of the studied compounds were analyzed in the presence (+S9) and absence (–S9) of the rat liver microsomal S9 fraction. The levels of bulky DNA adducts were highest after treatment with B[a]P, followed by winter EOMs; their induction by summer EOMs was weak. The induction of both mRNA and protein expression was observed, with the most pronounced effects after treatment with B[a]P (–S9); the response induced by EOMs from both cities and seasons was substantially weaker. The expression of DNA repair genes was not accompanied by the induction of UDS activity. In summary, our results indicate that the tested compounds induced low levels of DNA damage and affected the expression of NER genes; however, nucleotide excision repair was not induced. PMID:23894430

  19. MISMATCH REPAIR-DEPENDENT ITERATIVE EXCISION AT IRREPARABLE O6-METHYLGUANINE LESIONS IN HUMAN NUCLEAR EXTRACTS*

    PubMed Central

    York, Sally J.; Modrich, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The response of mammalian cells to SN1 DNA methylators depends on functional MutSα and MutLα. Cells deficient in either of these activities are resistant to the cytotoxic effects of this class of chemotherapeutic drug. Because killing by SN1 methylators has been attributed to O6-methylguanine (MeG), we have constructed nicked circular heteroduplexes that contain a single MeG-T mispair and have examined processing of these molecules by mismatch repair in nuclear extracts of human cells. Excision provoked by MeG-T is restricted to the incised heteroduplex strand, leading to removal of the MeG when it resides on this strand. However, when the MeG is located on the continuous strand, the heteroduplex is irreparable. MeG-T-dependent repair DNA synthesis is observed on both reparable and irreparable, 3’ and 5’ heteroduplexes as judged by [32P]dAMP incorporation. Labeling with [α-32P]dATP followed by a cold dATP chase has demonstrated that newly synthesized DNA on irreparable molecules is subject to re-excision in a reaction that is MutLα-dependent, an effect attributable to presence of MeG on the template strand. Processing of the irreparable 3’ heteroduplex is also associated with incision of the discontinuous strand of a few percent of molecules near the thymidylate of the MeG-T base pair. These results provide the first direct evidence for mismatch repair-mediated iterative processing of DNA methylator damage, an effect that may be relevant to damage signaling events triggered by this class of chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:16772289

  20. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities.

    PubMed

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier

    2014-02-17

    DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes' activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL(-1) and 50 μg mL(-1) of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair activities.

  1. In vitro measurement of DNA base excision repair in isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Page, Melissa M; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is in relatively close proximity to reactive oxygen species (ROS) arising from spontaneous superoxide formation during respiration. As a result, it sustains oxidative damage that may include base modifications, base loss, and strand breaks. mtDNA replication past sites of oxidative damage can result in the introduction of mutations. mtDNA mutations are associated with various human diseases and can manifest as loss of bioenergetic function. DNA repair processes exist in mitochondria from apparently all metazoans. A fully functional DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway is present in mitochondria of vertebrates. This pathway is catalyzed by a number of DNA glycosylases, an AP endonuclease, polymerase gamma, and a DNA ligase. This chapter outlines the step-by-step protocols for isolating mitochondrial fractions, from a number of different model organisms, of sufficient purity to allow mtDNA repair activities to be measured. It details in vitro assays for the measurement of BER enzyme activities in lysates prepared from isolated mitochondria.

  2. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  3. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2004-08-01

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level, based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker, have led to estimates that vary over three to four orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our findings show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  4. Generation of DNA single-strand displacement by compromised nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Godon, Camille; Mourgues, Sophie; Nonnekens, Julie; Mourcet, Amandine; Coin, Fréderic; Vermeulen, Wim; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a precisely coordinated process essential to avoid DNA damage-induced cellular malfunction and mutagenesis. Here, we investigate the mechanistic details and effects of the NER machinery when it is compromised by a pathologically significant mutation in a subunit of the repair/transcription factor TFIIH, namely XPD. In contrast to previous studies, we find that no single- or double-strand DNA breaks are produced at early time points after UV irradiation of cells bearing a specific XPD mutation, despite the presence of a clear histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) signal in the UV-exposed areas. We show that the observed γH2AX signal can be explained by the presence of longer single-strand gaps possibly generated by strand displacement. Our in vivo measurements also indicate a strongly reduced TFIIH-XPG binding that could promote single-strand displacement at the site of UV lesions. This finding not only highlights the crucial role of XPG's interactions with TFIIH for proper NER, but also sheds new light on how a faulty DNA repair process can induce extreme genomic instability in human patients. PMID:22863773

  5. Base excision repair apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases in apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Onyango, David O.; Naguleswaran, Arunasalam; Delaplane, Sarah; Reed, April; Kelley, Mark R.; Georgiadis, Millie M.; Sullivan, William J.

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair is essential for cell viability and proliferation. In addition to reactive oxygen produced as a byproduct of their own metabolism, intracellular parasites also have to manage oxidative stress generated as a defense mechanism by the host. The spontaneous loss of DNA bases due to hydrolysis and oxidative DNA damage in intracellular parasites is great, but little is known about the type of DNA repair machineries that exist in these early-branching eukaryotes. However, it is clear processes similar to DNA base excision repair (BER) must exist to rectify spontaneous and host-mediated damage in Toxoplasma gondii. Here we report that Toxoplasma gondii, an opportunistic protozoan pathogen, possesses two apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases that function in DNA BER. We characterize the enzymatic activities of Toxoplasma exonuclease III (ExoIII, or Ape1) and endonuclease IV (EndoIV, or Apn1), designated TgAPE and TgAPN, respectively. Over-expression of TgAPN in Toxoplasma conferred protection from DNA damage, and viable knockouts of TgAPN were not obtainable. We generated an inducible TgAPN knockdown mutant using a ligand-controlled destabilization domain to establish that TgAPN is critical for Toxoplasma to recover from DNA damage. The importance of TgAPN and the fact that humans lack any observable APN family activity highlights TgAPN as a promising candidate for drug development to treat toxoplasmosis. PMID:21353648

  6. In vivo dynamics of chromatin-associated complex formation in mammalian nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Moné, Martijn J.; Bernas, Tytus; Dinant, Christoffel; Goedvree, Feliks A.; Manders, Erik M. M.; Volker, Marcel; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Vermeulen, Wim; van Driel, Roel

    2004-01-01

    Chromatin is the substrate for many processes in the cell nucleus, including transcription, replication, and various DNA repair systems, all of which require the formation of multiprotein machineries on the chromatin fiber. We have analyzed the kinetics of in vivo assembly of the protein complex that is responsible for nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Assembly is initiated by UV irradiation of a small area of the cell nucleus, after which the accumulation of GFP-tagged NER proteins in the DNA-damaged area is measured, reflecting the establishment of the dual-incision complex. The dynamic behavior of two NER proteins, ERCC1-XPF and TFIIH, was studied in detail. Results show that the repair complex is assembled with a rate of ≈30 complexes per second and is not diffusion limited. Furthermore, we provide in vivo evidence that not only binding of TFIIH, but also its helicase activity, is required for the recruitment of ERCC1-XPF. These studies give quantitative insight into the de novo assembly of a chromatin-associated protein complex in living cells. PMID:15520397

  7. Cells deficient in base-excision repair reveal cancer hallmarks originating from adjustments to genetic instability.

    PubMed

    Markkanen, Enni; Fischer, Roman; Ledentcova, Marina; Kessler, Benedikt M; Dianov, Grigory L

    2015-04-20

    Genetic instability, provoked by exogenous mutagens, is well linked to initiation of cancer. However, even in unstressed cells, DNA undergoes a plethora of spontaneous alterations provoked by its inherent chemical instability and the intracellular milieu. Base excision repair (BER) is the major cellular pathway responsible for repair of these lesions, and as deficiency in BER activity results in DNA damage it has been proposed that it may trigger the development of sporadic cancers. Nevertheless, experimental evidence for this model remains inconsistent and elusive. Here, we performed a proteomic analysis of BER deficient human cells using stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), and demonstrate that BER deficiency, which induces genetic instability, results in dramatic changes in gene expression, resembling changes found in many cancers. We observed profound alterations in tissue homeostasis, serine biosynthesis, and one-carbon- and amino acid metabolism, all of which have been identified as cancer cell 'hallmarks'. For the first time, this study describes gene expression changes characteristic for cells deficient in repair of endogenous DNA lesions by BER. These expression changes resemble those observed in cancer cells, suggesting that genetically unstable BER deficient cells may be a source of pre-cancerous cells.

  8. Transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The ambiguous role of Rad26.

    PubMed

    Li, Shisheng

    2015-12-01

    Transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) is believed to be triggered by an RNA polymerase stalled at a lesion in the transcribed strand of actively transcribed genes. Rad26, a DNA-dependent ATPase in the family of SWI2/SNF2 chromatin remodeling proteins, plays an important role in TC-NER in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, Rad26 is not solely responsible for TC-NER and Rpb9, a nonessential subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II), is largely responsible for Rad26-independent TC-NER. The Rad26-dependent and Rpb9-dependent TC-NER have different efficiencies in genes with different transcription levels and in different regions of a gene. Rad26 becomes entirely or partially dispensable for TC-NER in the absence of Rpb4, another nonessential subunit of RNAP II, or a number of transcription elongation factors (Spt4, Spt5 and the RNAP II associated factor complex). Rad26 may not be a true transcription-repair coupling factor that recruits the repair machinery to the damaged sites where RNAP II stalls. Rather, Rad26 may facilitate TC-NER indirectly, by antagonizing the action of TC-NER repressors that normally promote transcription elongation. The underlying mechanism of how Rad26 functions in TC-NER remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Initiation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response through the base excision repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Cheng; Hu, Ling-Yueh; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2015-08-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is activated by various genotoxic stresses. Base lesions, which are structurally simple and predominantly fixed by base excision repair (BER), can trigger the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) pathway, a DDR component. How these lesions trigger DDR remains unclear. Here we show that, for alkylation damage, methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, both of which function early in BER, are required for ATM-Chk2-dependent DDR. In addition, other DNA glycosylases, including uracil-DNA glycosylase and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, which are involved in repairing deaminated bases and oxidative damage, also induced DDR. The early steps of BER therefore play a vital role in modulating the ATM-Chk2 DDR in response to base lesions, facilitating downstream BER processing for repair, in which the formation of a single-strand break was shown to play a critical role. Moreover, MPG knockdown rescued cell lethality, its overexpression led to cell death triggered by DNA damage and, more interestingly, higher MPG expression in breast and ovarian cancers corresponded with a greater probability of relapse-free survival after chemotherapy, underscoring the importance of glycosylase-dependent DDR. This study highlights the crosstalk between BER and DDR that contributes to maintaining genomic integrity and may have clinical applications in cancer therapy.

  10. A novel function for the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex in base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Steininger, Sylvia; Ahne, Fred; Winkler, Klaudia; Kleinschmidt, Anja; Eckardt-Schupp, Friederike; Moertl, Simone

    2010-01-01

    The Mre11/Rad50/Xrs2 (MRX) complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has well-characterized functions in DNA double-strand break processing, checkpoint activation, telomere length maintenance and meiosis. In this study, we demonstrate an involvement of the complex in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. We studied the repair of methyl-methanesulfonate-induced heat-labile sites in chromosomal DNA in vivo and the in vitro BER capacity for the repair of uracil- and 8-oxoG-containing oligonucleotides in MRX-deficient cells. Both approaches show a clear BER deficiency for the xrs2 mutant as compared to wildtype cells. The in vitro analyses revealed that both subpathways, long-patch and short-patch BER, are affected and that all components of the MRX complex are similarly important for the new function in BER. The investigation of the epistatic relationship of XRS2 to other BER genes suggests a role of the MRX complex downstream of the AP-lyases Ntg1 and Ntg2. Analysis of individual steps in BER showed that base recognition and strand incision are not affected by the MRX complex. Reduced gap-filling activity and the missing effect of aphidicoline treatment, an inhibitor for polymerases, on the BER efficiency indicate an involvement of the MRX complex in providing efficient polymerase activity. PMID:20040573

  11. Different structural states in oligonucleosomes are required for early versus late steps of base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Shima; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H.; Smerdon, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin in eukaryotic cells is folded into higher order structures of folded nucleosome filaments, and DNA damage occurs at all levels of this structural hierarchy. However, little is known about the impact of higher order folding on DNA repair enzymes. We examined the catalytic activities of purified human base excision repair (BER) enzymes on uracil-containing oligonucleosome arrays, which are folded primarily into 30 nm structures when incubated in repair reaction buffers. The catalytic activities of uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) and apyrimidinic/apurinic endonuclease (APE) digest G:U mismatches to completion in the folded oligonucleosomes without requiring significant disruption. In contrast, DNA polymerase β (Pol β) synthesis is inhibited in a major fraction (∼80%) of the oligonucleosome array, suggesting that single strand nicks in linker DNA are far more accessible to Pol β in highly folded oligonucleosomes. Importantly, this barrier in folded oligonucleosomes is removed by purified chromatin remodeling complexes. Both ISW1 and ISW2 from yeast significantly enhance Pol β accessibility to the refractory nicked sites in oligonucleosomes. These results indicate that the initial steps of BER (UDG and APE) act efficiently on highly folded oligonucleosome arrays, and chromatin remodeling may be required for the latter steps of BER in intact chromatin. PMID:17576692

  12. Chromatin associated mechanisms in base excision repair - nucleosome remodeling and DNA transcription, two key players.

    PubMed

    Menoni, Hervé; Di Mascio, Paolo; Cadet, Jean; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar

    2016-12-20

    Genomic DNA is prone to a large number of insults by a myriad of endogenous and exogenous agents. The base excision repair (BER) is the major mechanism used by cells for the removal of various DNA lesions spontaneously or environmentally induced and the maintenance of genome integrity. The presence of persistent DNA damage is not compatible with life, since abrogation of BER leads to early embryonic lethality in mice. There are several lines of evidences showing existence of a link between deficient BER, cancer proneness and ageing, thus illustrating the importance of this DNA repair pathway in human health. Although the enzymology of BER mechanisms has been largely elucidated using chemically defined DNA damage substrates and purified proteins, the complex interplay of BER with another vital process like transcription or when DNA is in its natural state (i.e. wrapped in nucleosome and assembled in chromatin fiber is largely unexplored. Cells use chromatin remodeling factors to overcome the general repression associated with the nucleosomal organization. It is broadly accepted that energy-dependent nucleosome remodeling factors disrupt histones-DNA interactions at the expense of ATP hydrolysis to favor transcription as well as DNA repair. Importantly, unlike transcription, BER is not part of a regulated developmental process but represents a maintenance system that should be efficient anytime and anywhere in the genome. In this review we will discuss how BER can deal with chromatin organization to maintain genetic information. Emphasis will be placed on the following challenging question: how BER is initiated within chromatin?

  13. Expression of domains for protein-protein interaction of nucleotide excision repair proteins modifies cancer cell sensitivity to platinum derivatives and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Jordheim, Lars Petter; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Matera, Eva-Laure; Bouledrak, Karima; Dumontet, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is involved in the repair of DNA damage caused by platinum derivatives and has been shown to decrease the cytotoxic activity of these drugs. Because protein-protein interactions are essential for NER activity, we transfected human cancer cell lines (A549 and HCT116) with plasmids coding the amino acid sequences corresponding to the interacting domains between excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA), as well as ERCC1 and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group F (XPF), all NER proteins. Using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and annexin V staining, we showed that transfected A549 cells were sensitized 1.2-2.2-fold to carboplatin and that transfected HCT116 cells were sensitized 1.4-5.4-fold to oxaliplatin in vitro. In addition, transfected cells exhibited modified in vivo sensitivity to the same drugs. Finally, in particular cell models of the interaction between ERCC1 and XPF, DNA repair was decreased, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of the histone 2AX after exposure to mitomycin C, and genomic instability was increased, as determined by comparative genomic hybridization studies. The results indicate that the interacting peptides act as dominant negatives and decrease NER activity through inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  14. Age-Related Neuronal Degeneration: Complementary Roles of Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-Coupled Repair in Preventing Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    de Waard, Monique C.; Haasdijk, Elize D.; Brandt, Renata; Vermeij, Marcel; Rijksen, Yvonne; Maas, Alex; van Steeg, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration is a hallmark of many DNA repair syndromes. Yet, how DNA damage causes neuronal degeneration and whether defects in different repair systems affect the brain differently is largely unknown. Here, we performed a systematic detailed analysis of neurodegenerative changes in mouse models deficient in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR), two partially overlapping DNA repair systems that remove helix-distorting and transcription-blocking lesions, respectively, and that are associated with the UV-sensitive syndromes xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). TCR–deficient Csa−/− and Csb−/− CS mice showed activated microglia cells surrounding oligodendrocytes in regions with myelinated axons throughout the nervous system. This white matter microglia activation was not observed in NER–deficient Xpa−/− and Xpc−/− XP mice, but also occurred in XpdXPCS mice carrying a point mutation (G602D) in the Xpd gene that is associated with a combined XPCS disorder and causes a partial NER and TCR defect. The white matter abnormalities in TCR–deficient mice are compatible with focal dysmyelination in CS patients. Both TCR–deficient and NER–deficient mice showed no evidence for neuronal degeneration apart from p53 activation in sporadic (Csa−/−, Csb−/−) or highly sporadic (Xpa−/−, Xpc−/−) neurons and astrocytes. To examine to what extent overlap occurs between both repair systems, we generated TCR–deficient mice with selective inactivation of NER in postnatal neurons. These mice develop dramatic age-related cumulative neuronal loss indicating DNA damage substrate overlap and synergism between TCR and NER pathways in neurons, and they uncover the occurrence of spontaneous DNA injury that may trigger neuronal degeneration. We propose that, while Csa−/− and Csb−/− TCR–deficient mice represent powerful animal models to study the mechanisms underlying myelin abnormalities

  15. Interplay between base excision repair activity and toxicity of 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases in an E. coli complementation system.

    PubMed

    Troll, Christopher J; Adhikary, Suraj; Cueff, Marie; Mitra, Ileena; Eichman, Brandt F; Camps, Manel

    2014-01-01

    DNA glycosylases carry out the first step of base excision repair by removing damaged bases from DNA. The N3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases specialize in alkylation repair and are either constitutively expressed or induced by exposure to alkylating agents. To study the functional and evolutionary significance of constitutive versus inducible expression, we expressed two closely related yeast 3MeA DNA glycosylases - inducible Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAG and constitutive S. pombe Mag1 - in a glycosylase-deficient Escherichia coli strain. In both cases, constitutive expression conferred resistance to alkylating agent exposure. However, in the absence of exogenous alkylation, high levels of expression of both glycosylases were deleterious. We attribute this toxicity to excessive glycosylase activity, since suppressing spMag1 expression correlated with improved growth in liquid culture, and spMag1 mutants exhibiting decreased glycosylase activity showed improved growth and viability. Selection of a random spMag1 mutant library for increased survival in the presence of exogenous alkylation resulted in the selection of hypomorphic mutants, providing evidence for the presence of a genetic barrier to the evolution of enhanced glycosylase activity when constitutively expressed. We also show that low levels of 3MeA glycosylase expression improve fitness in our glycosylase-deficient host, implying that 3MeA glycosylase activity is likely necessary for repair of endogenous lesions. These findings suggest that 3MeA glycosylase activity is evolutionarily conserved for repair of endogenously produced alkyl lesions, and that inducible expression represents a common strategy to rectify deleterious effects of excessive 3MeA activity in the absence of exogenous alkylation challenge.

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination repair pathways and their role in the risk of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Guojun; Wang, Min; Chen, Weida; Shi, Wei; Yin, Jiapeng; Gang, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathways on the development of osteosarcoma patients. Methods: Genotypes of ERCC1 rs11615 and rs3212986, ERCC2 rs1799793 and rs13181, NBN rs709816 and rs1805794, RAD51 rs1801320, rs1801321 and rs12593359, and XRCC3 rs861539 were conducted by Polymerase Chain Reaction Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Results: Total 148 osteosarcoma patients and 296 control subjects were collected from Taizhou First People’s Hospital. Conditional logistic regression analyses found that individuals carrying with GA+AA genotype of ERCC2 rs1799793 and GC+CC genotype of NBN rs1805794 were significantly associated with increased risk of osteosarcoma, and the ORs(95%CI) were 1.58(1.03-2.41) and 2.66(1.73-4.08), respectively. We found that GA+AA genotype of ERCC2 rs1799793 or GC+CC genotype of NBN rs1805794 were associated with an increased risk of osteosarcoma in females, with ORs(95%CI) of 2.42(1.20-4.87) and 2.01(1.07-4.23), respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that ERCC2 rs1799793 and NBN rs1805794 polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk for osteosarcoma, which suggests that NER and HRR pathways modulate the risk of developing osteosarcoma. PMID:26101473

  17. Wound repair and anti-inflammatory potential of Lonicera japonica in excision wound-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae), a widely used traditional Chinese medicinal plant, is used to treat some infectious diseases and it may have uses as a healthy food and applications in cosmetics and as an ornamental groundcover. The ethanol extract of the flowering aerial parts of L. japonica (LJEE) was investigated for its healing efficiency in a rat excision wound model. Methods Excision wounds were inflicted upon three groups of eight rats each. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction in skin wound sites in rats treated with simple ointment base, 10% (w/w) LJEE ointment, or the reference standard drug, 0.2% (w/w) nitrofurazone ointment. The effects of LJEE on the contents of hydroxyproline and hexosamine during healing were estimated. The antimicrobial activity of LJEE against microorganisms was also assessed. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of LJEE was investigated to understand the mechanism of wound healing. Results LJEE exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis. The ointment formulation prepared with 10% (w/w) LJEE exhibited potent wound healing capacity as evidenced by the wound contraction in the excision wound model. The contents of hydroxyproline and hexosamine also correlated with the observed healing pattern. These findings were supported by the histopathological characteristics of healed wound sections, as greater tissue regeneration, more fibroblasts, and angiogenesis were observed in the 10% (w/w) LJEE ointment-treated group. The results also indicated that LJEE possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity, as it enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines that suppress proinflammatory cytokine production. Conclusions The results suggest that the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of LJEE act synergistically to accelerate wound repair. PMID:23173654

  18. Wound repair and anti-inflammatory potential of Lonicera japonica in excision wound-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Cheng; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Lee, Shiow-Ling; Liu, I-Min

    2012-11-23

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae), a widely used traditional Chinese medicinal plant, is used to treat some infectious diseases and it may have uses as a healthy food and applications in cosmetics and as an ornamental groundcover. The ethanol extract of the flowering aerial parts of L. japonica (LJEE) was investigated for its healing efficiency in a rat excision wound model. Excision wounds were inflicted upon three groups of eight rats each. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction in skin wound sites in rats treated with simple ointment base, 10% (w/w) LJEE ointment, or the reference standard drug, 0.2% (w/w) nitrofurazone ointment. The effects of LJEE on the contents of hydroxyproline and hexosamine during healing were estimated. The antimicrobial activity of LJEE against microorganisms was also assessed. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of LJEE was investigated to understand the mechanism of wound healing. LJEE exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis. The ointment formulation prepared with 10% (w/w) LJEE exhibited potent wound healing capacity as evidenced by the wound contraction in the excision wound model. The contents of hydroxyproline and hexosamine also correlated with the observed healing pattern. These findings were supported by the histopathological characteristics of healed wound sections, as greater tissue regeneration, more fibroblasts, and angiogenesis were observed in the 10% (w/w) LJEE ointment-treated group. The results also indicated that LJEE possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity, as it enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines that suppress proinflammatory cytokine production. The results suggest that the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of LJEE act synergistically to accelerate wound repair.

  19. Erectile function restoration after repair of excised cavernous nerves by autologous vein graft in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wanli; Cheng, Bei; Liu, Tongzu; Li, Shiwen; Tian, Yihao

    2010-10-01

    Cavernous nerves (CNs) injury is the main cause of erectile dysfunction (ED) following radical prostatectomy. Its restoration remains challenging. To investigate the feasibility of erectile function recovery by autologous vein graft after bilateral CNs being excised in a rat model. A total of 36 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups. A 5mm segment of CN was excised bilaterally in group B and C. In group B, a 7-mm segment of autologous saphenous vein was interposed at the defect site bilaterally, with two nerve stumps inserted into the vein lumen. Group C underwent no repair. Group A was accepted a sham operation. 4 months later, apomorphine tests were performed on each rat, followed by injection of 4% fluorogold into bilateral corpus cavernous. 5 days later, after monitoring intracorporal pressure (ICP) changes induced by electrostimulation of CN, rats were sacrificed and their bilateral major pelvic ganglions were obtained for detection of fluorogold, and penile tissues of middle shaft were obtained for detecting nitric oxide synthase-containing nerve fibers in penile dorsal nerves. Erectile function was assessed by apomorphine test and ICP monitoring. CN regeneration was judged by fluoroglod tracing and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase staining. Apomorphine tests resulted in 58% rats with erectile responses in group B, whereas no erection was observed in group C. ICP monitoring also demonstrated a significant recovery in erectile function in group B compared with group C. Much more and brighter fluorogold coloring cells were examined in major pelvic ganglions of group B than those of group C. NADPH-diaphorase staining also showed much more positive fibers were detected in penile dorsal nerves in group B than in group C. Autologous vein graft could provide a guide channel to induce CN regeneration and successfully restore autonomic erectile function after CNs being excised in rats. © 2010 International

  20. Discovery and Characterization of DNA Excision Repair Pathways: the Work of Philip Courtland Hanawalt

    PubMed Central

    Kresge, Nicole; Simoni, Robert D.; Hill, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of Wild-type p53 Is Required for Efficient Global Genomic Nucleotide Excision Repair in UV-irradiated Human Fibroblasts (Ford, J. M., and Hanawalt, P. C. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 28073–28080) Structural Characterization of RNA Polymerase II Complexes Arrested by a Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer in the Transcribed Strand of Template DNA (Tornaletti, S., Reines, D., and Hanawalt, P. C. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 24124–24130) G4-forming Sequences in the Non-transcribed DNA Strand Pose Blocks to T7 RNA Polymerase and Mammalian RNA Polymerase II (Tornaletti, S., Park-Snyder, S., and Hanawalt, P. C. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 12756–12762) PMID:20740724

  1. Nucleotide excision repair in chromatin: the shape of things to come.

    PubMed

    Reed, Simon H

    2005-07-28

    Much of our mechanistic understanding of nucleotide excision repair (NER) has been derived from biochemical studies that have analysed the reaction as it occurs on DNA substrates that are not representative of DNA as it exists in the living cell. These studies have been extremely useful in deciphering the core mechanism of the NER reaction, but efforts to understand how NER operates in chromatin have been hampered in part because assembling DNA into nucleosomes, the first level of chromatin compaction, is inhibitory to NER in vitro. However, recent research using biochemical, genetic and cell-based studies is now providing us with the first insights into the molecular mechanism of NER as it occurs in the cellular context. A number of recent studies have provided glimpses of a chromatin--NER connection. Here I review this literature and evaluate how it might aid our understanding, and shape our future research into NER.

  2. Transcriptional and Posttranslational Regulation of Nucleotide Excision Repair: The Guardian of the Genome against Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Min; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight represents a constant threat to genome stability by generating modified DNA bases such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts (6-4PP). If unrepaired, these lesions can have deleterious effects, including skin cancer. Mammalian cells are able to neutralize UV-induced photolesions through nucleotide excision repair (NER). The NER pathway has multiple components including seven xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) proteins (XPA to XPG) and numerous auxiliary factors, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) protein kinase and RCC1 like domain (RLD) and homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus (HECT) domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2 (HERC2). In this review we highlight recent data on the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of NER activity. PMID:27827925

  3. MUTYH the base excision repair gene family member associated with colorectal cancer polyposis.

    PubMed

    Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Golmohammadi, Mina; Behboudi, Faeghe; Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad, Ehsan; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    sporadic (70-75%), familial (20-25%) and hereditary (5-10%). hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes classified into two different subtypes: polyposis and non polyposis. Familial Adenomatous polyposis (FAP; OMIM #175100) is the most common polyposis syndrome, account for <1% of colorectal cancer incidence and characterized by germline mutations in the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC, 5q21- q22; OMIM #175100). FAP is a dominant cancer predisposing syndrome which 20-25% cases are de novo. There is also another polyposis syndrome; MUTYH associated polyposis (MAP, OMIM 608456) which it is caused by mutation in human Mut Y homologue MUTYH (MUTYH; OMIM 604933) and it is associated with multiple (15-100) colonic adenomas. In this paper we discuss MUTYH mechanism as an important member of Base Excision Repair (BER) family and its important role in polyposis condition.

  4. MUTYH the base excision repair gene family member associated with colorectal cancer polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Golmohammadi, Mina; Behboudi, Faeghe; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is classified in to three forms: sporadic (70–75%), familial (20–25%) and hereditary (5–10%). hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes classified into two different subtypes: polyposis and non polyposis. Familial Adenomatous polyposis (FAP; OMIM #175100) is the most common polyposis syndrome, account for <1% of colorectal cancer incidence and characterized by germline mutations in the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC, 5q21- q22; OMIM #175100). FAP is a dominant cancer predisposing syndrome which 20–25% cases are de novo. There is also another polyposis syndrome; MUTYH associated polyposis (MAP, OMIM 608456) which it is caused by mutation in human Mut Y homologue MUTYH (MUTYH; OMIM 604933) and it is associated with multiple (15–100) colonic adenomas. In this paper we discuss MUTYH mechanism as an important member of Base Excision Repair (BER) family and its important role in polyposis condition. PMID:24834277

  5. UVSSA and USP7: new players regulating transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) specifically removes DNA damage located in actively transcribed genes. Defects in TC-NER are associated with several human disorders, including Cockayne syndrome (CS) and ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive syndrome (UVSS). Using exome sequencing, and genetic and proteomic approaches, three recent studies have identified mutations in the UVSSA gene as being responsible for UVSS-A. These findings suggest a new mechanistic model involving UV-stimulated scaffold protein A (UVSSA) and the ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7) in the fate of stalled RNA polymerase II during TC-NER, and provide insights into the diverse clinical features of CS and UVSS. PMID:22621766

  6. Modeling nucleotide excision repair and its impact on UV-induced mutagenesis during SOS-response in bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Bugay, Aleksandr N; Krasavin, Evgeny A; Parkhomenko, Aleksandr Yu; Vasilyeva, Maria A

    2015-01-07

    A model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli bacteria has been developed taking into account the whole sequence of molecular events starting from initial photo-damage and finishing with the fixation of point mutations. The wild-type phenotype bacterial cells are compared with UV-sensitive repair-deficient mutant cells. Attention is mainly paid to excision repair system functioning as regards induced mutagenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Effectiveness of perichondrial cutaneous graft of dorsal auricle for repairing facial melanocytic nevus excision defect].

    PubMed

    Duan, Weiqiang; Cen, Ying

    2013-11-01

    To investigate and compare the effectiveness of perichondrial cutaneous graft (PCCG) of dorsal auricle for repairing defect after excision of melanocytic nevus in different parts of the face. Between February 2008 and October 2012, 29 cases of facial melanocytic nevus were admitted. There were 11 males and 18 females, aged 3-25 years (median, 11 years). The locations were the upper eyelid in 5 cases, the nose in 15 cases, and the buccal region in 9 cases. The size of the nevi ranged from 1.2 cm x 1.0 cm to 4.0 cm x 2.2 cm. Defects after excision of nevi were repaired by PCCG of the dorsal auricle, which size ranged from 1.5 cm x 1.5 cm to 4.2 cm x 2.5 cm. The postoperative effectiveness was scored by patients according to color match, scar formation, and flatness of the reception site. The satisfaction evaluations were compared by the score among different parts. All the PCCG survived. All the patients were followed up 7-15 months (mean, 10 months). All the reception site had good color match and acceptable scar formation. The nasal part had good flatness, and the upper eyelid had poor flatness. Score comparison showed no significant difference in color match between 3 parts (P > 0.05). Nasal part had significantly less scar formation than buccal region and upper eyelid (P < 0.05), but no significant difference between buccal region and upper eyelid (P > 0.05). Nasal part and buccal region both had significantly better flatness than upper eyelid (P < 0.05), but no significant difference between nasal part and buccal region (P > 0.05). The overall evaluation score of nasal part and buccal region was significantly higher than that of the upper eyelid group (P < 0.05), and the score of the nasal part was significantly higher than that of the buccal region (P < 0.05). PCCG of dorsal auricle has a good color match in repair of facial defect, especially in repair of nasal defect with good flatness and no obvious scar formation.

  8. Crystal structure of T4 endonuclease V: An excision repair enzyme for a pyrimidine dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, K.; Ariyoshi, M.; Vassylyev, D.

    1994-12-31

    Ultraviolet (UV) light induces the formation of pyrimidine dimers, which are the most prevalent DNA lesion. In bacteriophage T4-infected Escherichia coli, T4 endonuclease V (T4 endV), encoded by the denV gene of bacteriophage T4, is responsible for the first step of the excision repair pathway. Although T4 endV is a very small protein, consisting of 138 amino acids, it catalyzes two distinct reactions, at least in vitro: the cleavage of the glycosyl bond of the 5{prime}-pyrimidine of the cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (pyrimidine dimer glycosylase) and the incision of the phosphodiester bond at the resulting abasic site, producing an {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde and a 5{prime}-terminal phosphomonoester. This enzyme is also known to cleave the 3{prime}-phosphodiester bond at an abasic site by {beta}-elimination. It has been also suggested from the salt concentration dependence of the catalytic activity in vitro that the excision-repair involves two distinct steps, in terms of the interaction between the enzyme and DNA. Prior to making specific interaction with a pyrimidine dimer, T4 endV can be nonspecifically bound to DNA duplexes by electrostatic forces and slides on them. Once the enzyme has been specifically bound to a pyrimidine dimer, the glycosylation occurs at the 5{prime}-glycosyl bond in the dimer. It still remains obscure whether or not the same enzyme subsequently acts on the scission of the phosphodiester bond. In this report, we describe the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the T4 endV determined at atomic resolution by x-ray crystallography, and discuss the functional implications of the enzyme. The examination of structural features, including atomic resolution crystal structures of three different mutants, allows the identification of residues that participate in the substrate binding and the catalytic reaction of glycosylase.

  9. Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Tobacco Smoke Condensate Inhibits the Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Nathaniel; Goswami, Mamta; Han, Sung Gu; Clark, Samuel; Orren, David K.; Gairola, C. Gary; Mellon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to tobacco smoke is the number one risk factor for lung cancer. Although the DNA damaging properties of tobacco smoke have been well documented, relatively few studies have examined its effect on DNA repair pathways. This is especially true for the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway which recognizes and removes many structurally diverse DNA lesions, including those introduced by chemical carcinogens present in tobacco smoke. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of tobacco smoke on NER in human lung cells. We studied the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), a surrogate for tobacco smoke, on the NER pathway in two different human lung cell lines; IMR-90 lung fibroblasts and BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. To measure NER, we employed a slot-blot assay to quantify the introduction and removal of UV light-induced 6–4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. We find a dose-dependent inhibition of 6–4 photoproduct repair in both cell lines treated with CSC. Additionally, the impact of CSC on the abundance of various NER proteins and their respective RNAs was investigated. The abundance of XPC protein, which is required for functional NER, is significantly reduced by treatment with CSC while the abundance of XPA protein, also required for NER, is unaffected. Both XPC and XPA RNA levels are modestly reduced by CSC treatment. Finally, treatment of cells with MG-132 abrogates the reduction in the abundance of XPC protein produced by treatment with CSC, suggesting that CSC enhances proteasome-dependent turnover of the protein that is mediated by ubiquitination. Together, these findings indicate that tobacco smoke can inhibit the same DNA repair pathway that is also essential for the removal of some of the carcinogenic DNA damage introduced by smoke itself, increasing the DNA damage burden of cells exposed to tobacco smoke. PMID:27391141

  10. The Mechanism of Nucleotide Excision Repair-Mediated UV-Induced Mutagenesis in Nonproliferating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kozmin, Stanislav G.; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Following the irradiation of nondividing yeast cells with ultraviolet (UV) light, most induced mutations are inherited by both daughter cells, indicating that complementary changes are introduced into both strands of duplex DNA prior to replication. Early analyses demonstrated that such two-strand mutations depend on functional nucleotide excision repair (NER), but the molecular mechanism of this unique type of mutagenesis has not been further explored. In the experiments reported here, an ade2 adeX colony-color system was used to examine the genetic control of UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We confirmed a strong suppression of two-strand mutagenesis in NER-deficient backgrounds and demonstrated that neither mismatch repair nor interstrand crosslink repair affects the production of these mutations. By contrast, proteins involved in the error-prone bypass of DNA damage (Rev3, Rev1, PCNA, Rad18, Pol32, and Rad5) and in the early steps of the DNA-damage checkpoint response (Rad17, Mec3, Ddc1, Mec1, and Rad9) were required for the production of two-strand mutations. There was no involvement, however, for the Pol η translesion synthesis DNA polymerase, the Mms2-Ubc13 postreplication repair complex, downstream DNA-damage checkpoint factors (Rad53, Chk1, and Dun1), or the Exo1 exonuclease. Our data support models in which UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cells occurs during the Pol ζ-dependent filling of lesion-containing, NER-generated gaps. The requirement for specific DNA-damage checkpoint proteins suggests roles in recruiting and/or activating factors required to fill such gaps. PMID:23307894

  11. The mechanism of nucleotide excision repair-mediated UV-induced mutagenesis in nonproliferating cells.

    PubMed

    Kozmin, Stanislav G; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-03-01

    Following the irradiation of nondividing yeast cells with ultraviolet (UV) light, most induced mutations are inherited by both daughter cells, indicating that complementary changes are introduced into both strands of duplex DNA prior to replication. Early analyses demonstrated that such two-strand mutations depend on functional nucleotide excision repair (NER), but the molecular mechanism of this unique type of mutagenesis has not been further explored. In the experiments reported here, an ade2 adeX colony-color system was used to examine the genetic control of UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We confirmed a strong suppression of two-strand mutagenesis in NER-deficient backgrounds and demonstrated that neither mismatch repair nor interstrand crosslink repair affects the production of these mutations. By contrast, proteins involved in the error-prone bypass of DNA damage (Rev3, Rev1, PCNA, Rad18, Pol32, and Rad5) and in the early steps of the DNA-damage checkpoint response (Rad17, Mec3, Ddc1, Mec1, and Rad9) were required for the production of two-strand mutations. There was no involvement, however, for the Pol η translesion synthesis DNA polymerase, the Mms2-Ubc13 postreplication repair complex, downstream DNA-damage checkpoint factors (Rad53, Chk1, and Dun1), or the Exo1 exonuclease. Our data support models in which UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cells occurs during the Pol ζ-dependent filling of lesion-containing, NER-generated gaps. The requirement for specific DNA-damage checkpoint proteins suggests roles in recruiting and/or activating factors required to fill such gaps.

  12. Coupling of human DNA excision repair and the DNA damage checkpoint in a defined in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Kemp, Michael G; Reardon, Joyce T; DeRocco, Vanessa; Iyer, Ravi R; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2014-02-21

    DNA repair and DNA damage checkpoints work in concert to help maintain genomic integrity. In vivo data suggest that these two global responses to DNA damage are coupled. It has been proposed that the canonical 30 nucleotide single-stranded DNA gap generated by nucleotide excision repair is the signal that activates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response and that the signal is enhanced by gap enlargement by EXO1 (exonuclease 1) 5' to 3' exonuclease activity. Here we have used purified core nucleotide excision repair factors (RPA, XPA, XPC, TFIIH, XPG, and XPF-ERCC1), core DNA damage checkpoint proteins (ATR-ATRIP, TopBP1, RPA), and DNA damaged by a UV-mimetic agent to analyze the basic steps of DNA damage checkpoint response in a biochemically defined system. We find that checkpoint signaling as measured by phosphorylation of target proteins by the ATR kinase requires enlargement of the excision gap generated by the excision repair system by the 5' to 3' exonuclease activity of EXO1. We conclude that, in addition to damaged DNA, RPA, XPA, XPC, TFIIH, XPG, XPF-ERCC1, ATR-ATRIP, TopBP1, and EXO1 constitute the minimum essential set of factors for ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response.

  13. Mitochondrial base excision repair in mouse synaptosomes during normal aging and in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gredilla, Ricardo; Weissman, Lior; Yang, Jenq-Lin; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2012-04-01

    Brain aging is associated with synaptic decline and synaptic function is highly dependent on mitochondria. Increased levels of oxidative DNA base damage and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or deletions lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, playing an important role in the aging process and the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Here we have investigated the repair of oxidative base damage, in synaptosomes of mouse brain during normal aging and in an AD model. During normal aging, a reduction in the base excision repair (BER) capacity was observed in the synaptosomal fraction, which was associated with a decrease in the level of BER proteins. However, we did not observe changes between the synaptosomal BER activities of presymptomatic and symptomatic AD mice harboring mutated amyolid precursor protein (APP), Tau, and presinilin-1 (PS1) (3xTgAD). Our findings suggest that the age-related reduction in BER capacity in the synaptosomal fraction might contribute to mitochondrial and synaptic dysfunction during aging. The development of AD-like pathology in the 3xTgAD mouse model was, however, not associated with deficiencies of the BER mechanisms in the synaptosomal fraction when the whole brain was analyzed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of human global and transcription-coupled excision repair of UV damage at single-nucleotide resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera; Selby, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a method for genome-wide mapping of DNA excision repair named XR-seq (excision repair sequencing). Human nucleotide excision repair generates two incisions surrounding the site of damage, creating an ∼30-mer. In XR-seq, this fragment is isolated and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. We used XR-seq to produce stranded, nucleotide-resolution maps of repair of two UV-induced DNA damages in human cells: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) pyrimidine–pyrimidone photoproducts [(6-4)PPs]. In wild-type cells, CPD repair was highly associated with transcription, specifically with the template strand. Experiments in cells defective in either transcription-coupled excision repair or general excision repair isolated the contribution of each pathway to the overall repair pattern and showed that transcription-coupled repair of both photoproducts occurs exclusively on the template strand. XR-seq maps capture transcription-coupled repair at sites of divergent gene promoters and bidirectional enhancer RNA (eRNA) production at enhancers. XR-seq data also uncovered the repair characteristics and novel sequence preferences of CPDs and (6-4)PPs. XR-seq and the resulting repair maps will facilitate studies of the effects of genomic location, chromatin context, transcription, and replication on DNA repair in human cells. PMID:25934506

  15. [Effects of scar excision combined with negative-pressure on repair of hypertrophic scar in burn children].

    PubMed

    Cai, J H; Deng, H P; Shen, Z A; Sun, T J; Li, D J; Li, D W; He, L X; Wang, L; Jin, X

    2017-07-20

    incision were obviously improved, and the symptoms including pruritus and pain were basically relieved. Half-year after operation, the scar area of children ranged from 0 to 174 [21(9, 47)]cm(2,) which was significantly decreased as compared with that before operation (Z=-5.16, P<0.05). The reduction percentage of scar area ranged from 36% to 100% [(73±19)%]. Half-year after operation, the overall score of scar and scar score of trunk, upper limb, and lower limb of children were obviously decreased as compared with those before operation (with t values from 6.42 to 17.37, P values below 0.05). Conclusions: Scar excision combined with negative-pressure treatment has a good clinical effect on repair of hypertrophic scar in burn children, which is suitable for clinical application.

  16. AKAP12 mediates PKA-induced phosphorylation of ATR to enhance nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Stuart G.; Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; D'Orazio, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Loss-of-function in melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a GS protein-coupled receptor that regulates signal transduction through cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) in melanocytes, is a major inherited melanoma risk factor. Herein, we report a novel cAMP-mediated response for sensing and responding to UV-induced DNA damage regulated by A-kinase-anchoring protein 12 (AKAP12). AKAP12 is identified as a necessary participant in PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) at S435, a post-translational event required for cAMP-enhanced nucleotide excision repair (NER). Moreover, UV exposure promotes ATR-directed phosphorylation of AKAP12 at S732, which promotes nuclear translocation of AKAP12–ATR-pS435. This complex subsequently recruits XPA to UV DNA damage and enhances 5′ strand incision. Preventing AKAP12's interaction with PKA or with ATR abrogates ATR-pS435 accumulation, delays recruitment of XPA to UV-damaged DNA, impairs NER and increases UV-induced mutagenesis. Our results define a critical role for AKAP12 as an UV-inducible scaffold for PKA-mediated ATR phosphorylation, and identify a repair complex consisting of AKAP12–ATR-pS435-XPA at photodamage, which is essential for cAMP-enhanced NER. PMID:27683220

  17. Effect of estrogens on base excision repair in brain and liver mitochondria of aged female rats.

    PubMed

    Leclère, R; Torregrosa-Muñumer, R; Kireev, R; García, C; Vara, E; Tresguerres, J A F; Gredilla, R

    2013-08-01

    Changes in the endocrine system have been suggested to act as signaling factors in the regulation of age-related events. Among the different hormones that have been linked to the aging process, estrogens have been widely investigated. They have been associated with inflammatory and oxidative processes and several investigations have established a relationship between the protective effects of estrogens and the mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial DNA is subjected to continuous oxidative attack by free radicals, and the base excision repair (BER) pathway is the main DNA repair route present in mitochondria. We have investigated the effect of estrogen levels on some of the key enzymes of BER in brain and liver mitochondria. In both tissues, depletion of estrogens led to an increased mitochondrial AP endonuclease (mtAPE1) activity, while restoration of estrogen levels by exogenous supplementation resulted in restitution of control APE1 activity only in liver. Moreover, in hepatic mitochondria, changes in estrogen levels affected the processing of oxidative lesions but not deaminations. Our results suggest that changes in mtAPE1 activity are related to specific translocation of the enzyme from the cytosol into the mitochondria probably due to oxidative stress changes as a consequence of changes in estrogen levels.

  18. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. Mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Rodrigue, Garry R; Fitch, J Patrick; Wilson, David M

    2002-04-15

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts considerably less pathway throughput than observed in experimental in vitro assays. This finding, in combination with the effects of pathway cooperativity on model throughput, supports the hypothesis of cooperation during abasic site repair and between the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, Ape1, and the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Ogg1. The quantitative model also predicts that for 8-oxoguanine and hydrolytic AP site damage, short-patch Polbeta-mediated BER dominates, with minimal switching to the long-patch subpathway. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicates that the Polbeta-catalyzed reactions have the most control over pathway throughput, although other BER reactions contribute to pathway efficiency as well. The studies within represent a first step in a developing effort to create a predictive model for BER cellular capacity.

  19. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A.; Rodrigue, Garry R.; Fitch, J. Patrick; Wilson, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts considerably less pathway throughput than observed in experimental in vitro assays. This finding, in combination with the effects of pathway cooperativity on model throughput, supports the hypothesis of cooperation during abasic site repair and between the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, Ape1, and the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Ogg1. The quantitative model also predicts that for 8-oxoguanine and hydrolytic AP site damage, short-patch Polβ-mediated BER dominates, with minimal switching to the long-patch subpathway. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicates that the Polβ-catalyzed reactions have the most control over pathway throughput, although other BER reactions contribute to pathway efficiency as well. The studies within represent a first step in a developing effort to create a predictive model for BER cellular capacity. PMID:11937636

  20. Regulation and disregulation of mammalian nucleotide excision repair: A pathway to nongermline breast carcinogenesis

    DOE PAGES

    Latimer, Jean J.; Majekwana, Vongai J.; Pabon-Padin, Yashira R.; ...

    2014-12-19

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is important as a modulator of disease, especially in constitutive deficiencies, such as the cancer predisposition syndrome Xeroderma pigmentosum. We have found profound variation of NER capacity among normal individuals, between cell-types and during carcinogenesis. NER is a repair system for many types of DNA damage, and therefore many types of genotoxic carcinogenic exposures, including ultraviolet light, products of organic combustion, metals, oxidative stress, etc. Since NER is intimately related to cellular metabolism, requiring components of both the DNA replicative and transcription machinery, it has a narrow range of functional viability. Thus, genes in the NERmore » pathway are expressed at the low levels manifested by, for example, nuclear transcription factors. Since NER activity and gene expression vary by cell-type, it is inherently epigenetically regulated. Furthermore, this epigenetic regulation is disregulated during sporadic breast carcinogenesis. Loss of NER is one basis of genomic instability, a required element in cellular transformation, and one that potentially modulates response to therapy. In this article, we demonstrate differences in NER capacity in eight adult mouse tissues, and place this result into the context of our previous work on mouse extraembryonic tissues, normal human tissues and sporadic early stage human breast cancer.« less

  1. Regulation and disregulation of mammalian nucleotide excision repair: A pathway to nongermline breast carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Latimer, Jean J.; Majekwana, Vongai J.; Pabon-Padin, Yashira R.; Pimpley, Manasi R.; Grant, Stephen G.

    2014-12-19

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is important as a modulator of disease, especially in constitutive deficiencies, such as the cancer predisposition syndrome Xeroderma pigmentosum. We have found profound variation of NER capacity among normal individuals, between cell-types and during carcinogenesis. NER is a repair system for many types of DNA damage, and therefore many types of genotoxic carcinogenic exposures, including ultraviolet light, products of organic combustion, metals, oxidative stress, etc. Since NER is intimately related to cellular metabolism, requiring components of both the DNA replicative and transcription machinery, it has a narrow range of functional viability. Thus, genes in the NER pathway are expressed at the low levels manifested by, for example, nuclear transcription factors. Since NER activity and gene expression vary by cell-type, it is inherently epigenetically regulated. Furthermore, this epigenetic regulation is disregulated during sporadic breast carcinogenesis. Loss of NER is one basis of genomic instability, a required element in cellular transformation, and one that potentially modulates response to therapy. In this article, we demonstrate differences in NER capacity in eight adult mouse tissues, and place this result into the context of our previous work on mouse extraembryonic tissues, normal human tissues and sporadic early stage human breast cancer.

  2. Oxidative damage to RPA limits the nucleotide excision repair capacity of human cells

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Melisa; Brem, Reto; Macpherson, Peter; Peacock, Matthew; Karran, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) protects against sunlight-induced skin cancer. Defective NER is associated with photosensitivity and a high skin cancer incidence. Some clinical treatments that cause photosensitivity can also increase skin cancer risk. Among these, the immunosuppressant azathioprine and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin, interact with UVA radiation to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that diminish NER capacity by causing protein damage. The RPA DNA binding protein plays a pivotal role in DNA metabolism and is an essential component of NER. The relationship between protein oxidation and NER inhibition was investigated in cultured human cells expressing different levels of RPA. We show here that RPA is limiting for NER and that oxidative damage to RPA compromises NER capability. Our findings reveal that cellular RPA is surprisingly vulnerable to oxidation and we identify oxidized forms of RPA that are associated with impaired NER. The vulnerability of NER to inhibition by oxidation provides a connection between cutaneous photosensitivity, protein damage and increased skin cancer risk. Our findings emphasize that damage to DNA repair proteins, as well as to DNA itself is likely to be an important contributor to skin cancer risk. PMID:26134950

  3. SUMOylation of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein regulates DNA damage recognition during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Masaki; Tak, Yon-Soo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Syota; Okuda-Shimizu, Yuki; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Nishi, Ryotaro; Saitoh, Hisato; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex is a key factor that detects DNA damage and initiates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Although biochemical and structural studies have elucidated the interaction of XPC with damaged DNA, the mechanism of its regulation in vivo remains to be understood in more details. Here, we show that the XPC protein undergoes modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins and the lack of this modification compromises the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions. In the absence of SUMOylation, XPC is normally recruited to the sites with photolesions, but then immobilized profoundly by the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) complex. Since the absence of UV-DDB alleviates the NER defect caused by impaired SUMOylation of XPC, we propose that this modification is critical for functional interactions of XPC with UV-DDB, which facilitate the efficient damage handover between the two damage recognition factors and subsequent initiation of NER. PMID:26042670

  4. Activation of cellular signaling by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1-initiated DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    German, Peter; Szaniszlo, Peter; Hajas, Gyorgy; Radak, Zsolt; Bacsi, Attila; Hazra, Tapas K; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-10-01

    Accumulation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) in the DNA results in genetic instability and mutagenesis, and is believed to contribute to carcinogenesis, aging processes and various aging-related diseases. 8-OxoG is removed from the DNA via DNA base excision repair (BER), initiated by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1). Our recent studies have shown that OGG1 binds its repair product 8-oxoG base with high affinity at a site independent from its DNA lesion-recognizing catalytic site and the OGG1•8-oxoG complex physically interacts with canonical Ras family members. Furthermore, exogenously added 8-oxoG base enters the cells and activates Ras GTPases; however, a link has not yet been established between cell signaling and DNA BER, which is the endogenous source of the 8-oxoG base. In this study, we utilized KG-1 cells expressing a temperature-sensitive mutant OGG1, siRNA ablation of gene expression, and a variety of molecular biological assays to define a link between OGG1-BER and cellular signaling. The results show that due to activation of OGG1-BER, 8-oxoG base is released from the genome in sufficient quantities for activation of Ras GTPase and resulting in phosphorylation of the downstream Ras targets Raf1, MEK1,2 and ERK1,2. These results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism for cellular responses to OGG1-initiated DNA BER.

  5. Negative interference of metal (II) ions with nucleotide excision repair in human cell-free extracts.

    PubMed

    Calsou, P; Frit, P; Bozzato, C; Salles, B

    1996-12-01

    Inhibition of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process is believed to cause the potentiation of the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of DNA damaging agents like UV-light or cisplatin by metal ions. However, the precise underlying molecular mechanism of this phenomenon is still unknown. Using in vitro assays, we have determined the potential interference of several metal (II) ions with the lesion recognition and strand incision/displacement steps of the NER mechanism, independently from the DNA polymerization step. When combinations of an optimal Mg2+ concentration and concentrations of various metal ions in a range from 0.1 to 1 mM were tested, all combinations, with Mn2+ and Ni2+ excepted, inhibited specifically the incision repair activity by human protein extracts. There was a good correlation for Cd2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+ between an inhibiting effect on the incision activity and a reduced protein binding activity to a damaged DNA probe as assessed by gel mobility shift assay.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of DNA damage recognition for mammalian nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    For faithful DNA repair, it is crucial for cells to locate lesions precisely within the vast genome. In the mammalian global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, this difficult task is accomplished through multiple steps, in which the xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex plays a central role. XPC senses the presence of oscillating 'normal' bases in the DNA duplex, and its binding properties contribute to the extremely broad substrate specificity of NER. Unlike XPC, which acts as a versatile sensor of DNA helical distortion, the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) is more specialized, recognizing UV-induced photolesions and facilitating recruitment of XPC. Recent single-molecule analyses and structural studies have advanced our understanding of how UV-DDB finds its targets, particularly in the context of chromatin. After XPC binds DNA, it is necessary to verify the presence of damage in order to avoid potentially deleterious incisions at damage-free sites. Accumulating evidence suggests that XPA and the helicase activity of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) cooperate to verify abnormalities in DNA chemistry. This chapter reviews recent findings about the mechanisms underlying the efficiency, versatility, and accuracy of NER. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Selected Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in Japanese

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Makoto; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Watanabe, Miki; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Sato, Shigeki; Yatabe, Yasushi; Yamao, Kenji; Ueda, Ryuzo; Tajima, Kazuo; Tanaka, Hideo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2012-01-01

    Background Although several reports have described a possible association between DNA repair genes and pancreatic cancer (PC) in smokers, this association has not been fully evaluated in an Asian population. We assessed the impact of genetic polymorphisms in the base excision repair (BER) pathway on PC risk among Japanese. Methods This case-control study compared the frequency of 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of BER genes, namely rs1052133 in OGG1, rs1799782 and rs25487 in XRCC1, rs1130409 in APE1, and rs1136410 in PARP1. SNPs were investigated using the TaqMan assay in 185 PC cases and 1465 controls. Associations of PC risk with genetic polymorphisms and gene–environment interaction were examined with an unconditional logistic regression model. Exposure to risk factors was assessed from the results of a self-administered questionnaire. We also performed haplotype-based analysis. Results We observed that the minor allele of rs25487 in XRCC1 was significantly associated with PC risk in the per-allele model (odds ratio = 1.29, CI = 1.01–1.65; trend P = 0.043). Haplotype analysis of XRCC1 also showed a statistically significant association with PC risk. No statistically significant interaction between XRCC1 polymorphisms and smoking status was seen. Conclusions Our findings suggest that XRCC1 polymorphisms affect PC risk in Japanese. PMID:22850545

  8. Thymine DNA Glycosylase Is Essential for Active DNA Demethylation by Linked Deamination-Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cortellino, Salvatore; Xu, Jinfei; Sannai, Mara; Moore, Robert; Caretti, Elena; Cigliano, Antonio; Le Coz, Madeleine; Devarajan, Karthik; Wessels, Andy; Soprano, Dianne; Abramowitz, Lara K.; Bartolomei, Marisa S.; Rambow, Florian; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Bruno, Tiziana; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Renner, Catherine; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Kobi, Dominique; Davidson, Irwin; Alberti, Christophe; Larue, Lionel; Bellacosa, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism for gene silencing. While methyltransferases mediate cytosine methylation, it is less clear how unmethylated regions in mammalian genomes are protected from de novo methylation and whether an active demethylating activity is involved. Here we show that either knockout or catalytic inactivation of the DNA repair enzyme Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) leads to embryonic lethality in mice. TDG is necessary for recruiting p300 to retinoic acid (RA)-regulated promoters, protection of CpG islands from hypermethylation, and active demethylation of tissue-specific, developmentally- and hormonally-regulated promoters and enhancers. TDG interacts with the deaminase AID and the damage-response protein GADD45a. These findings highlight a dual role for TDG in promoting proper epigenetic states during development and suggest a two-step mechanism for DNA demethylation in mammals, whereby 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine are first deaminated by AID to thymine and 5-hydroxymethyluracil, respectively, followed by TDG-mediated thymine and 5-hydroxymethyluracil excision repair. PMID:21722948

  9. PARP1 promotes nucleotide excision repair through DDB2 stabilization and recruitment of ALC1

    PubMed Central

    Vrouwe, Mischa G.; Marteijn, Jurgen A.; Typas, Dimitris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; Cansoy, Medine; Hensbergen, Paul; Deelder, André; de Groot, Anton; Matsumoto, Syota; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Thoma, Nicolas; Vermeulen, Wim; Vrieling, Harry

    2012-01-01

    The WD40-repeat protein DDB2 is essential for efficient recognition and subsequent removal of ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA lesions by nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, how DDB2 promotes NER in chromatin is poorly understood. Here, we identify poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) as a novel DDB2-associated factor. We demonstrate that DDB2 facilitated poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of UV-damaged chromatin through the activity of PARP1, resulting in the recruitment of the chromatin-remodeling enzyme ALC1. Depletion of ALC1 rendered cells sensitive to UV and impaired repair of UV-induced DNA lesions. Additionally, DDB2 itself was targeted by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, resulting in increased protein stability and a prolonged chromatin retention time. Our in vitro and in vivo data support a model in which poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of DDB2 suppresses DDB2 ubiquitylation and outline a molecular mechanism for PARP1-mediated regulation of NER through DDB2 stabilization and recruitment of the chromatin remodeler ALC1. PMID:23045548

  10. DNA breaks and chromosomal aberrations arise when replication meets base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Ensminger, Michael; Iloff, Lucie; Ebel, Christian; Nikolova, Teodora; Lӧbrich, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Exposures that methylate DNA potently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations, which are thought to arise when damaged bases block DNA replication. Here, we demonstrate that DNA methylation damage causes DSB formation when replication interferes with base excision repair (BER), the predominant pathway for repairing methylated bases. We show that cells defective in the N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase, which fail to remove N-methylpurines from DNA and do not initiate BER, display strongly reduced levels of methylation-induced DSBs and chromosomal aberrations compared with wild-type cells. Also, cells unable to generate single-strand breaks (SSBs) at apurinic/apyrimidinic sites do not form DSBs immediately after methylation damage. In contrast, cells deficient in x-ray cross-complementing protein 1, DNA polymerase β, or poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 activity, all of which fail to seal SSBs induced at apurinic/apyrimidinic sites, exhibit strongly elevated levels of methylation-induced DSBs and chromosomal aberrations. We propose that DSBs and chromosomal aberrations after treatment with N-alkylators arise when replication forks collide with SSBs generated during BER. PMID:24982429

  11. The role of base excision repair in pathogenesis of breast cancer in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Cuchra, Magda; Mucha, Bartosz; Markiewicz, Lukasz; Przybylowska-Sygut, Karolina; Pytel, Dariusz; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Kordek, Radzisław; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is leading type of cancer among group of women, which determines almost 23% of invasive cancers. It has been reported repeatedly that the level of oxidative stress is higher for BC in comparison to cancer-free woman. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of base excision repair (BER) pathway in the development of BC. One-hundred seventy-one women with confirmed BC and 222 healthy controls were enrolled in presented study. The level of oxidative DNA damage and the kinetic of their repair were analyzed by the modified alkaline comet assay. The efficiency of BER pathway was evaluated by BER assay. The presence of the 326Cys/Cys genotype and 326Cys allele of OGG1 gene and the 324His/His of MUTYH gene are associated with increased risk of BC development. Moreover, correlation between clinical parameter with selected genes has shown increased risk of BC progression. The survival analysis has shown a significant lower DFS for individuals with the 762Ala/Ala genotype compared to 762Val/Vla carriers and the 762Val/Ala genotype in relation to concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In subgroup of patients with alone chemotherapy and alone radiotherapy, the 762Val/Val genotype was significantly associated with lower overall survival. Furthermore, we also elevated the level of basal and oxidative DNA damage in a group of patients with BC in relation to healthy controls. We also observed the difference in effectiveness of DNA damage repair. The results of present studies suggested the important role of BER pathway in BC development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  13. Nonhomologous end joining of complex DNA double-strand breaks with proximal thymine glycol and interplay with base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Almohaini, Mohammed; Chalasani, Sri Lakshmi; Bafail, Duaa; Akopiants, Konstantin; Zhou, Tong; Yannone, Steven M; Ramsden, Dale A; Hartman, Matthew C T; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2016-05-01

    DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation are often accompanied by ancillary oxidative base damage that may prevent or delay their repair. In order to better define the features that make some DSBs repair-resistant, XLF-dependent nonhomologous end joining of blunt-ended DSB substrates having the oxidatively modified nonplanar base thymine glycol at the first (Tg1), second (Tg2), third (Tg3) or fifth (Tg5) positions from one 3' terminus, was examined in human whole-cell extracts. Tg at the third position had little effect on end-joining even when present on both ends of the break. However, Tg as the terminal or penultimate base was a major barrier to end joining (>10-fold reduction in ligated products) and an absolute barrier when present at both ends. Dideoxy trapping of base excision repair intermediates indicated that Tg was excised from Tg1, Tg2 and Tg3 largely if not exclusively after DSB ligation. However, Tg was rapidly excised from the Tg5 substrate, resulting in a reduced level of DSB ligation, as well as slow concomitant resection of the opposite strand. Ligase reactions containing only purified Ku, XRCC4, ligase IV and XLF showed that ligation of Tg3 and Tg5 was efficient and only partially XLF-dependent, whereas ligation of Tg1 and Tg2 was inefficient and only detectable in the presence of XLF. Overall, the results suggest that promoting ligation of DSBs with proximal base damage may be an important function of XLF, but that Tg can still be a major impediment to repair, being relatively resistant to both trimming and ligation. Moreover, it appears that base excision repair of Tg can sometimes interfere with repair of DSBs that would otherwise be readily rejoined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular analysis of plasmid DNA repair within ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli. II. UvrABC-initiated excision repair and photolyase-catalyzed dimer monomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Gruskin, E.A.; Lloyd, R.S.

    1988-09-05

    In this study, a novel approach to the analysis of DNA repair in Escherichia coli was employed which allowed the first direct determination of the mechanisms by which endogenous DNA repair enzymes encounter target sites in vivo. An in vivo plasmid DNA repair analysis was employed to discriminate between two possible mechanisms of target site location: a processive DNA scanning mechanism or a distributive random diffusion mechanism. The results demonstrate that photolyase acts by a distributive mechanism within E. coli. In contrast, UvrABC-initiated excision repair occurs by a limited processive DNA scanning mechanism. A majority of the dimer sites on a given plasmid molecule were repaired prior to the dissociation of the UvrABC complex. Furthermore, plasmid DNA repair catalyzed by the UvrABC complex occurs without a detectable accumulation of nicked plasmid intermediates despite the fact that the UvrABC complex generates dual incisions in the DNA at the site of a pyrimidine dimer. Therefore, the binding or assembly of the UvrABC complex on DNA at the site of a pyrimidine dimer represents the rate-limiting step in the overall process of UvrABC-initiated excision repair in vivo.

  15. Monofunctional platinum-DNA adducts are strong inhibitors of transcription and substrates for nucleotide excision repair in live mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangyu; Myint, MyatNoeZin; Ang, Wee Han; Song, Lina; Lippard, Stephen J

    2012-02-01

    To overcome drug resistance and reduce the side effects of cisplatin, a widely used antineoplastic agent, major efforts have been made to develop next generation platinum-based anticancer drugs. Because cisplatin-DNA adducts block RNA polymerase II unless removed by transcription-coupled excision repair, compounds that react similarly but elude repair are desirable. The monofunctional platinum agent pyriplatin displays antitumor activity in mice, a cytotoxicity profile in cell cultures distinct from that of cisplatin, and a unique in vitro transcription inhibition mechanism. In this study, we incorporated pyriplatin globally or site specifically into luciferase reporter vectors to examine its transcription inhibition profiles in live mammalian cells. Monofunctional pyriplatin reacted with plasmid DNA as efficiently as bifunctional cisplatin and inhibited transcription as strongly as cisplatin in various mammalian cells. Using repair-defective nucleotide excision repair (NER)-, mismatch repair-, and single-strand break repair-deficient cells, we show that NER is mainly responsible for removal of pyriplatin-DNA adducts. These findings reveal that the mechanism by which pyriplatin generates its antitumor activity is very similar to that of cisplatin, despite the chemically different nature of their DNA adducts, further supporting a role for monofunctional platinum anticancer agents in human cancer therapy. This information also provides support for the validity of the proposed mechanism of action of cisplatin and provides a rational basis for the design of more potent platinum anticancer drug candidates using a monofunctional DNA-damaging strategy. ©2011 AACR.

  16. The nucleotide excision repair (NER) system of Helicobacter pylori: Role in mutation prevention and chromosomal import patterns after natural transformation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive genetic diversity and rapid allelic diversification are characteristics of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, and are believed to contribute to its ability to cause chronic infections. Both a high mutation rate and frequent imports of short fragments of exogenous DNA during mixed infections play important roles in generating this allelic diversity. In this study, we used a genetic approach to investigate the roles of nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway components in H. pylori mutation and recombination. Results Inactivation of any of the four uvr genes strongly increased the susceptibility of H. pylori to DNA damage by ultraviolet light. Inactivation of uvrA and uvrB significantly decreased mutation frequencies whereas only the uvrA deficient mutant exhibited a significant decrease of the recombination frequency after natural transformation. A uvrC mutant did not show significant changes in mutation or recombination rates; however, inactivation of uvrC promoted the incorporation of significantly longer fragments of donor DNA (2.2-fold increase) into the recipient chromosome. A deletion of uvrD induced a hyper-recombinational phenotype. Conclusions Our data suggest that the NER system has multiple functions in the genetic diversification of H. pylori, by contributing to its high mutation rate, and by controlling the incorporation of imported DNA fragments after natural transformation. PMID:22559785

  17. Chk1 inhibitor synergizes quinacrine mediated apoptosis in breast cancer cells by compromising the base excision repair cascade.

    PubMed

    Preet, Ranjan; Siddharth, Sumit; Satapathy, Shakti Ranjan; Das, Sarita; Nayak, Anmada; Das, Dipon; Wyatt, Michael D; Kundu, Chanakya Nath

    2016-04-01

    Quinacrine (QC) causes apoptosis in breast cancer cells by induction of DNA damage, arrest of cells in S-phase, and by topoisomerase inhibition. Here, we show that QC-mediated apoptosis is not only due to increased DNA damage but also by compromising cell cycle checkpoints and base excision repair (BER) capacity in breast cancer cells. QC decreased CHK1, CDKs (CDC2, MDM2, CDC6), cyclins (B1, E1) and CDC25-A in a dose dependent manner. The expression of basal ATR remains unaltered but pATR (Ser-428) increased after QC treatment. A CHK1 inhibitor, SB218078, was also tested alone and in combination with QC. Like QC, SB218078 caused apoptosis by DNA damage and S-phase arrest. The combination of QC and SB218078 increased apoptosis by blocking the cell cycle in G2/M, which caused a mitotic catastrophe, and induced DNA damage at a higher level in comparison to individual compound treatments. Both drugs individually or in combination decreased the levels of replication protein A (RPA). Measurement of the expression of BER (SP- and LP-BER) proteins and direct in vivo BER activity revealed that the QC/SB218078 combination caused apoptosis in cancer cells by disrupting the induction of BER, which represents a novel means of potentially treating breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nucleotide excision repair and photoreactivation in the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana, Beauveria brongniartii, Beauveria nivea, Metarhizium anisopliae, Paecilomyces farinosus and Verticillium lecanii.

    PubMed

    Chelico, L; Haughian, J L; Khachatourians, G G

    2006-05-01

    To compare the DNA repair capabilities of the entomopathogenic fungus (EPF) bassiana to the EPF Beauveria brongniartii, Beauveria nivea, Metarhizium anisopliae, Paecilomyces farinosus, Verticillium lecanii, and the fungi Aspergillus niger and Neurospora crassa. Germination of B. bassiana conidiospores following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was used to show that nucleotide excision repair and photoreactivation decrease the post-UV germination delay. These two modes of repair were characterized and compared between the aforementioned EPF, A. niger and N. crassa using a physiological assay where per cent survival post-UV irradiation was scored as colony forming units. The results showed B. bassiana and M. anisopliae are the most UV-tolerant EPF. The DNA repair capabilities indicated that EPF do not have all DNA repair options available to fungi, such as A. niger and N. crassa. A key factor detrimental to the survival of EPF in agro-ecosystems is UV light from solar radiation. The EPF literature pertaining to UV irradiation is varied with respect to methodology, UV source, and dose, which prevented comparisons. Here we have characterized the fungi by a standard method and established the repair capabilities of EPF under optimal conditions.

  19. Mutations associated with base excision repair deficiency and methylation-induced genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Robert W.; Watson, David E.; Nakamura, Jun; Yakes, F. Michael; Hou, Esther; Horton, Julie K.; Ladapo, Joseph; Van Houten, Bennett; Swenberg, James A.; Tindall, Kenneth R.; Samson, Leona D.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2002-01-01

    The long-term effect of exposure to DNA alkylating agents is entwined with the cell's genetic capacity for DNA repair and appropriate DNA damage responses. A unique combination of environmental exposure and deficiency in these responses can lead to genomic instability; this “gene–environment interaction” paradigm is a theme for research on chronic disease etiology. In the present study, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts with a gene deletion in the base excision repair (BER) enzymes DNA β-polymerase (β-pol) and alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG), along with exposure to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) to study mutagenesis as a function of a particular gene–environment interaction. The β-pol null cells, defective in BER, exhibit a modest increase in spontaneous mutagenesis compared with wild-type cells. MMS exposure increases mutant frequency in β-pol null cells, but not in isogenic wild-type cells; UV light exposure or N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine exposure increases mutant frequency similarly in both cell lines. The MMS-induced increase in mutant frequency in β-pol null cells appears to be caused by DNA lesions that are AAG substrates, because overexpression of AAG in β-pol null cells eliminates the effect. In contrast, β-pol/AAG double null cells are slightly more mutable than the β-pol null cells after MMS exposure. These results illustrate that BER plays a role in protecting mouse embryonic fibroblast cells against methylation-induced mutations and characterize the effect of a particular combination of BER gene defect and environmental exposure. PMID:11983862

  20. Genetic variation in nucleotide excision repair pathway genes, pesticide exposure and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Kathryn Hughes; Koutros, Stella; Andreotti, Gabriella; Sandler, Dale P.; Burdette, Laurie A.; Yeager, Meredith; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Lubin, Jay H.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Berndt, Sonja I.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates increased prostate cancer risk for pesticide applicators and pesticide manufacturing workers. Although underlying mechanisms are unknown, human biomonitoring studies indicate increased genetic damage (e.g. chromosomal aberrations) with pesticide exposure. Given that the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway repairs a broad range of DNA damage, we evaluated interactions between pesticide exposure and 324 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging 27 NER genes among 776 prostate cancer cases and 1444 male controls in a nested case–control study of white Agricultural Health Study pesticide applicators. We determined interaction P values using likelihood ratio tests from logistic regression models and three-level pesticide variables (none/low/high) based on lifetime days of use weighted to an intensity score. We adjusted for multiple comparisons using the false discovery rate (FDR) method. Of the 17 interactions that met FDR <0.2, 3 displayed a monotonic increase in prostate cancer risk with increasing exposure in one genotype group and no significant association in the other group. Men carrying the variant A allele at ERCC1 rs2298881 exhibited increased prostate cancer risk with high versus no fonofos use [odds ratio (OR) 2.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.65–5.39; Pinteract = 3.6 × 10−4; FDR-adjusted P = 0.11]. Men carrying the homozygous wild-type TT genotype at two correlated CDK7 SNPs, rs11744596 and rs2932778 (r2 = 1.0), exhibited increased risk with high versus no carbofuran use (OR 2.01; 95% CI 1.31–3.10 for rs11744596; Pinteract = 7.2 × 10−4; FDR-adjusted P = 0.09). In contrast, we did not observe associations among men with other genotypes at these loci. While requiring replication, our findings suggest a role for NER genetic variation in pesticide-associated prostate cancer risk. PMID:22102698

  1. Genetic Variation in Base Excision Repair Pathway Genes, Pesticide Exposure, and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Koutros, Stella; Berndt, Sonja I.; Andreotti, Gabriella; Hoppin, Jane A.; Sandler, Dale P.; Burdette, Laurie A.; Yeager, Meredith; Freeman, Laura E. Beane; Lubin, Jay H.; Ma, Xiaomei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Alavanja, Michael C.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous research indicates increased prostate cancer risk for pesticide applicators and pesticide manufacturing workers. Although underlying mechanisms are unknown, evidence suggests a role of oxidative DNA damage. Objectives: Because base excision repair (BER) is the predominant pathway involved in repairing oxidative damage, we evaluated interactions between 39 pesticides and 394 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for 31 BER genes among 776 prostate cancer cases and 1,444 male controls in a nested case–control study of white Agricultural Health Study (AHS) pesticide applicators. Methods: We used likelihood ratio tests from logistic regression models to determine p-values for interactions between three-level pesticide exposure variables (none/low/high) and SNPs (assuming a dominant model), and the false discovery rate (FDR) multiple comparison adjustment approach. Results: The interaction between fonofos and rs1983132 in NEIL3 [nei endonuclease VIII-like 3 (Escherichia coli)], which encodes a glycosylase that can initiate BER, was the most significant overall [interaction p-value (pinteract) = 9.3 × 10–6; FDR-adjusted p-value = 0.01]. Fonofos exposure was associated with a monotonic increase in prostate cancer risk among men with CT/TT genotypes for rs1983132 [odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for low and high use compared with no use were 1.65 (0.91, 3.01) and 3.25 (1.78, 5.92), respectively], whereas fonofos was not associated with prostate cancer risk among men with the CC genotype. Carbofuran and S-ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate (EPTC) interacted similarly with rs1983132; however, these interactions did not meet an FDR < 0.2. Conclusions: Our significant finding regarding fonofos is consistent with previous AHS findings of increased prostate cancer risk with fonofos exposure among those with a family history of prostate cancer. Although requiring replication, our findings suggest a role of BER genetic variation in pesticide

  2. ERCC4 (XPF) encodes a human nucleotide excision repair protein with eukaryotic recombination homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Brookman, K W; Lamerdin, J E; Thelen, M P; Hwang, M; Reardon, J T; Sancar, A; Zhou, Z Q; Walter, C A; Parris, C N; Thompson, L H

    1996-01-01

    ERCC4 is an essential human gene in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which is responsible for removing UV-C photoproducts and bulky adducts from DNA. Among the NER genes, ERCC4 and ERCC1 are also uniquely involved in removing DNA interstrand cross-linking damage. The ERCC1-ERCC4 heterodimer, like the homologous Rad10-Rad1 complex, was recently found to possess an endonucleolytic activity that incises on the 5' side of damage. The ERCC4 gene, assigned to chromosome 16p13.1-p13.2, was previously isolated by using a chromosome 16 cosmid library. It corrects the defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutants of NER complementation group 4 and is implicated in complementation group F of the human disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. We describe the ERCC4 gene structure and functional cDNA sequence encoding a 916-amino-acid protein (104 kDa), which has substantial homology with the eukaryotic DNA repair and recombination proteins MEI-9 (Drosophila melanogaster), Rad16 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and Rad1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). ERCC4 cDNA efficiently corrected mutants in rodent NER complementation groups 4 and 11, showing the equivalence of these groups, and ERCC4 protein levels were reduced in mutants of both groups. In cells of an XP-F patient, the ERCC4 protein level was reduced to less than 5%, consistent with XPF being the ERCC4 gene. The considerable identity (40%) between ERCC4 and MEI-9 suggests a possible involvement of ERCC4 in meiosis. In baboon tissues, ERCC4 was expressed weakly and was not significantly higher in testis than in nonmeiotic tissues. PMID:8887684

  3. ROLE OF INTERACTION OF XPF WITH RPA IN NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Laura A.; Bessho, Mika; Wakasugi, Mitsuo; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Bessho, Tadayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a very important defense system against various types of DNA damage and it is necessary for maintaining genomic stability. The molecular mechanism of NER has been studied in considerable detail, and it has been shown that proper protein-protein interactions among NER factors are critical for efficient repair. A structure-specific endonuclease, XPF-ERCC1, which makes the 5’ incision in NER, was shown to interact with a single-stranded DNA binding protein, RPA. However, the biological significance of this interaction was not studied in detail. We used the yeast two-hybrid assay to determine that XPF interacts with the p70 subunit of RPA. To further examine the role of this XPF-p70 interaction, a p70-interaction deficient mutant form of XPF that contains a single amino acid substitution in the N-terminus of XPF was isolated by the reverse yeast two-hybrid assay using randomly mutagenized XPF. Biochemical properties of this RPA-interaction deficient mutant XPF-ERCC1 are very similar to wild type XPF-ERCC1 in vitro. Interestingly, expression of this mutated form of XPF in the XPF-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, UV41, only partially restores NER activity and UV resistance in vivo compared to wild type XPF. We discovered that the RPA-interaction deficient XPF is not localized in nuclei and the mislocalization of XPF-ERCC1 prevents the complex from functioning in NER. PMID:21875596

  4. Quantitative characterization of protein–protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Nina A.; Vasil'eva, Inna A.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Antson, Alfred A.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2015-01-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein–protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process. PMID:26013813

  5. Polymorphisms in three base excision repair genes and breast cancer risk in Thai women.

    PubMed

    Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Schmezer, Peter; Burkholder, Iris; Waas, Peter; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Bartsch, Helmut; Wiangnon, Surapon; Popanda, Odilia

    2008-09-01

    DNA repair plays an important role in tumor development. The base excision repair (BER) pathway mainly removes DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation and reactive oxidative species. Here, we examined possible associations between polymorphisms in three important BER genes (OGG1 Ser326Cys, APEX1 Asp148Glu, XRCC1 Arg194Trp, XRCC1 Arg280His, XRCC1 Arg399Gln) and breast cancer incidence in Thai women. The study population consisted of 507 breast cancer cases and 425 controls. Odds ratios (OR) were adjusted by multivariate logistic regression analysis for age, body mass index, age at menarche, family history of breast cancer, menopausal status, reproduction parameters, use of contraceptives, tobacco smoking, involuntary tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, and education. For homozygous carriers of the Glu allele in APEX1, a significant protective effect was found when compared to Asp/Asp carriers (odds ratio (OR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38-0.94). Subgroup analysis based on menopausal status revealed increased breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women and OGG1 (OR = 2.05, 95% CI 1.14-3.69). Reconstructed diplotypes for XRCC1 showed that CGA/CGA carriers had an increased risk of breast cancer compared with carriers of the wild type diplotype CGG/CGG (OR = 2.56, 95% CI 1.28-5.15). When the joint effects of XRCC1, APEX1 and OGG1 polymorphisms were evaluated, individuals homozygous for two or three risk alleles were at increased risk (OR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.26-2.82). In conclusion, our data suggest that Thai women with a certain XRCC1 diplotype or homozygous for two or three variant alleles of XRCC1, OGG1, and APEX1 are likely to have an increased susceptibility to breast cancer.

  6. Clopidogrel enhances periodontal repair in rats through decreased inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Coimbra, Leila S; Steffens, Joao Paulo; Rossa, Carlos; Graves, Dana T; Spolidorio, Luis C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim We hypothesized that platelet inactivation induced by drugs might interfere with periodontal repair in experimental periodontitis by suppressing the release of biological mediators from platelets at the site of injury. Material and Methods 60 rats were randomly assigned to 6 groups (n=10) and ligatures were placed around lower first molars of three groups. The other three groups were used as negative controls. Ligatures were removed after 10 days of periodontitis induction and all groups were submitted to treatment with aspirin (Asp) (30 mg/kg), clopidogrel (Clop) (75 mg/kg) or NaCl 0.9% intragastrically once daily for 3 days. Periodontal tissue was assessed by the measurement of CXCL12, CXCL4, CCL5 and PDGF by ELISA; histomorphometric analysis of PMN infiltration, attachment loss, bone loss and osteoclast numbers and quantification of blood vessels by imunnohistochemistry. Results During periodontal repair and treatment with NaCl 0.9%, CCL5 was decreased and CXCL12 increased when compared to negative control groups. Asp and Clop did not affect CCL5 expression, decreased CXCL12 but only Clop decreased CXCL4 and PDGF content compared to saline-treated animals. Clop increased blood vessel number, reduced PMN count, and decreased attachment and bone loss, also decreased osteoclast number in animals submitted or not to periodontal repair. Conclusion Systemic administration of Clop during 3 days improved the repair process associated with experimental periodontal disease, suggesting that it may have therapeutic value under situations where tissues undergo a transition from inflammation to repair. PMID:24433307

  7. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L.; Jiang, Yanlin; Kelley, Mark R.; Vasko, Michael R.; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 hours. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ~80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Reduction in APE1 expression also altered the expression of the NER proteins RPA70 and XPA in sensory neuronal cultures. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226+177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons. PMID:26164266

  8. Resistance to Nucleotide Excision Repair of Bulky Guanine Adducts Opposite Abasic Sites in DNA Duplexes and Relationships between Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Ding, Shuang; Kropachev, Konstantin; Lei, Jia; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair of certain bulky DNA lesions is abrogated in some specific non-canonical DNA base sequence contexts, while the removal of the same lesions by the nucleotide excision repair mechanism is efficient in duplexes in which all base pairs are complementary. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair activity in human cell extracts is moderate-to-high in the case of two stereoisomeric DNA lesions derived from the pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (cis- and trans-B[a]P-N2-dG adducts) in a normal DNA duplex. By contrast, the nucleotide excision repair activity is completely abrogated when the canonical cytosine base opposite the B[a]P-dG adducts is replaced by an abasic site in duplex DNA. However, base excision repair of the abasic site persists. In order to understand the structural origins of these striking phenomena, we used NMR and molecular spectroscopy techniques to evaluate the conformational features of 11mer DNA duplexes containing these B[a]P-dG lesions opposite abasic sites. Our results show that in these duplexes containing the clustered lesions, both B[a]P-dG adducts adopt base-displaced intercalated conformations, with the B[a]P aromatic rings intercalated into the DNA helix. To explain the persistence of base excision repair in the face of the opposed bulky B[a]P ring system, molecular modeling results suggest how the APE1 base excision repair endonuclease, that excises abasic lesions, can bind productively even with the trans-B[a]P-dG positioned opposite the abasic site. We hypothesize that the nucleotide excision repair resistance is fostered by local B[a]P residue—DNA base stacking interactions at the abasic sites, that are facilitated by the absence of the cytosine partner base in the complementary strand. More broadly, this study sets the stage for elucidating the interplay between base excision and nucleotide excision repair in processing different types of clustered DNA lesions that are substrates of nucleotide

  9. Resistance to Nucleotide Excision Repair of Bulky Guanine Adducts Opposite Abasic Sites in DNA Duplexes and Relationships between Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Ding, Shuang; Kropachev, Konstantin; Jia, Lei; Lei, Jia; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair of certain bulky DNA lesions is abrogated in some specific non-canonical DNA base sequence contexts, while the removal of the same lesions by the nucleotide excision repair mechanism is efficient in duplexes in which all base pairs are complementary. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair activity in human cell extracts is moderate-to-high in the case of two stereoisomeric DNA lesions derived from the pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (cis- and trans-B[a]P-N2-dG adducts) in a normal DNA duplex. By contrast, the nucleotide excision repair activity is completely abrogated when the canonical cytosine base opposite the B[a]P-dG adducts is replaced by an abasic site in duplex DNA. However, base excision repair of the abasic site persists. In order to understand the structural origins of these striking phenomena, we used NMR and molecular spectroscopy techniques to evaluate the conformational features of 11mer DNA duplexes containing these B[a]P-dG lesions opposite abasic sites. Our results show that in these duplexes containing the clustered lesions, both B[a]P-dG adducts adopt base-displaced intercalated conformations, with the B[a]P aromatic rings intercalated into the DNA helix. To explain the persistence of base excision repair in the face of the opposed bulky B[a]P ring system, molecular modeling results suggest how the APE1 base excision repair endonuclease, that excises abasic lesions, can bind productively even with the trans-B[a]P-dG positioned opposite the abasic site. We hypothesize that the nucleotide excision repair resistance is fostered by local B[a]P residue-DNA base stacking interactions at the abasic sites, that are facilitated by the absence of the cytosine partner base in the complementary strand. More broadly, this study sets the stage for elucidating the interplay between base excision and nucleotide excision repair in processing different types of clustered DNA lesions that are substrates of nucleotide excision

  10. Conservation of the nucleotide excision repair pathway: characterization of hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum group F homolog.

    PubMed

    Barve, Apurva; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2013-01-01

    Hydra, one of the earliest metazoans with tissue grade organization and nervous system, is an animal with a remarkable regeneration capacity and shows no signs of organismal aging. We have for the first time identified genes of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway from hydra. Here we report cloning and characterization of hydra homolog of xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF) gene that encodes a structure-specific 5' endonuclease which is a crucial component of NER. In silico analysis shows that hydra XPF amino acid sequence is very similar to its counterparts from other animals, especially vertebrates, and shows all features essential for its function. By in situ hybridization, we show that hydra XPF is expressed prominently in the multipotent stem cell niche in the central region of the body column. Ectoderm of the diploblastic hydra was shown to express higher levels of XPF as compared to the endoderm by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated that interstitial cells, a multipotent and rapidly cycling stem cell lineage of hydra, express higher levels of XPF mRNA than other cell types. Our data show that XPF and by extension, the NER pathway is highly conserved during evolution. The prominent expression of an NER gene in interstitial cells may have implications for the lack of senescence in hydra.

  11. Conservation of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway: Characterization of Hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group F Homolog

    PubMed Central

    Barve, Apurva; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2013-01-01

    Hydra, one of the earliest metazoans with tissue grade organization and nervous system, is an animal with a remarkable regeneration capacity and shows no signs of organismal aging. We have for the first time identified genes of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway from hydra. Here we report cloning and characterization of hydra homolog of xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF) gene that encodes a structure-specific 5′ endonuclease which is a crucial component of NER. In silico analysis shows that hydra XPF amino acid sequence is very similar to its counterparts from other animals, especially vertebrates, and shows all features essential for its function. By in situ hybridization, we show that hydra XPF is expressed prominently in the multipotent stem cell niche in the central region of the body column. Ectoderm of the diploblastic hydra was shown to express higher levels of XPF as compared to the endoderm by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated that interstitial cells, a multipotent and rapidly cycling stem cell lineage of hydra, express higher levels of XPF mRNA than other cell types. Our data show that XPF and by extension, the NER pathway is highly conserved during evolution. The prominent expression of an NER gene in interstitial cells may have implications for the lack of senescence in hydra. PMID:23577191

  12. Genome Instability in Development and Aging: Insights from Nucleotide Excision Repair in Humans, Mice, and Worms

    PubMed Central

    Edifizi, Diletta; Schumacher, Björn

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage causally contributes to aging and cancer. Congenital defects in nucleotide excision repair (NER) lead to distinct cancer-prone and premature aging syndromes. The genetics of NER mutations have provided important insights into the distinct consequences of genome instability. Recent work in mice and C. elegans has shed new light on the mechanisms through which developing and aging animals respond to persistent DNA damage. The various NER mouse mutants have served as important disease models for Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD), while the traceable genetics of C. elegans have allowed the mechanistic delineation of the distinct outcomes of genome instability in metazoan development and aging. Intriguingly, highly conserved longevity assurance mechanisms respond to transcription-blocking DNA lesions in mammals as well as in worms and counteract the detrimental consequences of persistent DNA damage. The insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) effector transcription factor DAF-16 could indeed overcome DNA damage-driven developmental growth delay and functional deterioration even when DNA damage persists. Longevity assurance mechanisms might thus delay DNA damage-driven aging by raising the threshold when accumulating DNA damage becomes detrimental for physiological tissue functioning. PMID:26287260

  13. Base excision DNA repair levels in mitochondrial lysates of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a senile dementia with increased incidence in older subjects (age >65 years). One of the earliest markers of AD is oxidative DNA damage. Recently, it has been reported that preclinical AD patient brains show elevated levels of oxidative damage in both nuclear and mitochondrial nucleic acids. Moreover, different oxidative lesions in mitochondrial DNA are between 5- and 10-fold higher than in nuclear DNA in both control and AD postmortem brains. We previously showed that there is a significant loss of base excision repair (BER) components in whole tissue extracts of AD and mild cognitive impairment subjects relative to matched control subjects. However, comprehensive analysis of specific steps in BER levels in mitochondrial extracts of AD patient brains is not available. In this study, we mainly investigated various components of BER in mitochondrial extracts of AD and matched control postmortem brain samples. We found that the 5-hydroxyuracil incision and ligase activities are significantly lower in AD brains, whereas the uracil incision, abasic site cleavage, and deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate incorporation activities are normal in these samples.

  14. Oxidative DNA damage is epigenetic by regulating gene transcription via base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Aaron M.; Ding, Yun; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have emerged as important cellular-signaling agents for cellular survival. Herein, we demonstrate that ROS-mediated oxidation of DNA to yield 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG) in gene promoters is a signaling agent for gene activation. Enhanced gene expression occurs when OG is formed in guanine-rich, potential G-quadruplex–forming sequences (PQS) in promoter-coding strands, initiating base excision repair (BER) by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), yielding an abasic site (AP). The AP enables melting of the duplex to unmask the PQS, adopting a G-quadruplex fold in which apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) binds, but inefficiently cleaves, the AP for activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or endonuclease III-like protein 1 (NTHL1) genes. These details were mapped via synthesis of OG and AP analogs at single-nucleotide precision within the promoter of a luciferase reporter system. The reporters were analyzed in human and mouse cells while selectively knocking out or down critical BER proteins to identify the impact on luciferase expression. Identification of the oxidatively modified DNA base OG to guide BER activity in a gene promoter and impact cellular phenotype ascribes an epigenetic role to OG. PMID:28143930

  15. Deficiency of base excision repair enzyme NEIL3 drives increased predisposition to autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Massaad, Michel J.; Zhou, Jia; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Chou, Janet; Jabara, Haifa; Janssen, Erin; Glauzy, Salomé; Olson, Brennan G.; Morbach, Henner; Ohsumi, Toshiro K.; Schmitz, Klaus; Kane, Jennifer; Torisu, Kumiko; Chouery, Eliane; Megarbane, Andre; Kang, Peter B.; Al-Idrissi, Eman; Aldhekri, Hasan; Meffre, Eric; Mizui, Masayuki; Manis, John P.; Al-Herz, Waleed; Wallace, Susan S.; Geha, Raif S.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the apoptosis of immune cells have been associated with autoimmunity. Here, we have identified a homozygous missense mutation in the gene encoding the base excision repair enzyme Nei endonuclease VIII-like 3 (NEIL3) that abolished enzymatic activity in 3 siblings from a consanguineous family. The NEIL3 mutation was associated with fatal recurrent infections, severe autoimmunity, hypogammaglobulinemia, and impaired B cell function in these individuals. The same homozygous NEIL3 mutation was also identified in an asymptomatic individual who exhibited elevated levels of serum autoantibodies and defective peripheral B cell tolerance, but normal B cell function. Further analysis of the patients revealed an absence of LPS-responsive beige-like anchor (LRBA) protein expression, a known cause of immunodeficiency. We next examined the contribution of NEIL3 to the maintenance of self-tolerance in Neil3–/– mice. Although Neil3–/– mice displayed normal B cell function, they exhibited elevated serum levels of autoantibodies and developed nephritis following treatment with poly(I:C) to mimic microbial stimulation. In Neil3–/– mice, splenic T and B cells as well as germinal center B cells from Peyer’s patches showed marked increases in apoptosis and cell death, indicating the potential release of self-antigens that favor autoimmunity. These findings demonstrate that deficiency in NEIL3 is associated with increased lymphocyte apoptosis, autoantibodies, and predisposition to autoimmunity. PMID:27760045

  16. Genome Instability in Development and Aging: Insights from Nucleotide Excision Repair in Humans, Mice, and Worms.

    PubMed

    Edifizi, Diletta; Schumacher, Björn

    2015-08-13

    DNA damage causally contributes to aging and cancer. Congenital defects in nucleotide excision repair (NER) lead to distinct cancer-prone and premature aging syndromes. The genetics of NER mutations have provided important insights into the distinct consequences of genome instability. Recent work in mice and C. elegans has shed new light on the mechanisms through which developing and aging animals respond to persistent DNA damage. The various NER mouse mutants have served as important disease models for Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD), while the traceable genetics of C. elegans have allowed the mechanistic delineation of the distinct outcomes of genome instability in metazoan development and aging. Intriguingly, highly conserved longevity assurance mechanisms respond to transcription-blocking DNA lesions in mammals as well as in worms and counteract the detrimental consequences of persistent DNA damage. The insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) effector transcription factor DAF-16 could indeed overcome DNA damage-driven developmental growth delay and functional deterioration even when DNA damage persists. Longevity assurance mechanisms might thus delay DNA damage-driven aging by raising the threshold when accumulating DNA damage becomes detrimental for physiological tissue functioning.

  17. The endoperoxide ascaridol shows strong differential cytotoxicity in nucleotide excision repair-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Rashda; Efferth, Thomas; Kuhmann, Christine; Opatz, Till; Hao, Xiaojiang; Popanda, Odilia; Schmezer, Peter

    2012-03-15

    Targeting synthetic lethality in DNA repair pathways has become a promising anti-cancer strategy. However little is known about such interactions with regard to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Therefore, cell lines with a defect in the NER genes ERCC6 or XPC and their normal counterparts were screened with 53 chemically defined phytochemicals isolated from plants used in traditional Chinese medicine for differential cytotoxic effects. The screening revealed 12 drugs that killed NER-deficient cells more efficiently than proficient cells. Five drugs were further analyzed for IC{sub 50} values, effects on cell cycle distribution, and induction of DNA damage. Ascaridol was the most effective compound with a difference of > 1000-fold in resistance between normal and NER-deficient cells (IC{sub 50} values for cells with deficiency in ERCC6: 0.15 μM, XPC: 0.18 μM, and normal cells: > 180 μM). NER-deficiency combined with ascaridol treatment led to G2/M-phase arrest, an increased percentage of subG1 cells, and a substantially higher DNA damage induction. These results were confirmed in a second set of NER-deficient and -proficient cell lines with isogenic background. Finally, ascaridol was characterized for its ability to generate oxidative DNA damage. The drug led to a dose-dependent increase in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species at cytotoxic concentrations, but only NER-deficient cells showed a strongly induced amount of 8-oxodG sites. In summary, ascaridol is a cytotoxic and DNA-damaging compound which generates intracellular reactive oxidative intermediates and which selectively affects NER-deficient cells. This could provide a new therapeutic option to treat cancer cells with mutations in NER genes. -- Highlights: ► Thousand-fold higher Ascaridol activity in NER-deficient versus proficient cells. ► Impaired repair of Ascaridol-induced oxidative DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. ► Selective activity of Ascaridol opens new therapy

  18. Nrf1 CNC-bZIP protein promotes cell survival and nucleotide excision repair through maintaining glutathione homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Han, Weinong; Ming, Mei; Zhao, Rui; Pi, Jingbo; Wu, Chunli; He, Yu-Ying

    2012-05-25

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Its major environmental risk factor is UVB radiation in sunlight. In response to UVB damage, epidermal keratinocytes activate a specific repair pathway, i.e. nucleotide excision repair, to remove UVB-induced DNA lesions. However, the regulation of UVB response is not fully understood. Here we show that the long isoform of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 1 (Nrf1, also called NFE2L1), a cytoprotective transcription factor critical for the expression of multiple antioxidant response element-dependent genes, plays an important role in the response of keratinocytes to UVB. Nrf1 loss sensitized keratinocytes to UVB-induced apoptosis by up-regulating the expression of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bik through reducing glutathione levels. Knocking down Bik reduced UVB-induced apoptosis in Nrf1-inhibited cells. In UVB-irradiated surviving cells, however, disruption of Nrf1 impaired nucleotide excision repair through suppressing the transcription of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC), a factor essential for initiating the global genome nucleotide excision repair by recognizing the DNA lesion and recruiting downstream factors. Nrf1 enhanced XPC expression by increasing glutathione availability but was independent of the transcription repressor of XPC. Adding XPC or glutathione restored the DNA repair capacity in Nrf1-inhibited cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Nrf1 levels are significantly reduced by UVB radiation in mouse skin and are lower in human skin tumors than in normal skin. These results indicate a novel role of Nrf1 in UVB-induced DNA damage repair and suggest Nrf1 as a tumor suppressor in the skin.

  19. Red meat and poultry intake, polymorphisms in the nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair pathways and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amit D; Corral, Román; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Haile, Robert W; Le Marchand, Loïc; Martínez, Maria Elena; Ahnen, Dennis J; Sandler, Robert S; Lance, Peter; Stern, Mariana C

    2009-03-01

    Diets high in red meat have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and may result in exposure to carcinogens that cause DNA damage [i.e polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and N-nitroso compounds]. Using a family-based study, we investigated whether polymorphisms in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) (ERCC1 3' untranslated region (UTR) G/T, XPD Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln, XPC intron 11 C/A, XPA 5' UTR C/T, XPF Arg415Gln and XPG Asp1104His) and mismatch repair (MLH1 Ile219Val and MSH2 Gly322Asp) pathways modified the association with red meat and poultry intake. We tested for gene-environment interactions using case-only analyses (n = 577) and compared the results using case-unaffected sibling comparisons (n = 307 sibships). Increased risk of CRC was observed for intake of more than or equal to three servings per week of red meat [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3-2.5)] or high-temperature cooked red meat (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-2.2). Intake of red meat heavily brown on the outside or inside increased CRC risk only among subjects who carried the XPD codon 751 Lys/Lys genotype (case-only interaction P = 0.006 and P = 0.001, respectively, for doneness outside or inside) or the XPD codon 312 Asp/Asp genotype (case-only interaction P = 0.090 and P < 0.001, respectively). These interactions were stronger for rectal cancer cases (heterogeneity test P = 0.002 for XPD Asp312Asn and P = 0.03 for XPD Lys751Gln) and remained statistically significant after accounting for multiple testing. Case-unaffected sibling analyses were generally supportive of the case-only results. These findings highlight the possible contribution of diets high in red meat to the formation of lesions that elicit the NER pathway, such as carcinogen-induced bulky adducts.

  20. Red meat and poultry intake, polymorphisms in the nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair pathways and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Amit D.; Corral, Román; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Haile, Robert W.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Martínez, Maria Elena; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Sandler, Robert S.; Lance, Peter; Stern, Mariana C.

    2009-01-01

    Diets high in red meat have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and may result in exposure to carcinogens that cause DNA damage [i.e polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and N-nitroso compounds]. Using a family-based study, we investigated whether polymorphisms in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) (ERCC1 3′ untranslated region (UTR) G/T, XPD Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln, XPC intron 11 C/A, XPA 5′ UTR C/T, XPF Arg415Gln and XPG Asp1104His) and mismatch repair (MLH1 Ile219Val and MSH2 Gly322Asp) pathways modified the association with red meat and poultry intake. We tested for gene–environment interactions using case-only analyses (n = 577) and compared the results using case-unaffected sibling comparisons (n = 307 sibships). Increased risk of CRC was observed for intake of more than or equal to three servings per week of red meat [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3–2.5)] or high-temperature cooked red meat (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1–2.2). Intake of red meat heavily brown on the outside or inside increased CRC risk only among subjects who carried the XPD codon 751 Lys/Lys genotype (case-only interaction P = 0.006 and P = 0.001, respectively, for doneness outside or inside) or the XPD codon 312 Asp/Asp genotype (case-only interaction P = 0.090 and P < 0.001, respectively). These interactions were stronger for rectal cancer cases (heterogeneity test P = 0.002 for XPD Asp312Asn and P = 0.03 for XPD Lys751Gln) and remained statistically significant after accounting for multiple testing. Case-unaffected sibling analyses were generally supportive of the case-only results. These findings highlight the possible contribution of diets high in red meat to the formation of lesions that elicit the NER pathway, such as carcinogen-induced bulky adducts. PMID:19029193

  1. Arsenic exposure is associated with decreased DNA repair in vitro and in individuals exposed to drinking water arsenic.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Angeline S; Burgess, Jefferey L; Meza, Maria M; Demidenko, Eugene; Waugh, Mary G; Hamilton, Joshua W; Karagas, Margaret R

    2006-08-01

    The mechanism(s) by which arsenic exposure contributes to human cancer risk is unknown ; however, several indirect cocarcinogenesis mechanisms have been proposed. Many studies support the role of As in altering one or more DNA repair processes. In the present study we used individual-level exposure data and biologic samples to investigate the effects of As exposure on nucleotide excision repair in two study populations, focusing on the excision repair cross-complement 1 (ERCC1) component. We measured drinking water, urinary, or toenail As levels and obtained cryopreserved lymphocytes of a subset of individuals enrolled in epidemiologic studies in New Hampshire (USA) and Sonora (Mexico). Additionally, in corroborative laboratory studies, we examined the effects of As on DNA repair in a cultured human cell model. Arsenic exposure was associated with decreased expression of ERCC1 in isolated lymphocytes at the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, lymphocytes from As-exposed individuals showed higher levels of DNA damage, as measured by a comet assay, both at baseline and after a 2-acetoxyacetylaminofluorene (2-AAAF) challenge. In support of the in vivo data, As exposure decreased ERCC1 mRNA expression and enhanced levels of DNA damage after a 2-AAAF challenge in cell culture. These data provide further evidence to support the ability of As to inhibit the DNA repair machinery, which is likely to enhance the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of other directly genotoxic compounds, as part of a cocarcinogenic mechanism of action.

  2. Nucleotide excision repair polymorphisms may modify ionizing radiation-related breast cancer risk in US radiologic technologists

    PubMed Central

    Rajaraman, Preetha; Bhatti, Parveen; Doody, Michele Morin; Simon, Steven L.; Weinstock, Robert M.; Linet, Martha S.; Rosenstein, Marvin; Stovall, Marilyn; Alexander, Bruce H.; Preston, Dale L.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation has been consistently associated with increased risk of female breast cancer. Although the majority of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation is corrected by the base-excision repair pathway, certain types of multiple-base damage can only be repaired through the nucleotide excision repair pathway. In a nested case–control study of breast cancer in US radiologic technologists exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation (858 cases, 1,083 controls), we examined whether risk of breast cancer conferred by radiation was modified by nucleotide excision gene polymorphisms ERCC2 (XPD) rs13181, ERCC4 (XPF) rs1800067 and rs1800124, ERCC5 (XPG) rs1047769 and rs17655; and ERCC6 rs2228526. Of the 6 ERCC variants examined, only ERCC5 rs17655 showed a borderline main effect association with breast cancer risk (ORGC = 1.1, ORCC = 1.3; p-trend = 0.08), with some indication that individuals carrying the C allele variant were more susceptible to the effects of occupational radiation (EOR/GyGG = 1.0, 95% CI = <0, 6.0; EOR/GyGC/CC = 5.9, 95% CI = 0.9, 14.4; phet = 0.10). ERCC2 rs13181, although not associated with breast cancer risk overall, statistically significantly modified the effect of occupational radiation dose on risk of breast cancer (EOR/GyAA = 9.1, 95% CI = 2.1–21.3; EOR/GyAC/CC = 0.6, 95% CI = <0, 4.6; phet = 0.01). These results suggest that common variants in nucleotide excision repair genes may modify the association between occupational radiation exposure and breast cancer risk. PMID:18767034

  3. Dimer excision and repair replication patch size in recL152 mutant of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, R H

    1978-01-01

    Dimers are excised slowly in a recL152 mutant. This observation is not an artifact of altered DNA degradation because degradation is the same in recL+ and recL strains. The repair patch size was measured by the bromodeoxyuridine-313 nm radiation photolysis technique. In the recL+ strain, the average patch size was found to be about 30 nucleotides in length, but in the recL mutant, it was about 360. PMID:361703

  4. Mitochondrial base excision repair in mouse synaptosomes during normal aging and in a model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gredilla, Ricardo; Weissman, Lior; Yang, Jenq-Lin; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2010-01-01

    Brain aging is associated with synaptic decline and cognitive impairment. Increased levels of oxidative DNA base damage and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or deletions lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, playing an important role in the aging process and the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In mitochondria, base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway for base modifications such as deamination and oxidation, and constitutes an important mechanism to avoid accumulation of mtDNA mutations. Synaptic function is highly dependent on mitochondria, and in the current study we have investigated BER in synaptosomes of mouse brain during normal aging and in an AD model. Synaptosomes are isolated synapses in membranous structures produced by subcellular fractionation of brain tissue. They include the whole presynaptic terminal as well as portions of the postsynaptic terminal. Synaptosomes contain the molecular machinery necessary for uptake, storage, and release of neurotransmitters, including synaptic vesicles and mitochondria. BER activities were measured in synaptosomal fractions from young and old mice and from pre-symptomatic and symptomatic AD mice harboring mutated APP, Tau and PS1 (3xTgAD). During normal aging, a reduction in the BER capacity was observed in the synaptosomal fraction, which was associated with a decrease in the level of BER proteins. However, we did not observe changes between the synaptosomal BER activities of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic AD mice. Our findings suggest that the age-related reduction in BER capacity in the synaptosomal fraction might contribute to mitochondrial and synaptic dysfunction during aging. The development of AD-like pathology in the 3xTgAD mouse model was, however, not associated with deficiencies of the BER mechanisms in the synaptosomal fraction when the whole brain was analyzed. PMID:20708822

  5. C. elegans lifespan extension by osmotic stress requires FUdR, base excision repair, FOXO, and sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Edward N; Corkins, Mark E; Li, Jia-Cheng; Singh, Komudi; Parsons, Sadé; Tucey, Tim M; Sorkaç, Altar; Huang, Huiyan; Dimitriadi, Maria; Sinclair, David A

    2016-01-01

    Moderate stress can increase lifespan by hormesis, a beneficial low-level induction of stress response pathways. 5’-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR) is commonly used to sterilize Caenorhabditis elegans in aging experiments. However, FUdR alters lifespan in some genotypes and induces resistance to thermal and proteotoxic stress. We report that hypertonic stress in combination with FUdR treatment or inhibition of the FUdR target thymidylate synthase, TYMS-1, extends C. elegans lifespan by up to 30%. By contrast, in the absence of FUdR, hypertonic stress decreases lifespan. Adaptation to hypertonic stress requires diminished Notch signaling and loss of Notch co-ligands leads to lifespan extension only in combination with FUdR. Either FUdR treatment or TYMS-1 loss induced resistance to acute hypertonic stress, anoxia, and thermal stress. FUdR treatment increased expression of DAF-16 FOXO and the osmolyte biosynthesis enzyme GPDH-1. FUdR-induced hypertonic stress resistance was partially dependent on sirtuins and base excision repair (BER) pathways, while FUdR-induced lifespan extension under hypertonic stress conditions requires DAF-16, BER, and sirtuin function. Combined, these results demonstrate that FUdR, through inhibition of TYMS-1, activates stress response pathways in somatic tissues to confer hormetic resistance to acute and chronic stress. C. elegans lifespan studies using FUdR may need re-interpretation in light of this work. PMID:26854551

  6. C. elegans lifespan extension by osmotic stress requires FUdR, base excision repair, FOXO, and sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Edward N; Corkins, Mark E; Li, Jia-Cheng; Singh, Komudi; Parsons, Sadé; Tucey, Tim M; Sorkaç, Altar; Huang, Huiyan; Dimitriadi, Maria; Sinclair, David A; Hart, Anne C

    2016-03-01

    Moderate stress can increase lifespan by hormesis, a beneficial low-level induction of stress response pathways. 5'-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR) is commonly used to sterilize Caenorhabditis elegans in aging experiments. However, FUdR alters lifespan in some genotypes and induces resistance to thermal and proteotoxic stress. We report that hypertonic stress in combination with FUdR treatment or inhibition of the FUdR target thymidylate synthase, TYMS-1, extends C. elegans lifespan by up to 30%. By contrast, in the absence of FUdR, hypertonic stress decreases lifespan. Adaptation to hypertonic stress requires diminished Notch signaling and loss of Notch co-ligands leads to lifespan extension only in combination with FUdR. Either FUdR treatment or TYMS-1 loss induced resistance to acute hypertonic stress, anoxia, and thermal stress. FUdR treatment increased expression of DAF-16 FOXO and the osmolyte biosynthesis enzyme GPDH-1. FUdR-induced hypertonic stress resistance was partially dependent on sirtuins and base excision repair (BER) pathways, while FUdR-induced lifespan extension under hypertonic stress conditions requires DAF-16, BER, and sirtuin function. Combined, these results demonstrate that FUdR, through inhibition of TYMS-1, activates stress response pathways in somatic tissues to confer hormetic resistance to acute and chronic stress. C. elegans lifespan studies using FUdR may need re-interpretation in light of this work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Repair of DNA-protein cross-links in an excision repair-deficient human cell line and its simian virus 40-transformed derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, R.; Taylor, W.G.; Camalier, R.F.; Stephens, E.V.

    1984-05-01

    DNA-protein cross-links are induced in mammalian cells by X-rays, ultraviolet light, fluorescent light, and numerous chemical carcinogens. Others have shown that these cross-links are repaired by normal cells but that excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) Group A cells, XP12BE, are deficient in repair of these bulky adducts. This paper compares the DNA-protein cross-link repair competency of another XP Group A strain, XP20S, with its more rapidly proliferating simian virus 40-transformed derivative line and with normal human skin fibroblasts. DNA-protein cross-links were induced with 20 microM transplatinum(II)diamminedichloride and assayed by the membrane alkaline elution procedure of Kohn. Treated and untreated cells are lysed on a polycarbonate membrane filter, and the coelution rates of the DNA at pH 12.2 are compared; DNA-protein cross-links retard elution of DNA. The repair competency of XP20S cells for trans-platinum(II)diamminedichloride-induced DNA-protein cross-links was similar to that of XP12BE cells, but the competency of the simian virus 40-transformed XP20S cells was nearly equal to that of normal human skin fibroblasts. These results suggest that either cell cycling compensates for the genetic deficiency present in the nucleotide excision process of XP Group A cells or that a process other than nucleotide excision can repair these lesions; this process requires cell cycling or activation by the virus.

  8. Evidence for an involvement of thymidine kinase in the excision repair of ultraviolet-irradiated herpes simplex virus in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Intine, R.V.; Rainbow, A.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A wild-type strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1:KOS) encoding a functional thymidine kinase (tk+) and a tk- mutant strain (HSV-1:PTK3B) were used to study the role of the viral tk in the repair of UV-irradiated HSV-1 in human cells. UV survival of HSV-1:PTK3B was substantially reduced compared with that of HSV-1:KOS when infecting normal human cells. In contrast, the UV survival of HSV-1:PTK3B was similar to that of HSV-1:KOS when infecting excision repair-deficient cells from a xeroderma pigmentosum patient from complementation group A. These results suggest that the repair of UV-irradiated HSV-1 in human cells depends, in part at least, on expression of the viral tk and that the repair process influenced by tk activity is excision repair or a process dependent on excision repair.

  9. Repair of rDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: RAD4-independent strand-specific nucleotide excision repair of RNA polymerase I transcribed genes.

    PubMed Central

    Verhage, R A; Van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1996-01-01

    Removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the individual strands of the rDNA locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. Yeast rDNA, that is transcribed by RNA polymerase I(RNA pol I), is repaired efficiently, slightly strand-specific and independently of RAD26, which has been implicated in transcription-coupled repair of the RNA pol II transcribed RPB2 gene. No repair of rDNA is observed in rad1,2,3 and 14 mutants, demonstrating that dimer removal from this highly repetitive DNA is accomplished by nucleotide excision repair (NER). In rad7 and rad16 mutants, which are specifically deficient in repair of non-transcribed DNA, there is a clear preferential repair of the transcribed strand of rDNA, indicating that strand-specific and therefore probably transcription-coupled repair of RNA pol I transcribed genes does exist in yeast. Unexpectedly, the transcribed but not the non-transcribed strand of rDNA can be repaired in rad4 mutants, which seem otherwise completely NER-deficient. PMID:8604332

  10. Metal inhibition of human alkylpurine-DNA-N-glycosylase activityin base excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ping; Guliaev, Anton B.; Hang, Bo

    2006-02-28

    Cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}), nickel (Ni{sup 2+}) and cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) are human and/or animal carcinogens. Zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) is not categorized as a carcinogen, and rather an essential element to humans. Metals were recently shown to inhibit DNA repair proteins that use metals for their function and/or structure. Here we report that the divalent ions Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} can inhibit the activity of a recombinant human N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) toward a deoxyoligonucleotide with ethenoadenine (var epsilonA). MPG removes a variety of toxic/mutagenic alkylated bases and does not require metal for its catalytic activity or structural integrity. At concentrations starting from 50 to 1000 {micro}M, both Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} showed metal-dependent inhibition of the MPG catalytic activity. Ni{sup 2+} also inhibited MPG, but to a lesser extent. Such an effect can be reversed with EDTA addition. In contrast, Co{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} did not inhibit the MPG activity in the same dose range. Experiments using HeLa cell-free extracts demonstrated similar patterns of inactivation of the var epsilonA excision activity by the same metals. Binding of MPG to the substrate was not significantly affected by Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} at concentrations that show strong inhibition of the catalytic function, suggesting that the reduced catalytic activity is not due to altered MPG binding affinity to the substrate. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with Zn{sup 2+} showed that the MPG active site has a potential binding site for Zn{sup 2+}, formed by several catalytically important and conserved residues. Metal binding to such a site is expected to interfere with the catalytic mechanism of this protein. These data suggest that inhibition of MPG activity may contribute to metal genotoxicity and depressed repair of alkylation damage by metals in vivo.

  11. Editor's Highlight: Base Excision Repair Variants and Pesticide Exposure Increase Parkinson's Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Laurie H; Paul, Kimberly C; Howlett, Evan H; Lawal, Hakeem; Boppana, Sridhar; Bronstein, Jeff M; Ritz, Beate; Greenamyre, J Timothy

    2017-07-01

    Exposure to certain pesticides induces oxidative stress and increases Parkinson's disease (PD) risk. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is found in dopaminergic neurons in idiopathic PD and following pesticide exposure in experimental models thereof. Base excision repair (BER) is the major pathway responsible for repairing oxidative DNA damage in cells. Whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in BER genes alone or in combination with pesticide exposure influence PD risk is unknown. We investigated the contributions of functional SNPs in 2 BER genes (APEX1 and OGG1) and mitochondrial dysfunction- or oxidative stress-related pesticide exposure, including paraquat, to PD risk. We also studied the effect of paraquat on levels of mtDNA damage and mitochondrial bioenergetics. 619 PD patients and 854 population-based controls were analyzed for the 2 SNPs, APEX1 rs1130409 and OGG1 rs1052133. Ambient pesticide exposures were assessed with a geographic information system. Individually, or in combination, the BER SNPs did not influence PD risk. Mitochondrial-inhibiting (OR = 1.79, 95% CI [1.32, 2.42]), oxidative stress-inducing pesticides (OR = 1.61, 95% CI [1.22, 2.11]), and paraquat (OR = 1.54, 95% CI [1.23, 1.93]) were associated with PD. Statistical interactions were detected, including for a genetic risk score based on rs1130409 and rs1052133 and oxidative stress inducing pesticides, where highly exposed carriers of both risk genotypes were at the highest risk of PD (OR = 2.21, 95% CI [1.25, 3.86]); similar interactions were estimated for mitochondrial-inhibiting pesticides and paraquat alone. Additionally, paraquat exposure was found to impair mitochondrial respiration and increase mtDNA damage in in vivo and in vitro systems. Our findings provide insight into possible mechanisms involved in increased PD risk due to pesticide exposure in the context of BER genotype variants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  12. Nucleotide Excision Repair Gene Polymorphisms, Meat Intake and Colon Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Susan E.; Butler, Lesley M.; Keku, Temitope; Antwi, Samuel; Galanko, Joseph; Sandler, Robert S.; Hu, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Much of the DNA damage from colon cancer-related carcinogens, including heterocyclic amines (HCA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from red meat cooked at high temperature, are repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Thus, we examined whether NER non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) modified the association between red meat intake and colon cancer risk. Methods The study consists of 244 African-American and 311 white colon cancer cases and population-based controls (331 African Americans and 544 whites) recruited from 33 counties in North Carolina from 1996 to 2000. Information collected by food frequency questionnaire on meat intake and preparation methods were used to estimate HCA and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP, a PAH) intake. We tested 7 nsSNPs in 5 NER genes: XPC A499V and K939Q, XPD D312N and K751Q, XPF R415Q, XPG D1104H, and RAD23B A249V. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Results Among African Americans, we observed a statistically significant positive association between colon cancer risk and XPC 499 AV+VV genotype (OR=1.7, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.7, AA as referent), and an inverse association with XPC 939 QQ (OR=0.3, 95%CI: 0.2, 0.8, KK as referent). These associations were not observed among whites. For both races combined, there was interaction between the XPC 939 genotype, well-done red meat intake and colon cancer risk (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.0, 2.2 for high well-done red meat and KK genotype as compared to low well-done red meat and KK genotype, pinteraction =0.05). Conclusions Our data suggest that NER nsSNPs are associated with colon cancer risk and may modify the association between well-done red meat intake and colon cancer risk. PMID:24607854

  13. Base excision repair of tandem modifications in a methylated CpG dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Akira; Çağlayan, Melike; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S; Beard, William A; Wilson, Samuel H

    2014-05-16

    Cytosine methylation and demethylation in tracks of CpG dinucleotides is an epigenetic mechanism for control of gene expression. The initial step in the demethylation process can be deamination of 5-methylcytosine producing the TpG alteration and T:G mispair, and this step is followed by thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) initiated base excision repair (BER). A further consideration is that guanine in the CpG dinucleotide may become oxidized to 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), and this could affect the demethylation process involving TDG-initiated BER. However, little is known about the enzymology of BER of altered in-tandem CpG dinucleotides; e.g. Tp8-oxoG. Here, we investigated interactions between this altered dinucleotide and purified BER enzymes, the DNA glycosylases TDG and 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1, DNA polymerase β, and DNA ligases. The overall TDG-initiated BER of the Tp8-oxoG dinucleotide is significantly reduced. Specifically, TDG and DNA ligase activities are reduced by a 3'-flanking 8-oxoG. In contrast, the OGG1-initiated BER pathway is blocked due to the 5'-flanking T:G mispair; this reduces OGG1, AP endonuclease 1, and DNA polymerase β activities. Furthermore, in TDG-initiated BER, TDG remains bound to its product AP site blocking OGG1 access to the adjacent 8-oxoG. These results reveal BER enzyme specificities enabling suppression of OGG1-initiated BER and coordination of TDG-initiated BER at this tandem alteration in the CpG dinucleotide.

  14. The effect of oxidative stress on nucleotide-excision repair in colon tissue of newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Langie, Sabine A S; Kowalczyk, Pawel; Tudek, Barbara; Zabielski, Romuald; Dziaman, Tomasz; Oliński, Ryszard; van Schooten, Frederik J; Godschalk, Roger W L

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide-excision repair (NER) is important for the maintenance of genomic integrity and to prevent the onset of carcinogenesis. Oxidative stress was previously found to inhibit NER in vitro, and dietary antioxidants could thus protect DNA not only by reducing levels of oxidative DNA damage, but also by protecting NER against oxidative stress-induced inhibition. To obtain further insight in the relation between oxidative stress and NER activity in vivo, oxidative stress was induced in newborn piglets by means of intra-muscular injection of iron (200mg) at day 3 after birth. Indeed, injection of iron significantly increased several markers of oxidative stress, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) levels in colon DNA and urinary excretion of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua). In parallel, the influence of maternal supplementation with an antioxidant-enriched diet was investigated in their offspring. Supplementation resulted in reduced iron concentrations in the colon (P=0.004) at day 7 and a 40% reduction of 8-oxodG in colon DNA (P=0.044) at day 14 after birth. NER capacity in animals that did not receive antioxidants was significantly reduced to 32% at day 7 compared with the initial NER capacity on day 1 after birth. This reduction in NER capacity was less pronounced in antioxidant-supplemented piglets (69%). Overall, these data indicate that NER can be reduced by oxidative stress in vivo, which can be compensated for by antioxidant supplementation.

  15. [Association between nucleotide excision repair gene polymorphisms and chromosomal damage in coke-oven workers].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Juan; Leng, Shu-Guang; Dai, Yu-Fei; Pan, Zu-Fei; Niu, Yong; Li, Bin; Zheng, Yu-Xin

    2006-11-01

    To investigate the association of polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair genes and chromosomal damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among coke-oven workers. The genotypes of ERCC1 C19007T, ERCC2 C22541A, ERCC2 G23591A, ERCC2 A35931C, ERCC4 T30028C, ERCC5 G3507C and ERCC6 A3368G among 140 coke-oven workers and 66 non-coke-oven controls were determined by PCR-PFLP methods. Chromosomal damage was detected by cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that in coke-oven workers, the ERCC1 19007 CC genotype exhibited significantly higher CBMN frequency [(1.05 +/- 0.68)%] than did the CT [(0.81 +/- 0.66)%] (P = 0.01) or TT [(0.66 +/- 0.37)%] (P = 0.05) or CT + TT genotypes [(0.75 +/- 0.63)%] (P = 0.004). For the ERCC6 A3368G polymorphism, AA genotype exhibited significantly higher CBMN frequency [(1.00 +/- 0.69)%] than did the AG [(0.67 +/- 0.42)%] (P = 0.05) or AG + GG genotypes [(0.66 +/- 0.41)%] (P = 0.02). Stratification analysis found the significant association between the two polymorphisms, ERCC1 C19007T and ERCC6 A3368G, and the CBMN frequencies were most pronounced in older workers. In addition, for the polymorphism of ERCC2 G23591A, GA carriers had significantly higher CBMN frequencies [(1.40 +/- 0.63)%] than those GG carriers [(0.98 +/- 0.59)%] (P = 0.01) in older workers. Our results suggested that polymorphisms of ERCC1 C19007T, ERCC6 A3368G and ERCC2 G23591A were associated with the CBMN frequencies in coke-oven workers.

  16. Association between nucleotide excision repair gene polymorphisms and chromosomal damage in coke-oven workers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J; Leng, S; Dai, Y; Huang, C; Pan, Z; Niu, Y; Li, B; Zheng, Y

    2007-01-01

    The associations between several genetic polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair genes (NER) and chromosome damage level were studied among 140 coke-oven workers exposed to a high level of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 66 non-exposed workers. Seven polymorphisms with functional potential in five NER genes (ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC4, ERCC5 and ERCC6) were genotyped in the 206 study subjects. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that coke-oven workers with the ERCC1 19007 CC genotype had significantly higher cytokinesis-block micronucleus frequency (CBMN) (10.5 +/- 6.8 per thousand) than those with CT (8.1 +/- 6.6 per thousand, p = 0.01) or TT (6.6 +/- 3.7-/ per thousand p = 0.05) or CT+TT genotypes (7.5 +/- 6.3 per thousand, p = 0.004). The ERCC6 A3368G polymorphism was also associated with CBMN frequency among coke-oven workers. Subjects with the AA genotype have a significantly higher CBMN frequency (10.0 +/- 6.9 per thousand) than those with AG (6.7 +/- 4.2 per thousand, p = 0.05) or AG+GG genotypes (6.6 +/- 4.1 per thousand, p = 0.02). Stratification analysis revealed the significant associations between ERCC1 C19007T and ERCC6 A3368G, and the CBMN frequencies were only found among older workers. In addition, a significant association between ERCC2 G23591A polymorphism and CBMN frequencies was also found among older coke-oven workers. The results suggest that polymorphisms of ERCC1 C19007T, ERCC6 A3368G and ERCC2 G23591A are associated with the CBMN frequencies among coke-oven workers.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes, cancer treatment, and head and neck cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Annah B.; Weissler, Mark C.; Avery, Christy L.; Herring, Amy H.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Head and neck cancers (HNC) are commonly treated with radiation and platinum-based chemotherapy, which produce bulky DNA adducts to eradicate cancerous cells. Because nucleotide excision repair (NER) enzymes remove adducts, variants in NER genes may be associated with survival among HNC cases both independently and jointly with treatment. Methods Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate race-stratified (White, African American) hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for overall (OS) and disease-specific (DS) survival based on treatment (combinations of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy) and 84 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15 NER genes among 1,227 HNC cases from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Study. Results None of the NER variants evaluated were associated with survival at a Bonferroni-corrected alpha of 0.0006. However, rs3136038 [OS HR = 0.79 (0.65, 0.97), DS HR = 0.69 (0.51, 0.93)] and rs3136130 [OS HR = 0.78 (0.64, 0.96), DS HR = 0.68 (0.50, 0.92)] of ERCC4 and rs50871 [OS HR = 0.80 (0.64, 1.00), DS HR = 0.67 (0.48, 0.92)] of ERCC2 among Whites, and rs2607755 [OS HR = 0.62 (0.45, 0.86), DS HR = 0.51 (0.30, 0.86)] of XPC among African Americans were suggestively associated with survival at an uncorrected alpha of 0.05. Three SNP-treatment joint effects showed possible departures from additivity among Whites. Conclusions Our study, a large and extensive evaluation of SNPs in NER genes and HNC survival, identified mostly null associations, though a few variants were suggestively associated with survival and potentially interacted additively with treatment. PMID:24487794

  18. NDR1 modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint and nucleotide excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong-Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Yi, Joo Mi; Chung, Jin Woong; Leem, Sun-Hee; Koh, Sang Seok; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2015-06-05

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism of UV-induced DNA lesion repair in mammals. A single round of NER requires multiple components including seven core NER factors, xeroderma pigmentosum A–G (XPA–XPG), and many auxiliary effector proteins including ATR serine/threonine kinase. The XPA protein helps to verify DNA damage and thus plays a rate-limiting role in NER. Hence, the regulation of XPA is important for the entire NER kinetic. We found that NDR1, a novel XPA-interacting protein, modulates NER by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint. In quiescent cells, NDR1 localized mainly in the cytoplasm. After UV irradiation, NDR1 accumulated in the nucleus. The siRNA knockdown of NDR1 delayed the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in both normal cells and cancer cells. It did not, however, alter the expression levels or the chromatin association levels of the core NER factors following UV irradiation. Instead, the NDR1-depleted cells displayed reduced activity of ATR for some set of its substrates including CHK1 and p53, suggesting that NDR1 modulates NER indirectly via the ATR pathway. - Highlights: • NDR1 is a novel XPA-interacting protein. • NDR1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to UV irradiation. • NDR1 modulates NER (nucleotide excision repair) by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint response.

  19. The Drosophila Meiotic Recombination Gene Mei-9 Encodes a Homologue of the Yeast Excision Repair Protein Rad1

    PubMed Central

    Sekelsky, J. J.; McKim, K. S.; Chin, G. M.; Hawley, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Meiotic recombination and DNA repair are mediated by overlapping sets of genes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes required to repair DNA double-strand breaks are also required for meiotic recombination. In contrast, mutations in genes required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) have no detectable effects on meiotic recombination in S. cerevisiae. The Drosophila melanogaster mei-9 gene is unique among known recombination genes in that it is required for both meiotic recombination and NER. We have analyzed the mei-9 gene at the molecular level and found that it encodes a homologue of the S. cerevisiae excision repair protein Rad1, the probable homologue of mammalian XPF/ERCC4. Hence, the predominant process of meiotic recombination in Drosophila proceeds through a pathway that is at least partially distinct from that of S. cerevisiae, in that it requires an NER protein. The biochemical properties of the Rad1 protein allow us to explain the observation that mei-9 mutants suppress reciprocal exchange without suppressing the frequency of gene conversion. PMID:8647398

  20. Recovery of DNA Replication in UV-Irradiated Escherichia coli Requires both Excision Repair and RecF Protein Function†

    PubMed Central

    Courcelle, Justin; Crowley, David J.; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    1999-01-01

    After UV doses that disrupt DNA replication, the recovery of replication at replication forks in Escherichia coli requires a functional copy of the recF gene. In recF mutants, replication fails to recover and extensive degradation of the nascent DNA occurs, suggesting that recF function is needed to stabilize the disrupted replication forks and facilitate the process of recovery. We show here that the ability of recF to promote the recovery of replication requires that the disrupting lesions be removed. In the absence of excision repair, recF+ cells protect the nascent DNA at replication forks, but replication does not resume. The classical view is that recombination proteins operate in pathways that are independent from DNA repair, and therefore the functions of Rec proteins have been studied in repair-deficient cells. However, mutations in either uvr or recF result in failure to recover replication at UV doses from which wild-type cells recover efficiently, suggesting that recF and excision repair contribute to a common pathway in the recovery of replication. PMID:9922256

  1. Repair of oxidatively induced DNA damage by DNA glycosylases: Mechanisms of action, substrate specificities and excision kinetics.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Coskun, Erdem; Jaruga, Pawel

    Endogenous and exogenous reactive species cause oxidatively induced DNA damage in living organisms by a variety of mechanisms. As a result, a plethora of mutagenic and/or cytotoxic products are formed in cellular DNA. This type of DNA damage is repaired by base excision repair, although nucleotide excision repair also plays a limited role. DNA glycosylases remove modified DNA bases from DNA by hydrolyzing the glycosidic bond leaving behind an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. Some of them also possess an accompanying AP-lyase activity that cleaves the sugar-phosphate chain of DNA. Since the first discovery of a DNA glycosylase, many studies have elucidated the mechanisms of action, substrate specificities and excision kinetics of these enzymes present in all living organisms. For this purpose, most studies used single- or double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides with a single DNA lesion embedded at a defined position. High-molecular weight DNA with multiple base lesions has been used in other studies with the advantage of the simultaneous investigation of many DNA base lesions as substrates. Differences between the substrate specificities and excision kinetics of DNA glycosylases have been found when these two different substrates were used. Some DNA glycosylases possess varying substrate specificities for either purine-derived lesions or pyrimidine-derived lesions, whereas others exhibit cross-activity for both types of lesions. Laboratory animals with knockouts of the genes of DNA glycosylases have also been used to provide unequivocal evidence for the substrates, which had previously been found in in vitro studies, to be the actual substrates in vivo as well. On the basis of the knowledge gained from the past studies, efforts are being made to discover small molecule inhibitors of DNA glycosylases that may be used as potential drugs in cancer therapy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Role of the DNA Base Excision Repair Protein, APE1 in Cisplatin, Oxaliplatin, or Carboplatin Induced Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Mark R.; Jiang, Yanlin; Guo, Chunlu; Reed, April; Meng, Hongdi; Vasko, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Although chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting side effect of platinum drugs, the mechanisms of this toxicity remain unknown. Previous work in our laboratory suggests that cisplatin-induced CIPN is secondary to DNA damage which is susceptible to base excision repair (BER). To further examine this hypothesis, we studied the effects of cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin on cell survival, DNA damage, ROS production, and functional endpoints in rat sensory neurons in culture in the absence or presence of reduced expression of the BER protein AP endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1). Using an in situ model of peptidergic sensory neuron function, we examined the effects of the platinum drugs on hind limb capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation. Exposing sensory neurons in culture to the three platinum drugs caused a concentration-dependent increase in apoptosis and cell death, although the concentrations of carboplatin were 10 fold higher than cisplatin. As previously observed with cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin also increased DNA damage as indicated by an increase in phospho-H2AX and reduced the capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from neuronal cultures. Both cisplatin and oxaliplatin increased the production of ROS as well as 8-oxoguanine DNA adduct levels, whereas carboplatin did not. Reducing levels of APE1 in neuronal cultures augmented the cisplatin and oxaliplatin induced toxicity, but did not alter the effects of carboplatin. Using an in vivo model, systemic injection of cisplatin (3 mg/kg), oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg), or carboplatin (30 mg/kg) once a week for three weeks caused a decrease in capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation, which was delayed in onset. The effects of cisplatin on capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation were attenuated by chronic administration of E3330, a redox inhibitor of APE1 that serendipitously enhances APE1 DNA repair activity in sensory neurons. These outcomes support the importance of the BER pathway, and particularly APE

  3. Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde adducts decrease bronchial epithelial wound repair.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Todd A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Tuma, Dean J; Sisson, Joseph H; Spurzem, John R

    2005-05-01

    Most people who abuse alcohol are cigarette smokers. Previously, we have shown that malondialdehyde, an inflammation product of lipid peroxidation, and acetaldehyde, a component of both ethanol metabolism and cigarette smoke, form protein adducts that stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) activation in bronchial epithelial cells. We have also shown that PKC can regulate bronchial epithelial cell wound repair. We hypothesize that bovine serum albumin adducted with malondialdehyde and acetaldehyde (BSA-MAA) decreases bronchial epithelial cell wound repair via binding to scavenger receptors on bronchial epithelial cells. To test this, confluent monolayers of bovine bronchial epithelial cells were grown in serum-free media prior to wounding the cells. Bronchial epithelial cell wound closure was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner (up to 60%) in the presence of BSA-MAA than in media treated cells (Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis [LHC]-9-Roswell Park Memorial Institute [RPMI]). The specific scavenger receptor ligand, fucoidan, also stimulated PKC activation and decreased wound repair. Pretreatment with fucoidan blocked malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde binding to bronchial epithelial cells. When bronchial epithelial cells were preincubated with a PKC alpha inhibitor, Gö 6976, the inhibition of wound closure by fucoidan and BSA-MAA was blocked. Western blot demonstrated the presence of several scavenger receptors on bronchial epithelial cell membranes, including SRA, SRBI, SRBII, and CD36. Scavenger receptor-mediated activation of PKC alpha may function to reduce wound healing under conditions of alcohol and cigarette smoke exposure where malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde adducts may be present.

  4. Modulation of DNA polymerase beta-dependent base excision repair in cultured human cells after low dose exposure to arsenite

    SciTech Connect

    Sykora, Peter; Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2008-05-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is crucial for development and for the repair of endogenous DNA damage. However, unlike nucleotide excision repair, the regulation of BER is not well understood. Arsenic, a well-established human carcinogen, is known to produce oxidative DNA damage, which is repaired primarily by BER, whilst high doses of arsenic can also inhibit DNA repair. However, the mechanism of repair inhibition by arsenic and the steps inhibited are not well defined. To address this question we have investigated the regulation of DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) and AP endonuclease (APE1), in response to low, physiologically relevant doses of arsenic. GM847 lung fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to sodium arsenite, As(III), and mRNA, protein levels and BER activity were assessed. Both Pol {beta} and APE1 mRNA exhibited significant dose-dependant down regulation at doses of As(III) above 1 {mu}M. However, at lower doses Pol {beta} mRNA and protein levels, and consequently, BER activity were significantly increased. In contrast, APE1 protein levels were only marginally increased by low doses of As(III) and there was no correlation between APE1 and overall BER activity. Enzyme supplementation of nuclear extracts confirmed that Pol {beta} was rate limiting. These changes in BER correlated with overall protection against sunlight UV-induced toxicity at low doses of As(III) and produced synergistic toxicity at high doses. The results provide evidence that changes in BER due to low doses of arsenic could contribute to a non-linear, threshold dose response for arsenic carcinogenesis.

  5. Rapid and apparently error-prone excision repair of nonreplicating UV-irradiated plasmids in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, J.B.; Ackerman, E.J.; Pang, Q.S. )

    1990-07-01

    Repair of UV-irradiated plasmid DNA microinjected into frog oocytes was measured by two techniques: transformation of repair-deficient (delta uvrB delta recA delta phr) bacteria, and removal of UV endonuclease-sensitive sites (ESS). Transformation efficiencies relative to unirradiated plasmids were used to estimate the number of lethal lesions; the latter were assumed to be Poisson distributed. These estimates were in good agreement with measurements of ESS. By both criteria, plasmid DNA was efficiently repaired, mostly during the first 2 h, when as many as 2 x 10(10) lethal lesions were removed per oocyte. This rate is about 10(6) times the average for removal of ESS from repair-proficient human cells. Repair was slower but still significant after 2 h, but some lethal lesions usually remained after overnight incubation. Most repair occurred in the absence of light, in marked contrast to differentiated frog cells, previously shown to possess photoreactivating but no excision repair activity. There was no increase in the resistance to DpnI restriction of plasmids (methylated in Escherichia coli at GATC sites) incubated in oocytes; this implies no increase in hemimethylated GATC sites, and hence no semiconservative DNA replication. Plasmid substrates capable of either intramolecular or intermolecular homologous recombination were not recombined, whether UV-irradiated or not. Repair of Lac+ plasmids was accompanied by a significant UV-dependent increase in the frequency of Lac- mutants, corresponding to a repair synthesis error frequency on the order of 10(-4) per nucleotide.

  6. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Enhances Neuronal Base Excision Repair via PI3K-AKT-Induced Expression of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yin-Ping; Kuo, Chao-Ying; Chen, Shang-Der

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal-secreted incretin that increases cellular glucose up-take to decrease blood sugar. Recent studies, however, suggest that the function of GLP-1 is not only to decrease blood sugar, but also acts as a neurotrophic factor that plays a role in neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and protects synaptic plasticity and memory formation from effects of β-amyloid. Oxidative DNA damage occurs during normal neuron-activity and in many neurological diseases. Our study describes how GLP-1 affected the ability of neurons to ameliorate oxidative DNA damage. We show that activation of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) protect cortical neurons from menadione induced oxidative DNA damage via a signaling pathway involving enhanced DNA repair. GLP-1 stimulates DNA repair by activating the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) which, consequently, induces the expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), a key enzyme in the base excision DNA repair (BER) pathway. In this study, APE1 expression was down-regulated as a consequence phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) suppression by the inhibitor LY294002, but not by the suppression of MEK activity. Ischemic stroke is typically caused by overwhelming oxidative-stress in brain cells. Administration of exentin-4, an analogue of GLP-1, efficiently enhanced DNA repair in brain cells of ischemic stroke rats. Our study suggests that a new function of GLP-1 is to elevate DNA repair by inducing the expression of the DNA repair protein APE1. PMID:27698937

  7. Reconstitution of mammalian excision repair activity with mutant cell-free extracts and XPAC and ERCC1 proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Park, C H; Sancar, A

    1993-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair in humans involves the coordinated actions of 8-10 proteins. To understand the roles of each of these proteins in excision it is necessary to develop an in vitro excision repair system reconstituted entirely from purified proteins. Towards this goal we have expressed in E. coli two of the 8 genes known to be essential for the excision reaction. XPAC and ERCC1 were expressed as fusion proteins with the Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP) and purified to > 80% homogeneity by affinity chromatography. The purified proteins either as fusions or after cleavage from the MBP were able to complement the CFE of cells with mutations in the corresponding genes in an excision assay with thymine dimer containing substrate. Images PMID:8255764

  8. Nucleotide excision repair and photolyase repair of UV photoproducts in nucleosomes: assessing the existence of nucleosome and non-nucleosome rDNA chromatin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Maxime; Toussaint, Martin; D'Amours, Annie; Conconi, Antonio

    2009-02-01

    The genome is organized into nuclear domains, which create microenvironments that favor distinct chromatin structures and functions (e.g., highly repetitive sequences, centromeres, telomeres, noncoding sequences, inactive genes, RNA polymerase II and III transcribed genes, and the nucleolus). Correlations have been drawn between gene silencing and proximity to a heterochromatic compartment. At the other end of the scale are ribosomal genes, which are transcribed at a very high rate by RNA polymerase I (~60% of total transcription), have a loose chromatin structure, and are clustered in the nucleolus. The rDNA sequences have 2 distinct structures: active rRNA genes, which have no nucleosomes; and inactive rRNA genes, which have nucleosomes. Like DNA transcription and replication, DNA repair is modulated by the structure of chromatin, and the kinetics of DNA repair vary among the nuclear domains. Although research on DNA repair in all chromosomal contexts is important to understand the mechanisms of genome maintenance, this review focuses on nucleotide excision repair and photolyase repair of UV photoproducts in the first-order packing of DNA in chromatin: the nucleosome. In addition, it summarizes the studies that have demonstrated the existence of the 2 rDNA chromatins, and the way this feature of the rDNA locus allows for direct comparison of DNA repair in 2 very different structures: nucleosome and non-nucleosome DNA.

  9. Important role for Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrD1 in pathogenesis and persistence apart from its function in nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Joanna; Townsend, Carolin; Williams, Alan R; Rodgers, Angela; Rand, Lucinda; Walker, K Barry; Böttger, Erik C; Springer, Burkhard; Davis, Elaine O

    2012-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives and replicates in macrophages, where it is exposed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that damage DNA. In this study, we investigated the roles of UvrA and UvrD1, thought to be parts of the nucleotide excision repair pathway of M. tuberculosis. Strains in which uvrD1 was inactivated either alone or in conjunction with uvrA were constructed. Inactivation of uvrD1 resulted in a small colony phenotype, although growth in liquid culture was not significantly affected. The sensitivity of the mutant strains to UV irradiation and to mitomycin C highlighted the importance of the targeted genes for nucleotide excision repair. The mutant strains all exhibited heightened susceptibility to representatives of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). The uvrD1 and the uvrA uvrD1 mutants showed decreased intracellular multiplication following infection of macrophages. Most importantly, the uvrA uvrD1 mutant was markedly attenuated following infection of mice by either the aerosol or the intravenous route.

  10. Evidence for two independent pathways of biologically effective excision repair from its rate and extent in cells cultured from sun-sensitive humans

    SciTech Connect

    Tyrrell, R.M.; Amaudruz, F.

    1987-07-15

    Repair-proficient human cells can be sensitized to exposure to UV radiation at 254 nm by postirradiation incubation in the presence of the eukaryotic alpha polymerase inhibitor, aphidicolin. The degree of sensitization has been examined in cells cultured from humans suffering from various types of sun-sensitive syndromes. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) variant and Bloom's cell lines (both excision proficient) were strongly sensitized by aphidicolin. An excision repair proficient Cockayne's cell line and a deficient XPD line were both sensitized to a level similar to the sensitivity of excision deficient XPA cells. In contrast, three XPC cell lines which show intermediate UV-induced repair replication and UV sensitivity were sensitized little (in one case) or not at all (in two cases) to UV by postirradiation inhibition of the alpha polymerase. These results lead us to conclude that there are two independent pathways of biologically effective excision repair, the major one of which involves the alpha polymerase and a second, less efficient and slower pathway which is independent of the alpha polymerase and which is the only pathway operating in two of the three XPC strains tested. The rates of biologically effective excision repair were similar in normal, XP variant, and Cockayne's cell lines, but these rates were considerably higher than published rates of dimer excision measured under similar conditions.

  11. The DNA excision repair system of the highly radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is facilitated by the pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-M; Liu, J-K; Wong, T-Y

    2003-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is highly resistant to radiation and mutagenic chemicals. Mutants defective in the putative glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (zwf-) and the aldolase gene (fda-) were generated by homologous recombination. These mutants were used to test the cells' resistance to agents that cause dimer formation and DNA strand breaks. The zwf - mutants were more sensitive to agents that induce DNA excision repair, such as UV irradiation and H2O2, but were as resistant to DNA strand break-causing agents such as methylmethanesulphonic acid (MMS) and mitomycin C (MMC) as the wild-type cells. Analysis of the cytoplasmic fraction of zwf- cells showed that the concentrations of inosine monophosphate (IMP) and uridine monophosphate (UMP) were only 30% of those found in the wild-type cells. The fda- mutants were slightly more resistant to UV light and H2O2. Results suggested that the deinococcal pentose phosphate pathway augmented the DNA excision repair system by providing cells with adequate metabolites for the DNA mismatch repair.

  12. Association between common genetic variation in Cockayne syndrome A and B genes and nucleotide excision repair capacity among smokers.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuguang; Bernauer, Amanda; Stidley, Christine A; Picchi, Maria A; Sheng, Xin; Frasco, Melissa A; Van Den Berg, David; Gilliland, Frank D; Crowell, Richard E; Belinsky, Steven A

    2008-08-01

    Mutagen sensitivity in in vitro cultured lymphocytes challenged by benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE) has been validated as an intrinsic susceptibility factor for several cancers. Bulky BPDE-DNA adducts are repaired via either transcription-coupled repair or global genome nucleotide excision repair depending on the location of lesions. Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) and B (CSB) play essential roles in integrating the recognition of damage, chromatin remodeling, and the core nucleotide excision repair proteins. This study evaluated the hypothesis that common genetic variation in CSA and CSB is associated with mutagen sensitivity induced by BPDE in 276 cancer-free smokers. Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; n = 37) selected across the entire coding and putative regulatory regions of CSA and CSB based on a high-density SNP database were genotyped by the Illumina Golden Gate assay. Major principal components of CSA and CSB that captured the linkage disequilibrium from multiple SNPs were globally associated with the number of breaks per cell at the threshold of 80% (P < or = 0.02 for both genes). Haplotype H125 in CSA and H97 in CSB as well as SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium with these two haplotypes were significantly associated with a 13% to 15% reduction in the mean number of chromatid breaks per cell (P < 0.05). A resampling-based omnibus test supported the significant association between SNPs and haplotypes in CSA and mutagen sensitivity induced by BPDE (P = 0.035). This study implicates transcription-coupled repair in protecting the cell from BPDE-induced DNA damage.

  13. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Nucleotide Excision Repair Genes, Cigarette Smoking, and the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Annah B.; Herring, Amy H.; Avery, Christy L.; Weissler, Mark C.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Funkhouser, William K.; Olshan, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is associated with increased head and neck cancer (HNC) risk. Tobacco-related carcinogens are known to cause bulky DNA adducts. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes encode enzymes that remove adducts and may be independently associated with HNC, as well as modifiers of the association between smoking and HNC. Methods Using population-based case-control data from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Study (1,227 cases, 1,325 controls), race-stratified (white, African American) conventional and hierarchical logistic regression models were utilized to estimate odds ratios (OR) with 95% intervals (I) for the independent and joint effects of cigarette smoking and 84 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 15 NER genes on HNC risk. Results The odds of HNC were elevated among ever cigarette smokers, and increased with smoking duration and frequency. Among whites, rs4150403 on ERCC3 was associated with increased HNC odds (AA+AG vs. GG, OR=1.28, 95% I=1.01,1.61). Among African Americans, rs4253132 on ERCC6 was associated with decreased HNC odds (CC+CT vs. TT, OR=0.62, 95% I=0.45,0.86). Interactions between ever cigarette smoking and three SNPs (rs4253132 on ERCC6, rs2291120 on DDB2, and rs744154 on ERCC4) suggested possible departures from additivity among whites. Conclusions We did not find associations between some previously studied NER variants and HNC. We did identify new associations between two SNPs and HNC and three suggestive cigarette-SNP interactions to consider in future studies. Impact We conducted one of the most comprehensive evaluations of NER variants, identifying a few SNPs from biologically plausible candidate genes associated with HNC and possibly interacting with cigarette smoking. PMID:23720401

  14. uv excision-repair gene transfer in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.A.; Bingham, J.M.; Strniste, G.F.; Thompson, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    uvc-sensitive mutants of CHO cells provide a model system for molecular studies of DNA repair. We present our recent results which show that these mutants are competent recipients for plasmid marker gene transfer and incorporation of a putative CHO repair gene. The applicability and advantages of this system for interspecies human repair gene identification are discussed.

  15. Nucleotide Excision Repair Proteins Rapidly Accumulate but Fail to Persist in Human XP-E (DDB2 Mutant) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyu-Seon; Imoto, Kyoko; Emmert, Steffen; Tamura, Deborah; DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth. H.

    2011-01-01

    The XP-E DNA damage binding protein (DDB2) is involved in early recognition of global genome DNA damage during DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER). We found that skin fibroblasts from 4 newly reported XP-E patients with numerous skin cancers and DDB2 mutations had slow repair of 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) and markedly reduced repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). NER proteins (XPC, XPB, XPG, XPA, and XPF) co-localized to CPD and 6-4PP positive regions immediately (< 0.1h) after localized UV irradiation in cells from the XP-E patients and normal controls. While these proteins persist in normal cells, surprisingly, within 0.5h these repair proteins were no longer detectable at the sites of DNA damage in XP-E cells. Our results indicate that DDB2 is not required for the rapid recruitment of NER proteins to sites of UV photoproducts or for partial repair of 6-4PP but is essential for normal persistence of these proteins for CPD photoproduct removal. PMID:21388382

  16. p38 MAPK- and Akt-mediated p300 phosphorylation regulates its degradation to facilitate nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi-En; Han, Chunhua; Zhao, Ran; Wani, Gulzar; Zhu, Qianzheng; Gong, Li; Battu, Aruna; Racoma, Ira; Sharma, Nidhi; Wani, Altaf A.

    2013-01-01

    Besides the primary histone acetyltransferase (HAT)-mediated chromatin remodeling function, co-transcriptional factor, p300, is also known to play a distinct role in DNA repair. However, the exact mechanism of p300 function in DNA repair has remained unclear and difficult to discern due to the phosphorylation and degradation of p300 in response to DNA damage. Here, we have demonstrated that p300 is only degraded in the presence of specific DNA lesions, which are the substrates of nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. In contrast, DNA double-strand breaks fail to degrade p300. Degradation is initiated by phosphorylation of p300 at serine 1834, which is catalyzed by the cooperative action of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and Akt kinases. In depth, functional analysis revealed that (i) p300 and CBP act redundantly in repairing ultraviolet (UV) lesions, (ii) the phosphorylation of p300 at S1834 is critical for efficient removal of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (iii) p300 is recruited to DNA damage sites located within heterochromatin. Taken together, we conclude that phosphorylated p300 initially acetylates histones to relax heterochromatin to allow damage recognition factors access to damage DNA. Thereupon, p300 is promptly degraded to allow the sequential recruitment of downstream repair proteins for successful execution of NER. PMID:23275565

  17. Human HMGB1 directly facilitates interactions between nucleotide excision repair proteins on triplex-directed psoralen interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Lange, Sabine S; Reddy, Madhava C; Vasquez, Karen M

    2009-07-04

    Psoralen is a chemotherapeutic agent that acts by producing DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), which are especially cytotoxic and mutagenic because their complex chemical nature makes them difficult to repair. Proteins from multiple repair pathways, including nucleotide excision repair (NER), are involved in their removal in mammalian cells, but the exact nature of their repair is poorly understood. We have shown previously that HMGB1, a protein involved in chromatin structure, transcriptional regulation, and inflammation, can bind cooperatively to triplex-directed psoralen ICLs with RPA, and that mammalian cells lacking HMGB1 are hypersensitive to psoralen ICLs. However, whether this effect is mediated by a role for HMGB1 in DNA damage recognition is still unknown. Given HMGB1's ability to bind to damaged DNA and its interaction with the RPA protein, we hypothesized that HMGB1 works together with the NER damage recognition proteins to aid in the removal of ICLs. We show here that HMGB1 is capable of binding to triplex-directed psoralen ICLs with the dedicated NER damage recognition complex XPC-RAD23B, as well as XPA-RPA, and that they form a higher-order complex on these lesions. In addition, we demonstrate that HMGB1 interacts with XPC-RAD23B and XPA in the absence of DNA. These findings directly demonstrate interactions between HMGB1 and the NER damage recognition proteins, and suggest that HMGB1 may affect ICL repair by enhancing the interactions between NER damage recognition factors.

  18. Replication factor C recruits DNA polymerase delta to sites of nucleotide excision repair but is not required for PCNA recruitment.

    PubMed

    Overmeer, René M; Gourdin, Audrey M; Giglia-Mari, Ambra; Kool, Hanneke; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Siegal, Gregg; Fousteri, Maria I; Mullenders, Leon H F; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) operates through coordinated assembly of repair factors into pre- and postincision complexes. The postincision step of NER includes gap-filling DNA synthesis and ligation. However, the exact composition of this NER-associated DNA synthesis complex in vivo and the dynamic interactions of the factors involved are not well understood. Using immunofluorescence, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and live-cell protein dynamic studies, we show that replication factor C (RFC) is implicated in postincision NER in mammalian cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of RFC impairs upstream removal of UV lesions and abrogates the downstream recruitment of DNA polymerase delta. Unexpectedly, RFC appears dispensable for PCNA recruitment yet is required for the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerases to PCNA, indicating that RFC is essential to stably load the polymerase clamp to start DNA repair synthesis at 3' termini. The kinetic studies are consistent with a model in which RFC exchanges dynamically at sites of repair. However, its persistent localization at stalled NER complexes suggests that RFC remains targeted to the repair complex even after loading of PCNA. We speculate that RFC associates with the downstream 5' phosphate after loading; such interaction would prevent possible signaling events initiated by the RFC-like Rad17 and may assist in unloading of PCNA.

  19. ERCC2: cDNA cloning and molecular characterization of a human nucleotide excision repair gene with high homology to yeast RAD3.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, C A; Salazar, E P; Stewart, S A; Thompson, L H

    1990-01-01

    Human ERCC2 genomic clones give efficient, stable correction of the nucleotide excision repair defect in UV5 Chinese hamster ovary cells. One clone having a breakpoint just 5' of classical promoter elements corrects only transiently, implicating further flanking sequences in stable gene expression. The nucleotide sequences of a cDNA clone and genomic flanking regions were determined. The ERCC2 translated amino acid sequence has 52% identity (73% homology) with the yeast nucleotide excision repair protein RAD3. RAD3 is essential for cell viability and encodes a protein that is a single-stranded DNA dependent ATPase and an ATP dependent helicase. The similarity of ERCC2 and RAD3 suggests a role for ERCC2 in both cell viability and DNA repair and provides the first insight into the biochemical function of a mammalian nucleotide excision repair gene. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2184031

  20. The mechanism of the glycosylase reaction with hOGG1 base-excision repair enzyme: concerted effect of Lys249 and Asp268 during excision of 8-oxoguanine

    PubMed Central

    Šebera, Jakub; Hattori, Yoshikazu; Sato, Daichi; Řeha, David; Nencka, Radim; Kohno, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The excision of 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) by the human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) base-excision repair enzyme was studied by using the QM/MM (M06-2X/6-31G(d,p):OPLS2005) calculation method and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The calculated glycosylase reaction included excision of the oxoG base, formation of Lys249-ribose enzyme–substrate covalent adduct and formation of a Schiff base. The formation of a Schiff base with ΔG# = 17.7 kcal/mol was the rate-limiting step of the reaction. The excision of the oxoG base with ΔG# = 16.1 kcal/mol proceeded via substitution of the C1΄-N9 N-glycosidic bond with an H-N9 bond where the negative charge on the oxoG base and the positive charge on the ribose were compensated in a concerted manner by NH3+(Lys249) and CO2−(Asp268), respectively. The effect of Asp268 on the oxoG excision was demonstrated with 1H NMR for WT hOGG1 and the hOGG1(D268N) mutant: the excision of oxoG was notably suppressed when Asp268 was mutated to Asn. The loss of the base-excision function was rationalized with QM/MM calculations and Asp268 was confirmed as the electrostatic stabilizer of ribose oxocarbenium through the initial base-excision step of DNA repair. The NMR experiments and QM/MM calculations consistently illustrated the base-excision reaction operated by hOGG1. PMID:28334993

  1. Major Roles for Pyrimidine Dimers, Nucleotide Excision Repair, and ATR in the Alternative Splicing Response to UV Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel J; Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Giono, Luciana E; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Dujardin, Gwendal; Bastianello, Giulia; Lavore, Stefania; Torres-Méndez, Antonio; Menck, Carlos F M; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Irimia, Manuel; Foiani, Marco; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2017-03-21

    We have previously found that UV irradiation promotes RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) hyperphosphorylation and subsequent changes in alternative splicing (AS). We show now that UV-induced DNA damage is not only necessary but sufficient to trigger the AS response and that photolyase-mediated removal of the most abundant class of pyrimidine dimers (PDs) abrogates the global response to UV. We demonstrate that, in keratinocytes, RNAPII is the target, but not a sensor, of the signaling cascade initiated by PDs. The UV effect is enhanced by inhibition of gap-filling DNA synthesis, the last step in the nucleotide excision repair pathway (NER), and reduced by the absence of XPE, the main NER sensor of PDs. The mechanism involves activation of the protein kinase ATR that mediates the UV-induced RNAPII hyperphosphorylation. Our results define the sequence UV-PDs-NER-ATR-RNAPII-AS as a pathway linking DNA damage repair to the control of both RNAPII phosphorylation and AS regulation.

  2. Surgeon performed continuous intraoperative ultrasound guidance decreases re-excisions and mastectomy rates in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Karadeniz Cakmak, Guldeniz; Emre, Ali U; Tascilar, Oge; Bahadir, Burak; Ozkan, Selcuk

    2017-06-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound guided (IUG) breast conserving surgery (BCS) is being increasingly embraced by breast surgeons worldwide. We aimed to compare the efficacy of IUG-BCS for palpable and nonpalpable breast cancer with respect to margin status, re-excision rate, tissue sacrifice and cost-time analysis. Intraoperative localization protocol includes intraoperative ultrasound prior to excision to localize the lesion and guide the initial resection. The excised specimen was then examined visually and by palpation and the specimen and cavity was examined with ultrasound. Frozen sections were obtained routinely from a portion of all six faces of the resected specimen, and shaved cavity margins were sent for permanent histology. Of the 208 patients, 57.2% had nonpalpable tumors. The sensitivity of ultrasound localization was 100%. Negative margins were achieved in 92.43% of nonpalpable and 91.01% of palpable lesions at initial procedure. The involved margins were correctly identified by the surgeon via specimen sonography in 95.4% of cases. Final positive margin rate was 2.4%. Calculated resection ratio and time analysis revealed nothing significant. IUG-BCS is an invaluable and effective modality for obtaining clear surgical margins with optimum resection volumes and reducing re-operations. Furthermore, by means of this algorithm, in case of shaving cavity margins of the tumor bed for permanent analysis, frozen section evaluation might be omitted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Arabidopsis uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) is required for base excision repair of uracil and increases plant sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Dubois, Emeline; Ariza, Rafael R; Doutriaux, Marie-Pascale; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa

    2010-03-05

    Uracil in DNA arises by misincorporation of dUMP during replication and by hydrolytic deamination of cytosine. This common lesion is actively removed through a base excision repair (BER) pathway initiated by a uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) activity that excises the damage as a free base. UDGs are classified into different families differentially distributed across eubacteria, archaea, yeast, and animals, but remain to be unambiguously identified in plants. We report here the molecular characterization of AtUNG (Arabidopsis thaliana uracil DNA glycosylase), a plant member of the Family-1 of UDGs typified by Escherichia coli Ung. AtUNG exhibits the narrow substrate specificity and single-stranded DNA preference that are characteristic of Ung homologues. Cell extracts from atung(-/-) mutants are devoid of UDG activity, and lack the capacity to initiate BER on uracil residues. AtUNG-deficient plants do not display any apparent phenotype, but show increased resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a cytostatic drug that favors dUMP misincorporation into DNA. The resistance of atung(-/-) mutants to 5-FU is accompanied by the accumulation of uracil residues in DNA. These results suggest that AtUNG excises uracil in vivo but generates toxic AP sites when processing abundant U:A pairs in dTTP-depleted cells. Altogether, our findings point to AtUNG as the major UDG activity in Arabidopsis.

  4. Conserved XPB Core Structure and Motifs for DNA Unwinding:Implications for Pathway Selection of Transcription or ExcisionRepair

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Li; Arval, Andrew S.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Iwai, Shigenori; Hanaoka, Fumio; Tainer, John A.

    2005-04-01

    The human xeroderma pigmentosum group B (XPB) helicase is essential for transcription, nucleotide excision repair, and TFIIH functional assembly. Here, we determined crystal structures of an Archaeoglobus fulgidus XPB homolog (AfXPB) that characterize two RecA-like XPB helicase domains and discover a DNA damage recognition domain (DRD), a unique RED motif, a flexible thumb motif (ThM), and implied conformational changes within a conserved functional core. RED motif mutations dramatically reduce helicase activity, and the DRD and ThM, which flank the RED motif, appear structurally as well as functionally analogous to the MutS mismatch recognition and DNA polymerase thumb domains. Substrate specificity is altered by DNA damage, such that AfXPB unwinds dsDNA with 3' extensions, but not blunt-ended dsDNA, unless it contains a lesion, as shown for CPD or (6-4) photoproducts. Together, these results provide an unexpected mechanism of DNA unwinding with Implications for XPB damage verification in nucleotide excision repair.

  5. Localization of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein and replication protein A on damaged DNA in nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) and replication protein A (RPA) with damaged DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) was studied using model dsDNA and bubble-DNA structure with 5-{3-[6-(carboxyamido-fluoresceinyl)amidocapromoyl]allyl}-dUMP lesions in one strand and containing photoreactive 5-iodo-dUMP residues in defined positions. Interactions of XPA and RPA with damaged and undamaged DNA strands were investigated by DNA–protein photocrosslinking and gel shift analysis. XPA showed two maximums of crosslinking intensities located on the 5′-side from a lesion. RPA mainly localized on undamaged strand of damaged DNA duplex and damaged bubble-DNA structure. These results presented for the first time the direct evidence for the localization of XPA in the 5′-side of the lesion and suggested the key role of XPA orientation in conjunction with RPA binding to undamaged strand for the positioning of the NER preincision complex. The findings supported the mechanism of loading of the heterodimer consisting of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum group F proteins by XPA on the 5′-side from the lesion before damaged strand incision. Importantly, the proper orientation of XPA and RPA in the stage of preincision was achieved in the absence of TFIIH and XPG. PMID:20693538

  6. Targeted detection of in vivo endogenous DNA base damage reveals preferential base excision repair in the transcribed strand

    PubMed Central

    Reis, António M. C.; Mills, Wilbur K.; Ramachandran, Ilangovan; Friedberg, Errol C.; Thompson, David; Queimado, Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous DNA damage is removed mainly via base excision repair (BER), however, whether there is preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage is still under intense debate. We developed a highly sensitive primer-anchored DNA damage detection assay (PADDA) to map and quantify in vivo endogenous DNA damage. Using PADDA, we documented significantly higher levels of endogenous damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in stationary phase than in exponential phase. We also documented that yeast BER-defective cells have significantly higher levels of endogenous DNA damage than isogenic wild-type cells at any phase of growth. PADDA provided detailed fingerprint analysis at the single-nucleotide level, documenting for the first time that persistent endogenous nucleotide damage in CAN1 co-localizes with previously reported spontaneous CAN1 mutations. To quickly and reliably quantify endogenous strand-specific DNA damage in the constitutively expressed CAN1 gene, we used PADDA on a real-time PCR setting. We demonstrate that wild-type cells repair endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. In contrast, yeast BER-defective cells accumulate endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. These data provide the first direct evidence for preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage and documents the major role of BER in this process. PMID:21911361

  7. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Desler, Claus; Hickson, Ian D; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy.

  8. Multiple DNA Binding Domains Mediate the Function of the ERCC1-XPF Protein in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yan; Orelli, Barbara; Madireddy, Advaitha; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Schärer, Orlando D.

    2012-01-01

    ERCC1-XPF is a heterodimeric, structure-specific endonuclease that cleaves single-stranded/double-stranded DNA junctions and has roles in nucleotide excision repair (NER), interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair, homologous recombination, and possibly other pathways. In NER, ERCC1-XPF is recruited to DNA lesions by interaction with XPA and incises the DNA 5′ to the lesion. We studied the role of the four C-terminal DNA binding domains in mediating NER activity and cleavage of model substrates. We found that mutations in the helix-hairpin-helix domain of ERCC1 and the nuclease domain of XPF abolished cleavage activity on model substrates. Interestingly, mutations in multiple DNA binding domains were needed to significantly diminish NER activity in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that interactions with proteins in the NER incision complex can compensate for some defects in DNA binding. Mutations in DNA binding domains of ERCC1-XPF render cells more sensitive to the crosslinking agent mitomycin C than to ultraviolet radiation, suggesting that the ICL repair function of ERCC1-XPF requires tighter substrate binding than NER. Our studies show that multiple domains of ERCC1-XPF contribute to substrate binding, and are consistent with models of NER suggesting that multiple weak protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions drive progression through the pathway. Our findings are discussed in the context of structural studies of individual domains of ERCC1-XPF and of its role in multiple DNA repair pathways. PMID:22547097

  9. The nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location, and protein stoichiometry influence the base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats.

    PubMed

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E; Wilson, David M; Merienne, Karine

    2012-05-08

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >14 genetic disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases, the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights into how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, the repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely because of the lower level of APE1, FEN1, and LIG1. Damage located toward the 5' end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired, with the accumulation of incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the center or at the 3' end of the repeats or within control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5' end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly at the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that the BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence, and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome and suggest that a suboptimal long-patch BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability.

  10. Nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location and protein stoichiometry influence base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats

    PubMed Central

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E.; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, David M.; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >fourteen genetic disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights as to how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely due to the lower level of APE1, FEN1 and LIG1. Damage located towards the 5’ end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired accumulating incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the centre or at the 3’ end of the repeats or within a control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5’ end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly under the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome, and suggest that a suboptimal LP-BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability. PMID:22497302

  11. Modulation of base excision repair of 8-oxoguanine by the nucleotide sequence.

    PubMed

    Allgayer, Julia; Kitsera, Nataliya; von der Lippen, Carina; Epe, Bernd; Khobta, Andriy

    2013-10-01

    8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is a major product of oxidative DNA damage, which induces replication errors and interferes with transcription. By varying the position of single 8-oxoG in a functional gene and manipulating the nucleotide sequence surrounding the lesion, we found that the degree of transcriptional inhibition is independent of the distance from the transcription start or the localization within the transcribed or the non-transcribed DNA strand. However, it is strongly dependent on the sequence context and also proportional to cellular expression of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1)-demonstrating that transcriptional arrest does not take place at unrepaired 8-oxoG and proving a causal connection between 8-oxoG excision and the inhibition of transcription. We identified the 5'-CAGGGC[8-oxoG]GACTG-3' motif as having only minimal transcription-inhibitory potential in cells, based on which we predicted that 8-oxoG excision is particularly inefficient in this sequence context. This anticipation was fully confirmed by direct biochemical assays. Furthermore, in DNA containing a bistranded Cp[8-oxoG]/Cp[8-oxoG] clustered lesion, the excision rates differed between the two strands at least by a factor of 9, clearly demonstrating that the excision preference is defined by the DNA strand asymmetry rather than the overall geometry of the double helix or local duplex stability.

  12. Predicting decreases in smoking with a cigarette purchase task: evidence from an excise tax rise in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Grace, Randolph C; Kivell, Bronwyn M; Laugesen, Murray

    2015-11-01

    Tobacco excise taxes are known to be effective in reducing smoking at the population level, but less research has examined how individual smokers respond to changes in tax policy. We ask whether price elasticities for individual smokers, derived from simulated demand curves obtained with a cigarette purchase task (CPT), can predict changes in smoking after a tax increase. Smokers (N=357) were recruited from four New Zealand cities and interviewed before and after a 10% tobacco excise tax increase. Simulated demand curves from the CPT were curvilinear and well described by an exponential model. Smokers reported significant reductions in cigarettes/day and addiction scores at Wave 2 (n=226). Local elasticities derived from the demand curves significantly predicted decreases in cigarettes/day after controlling for covariates. Elasticities from simulated demand curves can predict decreases in consumption for individual smokers after an excise tax increase. Understanding individual differences in tobacco demand curves may help to predict how different groups of smokers will respond to price increases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Oxidatively Generated Guanine(C8)-Thymine(N3) Intrastrand Cross-links in Double-stranded DNA Are Repaired by Base Excision Repair Pathways.

    PubMed

    Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Liu, Zhi; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Akishev, Zhiger; Matkarimov, Bakhyt T; Gasparutto, Didier; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Saparbaev, Murat

    2015-06-05

    Oxidatively generated guanine radical cations in DNA can undergo various nucleophilic reactions including the formation of C8-guanine cross-links with adjacent or nearby N3-thymines in DNA in the presence of O2. The G*[C8-N3]T* lesions have been identified in the DNA of human cells exposed to oxidative stress, and are most likely genotoxic if not removed by cellular defense mechanisms. It has been shown that the G*[C8-N3]T* lesions are substrates of nucleotide excision repair in human cell extracts. Cleavage at the sites of the lesions was also observed but not further investigated (Ding et al. (2012) Nucleic Acids Res. 40, 2506-2517). Using a panel of eukaryotic and prokaryotic bifunctional DNA glycosylases/lyases (NEIL1, Nei, Fpg, Nth, and NTH1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases (Apn1, APE1, and Nfo), the analysis of cleavage fragments by PAGE and MALDI-TOF/MS show that the G*[C8-N3]T* lesions in 17-mer duplexes are incised on either side of G*, that none of the recovered cleavage fragments contain G*, and that T* is converted to a normal T in the 3'-fragment cleavage products. The abilities of the DNA glycosylases to incise the DNA strand adjacent to G*, while this base is initially cross-linked with T*, is a surprising observation and an indication of the versatility of these base excision repair proteins.

  14. Nucleotide excision repair in rat male germ cells: low level of repair in intact cells contrasts with high dual incision activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J; Olsen, A K; Wiger, R; Naegeli, H; de Boer, P; van Der Hoeven, F; Holme, J A; Brunborg, G; Mullenders, L

    2001-04-15

    The acquisition of genotoxin-induced mutations in the mammalian germline is detrimental to the stable transfer of genomic information. In somatic cells, nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a major pathway to counteract the mutagenic effects of DNA damage. Two NER subpathways have been identified, global genome repair (GGR) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR). In contrast to somatic cells, little is known regarding the expression of these pathways in germ cells. To address this basic question, we have studied NER in rat spermatogenic cells in crude cell suspension, in enriched cell stages and within seminiferous tubules after exposure to UV or N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene. Surprisingly, repair in spermatogenic cells was inefficient in the genome overall and in transcriptionally active genes indicating non-functional GGR and TCR. In contrast, extracts from early/mid pachytene cells displayed dual incision activity in vitro as high as extracts from somatic cells, demonstrating that the proteins involved in incision are present and functional in premeiotic cells. However, incision activities of extracts from diplotene cells and round spermatids were low, indicating a stage-dependent expression of incision activity. We hypothesize that sequestering of NER proteins by mispaired regions in DNA involved in synapsis and recombination may underlie the lack of NER activity in premeiotic cells.

  15. Surprising Repair Activities of Nonpolar Analogs of 8-oxoG Expose Features of Recognition and Catalysis by Base Excision Repair Glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    McKibbin, Paige L.; Kobori, Akio; Taniguchi, Yosuke

    2012-01-01

    Repair glycosylases locate and excise damaged bases from DNA, playing central roles in preservation of the genome and prevention of disease. Two key glycosylases, Fpg and hOGG1, function to remove the mutagenic oxidized base 8-oxoG (OG) from DNA. To investigate the relative contributions of conformational preferences, leaving group ability, enzyme-base hydrogen bonding and nucleobase shape on damage recognition by these glycosylases, a series of four substituted indole nucleosides, based on the parent OG nonpolar isostere 2Cl-4F-indole, were tested as possible direct substrates of these enzymes in the context of 30 base pair duplexes paired with C. Surprisingly, single-turnover experiments revealed that Fpg-catalyzed base removal activity of two of the nonpolar analogs was superior to the native OG substrate. The hOGG1 glycosylase was also found to catalyze removal of three of the nonpolar analogs, albeit considerably less efficiently than removal of OG. Of note, the analog that was completely resistant to hOGG1-catalyzed excision has a chloro-substituent at the position of NH7 of OG implicating the importance of recognition of this position in catalysis. Both hOGG1 and Fpg retained high affinity for the duplexes containing the nonpolar isosteres. These studies show that hydrogen bonds between base and enzyme are not needed for efficient damage recognition and repair by Fpg and underscore the importance of facile extrusion from the helix in its damaged base selection. In contrast, damage removal by hOGG1 is sensitive both to hydrogen bonding groups and nucleobase shape. The relative rates of excision of the analogs with the two glycosylases highlight key differences in their mechanisms of damaged base recognition and removal. PMID:22175854

  16. Surprising repair activities of nonpolar analogs of 8-oxoG expose features of recognition and catalysis by base excision repair glycosylases.

    PubMed

    McKibbin, Paige L; Kobori, Akio; Taniguchi, Yosuke; Kool, Eric T; David, Sheila S

    2012-01-25

    Repair glycosylases locate and excise damaged bases from DNA, playing central roles in preservation of the genome and prevention of disease. Two key glycosylases, Fpg and hOGG1, function to remove the mutagenic oxidized base 8-oxoG (OG) from DNA. To investigate the relative contributions of conformational preferences, leaving group ability, enzyme-base hydrogen bonding, and nucleobase shape on damage recognition by these glycosylases, a series of four substituted indole nucleosides, based on the parent OG nonpolar isostere 2Cl-4F-indole, were tested as possible direct substrates of these enzymes in the context of 30 base pair duplexes paired with C. Surprisingly, single-turnover experiments revealed that Fpg-catalyzed base removal activity of two of the nonpolar analogs was superior to the native OG substrate. The hOGG1 glycosylase was also found to catalyze removal of three of the nonpolar analogs, albeit considerably less efficiently than removal of OG. Of note, the analog that was completely resistant to hOGG1-catalyzed excision has a chloro-substituent at the position of NH7 of OG, implicating the importance of recognition of this position in catalysis. Both hOGG1 and Fpg retained high affinity for the duplexes containing the nonpolar isosteres. These studies show that hydrogen bonds between base and enzyme are not needed for efficient damage recognition and repair by Fpg and underscore the importance of facile extrusion from the helix in its damaged base selection. In contrast, damage removal by hOGG1 is sensitive to both hydrogen bonding groups and nucleobase shape. The relative rates of excision of the analogs with the two glycosylases highlight key differences in their mechanisms of damaged base recognition and removal.

  17. A potential impact of DNA repair on ageing and lifespan in the ageing model organism Podospora anserina: decrease in mitochondrial DNA repair activity during ageing.

    PubMed

    Soerensen, Mette; Gredilla, Ricardo; Müller-Ohldach, Mathis; Werner, Alexandra; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Osiewacz, Heinz D; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2009-08-01

    The free radical theory of ageing states that ROS play a key role in age-related decrease in mitochondrial function via the damage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), proteins and lipids. In the sexually reproducing ascomycete Podospora anserina ageing is, as in other eukaryotes, associated with mtDNA instability and mitochondrial dysfunction. Part of the mtDNA instabilities may arise due to accumulation of ROS induced mtDNA lesions, which, as previously suggested for mammals, may be caused by an age-related decrease in base excision repair (BER). Alignments of known BER protein sequences with the P. anserina genome revealed high homology. We report for the first time the presence of BER activities in P. anserina mitochondrial extracts. DNA glycosylase activities decrease with age, suggesting that the increased mtDNA instability with age may be caused by decreased ability to repair mtDNA damage and hence contribute to ageing and lifespan control in this ageing model. Additionally, we find low DNA glycosylase activities in the long-lived mutants grisea and DeltaPaCox17::ble, which are characterized by low mitochondrial ROS generation. Overall, our data identify a potential role of mtDNA repair in controlling ageing and life span in P. anserina, a mechanism possibly regulated in response to ROS levels.

  18. A potential impact of DNA repair on ageing and lifespan in the ageing model organism Podospora anserina: Decrease in mitochondrial DNA repair activity during ageing

    PubMed Central

    Soerensen, Mette; Gredilla, Ricardo; Müller-Ohldach, Mathis; Werner, Alexandra; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Osiewacz, Heinz D.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2009-01-01

    Summary The free radical theory of ageing states that ROS play a key role in age-related decrease in mitochondrial function via the damage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), proteins and lipids. In the sexually reproducing ascomycete Podospora anserina ageing is, as in other eukaryotes, associated with mtDNA instability and mitochondrial dysfunction. Part of the mtDNA instabilities may arise due to accumulation of ROS induced mtDNA lesions, which, as previously suggested for mammals, may be caused by an age-related decrease in base excision repair (BER). Alignments of known BER protein sequences with the P. anserina genome revealed high homology. We report for the first time the presence of BER activities in P. anserina mitochondrial extracts. DNA glycosylase activities decrease with age, suggesting that the increased mtDNA instability with age may be caused by decreased ability to repair mtDNA damage and hence contribute to ageing and lifespan control in this ageing model. Additionally, we find low DNA glycosylase activities in the long-lived mutants grisea and ΔPaCox17∷ble, which are characterized by among others low mitochondrial ROS generation. Overall, our data identify a potential role of mtDNA repair in controlling ageing and life span in P. anserina, a mechanism possibly regulated in response to ROS levels. PMID:19486911

  19. Enhanced excision repair and lack of PSII activity contribute to higher UV survival of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells in dark.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Vishalsingh R; Vyawahare, Aniket; Bhattacharjee, Swapan K; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2015-03-01

    Plant cells are known to differentiate their responses to stress depending up on the light conditions. We observed that UVC sensitive phenotype of light grown asynchronous Chlamydomonas reinhardtii culture (Light culture: LC) can be converted to relatively resistant form by transfer to dark condition (Dark culture: DC) before UVC exposure. The absence of photosystem II (PSII) function, by either atrazine treatment in wild type or in D1 (psbA) null mutant, conferred UV protection even in LC. We provide an indirect support for involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling by showing higher UV survival on exposures to mild dose of H2O2 or Methyl Viologen. Circadian trained culture also showed a rhythmic variation in UV sensitivity in response to alternating light-dark (12 h:12 h) entrainment, with maximum UV survival at the end of 12 h dark and minimum at the end of 12 h light. This rhythm failed to maintain in "free running" conditions, making it a non-circadian phenotype. Moreover, atrazine strongly inhibited rhythmic UV sensitivity and conferred a constitutively high resistance, without affecting internal circadian rhythm marker expression. Dampening of UV sensitivity rhythm in Thymine-dimer excision repair mutant (cc-888) suggested the involvement of DNA repair in this phenomenon. DNA excision repair (ER) assays in cell-free extracts revealed that dark incubated cells exhibit higher ER compared to those growing in light, underscoring the role of ER in conferring differential UV sensitivity in dark versus light incubation. We suggest that multiple factors such as ROS changes triggered by differences in PSII activity, concomitant with differential ER efficiency collectively contribute to light-dark (12 h: 12 h) rhythmicity in C. reinhardtii UV sensitivity.

  20. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers affect mRNA expression of DNA nucleotide excision repair in skin and muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Sergio, Luiz Philippe S; Campos, Vera Maria A; Vicentini, Solange C; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; de Paoli, Flavia; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-04-01

    Lasers emit light beams with specific characteristics, in which wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode properties determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses. Low-intensity lasers could induce free radical generation in biological tissues and cause alterations in macromolecules, such as DNA. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and excision repair cross-complementing group 2 (ERCC2) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in biological tissues exposed to low-intensity lasers. Wistar rat (n = 28, 4 for each group) skin and muscle were exposed to low-intensity red (660 nm) and near-infrared (880 nm) lasers at different fluences (25, 50, and 100 J/cm(2)), and samples of these tissues were withdrawn for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and gene expression evaluation by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Laser exposure was in continuous wave and power of 100 mW. Data show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expressions decrease in skin (p < 0.001) exposed to near-infrared laser, but increase in muscle tissue (p < 0.001). ERCC1 mRNA expression does not alter (p > 0.05), but ERCC2 mRNA expression decreases in skin (p < 0.001) and increases in muscle tissue (p < 0.001) exposed to red laser. Our results show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expression is differently altered in skin and muscle tissue exposed to low-intensity lasers depending on wavelengths and fluences used in therapeutic protocols.

  1. ATR kinase is required for global genomic nucleotide excision repair exclusively during S phase in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Auclair, Yannick; Rouget, Raphael; Affar, El Bachir; Drobetsky, Elliot A.

    2008-01-01

    Global-genomic nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) is the only pathway available to humans for removal, from the genome overall, of highly genotoxic helix-distorting DNA adducts generated by many environmental mutagens and certain chemotherapeutic agents, e.g., UV-induced 6–4 photoproducts (6–4PPs) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). The ataxia telangiectasia and rad-3-related kinase (ATR) is rapidly activated in response to UV-induced replication stress and proceeds to phosphorylate a plethora of downstream effectors that modulate primarily cell cycle checkpoints but also apoptosis and DNA repair. To investigate whether this critical kinase might participate in the regulation of GG-NER, we developed a novel flow cytometry-based DNA repair assay that allows precise evaluation of GG-NER kinetics as a function of cell cycle. Remarkably, inhibition of ATR signaling in primary human lung fibroblasts by treatment with caffeine, or with siRNA specifically targeting ATR, resulted in total inhibition of 6–4PP removal during S phase, whereas cells repaired normally during either G0/G1 or G2/M. Similarly striking S-phase-specific defects in GG-NER of both 6–4PPs and CPDs were documented in ATR-deficient Seckel syndrome skin fibroblasts. Finally, among six diverse model human tumor strains investigated, three manifested complete abrogation of 6–4PP repair exclusively in S-phase populations. Our data reveal a highly novel role for ATR in the regulation of GG-NER uniquely during S phase of the cell cycle, and indicate that many human cancers may be characterized by a defect in this regulation. PMID:19004803

  2. Functional nucleotide excision repair is required for the preferential removal of N-ethylpurines from the transcribed strand of the dihydrofolate reductase gene of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sitaram, A; Plitas, G; Wang, W; Scicchitano, D A

    1997-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair of DNA adducts is an essential factor that must be considered when one is elucidating biological endpoints resulting from exposure to genotoxic agents. Alkylating agents comprise one group of chemical compounds which modify DNA by reacting with oxygen and nitrogen atoms in the bases of the double helix. To discern the role of transcription-coupled DNA repair of N-ethylpurines present in discrete genetic domains, Chinese hamster ovary cells were exposed to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, and the clearance of the damage from the dihydrofolate reductase gene was investigated. The results indicate that N-ethylpurines were removed from the dihydrofolate reductase gene of nucleotide excision repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary cells; furthermore, when repair rates in the individual strands were determined, a statistically significant bias in the removal of ethyl-induced, alkali-labile sites was observed, with clearance occurring 30% faster from the transcribed strand than from its nontranscribed counterpart at early times after exposure. In contrast, removal of N-ethylpurines was observed in the dihydrofolate reductase locus in cells that lacked nucleotide excision repair, but both strands were repaired at the same rate, indicating that transcription-coupled clearance of these lesions requires the presence of active nucleotide excision repair. PMID:9001209

  3. Distinct spatiotemporal patterns and PARP dependence of XRCC1 recruitment to single-strand break and base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Campalans, Anna; Kortulewski, Thierry; Amouroux, Rachel; Menoni, Hervé; Vermeulen, Wim; Radicella, J. Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Single-strand break repair (SSBR) and base excision repair (BER) of modified bases and abasic sites share several players. Among them is XRCC1, an essential scaffold protein with no enzymatic activity, required for the coordination of both pathways. XRCC1 is recruited to SSBR by PARP-1, responsible for the initial recognition of the break. The recruitment of XRCC1 to BER is still poorly understood. Here we show by using both local and global induction of oxidative DNA base damage that XRCC1 participation in BER complexes can be distinguished from that in SSBR by several criteria. We show first that XRCC1 recruitment to BER is independent of PARP. Second, unlike SSBR complexes that are assembled within minutes after global damage induction, XRCC1 is detected later in BER patches, with kinetics consistent with the repair of oxidized bases. Third, while XRCC1-containing foci associated with SSBR are formed both in eu- and heterochromatin domains, BER complexes are assembled in patches that are essentially excluded from heterochromatin and where the oxidized bases are detected. PMID:23355608

  4. Analysis of the base excision repair genes MTH1, OGG1 and MUTYH in patients with squamous oral carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Görgens, Heike; Müller, Annegret; Krüger, Stefan; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; König, Inke R; Ziegler, Andreas; Schackert, Hans K; Eckelt, Uwe

    2007-09-01

    A number of environmental factors, such as tobacco and alcohol, have been implicated, through oxidative DNA damage, in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN). Several pathways are involved in the repair of DNA lesions caused by oxidative stress, such as the base excision repair system (BER), which repairs mutation involving 8-oxoguanine and comprises the MUTYH, OGG1 and MTH1 genes. We analysed 29 patients, assessing germline polymorphisms or mutations in these genes by complete genomic sequencing of exons and adjacent intronic regions. Thirty healthy blood donors served as controls. No pathogenic germline mutations were identified. We found common and rare new variants in the coding and adjacent intronic regions. In summary, our data do not support a major role for MUTYH, OGG1 and MTH1 variants in the etiology of sporadic squamous oral/oropharyngeal carcinomas. This does not exclude the involvement of the three BER genes in the tumorigenesis of SCCHN through other mechanisms such as promotor hypermethylation, genomic rearrangements or mutations involving regulatory sequences.

  5. A novel regulatory circuit in base excision repair involving AP endonuclease 1, Creb1 and DNA polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Pei, De-Sheng; Yang, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Wei; Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Schrader, Carol E.; Strauss, Phyllis R.

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair is required to maintain genome stability in stem cells and early embryos. At critical junctures, oxidative damage to DNA requires the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Since early zebrafish embryos lack the major polymerase in BER, DNA polymerase ß, repair proceeds via replicative polymerases, even though there is ample polb mRNA. Here, we report that Polb protein fails to appear at the appropriate time in development when AP endonuclease 1 (Apex), the upstream protein in BER, is knocked down. Because polb contains a Creb1 binding site, we examined whether knockdown of Apex affects creb1. Apex knockdown results in loss of Creb1 and Creb complex members but not Creb1 phosphorylation. This effect is independent of p53. Although both apex and creb1 mRNA rescue Creb1 and Polb after Apex knockdown, Apex is not a co-activator of creb1 transcription. This observation has broad significance, as similar results occur when Apex is inhibited in B cells from apex+/− mice. These results describe a novel regulatory circuit involving Apex, Creb1 and Polb and provide a mechanism for lethality of Apex loss in higher eukaryotes. PMID:21172930

  6. Minimal role of base excision repair in TET-induced global DNA demethylation in HEK293T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunlei; Qin, Taichun; Barton, Michelle Craig; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine by TET family proteins can induce DNA replication-dependent (passive) DNA demethylation and base excision repair (BER)-based (active) DNA demethylation. The balance of active vs. passive TET-induced demethylation remains incompletely determined. In the context of large scale DNA demethylation, active demethylation may require massive induction of the DNA repair machinery and thus compromise genome stability. To study this issue, we constructed a tetracycline-controlled TET-induced global DNA demethylation system in HEK293T cells. Upon TET overexpression, we observed induction of DNA damage and activation of a DNA damage response; however, BER genes are not upregulated to promote DNA repair. Depletion of TDG (thymine DNA glycosylase) or APEX1 (apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), two key BER enzymes, enhances rather than impairs global DNA demethylation, which can be explained by stimulated proliferation. By contrast, growth arrest dramatically blocks TET-induced global DNA demethylation. Thus, in the context of TET-induction in HEK293T cells, the DNA replication-dependent passive mechanism functions as the predominant pathway for global DNA demethylation. In the same context, BER-based active demethylation is markedly restricted by limited BER upregulation, thus potentially preventing a disastrous DNA damage response to extensive active DNA demethylation. PMID:26440216

  7. An improved method for the detection of nucleotide excision repair factors at local UV DNA damage sites.

    PubMed

    Dutto, Ilaria; Cazzalini, Ornella; Stivala, Lucia Anna; Prosperi, Ennio

    2017-03-01

    Among different DNA repair processes that cells use to face with DNA damage, nucleotide excision repair (NER) is particularly important for the removal of a high variety of lesions, including those generated by some antitumor drugs. A number of factors participating in NER, such as the TFIIH complex and the endonuclease XPG are also involved in basal processes, e.g. transcription. For this reason, localization of these factors at DNA damage sites may be difficult. Here we have applied a mild digestion of chromatin with DNase I to improve the in situ extraction necessary to detect chromatin-bound proteins by immunofluorescence. We have compared this method with different extraction protocols and investigated its application on different cell types, and with different antibodies. Our results show that a short DNase I treatment before the immunoreaction, enhances the fluorescence signal of NER proteins, such as XPG, DDB2 and XPC. In addition, our findings indicate that the antibody choice is a critical factor for accurate localization of DNA repair proteins at DNA damage sites. In conclusion, a mild DNA digestion with DNase I improves the immunofluorescence detection of the recruitment of NER factors at local DNA damage sites by enhancing accessibility to the antibodies, independently of the cell type. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship between polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair genes and oral cancer risk in Taiwan: evidence for modification of smoking habit.

    PubMed

    Bau, Da-Tian; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Cheng-Chun; Tseng, Hsien-Chang; Lo, Yen-Li; Tsai, Yuhsin; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2007-12-31

    Inherited polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may be associated with differences in the repair capacity and contribute to individual's susceptibility to smoking-related cancers. Both XPA and XPD encode proteins that are part of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. In a hospital-based case-control study, we have investigated the influence of XPA A-23G and XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms on oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population. In total, 154 patients with oral cancer, and 105 age-matched controls recruited from the Chinese Medical Hospital in Central Taiwan were genotyped. No significant association was found between the heterozygous variant allele (AG), the homozygous variant allele (AA) at XPA A-23G, the heterozygous variant allele (AC), the homozygous variant allele (CC) at XPD Lys751Gln, and oral cancer risk. There was no significant joint effect of XPA A-23G and XPD Lys751Gln on oral cancer risk either. Since XPA and XPD are both NER genes, which are very important in removing tobacco-induced DNA adducts, further stratified analyses of both genotype and smoking habit were performed. We found a synergistic effect of variant genotypes of both XPA and XPD, and smoking status on oral cancer risk. Our results suggest that the genetic polymorphisms are modified by environmental carcinogen exposure status, and combined analyses of both genotype and personal habit record are a better access to know the development of oral cancer and useful for primary prevention and early intervention.

  9. Molecular mechanism of adenomatous polyposis coli-induced blockade of base excision repair pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Satya; Sharma, Ritika

    2015-10-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of death in both men and women in North America. Despite chemotherapeutic efforts, CRC is associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality. Thus, to develop effective treatment strategies for CRC, one needs knowledge of the pathogenesis of cancer development and cancer resistance. It is suggested that colonic tumors or cell lines harbor truncated adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) without DNA repair inhibitory (DRI)-domain. It is also thought that the product of the APC gene can modulate base excision repair (BER) pathway through an interaction with DNA polymerase β (Pol-β) and flap endonuclease 1 (Fen-1) to mediate CRC cell apoptosis. The proposed therapy with temozolomide (TMZ) exploits this particular pathway; however, a high percentage of colorectal tumors continue to develop resistance to chemotherapy due to mismatch repair (MMR)-deficiency. In the present communication, we have comprehensively reviewed a critical issue that has not been addressed previously: a novel mechanism by which APC-induced blockage of single nucleotide (SN)- and long-patch (LP)-BER play role in DNA-alkylation damage-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhancement of UV-induced nucleotide excision repair activity upon forskolin treatment is cell growth-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Min; Park, Jeong-Min; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Forskolin (FSK), an adenylyl cyclase activator, has recently been shown to enhance nucleotide excision repair (NER) upon UV exposure. However, our study revealed that this effect was detected in human skin epithelial ARPE19 cells only in growing cells, but not in non-cycling cells. When the cells were grown at low density (70% confluence), FSK was capable of stimulating cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) phosphorylation, a marker for FSK-stimulated PKA activation, and resulted in a significant increase of NER activity compared to control treatment. However, cells grown under 100% confluent conditions showed neither FSK-induced CREB phosphorylation nor the resulting NER enhancement. These findings indicate that cellular growth is critical for FSK-induced NER enhancement and suggest that cellular growth conditions should be considered as a variable while evaluating a reagent’s pharmacotherapeutic efficacy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(10): 566-571] PMID:27470212

  11. Enhancement of UV-induced nucleotide excision repair activity upon forskolin treatment is cell growth-dependent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Min; Park, Jeong-Min; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2016-10-01

    Forskolin (FSK), an adenylyl cyclase activator, has recently been shown to enhance nucleotide excision repair (NER) upon UV exposure. However, our study revealed that this effect was detected in human skin epithelial ARPE19 cells only in growing cells, but not in non-cycling cells. When the cells were grown at low density (70% confluence), FSK was capable of stimulating cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) phosphorylation, a marker for FSK-stimulated PKA activation, and resulted in a significant increase of NER activity compared to control treatment. However, cells grown under 100% confluent conditions showed neither FSK-induced CREB phosphorylation nor the resulting NER enhancement. These findings indicate that cellular growth is critical for FSK-induced NER enhancement and suggest that cellular growth conditions should be considered as a variable while evaluating a reagent's pharmacotherapeutic efficacy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(10): 566-571].

  12. Unique use of botulinum toxin to decrease adductor tone and allow surgical excision of vulvar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Shin, K

    2004-01-01

    Here, we present the case of an 86-year-old woman with vulvar carcinoma requiring surgical resection and with Parkinson's disease with severe spasticity and contractures of the lower extremities. Because of the patient's severe contractures and spasticity (her knees could only be separated by 2 cm with sustained abducting force), surgical positioning and access to the vulva were impossible. The patient was admitted, intending to undergo surgery after injection with botulinum toxin (BTX) to hip adductors and intensive physical therapy. After confirmed healed hip arthroplasty, the patient underwent BTX injection (400 U) to her bilateral adductor brevis, adductor longus, adductor magnus, and semimembranosus and semitendinosus muscles on day 2 of her hospital stay. On day 3, a physical therapist began a twice-a-day stretching program. An adjustable abduction brace was custom-made to provide sustained stretching. On day 9, the patient underwent wide local excision of vulvar carcinoma with the abductor brace in place. The patient tolerated the surgery well and was discharged home on day 11 with continuous physical therapy. Upon discharge, the distance between the patient's knees was 14 cm. This unique case demonstrated a new indication for BTX treatment in the preoperative setting to allow surgical positioning and access.

  13. Nucleosomes Suppress the Formation of Double-strand DNA Breaks during Attempted Base Excision Repair of Clustered Oxidative Damages*

    PubMed Central

    Cannan, Wendy J.; Tsang, Betty P.; Wallace, Susan S.; Pederson, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can produce multiple, clustered oxidative lesions in DNA. The near simultaneous excision of nearby lesions in opposing DNA strands by the base excision repair (BER) enzymes can produce double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). This attempted BER accounts for many of the potentially lethal or mutagenic DSBs that occur in vivo. To assess the impact of nucleosomes on the frequency and pattern of BER-dependent DSB formation, we incubated nucleosomes containing oxidative damages in opposing DNA strands with selected DNA glycosylases and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1. Overall, nucleosomes substantially suppressed DSB formation. However, the degree of suppression varied as a function of (i) the lesion type and DNA glycosylase tested, (ii) local sequence context and the stagger between opposing strand lesions, (iii) the helical orientation of oxidative lesions relative to the underlying histone octamer, and (iv) the distance between the lesion cluster and the nucleosome edge. In some instances the binding of a BER factor to one nucleosomal lesion appeared to facilitate binding to the opposing strand lesion. DSB formation did not invariably lead to nucleosome dissolution, and in some cases, free DNA ends resulting from DSB formation remained associated with the histone octamer. These observations explain how specific structural and dynamic properties of nucleosomes contribute to the suppression of BER-generated DSBs. These studies also suggest that most BER-generated DSBs will occur in linker DNA and in genomic regions associated with elevated rates of nucleosome turnover or remodeling. PMID:24891506

  14. Structure and stereochemistry of the base excision repair glycosylase MutY reveal a mechanism similar to retaining glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Woods, Ryan D; O'Shea, Valerie L; Chu, Aurea; Cao, Sheng; Richards, Jody L; Horvath, Martin P; David, Sheila S

    2016-01-29

    MutY adenine glycosylases prevent DNA mutations by excising adenine from promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG):A mismatches. Here, we describe structural features of the MutY active site bound to an azaribose transition state analog which indicate a catalytic role for Tyr126 and approach of the water nucleophile on the same side as the departing adenine base. The idea that Tyr126 participates in catalysis, recently predicted by modeling calculations, is strongly supported by mutagenesis and by seeing close contact between the hydroxyl group of this residue and the azaribose moiety of the transition state analog. NMR analysis of MutY methanolysis products corroborates a mechanism for adenine removal with retention of stereochemistry. Based on these results, we propose a revised mechanism for MutY that involves two nucleophilic displacement steps akin to the mechanisms accepted for 'retaining' O-glycosidases. This new-for-MutY yet familiar mechanism may also be operative in related base excision repair glycosylases and provides a critical framework for analysis of human MutY (MUTYH) variants associated with inherited colorectal cancer.

  15. Structure and stereochemistry of the base excision repair glycosylase MutY reveal a mechanism similar to retaining glycosidases

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Ryan D.; O'Shea, Valerie L.; Chu, Aurea; Cao, Sheng; Richards, Jody L.; Horvath, Martin P.; David, Sheila S.

    2016-01-01

    MutY adenine glycosylases prevent DNA mutations by excising adenine from promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG):A mismatches. Here, we describe structural features of the MutY active site bound to an azaribose transition state analog which indicate a catalytic role for Tyr126 and approach of the water nucleophile on the same side as the departing adenine base. The idea that Tyr126 participates in catalysis, recently predicted by modeling calculations, is strongly supported by mutagenesis and by seeing close contact between the hydroxyl group of this residue and the azaribose moiety of the transition state analog. NMR analysis of MutY methanolysis products corroborates a mechanism for adenine removal with retention of stereochemistry. Based on these results, we propose a revised mechanism for MutY that involves two nucleophilic displacement steps akin to the mechanisms accepted for ‘retaining’ O-glycosidases. This new-for-MutY yet familiar mechanism may also be operative in related base excision repair glycosylases and provides a critical framework for analysis of human MutY (MUTYH) variants associated with inherited colorectal cancer. PMID:26673696

  16. Using Shifts in Amino Acid Frequency and Substitution Rate to Identify Latent Structural Characters in Base-Excision Repair Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Barrantes-Reynolds, Ramiro; Wallace, Susan S.; Bond, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01

    Protein evolution includes the birth and death of structural motifs. For example, a zinc finger or a salt bridge may be present in some, but not all, members of a protein family. We propose that such transitions are manifest in sequence phylogenies as concerted shifts in substitution rates of amino acids that are neighbors in a representative structure. First, we identified rate shifts in a quartet from the Fpg/Nei family of base excision repair enzymes using a method developed by Xun Gu and coworkers. We found the shifts to be spatially correlated, more precisely, associated with a flexible loop involved in bacterial Fpg substrate specificity. Consistent with our result, sequences and structures provide convincing evidence that this loop plays a very different role in other family members. Second, then, we developed a method for identifying latent protein structural characters (LSC) given a set of homologous sequences based on Gu's method and proximity in a high-resolution structure. Third, we identified LSC and assigned states of LSC to clades within the Fpg/Nei family of base excision repair enzymes. We describe seven LSC; an accompanying Proteopedia page (http://proteopedia.org/wiki/index.php/Fpg_Nei_Protein_Family) describes these in greater detail and facilitates 3D viewing. The LSC we found provided a surprisingly complete picture of the interaction of the protein with the DNA capturing familiar examples, such as a Zn finger, as well as more subtle interactions. Their preponderance is consistent with an important role as phylogenetic characters. Phylogenetic inference based on LSC provided convincing evidence of independent losses of Zn fingers. Structural motifs may serve as important phylogenetic characters and modeling transitions involving structural motifs may provide a much deeper understanding of protein evolution. PMID:21998646

  17. Silymarin Protects Epidermal Keratinocytes from Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Apoptosis and DNA Damage by Nucleotide Excision Repair Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Santosh K.; Mantena, Sudheer K.; Meeran, Syed M.

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells. PMID:21731736

  18. Both base excision repair and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protect against methylation-induced colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, Stefan; Nagel, Georg; Eshkind, Leonid; Neurath, Markus F.; Samson, Leona D.; Kaina, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Methylating agents are widely distributed environmental carcinogens. Moreover, they are being used in cancer chemotherapy. The primary target of methylating agents is DNA, and therefore, DNA repair is the first-line barrier in defense against their toxic and carcinogenic effects. Methylating agents induce in the DNA O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) and methylations of the ring nitrogens of purines. The lesions are repaired by O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (Mgmt) and by enzymes of the base excision repair (BER) pathway, respectively. Whereas O6MeG is well established as a pre-carcinogenic lesion, little is known about the carcinogenic potency of base N-alkylation products such as N3-methyladenine and N3-methylguanine. To determine their role in cancer formation and the role of BER in cancer protection, we checked the response of mice with a targeted gene disruption of Mgmt or N-alkylpurine-DNA glycosylase (Aag) or both Mgmt and Aag, to azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis, using non-invasive mini-colonoscopy. We demonstrate that both Mgmt- and Aag-null mice show a higher colon cancer frequency than the wild-type. With a single low dose of AOM (3 mg/kg) Aag-null mice showed an even stronger tumor response than Mgmt-null mice. The data provide evidence that both BER initiated by Aag and O6MeG reversal by Mgmt are required for protection against alkylation-induced colon carcinogenesis. Further, the data indicate that non-repaired N-methylpurines are not only pre-toxic but also pre-carcinogenic DNA lesions. PMID:20732909

  19. Silymarin protects epidermal keratinocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage by nucleotide excision repair mechanism.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K; Mantena, Sudheer K; Meeran, Syed M

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells.

  20. Both base excision repair and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protect against methylation-induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Stefan; Nagel, Georg; Eshkind, Leonid; Neurath, Markus F; Samson, Leona D; Kaina, Bernd

    2010-12-01

    Methylating agents are widely distributed environmental carcinogens. Moreover, they are being used in cancer chemotherapy. The primary target of methylating agents is DNA, and therefore, DNA repair is the first-line barrier in defense against their toxic and carcinogenic effects. Methylating agents induce in the DNA O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)MeG) and methylations of the ring nitrogens of purines. The lesions are repaired by O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (Mgmt) and by enzymes of the base excision repair (BER) pathway, respectively. Whereas O(6)MeG is well established as a pre-carcinogenic lesion, little is known about the carcinogenic potency of base N-alkylation products such as N3-methyladenine and N3-methylguanine. To determine their role in cancer formation and the role of BER in cancer protection, we checked the response of mice with a targeted gene disruption of Mgmt or N-alkylpurine-DNA glycosylase (Aag) or both Mgmt and Aag, to azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis, using non-invasive mini-colonoscopy. We demonstrate that both Mgmt- and Aag-null mice show a higher colon cancer frequency than the wild-type. With a single low dose of AOM (3 mg/kg) Aag-null mice showed an even stronger tumor response than Mgmt-null mice. The data provide evidence that both BER initiated by Aag and O(6)MeG reversal by Mgmt are required for protection against alkylation-induced colon carcinogenesis. Further, the data indicate that non-repaired N-methylpurines are not only pre-toxic but also pre-carcinogenic DNA lesions.

  1. p16 Staining of Cervical Biopsies May Decrease the Frequency of Unnecessary Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedures.

    PubMed

    de Sam Lazaro, Shireen; Newbill, Colin P; Berlin, Michelle; Morgan, Terry K

    2016-07-01

    Loop electrosurgical excision procedures (LEEPs) are negative for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+) after a hematoxylin and eosin-based CIN 2+ colposcopic biopsy diagnosis in 14% to 24% of cases. This may be due to diagnostic errors or biopsy-related regression of the dysplasia. Because p16 immunohistochemical staining of cervical biopsies improves diagnostic accuracy, we hypothesized that p16-based cervical biopsy diagnoses may reduce the frequency of negative LEEPs. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of all cervical LEEPs completed at our institution from 2002 to 2012. We recorded patient age, sexual history, smoking history, pathologic diagnoses (including whether the diagnosis was p16 based), the number of days from biopsy to follow-up LEEP, and clinical follow-up. This yielded 593 study subjects meeting inclusion criteria of CIN 2+ colposcopic diagnoses with follow-up LEEP and 2 years of clinical follow-up. Colposcopic biopsies and follow-up LEEPs were reviewed and p16 immunostaining was performed on all samples to provide criterion standard results. Data were analyzed by χ and regression modeling. Our practice employed p16 to aid cervical biopsy diagnoses by 2006. The frequency of negative LEEPs before 2006 was 12 (10%) of 126. The frequency dropped during the p16 era (2006-2012) to 23 (5%) of 467. Overall, we observed an inverse relationship between the frequency of p16 employment and the frequency of negative LEEP outcomes (R = 0.71; p < .001), independent of potential covariates. Our data suggest that more accurate p16-based diagnoses may reduce the frequency of unnecessary LEEPs.

  2. In vitro Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage by Human Nucleotide Excision Repair System: Possible Explanation for Neurodegeneration in Xeroderma Pigmentosum Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Joyce T.; Bessho, Tadayoshi; Kung, Hsiang Chuan; Bolton, Philip H.; Sancar, Aziz

    1997-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients fail to remove pyrimidine dimers caused by sunlight and, as a consequence, develop multiple cancers in areas exposed to light. The second most common sign, present in 20-30% of XP patients, is a set of neurological abnormalities caused by neuronal death in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neural tissue is shielded from sunlight-induced DNA damage, so the cause of neurodegeneration in XP patients remains unexplained. In this study, we show that two major oxidative DNA lesions, 8-oxoguanine and thymine glycol, are excised from DNA in vitro by the same enzyme system responsible for removing pyrimidine dimers and other bulky DNA adducts. Our results suggest that XP neurological disease may be caused by defective repair of lesions that are produced in nerve cells by reactive oxygen species generated as by-products of an active oxidative metabolism.

  3. Disruption of DNA repair in cancer cells by ubiquitination of a destabilising dimerization domain of nucleotide excision repair protein ERCC1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lanlan; Ritchie, Ann-Marie; Melton, David W.

    2017-01-01

    DNA repair pathways present in all cells serve to preserve genome stability, but in cancer cells they also act reduce the efficacy of chemotherapy. The endonuclease ERCC1-XPF has an important role in the repair of DNA damage caused by a variety of chemotherapeutic agents and there has been intense interest in the use of ERCC1 as a predictive marker of therapeutic response in non-small cell lung carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and ovarian cancer. We have previously validated ERCC1 as a therapeutic target in melanoma, but all small molecule ERCC1-XPF inhibitors reported to date have lacked sufficient potency and specificity for clinical use. In an alternative approach to prevent the repair activity of ERCC1-XPF, we investigated the mechanism of ERCC1 ubiquitination and found that the key region was the C-terminal (HhH)2 domain which heterodimerizes with XPF. This ERCC1 region was modified by non-conventional lysine-independent, but proteasome-dependent polyubiquitination, involving Lys33 of ubiquitin and a linear ubiquitin chain. XPF was not polyubiquitinated and its expression was dependent on presence of ERCC1, but not vice versa. To our surprise we found that ERCC1 can also homodimerize through its C-terminal (HhH)2 domain. We exploited the ability of a peptide containing this C-terminal domain to destabilise both endogenous ERCC1 and XPF in human melanoma cells and fibroblasts, resulting in reductions of up to 85% in nucleotide excision repair and near two-fold increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We suggest that the ERCC1 (HhH)2 domain could be used in an alternative strategy to treat cancer. PMID:28903417

  4. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA BASE EXCISION REPAIR GENES APEX1 AND XRCC1 AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County is among the highest in China and has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a key role in revers...

  5. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA BASE EXCISION REPAIR GENES APEX1 AND XRCC1 AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County is among the highest in China and has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a key role in revers...

  6. Excision repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group C but not group D is clustered in a small fraction of the total genome.

    PubMed

    Karentz, D; Cleaver, J E

    1986-05-01

    DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups C and D occurs at a low level. Measurements of pyrimidine dimers remaining in bulk DNA from the whole genome indicated very little excision in either complementation group. The repair sites in group C cells were, however, clustered together in small regions of the genome which appeared to be mended nearly as efficiently as the whole genome is mended in normal cells, while repair in group D cells was randomly distributed. Growth of normal cells in cycloheximide or 3-aminobenzamide neither inhibited repair nor altered the distribution of repair sites. Growth of normal cells in novobiocin or aphidicolin inhibited excision but repair remained randomly distributed. On the basis of these observations, and consideration of other cellular features of group C and D, we suggest that group C may represent a mutation which results in a low level of repair enzymes with normal function. Group D, on the other hand, may represent a mutation resulting in functionally defective repair enzymes.

  7. ABT-888 and quinacrine induced apoptosis in metastatic breast cancer stem cells by inhibiting base excision repair via adenomatous polyposis coli.

    PubMed

    Siddharth, Sumit; Nayak, Deepika; Nayak, Anmada; Das, Sarita; Kundu, Chanakya Nath

    2016-09-01

    PARP inhibitors in combination with other agents are in clinical trial against cancer, but its effect on cancer stem cells (CSCs) is limited. CSCs are responsible for drug resistance, metastasis and cancer relapse due to high DNA repair capacity. Here, we present preclinical effects of Quinacrine (QC) with ABT-888, a PARP inhibitor, on highly metastatic breast cancer stem cells (mBCSCs). An increased level of Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) was noted after treatment with ABT-888 in QC pre-treated mBCSCs cells. Increased APC physically interacts with PARP-1 and inhibits PARylation causing the non assembly of base excision repair (BER) multiprotein complex, resulting in an irreparable DNA damage and subsequent apoptosis. Knockdown of APC in mBCSCs inhibited DNA damage, increased BER and PARylation, reduces apoptosis while the over-expression of APC in BT20 (APC low expressing) cells reversed the effect. Thus, combination of QC and ABT-888 decreased mBCSCs growth by activating APC and inhibiting BER within the cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in human skin in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Slazinski, L.; Whetstone, J.W.; Lowney, E.

    1981-09-01

    The induction and loss of pyrimidine dimers in human skin in vivo was determined using UV endonuclease, alkaline sucrose sedimentations, and the fluorescent detection of nonradiolabeled DNA. The number of dimers induced following exposure of the skin to radiation emitted from a Burdick UV-800 sunlamp was quantitated by reacting the extracted DNA with Micrococcus luteus endonuclease specific for pyrimidine dimers. Exposure to 15 and 30 seconds of radiation emitted from this lamp produced the formation of 12.8 and 23.6 dimers per 10(8) daltons DNA, respectively. Approximately 50% of the dimers induced were lost 58 min after irradiation. Only a small percentage (less than 10) remained 24 hr postirradiation. These data partially characterize the process by which pyrimidine dimers are excised from human skin DNA in vivo.

  9. Deficiency in Nucleotide Excision Repair Family Gene Activity, Especially ERCC3, Is Associated with Non-Pigmented Hair Fiber Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mei; Bell, Robert H.; Ho, Maggie M.; Leung, Gigi; Haegert, Anne; Carr, Nicholas; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a microarray study to discover gene expression patterns associated with a lack of melanogenesis in non-pigmented hair follicles (HF) by microarray. Pigmented and non-pigmented HFs were collected and micro-dissected into the hair bulb (HB) and the upper hair sheaths (HS) including the bulge region. In comparison to pigmented HS and HBs, nucleotide excision repair (NER) family genes ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC3, ERCC4, ERCC5, ERCC6, XPA, NTPBP, HCNP, DDB2 and POLH exhibited statistically significantly lower expression in non- pigmented HS and HBs. Quantitative PCR verified microarray data and identified ERCC3 as highly differentially expressed. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ERCC3 expression in HF melanocytes. A reduction in ERCC3 by siRNA interference in human melanocytes in vitro reduced their tyrosinase production ability. Our results suggest that loss of NER gene function is associated with a loss of melanin production capacity. This may be due to reduced gene transcription and/or reduced DNA repair in melanocytes which may eventually lead to cell death. These results provide novel information with regard to melanogenesis and its regulation. PMID:22615732

  10. Cross-talk between nucleotide excision and homologous recombination DNA repair pathways in the mechanism of action of antitumor trabectedin.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Ana B; Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Marco, Esther; Gago, Federico; Moreno, Sergio

    2006-08-15

    Trabectedin (Yondelis) is a potent antitumor drug that has the unique characteristic of killing cells by poisoning the DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The basis for the NER-dependent toxicity has not yet been elucidated but it has been proposed as the major determinant for the drug's cytotoxicity. To study the in vivo mode of action of trabectedin and to explore the role of NER in its cytotoxicity, we used the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model system. Treatment of S. pombe wild-type cells with trabectedin led to cell cycle delay and activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, indicating that the drug causes DNA damage in vivo. DNA damage induced by the drug is mostly caused by the NER protein, Rad13 (the fission yeast orthologue to human XPG), and is mainly repaired by homologous recombination. By constructing different rad13 mutants, we show that the DNA damage induced by trabectedin depends on a 46-amino acid region of Rad13 that is homologous to a DNA-binding region of human nuclease FEN-1. More specifically, an arginine residue in Rad13 (Arg961), conserved in FEN1 (Arg314), was found to be crucial for the drug's cytotoxicity. These results lead us to propose a model for the action of trabectedin in eukaryotic cells in which the formation of a Rad13/DNA-trabectedin ternary complex, stabilized by Arg961, results in cell death.

  11. The role of the PHP domain associated with DNA polymerase X from Thermus thermophilus HB8 in base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Shuhei; Nakagawa, Noriko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Masui, Ryoji

    2012-11-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is one of the most commonly used DNA repair pathways involved in genome stability. X-family DNA polymerases (PolXs) play critical roles in BER, especially in filling single-nucleotide gaps. In addition to a polymerase core domain, bacterial PolXs have a polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain with phosphoesterase activity which is also required for BER. However, the role of the PHP domain of PolX in bacterial BER remains unresolved. We found that the PHP domain of Thermus thermophilus HB8 PolX (ttPolX) functions as two types of phosphoesterase in BER, including a 3'-phosphatase and an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease. Experiments using T. thermophilus HB8 cell lysates revealed that the majority of the 3'-phosphatase and AP endonuclease activities are attributable to the another phosphoesterase in T. thermophilus HB8, endonuclease IV (ttEndoIV). However, ttPolX possesses significant 3'-phosphatase activity in ΔttendoIV cell lysate, indicating possible complementation. Our experiments also reveal that there are only two enzymes that display the 3'-phosphatase activity in the T. thermophilus HB8 cell, ttPolX and ttEndoIV. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of ΔttpolX, ΔttendoIV, and ΔttpolX/ΔttendoIV using hydrogen peroxide and sodium nitrite supports the hypothesis that ttPolX functions as a backup for ttEndoIV in BER.

  12. 3CAPS – a structural AP–site analogue as a tool to investigate DNA base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Schuermann, David; Scheidegger, Simon P.; Weber, Alain R.; Bjørås, Magnar; Leumann, Christian J.; Schär, Primo

    2016-01-01

    Abasic sites (AP-sites) are frequent DNA lesions, arising by spontaneous base hydrolysis or as intermediates of base excision repair (BER). The hemiacetal at the anomeric centre renders them chemically reactive, which presents a challenge to biochemical and structural investigation. Chemically more stable AP-site analogues have been used to avoid spontaneous decay, but these do not fully recapitulate the features of natural AP–sites. With its 3′–phosphate replaced by methylene, the abasic site analogue 3CAPS was suggested to circumvent some of these limitations. Here, we evaluated the properties of 3CAPS in biochemical BER assays with mammalian proteins. 3CAPS-containing DNA substrates were processed by APE1, albeit with comparably poor efficiency. APE1-cleaved 3CAPS can be extended by DNA polymerase β but repaired only by strand displacement as the 5′–deoxyribophosphate (dRP) cannot be removed. DNA glycosylases physically and functionally interact with 3CAPS substrates, underlining its structural integrity and biochemical reactivity. The AP lyase activity of bifunctional DNA glycosylases (NTH1, NEIL1, FPG), however, was fully inhibited. Notably, 3CAPS-containing DNA also effectively inhibited the activity of bifunctional glycosylases on authentic substrates. Hence, the chemically stable 3CAPS with its preserved hemiacetal functionality is a potent tool for BER research and a potential inhibitor of bifunctional DNA glycosylases. PMID:26733580

  13. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage coupled with removal of a CAG repeat hairpin attenuates trinucleotide repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Torner, Justin; Zhang, Yanbin; Zhang, Zunzhen; Liu, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion is responsible for numerous human neurodegenerative diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that DNA base excision repair (BER) can mediate TNR expansion and deletion by removing base lesions in different locations of a TNR tract, indicating that BER can promote or prevent TNR expansion in a damage location-dependent manner. In this study, we provide the first evidence that the repair of a DNA base lesion located in the loop region of a CAG repeat hairpin can remove the hairpin, attenuating repeat expansion. We found that an 8-oxoguanine located in the loop region of CAG hairpins of varying sizes was removed by OGG1 leaving an abasic site that was subsequently 5'-incised by AP endonuclease 1, introducing a single-strand breakage in the hairpin loop. This converted the hairpin into a double-flap intermediate with a 5'- and 3'-flap that was cleaved by flap endonuclease 1 and a 3'-5' endonuclease Mus81/Eme1, resulting in complete or partial removal of the CAG hairpin. This further resulted in prevention and attenuation of repeat expansion. Our results demonstrate that TNR expansion can be prevented via BER in hairpin loops that is coupled with the removal of TNR hairpins.

  14. Modulation of proteostasis counteracts oxidative stress and affects DNA base excision repair capacity in ATM-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Mattia; Yang, Di; Fletcher, Sally C; Vendrell, Iolanda; Fischer, Roman; Legrand, Arnaud J; Dianov, Grigory L

    2017-09-29

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a syndrome associated with loss of ATM protein function. Neurodegeneration and cancer predisposition, both hallmarks of A-T, are likely to emerge as a consequence of the persistent oxidative stress and DNA damage observed in this disease. Surprisingly however, despite these severe features, a lack of functional ATM is still compatible with early life, suggesting that adaptation mechanisms contributing to cell survival must be in place. Here we address this gap in our knowledge by analysing the process of human fibroblast adaptation to the lack of ATM. We identify profound rearrangement in cellular proteostasis occurring very early on after loss of ATM in order to counter protein damage originating from oxidative stress. Change in proteostasis, however, is not without repercussions. Modulating protein turnover in ATM-depleted cells also has an adverse effect on the DNA base excision repair pathway, the major DNA repair system that deals with oxidative DNA damage. As a consequence, the burden of unrepaired endogenous DNA lesions intensifies, progressively leading to genomic instability. Our study provides a glimpse at the cellular consequences of loss of ATM and highlights a previously overlooked role for proteostasis in maintaining cell survival in the absence of ATM function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. The Potential Role of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase-Driven DNA Base Excision Repair in Exercise-Induced Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, KarryAnne K.; Ameredes, Bill T.; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by reversible airway narrowing, shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and other symptoms driven by chronic inflammatory processes, commonly triggered by allergens. In 90% of asthmatics, most of these symptoms can also be triggered by intense physical activities and severely exacerbated by environmental factors. This condition is known as exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Current theories explaining EIA pathogenesis involve osmotic and/or thermal alterations in the airways caused by changes in respiratory airflow during exercise. These changes, along with existing airway inflammatory conditions, are associated with increased cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) affecting important biomolecules including DNA, although the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. One of the most abundant oxidative DNA lesions is 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), which is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) during the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Whole-genome expression analyses suggest a cellular response to OGG1-BER, involving genes that may have a role in the pathophysiology of EIA leading to mast cell degranulation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and bronchoconstriction. Accordingly, this review discusses a potential new hypothesis in which OGG1-BER-induced gene expression is associated with EIA symptoms. PMID:27524866

  16. Small-scale extracts for the study of nucleotide excision repair and non-homologous end joining

    PubMed Central

    Smeaton, Michael B.; Miller, Paul S.; Ketner, Gary; Hanakahi, Les A.

    2007-01-01

    The repair of DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is essential for maintenance of genomic integrity and cell viability. Examination of NHEJ and NER in vitro using cell-free extracts has led to a deeper understanding of the biochemical mechanisms that underlie these processes. Current methods for production of whole-cell extracts (WCEs) to investigate NER and NHEJ start with one or more liters of culture containing 1–5 × 109 cells. Here, we describe a small-scale method for production of WCE that can be used to study NER. We also describe a rapid, small-scale method for the preparation of WCE that can be used in the study of NHEJ. These methods require less time, 20- to 1000-fold fewer cells than large-scale extracts, facilitate examination of numerous samples and are ideal for such applications as the study of host–virus interactions and analysis of mutant cell lines. PMID:18073193

  17. Neil3-dependent base excision repair regulates lipid metabolism and prevents atherosclerosis in Apoe-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Skarpengland, Tonje; Holm, Sverre; Scheffler, Katja; Gregersen, Ida; Dahl, Tuva B.; Suganthan, Rajikala; Segers, Filip M.; Østlie, Ingunn; Otten, Jeroen J. T.; Luna, Luisa; Ketelhuth, Daniel F. J.; Lundberg, Anna M.; Neurauter, Christine G.; Hildrestrand, Gunn; Skjelland, Mona; Bjørndal, Bodil; Svardal, Asbjørn M.; Iversen, Per O.; Hedin, Ulf; Nygård, Ståle; Olstad, Ole K.; Krohg-Sørensen, Kirsten; Slupphaug, Geir; Eide, Lars; Kuśnierczyk, Anna; Folkersen, Lasse; Ueland, Thor; Berge, Rolf K.; Hansson, Göran K.; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Halvorsen, Bente; Bjørås, Magnar; Aukrust, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative DNA damage accumulates in atherosclerosis. Recently, we showed that a genetic variant in the human DNA repair enzyme NEIL3 was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. Here, we explored the role of Neil3/NEIL3 in atherogenesis by both clinical and experimental approaches. Human carotid plaques revealed increased NEIL3 mRNA expression which significantly correlated with mRNA levels of the macrophage marker CD68. Apoe−/−Neil3−/− mice on high-fat diet showed accelerated plaque formation as compared to Apoe−/− mice, reflecting an atherogenic lipid profile, increased hepatic triglyceride levels and attenuated macrophage cholesterol efflux capacity. Apoe−/−Neil3−/− mice showed marked alterations in several pathways affecting hepatic lipid metabolism, but no genotypic alterations in genome integrity or genome-wide accumulation of oxidative DNA damage. These results suggest a novel role for the DNA glycosylase Neil3 in atherogenesis in balancing lipid metabolism and macrophage function, potentially independently of genome-wide canonical base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage. PMID:27328939

  18. 3CAPS - a structural AP-site analogue as a tool to investigate DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Schuermann, David; Scheidegger, Simon P; Weber, Alain R; Bjørås, Magnar; Leumann, Christian J; Schär, Primo

    2016-03-18

    Abasic sites (AP-sites) are frequent DNA lesions, arising by spontaneous base hydrolysis or as intermediates of base excision repair (BER). The hemiacetal at the anomeric centre renders them chemically reactive, which presents a challenge to biochemical and structural investigation. Chemically more stable AP-site analogues have been used to avoid spontaneous decay, but these do not fully recapitulate the features of natural AP-sites. With its 3'-phosphate replaced by methylene, the abasic site analogue 3CAPS was suggested to circumvent some of these limitations. Here, we evaluated the properties of 3CAPS in biochemical BER assays with mammalian proteins. 3CAPS-containing DNA substrates were processed by APE1, albeit with comparably poor efficiency. APE1-cleaved 3CAPS can be extended by DNA polymerase β but repaired only by strand displacement as the 5'-deoxyribophosphate (dRP) cannot be removed. DNA glycosylases physically and functionally interact with 3CAPS substrates, underlining its structural integrity and biochemical reactivity. The AP lyase activity of bifunctional DNA glycosylases (NTH1, NEIL1, FPG), however, was fully inhibited. Notably, 3CAPS-containing DNA also effectively inhibited the activity of bifunctional glycosylases on authentic substrates. Hence, the chemically stable 3CAPS with its preserved hemiacetal functionality is a potent tool for BER research and a potential inhibitor of bifunctional DNA glycosylases.

  19. Nucleotide excision repair is reduced in oral epithelial tissues compared with skin.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David; Paniker, Lakshmi; Godar, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure to internal tissues for diagnostic, therapeutic and cosmetic procedures has increased dramatically over the past decade. The greatest increase in UVR exposure of internal tissues occurs in the cosmetic industry where it is combined with oxidizing agents for teeth whitening, often in conjunction with indoor tanning. To address potential carcinogenic risks of these procedures, we analyzed the formation and repair of the DNA photoproducts associated with the signature mutations of UVR. Radioimmunoassay was used to quantify the induction and repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts in DNA purified from three reconstructed tissues, EpiDerm(TM) , EpiGingival(TM) and EpiOral(TM) . We observed comparable levels of DNA damage in all tissues immediately after UVR exposure. In contrast, repair was significantly reduced in both oral tissues compared with EpiDerm(TM) . Our data suggest that UVR exposure of oral tissues can result in accumulation of DNA damage and increase the risk for carcinoma and melanoma of the mouth. Because NER is a broad-spectrum defense against DNA damage caused by a variety of agents in addition to UVR, our data suggest that the relatively low NER efficiency observed in oral tissues may have wide-ranging consequences in this highly exposed environment.

  20. Triple-helix formation induces recombination in mammalian cells via a nucleotide excision repair-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, A F; Datta, H J; Carroll, D; Seidman, M M; Glazer, P M

    2000-02-01

    The ability to stimulate recombination in a site-specific manner in mammalian cells may provide a useful tool for gene knockout and a valuable strategy for gene therapy. We previously demonstrated that psoralen adducts targeted by triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) could induce recombination between tandem repeats of a supF reporter gene in a simian virus 40 vector in monkey COS cells. Based on work showing that triple helices, even in the absence of associated psoralen adducts, are able to provoke DNA repair and cause mutations, we asked whether intermolecular triplexes could stimulate recombination. Here, we report that triple-helix formation itself is capable of promoting recombination and that this effect is dependent on a functional nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Transfection of COS cells carrying the dual supF vector with a purine-rich TFO, AG30, designed to bind as a third strand to a region between the two mutant supF genes yielded recombinants at a frequency of 0.37%, fivefold above background, whereas a scrambled sequence control oligomer was ineffective. In human cells deficient in the NER factor XPA, the ability of AG30 to induce recombination was eliminated, but it was restored in a corrected subline expressing the XPA cDNA. In comparison, the ability of triplex-directed psoralen cross-links to induce recombination was only partially reduced in XPA-deficient cells, suggesting that NER is not the only pathway that can metabolize targeted psoralen photoadducts into recombinagenic intermediates. Interestingly, the triplex-induced recombination was unaffected in cells deficient in DNA mismatch repair, challenging our previous model of a heteroduplex intermediate and supporting a model based on end joining. This work demonstrates that oligonucleotide-mediated triplex formation can be recombinagenic, providing the basis for a potential strategy to direct genome modification by using high-affinity DNA binding ligands.

  1. Cell cycle-dependent strand bias for UV-induced mutations in the transcribed strand of excision repair-proficient human fibroblasts but not in repair-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, W.G.; Chen, Ruey-Hwa; Lukash, L.; Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J. )

    1991-04-01

    To study the effect of nucleotide excision repair on the spectrum of mutations induced in diploid human fibroblasts by UV light (wavelength, 254 nm), the authors synchronized repair-proficient cells and irradiated them when the HPRT gene was about to be replicated (early S phase) so that there would be no time for repair in that gene before replication, or in G, phase 6 h prior to S, and determined the kinds and location of mutations in that gene. As a control, they also compared the spectra of mutations induced in synchronized populations of xeroderma pigmentosum cells (XP12BE cells, which are unable to excise UV-induced DNA damage). Among the 84 mutants sequenced, base substitutions predominated. Of the XP mutants from S or G[sub 1] and the repair-proficient mutants from S, [approximately]62% were G [center dot] C[r arrow]A [center dot] T. In the repair-proficient mutants from G[sub 1], 47% were. In mutants from the repair-proficient cells irradiated in S, 71% (10 of 14) of the premutagenic lesions were located in the transcribed strand; with mutants from such cells irradiated in G[sub 1], only 20% (3 of 15) were. The switch in strand bias supports preferential nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced damage in the transcribed strand of the HPRT gene.

  2. Identification of a conserved 5′-dRP lyase activity in bacterial DNA repair ligase D and its potential role in base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    de Ory, Ana; Nagler, Katja; Carrasco, Begoña; Raguse, Marina; Zafra, Olga; Moeller, Ralf; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is one of the bacterial members provided with a nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) system constituted by the DNA-binding Ku homodimer that recruits the ATP-dependent DNA Ligase D (BsuLigD) to the double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) ends. BsuLigD has inherent polymerization and ligase activities that allow it to fill the short gaps that can arise after realignment of the broken ends and to seal the resulting nicks, contributing to genome stability during the stationary phase and germination of spores. Here we show that BsuLigD also has an intrinsic 5′-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphate (dRP) lyase activity located at the N-terminal ligase domain that in coordination with the polymerization and ligase activities allows efficient repairing of 2′-deoxyuridine-containing DNA in an in vitro reconstituted Base Excision Repair (BER) reaction. The requirement of a polymerization, a dRP removal and a final sealing step in BER, together with the joint participation of BsuLigD with the spore specific AP endonuclease in conferring spore resistance to ultrahigh vacuum desiccation suggest that BsuLigD could actively participate in this pathway. We demonstrate the presence of the dRP lyase activity also in the homolog protein from the distantly related bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, allowing us to expand our results to other bacterial LigDs. PMID:26826709

  3. Rapid complementation method for classifying excision repair-defective xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains.

    PubMed

    Cleaver, J E

    1982-11-01

    A rapid method has been developed that permits demonstration of complementation between different cell strains from ultraviolet-sensitive xeroderma pigmentosum patients. Combining polyethylene glycol-mediated cell fusion with low doses of ultraviolet light to eliminate unfused sensitive cells, the method permits assignment of cell strains to complementation groups by visual inspection, avoiding use of laborious methods involving autoradiography. This method can be augmented by measuring DNA repair synthesis, which shows large quantitative differences between fusions that result in complementation and those that do not.

  4. Vibrational characteristics of bone fracture and fracture repair: application to excised rat femur.

    PubMed

    Alizad, Azra; Walch, Matthew; Greenleaf, James F; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2006-06-01

    The vibrational characteristics of any object are directly dependent on the physical properties of that object. Therefore, changing the physical properties of an object will cause the object to adopt changed natural frequencies. A fracture in a bone results in the loss of mechanical stability of the bone. This change in mechanical properties of a bone should result in a change of the resonant frequencies of that bone. A vibrational method for bone evaluation has been introduced. This method uses the radiation force of focused amplitude-modulated ultrasound to exert a vibrating force directly, and remotely, on a bone. The vibration frequency is varied in the range of interest to induce resonances in the bone. The resulting bone motion is recorded and the resonance frequencies are determined. Experiments are conducted on excised rat femurs and resonance frequencies of intact, fractured, and bonded (simulating healed) bones are measured. The experiments demonstrate that changes in the resonance frequency are indicative of bone fracture and healing, i.e., the fractured bone exhibits a lower resonance frequency than the intact bone, and the resonance frequency of the bonded bone approaches that of the intact bone. It is concluded that the proposed radiation force method may be used as a remote and noninvasive tool for monitoring bone fracture and healing process, and the use of focused ultrasound enables one to selectively evaluate individual bones.

  5. A versatile new tool to quantify abasic sites in DNA and inhibit base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shanqiao; Shalhout, Sophia; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2015-03-01

    A number of endogenous and exogenous agents, and cellular processes create abasic (AP) sites in DNA. If unrepaired, AP sites cause mutations, strand breaks and cell death. Aldehyde-reactive agent methoxyamine reacts with AP sites and blocks their repair. Another alkoxyamine, ARP, tags AP sites with a biotin and is used to quantify these sites. We have combined both these abilities into one alkoxyamine, AA3, which reacts with AP sites with a better pH profile and reactivity than ARP. Additionally, AA3 contains an alkyne functionality for bioorthogonal click chemistry that can be used to link a wide variety of biochemical tags to AP sites. We used click chemistry to tag AP sites with biotin and a fluorescent molecule without the use of proteins or enzymes. AA3 has a better reactivity profile than ARP and gives much higher product yields at physiological pH than ARP. It is simpler to use than ARP and its use results in lower background and greater sensitivity for AP site detection. We also show that AA3 inhibits the first enzyme in the repair of abasic sites, APE-1, to about the same extent as methoxyamine. Furthermore, AA3 enhances the ability of an alkylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate, to kill human cells and is more effective in such combination chemotherapy than methoxyamine.

  6. The Shu complex promotes error-free tolerance of alkylation-induced base excision repair products

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Stephen K.; Zhang, Zhuying; Herken, Benjamin W.; Westmoreland, James W.; Lee, Alison G.; Mihalevic, Michael J.; Yu, Zhongxun; Sobol, Robert W.; Resnick, Michael A.; Bernstein, Kara A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate the role of the budding yeast Shu complex in promoting homologous recombination (HR) upon replication fork damage. We recently found that the Shu complex stimulates Rad51 filament formation during HR through its physical interactions with Rad55-Rad57. Unlike other HR factors, Shu complex mutants are primarily sensitive to replicative stress caused by MMS and not to more direct DNA breaks. Here, we uncover a novel role for the Shu complex in the repair of specific MMS-induced DNA lesions and elucidate the interplay between HR and translesion DNA synthesis. We find that the Shu complex promotes high-fidelity bypass of MMS-induced alkylation damage, such as N3-methyladenine, as well as bypassing the abasic sites generated after Mag1 removes N3-methyladenine lesions. Furthermore, we find that the Shu complex responds to ssDNA breaks generated in cells lacking the abasic site endonucleases. At each lesion, the Shu complex promotes Rad51-dependent HR as the primary repair/tolerance mechanism over error-prone translesion DNA polymerases. Together, our work demonstrates that the Shu complex's promotion of Rad51 pre-synaptic filaments is critical for high-fidelity bypass of multiple replication-blocking lesion. PMID:27298254

  7. Role of base sequence context in conformational equilibria and nucleotide excision repair of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-adenine adducts.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shixiang; Wu, Min; Buterin, Tonko; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Broyde, Suse

    2003-03-04

    We investigate the influence of base sequence context on the conformations of the 10S (+)- and 10R (-)-trans-anti-[BP]-N(6)-dA adducts through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with free energy calculations, and relate the structural findings to results of nucleotide excision repair (NER) assays in human cell extracts. In previous studies, these adducts were studied in the CA*A sequence context, and here we report results for the CA*C sequence. Our simulations indicate that the base sequence context affects the syn-anti conformational equilibrium in the 10S (+) adduct by modulating the barrier heights between these states on the energy surface, with a higher barrier in the CA*C case. Our nucleotide excision repair assay finds greater NER susceptibilities in the 10S (+) adduct for the CA*C sequence context. A structural rationale ties together these results. A sequence specific hydrogen bond, accompanied by a significantly increased roll and consequent bending in the 10S (+) adduct, has been found in our simulations for the CA*C sequence, which could account for the enhanced nucleotide excision repair as well as the syn-anti equilibrium difference we observe in this isomer and sequence. Such sequence specific differential repair could contribute to the existence of mutational hotspots and thereby contribute to the complexity of cancer initiation.

  8. An Integrated Approach for Analysis of the DNA Damage Response in Mammalian Cells: NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR, DNA DAMAGE CHECKPOINT, AND APOPTOSIS.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, So-Young; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Kemp, Michael G; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-11-27

    DNA damage by UV and UV-mimetic agents elicits a set of inter-related responses in mammalian cells, including DNA repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis. Conventionally, these responses are analyzed separately using different methodologies. Here we describe a unified approach that is capable of quantifying all three responses in parallel using lysates from the same population of cells. We show that a highly sensitive in vivo excision repair assay is capable of detecting nucleotide excision repair of a wide spectrum of DNA lesions (UV damage, chemical carcinogens, and chemotherapeutic drugs) within minutes of damage induction. This method therefore allows for a real-time measure of nucleotide excision repair activity that can be monitored in conjunction with other components of the DNA damage response, including DNA damage checkpoint and apoptotic signaling. This approach therefore provides a convenient and reliable platform for simultaneously examining multiple aspects of the DNA damage response in a single population of cells that can be applied for a diverse array of carcinogenic and chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. Cloning, comparative mapping, and RNA expression of the mouse homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleotide excision repair gene RAD23

    SciTech Connect

    Spek, P.J. van der; Visser, C.E.; Bootsma, D.

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 gene is involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Two human homologs of RAD23, HHR23A and HHR23B (HGMW-approved symbols RAD23A and RAD23B), were previously isolated. The HHR23B protein is complexed with the protein defective in the cancer-prone repair syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group C, and is specifically involved in the global genome NER subpathway. The cloning of both mouse homologs (designated MHR23A and MHR23B) and detailed sequence comparison permitted the deduction of the following overall structure for all RAD23 homologs: an ubiquitin-like N-terminus followed by a strongly conserved 50-amino-acid domain that is repeated at the C-terminus. We also found this domain as a specific C-terminal extension of one of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, providing a second link with the ubiquitin pathway. By means of in situ hybridization, MHR23A was assigned to mouse chromosome 8C3 and MHR23B to 4B3. Because of the close chromosomal proximity of human XPC and HHR23B, the mouse XPC chromosomal location was determined (6D). Physical disconnection of the genes in mouse argues against a functional significance of the colocalization of these genes in human. Northern blot analysis revealed constitutive expression of both MHR23 genes in all tissues examined. Elevated RNA expression of both MHR23 genes was observed in testis. Although the RAD23 equivalents are well conserved during evolution, the mammalian genes did not express the UV-inducible phenotype of their yeast counterpart. This may point to a fundamental difference between the UV responses of yeast and human. No stage-specific mRNA expression during the cell cycle was observed for the mammalian RAD23 homologs. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Twist-open mechanism of DNA damage recognition by the Rad4/XPC nucleotide excision repair complex

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Chen, Xuejing; Slogoff Sevilla, Phillip; Min, Jung-Hyun; Ansari, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage repair starts with the recognition of damaged sites from predominantly normal DNA. In eukaryotes, diverse DNA lesions from environmental sources are recognized by the xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) nucleotide excision repair complex. Studies of Rad4 (radiation-sensitive 4; yeast XPC ortholog) showed that Rad4 “opens” up damaged DNA by inserting a β-hairpin into the duplex and flipping out two damage-containing nucleotide pairs. However, this DNA lesion “opening” is slow (˜5–10 ms) compared with typical submillisecond residence times per base pair site reported for various DNA-binding proteins during 1D diffusion on DNA. To address the mystery as to how Rad4 pauses to recognize lesions during diffusional search, we examine conformational dynamics along the lesion recognition trajectory using temperature-jump spectroscopy. Besides identifying the ˜10-ms step as the rate-limiting bottleneck towards opening specific DNA site, we uncover an earlier ˜100- to 500-μs step that we assign to nonspecific deformation (unwinding/“twisting”) of DNA by Rad4. The β-hairpin is not required to unwind or to overcome the bottleneck but is essential for full nucleotide-flipping. We propose that Rad4 recognizes lesions in a step-wise “twist-open” mechanism, in which preliminary twisting represents Rad4 interconverting between search and interrogation modes. Through such conformational switches compatible with rapid diffusion on DNA, Rad4 may stall preferentially at a lesion site, offering time to open DNA. This study represents the first direct observation, to our knowledge, of dynamical DNA distortions during search/interrogation beyond base pair breathing. Submillisecond interrogation with preferential stalling at cognate sites may be common to various DNA-binding proteins. PMID:27035942

  11. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} and its dependence on p53 genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, Jeanne E.; Bondy, Genevieve S.; Mehta, Rekha; Massey, Thomas E.

    2014-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53{sup tm1Brd}N5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB{sub 1}-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB{sub 1} concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB{sub 1} exposure did not alter repair of AFB{sub 1}-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB{sub 1} increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). • The effects of AFB{sub 1} and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB{sub 1} increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in

  12. Nucleotide excision repair-dependent DNA double-strand break formation and ATM signaling activation in mammalian quiescent cells.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Megumi; Nagaoka, Miyuki; Inoue, Keiko; Inobe, Manabu; Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Matsunaga, Tsukasa

    2014-10-10

    Histone H2A variant H2AX is phosphorylated at Ser(139) in response to DNA double-strand break (DSB) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formation. UV light dominantly induces pyrimidine photodimers, which are removed from the mammalian genome by nucleotide excision repair (NER). We previously reported that in quiescent G0 phase cells, UV induces ATR-mediated H2AX phosphorylation plausibly caused by persistent ssDNA gap intermediates during NER. In this study, we have found that DSB is also generated following UV irradiation in an NER-dependent manner and contributes to an earlier fraction of UV-induced H2AX phosphorylation. The NER-dependent DSB formation activates ATM kinase and triggers the accumulation of its downstream factors, MRE11, NBS1, and MDC1, at UV-damaged sites. Importantly, ATM-deficient cells exhibited enhanced UV sensitivity under quiescent conditions compared with asynchronously growing conditions. Finally, we show that the NER-dependent H2AX phosphorylation is also observed in murine peripheral T lymphocytes, typical nonproliferating quiescent cells in vivo. These results suggest that in vivo quiescent cells may suffer from NER-mediated secondary DNA damage including ssDNA and DSB.

  13. Expression of Excision Repair Cross-Complementation Group 1 as Predictive Marker for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jong-Mu; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Min Jae; Lee, Hui-Young; Ahn, Jin Seok; Lee, Seungkoo; Kang, Gu; Han, Joungho; Son, Young-Ik; Baek, Chung-Hwan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keunchil

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer. The expression of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) has been reported to be associated with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. We evaluated whether ERCC1 expression could predict the treatment response and survival outcome of patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer who were treated with cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of ERCC1 in nasopharyngeal tumor tissue. Patients were categorized into either a resistant or sensitive group depending on their treatment response outcome. A total of 77 patients were assessed in the present study. Results: The resistant and sensitive groups included 25 and 52 patients, respectively. ERCC1 expression was positive in the tumor tissue for 39 of the 77 patients (51%). Significantly more ERCC1-negative tumors were in the sensitive group than in the resistant group (p = .035). In terms of survival outcome, univariate analysis determined that patients with ERCC1-negative tumors had longer disease-free survival (p = .076) and overall survival (p = .013) than patients with ERCC1-positive tumors. Multivariate analysis determined that negative ERCC expression in tumors was an independent predictor for prolonged overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.71). Conclusion: These results suggest that ERCC1 expression might be a useful predictive marker in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer who are under consideration for cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  14. Recruitment of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Endonuclease XPG to Sites of UV-Induced DNA Damage Depends on Functional TFIIH▿

    PubMed Central

    Zotter, Angelika; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Ibrahim, Shehu; Nigg, Alex; van Cappellen, Wiggert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van Driel, Roel; Vermeulen, Wim; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.

    2006-01-01

    The structure-specific endonuclease XPG is an indispensable core protein of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. XPG cleaves the DNA strand at the 3′ side of the DNA damage. XPG binding stabilizes the NER preincision complex and is essential for the 5′ incision by the ERCC1/XPF endonuclease. We have studied the dynamic role of XPG in its different cellular functions in living cells. We have created mammalian cell lines that lack functional endogenous XPG and stably express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-tagged XPG. Life cell imaging shows that in undamaged cells XPG-eGFP is uniformly distributed throughout the cell nucleus, diffuses freely, and is not stably associated with other nuclear proteins. XPG is recruited to UV-damaged DNA with a half-life of 200 s and is bound for 4 min in NER complexes. Recruitment requires functional TFIIH, although some TFIIH mutants allow slow XPG recruitment. Remarkably, binding of XPG to damaged DNA does not require the DDB2 protein, which is thought to enhance damage recognition by NER factor XPC. Together, our data present a comprehensive view of the in vivo behavior of a protein that is involved in a complex chromatin-associated process. PMID:17000769

  15. Heterogeneity of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 gene expression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    SMIRNOV, SERHEY; PASHKEVICH, ANASTASIYA; LIUNDYSHEVA, VALERIYA; BABENKO, ANDREY; SMOLYAKOVA, RAISA

    2015-01-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) gene expression analysis is currently used widely in the molecular diagnosis of cancer. According to numerous studies, ERCC1 gene expression correlates with overall survival and effectiveness of chemotherapy with platinum agents. However, the degree of this correlation differs among various studies, with certain authors reporting a complete lack of such a correlation. These contradictions may be attributed to a number of factors, including the heterogeneity of the tumor tissue. In this study, we attempted to assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity exhibited by tissue samples obtained from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) through the expression of the ERCC1 gene. This study included 25 samples of tumor tissue from patients with a morphologically confirmed NSCLC diagnosis. A total of three randomized sections of each specimen were used. The ERCC1 gene expression was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in the TaqMan format. When planning the experiment and analysis of qPCR data, the MIQE guidelines were taken into consideration. We established that the coefficient of variation of the relative level of ERCC1 gene expression in the majority of the samples exceeded 33% (P<0.05), indicating the significant heterogeneity of the sample. We also demonstrated that the degree of heterogeneity of the tumor tissue is largely dependent on disease stage. PMID:25469300

  16. Defective transcription initiation causes postnatal growth failure in a mouse model of nucleotide excision repair (NER) progeria.

    PubMed

    Kamileri, Irene; Karakasilioti, Ismene; Sideri, Aria; Kosteas, Theodoros; Tatarakis, Antonis; Talianidis, Iannis; Garinis, George A

    2012-02-21

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) defects are associated with cancer, developmental disorders and neurodegeneration. However, with the exception of cancer, the links between defects in NER and developmental abnormalities are not well understood. Here, we show that the ERCC1-XPF NER endonuclease assembles on active promoters in vivo and facilitates chromatin modifications for transcription during mammalian development. We find that Ercc1(-/-) mice demonstrate striking physiological, metabolic and gene expression parallels with Taf10(-/-) animals carrying a liver-specific transcription factor II D (TFIID) defect in transcription initiation. Promoter occupancy studies combined with expression profiling in the liver and in vitro differentiation cell assays reveal that ERCC1-XPF interacts with TFIID and assembles with POL II and the basal transcription machinery on promoters in vivo. Whereas ERCC1-XPF is required for the initial activation of genes associated with growth, it is dispensable for ongoing transcription. Recruitment of ERCC1-XPF on promoters is accompanied by promoter-proximal DNA demethylation and histone marks associated with active hepatic transcription. Collectively, the data unveil a role of ERCC1/XPF endonuclease in transcription initiation establishing its causal contribution to NER developmental disorders.

  17. Comparative Analysis of Interaction of Human and Yeast DNA Damage Recognition Complexes with Damaged DNA in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Pestryakov, Pavel E.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2013-01-01

    The human XPC-RAD23B complex and its yeast ortholog, Rad4-Rad23, are the primary initiators of global genome nucleotide excision repair. The interaction of these proteins with damaged DNA was analyzed using model DNA duplexes containing a single fluorescein-substituted dUMP analog as a lesion. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed similarity between human and yeast proteins in DNA binding. Quantitative analyses of XPC/Rad4 binding to the model DNA structures were performed by fluorescent depolarization measurements. XPC-RAD23B and Rad4-Rad23 proteins demonstrate approximately equal binding affinity to the damaged DNA duplex (KD ∼ (0.5 ± 0.1) and (0.6 ± 0.3) nm, respectively). Using photoreactive DNA containing 5-iodo-dUMP in defined positions, XPC/Rad4 location on damaged DNA was shown. Under conditions of equimolar binding to DNA both proteins exhibited the highest level of cross-links to 5I-dUMP located exactly opposite the damaged nucleotide. The positioning of the XPC and Rad4 proteins on damaged DNA by photocross-linking footprinting is consistent with x-ray analysis of the Rad4-DNA crystal complex. The identity of the XPC and Rad4 location illustrates the common principles of structure organization of DNA damage-scanning proteins from different Eukarya organisms. PMID:23443653

  18. The FEN1 L209P mutation interferes with long-patch base excision repair and induces cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, H; He, L; Wu, H; Pan, F; Wu, X; Zhao, J; Hu, Z; Sekhar, C; Li, H; Zheng, L; Chen, H; Shen, B H; Guo, Z

    2017-01-01

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1) is a multifunctional, structure-specific nuclease that has a critical role in maintaining human genome stability. FEN1 mutations have been detected in human cancer specimens and have been suggested to cause genomic instability and cancer predisposition. However, the exact relationship between FEN1 deficiency and cancer susceptibility remains unclear. In the current work, we report a novel colorectal cancer-associated FEN1 mutation, L209P. This mutant protein lacks the FEN, exonuclease (EXO) and gap endonuclease (GEN) activities of FEN1 but retains DNA-binding affinity. The L209P FEN1 variant interferes with the function of the wild-type FEN1 enzyme in a dominant-negative manner and impairs long-patch base excision repair in vitro and in vivo. Expression of L209P FEN1 sensitizes cells to DNA damage, resulting in endogenous genomic instability and cellular transformation, as well as tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. These data indicate that human cancer-associated genetic alterations in the FEN1 gene can contribute substantially to cancer development. PMID:27270424

  19. Polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes and risk of multiple primary melanoma: the Genes Environment and Melanoma Study.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Robert C; Hummer, Amanda; Begg, Colin; Player, Jon; de Cotret, Allan René; Winkel, Scott; Mohrenweiser, Harvey; Thomas, Nancy; Armstrong, Bruce; Kricker, Anne; Marrett, Loraine D; Gruber, Stephen B; Culver, Hoda Anton; Zanetti, Roberto; Gallagher, Richard P; Dwyer, Terence; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Busam, Klaus; From, Lynn; Mujumdar, Urvi; Berwick, Marianne

    2006-03-01

    Polymorphisms in six genes involved in nucleotide excision repair of DNA were examined in a large population-based case-control study of melanoma. Genotyping was conducted for 2485 patients with a single primary melanoma (controls) and 1238 patients with second or higher order primary melanomas (cases). Patients were ascertained from nine geographic regions in Australia, Canada, Italy and the United States. Positive associations were observed for XPD 312 Asn/Asn versus Asp/Asp [odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-1.9] and XPD 751 Gln/Gln versus Lys/Lys (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7) genotypes and melanoma. The combined XPD Asn (A) 312 + Gln (C) 751 haplotype was significantly more frequent in cases (32%) compared with controls (29%) (P = 0.003) and risk of melanoma increased significantly with one and two copies of the haplotype (ORs 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.4, and 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.0, trend P = 0.002). No significant associations were observed for HR23B codon 249, XPG codon 1104, XPC codon 939, XPF codon 415, XPF nt 2063, ERCC6 codon 1213 or ERCC6 codon 1230. ORs for XPD and XPC genotypes were stronger for melanoma diagnosed at an early age, but tests for interaction were not statistically significant. The results provide further evidence for a role of XPD in the etiology of melanoma.

  20. Holliday junction affinity of the base excision repair factor Endo III contributes to cholera toxin phage integration.

    PubMed

    Bischerour, Julien; Spangenberg, Claudia; Barre, François-Xavier

    2012-09-12

    Toxigenic conversion of Vibrio cholerae bacteria results from the integration of a filamentous phage, CTX phage. Integration is driven by the bacterial Xer recombinases, which catalyse the exchange of a single pair of strands between the phage single-stranded DNA and the host double-stranded DNA genomes; replication is thought to convert the resulting pseudo-Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate into the final recombination product. The natural tendency of the Xer recombinases to recycle HJ intermediates back into substrate should thwart this integration strategy, which prompted a search for additional co-factors aiding directionality of the process. Here, we show that Endo III, a ubiquitous base excision repair enzyme, facilitates CTX phage-integration in vivo. In vitro, we show that it prevents futile Xer recombination cycles by impeding new rounds of strand exchanges once the pseudo-HJ is formed. We further demonstrate that this activity relies on the unexpected ability of Endo III to bind to HJs even in the absence of the recombinases. These results explain how tandem copies of the phage genome can be created, which is crucial for subsequent virion production.

  1. Holliday junction affinity of the base excision repair factor Endo III contributes to cholera toxin phage integration

    PubMed Central

    Bischerour, Julien; Spangenberg, Claudia; Barre, François-Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Toxigenic conversion of Vibrio cholerae bacteria results from the integration of a filamentous phage, CTXϕ. Integration is driven by the bacterial Xer recombinases, which catalyse the exchange of a single pair of strands between the phage single-stranded DNA and the host double-stranded DNA genomes; replication is thought to convert the resulting pseudo-Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate into the final recombination product. The natural tendency of the Xer recombinases to recycle HJ intermediates back into substrate should thwart this integration strategy, which prompted a search for additional co-factors aiding directionality of the process. Here, we show that Endo III, a ubiquitous base excision repair enzyme, facilitates CTXϕ-integration in vivo. In vitro, we show that it prevents futile Xer recombination cycles by impeding new rounds of strand exchanges once the pseudo-HJ is formed. We further demonstrate that this activity relies on the unexpected ability of Endo III to bind to HJs even in the absence of the recombinases. These results explain how tandem copies of the phage genome can be created, which is crucial for subsequent virion production. PMID:22863778

  2. Mutations in Replicative Stress Response Pathways Are Associated with S Phase-specific Defects in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, François; Angers, Jean-Philippe; Fortier, Émile; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Costantino, Santiago; Drobetsky, Elliot; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a highly conserved pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA lesions induced by a plethora of mutagens, including UV light. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that human cells deficient in either ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase or translesion DNA polymerase η (i.e. key proteins that promote the completion of DNA replication in response to UV-induced replicative stress) are characterized by profound inhibition of NER exclusively during S phase. Toward elucidating the mechanistic basis of this phenomenon, we developed a novel assay to quantify NER kinetics as a function of cell cycle in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using this assay, we demonstrate that in yeast, deficiency of the ATR homologue Mec1 or of any among several other proteins involved in the cellular response to replicative stress significantly abrogates NER uniquely during S phase. Moreover, initiation of DNA replication is required for manifestation of this defect, and S phase NER proficiency is correlated with the capacity of individual mutants to respond to replicative stress. Importantly, we demonstrate that partial depletion of Rfa1 recapitulates defective S phase-specific NER in wild type yeast; moreover, ectopic RPA1–3 overexpression rescues such deficiency in either ATR- or polymerase η-deficient human cells. Our results strongly suggest that reduction of NER capacity during periods of enhanced replicative stress, ostensibly caused by inordinate sequestration of RPA at stalled DNA replication forks, represents a conserved feature of the multifaceted eukaryotic DNA damage response. PMID:26578521

  3. Role of nucleotide excision repair and p53 in zidovudine (AZT)-induced centrosomal deregulation.

    PubMed

    Momot, Dariya; Nostrand, Terri A; John, Kaarthik; Ward, Yvona; Steinberg, Seth M; Liewehr, David J; Poirier, Miriam C; Olivero, Ofelia A

    2014-12-01

    The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine (AZT) induces genotoxic damage that includes centrosomal amplification (CA > 2 centrosomes/cell) and micronucleus (MN) formation. Here we explored these end points in mice deficient in DNA repair and tumor suppressor function to evaluate their effect on AZT-induced DNA damage. We used mesenchymal-derived fibroblasts cultured from C57BL/6J mice that were null and wild type (WT) for Xpa, and WT, haploinsufficient and null for p53 (6 different genotypes). Dose-responses for CA formation, in cells exposed to 0, 10, and 100 μM AZT for 24 hr, were observed in all genotypes except the Xpa((+/+)) p53((+/-)) cells, which had very low levels of CA, and the Xpa((-/-)) p53((-/-)) cells, which had very high levels of CA. For CA there was a significant three-way interaction between Xpa, p53, and AZT concentration, and Xpa((-/-)) cells had significantly higher levels of CA than Xpa((+/+)) cells, only for p53((+/-)) cells. In contrast, the MN and MN + chromosomes (MN + C) data showed a lack of AZT dose response. The Xpa((-/-)) cells, with p53((+/+)) or ((+/-)) genotypes, had levels of MN and MN + C higher than the corresponding Xpa((+/+)) cells. The data show that CA is a major event induced by exposure to AZT in these cells, and that there is a complicated relationship between AZT and CA formation with respect to gene dosage of Xpa and p53. The loss of both genes resulted in high levels of damage, and p53 haploinsufficicency strongly protected Xpa((+/+)) cells from AZT-induced CA damage.

  4. Nucleotide excision repair of 2-acetylaminofluorene- and 2-aminofluorene-(C8)-guanine adducts: molecular dynamics simulations elucidate how lesion structure and base sequence context impact repair efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Mu, Hong; Kropachev, Konstantin; Wang, Lihua; Zhang, Lu; Kolbanovskiy, Alexander; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Broyde, Suse

    2012-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) efficiencies of DNA lesions can vary by orders of magnitude, for reasons that remain unclear. An example is the pair of N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene (dG-C8-AF) and N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene (dG-C8-AAF) adducts that differ by a single acetyl group. The NER efficiencies in human HeLa cell extracts of these lesions are significantly different when placed at G(1), G(2) or G(3) in the duplex sequence (5'-CTCG(1)G(2)CG(3)CCATC-3') containing the NarI mutational hot spot. Furthermore, the dG-C8-AAF adduct is a better substrate of NER than dG-C8-AF in all three NarI sequence contexts. The conformations of each of these adducts were investigated by Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods. In the base-displaced conformational family, the greater repair susceptibility of dG-C8-AAF in all sequences stems from steric hindrance effects of the acetyl group which significantly diminish the adduct-base stabilizing van der Waals stacking interactions relative to the dG-C8-AF case. Base sequence context effects for each adduct are caused by differences in helix untwisting and minor groove opening that are derived from the differences in stacking patterns. Overall, the greater NER efficiencies are correlated with greater extents of base sequence-dependent local untwisting and minor groove opening together with weaker stacking interactions.

  5. A Catalytic Role for C-H/π Interactions in Base Excision Repair by Bacillus cereus DNA Glycosylase AlkD.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Zachary D; Bland, Joshua M; Mullins, Elwood A; Eichman, Brandt F

    2016-09-14

    DNA glycosylases protect genomic integrity by locating and excising aberrant nucleobases. Substrate recognition and excision usually take place in an extrahelical conformation, which is often stabilized by π-stacking interactions between the lesion nucleobase and aromatic side chains in the glycosylase active site. Bacillus cereus AlkD is the only DNA glycosylase known to catalyze base excision without extruding the damaged nucleotide from the DNA helix. Instead of contacting the nucleobase itself, the AlkD active site interacts with the lesion deoxyribose through a series of C-H/π interactions. These interactions are ubiquitous in protein structures, but evidence for their catalytic significance in enzymology is lacking. Here, we show that the C-H/π interactions between AlkD and the lesion deoxyribose participate in catalysis of glycosidic bond cleavage. This is the first demonstration of a catalytic role for C-H/π interactions as intermolecular forces important to DNA repair.

  6. Inter-individual variation in nucleotide excision repair pathway is modulated by non-synonymous polymorphisms in ERCC4 and MBD4 genes.

    PubMed

    Allione, Alessandra; Guarrera, Simonetta; Russo, Alessia; Ricceri, Fulvio; Purohit, Rituraj; Pagnani, Andrea; Rosa, Fabio; Polidoro, Silvia; Voglino, Floriana; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Inter-individual differences in DNA repair capacity (DRC) may lead to genome instability and, consequently, modulate individual cancer risk. Among the different DNA repair pathways, nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one of the most versatile, as it can eliminate a wide range of helix-distorting DNA lesions caused by ultraviolet light irradiation and chemical mutagens. We performed a genotype-phenotype correlation study in 122 healthy subjects in order to assess if any associations exist between phenotypic profiles of NER and DNA repair gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Individuals were genotyped for 768 SNPs with a custom Illumina Golden Gate Assay, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the same subjects were tested for a NER comet assay to measure DRC after challenging cells by benzo(a)pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE). We observed a large inter-individual variability of NER capacity, with women showing a statistically significant lower DRC (mean ± SD: 6.68 ± 4.76; p = 0.004) than men (mean ± SD: 8.89 ± 5.20). Moreover, DRC was significantly lower in individuals carrying a variant allele for the ERCC4 rs1800124 non-synonymous SNP (nsSNP) (p = 0.006) and significantly higher in subjects with the variant allele of MBD4 rs2005618 SNP (p = 0.008), in linkage disequilibrium (r(2) = 0.908) with rs10342 nsSNP. Traditional in silico docking approaches on protein-DNA and protein-protein interaction showed that Gly875 variant in ERCC4 (rs1800124) decreases the DNA-protein interaction and that Ser273 and Thr273 variants in MBD4 (rs10342) indicate complete loss of protein-DNA interactions. Our results showed that NER inter-individual capacity can be modulated by cross-talk activity involving nsSNPs in ERCC4 and MBD4 genes, and they suggested to better investigate SNP effect on cancer risk and response to chemo- and radiotherapies.

  7. Photoaffinity Labeling of Mouse Fibroblast Enzymes by a Base Excision Repair Intermediate: New Evidence on the Role of PARP-1 in DNA Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Olga I.; Prasad, Rajendra; Sobol, Robert W.; Horton, Julie K.; Ackerman, Eric J. ); Wilson, Samuel H.

    2001-07-06

    To examine mammalian base excision repair (BER) enzymes interacting with DNA intermediates formed during BER, we used a novel photoaffinity labeling probe and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) crude extract. The probe was formed in situ, using an end-labeled oligonucleotide containing a synthetic abasic site; this site was incised by AP endonuclease creating a nick with 3' hydroxyl and 5' reduced sugar phosphate groups at the margins, and then a dNMP carrying a photoreactive adduct was introduced at the 3' hydroxyl group. With near UV-light exposure (312nm) of the extract-probe mixture, only six proteins were strongly labeled, including poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) and the well-known BER participants flap endonuclease (FEN-1), DNA polymerase b (b-pol), and AP endonuclease (APE). The amount of probe crosslinked to PARP-1 was greater than that crosslinked to the other proteins. The specificity of PARP-1 labeling was examined by competition experiments involving various oligonucleotide competitors; competition of labeling by the probe was much greater for the BER intermediates tested than for normal double-stranded DNA. The specificity of PARP-1 labeling also was examined using DNA probes with alternate structures; PARP-1 labeling was stronger with a DNA oligomer representing a BER intermediate than with a molecule representing a nick in double-stranded DNA. These results identifying interaction of PARP-1 with a BER intermediate are discussed in light of PARP-1's role in mammalian BER.

  8. A ubiquitylation site in Cockayne syndrome B required for repair of oxidative DNA damage, but not for transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Ranes, Michael; Boeing, Stefan; Wang, Yuming; Wienholz, Franziska; Menoni, Hervé; Walker, Jane; Encheva, Vesela; Chakravarty, Probir; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; Stewart, Aengus; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Vermeulen, Wim; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2016-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome B (CSB), best known for its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), contains a ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD), but the functional connection between protein ubiquitylation and this UBD remains unclear. Here, we show that CSB is regulated via site-specific ubiquitylation. Mass spectrometry analysis of CSB identified lysine (K) 991 as a ubiquitylation site. Intriguingly, mutation of this residue (K991R) does not affect CSB's catalytic activity or protein stability, but greatly affects genome stability, even in the absence of induced DNA damage. Moreover, cells expressing CSB K991R are sensitive to oxidative DNA damage, but proficient for TC-NER. K991 becomes ubiquitylated upon oxidative DNA damage, and while CSB K991R is recruited normally to such damage, it fails to dissociate in a timely manner, suggesting a requirement for K991 ubiquitylation in CSB activation. Interestingly, deletion of CSB's UBD gives rise to oxidative damage sensitivity as well, while CSB ΔUBD and CSB K991R affects expression of overlapping groups of genes, further indicating a functional connection. Together, these results shed new light on the regulation of CSB, with K991R representing an important separation-of-function-mutation in this multi-functional protein. PMID:27060134

  9. The 8, 5’-Cyclopurine-2’-Deoxynucleosides: Candidate Neurodegenerative DNA Lesions in Xeroderma Pigmentosum, and Unique Probes of Transcription and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, P. J.

    2008-01-01

    It is a commonly held view that oxidatively-induced DNA lesions are repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway, whereas DNA lesions induced by UV light and other “bulky” chemical adducts are repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. While this distinction is generally accurate, the 8,5’ cyclopurine deoxynucleosides represent an important exception, in that they are formed in DNA by the hydroxyl radical, but are specifically repaired by NER, not by BER. They are also strong blocks to nucleases and polymerases, including RNA polymerase II in human cells. In this review, I will discuss the evidence that these lesions are in part responsible for the neurodegeneration that occurs in some XP patients, and what additional evidence would be necessary to prove such a role. I will also consider other DNA lesions that might be involved in XP neurologic disease. Finally, I will also discuss how our recent studies of these lesions have generated novel insights into the process of transcriptional mutagenesis in human cells, as well as the value of studying these lesions not only for a better understanding of NER, but also for other aspects of human health and disease. PMID:18495558

  10. Partial Complementation of the UV Sensitivity of Deinococcus Radiodurans Excision Repair Mutants by the Cloned denv Gene of Bacteriophage T4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-19

    partially characterized as incising UV irradiated DNA at the same frequency as the PD-glycosylase from Micrococcus luteus (Evans and Moseley, 1985...the dimer-glycosylase of Micrococcus luteus . Excision repair in E. coli is governed by the uvr A, uvr B and uvr C genes. Mutations in any one of... Micrococcus luteus are very similar: they specifically recognize only dimers, and not 6-4 photoproducts or chemical adducts, and have been shown in vitro

  11. Cell cycle association and hypoxia regulation of excision repair cross complementation group 1 protein (ERCC1) in tumor cells of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Dudás, József; Schartinger, Volker H; Romani, Angela; Schweigl, Gabriele; Kordsmeyer, Kristian; Marta, Patricia Irina; Url, Christoph; Kral, Florian; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2014-08-01

    Excision repair cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a key component of homologous recombination-based repair of interstrand DNA cross-links (ICLs). As a consequence, ERCC1 mediates resistance to mitomycin C (MMC) and platinum chemotherapeutic agents and may predict treatment failure. Clinical response to MMC or cisplatin (CDDP)-based radiochemotherapy (RCT) was assessed in 106 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients and correlated with cell nuclear immunoreactivity of the mouse monoclonal (clone: 8 F1) ERCC1 antibody in tumor tissue samples. BEAS-2B epithelial and Detroit 562 pharyngeal squamous carcinoma cells were treated with CDDP, MMC, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) at 50 % growth inhibitory (IC-50) concentrations. ERCC1 protein synthesis was compared with cell cycle distribution using combined immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. ERCC1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression was investigated in normoxic and hypoxic conditions in Detroit 562 cells. Clinically, the nonresponder revealed significantly lower HNSCC tissue ERCC1 immunoreactivity than the responder (p = 0.0064) or control normal mucosa, which led to further mechanistic investigations. In vitro, control cells and cells treated with cytotoxic agents showed increasing ERCC1 levels from the G1 through S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In CDDP-treated cells, ERCC1 mRNA and protein expression increased. Under hypoxic conditions, ERCC1 gene expression significantly decreased. Although ERCC1(+) cells show increased chemoresistance, they might be particularly radiosensitive, representing G2 cell cycle phase and less hypoxic. ERCC1 expression might be indirectly related with some conditions important for RCT treatment, but it is not a clear predictor for its failure in HNSCC patients.

  12. Characterizing Requirements for Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) Modification and Binding on Base Excision Repair Activity of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase in Vivo.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Dylan; Coey, Christopher T; Yang, Wei-Chih; Drohat, Alexander C; Matunis, Michael J

    2016-04-22

    Thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) plays critical roles in DNA base excision repair and DNA demethylation. It has been proposed, based on structural studies and in vitro biochemistry, that sumoylation is required for efficient TDG enzymatic turnover following base excision. However, whether sumoylation is required for TDG activity in vivo has not previously been tested. We have developed an in vivo assay for TDG activity that takes advantage of its recently discovered role in DNA demethylation and selective recognition and repair of 5-carboxylcytosine. Using this assay, we investigated the role of sumoylation in regulating TDG activity through the use of TDG mutants defective for sumoylation and Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) binding and by altering TDG sumoylation through SUMO and SUMO protease overexpression experiments. Our findings indicate that sumoylation and SUMO binding are not essential for TDG-mediated excision and repair of 5-carboxylcytosine bases. Moreover, in vitro assays revealed that apurinic/apyrimidinic nuclease 1 provides nearly maximum stimulation of TDG processing of G·caC substrates. Thus, under our assay conditions, apurinic/apyrimidinic nuclease 1-mediated stimulation or other mechanisms sufficiently alleviate TDG product inhibition and promote its enzymatic turnover in vivo.

  13. Inroads into base excision repair II. The discovery of DNA glycosylases. "An N-glycosidase from Escherichia coli that releases free uracil from DNA containing deaminated cytosine residues," Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, 1974.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C; Lindahl, Tomas

    2004-11-02

    The discovery of a DNA glycosylase that specifically removes uracil from DNA, opened the door for uncovering a large class of such enzymes that are fundamental to the process of base excision repair of DNA.

  14. Molecular Cloning and 3D Structure Modeling of APEX1, DNA Base Excision Repair Enzyme from the Camel, Camelus dromedarius

    PubMed Central

    Ataya, Farid Shokry; Fouad, Dalia; Malik, Ajamaluddin; Saeed, Hesham Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The domesticated one-humped camel, Camelus dromedarius, is one of the most important animals in the Arabian Desert. It is exposed most of its life to both intrinsic and extrinsic genotoxic factors that are known to cause gross DNA alterations in many organisms. Ionic radiation and sunlight are known producers of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), one of the causes for DNA lesions. The damaged DNA is repaired by many enzymes, among of them Base Excision Repair enzymes, producing the highly mutagenic apurinic/apyrimidinicsites (AP sites). Therefore, recognition of AP sites is fundamental to cell/organism survival. In the present work, the full coding sequence of a putative cAPEX1 gene was amplified for the first time from C. dromedarius by RT-PCR and cloned (NCBI accession number are HM209828 and ADJ96599 for nucleotides and amino acids, respectively). cDNA sequencing was deduced to be 1041 nucleotides, of which 954 nucleotides encode a protein of 318 amino acids, similar to the coding region of the APEX1 gene and the protein from many other species. The calculated molecular weight and isoelectric point of cAPEX1 using Bioinformatics tools was 35.5 kDa and 8.11, respectively. The relative expressions of cAPEX1 in camel kidney, spleen, lung and testis were examined using qPCR and compared with that of the liver using a 18S ribosomal subunit as endogenous control. The highest level of cAPEX1 transcript was found in the testis; 325% higher than the liver, followed by spleen (87%), kidney (20%) and lung (5%), respectively. The cAPEX1 is 94%–97% similar to their mammalian counterparts. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that cAPEX1 is grouped together with that of S. scrofa. The predicted 3D structure of cAPEX1 has similar folds and topology with the human (hAPEX1). The root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) between cAPEX1 and hAPEX1 was 0.582 and the Q-score was 0.939. PMID:22942721

  15. The introduction of sialendoscopy has significantly contributed to a decreased number of excised salivary glands in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Eva Rye; Lykke, Eva; Wagner, Niels; Nielsen, Troels; Waersted, Stian; Arndal, Helge

    2016-08-01

    Excision has been the treatment of choice in benign non-tumorous obstructive disorders of the major salivary glands, when symptoms persisted in spite of conservative measures. Unfortunately surgical resection has been associated with a relatively high rate of adverse effects. To meet the need for a less invasive treatment modality for benign obstructive non-tumorous disorders (i.e., salivary stones or stenosis), sialendoscopy has been developed and implemented in several countries here among Denmark. This study is a 13-year retrospective registry-based study using The Danish National Patient Register. ICD-10 codes used for non-tumorous obstructive disease of the salivary glands were identified and used to extract patients potentially eligible for sialendoscopy in order to compare sialendoscopic surgery and extirpations of salivary glands. In 2012 sialendoscopy accounted for almost 20 % of all surgical interventions on the major salivary glands due to benign non-tumorous disease. Nationally and regionally the total number of resected major salivary glands due to benign obstructive disease also decreased significantly during the study period. A positive outcome, like the ones described here, will inspire further development and dissemination of gland preserving techniques, to great benefit for the patients.

  16. The MUTYH base excision repair gene protects against inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Francesca; Di Meo, Serena; De Luca, Gabriele; Pasquini, Luca; Rossi, Stefania; Boirivant, Monica; Biffoni, Mauro; Bignami, Margherita; Di Carlo, Emma

    2015-01-01

    MUTYH DNA glycosylase removes mismatched adenine opposite 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), which is the major mutagenic lesion induced by oxidative stress. Biallelic mutations in MUTYH are associated with MUTYH-Associated polyposis (MAP) and increased risk in colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated cancer susceptibility associated with MUTYH inactivation in a mouse model of inflammation-dependent carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulphate (DSS). Mutyh−/− mice were more sensitive than wild-type (WT) animals to AOM/DSS toxicity and accumulated DNA 8-oxoG in their gastrointestinal tract. AOM/DSS-induced colonic adenomas were significantly more numerous in Mutyh−/− than in WT animals, and frequently showed a tubulo-villous feature along with high-grade dysplasia and larger size lesions. This condition resulted in a greater propensity to develop adenocarcinomas. The colon of untreated Mutyh−/− mice expressed higher basal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines GM-CSF and IFNγ, and treatment with AOM/DSS induced an early decrease in circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and an increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Adenomas from Mutyh−/− mice had a greater infiltrate of Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, granulocytes, macrophages, MDSCs and strong expression of TGF-β-latency-associated peptide and IL6. Our findings indicate that MUTYH loss is associated with an increase in CRC risk, which involves immunosuppression and altered inflammatory response. We propose that the AOM/DSS initiation/promotion protocol in Mutyh−/− mice provides a good model for MAP. PMID:26109431

  17. Excision repair of pyrimidine dimers induced by simulated solar radiation in the skin of patients with basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Alcalay, J.; Freeman, S.E.; Goldberg, L.H.; Wolf, J.E. )

    1990-11-01

    One prominent lesion induced in DNA by ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimer formed between adjacent pyrimidines on the same DNA strand. We investigated whether people who have developed basal cell carcinoma on sun-exposed skin have an altered ability to repair UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in DNA. Twenty-two patients with at least one basal cell carcinoma, aged 31-84 years, and 19 healthy volunteers, aged 25-61 years, took part in the study. Both groups were given one minimal erythema dose (MED) of simulated solar radiation on the lower back. DNA was extracted from the irradiated skin 0 to 6 h later, and the number of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers was determined using a dimer-specific endonuclease. At time 0, the average number of dimers per unit of DNA was similar in the two groups. After 6 h, an average of 22 +/- 4% of the dimers were removed in the group with basal cell carcinoma compared to 33 +/- 4% in the cancer-free group. In the basal cell carcinoma group, only 23% of the patients repaired more than 30% of the dimers after 6 h, compared with 53% of the cancer-free subjects (p less than 0.05). We conclude that patients who develop basal cell carcinoma on sun-exposed skin may have a decreased ability to repair pyrimidine dimers induced in skin exposed to simulated solar radiation.

  18. [Influences of excision repair cross complementation group 4 genetic variations on DNA damage in lymphocytes among coke oven workers].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-bo; Zhen, Jin-ping; Bai, Yun; Wang, Hong; Tan, Hao; Tian, Feng-jie; Chen, Wei-hong; Wu, Tang-chun

    2007-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between excision repair cross complementation group 4 ERCC4 gene polymorphisms and DNA damage in lymphocytes of coke oven workers and controls. Two hundred and forty-six coke oven workers and one hundred and twenty-seven controls were recruited in the study, and peripheral vein blood was drawn after over night fasting. Comet assay was used to evaluate DNA damage, and TaqMan-MGB probes were used to analyze ERCC4 genetic variations including the three Tagged-single nucleotide polymorphisms (Tag SNPs), referred to rs744154, rs3136079 and rs31870 which were picked out from Hapmap database. Then haplotypes were reconstructed by PHASE2.0.2 software. The lymphocytes Olive TM value of coke oven workers was significantly higher than that of controls (1.26+/-1.12 vs 0.52+/-0.97, P<0.01). Among coke oven workers, no significant difference was found between the Olive TM of those with different genotypes or haplotype pairs at ERCC4 gene (P>0.05). However, in the control group, the TG genotype carriers had higher Olive TM than the TT and GG genotype carriers (0.26+/-0.96 vs 0.66+/-0.98 and 0.66+/-0.51, P<0.05), and the CTG/CTG haplotype pairs carriers had the highest Olive TM (0.69+/-1.01), and no CTG haplotype carriers had the lowest Olive TM (0.25+/-0.80), and the difference was borderline (P=0.08). The gene polymorphism at ERCC4 gene has no effects on the DNA damage of lymphocytes in coke oven workers, but the TG genotype carriers has lower DNA damage in the control. DNA damage is influenced by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors.

  19. Effect of point substitutions within the minimal DNA-binding domain of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein on interaction with DNA intermediates of nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Maltseva, E A; Krasikova, Y S; Naegeli, H; Lavrik, O I; Rechkunova, N I

    2014-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum factor A (XPA) is one of the key proteins in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process. The effects of point substitutions in the DNA-binding domain of XPA (positively charged lysine residues replaced by negatively charged glutamate residues: XPA K204E, K179E, K141E, and tandem mutant K141E/K179E) on the interaction of the protein with DNA structures modeling intermediates of the damage recognition and pre-incision stages in NER were analyzed. All these mutations decreased the affinity of the protein to DNA, the effect depending on the substitution and the DNA structure. The mutant as well as wild-type proteins bind with highest efficiency partly open damaged DNA duplex, and the affinity of the mutants to this DNA is reduced in the order: K204E > K179E > K141E = K141/179E. For all the mutants, decrease in DNA binding efficiency was more pronounced in the case of full duplex and single-stranded DNA than with bubble-DNA structure, the difference between protein affinities to different DNA structures increasing as DNA binding activity of the mutant decreased. No effect of the studied XPA mutations on the location of the protein on the partially open DNA duplex was observed using photoinduced crosslinking with 5-I-dUMP in different positions of the damaged DNA strand. These results combined with earlier published data suggest no direct correlation between DNA binding and activity in NER for these XPA mutants.

  20. Cell cycle-dependent strand bias for UV-induced mutations in the transcribed strand of excision repair-proficient human fibroblasts but not in repair-deficient cells.

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, W G; Chen, R H; Lukash, L; Maher, V M; McCormick, J J

    1991-01-01

    To study the effect of nucleotide excision repair on the spectrum of mutations induced in diploid human fibroblasts by UV light (wavelength, 254 nm), we synchronized repair-proficient cells and irradiated them when the HPRT gene was about to be replicated (early S phase) so that there would be no time for repair in that gene before replication, or in G1 phase 6 h prior to S, and determined the kinds and location of mutations in that gene. As a control, we also compared the spectra of mutations induced in synchronized populations of xeroderma pigmentosum cells (XP12BE cells, which are unable to excise UV-induced DNA damage). Among the 84 mutants sequenced, base substitutions predominated. Of the XP mutants from S or G1 and the repair-proficient mutants from S, approximately 62% were G.C----A.T. In the repair-proficient mutants from G1, 47% were. In mutants from the repair-proficient cells irradiated in S, 71% (10 of 14) of the premutagenic lesions were located in the transcribed strand; with mutants from such cells irradiated in G1, only 20% (3 of 15) were. In contrast, there was no statistically significant difference in the fraction of premutagenic lesions located in the transcribed strand of the XP12BE cells; approximately 75% (24 of 32) of the premutagenic lesions were located in that strand, i.e., 15 of 19 (79%) in the S-phase cells and 9 of 13 (69%) in the G1-phase cells. The switch in strand bias supports preferential nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced damage in the transcribed strand of the HPRT gene. PMID:2005888

  1. Cell cycle-dependent strand bias for UV-induced mutations in the transcribed strand of excision repair-proficient human fibroblasts but not in repair-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    McGregor, W G; Chen, R H; Lukash, L; Maher, V M; McCormick, J J

    1991-04-01

    To study the effect of nucleotide excision repair on the spectrum of mutations induced in diploid human fibroblasts by UV light (wavelength, 254 nm), we synchronized repair-proficient cells and irradiated them when the HPRT gene was about to be replicated (early S phase) so that there would be no time for repair in that gene before replication, or in G1 phase 6 h prior to S, and determined the kinds and location of mutations in that gene. As a control, we also compared the spectra of mutations induced in synchronized populations of xeroderma pigmentosum cells (XP12BE cells, which are unable to excise UV-induced DNA damage). Among the 84 mutants sequenced, base substitutions predominated. Of the XP mutants from S or G1 and the repair-proficient mutants from S, approximately 62% were G.C----A.T. In the repair-proficient mutants from G1, 47% were. In mutants from the repair-proficient cells irradiated in S, 71% (10 of 14) of the premutagenic lesions were located in the transcribed strand; with mutants from such cells irradiated in G1, only 20% (3 of 15) were. In contrast, there was no statistically significant difference in the fraction of premutagenic lesions located in the transcribed strand of the XP12BE cells; approximately 75% (24 of 32) of the premutagenic lesions were located in that strand, i.e., 15 of 19 (79%) in the S-phase cells and 9 of 13 (69%) in the G1-phase cells. The switch in strand bias supports preferential nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced damage in the transcribed strand of the HPRT gene.

  2. ERCC1 function in nuclear excision and interstrand crosslink repair pathways is mediated exclusively by the ERCC1-202 isoform

    PubMed Central

    Friboulet, Luc; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; Sourisseau, Tony; Adam, Julien; Stoclin, Annabelle; Ponsonnailles, Florence; Dorvault, Nicolas; Commo, Frédéric; Saulnier, Patrick; Salome-Desmoulez, Sophie; Pottier, Géraldine; André, Fabrice; Kroemer, Guido; Soria, Jean Charles; Olaussen, Ken André

    2013-01-01

    ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) plays essential roles in the removal of DNA intrastrand crosslinks by nucleotide excision repair, and that of DNA interstrand crosslinks by the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway and homology-directed repair processes (HDR). The function of ERCC1 thus impacts on the DNA damage response (DDR), particularly in anticancer therapy when DNA damaging agents are employed. ERCC1 expression has been proposed as a predictive biomarker of the response to platinum-based therapy. However, the assessment of ERCC1 expression in clinical samples is complicated by the existence of 4 functionally distinct protein isoforms, which differently impact on DDR. Here, we explored the functional competence of each ERCC1 protein isoform and obtained evidence that the 202 isoform is the sole one endowed with ERCC1 activity in DNA repair pathways. The ERCC1 isoform 202 interacts with RPA, XPA, and XPF, and XPF stability requires expression of the ERCC1 202 isoform (but none of the 3 others). ERCC1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells show abnormal mitosis, a phenotype reminiscent of the FA phenotype that can be rescued by isoform 202 only. Finally, we could not observe any dominant-negative interaction between ERCC1 isoforms. These data suggest that the selective assessment of the ERCC1 isoform 202 in clinical samples should accurately reflect the DDR-related activity of the gene and hence constitute a useful biomarker for customizing anticancer therapies. PMID:24036546

  3. Transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair in Escherichia coli can be affected by changing the arginine at position 529 of the β subunit of RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Ann K.; Smith, Abigail J.; Savery, Nigel J.; Zamos, Portia; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2008-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TCR) invokes RNA polymerase (RNAP) blocked at a DNA lesion as a signal to initiate repair. In Escherichia coli, TCR requires the interaction of RNAP with a transcription-repair coupling factor encoded by the mfd gene. The interaction between RNAP and Mfd depends upon amino acids 117, 118, and 119 of the β subunit of RNAP; changing any one of these to alanine diminishes the interaction [1]. Using direct assays for TCR, and the lac operon of Escherichia coli containing UV induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) as substrate, we have found that a change from arginine to cysteine at amino acid 529 of the β subunit of the RNAP inactivates TCR, but does not prevent the interaction of RNAP with Mfd. Our results suggest that this interaction may be necessary but not sufficient to facilitate TCR. PMID:17532270

  4. New Insights in the Removal of the Hydantoins, Oxidation Product of Pyrimidines, via the Base Excision and Nucleotide Incision Repair Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Couve, Sophie; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Gasparutto, Didier; Saparbaev, Murat

    2011-01-01

    Background Oxidative damage to DNA, if not repaired, can be both miscoding and blocking. These genetic alterations can lead to mutations and/or cell death, which in turn cause cancer and aging. Oxidized DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: base excision (BER) and nucleotide incision repair (NIR). Hydantoin derivatives such as 5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-Hyd) and 5-methyl-5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-5Me-Hyd), major products of cytosine and thymine oxidative degradation pathways, respectively, have been detected in cancer cells and ancient DNA. Hydantoins are blocking lesions for DNA polymerases and excised by bacterial and yeast DNA glycosylases in the BER pathway. However little is known about repair of pyrimidine-derived hydantoins in human cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, using both denaturing PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS analyses we report that the bacterial, yeast and human AP endonucleases can incise duplex DNA 5′ next to 5OH-Hyd and 5OH-5Me-Hyd thus initiating the NIR pathway. We have fully reconstituted the NIR pathway for these lesions in vitro using purified human proteins. Depletion of Nfo in E. coli and APE1 in HeLa cells abolishes the NIR activity in cell-free extracts. Importantly, a number of redundant DNA glycosylase activities can excise hydantoin residues, including human NTH1, NEIL1 and NEIL2 and the former protein being a major DNA glycosylase activity in HeLa cells extracts. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that both BER and NIR pathways can compete and/or back-up each other to remove hydantoin DNA lesions in vivo. PMID:21799731

  5. Three-dimensional structural views of damaged-DNA recognition: T4 endonuclease V, E. coli Vsr protein, and human nucleotide excision repair factor XPA.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, K; Shirakawa, M

    2000-08-30

    Genetic information is frequently disturbed by introduction of modified or mismatch bases into duplex DNA, and hence all organisms contain DNA repair systems to restore normal genetic information by removing such damaged bases or nucleotides and replacing them by correct ones. The understanding of this repair mechanism is a central subject in cell biology. This review focuses on the three-dimensional structural views of damaged DNA recognition by three proteins. The first protein is T4 endonuclease V (T4 endo V), which catalyzes the first reaction step of the excision repair pathway to remove pyrimidine-dimers (PD) produced within duplex DNA by UV irradiation. The crystal structure of this enzyme complexed with DNA containing a thymidine-dimer provided the first direct view of DNA lesion recognition by a repair enzyme, indicating that the DNA kink coupled with base flipping-out is important for damaged DNA recognition. The second is very short patch repair (Vsr) endonuclease, which recognizes a TG mismatch within the five base pair consensus sequence. The crystal structure of this enzyme in complex with duplex DNA containing a TG mismatch revealed a novel mismatch base pair recognition scheme, where three aromatic residues intercalate from the major groove into the DNA to strikingly deform the base pair stacking but the base flipping-out does not occur. The third is human nucleotide excision repair (NER) factor XPA, which is a major component of a large protein complex. This protein has been shown to bind preferentially to UV- or chemical carcinogen-damaged DNA. The solution structure of the XPA central domain, essential for the interaction of damaged DNA, was determined by NMR. This domain was found to be divided mainly into a (Cys)4-type zinc-finger motif subdomain for replication protein A (RPA) recognition and the carboxyl terminal subdomain responsible for DNA binding.

  6. Graphene oxide nanosheets induce DNA damage and activate the base excision repair (BER) signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Junaid, Muhammad; Ma, Yan-Bo; Jia, Pan-Pan; Wang, Hua-Bin; Pei, De-Sheng

    2017-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has widespread concerns in the fields of biological sciences and medical applications. Currently, studies have reported that excessive GO exposure can cause cellular DNA damage through reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. However, DNA damage mediated response of the base excision repair (BER) pathway due to GO exposure is not elucidated yet. Therefore, we exposed HEK293T cells and zebrafish embryos to different concentrations of GO for 24 h, and transcriptional profiles of BER pathway genes, DNA damage, and cell viability were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the deformation of HEK293T cells before and after GO exposure was also investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify the physical changes occurred in the cells' structure. CCK-8 and Comet assay revealed the significant decrease in cell viability and increase in DNA damage in HEK293T cells at higher GO doses (25 and 50 μg/mL). Among the investigated genetic markers in HEK293T cells, BER pathway genes (APEX1, OGG1, CREB1, UNG) were significantly up-regulated upon exposure to higher GO dose (50 μg/mL), however, low exposure concentration (5, 25 μg/mL) failed to induce significant genetic induction except for CREB1 at 25 μg/mL. Additionally, the viscosity of HEK293T cells decreased upon GO exposure. In zebrafish, the results of up-regulated gene expressions (apex1, ogg1, polb, creb1) were consistent with those in the HEK293T cells. Taken all together, the exposure to elevated GO concentration could cause DNA damage to HEK293T cells and zebrafish embryos; BER pathway could be proposed as the possible inner response mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mercury (II) impairs nucleotide excision repair (NER) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos by targeting primarily at the stage of DNA incision.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung; Lee, Wei-Yuan; Lin, Yu-Jie; Hsu, Todd

    2017-09-14

    Mercuric ion (Hg(2+)) is the most prevalent form of inorganic Hg found in polluted aquatic environment. As inhibition of DNA damage repair has been proposed as one of the mechanisms of Hg(2+)-induced genotoxicity in aquatic animals and mammalian cells, this study explored the susceptibility of different stages of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to Hg(2+) using UV-damaged DNA as the repair substrate. Exposure of embryos at 1h post fertilization (hpf) to HgCl2 at 0.1-2.5μM for 9h caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of NER capacity monitored by a transcription-based DNA repair assay. The extracts of embryos exposed to 2.5μM Hg(2+) almost failed to up-regulate UV-suppressed marker cDNA transcription. No inhibition of ATP production was observed in all Hg(2+)-exposed embryos. Hg(2+) exposure imposed either weak inhibitory or stimulating effects on the gene expression of NER factors, while band shift assay showed the inhibition of photolesion binding activities to about 40% of control in embryos treated with 1-2.5μM HgCl2. The damage incision stage of NER in zebrafish embryos was found to be more sensitive to Hg(2+) than photolesion binding capacity due to the complete loss of damage incision activity in the extracts of embryos exposed to 1-2.5μM Hg(2+). NER-related DNA incision was induced in UV-irradiated embryos based on the production of short DNA fragments matching the sizes of excision products generated by eukaryotic NER. Pre-exposure of embryos to Hg(2+) at 0.1-2.5μM all suppressed DNA incision/excision in UV-irradiated embryos, reflecting a high sensitivity of DNA damage incision/excision to Hg(2+). Our results showed the potential of Hg(2+) at environmental relevant levels to disturb NER in zebrafish embryos by targeting primarily at the stage of DNA incision/excision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of DNA base and nucleotide excision repair activities in mammalian cells and tissues using the comet assay--a methodological overview.

    PubMed

    Azqueta, Amaya; Langie, Sabine A S; Slyskova, Jana; Collins, Andrew R

    2013-11-01

    There is an increasing demand for phenotyping assays in the field of human functional genetics. DNA repair activity is representative of this functional approach, being seen as a valuable biomarker related to cancer risk. Repair activity is evaluated by incubating a cell extract with a DNA substrate containing lesions specific for the DNA repair pathway of interest. Enzymic incision at the lesion sites can be measured by means of the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis). The assay is particularly applicable for evaluation of base and nucleotide excision repair pathways (BER and NER). Substrate DNA containing oxidised purines gives a measure of BER, while UV-induced photolesions are the substrate for NER. While applications of comet-based DNA repair assays continue to increase, there are no commonly accepted standard protocols, which complicates inter-laboratory comparisons of results. Here we provide a comprehensive summary of protocols for the comet-based BER- and NER-specific in vitro DNA repair assays that can be applied to a wide spectrum of biological material--cultured cell lines, blood cells, animal tissue samples and human biopsies. Our intention is to provide a detailed and user-friendly account of the assays, including practical tips and recommendations to help in setting them up. By proposing standard protocols, we hope to facilitate comparison of results obtained in different laboratories.

  9. Site-specific excision repair of 1-nitrosopyrene-induced DNA adducts at the nucleotide level in the HPRT gene of human fibroblasts: effect of adduct conformation on the pattern of site-specific repair.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, D; Maher, V M; McCormick, J J

    1996-01-01

    Studies showing that different types of DNA adducts are repaired in human cells at different rates suggest that DNA adduct conformation is the major determinant of the rate of nucleotide excision repair. However, recent studies of repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)-induced adducts at the nucleotide level in DNA of normal human fibroblasts indicate that the rate of repair of the same adduct at different nucleotide positions can vary up to 10-fold, suggesting an important role for local DNA conformation. To see if site-specific DNA repair is a common phenomenon for bulky DNA adducts, we determined the rate of repair of 1-nitrosopyrene (1-NOP)-induced adducts in exon 3 of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene at the nucleotide level using ligation-mediated PCR. To distinguish between the contributions of adduct conformation and local DNA conformation to the rate of repair, we compared the results obtained with 1-NOP with those we obtained previously using BPDE. The principal DNA adduct formed by either agent involves guanine. We found that rates of repair of 1-NOP-induced adducts also varied significantly at the nucleotide level, but the pattern of site-specific repair differed from that of BPDE-induced adducts at the same guanine positions in the same region of DNA. The average rate of excision repair of 1-NOP adducts in exon 3 was two to three times faster than that of BPDE adducts, but at particular nucleotides the rate was slower or faster than that of BPDE adducts or, in some cases, equal to that of BPDE adducts. These results indicate that the contribution of the local DNA conformation to the rate of repair at a particular nucleotide position depends upon the specific DNA adduct involved. However, the data also indicate that the conformation of the DNA adduct is not the only factor contributing to the rate of repair at different nucleotide positions. Instead, the rate of repair at a particular nucleotide

  10. Distant neighbor base sequence context effects in human nucleotide excision repair of a benzo[a]pyrene-derived DNA lesion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuqin; Kropachev, Konstantin; Xu, Rong; Tang, Yijin; Kolbanovskii, Marina; Kolbanovskii, Alexander; Amin, Shantu; Patel, Dinshaw J; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2010-06-11

    The effects of non-nearest base sequences, beyond the nucleotides flanking a DNA lesion on either side, on nucleotide excision repair (NER) in extracts from human cells were investigated. We constructed two duplexes containing the same minor groove-aligned 10S (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(2)-dG (G*) DNA adduct, derived from the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P): 5'-C-C-A-T-C-G*-C-T-A-C-C-3' (CG*C-I), and 5'-C-A-C3-A4-C5-G*-C-A-C-A-C-3' (CG*C-II). We used polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to compare the extent of DNA bending, and molecular dynamics simulations to analyze the structural characteristics of these two DNA duplexes. The NER efficiencies are 1.6(+/-0.2)-fold greater in the case of the CG*C-II than the CG*C-I sequence context in 135-mer duplexes. Gel electrophoresis and self-ligation circularization experiments revealed that the CG*C-II duplex is more bent than the CG*C-I duplex, while molecular dynamics simulations showed that the unique -C3-A4-C5- segment in the CG*C-II duplex plays a key role. The presence of a minor groove-positioned guanine amino group, the Watson-Crick partner to C3, acts as a wedge; facilitated by a highly deformable local -C3-A4- base step, this amino group allows the B[a]P ring system to produce a more enlarged minor groove in CG*C-II than in CG*C-I, as well as a local untwisting and enlarged and flexible Roll only in the CG*C-II sequence. These structural properties fit well with our earlier findings that in the case of the family of minor groove 10S (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(2)-dG lesions, flexible bends and enlarged minor groove widths constitute NER recognition signals, and extend our understanding of sequence context effects on NER to the neighbors that are distant to the lesion.

  11. Distant neighbor base sequence context effects in human nucleotide excision repair of a benzo[a]pyrene-derived DNA lesion

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuqin; Kropachev, Konstantin; Xu, Rong; Tang, Yijin; Kolbanovskii, Marina; Kolbanovskii, Alexander; Amin, Shantu; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The effects of non-nearest base sequences, beyond the nucleotides flanking a DNA lesion on either side, on nucleotide excision repair (NER) in extracts from human cells were investigated. We constructed two duplexes containing the same minor groove-aligned 10S (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N2-dG (G*) DNA adduct, derived from the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P): 5′-C-C-A-T-C-G*-C-T-A-C-C-3′ (CG*C-I), and 5′-C-A-C3-A4-C5-G*-C-A-C-A-C-3′ (CG*C-II). We utilized gel electrophoresis to compare the extent of DNA bending, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to analyze the structural characteristics of these two DNA duplexes. The NER efficiencies are 1.6 ± 0.2 times greater in the case of the CG*C-II than the CG*C-I sequence context in 135-mer duplexes. Gel electrophoresis and self-ligation circularization experiments revealed that the CG*C-II duplex is more bent than the CG*C-I duplex, while MD simulations showed that the unique -C3-A4-C5- segment in the CG*C-II duplex plays a key role. The presence of a minor groove-positioned guanine amino group, namely, the Watson-Crick partner to C3, acts as a wedge; facilitated by a highly deformable local -C3-A4- base step, this amino group allows the B[a]P ring system to produce a more enlarged minor groove in CG*C-II than in CG*C-I, as well as a local untwisting and enlarged and flexible Roll only in the CG*C-II sequence. These structural properties fit well with our prior findings that in the case of the family of minor groove 10S (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N2-dG lesions, flexible bends and enlarged minor groove widths (Cai et al. (2009) J. Mol. Biol., 385: 30–44) constitute NER recognition signals, and extend our understanding of sequence context effects on NER to the neighbors that are distant to the lesion. PMID:20399214

  12. Involvement of rhp23, a Schizosaccharomyces pombe homolog of the human HHR23A and Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 nucleotide excision repair genes, in cell cycle control and protein ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Elder, Robert T; Song, Xiang-qian; Chen, Mingzhong; Hopkins, Kevin M; Lieberman, Howard B; Zhao, Yuqi

    2002-01-15

    A functional homolog (rhp23) of human HHR23A and Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 was cloned from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and characterized. Consistent with the role of Rad23 homologs in nucleotide excision repair, rhp23 mutant cells are moderately sensitive to UV light but demonstrate wild-type resistance to gamma-rays and hydroxyurea. Expression of the rhp23, RAD23 or HHR23A cDNA restores UV resistance to the mutant, indicating that rhp23 is a functional homolog of the human and S.cerevisiae genes. The rhp23::ura4 mutation also causes a delay in the G2 phase of the cell cycle which is corrected when rhp23, RAD23 or HHR23A cDNA is expressed. Rhp23 is present throughout the cell but is located predominantly in the nucleus, and the nuclear levels of Rhp23 decrease around the time of S phase in the cell cycle. Rhp23 is ubiquitinated at low levels, but overexpression of the rhp23 cDNA induces a large increase in ubiquitination of other proteins. Consistent with a role in protein ubiquitination, Rhp23 binds ubiquitin, as determined by two-hybrid analysis. Thus, the rhp23 gene plays a role not only in nucleotide excision repair but also in cell cycle regulation and the ubiquitination pathways.

  13. Prospective randomized controlled study of excision versus distal splitting of hernial sac and processus vaginalis in the repair of inguinal hernias and communicating hydroceles.

    PubMed

    Gahukamble, D B; Khamage, A S

    1995-04-01

    A total of 798 pediatric patients between the ages of 16 days and 10 years underwent a randomized trial of two surgical procedures to assess the superiority of one over the other. In the first group of 231 patients, 236 hernial sacs (HS)/processus vaginalis (PV) were excised completely after transfixation and transection of the sac at the internal ring, whereas in the second group of 567 patients, 595 residual HS/PV were not excised but split longitudinally. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the two groups as far as complications were concerned. Considering the results of these two procedures, it could be concluded that even the less extensive process of distal longitudinal splitting of the residual HS or PV can be preferred in the repair of hernias or communicating hydroceles in male children.

  14. Protective Effect of Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced DNA Damage by Inducing the Nucleotide Excision Repair System in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Mei Jing; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the protective properties of diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC), a phlorotannin, against ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in HaCaT human keratinocytes. The nucleotide excision repair (NER) system is the pathway by which cells identify and repair bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced CPDs and 6-4 photoproducts. CPDs levels were elevated in UVB-exposed cells; however, this increase was reduced by DPHC. Expression levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), which are essential components of the NER pathway, were induced in DPHC-treated cells. Expression of XPC and ERCC1 were reduced following UVB exposure, whereas DPHC treatment partially restored the levels of both proteins. DPHC also increased expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) and sirtuin 1, an up-regulator of XPC, in UVB-exposed cells. DPHC restored binding of the SP1 to the XPC promoter, which is reduced in UVB-exposed cells. These results indicate that DPHC can protect cells against UVB-induced DNA damage by inducing the NER system. PMID:26404324

  15. A multiplex assay based on encoded microbeads conjugated to DNA NanoBeacons to monitor base excision repair activities by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier

    2014-08-15

    We reported here a new assay to detect base excision repair activities from purified enzymes, as well as in cell-free extracts. The multiplex format rests upon the encoding of magnetic beads with the fluorophore Alexa 488, thanks to a fast and original procedure. Fluorescently encoded microbeads are subsequently functionalized by lesion-containing DNA NanoBeacons labeled with the fluorophore/quencher pair Cyanine 5/BHQ2. Probes cleavage, induced by targeted enzymes leads to Cyanine 5 signal enhancement, which is finally quantified by flow cytometry. The multiplex assay was applied to the detection of restriction enzymes activities as well as base excision repair processes. Each test requires only 500fmol of DNA substrate, which constitutes great sensitivity compared to other BER functional assays. The present biosensor is able to detect both uracil DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) and AP-endonuclease 1 (APE1) within few nanograms of nuclear extract. Additionally, we demonstrated that the corresponding assay has potential application in DNA repair inhibitor search. Finally, the current multiplexed tool shows several advantages in comparison to other functional BER assays with no need of electrophoretic separation, straightforward, easy and reproducible functionalization of encoded microbeads and a high stability of DNA probes in cell-free extracts.

  16. Mechanisms of stress resistance in Snell dwarf mouse fibroblasts: enhanced antioxidant and DNA base excision repair capacity, but no differences in mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Page, Melissa M; Salmon, Adam B; Leiser, Scott F; Robb, Ellen L; Brown, Melanie F; Miller, Richard A; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2009-04-15

    Dermal fibroblasts from long-lived Snell dwarf mice can withstand a variety of oxidative and non-oxidative stressors compared to normal littermate controls. Here, we report differences in the levels and activities of intracellular antioxidant and DNA repair enzymes between normal and Snell dwarf mice fibroblasts cultured under a variety of conditions, including: 3% and 20% ambient O(2); the presence and absence of serum; and the addition of an exogenous oxidative stress. The only significant difference between normal and dwarf cells cultured in complete medium, at 20% O(2), was an approximately 40% elevation of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the mutant cells. Serum deprivation elicited increases in GPx in both genotypes, but these activities remained higher in dwarf mouse cells. Dwarf mouse cells deprived of serum and challenged with exposure to paraquat or hydrogen peroxide showed a generally greater upregulation of catalase and DNA base excision repair enzymes. As these toxins can interact with mitochondria to increase mitochondrial ROS production, we explored whether there were differences in mitochondrial metabolism between normal and dwarf mouse cells. However, neither mitochondrial content nor the apparent mitochondrial membrane potential differed between genotypes. Overall, the results suggest that superior hydrogen peroxide metabolism and a marginally greater DNA base excision repair capacity contribute to the stress resistance phenotype of Snell dwarf mouse fibroblasts.

  17. Protective Effect of Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced DNA Damage by Inducing the Nucleotide Excision Repair System in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei Jing; Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara Madduma; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-09-02

    We investigated the protective properties of diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC), a phlorotannin, against ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in HaCaT human keratinocytes. The nucleotide excision repair (NER) system is the pathway by which cells identify and repair bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced CPDs and 6-4 photoproducts. CPDs levels were elevated in UVB-exposed cells; however, this increase was reduced by DPHC. Expression levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), which are essential components of the NER pathway, were induced in DPHC-treated cells. Expression of XPC and ERCC1 were reduced following UVB exposure, whereas DPHC treatment partially restored the levels of both proteins. DPHC also increased expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) and sirtuin 1, an up-regulator of XPC, in UVB-exposed cells. DPHC restored binding of the SP1 to the XPC promoter, which is reduced in UVB-exposed cells. These results indicate that DPHC can protect cells against UVB-induced DNA damage by inducing the NER system.

  18. Evolutionary conservation of excision repair in Schizosaccharomyces pombe: evidence for a family of sequences related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD2 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, A M; Sheldrick, K S; Murray, J M; al-Harithy, R; Watts, F Z; Lehmann, A R

    1993-01-01

    Cells mutated at the rad13 locus in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe are deficient in excision-repair of UV damage. We have cloned the S.pombe rad13 gene by its ability to complement the UV sensitivity of a rad13 mutant. The gene is not essential for cell proliferation. Sequence analysis of the cloned gene revealed an open reading-frame of 1113 amino acids with structural homology to the RAD2 gene of the distantly related Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The sequence similarity is confined to three domains, two close to the N-terminus of the encoded protein, the third being close to the C-terminus. The central region of about 500 amino acids shows little similarity between the two organisms. The first and third domains are also found in a related yet distinct pair of homologous S.pombe/S.cerevisiae DNA repair genes (rad2/YKL510), which have only a very short region between these two conserved domains. Using the polymerase chain reaction with degenerate primers, we have isolated fragments from a gene homologous to rad13/RAD2 from Aspergillus nidulans. These findings define new functional domains involved in excision-repair, as well as identifying a conserved family of genes related to RAD2. Images PMID:8464724

  19. Defective excision and postreplication repair of UV-damaged DNA in a recL mutant strain of E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Rothman, R H; Clark, A J

    1977-10-24

    The mutation recL152 leads to a reduction of excision repair as measured by an increase in the time required to close uvrA uvrB dependent incision breaks, and by a reduction of host cell reactivation ability. Postreplication repair is also delayed when measured in a uvrB5 recL152 double mutant. Such a determination could not be made using the recL152 single mutant because the excision defect led to an accumulation of breaks in the unlabeled high molecular weight DNA to which the labeled DNA synthesized after irradiation must attach in order to achieve normal high molecular weight. Further, the recL gene product seems to be required to rejoin breaks in parental strand DNA which are generated during postreplication repair, since such gaps accumulate in a recL152 uvrB5 double mutant but not in a recL+ uvrB5 single mutant. We have noticed a striking phenotypic similarity between recL152 and polA1 and suggest that recL152 is required for full in vivo activity of DNA polymerase I.

  20. Photoactivated DNA analogs of substrates of the nucleotide excision repair system and their interaction with proteins of NER-competent HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed

    Petruseva, I O; Tikhanovich, I S; Maltseva, E A; Safronov, I V; Lavrik, O I

    2009-05-01

    Photoactivated DNA analogs of nucleotide excision repair (NER) substrates have been created that are 48-mer duplexes containing in internal positions pyrimidine nucleotides with bulky substituents imitating lesions. Fluorochloroazidopyridyl, anthracenyl, and pyrenyl groups introduced using spacer fragments at 4N and 5C positions of dCMP and dUMP were used as model damages. The gel retardation and photo-induced affinity modification techniques were used to study the interaction of modified DNA duplexes with proteins in HeLa cell extracts containing the main components of NER protein complexes. It is shown that the extract proteins selectively bind and form covalent adducts with the model DNA. The efficiency and selectivity of protein modification depend on the structure of used DNA duplex. Apparent molecular masses of extract proteins, undergoing modification, were estimated. Mutual influence of simultaneous presence of extract proteins and recombinant NER protein factors XPC-HR23B, XPA, and RPA on interaction with the model DNA was analyzed. The extract proteins and RPA competed for interaction with photoactive DNA, mutually decreasing the yield of modification products. In this case the presence of extract proteins at particular concentrations tripled the increase in yield of covalent adducts formed by XPC. It is supposed that the XPC subunit interaction with DNA is stimulated by endogenous HR23B present in the extract. Most likely, the mutual effect of XPA and extract proteins stimulating formation of covalent adducts with model DNA is due to the interaction of XPA with endogenous RPA of the extract. A technique based on the use of specific antibodies revealed that RPA present in the extract is a modification target for photoactive DNA imitating NER substrates.

  1. GCN5 and E2F1 stimulate nucleotide excision repair by promoting H3K9 acetylation at sites of damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruifeng; Chen, Jie; Mitchell, David L.; Johnson, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin structure is known to be a barrier to DNA repair and a large number of studies have now identified various factors that modify histones and remodel nucleosomes to facilitate repair. In response to ultraviolet (UV) radiation several histones are acetylated and this enhances the repair of DNA photoproducts by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. However, the molecular mechanism by which UV radiation induces histone acetylation to allow for efficient NER is not completely understood. We recently discovered that the E2F1 transcription factor accumulates at sites of UV-induced DNA damage and directly stimulates NER through a non-transcriptional mechanism. Here we demonstrate that E2F1 associates with the GCN5 acetyltransferase in response to UV radiation and recruits GCN5 to sites of damage. UV radiation induces the acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and this requires both GCN5 and E2F1. Moreover, as previously observed for E2F1, knock down of GCN5 results in impaired recruitment of NER factors to sites of damage and inefficient DNA repair. These findings demonstrate a direct role for GCN5 and E2F1 in NER involving H3K9 acetylation and increased accessibility to the NER machinery. PMID:20972224

  2. Lys98 Substitution in Human AP Endonuclease 1 Affects the Kinetic Mechanism of Enzyme Action in Base Excision and Nucleotide Incision Repair Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Timofeyeva, Nadezhda A.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Saparbaev, Murat K.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2011-01-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a key enzyme in the base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) pathways. We recently analyzed the conformational dynamics and kinetic mechanism of wild-type (wt) protein, in a stopped-flow fluorescence study. In this study, we investigated the mutant enzyme APE1K98A using the same approach. Lys98 was known to hydrogen bond to the carboxyl group of Asp70, a residue implicated in binding the divalent metal ion. Our data suggested that the conformational selection and induced fit occur during the enzyme action. We expanded upon the evidence that APE1 can pre-exist in two conformations. The isomerization of an enzyme-product complex in the BER process and the additional isomerization stage of enzyme-substrate complex in the NIR process were established for APE1K98A. These stages had not been registered for the wtAPE1. We found that the K98A substitution resulted in a 12-fold reduction of catalytic constant of 5′-phosphodiester bond hydrolysis in (3-hydroxytetrahydrofuran-2-yl)methyl phosphate (F, tetrahydrofuran) containing substrate, and in 200-fold reduction in 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU) containing substrate. Thus, the K98A substitution influenced NIR more than BER. We demonstrated that the K98A mutation influenced the formation of primary unspecific enzyme-substrate complex in a complicated manner, depending on the Mg2+ concentration and pH. This mutation obstructed the induced fit of enzyme in the complex with undamaged DNA and F-containing DNA and appreciably decreased the stability of primary complex upon interaction of enzyme with DNA, containing the natural apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. Furthermore, it significantly delayed the activation of the less active form of enzyme during NIR and slowed down the conformational conversion of the complex of enzyme with the cleavage product of DHU-substrate. Our data revealed that APE1 uses the same active site to catalyze the cleavage of DHU- and

  3. Homologous recombination rescues ssDNA gaps generated by nucleotide excision repair and reduced translesion DNA synthesis in yeast G2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjian; Westmoreland, James W.; Resnick, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of DNA bulky lesions often involves multiple repair pathways such as nucleotide-excision repair, translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), and homologous recombination (HR). Although there is considerable information about individual pathways, little is known about the complex interactions or extent to which damage in single strands, such as the damage generated by UV, can result in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and/or generate HR. We investigated the consequences of UV-induced lesions in nonreplicating G2 cells of budding yeast. In contrast to WT cells, there was a dramatic increase in ssDNA gaps for cells deficient in the TLS polymerases η (Rad30) and ζ (Rev3). Surprisingly, repair in TLS-deficient G2 cells required HR repair genes RAD51 and RAD52, directly revealing a redundancy of TLS and HR functions in repair of ssDNAs. Using a physical assay that detects recombination between circular sister chromatids within a few hours after UV, we show an approximate three-fold increase in recombinants in the TLS mutants over that in WT cells. The recombination, which required RAD51 and RAD52, does not appear to be caused by DSBs, because a dose of ionizing radiation producing 20 times more DSBs was much less efficient than UV in producing recombinants. Thus, in addition to revealing TLS and HR functional redundancy, we establish that UV-induced recombination in TLS mutants is not attributable to DSBs. These findings suggest that ssDNA that might originate during the repair of closely opposed lesions or of ssDNA-containing lesions or from uncoupled replication may drive recombination directly in various species, including humans. PMID:23858457

  4. Comparative study of the application of microcurrent and AsGa 904 nm laser radiation in the process of repair after calvaria bone excision in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. S.; Neves, L. M. G.; Esquisatto, M. A. M.; Mendonça, F. A. S.; Santos, G. M. T.

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of microcurrent stimulation (10 μA/5 min) and 904 nm GaAs laser irradiation (3 J cm-2 for 69 s/day) on excisional lesions created in the calvaria bone of Wistar rats. The results showed significant responses in the reduction of inflammatory cells and an increase in the number of new blood vessels, number of fibroblasts and deposition of birefringent collagen fibers when these data were compared with those of samples of the untreated lesions. Both applications, microcurrent and laser at 904 nm, favored tissue repair in the region of bone excisions during the study period and these techniques can be used as coadjuvantes in the repair of bone tissue.

  5. First Reported Patient with Human ERCC1 Deficiency Has Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome with a Mild Defect in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Severe Developmental Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutations in ERCC1 have not been reported. Here, we describe the first case of human inherited ERCC1 deficiency. Patient cells showed moderate hypersensitivity to ultraviolet rays and mitomycin C, yet the clinical features were very severe and, unexpectedly, were compatible with a diagnosis of cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome. This discovery represents a novel complementation group of patients with defective NER. Further, the clinical severity, coupled with a relatively mild repair defect, suggests novel functions for ERCC1. PMID:17273966

  6. Bypass of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside by DNA polymerase β during DNA replication and base excision repair leads to nucleotide misinsertions and DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Laverde, Eduardo E; Terzidis, Michael A; Masi, Annalisa; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Liu, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    5',8-Cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides including 5',8-cyclo-dA (cdA) and 5',8-cyclo-dG (cdG) are induced by hydroxyl radicals resulting from oxidative stress such as ionizing radiation. 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside lesions are repaired by nucleotide excision repair with low efficiency, thereby leading to their accumulation in the human genome and lesion bypass by DNA polymerases during DNA replication and base excision repair (BER). In this study, for the first time, we discovered that DNA polymerase β (pol β) efficiently bypassed a 5'R-cdA, but inefficiently bypassed a 5'S-cdA during DNA replication and BER. We found that cell extracts from pol β wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited significant DNA synthesis activity in bypassing a cdA lesion located in replication and BER intermediates. However, pol β knock-out cell extracts exhibited little DNA synthesis to bypass the lesion. This indicates that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a cdA lesion during DNA replication and BER. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pol β inserted both a correct and incorrect nucleotide to bypass a cdA at a low concentration. Nucleotide misinsertion was significantly stimulated by a high concentration of pol β, indicating a mutagenic effect induced by pol β lesion bypass synthesis of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside. Moreover, we found that bypass of a 5'S-cdA by pol β generated an intermediate that failed to be extended by pol β, resulting in accumulation of single-strand DNA breaks. Our study provides the first evidence that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a 5',8-cyclo-dA during DNA replication and repair, as well as new insight into mutagenic effects and genome instability resulting from pol β bypassing of a cdA lesion.

  7. Tumor-selective use of DNA base excision repair inhibition in pancreatic cancer using the NQO1 bioactivatable drug, β-lapachone

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Silvers, Molly A.; Ilcheva, Mariya; Liu, Yuliang; Moore, Zachary R.; Luo, Xiuquan; Gao, Jinming; Anderson, Glenda; Liu, Lili; Sarode, Venetia; Gerber, David E.; Burma, Sandeep; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Gerson, Stanton L.; Boothman, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is an essential pathway for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) survival. Attempts to target this repair pathway have failed due to lack of tumor-selectivity and very limited efficacy. The NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) bioactivatable drug, ß-lapachone (ARQ761 in clinical form), can provide tumor-selective and enhanced synergy with BER inhibition. ß-Lapachone undergoes NQO1-dependent futile redox cycling, generating massive intracellular hydrogen peroxide levels and oxidative DNA lesions that stimulate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) hyperactivation. Rapid NAD+/ATP depletion and programmed necrosis results. To identify BER modulators essential for repair of ß-lapachone-induced DNA base damage, a focused synthetic lethal RNAi screen demonstrated that silencing the BER scaffolding protein, XRCC1, sensitized PDA cells. In contrast, depleting OGG1 N-glycosylase spared cells from ß-lap-induced lethality and blunted PARP1 hyperactivation. Combining ß-lapachone with XRCC1 knockdown or methoxyamine (MeOX), an apyrimidinic/apurinic (AP)-modifying agent, led to NQO1-dependent synergistic killing in PDA, NSCLC, breast and head and neck cancers. OGG1 knockdown, dicoumarol-treatment or NQO1- cancer cells were spared. MeOX + ß-lapachone exposure resulted in elevated DNA double-strand breaks, PARP1 hyperactivation and TUNEL+ programmed necrosis. Combination treatment caused dramatic antitumor activity, enhanced PARP1-hyperactivation in tumor tissue, and improved survival of mice bearing MiaPaca2-derived xenografts, with 33% apparent cures. Significance: Targeting base excision repair (BER) alone has limited therapeutic potential for pancreatic or other cancers due to a general lack of tumor-selectivity. Here, we present a treatment strategy that makes BER inhibition tumor-selective and NQO1-dependent for therapy of most solid neoplasms, particularly for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26602448

  8. Polymorphisms of base-excision repair genes hOGG1 326cys and XRCC1 280His increase hepatocellular carcinoma risk.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tao; Wei, Jingyu; Luo, Jie; Liu, Menggang; Deng, Shaoli; Chen, Ping

    2012-09-01

    DNA base-excision repair genes hOGG1 and XRCC1 play an important role in preserving genetic stability in mammalian cells against any damage caused by different factors. However, it is unclear whether altered expression and function of these DNA repair genes could lead to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) susceptibility. This study determined the association between polymorphisms of the genes encoding two key proteins of DNA base excision repair (hOGG1 ser326Cys and XRCC1 Arg 280His) and HCC risk. A total of 350 HCC patients (mean age of 51.1 years) and 400 healthy controls (mean age of 51.4 years) were recruited for analysis of XRCC1 and hOGG1 gene polymorphisms using PCR plus restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The data showed that the hOGG1 Cys326Cys and Ser326Cys genotypes were associated with increase in HCC risk. In contrast, there was no association between HCC susceptibility and the distribution of XRCC1 His 280 His and Arg280His. However, combination of these two gene polymorphisms (XRCC1-280 Arg and hOGG1-326Cys) is associated with significant induction of HCC risk. In addition, the data also showed that XRCC1 280His polymorphism was associated with HBV infection and HCC family history to increase HCC risk. The hOGG1 326cys genotype was associated with alcohol consumption, tobacco smoke, and HBV infection to increase HCC risk. The data from the current study demonstrated the association of these two DNA repair gene polymorphisms with HCC risk. Future studies will confirm these data before they can be used as a biomarker for assessing HCC risk.

  9. Multimodality gynecomastia repair by cross-chest power-assisted superficial liposuction combined with endoscopic-assisted pull-through excision.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Ytzhack; Fodor, Lucian; Peled, Isaac J; Eldor, Liron; Egozi, Dana; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Numerous methods of gynecomastia repair have been described to accomplish removal of breast tissue. Our multimodality surgical approach for the treatment of gynecomastia combines the use of power-assisted superficial cross-chest liposuction with direct pull-through excision of the breast parenchyma under endoscopic supervision. Seventeen patients, aging 17-39, underwent this multimodality approach. According to Simon's grading, 3 patients had grade 1, 5 had grade 2a, 6 had grade 2b, and 3 had grade 3 gynecomastia. Power-assisted liposuction was performed with a 3- or 4-mm triple-hole cannula inserted through the contralateral periareolar medial incision to suction the contralateral prepectoral fatty breast. At the end of the liposuction, the fibrous tissue was easily pulled through the ipsilateral stab wound and excised under endoscopic control. Follow-up time ranged from 6 to 34 months. The amount of fat removed by liposuction varied from 100-800 mL per breast, and the amount of breast parenchyma removed by excision varied from 20-110 g. All patients recovered remarkably well. No complications were recorded. All patients were satisfied with their results. This technique enables an effective treatment of both the fatty and fibrous tissue of the male breast and avoids skin redundancy due to skin contraction. A smooth masculine breast contour is consistently achieved without the stigma of this type of surgery.

  10. Guanine oxidation product 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin induces mutations when bypassed by DNA polymerases and is a substrate for base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Alshykhly, Omar R; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2015-09-21

    Guanine (G) is a target for oxidation by reactive oxygen species in DNA, RNA, and the nucleotide pool. Damage to DNA yields products with alternative properties toward DNA processing enzymes compared to those of the parent nucleotide. A new lesion, 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih), bearing a stereocenter in the base was recently identified from the oxidation of G. DNA polymerase and base excision repair processing of this new lesion has now been evaluated. Single nucleotide insertion opposite (S)-2Ih and (R)-2Ih in the template strand catalyzed by the DNA polymerases Klenow fragment exo(-), DPO4, and Hemo KlenTaq demonstrates these lesions to cause point mutations. Specifically, they promote 3-fold more G·C → C·G transversion mutations than G·C → T·A, and (S)-2Ih was 2-fold more blocking for polymerase bypass than (R)-2Ih. Both diastereomer lesions were found to be substrates for the DNA glycosylases NEIL1 and Fpg, and poorly excised by endonuclease III (Nth). The activity was independent of the base pair partner. Thermal melting, CD spectroscopy, and density functional theory geometric optimization calculations were conducted to provide insight into these polymerase and DNA glycosylase studies. These results identify that formation of the 2Ih lesions in a cell would be mutagenic in the event that they were not properly repaired.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a mammalian excision repair gene that partially restores UV resistance to xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arrand, J.E.; Bone, N.M.; Johnson, R.T. )

    1989-09-01

    A hamster DNA repair gene has been isolated by cosmid rescue after two rounds of transfection of an immortalized xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D cell line with neomycin-resistance gene (neo)-tagged normal hamster DNA and selection with G418 and ultraviolet irradiation. The functional length of the sequence has been defined as 11.5 kilobase pairs by measurement of the region of overlap between two hamster DNA-containing cosmids, cloned by selection for the integrated neo gene, that are able to confer an increase in resistance to ultraviolet irradiation on two XP-D cell line but not on an XP-A line. Detailed molecular characterization of the hamster repair gene has revealed no obvious similarities to two human excision repair genes (ERCC1 and ERCC2) that correct repair-defective hamster cells but have no effect on XP cells. Hybridization analyses of normal human and XP cell genomic DNAs and mRNAs, using a cosmid-clone probe from which repeated sequences have been removed, show that homologues are present and expressed in all cases.

  12. DNA base-excision repair enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 is increased and competent in the brain and spinal cord of individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Arif Y; Martin, Lee J

    2002-01-01

    Motor neurons degenerate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The mechanisms for this neuronal cell death are not known, although apoptosis has been implicated. Oxidative damage to DNA and activation of p53 has been identified directly in motor neurons in cases of ALS. We evaluated whether motor neuron degeneration in ALS is associated with changes in the levels and function of the multifunctional protein apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE/Ref-1). APE/Ref-1 functions as an enzyme in the DNA base-excision repair pathway and as a redox-regulation protein for transcription factors. The protein level and localization of APE/Ref-1 are changed in ALS. Immunoblotting showed that APE/Ref-1 protein levels are increased in selectively vulnerable central nervous system (CNS) regions in individuals with ALS compared to age-matched controls. Plasmid DNA repair assay demonstrated that APE from individuals with ALS is competent in repairing apurinic (AP) sites. DNA repair function in nuclear fractions is increased significantly in ALS motor cortex and spinal cord. Immunocytochemistry and single-cell densitometry revealed that APE/Ref-1 is expressed at lower levels in control motor neurons than in ALS motor neurons, which are decreased in number by 42% in motor cortex. APE/Ref-1 is increased in the nucleus of remaining upper motor neurons in ALS, which show a 38% loss of nuclear area. APE-Ref-1 is also upregulated in astrocytes in spinal cord white matter pathways in familial ALS. We conclude that mechanisms for DNA repair are activated in ALS, supporting the possibility that DNA damage is an upstream mechanism for motor neuron degeneration in this disease.

  13. Interactions of Human Nucleotide Excision Repair Protein XPA with DNA and RPA70ΔC327: Chemical Shift Mapping and 15N NMR Relaxation Studies†

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Daughdrill, Gary W.; de Lorimier, Robert; K., Sudha Rao B.; Isern, Nancy G.; Lingbeck, Jody M.; Taylor, John-Stephen; Wold, Marc S.; Gochin, Miriam; Spicer, Leonard D.; Lowry, David F.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Human XPA is an essential component in the multienzyme nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The solution structure of the minimal DNA binding domain of XPA (XPA-MBD: M98-F219) was recently determined [Buchko et al. (1998) Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 2779–2788, Ikegami et al. (1998) Nat. Struct. Biol. 5, 701–706] and shown to consist of a compact zinc-binding core and a loop-rich C-terminal subdomain connected by a linker sequence. Here, the solution structure of XPA-MBD was further refined using an entirely new class of restraints based on pseudocontact shifts measured in cobalt-substituted XPA-MBD. Using this structure, the surface of XPA-MBD which interacts with DNA and a fragment of the largest subunit of replication protein A (RPA70ΔC327: M1-Y326) was determined using chemical shift mapping. DNA binding in XPA-MBD was highly localized in the loop-rich subdomain for DNA with or without a lesion [dihydrothymidine (dhT) or 6-4-thymidine-cytidine (64TC)], or with DNA in single- or double-stranded form, indicating that the character of the lesion itself is not the driving force for XPA binding DNA. RPA70ΔC327 was found to contact regions in both the zinc-binding and loop-rich subdomains. Some overlap of the DNA and RPA70ΔC327 binding regions was observed in the loop-rich subdomain, indicating a possible cooperative DNA-binding mode between XPA and RPA70ΔC327. To complement the chemical shift mapping data, the backbone dynamics of free XPA-MBD and XPA-MBD bound to DNA oligomers containing dhT or 64TC lesions were investigated using 15N NMR relaxation data. The dynamic analyses for the XPA-MBD complexes with DNA revealed localized increases and decreases in S2 and an increase in the global correlation time. Regions of XPA-MBD with the largest increases in S2 overlapped regions having the largest chemical shifts changes upon binding DNA, indicating that the loop-rich subdomain becomes more rigid upon binding DNA. Interestingly, S2 decreased for some residues in

  14. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients is associated with a decrease in the double strand break repair capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lacoste, Sandrine; Bhatia, Smita; Chen, Yanjun; Bhatia, Ravi; O’Connor, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    Patients who undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHCT) for treatment of a relapsed or refractory lymphoma are at risk of developing therapy related- myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML). Part of the risk likely resides in inherent interindividual differences in their DNA repair capacity (DRC), which is thought to influence the effect chemotherapeutic treatments have on the patient’s stem cells prior to aHCT. Measuring DRC involves identifying small differences in repair proficiency among individuals. Initially, we investigated the cell model in healthy individuals (primary lymphocytes and/or lymphoblastoid cell lines) that would be appropriate to measure genetically determined DRC using host-cell reactivation assays. We present evidence that interindividual differences in DRC double-strand break repair (by non-homologous end-joining [NHEJ] or single-strand annealing [SSA]) are better preserved in non-induced primary lymphocytes. In contrast, lymphocytes induced to proliferate are required to assay base excision (BER) or nucleotide excision repair (NER). We established that both NHEJ and SSA DRCs in lymphocytes of healthy individuals were inversely correlated with the age of the donor, indicating that DSB repair in lymphocytes is likely not a constant feature but rather something that decreases with age (~0.37% NHEJ DRC/year). To investigate the predictive value of pre-aHCT DRC on outcome in patients, we then applied the optimized assays to the analysis of primary lymphocytes from lymphoma patients and found that individuals who later developed t-MDS/AML (cases) were indistinguishable in their DRC from controls who never developed t-MDS/AML. However, when DRC was investigated shortly after aHCT in the same individuals (21.6 months later on average), aHCT patients (both cases and controls) showed a significant decrease in DSB repair measurements. The average decrease of 6.9% in NHEJ DRC observed among aHCT patients was much

  15. Decreased cell survival and DNA repair capacity after UVC irradiation in association with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP in human RSa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Ling; Kita, Kazuko . E-mail: kita@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Wano, Chieko; Wu Yuping; Sugaya, Shigeru; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-05-01

    In contrast to extensive studies on the roles of molecular chaperones, such as heat shock proteins, there are only a few reports about the roles of GRP78/BiP, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced molecular chaperone, in mammalian cell responses to DNA-damaging stresses. To investigate whether GRP78/BiP is involved in resistance to a DNA-damaging agent, UVC (principally 254 nm in wavelength), we established human cells with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP by transfection of human RSa cells with antisense cDNA for GRP78/BiP. We found that the transfected cells showed higher sensitivity to UVC-induced cell death than control cells transfected with the vector alone. In the antisense-cDNA transfected cells, the removal capacities of the two major types of UVC-damaged DNA (thymine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts) in vivo and DNA synthesis activity of whole cell extracts to repair UVC-irradiated plasmids in vitro were remarkably decreased compared with those in the control cells. Furthermore, the antisense-cDNA transfected cells also showed slightly higher sensitivity to cisplatin-induced cell death than the control cells. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage is primarily repaired by nucleotide excision repair, like UVC-induced DNA damage. The present results suggest that GRP78/BiP plays a protective role against UVC-induced cell death possibly via nucleotide excision repair, at least in the human RSa cells tested.

  16. Novel Augmentation Technique for Patellar Tendon Repair Improves Strength and Decreases Gap Formation: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Black, James C; Ricci, William M; Gardner, Michael J; McAndrew, Christopher M; Agarwalla, Avinesh; Wojahn, Robert D; Abar, Orchid; Tang, Simon Y

    2016-12-01

    study showed improved performance of a novel augmentation technique compared with the standard repair, in terms of reduced gap formation during cyclic loading and increased maximum load to failure. Decreased gap formation and higher load to failure may improve healing potential and minimize failure risk. This study shows a potential biomechanical advantage of the augmentation technique, providing support for future clinical investigations comparing this technique with other repair methods that are in common use such as transosseous suture repair.

  17. Correction of a nucleotide-excision-repair mutation by human chromosome 19 in hamster-human hybrid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Mooney, C.L.; Burkhart-Schultz, K.; Carrano, A.V.; Siciliano, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    A UV-sensitive mutant line of CHO cells, UV20, was shown to be phenotypically corrected to resistance by fusion with human lymphocytes or fibroblasts. Only human chromosome 19 correlated with the DNA repair phenotype of resistant hybrid clones and their resistant or sensitive subclones. This study demonstrates the mapping of a human repair gene by direct selection of complementing hybrids in the presence of a DNA-damaging agent (mitomycin C).

  18. Role of nucleotide excision repair and photoreactivation in the solar UVB radiation survival of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, T S; Sundin, G W

    2006-05-01

    To assess the role of DNA repair and photoreactivation in the solar radiation survival of the plant pathogen and leaf surface epiphyte Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (Pss). Mutants of Pss B728a, with insertional mutations within the nucleotide excision repair gene uvrA, photolyase gene phr, or uvrA phr double mutants, were constructed to examine the importance of individual repair mechanisms in solar UV radiation (UVR) survival. The survival of either the uvrA mutant or the phr mutant was reduced by approx. 10(2)-fold following exposure to a dose of 4.5 kJ m(-2) solar UVB (290-320 nm wavelengths) while the uvrA phr double mutant was reduced >10(6)-fold by the same dose. We constructed a transcriptional fusion between the Pss recA promoter and gfp to examine the induction of the SOS response in wild-type and mutant strains. Initiation of the recA mediated SOS response was more rapid and peaked at higher levels in mutant strains suggesting both increased DNA damage in mutant strains and also that photoreactivation and nucleotide excision repair remove DNA damage as it is incurred which is reflected in a delay of recA expression. Visualization of expression of B728a cells containing the recA::gfp reporter on UVB-irradiated bean leaves highlighted the movement of cells to intercellular spaces over time and that SOS induction was detectable when leaves were irradiated 48 h following leaf inoculation. This study indicated that solar UVB is detrimental to Pss B728a, DNA repair mechanisms play an important role in strain survival and expression of the SOS regulon on leaf surfaces contributes to survival of UVR-exposed cells during plant colonization. This work links previous laboratory-based UVR analyses with solar UVB dose-response analyses and highlights the role of photoreactivation in delaying induction of the SOS response following solar irradiation. Knowledge of population dynamics following direct solar irradiation will enhance our understanding of the biology of

  19. Refining the intraoperative measurement of the distal intrapancreatic part of a choledochal cyst during laparoscopic repair allows near total excision.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hiroyuki; Okawada, Manabu; Doi, Takashi; Miyano, Go; Lane, Geoffrey J; Yamataka, Atsuyuki

    2015-10-01

    During surgery for choledochal cyst (CC), any intrapancreatic CC (IPCC) must also be excised to prevent postoperative pancreatitis and stone formation. We report our technique for laparoscopic total IPCC excision (n = 16; mean age 6.0 years). We insert a fine ureteroscope with a light source into the opened CC through an extra 3.9-mm trocar placed in the epigastrium through a minute incision to identify the pancreatic duct orifice. By pulling the end of the ureteroscope emerging from the trocar gently to withdraw the tip from the pancreatic duct to where distal dissection was ceased under laparoscopic view, the IPCC can be measured. If longer than 5 mm, the distal CC is dissected further caudally until it is less than 5 mm. For accuracy, the distal CC is elevated with a suture that is exteriorized and clamped to provide constant traction. The IPCC was able to be measured in 11/16 (68 %). Initial lengths measured were 3-10 mm (5.2 ± 2.7 mm). Final IPCC were all 5 mm or less. Surgery was uncomplicated without any pancreatic duct injury and postoperative recovery was unremarkable. Follow-up MRI at 32 months showed no IPCC in any case. Measuring the IPCC enables total CC excision, thus reducing the potential for postoperative complications.

  20. Small-molecule inhibitors of proteins involved in base excision repair potentiate the anti-tumorigenic effect of existing chemotherapeutics and irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Reed, April M; Fishel, Melissa L; Kelley, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    There has been a recent upsurge in the development of small-molecule inhibitors specific to DNA repair proteins or proteins peripherally involved in base excision repair and the DNA damage response. These specific, nominally toxic inhibitors are able to potentiate the effect of existing cancer cell treatments in a wide array of cancers. One of the largest obstacles to overcome in the treatment of cancer is incomplete killing with initial cancer treatments, leading to resistant cancer. The progression of our understanding of cancer and normal cell responses to DNA damage has allowed us to develop biomarkers that we can use to help us predict responses of cancers, more specifically target cancer cells and overcome resistance. Initial successes using these small-molecule DNA repair inhibitors in target-validation experiments and in the early stages of clinical trials indicate an important role for these inhibitors, and allow for the possibility of a future in which cancers are potentially treated in a highly specific, individual manner. PMID:19519210

  1. DNA-protein crosslinks processed by nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination with base and strand preference in E. coli model system.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qingming

    2013-01-01

    Bis-electrophiles including dibromoethane and epibromohydrin can react with O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) and form AGT-DNA crosslinks in vitro and in vivo. The presence of human AGT (hAGT) paradoxically increases the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of bis-electrophiles in cells. Here we establish a bacterial system to study the repair mechanism and cellular responses to DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) in vivo. Results show that both nucleotide excision repair (NER) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways can process hAGT-DNA crosslinks with HR playing a dominant role. Mutation spectra show that HR has no strand preference but NER favors processing of the DPCs in the transcribed strand; UvrA, UvrB and Mfd can interfere with small size DPCs but only UvrA can interfere with large size DPCs in the transcribed strand processed by HR. Further, we found that DPCs at TA deoxynucleotide sites are very inefficiently processed by NER and the presence of NER can interfere with these DNA lesions processed by HR. These data indicate that NER and HR can process DPCs cooperatively and competitively and NER processes DPCs with base and strand preference. Therefore, the formation of hAGT-DNA crosslinks can be a plausible and specific system to study the repair mechanism and effects of DPCs precisely in vivo.

  2. Oxidative stress alters base excision repair pathway and increases apoptotic response in Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 haploinsufficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Archana; Raffoul, Julian J.; Patel, Hiral V.; Prychitko, Thomas M.; Anyangwe, Njwen; Meira, Lisiane B.; Friedberg, Errol C.; Cabelof, Diane C.; Heydari, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is the redox regulator of multiple stress-inducible transcription factors, such as NF-κB, and the major 5’-endonuclease in base excision repair (BER). We utilized mice containing heterozygous gene-targeted deletion of APE1/Ref-1 (Apex+/-) to determine the impact of APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency on the processing of oxidative DNA damage induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP) in the liver tissue of mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency results in a significant decline in NF-κB DNA binding activity in response to oxidative stress in liver. In addition, loss of APE1/Ref-1 increases the apoptotic response to oxidative stress where a significant increase in GADD45g expression, p53 protein stability and caspase activity are observed. Oxidative stress displays a differential impact on monofunctional (UDG) and bifunctional (OGG1) DNA glycosylase initiated BER in liver of Apex+/- mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency results in a significant decline in the repair of oxidized bases (e.g., 8-OHdG), while removal of uracil is increased in liver nuclear extracts of mice using an in vitro BER assay. Apex+/- mice exposed to 2-NP displayed a significant decline in 3’-OH-containing single-strand breaks and an increase in aldehydic lesions in their liver DNA suggesting an accumulation of repair intermediates of failed bifunctional DNA glycosylase initiated BER. PMID:19268524

  3. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Is Required for Base Excision Repair in Conventional but Not in Variant H2A.Bbd Nucleosomes▿

    PubMed Central

    Menoni, Hervé; Gasparutto, Didier; Hamiche, Ali; Cadet, Jean; Dimitrov, Stefan; Bouvet, Philippe; Angelov, Dimitar

    2007-01-01

    In eukaryotes, base excision repair (BER) is responsible for the repair of oxidatively generated lesions. The mechanism of BER on naked DNA substrates has been studied in detail, but how it operates on chromatin remains unclear. Here we have studied the mechanism of BER by introducing a single 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) lesion in the DNA of reconstituted positioned conventional and histone variant H2A.Bbd nucleosomes. We found that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, and polymerase β activities were strongly reduced in both types of nucleosomes. In conventional nucleosomes SWI/SNF stimulated the processing of 8-oxoG by each one of the three