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Sample records for deep brain areas

  1. [Deep brain stimulation. New target areas and new indications].

    PubMed

    Reich, M M; Kühn, A A; Volkmann, J

    2013-08-01

    Many patients with neurological movement disorders and psychiatric diseases cannot yet be adequately treated with conventional methods. Deep brain stimulation represents an important extension of therapeutic options by which invasive electrodes are implanted in various subcortical brain areas in order to achieve an improvement in motor and psychiatric symptoms by high frequency stimulation. Up to 2012 approximately 100,000 patients had been treated with deep brain stimulation worldwide. The indications for deep brain stimulation were essentially already established indications, such as idiopathic Parkinson's syndrome, dystonia and tremors. The newer indications which include in particular psychiatric symptoms, such as depression, obsessive diseases, addiction and Tourette syndrome, are as yet limited to approximately 5 % of treated patients. An increasingly better understanding of the system physiology of neurological and psychiatric diseases has promoted the search for new target areas and indications for treatment by neuromodulation. This article gives an overview of the latest developments in the established and also the developing application areas of deep brain stimulation.

  2. Eyelid apraxia associated with deep brain stimulation of the periaqueductal gray area.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Jean-Philippe; Srikandarajah, Nisaharan; Krahl, Scott E; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Behnke, Eric; Malkasian, Dennis; DeSalles, Antonio A F

    2014-09-01

    We report a patient with eyelid apraxia following deep brain stimulation of the periaqueductal gray area. Based on the position of our electrode, we argue that the phenomenon is linked to inhibition of the nearby central caudal nucleus of the oculomotor nucleus by high frequency stimulation.

  3. Ventral tegmental area deep brain stimulation in refractory short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sarah; Akram, Harith; Lagrata, Susie; Hariz, Marwan; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Matharu, Manjit

    2016-10-01

    SEE LEONE AND PROIETTI CECCHINI DOI101093/AWW233 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks are primary headache disorders characterized by short-lasting attacks of unilateral pain accompanied by autonomic features. A small minority are refractory to medical treatment. Neuroimaging studies have suggested a role of the posterior hypothalamic region in their pathogenesis. Previous case reports on deep brain stimulation of this region, now understood to be the ventral tegmental area, for this disorder are limited to a total of three patients. We present a case series of 11 new patients treated with ventral tegmental area deep brain stimulation in an uncontrolled, open-label prospective observational study. Eleven patients with refractory short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks underwent ipsilateral ventral tegmental area deep brain stimulation in a specialist unit. All patients had failed, or been denied access to, occipital nerve stimulation within the UK's National Health Service. Primary endpoint was change in mean daily attack frequency at final follow-up. Secondary outcomes included attack severity, attack duration, headache load (a composite score of attack frequency, severity and duration), quality of life measures, disability and affective scores. Information was also collected on adverse events. Eleven patients (six male) with a median age of 50 years (range 26-67) were implanted between 2009 and 2014. Median follow-up was 29 months (range 7-63). At final follow-up the median improvement in daily attack frequency was 78% (interquartile range 33%). Response rate (defined as at least a 50% improvement in daily attack frequency) was 82% and four patients were rendered pain-free for prolonged periods of time. Headache load improved by 99% (interquartile range 52%). Improvements were observed in a number of quality of life, disability and affect measures. Adverse events included mild incision

  4. An acute method for multielectrode recording from the interior of sulci and other deep brain areas.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Gopathy; Scott, Benjamin B; Bradley, David C

    2006-05-15

    Most current techniques for multielectrode recording involve chronically implanting planar or staggered arrays of electrodes. Such chronic implants are suited for studying a stable population of neurons over long periods of time but exploratory studies of the physiological properties of cortical subdivisions require the ability to sample multiple neural populations. This makes it necessary to penetrate frequently with small multielectrode assemblies. Some commercial systems allow daily penetrations with multiple electrodes, but they tend to be bulky, complex and expensive, and some make no provision for piercing the barrier of fibrous tissue that often covers the brain surface. We describe an apparatus for inserting bundles of 3-16 electrodes on a daily basis, thus allowing different neural populations to be sampled. The system is designed to allow penetration through a thick dura mater into deep brain structures. We discuss a simple method for performing multielectrode recording from cortical areas buried inside sulci using acute implantations of a bundle of electrodes. Our results show that it is possible to obtain stable recordings for at least 4h and that repeated implantations yield an average of two neurons per electrode with every electrode in the bundle picking up at least one single neuron in 70% of the implantations.

  5. Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Pendergrass, Jo Cara; Lozano, Andres M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have identified an association between memory deficits and defects of the integrated neuronal cortical areas known collectively as the default mode network. It is conceivable that the amyloid deposition or other molecular abnormalities seen in patients with Alzheimer’s disease may interfere with this network and disrupt neuronal circuits beyond the localized brain areas. Therefore, Alzheimer’s disease may be both a degenerative disease and a broader system-level disorder affecting integrated neuronal pathways involved in memory. In this paper, we describe the rationale and provide some evidence to support the study of deep brain stimulation of the hippocampal fornix as a novel treatment to improve neuronal circuitry within these integrated networks and thereby sustain memory function in early Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23346514

  6. Time-lapse imaging of disease progression in deep brain areas using fluorescence microendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barretto, Robert P. J.; Ko, Tony H.; Jung, Juergen C.; Wang, Tammy J.; Capps, George; Waters, Allison C.; Ziv, Yaniv; Attardo, Alessio; Recht, Lawrence; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of intravital microscopy and animal models of disease has propelled studies of disease mechanisms and treatments. However, many disorders afflict tissues inaccessible to light microscopy in live subjects. Here we introduce cellular-level time-lapse imaging deep within the live mammalian brain by one- and two-photon fluorescence microendoscopy over multiple weeks. Bilateral imaging sites allowed longitudinal comparisons within individual subjects, including of normal and diseased tissues. Using this approach we tracked CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neuron dendrites in adult mice, revealing these dendrites' extreme stability (>8,000 day mean lifetime) and rare examples of their structural alterations. To illustrate disease studies, we tracked deep lying gliomas by observing tumor growth, visualizing three-dimensional vasculature structure, and determining microcirculatory speeds. Average erythrocyte speeds in gliomas declined markedly as the disease advanced, notwithstanding significant increases in capillary diameters. Time-lapse microendoscopy will be applicable to studies of numerous disorders, including neurovascular, neurological, cancerous, and trauma-induced conditions. PMID:21240263

  7. The pedunculopontine nucleus area: critical evaluation of interspecies differences relevant for its use as a target for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mesbah; Schwabe, Kerstin; Krauss, Joachim K

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the pedunculopontine nucleus has been highlighted as a target for deep brain stimulation for the treatment of freezing of postural instability and gait disorders in Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. There is great controversy, however, as to the exact location of the optimal site for stimulation. In this review, we give an overview of anatomy and connectivity of the pedunculopontine nucleus area in rats, cats, non-human primates and humans. Additionally, we report on the behavioural changes after chemical or electrical manipulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus. We discuss the relation to adjacent regions of the pedunculopontine nucleus, such as the cuneiform nucleus and the subcuneiform nucleus, which together with the pedunculopontine nucleus are the main areas of the mesencephalic locomotor region and play a major role in the initiation of gait. This information is discussed with respect to the experimental designs used for research purposes directed to a better understanding of the circuitry pathway of the pedunculopontine nucleus in association with basal ganglia pathology, and with respect to deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus area in humans.

  8. Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.L.; Xiong, Y.Y.; Xu, G.L.; Liu, X.F.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has provided remarkable therapeutic benefits for people with a variety of neurological disorders. Despite the uncertainty of the precise mechanisms underlying its efficacy, DBS is clinically effective in improving motor function of essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and primary dystonia and in relieving obsessive-compulsive disorder. Recently, this surgical technique has continued to expand to other numerous neurological diseases with encouraging results. This review highlighted the current and potential future clinical applications of DBS. PMID:25187779

  9. Response to deep brain stimulation in the lateral hypothalamic area in a rat model of obesity: in vivo assessment of brain glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Pascau, Javier; Desco, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    To investigate changes in glucose brain metabolism after deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) in a rat model of obesity. Ten obese male Zucker rats were divided into two groups: LHA-control and LHA-DBS. Concentric bipolar platinum-iridium electrodes were implanted bilaterally. After 7 days, DBS was applied for 15 days. Weight and food and water intake were monitored. 2-Deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose ([(18)F]FDG) PET-CT imaging studies were performed the day after the end of DBS. Differences in glucose uptake between the groups were assessed with statistical parametric mapping. A difference in weight gain of 3.19 percentage points was found between groups. Average food consumption during the first 15 days was lower in DBS-treated animals than in non-stimulated animals. DBS increased metabolism in the mammillary body, subiculum-hippocampal area, and amygdala, while a decrease in metabolism was recorded in the thalamus, caudate, temporal cortex, and cerebellum. DBS produced significant changes in brain regions associated with the control of food intake and the brain reward system. DBS seems to normalize the impaired hippocampal functioning that has been described in obese rats. The smaller weight gain in the DBS group suggests that this technique could be considered an option for the treatment of obesity.

  10. Functional Circuitry Effect of Ventral Tegmental Area Deep Brain Stimulation: Imaging and Neurochemical Evidence of Mesocortical and Mesolimbic Pathway Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Settell, Megan L.; Testini, Paola; Cho, Shinho; Lee, Jannifer H.; Blaha, Charles D.; Jo, Hang J.; Lee, Kendall H.; Min, Hoon-Ki

    2017-01-01

    Background: The ventral tegmental area (VTA), containing mesolimbic and mesocortical dopaminergic neurons, is implicated in processes involving reward, addiction, reinforcement, and learning, which are associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Electrical stimulation of the VTA or the medial forebrain bundle and its projection target the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is reported to improve depressive symptoms in patients affected by severe, treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive-like symptoms in animal models of depression. Here we sought to determine the neuromodulatory effects of VTA deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a normal large animal model (swine) by combining neurochemical measurements with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods: Animals (n = 8 swine) were implanted with a unilateral DBS electrode targeting the VTA. During stimulation (130 Hz frequency, 0.25 ms pulse width, and 3 V amplitude), fMRI was performed. Following fMRI, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in combination with carbon fiber microelectrodes was performed to quantify VTA-DBS-evoked dopamine release in the ipsilateral NAc. In a subset of swine, the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) percent change evoked by stimulation was performed at increasing voltages (1, 2, and 3 V). Results: A significant increase in VTA-DBS-evoked BOLD signal was found in the following regions: the ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate, insula, premotor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and striatum. A decrease in the BOLD signal was also observed in the contralateral parahippocampal cortex, dorsolateral and anterior prefrontal cortex, insula, inferior temporal gyrus, and primary somatosensory cortex (Bonferroni-corrected < 0.001). During neurochemical measurements, stimulation time-locked changes in dopamine release were recorded in the NAc, confirming that mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons were stimulated by DBS. In the

  11. Deep brain stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain The neurostimulator, which puts out the electric current. The stimulator is similar to a heart pacemaker . It is usually placed under the skin near the collarbone, but may be ... pulses travel from the neurostimulator, along the extension ...

  12. Brain networks modulated by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Ettore A; Herrojo Ruiz, Maria; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Draganski, Bogdan; Kühn, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Given the frequent occurrence of stimulation-induced affective and cognitive adverse effects, a better understanding about the role of the subthalamic nucleus in non-motor functions is needed. The main goal of this study is to characterize anatomical circuits modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation, and infer about the inner organization of the nucleus in terms of motor and non-motor areas. Given its small size and anatomical intersubject variability, functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus is difficult to investigate in vivo with current methods. Here, we used local field potential recordings obtained from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease to identify a subthalamic area with an analogous electrophysiological signature, namely a predominant beta oscillatory activity. The spatial accuracy was improved by identifying a single contact per macroelectrode for its vicinity to the electrophysiological source of the beta oscillation. We then conducted whole brain probabilistic tractography seeding from the previously identified contacts, and further described connectivity modifications along the macroelectrode's main axis. The designated subthalamic 'beta' area projected predominantly to motor and premotor cortical regions additional to connections to limbic and associative areas. More ventral subthalamic areas showed predominant connectivity to medial temporal regions including amygdala and hippocampus. We interpret our findings as evidence for the convergence of different functional circuits within subthalamic nucleus' portions deemed to be appropriate as deep brain stimulation target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Potential clinical implications of our study are illustrated by an index case where deep brain stimulation of estimated predominant non-motor subthalamic nucleus induced hypomanic behaviour. © The

  13. Behavioral effects of deep brain stimulation of different areas of the Papez circuit on memory- and anxiety-related functions.

    PubMed

    Hescham, Sarah; Jahanshahi, Ali; Meriaux, Céline; Lim, Lee Wei; Blokland, Arjan; Temel, Yasin

    2015-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has gained interest as a potential therapy for advanced treatment-resistant dementia. However, possible targets for DBS and the optimal stimulation parameters are not yet clear. Here, we compared the effects of DBS of the CA1 sub-region of the hippocampus, mammillothalamic tract, anterior thalamic nucleus, and entorhinal cortex in an experimental rat model of dementia. Rats with scopolamine-induced amnesia were assessed in the object location task with different DBS parameters. Moreover, anxiety-related side effects were evaluated in the elevated zero maze and open field. After sacrifice, we applied c-Fos immunohistochemistry to assess which memory-related regions were affected by DBS. When comparing all structures, DBS of the entorhinal cortex and CA1 sub-region was able to restore memory loss when a specific set of stimulation parameters was used. No anxiety-related side effects were found following DBS. The beneficial behavioral performance of CA1 DBS rats was accompanied with an activation of cells in the anterior cingulate gyrus. Therefore, we conclude that acute CA1 DBS restores memory loss possibly through improved attentional and cognitive processes in the limbic cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Deep Brain Stimulation: Expanding Applications

    PubMed Central

    TEKRIWAL, Anand; BALTUCH, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    For over two decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has shown significant efficacy in treatment for refractory cases of dyskinesia, specifically in cases of Parkinson's disease and dystonia. DBS offers potential alleviation from symptoms through a well-tolerated procedure that allows personalized modulation of targeted neuroanatomical regions and related circuitries. For clinicians contending with how to provide patients with meaningful alleviation from often debilitating intractable disorders, DBSs titratability and reversibility make it an attractive treatment option for indications ranging from traumatic brain injury to progressive epileptic supra-synchrony. The expansion of our collective knowledge of pathologic brain circuitries, as well as advances in imaging capabilities, electrophysiology techniques, and material sciences have contributed to the expanding application of DBS. This review will examine the potential efficacy of DBS for neurologic and psychiatric disorders currently under clinical investigation and will summarize findings from recent animal models. PMID:26466888

  15. [Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Overbeek, Jozefien M; de Koning, Pelle P; Luigjes, Judy; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P R Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a treatment using implanted electrodes to deliver electrical pulses to targeted areas of the brain. DBS holds great promise in psychiatry for the treatment of patients with treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Double-blind and open trials have shown that the treatment is effective in about half of these patients. Further research should focus on optimizing DBS with respect to target location for the various psychiatric disorders. More controlled double-blind trials are needed to corroborate the effectiveness of DBS in patients with psychiatric disorders.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation May Ease Tourette 'Tics'

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164573.html Deep Brain Stimulation May Ease Tourette 'Tics' But neurology experts ... may benefit from having electrodes implanted in the brain, a small study suggests. The procedure, known as ...

  17. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Eric S; Zhang, Michael; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Azagury, Dan E; Bohon, Cara; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is now the third leading cause of preventable death in the US, accounting for 216,000 deaths annually and nearly 100 billion dollars in health care costs. Despite advancements in bariatric surgery, substantial weight regain and recurrence of the associated metabolic syndrome still occurs in almost 20-35% of patients over the long-term, necessitating the development of novel therapies. Our continually expanding knowledge of the neuroanatomic and neuropsychiatric underpinnings of obesity has led to increased interest in neuromodulation as a new treatment for obesity refractory to current medical, behavioral, and surgical therapies. Recent clinical trials of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in chronic cluster headache, Alzheimer’s disease, and depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of targeting the hypothalamus and reward circuitry of the brain with electrical stimulation, and thus provide the basis for a neuromodulatory approach to treatment-refractory obesity. In this study, we review the literature implicating these targets for DBS in the neural circuitry of obesity. We will also briefly review ethical considerations for such an intervention, and discuss genetic secondary-obesity syndromes that may also benefit from DBS. In short, we hope to provide the scientific foundation to justify trials of DBS for the treatment of obesity targeting these specific regions of the brain. PMID:26180683

  18. Lateral hypothalamic area deep brain stimulation for refractory obesity: a pilot study with preliminary data on safety, body weight, and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Donald M; Tomycz, Nestor D; Bailes, Julian; de Jonge, Lilian; Lecoultre, Virgile; Wilent, Bryan; Alcindor, Dunbar; Prostko, E Richard; Cheng, Boyle C; Angle, Cynthia; Cantella, Diane; Whiting, Benjamin B; Mizes, J Scott; Finnis, Kirk W; Ravussin, Eric; Oh, Michael Y

    2013-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) has been suggested as a potential treatment for intractable obesity. The authors present the 2-year safety results as well as early efficacy and metabolic effects in 3 patients undergoing bilateral LHA DBS in the first study of this approach in humans. Three patients meeting strict criteria for intractable obesity, including failed bariatric surgery, underwent bilateral implantation of LHA DBS electrodes as part of an institutional review board- and FDA-approved pilot study. The primary focus of the study was safety; however, the authors also received approval to collect data on early efficacy including weight change and energy metabolism. No serious adverse effects, including detrimental psychological consequences, were observed with continuous LHA DBS after a mean follow-up of 35 months (range 30-39 months). Three-dimensional nonlinear transformation of postoperative imaging superimposed onto brain atlas anatomy was used to confirm and study DBS contact proximity to the LHA. No significant weight loss trends were seen when DBS was programmed using standard settings derived from movement disorder DBS surgery. However, promising weight loss trends have been observed when monopolar DBS stimulation has been applied via specific contacts found to increase the resting metabolic rate measured in a respiratory chamber. Deep brain stimulation of the LHA may be applied safely to humans with intractable obesity. Early evidence for some weight loss under metabolically optimized settings provides the first "proof of principle" for this novel antiobesity strategy. A larger follow-up study focused on efficacy along with a more rigorous metabolic analysis is planned to further explore the benefits and therapeutic mechanism behind this investigational therapy.

  19. Introduction to Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Andres M; Gross, Robert E

    2017-04-01

    It is estimated that over 160,000 patients worldwide have received deep brain stimulation (DBS) to date predominantly for Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. With the success of this therapy, a greater appreciation of the clinical benefits and adverse effects is being realized. Neurosurgeons are increasingly paying attention to the technical details of these procedures and optimizing targeting, surgical techniques, and programming to improve outcomes. In this issue, the nuances of surgical techniques for DBS are covered by Dr. House. Dr. Toda et al. and Mr. Chartrain et al. tackle the approach to treating tremors, either essential tremor or Holmes tremor, using either a single target or, in cases of difficult-to-treat tremors, using more than one target and interleaving the stimulation. These abstracts and videos will be appreciated by both those who are being initiated to DBS and the more seasoned practitioners who are looking for helpful hints to tackle challenging cases.

  20. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jennifer J.; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely used for the treatment of movement disorders including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia and, to a lesser extent, certain treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric disorders including obsessive-compulsive disorder. Rather than a single unifying mechanism, DBS likely acts via several, nonexclusive mechanisms including local and network-wide electrical and neurochemical effects of stimulation, modulation of oscillatory activity, synaptic plasticity, and, potentially, neuroprotection and neurogenesis. These different mechanisms vary in importance depending on the condition being treated and the target being stimulated. Here we review each of these in turn and illustrate how an understanding of these mechanisms is inspiring next-generation approaches to DBS. PMID:26510756

  1. Deep brain stimulation: postoperative issues.

    PubMed

    Deuschl, Günther; Herzog, Jan; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit; Kubu, Cynthia; Lozano, Andres M; Lyons, Kelly E; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Tamma, Filippo; Tröster, Alexander I; Vitek, Jerrold L; Volkmann, Jens; Voon, Valerie

    2006-06-01

    Numerous factors need to be taken into account when managing a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) after deep brain stimulation (DBS). Questions such as when to begin programming, how to conduct a programming screen, how to assess the effects of programming, and how to titrate stimulation and medication for each of the targeted sites need to be addressed. Follow-up care should be determined, including patient adjustments of stimulation, timing of follow-up visits and telephone contact with the patient, and stimulation and medication conditions during the follow-up assessments. A management plan for problems that can arise after DBS such as weight gain, dyskinesia, axial symptoms, speech dysfunction, muscle contractions, paresthesia, eyelid, ocular and visual disturbances, and behavioral and cognitive problems should be developed. Long-term complications such as infection or erosion, loss of effect, intermittent stimulation, tolerance, and pain or discomfort can develop and need to be managed. Other factors that need consideration are social and job-related factors, development of dementia, general medical issues, and lifestyle changes. This report from the Consensus on Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease, a project commissioned by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the Movement Disorder Society, outlines answers to a series of questions developed to address all aspects of DBS postoperative management and decision-making with a systematic overview of the literature (until mid-2004) and by the expert opinion of the authors. The report has been endorsed by the Scientific Issues Committee of the Movement Disorder Society and the American Society of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery.

  2. Orientation selective deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, Lauri J.; Slopsema, Julia P.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Shatillo, Artem; Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Utecht, Lynn; Adriany, Gregor; Mangia, Silvia; Sierra, Alejandra; Low, Walter C.; Gröhn, Olli; Michaeli, Shalom

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Target selectivity of deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy is critical, as the precise locus and pattern of the stimulation dictates the degree to which desired treatment responses are achieved and adverse side effects are avoided. There is a clear clinical need to improve DBS technology beyond currently available stimulation steering and shaping approaches. We introduce orientation selective neural stimulation as a concept to increase the specificity of target selection in DBS. Approach. This concept, which involves orienting the electric field along an axonal pathway, was tested in the corpus callosum of the rat brain by freely controlling the direction of the electric field on a plane using a three-electrode bundle, and monitoring the response of the neurons using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Computational models were developed to further analyze axonal excitability for varied electric field orientation. Main results. Our results demonstrated that the strongest fMRI response was observed when the electric field was oriented parallel to the axons, while almost no response was detected with the perpendicular orientation of the electric field relative to the primary fiber tract. These results were confirmed by computational models of the experimental paradigm quantifying the activation of radially distributed axons while varying the primary direction of the electric field. Significance. The described strategies identify a new course for selective neuromodulation paradigms in DBS based on axonal fiber orientation.

  3. Deep brain stimulation for dystonia.

    PubMed

    Vidailhet, Marie; Jutras, Marie-France; Grabli, David; Roze, Emmanuel

    2013-09-01

    The few controlled studies that have been carried out have shown that bilateral internal globus pallidum stimulation is a safe and long-term effective treatment for hyperkinetic disorders. However, most recent published data on deep brain stimulation (DBS) for dystonia, applied to different targets and patients, are still mainly from uncontrolled case reports (especially for secondary dystonia). This precludes clear determination of the efficacy of this procedure and the choice of the 'good' target for the 'good' patient. We performed a literature analysis on DBS for dystonia according to the expected outcome. We separated those with good evidence of favourable outcome from those with less predictable outcome. In the former group, we review the main results for primary dystonia (generalised/focal) and highlight recent data on myoclonus-dystonia and tardive dystonia (as they share, with primary dystonia, a marked beneficial effect from pallidal stimulation with good risk/benefit ratio). In the latter group, poor or variable results have been obtained for secondary dystonia (with a focus on heredodegenerative and metabolic disorders). From this overview, the main results and limits for each subgroup of patients that may help in the selection of dystonic patients who will benefit from DBS are discussed.

  4. [Deep brain stimulation and neuroethics].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yoichi; Fukaya, Chikashi

    2009-01-01

    The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for mental disorders has been discussed in Japan from the viewpoint of ethical problems. Trials of experimental therapies require a basis of sound scientific rationale. New standard therapy emerges from such trials through detailed analysis of the outcome and side effects. Long-suffering patients with intractable symptoms may desperately seek an experimental therapy even though it has not yet been accepted as standard therapy. The ethical committee of each institution evaluates the level of scientific rationale and the expected level of benefits on the bias of the reported data, and decides whether the patients can receive the experimental therapy. However, the use of DBS for mental disorders is not based on sound scientific rational, since the disease mechanisms involved are far from understood. The data reported from the previous trials are insufficient for assuring the satisfactory results for mental disoder patients. Most institutions in Japan do not accept such levels of scientific rationale and expected benefits. Furthermore, from the cultural perspective, strong skepticism exists in Japan with regard to surgical interventions for mental disorders. Such an attitude is unexpectedly in harmony with many of the subjects currently discussed in the field of neuroethics. For example, who has the right to control DBS? How does someone decide the level of control of mental function by DBS? These questions are related to the discussion on how human society is formed and how the ethics are decided by considering both scientific rationale and human society.

  5. Deep brain stimulation: how does it work?

    PubMed

    Vitek, Jerrold L

    2008-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation has significantly improved the motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and other movement disorders. The mechanisms responsible for these improvements continue to be explored. Inhibition at the site of stimulation has been the prevailing explanation for the symptom improvement observed with deep brain stimulation. Research using microelectrode recording during deep brain stimulation in the MPTP monkey model of PD has helped clarify how electrical stimulation of structures within the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit improves motor symptoms, and suggests that activation of output and the resultant change in pattern of neuronal activity that permeates throughout the basal ganglia motor circuit is the mechanism responsible for symptom improvement.

  6. Deep Brain Electrical Stimulation in Epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Luisa L.

    2008-11-01

    The deep brain electrical stimulation has been used for the treatment of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, depression and epilepsy. Studies carried out in human brain indicate that the application of high frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) at 130 Hz in limbic structures of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy abolished clinical seizures and significantly decreased the number of interictal spikes at focus. The anticonvulsant effects of HFS seem to be more effective in patients with less severe epilepsy, an effect associated with a high GABA tissue content and a low rate of cell loss. In addition, experiments using models of epilepsy indicate that HFS (pulses of 60 μs width at 130 Hz at subthreshold current intensity) of specific brain areas avoids the acquisition of generalized seizures and enhances the postictal seizure suppression. HFS is also able to modify the status epilepticus. It is concluded that the effects of HFS may be a good strategy to reduce or avoid the epileptic activity.

  7. Tractography patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Lauro, Peter M; Huang, Ling; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Lungu, Codrin

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation therapy is an effective symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic effects remain unclear. Although the targets of deep brain stimulation are grey matter structures, axonal modulation is known to play an important role in deep brain stimulation's therapeutic mechanism. Several white matter structures in proximity to the subthalamic nucleus have been implicated in the clinical benefits of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. We assessed the connectivity patterns that characterize clinically beneficial electrodes in Parkinson's disease patients, after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We evaluated 22 patients with Parkinson's disease (11 females, age 57 ± 9.1 years, disease duration 13.3 ± 6.3 years) who received bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at the National Institutes of Health. During an initial electrode screening session, one month after deep brain stimulation implantation, the clinical benefits of each contact were determined. The electrode was localized by coregistering preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative computer tomography images and the volume of tissue activated was estimated from stimulation voltage and impedance. Brain connectivity for the volume of tissue activated of deep brain stimulation contacts was assessed using probabilistic tractography with diffusion-tensor data. Areas most frequently connected to clinically effective contacts included the thalamus, substantia nigra, brainstem and superior frontal gyrus. A series of discriminant analyses demonstrated that the strength of connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus were positively associated with clinical effectiveness. The connectivity patterns observed in our study suggest that the modulation of white matter tracts directed to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus is associated with favourable clinical

  8. Bibliometric profile of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kejia; Moses, Ziev B; Xu, Wendong; Williams, Ziv

    2017-05-08

    We aimed to identify and analyze the characteristics of the 100 most highly-cited papers in the research field of deep brain stimulation (DBS). The Web of Science was searched for highly-cited papers related to DBS research. The number of citations, countries, institutions of origin, year of publication, and research area were noted and analyzed. The 100 most highly-cited articles had a mean of 304.15 citations. These accrued an average of 25.39 citations a year. The most represented target by far was the subthalamic nucleus (STN). These articles were published in 46 high-impact journals, with Brain (n = 10) topping the list. These articles came from 11 countries, with the USA contributing the most highly-cited articles (n = 29); however, it was the University of Toronto (n = 13) in Canada that was the institution with the most highly-cited studies. This study identified the 100 most highly-cited studies and highlighted a historical perspective on the progress in the field of DBS. These findings allow for the recognition of the most influential reports and provide useful information that can indicate areas requiring further investigation.

  9. Identification of target areas for deep brain stimulation in human basal ganglia substructures based on median nerve sensory evoked potential criteria

    PubMed Central

    Klostermann, F; Vesper, J; Curio, G

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In the interventional treatment of movement disorders, the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are the most relevant electrode targets for deep brain stimulation (DBS). This study tested the value of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) for the functional identification of VIM and STN. Methods: Median nerve SEP were recorded from the final stimulation electrodes targeted at STN and VIM. Throughout the stereotactic procedure SEP were recorded during short electrode stops above STN/VIM and within the presumed target areas. After digital filtering, high and low frequency SEP components were analysed separately to parameterise both the 1000 Hz SEP burst and low frequency (<100 Hz) components. Results: SEP recorded in the VIM target region could unequivocally be distinguished from SEP recorded in STN. The 1000 Hz burst signal was significantly larger in VIM than in STN without any overlap of amplitude values. In the low frequency band, a primary high amplitude negativity was obtained in VIM, contrasting with a low amplitude positivity in STN. SEP waveshapes in recordings above target positions resembled SEP obtained in STN. When entering VIM, a sharp amplitude increase was observed over a few millimetres only. Conclusions: Based on SEP criteria, the VIM target but not the STN region can be identified by typical SEP configuration changes, when penetrating the target zone. The approach is independent of the patient's cooperation and vigilance and therefore feasible in general anaesthesia. It provides an easy, reliable, and robust tool for the final assessment of electrode positions at the last instance during electrode implantation when eventual electrode revisions can easily be performed. PMID:12876229

  10. Deep brain stimulation for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Boccard, Sandra G J; Pereira, Erlick A C; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical intervention popularised in movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, and also reported to improve symptoms of epilepsy, Tourette's syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorders and cluster headache. Since the 1950s, DBS has been used as a treatment to relieve intractable pain of several aetiologies including post stroke pain, phantom limb pain, facial pain and brachial plexus avulsion. Several patient series have shown benefits in stimulating various brain areas, including the sensory thalamus (ventral posterior lateral and medial), the periaqueductal and periventricular grey, or, more recently, the anterior cingulate cortex. However, this technique remains "off label" in the USA as it does not have Federal Drug Administration approval. Consequently, only a small number of surgeons report DBS for pain using current technology and techniques and few regions approve it. Randomised, blinded and controlled clinical trials that may use novel trial methodologies are desirable to evaluate the efficacy of DBS in patients who are refractory to other therapies. New imaging techniques, including tractography, may help optimise electrode placement and clinical outcome.

  11. Pallidotomy after chronic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bulluss, Kristian J; Pereira, Erlick A; Joint, Carole; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2013-11-01

    Recent publications have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease still exerts beneficial effects on tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia for up to 10 years after implantation of the stimulator. However with the progression of Parkinson's disease, features such as cognitive decline or "freezing" become prominent, and the presence of an implanted and functioning deep brain stimulator can impose a profound burden of care on the clinical team and family. The authors describe their experience in treating 4 patients who underwent removal of the implanted device due to either progressive dementia requiring full-time nursing or due to infection, and who subsequently underwent a unilateral pallidotomy.

  12. Red and NIR light dosimetry in the human deep brain.

    PubMed

    Pitzschke, A; Lovisa, B; Seydoux, O; Zellweger, M; Pfleiderer, M; Tardy, Y; Wagnières, G

    2015-04-07

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) appears promising to treat the hallmarks of Parkinson's Disease (PD) in cellular or animal models. We measured light propagation in different areas of PD-relevant deep brain tissue during transcranial, transsphenoidal illumination (at 671 and 808 nm) of a cadaver head and modeled optical parameters of human brain tissue using Monte-Carlo simulations. Gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, ventricles, thalamus, pons, cerebellum and skull bone were processed into a mesh of the skull (158 × 201 × 211 voxels; voxel side length: 1 mm). Optical parameters were optimized from simulated and measured fluence rate distributions. The estimated μeff for the different tissues was in all cases larger at 671 than at 808 nm, making latter a better choice for light delivery in the deep brain. Absolute values were comparable to those found in the literature or slightly smaller. The effective attenuation in the ventricles was considerably larger than literature values. Optimization yields a new set of optical parameters better reproducing the experimental data. A combination of PBM via the sphenoid sinus and oral cavity could be beneficial. A 20-fold higher efficiency of light delivery to the deep brain was achieved with ventricular instead of transcranial illumination. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to illuminate deep brain tissues transcranially, transsphenoidally and via different application routes. This opens therapeutic options for sufferers of PD or other cerebral diseases necessitating light therapy.

  13. Red and NIR light dosimetry in the human deep brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitzschke, A.; Lovisa, B.; Seydoux, O.; Zellweger, M.; Pfleiderer, M.; Tardy, Y.; Wagnières, G.

    2015-04-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) appears promising to treat the hallmarks of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in cellular or animal models. We measured light propagation in different areas of PD-relevant deep brain tissue during transcranial, transsphenoidal illumination (at 671 and 808 nm) of a cadaver head and modeled optical parameters of human brain tissue using Monte-Carlo simulations. Gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, ventricles, thalamus, pons, cerebellum and skull bone were processed into a mesh of the skull (158 × 201 × 211 voxels; voxel side length: 1 mm). Optical parameters were optimized from simulated and measured fluence rate distributions. The estimated μeff for the different tissues was in all cases larger at 671 than at 808 nm, making latter a better choice for light delivery in the deep brain. Absolute values were comparable to those found in the literature or slightly smaller. The effective attenuation in the ventricles was considerably larger than literature values. Optimization yields a new set of optical parameters better reproducing the experimental data. A combination of PBM via the sphenoid sinus and oral cavity could be beneficial. A 20-fold higher efficiency of light delivery to the deep brain was achieved with ventricular instead of transcranial illumination. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to illuminate deep brain tissues transcranially, transsphenoidally and via different application routes. This opens therapeutic options for sufferers of PD or other cerebral diseases necessitating light therapy.

  14. Deep brain stimulation surgery for alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Voges, Juergen; Müller, Ulf; Bogerts, Bernhard; Münte, Thomas; Heinze, Hans-Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of chronic alcohol dependence cause important health and economic burdens worldwide. Relapse rates after standard treatment (medication and psychotherapy) are high. There is evidence from in vivo investigations and from studies in patients that the brain's reward system is critically involved in the development and maintenance of addictive behavior, suggesting that modification of this system could significantly improve the prognosis of addictive patients. Motivated by an accidental observation, we used the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which has a central position in the dopaminergic reward system for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of alcohol addiction. We report our first experiences with NAc DBS for alcohol dependence and review the literature addressing the mechanisms leading to addiction. Five patients were treated off-label with bilateral NAc DBS for severe alcohol addiction (average follow-up 38 months). All patients experienced significant and ongoing improvement of craving. Two patients remained completely abstinent for more than 4 years. NAc stimulation was tolerated without permanent side effects. Simultaneous recording of local field potentials from the target area and surface electroencephalography while patients performed neuropsychological tasks gave a hint on the pivotal role of the NAc in processing alcohol-related cues. To our knowledge, the data presented here reflect the first attempt to treat alcohol-addicted patients with NAc DBS. Electrical NAc stimulation probably counterbalances the effect of drug-related stimuli triggering involuntarily drug-seeking behavior. Meanwhile, two prospective clinical studies using randomized, double-blind, and crossover stimulation protocols for DBS are underway to corroborate these preliminary results. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Optogenetics and deep brain stimulation neurotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Kowalski, Marek Mateusz; Roberts, Erik Andrew; Han, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Brain neural network is composed of densely packed, intricately wired neurons whose activity patterns ultimately give rise to every behavior, thought, or emotion that we experience. Over the past decade, a novel neurotechnique, optogenetics that combines light and genetic methods to control or monitor neural activity patterns, has proven to be revolutionary in understanding the functional role of specific neural circuits. We here briefly describe recent advance in optogenetics and compare optogenetics with deep brain stimulation technology that holds the promise for treating many neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bronstein, Jeff M.; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron L.; Lozano, Andres M.; Volkmann, Jens; Stefani, Alessandro; Horak, Fay B.; Okun, Michael S.; Foote, Kelly D.; Krack, Paul; Pahwa, Rajesh; Henderson, Jaimie M.; Hariz, Marwan I.; Bakay, Roy A.; Rezai, Ali; Marks, William J.; Moro, Elena; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Weaver, Frances M.; Gross, Robert E.; DeLong, Mahlon R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide recommendations to patients, physicians, and other health care providers on several issues involving deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease (PD). Data Sources and Study Selection An international consortium of experts organized, reviewed the literature, and attended the workshop. Topics were introduced at the workshop, followed by group discussion. Data Extraction and Synthesis A draft of a consensus statement was presented and further edited after plenary debate. The final statements were agreed on by all members. Conclusions (1) Patients with PD without significant active cognitive or psychiatric problems who have medically intractable motor fluctuations, intractable tremor, or intolerance of medication adverse effects are good candidates for DBS. (2) Deep brain stimulation surgery is best performed by an experienced neurosurgeon with expertise in stereotactic neurosurgery who is working as part of a interprofessional team. (3) Surgical complication rates are extremely variable, with infection being the most commonly reported complication of DBS. (4) Deep brain stimulation programming is best accomplished by a highly trained clinician and can take 3 to 6 months to obtain optimal results. (5) Deep brain stimulation improves levodopa-responsive symptoms, dyskinesia, and tremor; benefits seem to be long-lasting in many motor domains. (6) Subthalamic nuclei DBS may be complicated by increased depression, apathy, impulsivity, worsened verbal fluency, and executive dysfunction in a subset of patients. (7) Both globus pallidus pars interna and subthalamic nuclei DBS have been shown to be effective in addressing the motor symptoms of PD. (8) Ablative therapy is still an effective alternative and should be considered in a select group of appropriate patients. PMID:20937936

  17. Movement disorders induced by deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation represents a major advance in the treatment of several types of movement disorders. However, during stimulation new movement disorders may emerge, thus limiting the positive effects of this therapy. These movement disorders may be induced by: 1) stimulation of the targeted nucleus, 2) stimulation of surrounding tracts and nuclei, and 3) as a result of dose adjustment of accompanying medications, such as reduction of dopaminergic drugs in patients with Parkinson's disease. Various dyskinesias, blepharospasm, and apraxia of eyelid opening have been described mainly with subthalamic nucleus stimulation, whereas hypokinesia and freezing of gait have been observed with stimulation of the globus pallidus internus. Other deep brain stimulation-related movement disorders include dyskinesias associated with stimulation of the globus pallidus externus and ataxic gait as a side effect of chronic bilateral stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus. These movement disorders are generally reversible and usually resolved once the stimulation is reduced or turned off. This, however, typically leads to loss of benefit of the underlying movement disorder which can be re-gained by using different contacts, changing targets or stimulation parameters, and adjusting pharmacological therapy. New and innovative emerging technologies and stimulation techniques may help to prevent or overcome the various deep brain stimulation-induced movement disorders. In this review we aim to describe the clinical features, frequency, pathophysiology, and strategies for treatment of these iatrogenic movement disorders.

  18. Pathways of Translation: Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Alexandra J.; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Electrical stimulation of the brain has a 2000 year history. Deep brain stimulation (DBS), one form of neurostimulation, is a functional neurosurgical approach in which a high‐frequency electrical current stimulates targeted brain structures for therapeutic benefit. It is an effective treatment for certain neuropathologic movement disorders and an emerging therapy for psychiatric conditions and epilepsy. Its translational journey did not follow the typical bench‐to‐bedside path, but rather reversed the process. The shift from ancient and medieval folkloric remedy to accepted medical practice began with independent discoveries about electricity during the 19th century and was fostered by technological advances of the 20th. In this paper, we review that journey and discuss how the quest to expand its applications and improve outcomes is taking DBS from the bedside back to the bench. PMID:24330698

  19. Balancing the Brain: Resting State Networks and Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kringelbach, Morten L.; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu Z.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last three decades, large numbers of patients with otherwise treatment-resistant disorders have been helped by deep brain stimulation (DBS), yet a full scientific understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms is still missing. We have previously proposed that efficacious DBS works by restoring the balance of the brain's resting state networks. Here, we extend this proposal by reviewing how detailed investigations of the highly coherent functional and structural brain networks in health and disease (such as Parkinson's) have the potential not only to increase our understanding of fundamental brain function but of how best to modulate the balance. In particular, some of the newly identified hubs and connectors within and between resting state networks could become important new targets for DBS, including potentially in neuropsychiatric disorders. At the same time, it is of essence to consider the ethical implications of this perspective. PMID:21577250

  20. Deep learning for brain tumor classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Justin S.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Landman, Bennett A.; Fabbri, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Recent research has shown that deep learning methods have performed well on supervised machine learning, image classification tasks. The purpose of this study is to apply deep learning methods to classify brain images with different tumor types: meningioma, glioma, and pituitary. A dataset was publicly released containing 3,064 T1-weighted contrast enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) brain images from 233 patients with either meningioma, glioma, or pituitary tumors split across axial, coronal, or sagittal planes. This research focuses on the 989 axial images from 191 patients in order to avoid confusing the neural networks with three different planes containing the same diagnosis. Two types of neural networks were used in classification: fully connected and convolutional neural networks. Within these two categories, further tests were computed via the augmentation of the original 512×512 axial images. Training neural networks over the axial data has proven to be accurate in its classifications with an average five-fold cross validation of 91.43% on the best trained neural network. This result demonstrates that a more general method (i.e. deep learning) can outperform specialized methods that require image dilation and ring-forming subregions on tumors.

  1. Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Larson, Paul S

    2014-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an implanted electrical device that modulates specific targets in the brain resulting in symptomatic improvement in a particular neurologic disease, most commonly a movement disorder. It is preferred over previously used lesioning procedures due to its reversibility, adjustability, and ability to be used bilaterally with a good safety profile. Risks of DBS include intracranial bleeding, infection, malposition, and hardware issues, such migration, disconnection, or malfunction, but the risk of each of these complications is low--generally ≤ 5% at experienced, large-volume centers. It has been used widely in essential tremor, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia when medical treatment becomes ineffective, intolerable owing to side effects, or causes motor complications. Brain targets implanted include the thalamus (most commonly for essential tremor), subthalamic nucleus (most commonly for Parkinson's disease), and globus pallidus (Parkinson's disease and dystonia), although new targets are currently being explored. Future developments include brain electrodes that can steer current directionally and systems capable of "closed loop" stimulation, with systems that can record and interpret regional brain activity and modify stimulation parameters in a clinically meaningful way. New, image-guided implantation techniques may have advantages over traditional DBS surgery.

  2. Network effects of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Alhourani, Ahmad; McDowell, Michael M.; Randazzo, Michael J.; Wozny, Thomas A.; Kondylis, Efstathios D.; Lipski, Witold J.; Beck, Sarah; Karp, Jordan F.; Ghuman, Avniel S.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentially alter specific brain functions via deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a monumental advance in clinical neuroscience, as well as within medicine as a whole. Despite the efficacy of DBS in the treatment of movement disorders, for which it is often the gold-standard therapy when medical management becomes inadequate, the mechanisms through which DBS in various brain targets produces therapeutic effects is still not well understood. This limited knowledge is a barrier to improving efficacy and reducing side effects in clinical brain stimulation. A field of study related to assessing the network effects of DBS is gradually emerging that promises to reveal aspects of the underlying pathophysiology of various brain disorders and their response to DBS that will be critical to advancing the field. This review summarizes the nascent literature related to network effects of DBS measured by cerebral blood flow and metabolic imaging, functional imaging, and electrophysiology (scalp and intracranial electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography) in order to establish a framework for future studies. PMID:26269552

  3. [Functional imaging of deep brain stimulation in idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Hilker, R

    2010-10-01

    Functional brain imaging allows the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the living human brain to be investigated. In patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), positron emission tomography (PET) studies were undertaken at rest as well as under motor, cognitive or behavioral activation. DBS leads to a reduction of abnormal PD-related network activity in the motor system, which partly correlates with the improvement of motor symptoms. The local increase of energy consumption within the direct target area suggests a predominant excitatory influence of the stimulation current on neuronal tissue. Remote effects of DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on frontal association cortices indicate an interference of stimulation energy with associative and limbic basal ganglia loops. Taken together, functional brain imaging provides very valuable data for advancement of the DBS technique in PD therapy.

  4. Deep Brain Stimulation for Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Revell, Maria A

    2015-12-01

    Disruption in the interaction between the central nervous system, nerves, and muscles cause movement disorders. These disorders can negatively affect quality of life. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been identified as a therapy for Parkinson disease and essential tremor that has significant advantages compared with medicinal therapies. Surgical intervention for these disorders before DBS included ablative therapies such as thalamotomy and pallidotomy. These procedures were not reversible and did not allow for treatment adjustments. The advent of DBS progressed therapies for significant movement disorders into the realm of being reversible and adjustable based on patient symptoms.

  5. [Deep brain stimulation in psychiatry: ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulf J; Bogerts, Bernhard; Voges, Jürgen; Galazky, Imke; Kohl, Sina; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Kuhn, Jens; Steiner, Johann

    2014-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be an efficacious treatment for many neurological conditions and has thus been expanded to psychiatric diseases as well. Following an introduction on the history of DBS in psychiatry, this review summarizes commonly raised ethical concerns and questions on clinical trial design, selection of patients, informed consent and concerns about the possible impact of DBS on an individual's personality. Finally, it highlights the fact that critique on DBS in psychiatry is probably not selectively based on scientific concerns about potential risks; instead, the neurobiological origin of specific psychiatric disorders has been questioned.

  6. Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Thevathasan, Wesley; Gregory, Ralph

    2010-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation is now considered a routine treatment option for selected patients with advanced Parkinson's disease, primary segmental and generalised dystonia, and essential tremor. The neurosurgeon is responsible for the accurate and safe placement of the electrodes and the neurologist for the careful selection of patients and titration of medication against the effects of stimulation. A multidisciplinary team approach involving specialist nurses, neuropsychologists and neurophysiologists is required for a successful outcome. In this article we will summarise the key points in patient selection, provide an overview of the surgical technique, and discuss the beneficial and adverse outcomes that can occur.

  7. Deep brain stimulation for Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won; Pouratian, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a movement disorder characterized by repetitive stereotyped motor and phonic movements with varying degrees of psychiatric comorbidity. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a novel therapeutic intervention for patients with refractory Tourette syndrome. Since 1999, more than 100 patients have undergone DBS at various targets within the corticostriatothalamocortical network thought to be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome. Future multicenter clinical trials and the use of a centralized online database to compare the results are necessary to determine the efficacy of DBS for Tourette syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of brain MRI after deep brain stimulation hardware implantation.

    PubMed

    Nazzaro, Jules M; Lyons, Kelly E; Wetzel, Louis H; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the experience with and safety of brain 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) patients. This was a retrospective review of brain MRI scanning performed on DBS patients at the University of Kansas Medical Center between January 1995 and December 2007. A total of 249 DBS patients underwent 445 brain 1.5 T MRI scan sessions encompassing 1,092 individual scans using a transmit-receive head coil, representing the cumulative scanning of 1,649 DBS leads. Patients with complete implanted DBS systems as well as those with externalized leads underwent brain imaging. For the majority of scans, specific absorption rates localized to the head (SAR(H)) were estimated and in all cases SAR(H) were higher than that specified in the present product labeling. There were no clinical or hardware related adverse events secondary to brain MRI scanning. Our data should not be extrapolated to encourage MRI scanning beyond the present labeling. Rather, our data may contribute to further defining safe MRI scanning parameters that might ultimately be adopted in future product labeling as more centers report in detail their experiences.

  9. Improved electrode material for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Petrossians, A; Whalen, J J; Weiland, J D

    2016-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices have been implanted for treatment of basic tremor, Parkinson's disease and dystonia. These devices use electrodes in contact with tissue to deliver electrical pulses to targeted cells, to elicit specific therapeutic responses. In general, the neuromodulation industry has been evolving towards smaller, less invasive electrodes. However, current electrode materials do not support small sizes without severely restricting the stimulus output. Hence, an improved electrode material will benefit present and future DBS systems. In this study, five DBS leads were modified using a cost-effective and materials-efficient process for applying an ultra-low impedance platinum-iridium alloy coating. One DBS lead was used for insertion test and four DBS leads were chronically pulsed for 12 weeks. The platinum-iridium alloy significantly improved the electrical properties of the DBS electrodes and was robust to insertion into brain and to 12 weeks of chronic pulsing.

  10. Deep sleep maintains learning efficiency of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Fattinger, Sara; de Beukelaar, Toon T; Ruddy, Kathy L; Volk, Carina; Heyse, Natalie C; Herbst, Joshua A; Hahnloser, Richard H R; Wenderoth, Nicole; Huber, Reto

    2017-05-22

    It is hypothesized that deep sleep is essential for restoring the brain's capacity to learn efficiently, especially in regions heavily activated during the day. However, causal evidence in humans has been lacking due to the inability to sleep deprive one target area while keeping the natural sleep pattern intact. Here we introduce a novel approach to focally perturb deep sleep in motor cortex, and investigate the consequences on behavioural and neurophysiological markers of neuroplasticity arising from dedicated motor practice. We show that the capacity to undergo neuroplastic changes is reduced by wakefulness but restored during unperturbed sleep. This restorative process is markedly attenuated when slow waves are selectively perturbed in motor cortex, demonstrating that deep sleep is a requirement for maintaining sustainable learning efficiency.

  11. Deep sleep maintains learning efficiency of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Fattinger, Sara; de Beukelaar, Toon T.; Ruddy, Kathy L.; Volk, Carina; Heyse, Natalie C.; Herbst, Joshua A.; Hahnloser, Richard H. R.; Wenderoth, Nicole; Huber, Reto

    2017-01-01

    It is hypothesized that deep sleep is essential for restoring the brain's capacity to learn efficiently, especially in regions heavily activated during the day. However, causal evidence in humans has been lacking due to the inability to sleep deprive one target area while keeping the natural sleep pattern intact. Here we introduce a novel approach to focally perturb deep sleep in motor cortex, and investigate the consequences on behavioural and neurophysiological markers of neuroplasticity arising from dedicated motor practice. We show that the capacity to undergo neuroplastic changes is reduced by wakefulness but restored during unperturbed sleep. This restorative process is markedly attenuated when slow waves are selectively perturbed in motor cortex, demonstrating that deep sleep is a requirement for maintaining sustainable learning efficiency. PMID:28530229

  12. The ethics of deep brain stimulation (DBS).

    PubMed

    Unterrainer, Marcus; Oduncu, Fuat S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an invasive technique designed to stimulate certain deep brain regions for therapeutic purposes and is currently used mainly in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. However, DBS is also used increasingly for other experimental applications, such as the treatment of psychiatric disorders (e.g. severe depression), weight reduction. Apart from its therapeutic potential, DBS can cause severe adverse effects, some that might also have a significant impact on the patient's personality and autonomy by the external stimulation of DBS which effects lie beyond the individual's control and free will. The article's purpose is to outline the procedures of DBS currently used in therapeutic and experimental applications and to discuss the ethical concerns regarding this procedure. It will address the clinical benefit-risk-ratio, the particular ethics of research in this field, and the ethical issues raised by affecting a patient's or an individual's personality and autonomous behaviour. Moreover, a potential ethical guideline, the Ulysses contract is discussed for the field of clinical application as well as the question of responsibility.

  13. Origin and Evolution of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sironi, Vittorio A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly describes how the electrical stimulation, used since antiquity to modulate the nervous system, has been a fundamental tool of neurophysiologic investigation in the second half of the eighteenth century and was subsequently used by the early twentieth century, even for therapeutic purposes. In mid-twentieth century the advent of stereotactic procedures has allowed the drift from lesional to stimulating technique of deep nuclei of the brain for therapeutic purposes. In this way, deep brain stimulation (DBS) was born, that, over the last two decades, has led to positive results for the treatment of medically refractory Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. In recent years, the indications for therapeutic use of DBS have been extended to epilepsy, Tourette’s syndrome, psychiatric diseases (depression, obsessive–compulsive disorder), some kinds of headache, eating disorders, and the minimally conscious state. The potentials of the DBS for therapeutic use are fascinating, but there are still many unresolved technical and ethical problems, concerning the identification of the targets for each disease, the selection of the patients and the evaluation of the results. PMID:21887135

  14. Deep Brain Stimulation, Authenticity and Value.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Jonathan; Maslen, Hannah; Savulescu, Julian

    2017-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been of considerable interest to bioethicists, in large part because of the effects that the intervention can occasionally have on central features of the recipient's personality. These effects raise questions regarding the philosophical concept of authenticity. In this article, we expand on our earlier work on the concept of authenticity in the context of deep brain stimulation by developing a diachronic, value-based account of authenticity. Our account draws on both existentialist and essentialist approaches to authenticity, and Laura Waddell Ekstrom's coherentist approach to personal autonomy. In developing our account, we respond to Sven Nyholm and Elizabeth O'Neill's synchronic approach to authenticity, and explain how the diachronic approach we defend can have practical utility, contrary to Alexandre Erler and Tony Hope's criticism of autonomy-based approaches to authenticity. Having drawn a distinction between the authenticity of an individual's traits and the authenticity of that person's values, we consider how our conception of authenticity applies to the context of anorexia nervosa in comparison to other prominent accounts of authenticity. We conclude with some reflections on the prudential value of authenticity, and by highlighting how the language of authenticity can be invoked to justify covert forms of paternalism that run contrary to the value of individuality that seems to be at the heart of authenticity.

  15. Deep brain light stimulation effects on glutamate and dopamine concentration.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Lin, Shih-Shian; Liu, Janelle; Chen, Shih-How; Chio, Chung-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Compared to deep brain electrical stimulation, which has been applied to treating pathological brain diseases, little work has been done on the effect of deep brain light stimulation. A fiber-coupled laser stimulator at 840 nm wavelength and 130 Hz pulse repetition rate is developed in this work for deep brain light stimulation in a rat model. Concentration changes in glutamate and dopamine in the striatum are observed using a microdialysis probe when the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is stimulated at various optical power levels. Experimental results show that light stimulation causes the concentration of glutamate to decrease while that of dopamine is increased. This suggests that deep brain light stimulation of the STN is a promising therapeutic strategy for dopamine-related diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The stimulator developed for this work is useful for deep brain light stimulation in biomedical research.

  16. Deep brain stimulation: from neurology to psychiatry?

    PubMed

    Krack, Paul; Hariz, Marwan I; Baunez, Christelle; Guridi, Jorge; Obeso, Jose A

    2010-10-01

    Functional stereotaxy was introduced in the late 1940s to reduce the morbidity of lobotomy in psychiatric disease by using more focal lesions. The advent of neuroleptics led to a drastic decline in psychosurgery for several decades. Functional stereotactic neurosurgery has recently been revitalized, starting with treatment of Parkinson's disease, in which deep brain stimulation (DBS) facilitates reversible focal neuromodulation of altered basal ganglia circuits. DBS is now being extended to treatment of neuropsychiatric conditions such as Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression and addiction. In this review, we discuss the concept that dysfunction of motor, limbic and associative cortico-basal ganglia-thalamocortical loops underlies these various disorders, which might now be amenable to DBS treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Deep brain stimulation to reduce sexual drive

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Johannes; Auer, Matthias K.; Biedermann, Sarah V.; Briken, Peer; Hacke, Werner

    2015-01-01

    To date there are few treatment options to reduce high sexual drive or sexual urges in paraphilic patients with a risk for sexual offending. Pharmacological therapy aims to reduce sexual drive by lowering testosterone at the cost of severe side effects. We hypothesize that high sexual drive could also be reduced with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of circuits that generate sexual drive. This approach would help to avoid systemic side effects of antiandrogenic drug therapies. So far the best investigated target to reduce sexual drive is the ventromedial hypothalamus, which was lesioned unilaterally and bilaterally by stereotaxic interventions in paraphilic patients in the 1970s. Here, we discuss DBS as a treatment strategy in patients with severe paraphilic disorders with a serious risk of sexual offending. There are profound ethical and practical issues associated with DBS treatment of paraphilic patients that must be solved before considering such a treatment approach. PMID:26057198

  18. Deep Brain Stimulation for Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Holtzheimer, Paul E.; Mayberg, Helen S.

    2015-01-01

    Medications, psychotherapy, and other treatments are effective for many patients with psychiatric disorders. However, with currently available interventions, a substantial number of patients experience incomplete resolution of symptoms, and relapse rates are high. In the search for better treatments, increasing interest has focused on focal neuromodulation. This focus has been driven by improved neuroanatomical models of mood, thought, and behavior regulation, as well as by more advanced strategies for directly and focally altering neural activity. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is one of the most invasive focal neuromodulation techniques available; data have supported its safety and efficacy in a number of movement disorders. Investigators have produced preliminary data on the safety and efficacy of DBS for several psychiatric disorders, as well. In this review, we describe the development and justification for testing DBS for various psychiatric disorders, carefully consider the available clinical data, and briefly discuss potential mechanisms of action. PMID:21692660

  19. Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of uncommon tremor syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a standard therapy for the treatment of select cases of medication refractory essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease however the effectiveness and long-term outcomes of DBS in other uncommon and complex tremor syndromes has not been well established. Traditionally, the ventralis intermedius nucleus (VIM) of the thalamus has been considered the main target for medically intractable tremors; however alternative brain regions and improvements in stereotactic techniques and hardware may soon change the horizon for treatment of complex tremors. Areas covered: In this article, we conducted a PubMed search using different combinations between the terms ‘Uncommon tremors’, ‘Dystonic tremor’, ‘Holmes tremor’ ‘Midbrain tremor’, ‘Rubral tremor’, ‘Cerebellar tremor’, ‘outflow tremor’, ‘Multiple Sclerosis tremor’, ‘Post-traumatic tremor’, ‘Neuropathic tremor’, and ‘Deep Brain Stimulation/DBS’. Additionally, we examined and summarized the current state of evolving interventions for treatment of complex tremor syndromes. Expert c ommentary: Recently reported interventions for rare tremors include stimulation of the posterior subthalamic area, globus pallidus internus, ventralis oralis anterior/posterior thalamic subnuclei, and the use of dual lead stimulation in one or more of these targets. Treatment should be individualized and dictated by tremor phenomenology and associated clinical features. PMID:27228280

  20. Deep-brain stimulation for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hemmings; Van Dyck-Lippens, Pieter Jan; Santegoeds, Remco; van Kuyck, Kris; Gabriëls, Loes; Lin, Guozhen; Pan, Guihua; Li, Yongchao; Li, Dianyou; Zhan, Shikun; Sun, Bomin; Nuttin, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and severe, sometimes life-threatening, psychiatric disorder with high relapse rates under standard treatment. After decades of brain-lesioning procedures offered as a last resort, deep-brain stimulation (DBS) has come under investigation in the last few years as a treatment option for severe and refractory AN. In this jointly written article, Sun et al. (the Shanghai group) report an average of 65% increase in body weight in four severe and refractory patients with AN after they underwent the DBS procedure (average follow-up: 38 months). All patients weighed greater than 85% of expected body weight and thus no longer met the diagnostic criteria of AN at last follow-up. Nuttin et al. (the Leuven group) describe other clinical studies that provide evidence for the use of DBS for AN and further discuss patient selection criteria, target selection, and adverse event of this evolving therapy. Preliminary results from the Shanghai group and other clinical centers showed that the use of DBS to treat AN may be a valuable option for weight restoration in otherwise-refractory and life-threatening cases. The nature of this procedure, however, remains investigational and should not be viewed as a standard clinical treatment option. Further scientific investigation is essential to warrant the long-term efficacy and safety of DBS for AN. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Computational analysis of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Cameron C; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Butson, Christopher R

    2007-09-01

    Chronic, high-frequency electrical stimulation of subcortical brain structures (deep brain stimulation [DBS]) is an effective clinical treatment for several medically refractory neurological disorders. However, the clinical successes of DBS are tempered by the limited understanding of the response of neurons to applied electric fields and scientific definition of the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS remains elusive. In addition, it is presently unclear which electrode designs and stimulation parameters are optimal for maximum therapeutic benefit and minimal side effects. Detailed computer modeling of DBS has recently emerged as a powerful technique to enhance our understanding of the effects of DBS and to create a virtual testing ground for new stimulation paradigms. This review summarizes the fundamentals of neurostimulation modeling and provides an overview of some of the scientific contributions of computer models to the field of DBS. We then provide a prospective view on the application of DBS-modeling tools to augment the clinical utility of DBS and to design the next generation of DBS technology.

  2. [Consensus statement on deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical technique based on the placement of a programmable electrode into certain areas of central nervous system. DBS is nowadays a well established treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and motor complications. However, there are controversies about several items, including the correct selection of patients and the best time for DBS. There is a current trend for DBS to be carried out at earlier stages of PD. A group of experts from Spanish Neurosurgical Society (Functional Surgery Study Group) and Spanish Neurological Society (Movement Disorders Study Group) wrote this consensus statement in order to clarify these and other items.

  3. Deep brain photoreceptors control light seeking behavior in zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, António M.; Fero, Kandice; Arrenberg, Aristides B.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Driever, Wolfgang; Burgess, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Most vertebrates process visual information using elaborately structured photosensory tissues including the eyes and pineal. However there is strong evidence that other tissues can detect and respond to photic stimuli [1, 2, 3]. Many reports suggest that photosensitive elements exist within the brain itself and influence physiology and behavior, however a long standing puzzle has been the identity of the neurons and photoreceptor molecules involved [4, 5]. We tested whether light cues influence behavior in zebrafish larvae through deep brain photosensors. We found that larvae lacking eyes and pineal perform a simple light-seeking behavior triggered by loss of illumination (`dark photokinesis'). Neuroanatomical considerations prompted us to test orthopedia (otpa) deficient fish which showed a profound reduction in dark photokinesis. Using targeted genetic ablations, we narrowed the photosensitive region to neurons in the preoptic area. Neurons in this region express several photoreceptive molecules, but expression of the melanopsin opn4a is selectively lost in otpa mutants, suggesting that opn4a mediates dark photokinesis. Our findings shed light on the identity and function of deep brain photoreceptors and suggest that otpa specifies an ancient population of sensory neurons that mediate behavioral responses to light. PMID:23000151

  4. Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of uncommon tremor syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Okun, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a standard therapy for the treatment of select cases of medication refractory essential tremor and Parkinson's disease however the effectiveness and long-term outcomes of DBS in other uncommon and complex tremor syndromes has not been well established. Traditionally, the ventralis intermedius nucleus (VIM) of the thalamus has been considered the main target for medically intractable tremors; however alternative brain regions and improvements in stereotactic techniques and hardware may soon change the horizon for treatment of complex tremors. In this article, we conducted a PubMed search using different combinations between the terms 'Uncommon tremors', 'Dystonic tremor', 'Holmes tremor' 'Midbrain tremor', 'Rubral tremor', 'Cerebellar tremor', 'outflow tremor', 'Multiple Sclerosis tremor', 'Post-traumatic tremor', 'Neuropathic tremor', and 'Deep Brain Stimulation/DBS'. Additionally, we examined and summarized the current state of evolving interventions for treatment of complex tremor syndromes. Expert commentary: Recently reported interventions for rare tremors include stimulation of the posterior subthalamic area, globus pallidus internus, ventralis oralis anterior/posterior thalamic subnuclei, and the use of dual lead stimulation in one or more of these targets. Treatment should be individualized and dictated by tremor phenomenology and associated clinical features.

  5. Uncovering the underlying mechanisms and whole-brain dynamics of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Victor M; Kahan, Joshua; Foltynie, Tom; Friston, Karl; Aziz, Tipu Z; Green, Alexander L; van Hartevelt, Tim J; Cabral, Joana; Stevner, Angus B A; Fernandes, Henrique M; Mancini, Laura; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Marques, Paulo; Sousa, Nuno; Kringelbach, Morten L; Deco, Gustavo

    2017-08-29

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease is a highly effective treatment in controlling otherwise debilitating symptoms. Yet the underlying brain mechanisms are currently not well understood. Whole-brain computational modeling was used to disclose the effects of DBS during resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in ten patients with Parkinson's disease. Specifically, we explored the local and global impact that DBS has in creating asynchronous, stable or critical oscillatory conditions using a supercritical bifurcation model. We found that DBS shifts global brain dynamics of patients towards a Healthy regime. This effect was more pronounced in very specific brain areas such as the thalamus, globus pallidus and orbitofrontal regions of the right hemisphere (with the left hemisphere not analyzed given artifacts arising from the electrode lead). Global aspects of integration and synchronization were also rebalanced. Empirically, we found higher communicability and coherence brain measures during DBS-ON compared to DBS-OFF. Finally, using our model as a framework, artificial in silico DBS was applied to find potential alternative target areas for stimulation and whole-brain rebalancing. These results offer important insights into the underlying large-scale effects of DBS as well as in finding novel stimulation targets, which may offer a route to more efficacious treatments.

  6. Closing the loop of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Carron, Romain; Chaillet, Antoine; Filipchuk, Anton; Pasillas-Lépine, William; Hammond, Constance

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency deep brain stimulation is used to treat a wide range of brain disorders, like Parkinson's disease. The stimulated networks usually share common electrophysiological signatures, including hyperactivity and/or dysrhythmia. From a clinical perspective, HFS is expected to alleviate clinical signs without generating adverse effects. Here, we consider whether the classical open-loop HFS fulfills these criteria and outline current experimental or theoretical research on the different types of closed-loop DBS that could provide better clinical outcomes. In the first part of the review, the two routes followed by HFS-evoked axonal spikes are explored. In one direction, orthodromic spikes functionally de-afferent the stimulated nucleus from its downstream target networks. In the opposite direction, antidromic spikes prevent this nucleus from being influenced by its afferent networks. As a result, the pathological synchronized activity no longer propagates from the cortical networks to the stimulated nucleus. The overall result can be described as a reversible functional de-afferentation of the stimulated nucleus from its upstream and downstream nuclei. In the second part of the review, the latest advances in closed-loop DBS are considered. Some of the proposed approaches are based on mathematical models, which emphasize different aspects of the parkinsonian basal ganglia: excessive synchronization, abnormal firing-rate rhythms, and a deficient thalamo-cortical relay. The stimulation strategies are classified depending on the control-theory techniques on which they are based: adaptive and on-demand stimulation schemes, delayed and multi-site approaches, stimulations based on proportional and/or derivative control actions, optimal control strategies. Some of these strategies have been validated experimentally, but there is still a large reservoir of theoretical work that may point to ways of improving practical treatment. PMID:24391555

  7. Brain tumor segmentation with Deep Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Havaei, Mohammad; Davy, Axel; Warde-Farley, David; Biard, Antoine; Courville, Aaron; Bengio, Yoshua; Pal, Chris; Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Larochelle, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automatic brain tumor segmentation method based on Deep Neural Networks (DNNs). The proposed networks are tailored to glioblastomas (both low and high grade) pictured in MR images. By their very nature, these tumors can appear anywhere in the brain and have almost any kind of shape, size, and contrast. These reasons motivate our exploration of a machine learning solution that exploits a flexible, high capacity DNN while being extremely efficient. Here, we give a description of different model choices that we've found to be necessary for obtaining competitive performance. We explore in particular different architectures based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), i.e. DNNs specifically adapted to image data. We present a novel CNN architecture which differs from those traditionally used in computer vision. Our CNN exploits both local features as well as more global contextual features simultaneously. Also, different from most traditional uses of CNNs, our networks use a final layer that is a convolutional implementation of a fully connected layer which allows a 40 fold speed up. We also describe a 2-phase training procedure that allows us to tackle difficulties related to the imbalance of tumor labels. Finally, we explore a cascade architecture in which the output of a basic CNN is treated as an additional source of information for a subsequent CNN. Results reported on the 2013 BRATS test data-set reveal that our architecture improves over the currently published state-of-the-art while being over 30 times faster. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Deep brain stimulation for monogenic dystonia.

    PubMed

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R; Waugh, Jeff L; Stone, Scellig S

    2017-09-12

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has recently emerged as an important management option in children with medically refractory dystonia. DBS is most commonly used, best studied, and thought to be most efficacious for a select group of childhood or adolescent onset monogenic dystonias (designated with a standard 'DYT' prefix). We review how to clinically recognize these types of dystonia and the relative efficacy of DBS for key monogenic dystonias. Though used for dystonia in adults for several years, DBS has only lately been used in children. Recent evidence shows that patients with shorter duration of dystonia often experience greater benefit following DBS. This suggests that early recognition of the appropriate dystonic phenotypes and consideration of DBS in these patients may improve the management of dystonia. DBS should be considered early in patients who have medically refractory dystonia, especially for the monogenic dystonias that have a high response rate to DBS. It is important to differentiate between these monogenic dystonias and dystonias of other causes to properly prognosticate for these patients and to determine whether DBS is an appropriate management option.

  9. Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Groiss, S. J.; Wojtecki, L.; Südmeyer, M.

    2009-01-01

    During the last 15 years deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been established as a highly-effective therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Patient selection, stereotactic implantation, postoperative stimulator programming and patient care requires a multi-disciplinary team including movement disorders specialists in neurology and functional neurosurgery. To treat medically refractory levodopa-induced motor complications or resistant tremor the preferred target for high-frequency DBS is the subthalamic nucleus (STN). STN-DBS results in significant reduction of dyskinesias and dopaminergic medication, improvement of all cardinal motor symptoms with sustained long-term benefits, and significant improvement of quality of life when compared with best medical treatment. These benefits have to be weighed against potential surgery-related adverse events, device-related complications, and stimulus-induced side effects. The mean disease duration before initiating DBS in PD is currently about 13 years. It is presently investigated whether the optimal timing for implantation may be at an earlier disease-stage to prevent psychosocial decline and to maintain quality of life for a longer period of time. PMID:21180627

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation, Authenticity and Value.

    PubMed

    Nyholm, Sven; O'Neill, Elizabeth

    2017-10-01

    In this article, we engage in dialogue with Jonathan Pugh, Hannah Maslen, and Julian Savulescu about how to best interpret the potential impacts of deep brain stimulation on the self. We consider whether ordinary peoples' convictions about the true self should be interpreted in essentialist or existentialist ways. Like Pugh, Maslen, and Savulescu, we argue that it is useful to understand the notion of the true self as having both essentialist and existentialist components. We also consider two ideas from existentialist philosophy-Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir's ideas about "bad faith" and "ambiguity"-to argue that there can be value to patients in regarding themselves as having a certain amount of freedom to choose what aspects of themselves should be considered representative of their true selves. Lastly, we consider the case of an anorexia nervosa patient who shifts between conflicting mind-sets. We argue that mind-sets in which it is easier for the patient and his or her family to share values can plausibly be considered to be more representative of the patient's true self, if this promotes a well-functioning relationship between the patient and the family. However, we also argue that families are well advised to give patients room to determine what such shared values mean to them, as it can be alienating for patients if they feel that others try to impose values on them from the outside.

  11. Body weight gain and deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rieu, Isabelle; Derost, Philippe; Ulla, Miguel; Marques, Ana; Debilly, Bérangère; De Chazeron, Ingrid; Chéreau, Isabelle; Lemaire, Jean Jacques; Boirie, Yves; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Durif, Franck

    2011-11-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical technique that has now been available for some 25 years. It is used in the treatment of various motor disorders, e.g. Parkinson's disease (PD), essential tremor and dystonia, and neuropsychiatric illnesses, e.g. obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome. The surgical targets of DBS include the thalamic ventralis intermedius nucleus (Vim), the globus pallidus internus (GPi) and more recently the subthalamic nucleus (STN), currently considered as the reference target in the treatment of PD. In the last ten years, most studies in PD patients have described a rapid and marked weight gain in the months following DBS of the STN. This weight gain sometimes induces obesity and can have metabolic repercussions. The physiopathological mechanisms responsible for the weight gain are multifactorial (changes in energy metabolism and eating behaviour, reduction of motor complications, etc.). This review reports current knowledge concerning weight changes in patients treated by DBS with different surgical targets. It also describes the mechanisms responsible for weight gain and the health outcome for the patients.

  12. Deep brain stimulation: how does it work?

    PubMed

    Agnesi, Filippo; Johnson, Matthew D; Vitek, Jerrold L

    2013-01-01

    Chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a widely accepted surgical treatment for medication-refractory movement disorders and is under evaluation for a variety of neurological disorders. In order to create opportunities to improve treatment efficacy, streamline parameter selection, and foster new potential applications, it is important to have a clear and comprehensive understanding of how DBS works. Although early hypothesis proposed that high-frequency electrical stimulation inhibited neuronal activity proximal to the active electrode, recent studies have suggested that the output of the stimulated nuclei is paradoxically activated by DBS. Such regular, time-locked output is thought to override the transmission of pathological bursting and oscillatory activity through the stimulated nuclei, as well as inducing synaptic plasticity and network reorganization. This chapter reviews electrophysiological experiments, biochemical analyses, computer modeling and imaging studies positing that, although general principles exist, the therapeutic mechanism(s) of action depend both on the site of stimulation and on the disorder being treated. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Stochastic Phase Resetting: a Theory for Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, Peter A.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic approach to phase resetting in clusters of interacting oscillators is presented. This theory explains how a stimulus, especially a single pulse, induces synchronization and desynchronization processes. The theory is used to design a new technique for deep brain stimulation in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease or essential tremor that do no longer respond to drug therapy. This stimulation mode is a feedback controlled single pulse stimulation. The feedback signal is registered with the deep brain electrode, and the desynchronizing pulses are administered via the same electrode. The stochastic phase resetting theory is used as a starting point of a model based design of intelligent and gentle deep brain stimulation techniques.

  14. Weight Gain following Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation: A PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Sauleau, Paul; Drapier, Sophie; Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Dominique; Jannin, Pierre; Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Vérin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery seem to be multifactorial and suspected depending on the target, either the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Decreased energy expenditure following motor improvement and behavioral and/or metabolic changes are possible explanations. Focusing on GPi target, our objective was to analyze correlations between changes in brain metabolism (measured with PET) and weight gain following GPi-DBS in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose PET four months before and four months after the start of GPi-DBS in 19 PD patients. Dopaminergic medication was included in the analysis to control for its possible influence on brain metabolism. Body mass index increased significantly by 0.66 ± 1.3 kg/m2 (p = 0.040). There were correlations between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in premotor areas, including the left and right superior gyri (Brodmann area, BA 6), left superior gyrus (BA 8), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right middle gyrus, BAs 9 and 46), and the left and right somatosensory association cortices (BA 7). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in limbic and associative areas. Additionally, there was a trend toward a correlation between reduced dyskinesia and weight gain (r = 0.428, p = 0.067). These findings suggest that, unlike STN-DBS, motor improvement is the major contributing factor for weight gain following GPi-DBS PD, confirming the motor selectivity of this target. PMID:27070317

  15. Weight Gain following Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation: A PET Study.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Drapier, Sophie; Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Dominique; Jannin, Pierre; Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Vérin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery seem to be multifactorial and suspected depending on the target, either the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Decreased energy expenditure following motor improvement and behavioral and/or metabolic changes are possible explanations. Focusing on GPi target, our objective was to analyze correlations between changes in brain metabolism (measured with PET) and weight gain following GPi-DBS in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose PET four months before and four months after the start of GPi-DBS in 19 PD patients. Dopaminergic medication was included in the analysis to control for its possible influence on brain metabolism. Body mass index increased significantly by 0.66 ± 1.3 kg/m2 (p = 0.040). There were correlations between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in premotor areas, including the left and right superior gyri (Brodmann area, BA 6), left superior gyrus (BA 8), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right middle gyrus, BAs 9 and 46), and the left and right somatosensory association cortices (BA 7). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in limbic and associative areas. Additionally, there was a trend toward a correlation between reduced dyskinesia and weight gain (r = 0.428, p = 0.067). These findings suggest that, unlike STN-DBS, motor improvement is the major contributing factor for weight gain following GPi-DBS PD, confirming the motor selectivity of this target.

  16. MR Anatomy of Deep Brain Nuclei with Special Reference to Specific Diseases and Deep Brain Stimulation Localization

    PubMed Central

    Telford, Ryan; Vattoth, Surjith

    2014-01-01

    Summary Diseases affecting the basal ganglia and deep brain structures vary widely in etiology and include metabolic, infectious, ischemic, and neurodegenerative conditions. Some neurologic diseases, such as Wernicke encephalopathy or pseudohypoparathyroidism, require specific treatments, which if unrecognized could lead to further complications. Other pathologies, such as hypertrophic olivary degeneration, if not properly diagnosed may be mistaken for a primary medullary neoplasm and create unnecessary concern. The deep brain structures are complex and can be difficult to distinguish on routine imaging. It is imperative that radiologists first understand the intrinsic anatomic relationships between the different basal ganglia nuclei and deep brain structures with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. It is important to understand the "normal" MR signal characteristics, locations, and appearances of these structures. This is essential to recognizing diseases affecting the basal ganglia and deep brain structures, especially since most of these diseases result in symmetrical, and therefore less noticeable, abnormalities. It is also crucial that neurosurgeons correctly identify the deep brain nuclei presurgically for positioning deep brain stimulator leads, the most important being the subthalamic nucleus for Parkinson syndromes and the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus for essential tremor. Radiologists will be able to better assist clinicians in diagnosis and treatment once they are able to accurately localize specific deep brain structures. PMID:24571832

  17. Computational analysis of transcranial magnetic stimulation in the presence of deep brain stimulation probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syeda, F.; Holloway, K.; El-Gendy, A. A.; Hadimani, R. L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation is an emerging non-invasive treatment for depression, Parkinson's disease, and a variety of other neurological disorders. Many Parkinson's patients receive the treatment known as Deep Brain Stimulation, but often require additional therapy for speech and swallowing impairment. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation has been explored as a possible treatment by stimulating the mouth motor area of the brain. We have calculated induced electric field, magnetic field, and temperature distributions in the brain using finite element analysis and anatomically realistic heterogeneous head models fitted with Deep Brain Stimulation leads. A Figure of 8 coil, current of 5000 A, and frequency of 2.5 kHz are used as simulation parameters. Results suggest that Deep Brain Stimulation leads cause surrounding tissues to experience slightly increased E-field (Δ Emax =30 V/m), but not exceeding the nominal values induced in brain tissue by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation without leads (215 V/m). The maximum temperature in the brain tissues surrounding leads did not change significantly from the normal human body temperature of 37 °C. Therefore, we ascertain that Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the mouth motor area may stimulate brain tissue surrounding Deep Brain Stimulation leads, but will not cause tissue damage.

  18. Anesthetic Challenges for Deep Brain Stimulation: A Systematic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Rajkalyan; Ghazanwy, Mahmood; Tewari, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Ablative intracranial surgery for Parkinson's disease has advanced to embedding electrodes into precise areas of the basal ganglia. Electrode implantation surgery, referred to as deep brain stimulation (DBS), is preferred in view of its reversibility, adjustability, and capability to be safely performed bilaterally. DBS is been increasingly used for other movement disorders, intractable tremors epilepsy, and sometimes chronic pain. Anesthesiologists need to amalgamate the knowledge of neuroanatomical structures and surgical techniques involved in placement of microelectrodes in defined cerebral target areas. Perioperative verbal communication with the patient during the procedure is quintessential and may attenuate the need for pharmacological agents. This review will endeavor to assimilate the present knowledge regarding the patient selection, available/practiced anesthesia regimens, and perioperative complications after our thorough search for literature published between 1991 and 2013. PMID:25210668

  19. "Asleep" deep brain stimulation for essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsinsue; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Chapple, Kristina; Lambert, Margaret; Dhall, Rohit; Ponce, Francisco A

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Deep brain stimulation (DBS) performed under general anesthesia ("asleep" DBS) has not been previously reported for essential tremor. This is in part due to the inability to visualize the target (the ventral intermediate nucleus [VIM]) on MRI. The authors evaluate the efficacy of this asleep technique in treating essential tremor by indirect VIM targeting. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed consecutive cases of initial DBS for essential tremor performed by a single surgeon. DBS was performed with patients awake (n = 40, intraoperative test stimulation without microelectrode recording) or asleep (n = 17, under general anesthesia). Targeting proceeded with standardized anatomical coordinates on preoperative MRI. Intraoperative CT was used for stereotactic registration and lead position confirmation. Functional outcomes were evaluated with pre- and postoperative Bain and Findley Tremor Activities of Daily Living scores. RESULTS A total of 29 leads were placed in asleep patients, and 60 were placed in awake patients. Bain and Findley Tremor Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire scores were not significantly different preoperatively for awake versus asleep cohorts (p = 0.2). The percentage of postoperative improvement was not significantly different between asleep (48.6%) and awake (45.5%) cohorts (p = 0.35). Euclidean error (mm) was higher for awake versus asleep patients (1.7 ± 0.8 vs 1.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.01), and radial error (mm) trended higherfor awake versus asleep patients (1.3 ± 0.8 vs 0.9 ± 0.5, p = 0.06). There were no perioperative complications. CONCLUSIONS In the authors' initial experience, asleep VIM DBS for essential tremor without intraoperative test stimulation can be performed safely and effectively.

  20. Historical developments in children's deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cif, Laura; Coubes, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous by the underlying pathobiology and clinical presentation, childhood onset dystonia is most frequently progressive, with related disability and limitations in functions of daily living. Consequently, there is an obvious need for efficient symptomatic therapies. Following lesional surgery to basal ganglia (BG) and thalamus, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a more conservative and adjustable intervention to and validated for internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi), highly efficient in treating isolated "primary" dystonia and associated symptoms such as subcortical myoclonus. The role of DBS in acquired, neurometabolic and degenerative disorders with dystonia deserves further exploration to confirm as an efficient and lasting therapy. However, the pathobiological background with distribution of the sequellae over the central nervous system and related clinical features, will limit DBS efficacy in these conditions. Cumulative arguments propose DBS in severe life threatening dystonic conditions called status dystonicus as first line therapy, irrespective of the underlying cause. There are no currently available validated selection criteria for DBS in pediatric dystonia. Concurrent targets such as subthalamic nucleus (STN) and several motor nuclei of the thalamus are under exploration and only little information is available in children. DBS programming in paediatric population was adopted from experience in adults. The choice of neuromodulatory DBS parameters could influence not only the initial therapeutic outcome of dystonic symptoms but also its maintenance over time and potentially the occurrence of DBS related side effects. DBS allows efficient symptomatic treatment of severe dystonia in children and advances pathophysiological knowledge about local and distributed abnormal neural activity over the motor cortical-subcortical networks in dystonia and other movement disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  1. Deep brain and cortical stimulation for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sprengers, Mathieu; Vonck, Kristl; Carrette, Evelien; Marson, Anthony G; Boon, Paul

    2014-06-17

    Despite optimal medical treatment, including epilepsy surgery, many epilepsy patients have uncontrolled seizures. In the last decades, interest has grown in invasive intracranial neurostimulation as a treatment for these patients. Intracranial stimulation includes both deep brain stimulation (DBS) (stimulation through depth electrodes) and cortical stimulation (subdural electrodes). To assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of deep brain and cortical stimulation for refractory epilepsy based on randomized controlled trials. We searched PubMed (6 August 2013), the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (31 August 2013), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 7 of 12) and reference lists of retrieved articles. We also contacted device manufacturers and other researchers in the field. No language restrictions were imposed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing deep brain or cortical stimulation to sham stimulation, resective surgery or further treatment with antiepileptic drugs. Four review authors independently selected trials for inclusion. Two review authors independently extracted the relevant data and assessed trial quality and overall quality of evidence. The outcomes investigated were seizure freedom, responder rate, percentage seizure frequency reduction, adverse events, neuropsychological outcome and quality of life. If additional data were needed, the study investigators were contacted. Results were analysed and reported separately for different intracranial targets for reasons of clinical heterogeneity. Ten RCTs comparing one to three months of intracranial neurostimulation to sham stimulation were identified. One trial was on anterior thalamic DBS (n = 109; 109 treatment periods); two trials on centromedian thalamic DBS (n = 20; 40 treatment periods), but only one of the trials (n = 7; 14 treatment periods) reported sufficient information for inclusion in the quantitative meta

  2. Deep Brain Stimulation and the Search for Identity.

    PubMed

    Witt, Karsten; Kuhn, Jens; Timmermann, Lars; Zurowski, Mateusz; Woopen, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Ethical evaluation of deep brain stimulation as a treatment for Parkinson's disease is complicated by results that can be described as involving changes in the patient's identity. The risk of becoming another person following surgery is alarming for patients, caregivers and clinicians alike. It is one of the most urgent conceptual and ethical problems facing deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease at this time. In our paper we take issue with this problem on two accounts. First, we elucidate what is meant by "becoming another person" from a conceptual point of view. After critically discussing two broad approaches we concentrate on the notion of "individual identity" which centers on the idea of "core attitudes". Subsequently we discuss several approaches to determine what distinguishes core attitudes from those that are more peripheral. We argue for a "foundational-function model" highlighting the importance of specific dependency relations between these attitudes. Our second aim is to comment on the possibility to empirically measure changes in individual identity and argue that many of the instruments now commonly used in selecting and monitoring DBS-patients are inappropriate for this purpose. Future research in this area is advised combining a conceptual and an empirical approach as a basis of sound ethical appraisal.

  3. Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation vs Best Medical Therapy for Patients With Advanced Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Frances M.; Follett, Kenneth; Stern, Matthew; Hur, Kwan; Harris, Crystal; Marks, William J.; Rothlind, Johannes; Sagher, Oren; Reda, Domenic; Moy, Claudia S.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Burchiel, Kim; Hogarth, Penelope; Lai, Eugene C.; Duda, John E.; Holloway, Kathryn; Samii, Ali; Horn, Stacy; Bronstein, Jeff; Stoner, Gatana; Heemskerk, Jill; Huang, Grant D.

    2010-01-01

    quality-of-life scores (P<.001). Neurocognitive testing revealed small decrements in some areas of information processing for patients receiving deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy. At least 1 serious adverse event occurred in 49 deep brain stimulation patients and 15 best medical therapy patients (P<.001), including 39 adverse events related to the surgical procedure and 1 death secondary to cerebral hemorrhage. Conclusion In this randomized controlled trial of patients with advanced PD, deep brain stimulation was more effective than best medical therapy in improving on time without troubling dyskinesias, motor function, and quality of life at 6 months, but was associated with an increased risk of serious adverse events. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00056563 PMID:19126811

  4. Deep brain and cortical stimulation for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sprengers, Mathieu; Vonck, Kristl; Carrette, Evelien; Marson, Anthony G; Boon, Paul

    2017-07-18

    Despite optimal medical treatment, including epilepsy surgery, many epilepsy patients have uncontrolled seizures. Since the 1970s interest has grown in invasive intracranial neurostimulation as a treatment for these patients. Intracranial stimulation includes both deep brain stimulation (DBS) (stimulation through depth electrodes) and cortical stimulation (subdural electrodes). This is an updated version of a previous Cochrane review published in 2014. To assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of DBS and cortical stimulation for refractory epilepsy based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register on 29 September 2015, but it was not necessary to update this search, because records in the Specialized Register are included in CENTRAL. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 11, 5 November 2016), PubMed (5 November 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov (5 November 2016), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (5 November 2016) and reference lists of retrieved articles. We also contacted device manufacturers and other researchers in the field. No language restrictions were imposed. RCTs comparing deep brain or cortical stimulation versus sham stimulation, resective surgery, further treatment with antiepileptic drugs or other neurostimulation treatments (including vagus nerve stimulation). Four review authors independently selected trials for inclusion. Two review authors independently extracted the relevant data and assessed trial quality and overall quality of evidence. The outcomes investigated were seizure freedom, responder rate, percentage seizure frequency reduction, adverse events, neuropsychological outcome and quality of life. If additional data were needed, the study investigators were contacted. Results were analysed and reported separately for different intracranial targets for reasons of clinical heterogeneity

  5. Deep brain stimulation modulates effects of motivation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Eusebio, Alexandre; Vandenberghe, Wim; Nuttin, Bart; Brown, Peter

    2009-04-22

    It is unclear how motivation leads to improved motor performance. Here we test the hypothesis that motivation interacts with behavioural performance in the basal ganglia. We recorded trial-to-trial performance in a bimanual motor task in 10 patients with Parkinson's disease with electrodes chronically implanted in the subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation. Motivation-associated improvements in trial-to-trial performance were contrasted with and without stimulation at high frequency. Motivation and stimulation improved trial-to-trial performance, but the effect of motivation was halved during stimulation. We conclude that the subthalamic area is mechanistically important in those processes linking motivation to improvement in motor performance. This finding may be relevant to some of the cognitive and emotional changes associated with bilateral subthalamic stimulation.

  6. State of the Art: Novel Applications for Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Holly A; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2017-05-17

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a rapidly developing field of neurosurgery with potential therapeutic applications that are relevant to conditions traditionally viewed as beyond the limits of neurosurgery. Our objective, in this review, is to highlight some of the emerging applications of DBS within three distinct but overlapping spheres, namely trauma, neuropsychiatry, and autonomic physiology. An extensive literature review was carried out in MEDLINE, to identify relevant studies and review articles describing applications of DBS in the areas of trauma, neuropsychiatry and autonomic neuroscience. A wide range of applications of DBS in these spheres was identified, some having only been tested in one or two cases, others much better studied. We have identified various avenues for DBS to be applied for patient benefit in cases relevant to trauma, neuropsychiatry and autonomic neuroscience. Further developments in DBS technology and clinical trial design will enable these novel applications to be effectively and rigorously assessed and utilized most effectively. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  7. Is deep brain stimulation a form of psychosurgery?

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Perminder

    2007-04-01

    To examine the potential for the experimental treatment of deep brain stimulation for neuropsychiatric disorders, and to debate the argument that it should be considered another form of psychosurgery. Psychosurgery is an old term with considerable pejorative connotations. It should be replaced with the more descriptive and accurate 'neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders'. Moreover, neurosurgery should reflect ablative neurosurgery, and surgery for brain stimulation should be categorised as brain stimulation rather than neurosurgery, or indeed psychosurgery. This will prevent legislative restrictions on the development of brain stimulation techniques and not tar them with the lobotomy brush.

  8. Deep brain stimulation for movement and other neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    DeLong, Mahlon; Wichmann, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was introduced as a treatment for patients with parkinsonism and other movement disorders in the early 1990s. The technique rapidly became the treatment of choice for these conditions, and is now also being explored for other diseases, including Tourette syndrome, gait disorders, epilepsy, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and depression. Although the mechanism of action of DBS remains unclear, it is recognized that DBS works through focal modulation of functionally specific circuits. The fact that the same DBS parameters and targets can be used in multiple diseases suggests that DBS does not counteract the pathophysiology of any specific disorder, but acts to replace pathologic activities in disease-affected brain circuits with activity that is more easily tolerated. Despite the progress made in the use of DBS, much remains to be done to fully realize the potential of this therapy. We describe some of the most active areas of research in this field, both in terms of exploration of new targets and stimulation parameters, and in terms of new electrode or stimulator designs.

  9. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir; Brown, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, but its influence on synchronous activity in cortico-basal-ganglia loops remains to be fully characterized. Here, we demonstrate that deep brain stimulation selectively suppresses certain spatially and spectrally segregated resting state subthalamic nucleus-cortical networks. To this end we used a validated and novel approach for performing simultaneous recordings of the subthalamic nucleus and cortex using magnetoencephalography (during concurrent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation). Our results highlight that clinically effective subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation suppresses synchrony locally within the subthalamic nucleus in the low beta oscillatory range and furthermore that the degree of this suppression correlates with clinical motor improvement. Moreover, deep brain stimulation relatively selectively suppressed synchronization of activity between the subthalamic nucleus and mesial premotor regions, including the supplementary motor areas. These mesial premotor regions were predominantly coupled to the subthalamic nucleus in the high beta frequency range, but the degree of deep brain stimulation-associated suppression in their coupling to the subthalamic nucleus was not found to correlate with motor improvement. Beta band coupling between the subthalamic nucleus and lateral motor areas was not influenced by deep brain stimulation. Motor cortical coupling with subthalamic nucleus predominantly involved driving of the subthalamic nucleus, with those drives in the higher beta frequency band having much shorter net delays to subthalamic nucleus than those in the lower beta band. These observations raise the

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation for Essential Vocal Tremor: A Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Ho, Allen L; Choudhri, Omar; Sung, C Kwang; DiRenzo, Elizabeth E; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-03-01

    Essential vocal tremor (EVT) is the presence of a tremulous voice that is commonly associated with essential tremor. Patients with EVT often report a necessary increase in vocal effort that significantly worsens with stress and anxiety and can significantly impact quality of life despite optimal medical and behavioral treatment options. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as an effective therapy for vocal tremor, but very few studies exist in the literature that comprehensively evaluate the efficacy of DBS for specifically addressing EVT. We present a technical report on our multidisciplinary, comprehensive operative methodology for treatment of EVT with frameless, awake deep brain stimulation (DBS).

  11. Deep Brain Stimulation for Essential Vocal Tremor: A Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Choudhri, Omar; Sung, C. Kwang; DiRenzo, Elizabeth E; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-01-01

    Essential vocal tremor (EVT) is the presence of a tremulous voice that is commonly associated with essential tremor. Patients with EVT often report a necessary increase in vocal effort that significantly worsens with stress and anxiety and can significantly impact quality of life despite optimal medical and behavioral treatment options. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as an effective therapy for vocal tremor, but very few studies exist in the literature that comprehensively evaluate the efficacy of DBS for specifically addressing EVT. We present a technical report on our multidisciplinary, comprehensive operative methodology for treatment of EVT with frameless, awake deep brain stimulation (DBS). PMID:26180680

  12. Stochastic Phase Resetting: A Theory for Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, P. A.

    The basic principles of a stochastic approach to phase resetting in populations of interacting phase oscillators are presented in this article. This theory explains how synchronization and desynchronization processes are caused by a pulsatile stimulus. It is a central goal of this approach to establish a theoretical basis for the design of efficient and intelligent new deep brain stimulation techniques. Accordingly, the theory is used to design a new deep brain stimulation technique with feedback control in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease or essential tremor.

  13. Deep brain stimulation for treatment of cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Krauss, J K

    2007-01-01

    Pallidal deep brain stimulation is an efficient treatment option in those patients with cervical dystonia who do not benefit from conservative treatment including local botulinum toxin injections. Given the fact that other surgical treatment options such as selective peripheral denervation are available, it may be considered third-line treatment in most instances. Chronic bilateral pallidal stimulation improves dystonic posture and movements, pain caused by dystonia and disability related to dystonia. Preliminary data on longterm follow-up confirm its beneficial effect in the majority of patients. Given the frequency of cervical dystonia, pallidal deep brain stimulation will play a major role in the future.

  14. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology - Deep brain stimulation (DBS).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; D'Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    This review describes the wake/sleep symptoms present in Parkinson׳s disease, and the role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in these symptoms. The physiology of PPN cells is important not only because it is a major element of the reticular activating system, but also because it is a novel target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of gait and postural deficits in Parkinson׳s disease. A greater understanding of the physiology of the target nuclei within the brainstem and basal ganglia, amassed over the past decades, has enabled increasingly better patient outcomes from deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

  15. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology – Deep brain stimulation (DBS)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; D’Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the wake/sleep symptoms present in Parkinson׳s disease, and the role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in these symptoms. The physiology of PPN cells is important not only because it is a major element of the reticular activating system, but also because it is a novel target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of gait and postural deficits in Parkinson׳s disease. A greater understanding of the physiology of the target nuclei within the brainstem and basal ganglia, amassed over the past decades, has enabled increasingly better patient outcomes from deep brain stimulation for movement disorders. PMID:26779322

  16. Uncovering the mechanism(s) of deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Li; Chao, Yu; Ling, Lin; C-Y Lu, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Deep brain stimulators, often called `pacemakers for the brain', are implantable devices which continuously deliver impulse stimulation to specific targeted nuclei of deep brain structure, namely deep brain stimulation (DBS). To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most effective clinical technique for the treatment of several medically refractory movement disorders (e.g., Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia). In addition, new clinical applications of DBS for other neurologic and psychiatric disorders (e.g., epilepsy and obsessive-compulsive disorder) have been put forward. Although DBS has been effective in the treatment of movement disorders and is rapidly being explored for the treatment of other neurologic disorders, the scientific understanding of its mechanisms of action remains unclear and continues to be debated in the scientific community. Optimization of DBS technology for present and future therapeutic applications will depend on identification of the therapeutic mechanism(s) of action. The goal of this review is to address our present knowledge of the effects of high-frequency stimulation within the central nervous system and comment on the functional implications of this knowledge for uncovering the mechanism(s) of DBS.

  17. Deep brain stimulation: a new treatment in mood and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Velasques, Bruna; Diniz, Claudia; Teixeira, Silmar; Cartier, Consuelo; Peressutti, Caroline; Silva, Farmy; de Carvalho, Marcele; Novaes, Aline; Bittencourt, Juliana; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Cheniaux, Elie; Basile, Luis; Cagy, Mauricio; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    This article considered already existing studies about Deep Brain Stimulation in Mood and Anxiety Disorders. In particular, articles regarding Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression were mostly analyzed, due to the lack of researches about other types of Mood and Anxiety Disorders. We have concentrated on the target areas where Deep Brain Stimulation was most commonly applied, and on the effects this measure had on treatment-refractory patients. The obtained results showed that the stimulation of the: nucleus accumbens, subgenual cingulate cortex and ventral capsule/ventral striatum, has a positive influence on the development of the disorders investigated, sometimes showing the complete remission of the symptoms. Although Deep Brain Stimulation was overall found to be a promising and safe treatment for Mood and Anxiety Disorders, there are not enough studies proving its efficacy in wide samples and in the presence of more complex variables.

  18. Brain tumor classification of microscopy images using deep residual learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Yota; Washiya, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kota; Nagahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The crisis rate of brain tumor is about one point four in ten thousands. In general, cytotechnologists take charge of cytologic diagnosis. However, the number of cytotechnologists who can diagnose brain tumors is not sufficient, because of the necessity of highly specialized skill. Computer-Aided Diagnosis by computational image analysis may dissolve the shortage of experts and support objective pathological examinations. Our purpose is to support a diagnosis from a microscopy image of brain cortex and to identify brain tumor by medical image processing. In this study, we analyze Astrocytes that is a type of glia cell of central nerve system. It is not easy for an expert to discriminate brain tumor correctly since the difference between astrocytes and low grade astrocytoma (tumors formed from Astrocyte) is very slight. In this study, we present a novel method to segment cell regions robustly using BING objectness estimation and to classify brain tumors using deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) constructed by deep residual learning. BING is a fast object detection method and we use pretrained BING model to detect brain cells. After that, we apply a sequence of post-processing like Voronoi diagram, binarization, watershed transform to obtain fine segmentation. For classification using CNNs, a usual way of data argumentation is applied to brain cells database. Experimental results showed 98.5% accuracy of classification and 98.2% accuracy of segmentation.

  19. Intracerebral abscess: a rare complication of Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Eva; Rosas, Maria José; Abreu, Pedro; Linhares, Paulo; Vaz, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic option for some forms of Parkinson's disease (PD). The main adverse effects of this surgery are: infection (2-9%), haemorrhage (1-4%) and seizures (1-3%). We report a rare complication of DBS: an intracranial abscess. A 59-year-old male who had suffered PD for 19 years was submitted to bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS in September 2003, when he was 52. One month later, he developed an inflammatory reaction of the skin and subcutaneous tissue surrounding the area of the subcutaneous DBS system. No infectious agent was isolated. In the following 12 months he required 5 major surgeries due to a process of systematic inflammation/infection throughout different locations of the DBS system. A few days after removal of the DBS device, he developed a right oculomotor nerve paresis and mild left hemiparesis. A CT scan revealed an abscess in the right thalamo-mesencephalic area. Both the new neurological deficits and the previous tremor and rigidity improved after surgical drainage and medical treatment. This case report illustrates a rare complication of DBS surgery. Nevertheless, Parkinsonism improved, probably because the abscess acted like a subthalomotomy. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Optogenetic Tools for Confined Stimulation in Deep Brain Structures.

    PubMed

    Castonguay, Alexandre; Thomas, Sébastien; Lesage, Frédéric; Casanova, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics has emerged in the past decade as a technique to modulate brain activity with cell-type specificity and with high temporal resolution. Among the challenges associated with this technique is the difficulty to target a spatially restricted neuron population. Indeed, light absorption and scattering in biological tissues make it difficult to illuminate a minute volume, especially in the deep brain, without the use of optical fibers to guide light. This work describes the design and the in vivo application of a side-firing optical fiber adequate for delivering light to specific regions within a brain subcortical structure.

  1. Deep brain stimulator infection by a novel rapid growing mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Donna C; Harrington, Amanda T; Slavin, Konstantin; Gomez, Christy; Jarrett, Olamide D

    2017-09-20

    Devise-related infections after deep brain stimulator implantation are not uncommon. However, infections due to mycobacteria have not been reported in the medical literature. We describe the first reported case of DBS infection due to a novel rapidly growing mycobacteria, most closely resembling Mycobacterium goodii, by rpoB gene sequencing.

  2. Neuroethics of deep brain stimulation for mental disorders: brain stimulation reward in humans.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hideki; Katayama, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical basis of some deep brain stimulation (DBS) trials undertaken in the early years was the phenomenon of "brain stimulation reward (BSR)," which was first identified in rats. The animals appeared to be rewarded by pleasure caused by the stimulation of certain brain regions (reward system), such as the septal area. "Self-stimulation" experiments, in which rats were allowed to stimulate their own brain by pressing a freely accessible lever, they quickly learned lever pressing and sometimes continued to stimulate until they exhausted themselves. BSR was also observed with DBS of the septal area in humans. DBS trials in later years were undertaken on other theoretical bases, but unexpected BSR was sometimes induced by stimulation of some areas, such as the locus coeruleus complex. When BSR was induced, the subjects experienced feelings that were described as "cheerful," "alert," "good," "well-being," "comfort," "relaxation," "joy," or "satisfaction." Since the DBS procedure is equivalent to a "self-stimulation" experiment, they could become "addicted to the stimulation itself" or "compulsive about the stimulation," and stimulate themselves "for the entire day," "at maximum amplitude" and, in some instances, "into convulsions." DBS of the reward system has recently been applied to alleviate anhedonia in patients with refractory major depression. Although this approach appears promising, there remains a difficult problem: who can adjust their feelings and reward-oriented behavior within the normal range? With a self-stimulation procedure, the BSR may become uncontrollable. To develop DBS to the level of a standard therapy for mental disorders, we need to discuss "Who has the right to control the mental condition?" and "Who makes decisions" on "How much control is appropriate?" in daily life.

  3. Laser treatments of deep-seated brain lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Helen A.

    1997-06-01

    The five year survival rate of deep-seated malignant brain tumors after surgery/radiotherapy is virtually 100 percent mortality. Special problems include: (1) Lesions often present late. (2) Position: lesion overlies vital structures, so complete surgical/radiotherapy lesion destruction can damage vital brain-stem functions. (3) Difficulty in differentiating normal brain form malignant lesions. This study aimed to use the unique properties of the laser: (a) to minimize damage during surgical removal of deep-seated brain lesions by operating via fine optic fibers; and (b) to employ the propensity of certain lasers for absorption of dyes and absorption and induction of fluorescence in some brain substances, to differentiate borders of malignant and normal brain, for more complete tumor removal. In the method a fine laser endoscopic technique was devised for removal of brain lesions. The results of this technique, were found to minimize and accurately predict the extent of thermal damage and shock waves to within 1-2mm of the surgical laser beam. Thereby it eliminated the 'popcorn' effect.

  4. Neurosurgery of the future: Deep brain stimulations and manipulations.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Stylianos

    2017-04-01

    Important advances are afoot in the field of neurosurgery-particularly in the realms of deep brain stimulation (DBS), deep brain manipulation (DBM), and the newly introduced refinement "closed-loop" deep brain stimulation (CLDBS). Use of closed-loop technology will make both DBS and DBM more precise as procedures and will broaden their indications. CLDBS utilizes as feedback a variety of sources of electrophysiological and neurochemical afferent information about the function of the brain structures to be treated or studied. The efferent actions will be either electric, i.e. the classic excitatory or inhibitory ones, or micro-injection of such things as neural proteins and transmitters, neural grafts, implants of pluripotent stem cells or mesenchymal stem cells, and some variants of gene therapy. The pathologies to be treated, beside Parkinson's disease and movement disorders, include repair of neural tissues, neurodegenerative pathologies, psychiatric and behavioral dysfunctions, i.e. schizophrenia in its various guises, bipolar disorders, obesity, anorexia, drug addiction, and alcoholism. The possibility of using these new modalities to treat a number of cognitive dysfunctions is also under consideration. Because the DBS-CLDBS technology brings about a cross-fertilization between scientific investigation and surgical practice, it will also contribute to an enhanced understanding of brain function.

  5. Deep brain stimulation during early adolescence prevents microglial alterations in a model of maternal immune activation.

    PubMed

    Hadar, Ravit; Dong, Le; Del-Valle-Anton, Lucia; Guneykaya, Dilansu; Voget, Mareike; Edemann-Callesen, Henriette; Schweibold, Regina; Djodari-Irani, Anais; Goetz, Thomas; Ewing, Samuel; Kettenmann, Helmut; Wolf, Susanne A; Winter, Christine

    2016-12-07

    In recent years schizophrenia has been recognized as a neurodevelopmental disorder likely involving a perinatal insult progressively affecting brain development. The poly I:C maternal immune activation (MIA) rodent model is considered as a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. Using this model we and others demonstrated the association between neuroinflammation in the form of altered microglia and a schizophrenia-like endophenotype. Therapeutic intervention using the anti-inflammatory drug minocycline affected altered microglia activation and was successful in the adult offspring. However, less is known about the effect of preventive therapeutic strategies on microglia properties. Previously we found that deep brain stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex applied pre-symptomatically to adolescence MIA rats prevented the manifestation of behavioral and structural deficits in adult rats. We here studied the effects of deep brain stimulation during adolescence on microglia properties in adulthood. We found that in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens, but not in the medial prefrontal cortex, microglial density and soma size were increased in MIA rats. Pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA was unchanged in all brain areas before and after implantation and stimulation. Stimulation of either the medial prefrontal cortex or the nucleus accumbens normalized microglia density and soma size in main projection areas including the hippocampus and in the area around the electrode implantation. We conclude that in parallel to an alleviation of the symptoms in the rat MIA model, deep brain stimulation has the potential to prevent the neuroinflammatory component in this disease.

  6. Pre-operative DTI and probabilisitic tractography in four patients with deep brain stimulation for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Owen, S L F; Heath, J; Kringelbach, M; Green, A L; Pereira, E A C; Jenkinson, N; Jegan, T; Stein, J F; Aziz, T Z

    2008-07-01

    This study aimed to examine, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), differences in electrode placement in four patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain of varying aetiology. A pre-operative DTI was obtained for each patient, who was then implanted with deep brain stimulation electrodes in the periventricular/periaqueductal grey area with good pain relief. Using seeds from the postoperative MRI scan, probabilistic tractography was performed from the pre-operative DTI.

  7. A history of deep brain stimulation: Technological innovation and the role of clinical assessment tools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation involves using a pacemaker-like device to deliver constant electrical stimulation to problematic areas within the brain. It has been used to treat over 40,000 people with Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor worldwide and is currently undergoing clinical trials as a treatment for depression and obsessive–compulsive disorder. This article will provide an historical account of deep brain stimulation in order to illustrate the plurality of interests involved in the development and stabilization of deep brain stimulation technology. Using Latour’s notion of immutable mobiles, this article will illustrate the importance of clinical assessment tools in shaping technological development in the era of medical device regulation. Given that such tools can serve commercial and professional interests, this article suggests that it is necessary to scrutinise their application in research contexts to ensure that they capture clinical changes that are meaningful for patients and their families. This is particularly important in relation to potentially ethically problematic therapies such as deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders.

  8. Advances in closed-loop deep brain stimulation devices.

    PubMed

    Parastarfeizabadi, Mahboubeh; Kouzani, Abbas Z

    2017-08-11

    Millions of patients around the world are affected by neurological and psychiatric disorders. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a device-based therapy that could have fewer side-effects and higher efficiencies in drug-resistant patients compared to other therapeutic options such as pharmacological approaches. Thus far, several efforts have been made to incorporate a feedback loop into DBS devices to make them operate in a closed-loop manner. This paper presents a comprehensive investigation into the existing research-based and commercial closed-loop DBS devices. It describes a brief history of closed-loop DBS techniques, biomarkers and algorithms used for closing the feedback loop, components of the current research-based and commercial closed-loop DBS devices, and advancements and challenges in this field of research. This review also includes a comparison of the closed-loop DBS devices and provides the future directions of this area of research. Although we are in the early stages of the closed-loop DBS approach, there have been fruitful efforts in design and development of closed-loop DBS devices. To date, only one commercial closed-loop DBS device has been manufactured. However, this system does not have an intelligent and patient dependent control algorithm. A closed-loop DBS device requires a control algorithm to learn and optimize the stimulation parameters according to the brain clinical state. The promising clinical effects of open-loop DBS have been demonstrated, indicating DBS as a pioneer technology and treatment option to serve neurological patients. However, like other commercial devices, DBS needs to be automated and modernized.

  9. Customizing deep brain stimulation to the patient using computational models.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Cameron C; Frankenmolle, Anneke M; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M; Alberts, Jay L

    2009-01-01

    Bilateral subthalamic (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective in improving the cardinal motor signs of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD); however declines in cognitive function have been associated with this procedure. The aim of this study was to assess cognitive-motor performance of 10 PD patients implanted with STN DBS systems during either clinically determined stimulation settings or settings derived from a computational model. Cicerone DBS software was used to define the model parameters such that current spread to non-motor areas of the STN was minimized. Clinically determined and model defined parameters were equally effective in improving motor scores on the traditional clinical rating scale (UPDRS-III). Under modest dual-task conditions, cognitive-motor performance was worse with clinically determined compared to model derived parameters. In addition, the model parameters provided a 66% reduction in power consumption. These results indicate that the cognitive-motor declines associated with bilateral STN can be mitigated, without compromising motor benefits, utilizing stimulation parameters that minimize current spread into non-motor regions of the STN.

  10. Customizing Deep Brain Stimulation to the Patient Using Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Cameron C.; Frankenmolle, Anneke; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M.; Alberts, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral subthalamic (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective in improving the cardinal motor signs of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD); however declines in cognitive function have been associated with this procedure. The aim of this study was to assess cognitive-motor performance of 10 PD patients implanted with STN DBS systems during either clinically determined stimulation settings or settings derived from a computational model. Cicerone DBS software was used to define the model parameters such that current spread to non-motor areas of the STN was minimized. Clinically determined and model defined parameters were equally effective in improving motor scores on the traditional clinical rating scale (UPDRS-III). Under modest dual-task conditions, cognitive-motor performance was worse with clinically determined compared to model derived parameters. In addition, the model parameters provided a 33% reduction in power consumption. These results indicate that the cognitivemotor declines associated with bilateral STN can be mitigated, without compromising motor benefits, utilizing stimulation parameters that minimize current spread into non-motor regions of the STN. PMID:19965023

  11. Deep brain stimulation: a return journey from psychiatry to neurology.

    PubMed

    Ashkan, Keyoumars; Shotbolt, Paul; David, Anthony S; Samuel, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as an effective neurosurgical tool to treat a range of conditions. Its use in movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, tremor and dystonia is now well established and has been approved by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The NICE does, however, emphasise the need for a multidisciplinary team to manage these patients. Such a team is traditionally composed of neurologists, neurosurgeons and neuropsychologists. Neuropsychiatrists, however, are increasingly recognised as essential members given many psychiatric considerations that may arise in patients undergoing DBS. Patient selection, assessment of competence to consent and treatment of postoperative psychiatric disease are just a few areas where neuropsychiatric input is invaluable. Partly driven by this close team working and partly based on the early history of DBS for psychiatric disorders, there is increasing interest in re-exploring the potential of neurosurgery to treat patients with psychiatric disease, such as depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Although the clinical experience and evidence with DBS in this group of patients are steadily increasing, many questions remain unanswered. Yet, the characteristics of optimal surgical candidates, the best choice of DBS target, the most effective stimulating parameters and the extent of postoperative improvement are not clear for most psychiatric conditions. Further research is therefore required to define how DBS can be best utilised to improve the quality of life of patients with psychiatric disease.

  12. Slurry wall construction in deep mined area

    SciTech Connect

    Woodcock, J.C.; Miller, K.R.

    1997-12-31

    The Osborne Landfill Superfund site was a 72,850 square meter (18-acre) abandoned strip mining excavation pit located in northwestern Pennsylvania that was used for disposal of waste for more than 20 years until the mid-1970`s. The landfill was used for the disposal of approximately 191,000 cubic meters (250,000 cubic yards) of municipal and industrial wastes. The wastes in the landfill became saturated after placement because the waste pit was connected to an extensive flooded deep mine system. In 1984 the site was placed on the National Priority List, primarily as a result of the presence of drums on the surface of the site. Following completion of a remedial investigation and feasibility study, the United States Environmental Protection Agency proposed a remedy for the site that included removal of all materials from the mine pit, backfilling the pit with clean material, and constructing a RCRA landfill above the clean backfill for disposal of the waste. The agency did not believe that an in-place closure/containment option would work for the site because of the deep mine void system in contact with the landfill. The estimated cost of the EPA`s alternative was about $26 million.

  13. Weight gain following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: a PET study.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Le Jeune, Florence; Drapier, Sophie; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Lalys, Florent; Robert, Gabriel; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain weight gain after deep brain stimulation (DBS), but none provides a fully satisfactory account of this adverse effect. We analyzed the correlation between changes in brain metabolism (using positron emission tomography [PET] imaging) and weight gain after bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS in patients with Parkinson's disease. Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose 3 months before and 4 months after the start of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in 23 patients with Parkinson's disease. Motor complications (United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]-IV scores) and dopaminergic medication were included in the analysis to control for their possible influence on brain metabolism. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) body mass index increased significantly by 0.8 ± 1.5 kg/m(2) (P = 0.03). Correlations were found between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in limbic and associative areas, including the orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann areas [BAs] 10 and 11), lateral and medial parts of the temporal lobe (BAs 20, 21, 22,39 and 42), anterior cingulate cortex (BA 32), and retrosplenial cortex (BA 30). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in sensorimotor areas. These findings suggest that changes in associative and limbic processes contribute to weight gain after subthalamic nucleus DBS in Parkinson's disease.

  14. MRI-induced heating of deep brain stimulation leads.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Syed A; Sheikh, Noor M; Saeed, Usman

    2008-10-21

    The radiofrequency (RF) field used in magnetic resonance imaging is scattered by medical implants. The scattered field of a deep brain stimulation lead can be very intense near the electrodes stimulating the brain. The effect is more pronounced if the lead behaves as a resonant antenna. In this paper, we examine the resonant length effect. We also use the finite element method to compute the near field for (i) the lead immersed in inhomogeneous tissue (fat, muscle, and brain tissues) and (ii) the lead connected to an implantable pulse generator. Electric field, specific absorption rate and induced temperature rise distributions have been obtained in the brain tissue surrounding the electrodes. The worst-case scenario has been evaluated by neglecting the effect of blood perfusion. The computed values are in good agreement with in vitro measurements made in the laboratory.

  15. Automated deep-phenotyping of the vertebrate brain.

    PubMed

    Allalou, Amin; Wu, Yuelong; Ghannad-Rezaie, Mostafa; Eimon, Peter M; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-04-13

    Here, we describe an automated platform suitable for large-scale deep-phenotyping of zebrafish mutant lines, which uses optical projection tomography to rapidly image brain-specific gene expression patterns in 3D at cellular resolution. Registration algorithms and correlation analysis are then used to compare 3D expression patterns, to automatically detect all statistically significant alterations in mutants, and to map them onto a brain atlas. Automated deep-phenotyping of a mutation in the master transcriptional regulator fezf2 not only detects all known phenotypes but also uncovers important novel neural deficits that were overlooked in previous studies. In the telencephalon, we show for the first time that fezf2 mutant zebrafish have significant patterning deficits, particularly in glutamatergic populations. Our findings reveal unexpected parallels between fezf2 function in zebrafish and mice, where mutations cause deficits in glutamatergic neurons of the telencephalon-derived neocortex.

  16. Mechanism of Deep Brain Stimulation: Inhibition, Excitation, or Disruption?

    PubMed

    Chiken, Satomi; Nambu, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS), applying high-frequency electrical stimulation to deep brain structures, has now provided an effective therapeutic option for treatment of various neurological and psychiatric disorders. DBS targeting the internal segment of the globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, and thalamus is used to treat symptoms of movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and tremor. However, the mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of DBS remains poorly understood and is still under debate: Does DBS inhibit or excite local neuronal elements? In this short review, we would like to introduce our recent work on the physiological mechanism of DBS and propose an alternative explanation: DBS dissociates input and output signals, resulting in the disruption of abnormal information flow through the stimulation site. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Successful thalamic deep brain stimulation for orthostatic tremor.

    PubMed

    Guridi, Jorge; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Arbizu, Javier; Alegre, Manuel; Prieto, Elena; Landecho, Ignacio; Manrique, Miguel; Artieda, Julio; Obeso, Jose A

    2008-10-15

    We report a patient with severe orthostatic tremor (OT) unresponsive to pharmacological treatments that was successfully controlled with thalamic (Vim, ventralis intermedius nucleus) deep brain stimulation (DBS) over a 4-year period. Cortical activity associated with the OT revealed by EEG back-averaging and fluoro-deoxi-glucose PET were also suppressed in parallel with tremor arrest. This case suggests that Vim-DBS may be a useful therapeutic approach for patients highly disabled by OT.

  18. Deep brain stimulation in myoclonus-dystonia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cif, Laura; Valente, Enza Maria; Hemm, Simone; Coubes, Christine; Vayssiere, Nathalie; Serrat, Stéphanie; Di Giorgio, Annalisa; Coubes, Philippe

    2004-06-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia syndrome (MDS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by bilateral myoclonic jerks. An 8-year-old boy presenting with early onset, medically intractable, MDS due to a mutation in the epsilon-sarcoglycan gene (SGCE) underwent chronic bilateral stimulation of the globus pallidus internus, which eliminates both myoclonus and dystonia. We conclude that deep brain stimulation can be an effective and safe treatment for MDS. Copyright 2004 Movement Disorder Society

  19. Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders: where we are now.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel R; Ozpinar, Alp; Raslan, Ahmed M; Ko, Andrew L

    2015-06-01

    Fossil records showing trephination in the Stone Age provide evidence that humans have sought to influence the mind through physical means since before the historical record. Attempts to treat psychiatric disease via neurosurgical means in the 20th century provided some intriguing initial results. However, the indiscriminate application of these treatments, lack of rigorous evaluation of the results, and the side effects of ablative, irreversible procedures resulted in a backlash against brain surgery for psychiatric disorders that continues to this day. With the advent of psychotropic medications, interest in invasive procedures for organic brain disease waned. Diagnosis and classification of psychiatric diseases has improved, due to a better understanding of psychiatric patho-physiology and the development of disease and treatment biomarkers. Meanwhile, a significant percentage of patients remain refractory to multiple modes of treatment, and psychiatric disease remains the number one cause of disability in the world. These data, along with the safe and efficacious application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders, in principle a reversible process, is rekindling interest in the surgical treatment of psychiatric disorders with stimulation of deep brain sites involved in emotional and behavioral circuitry. This review presents a brief history of psychosurgery and summarizes the development of DBS for psychiatric disease, reviewing the available evidence for the current application of DBS for disorders of the mind.

  20. Closed loop deep brain stimulation: an evolving technology.

    PubMed

    Hosain, Md Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas; Tye, Susannah

    2014-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation is an effective and safe medical treatment for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, dystonia, and treatment resistant obsessive compulsive disorder. A closed loop deep brain stimulation (CLDBS) system automatically adjusts stimulation parameters by the brain response in real time. The CLDBS continues to evolve due to the advancement in the brain stimulation technologies. This paper provides a study on the existing systems developed for CLDBS. It highlights the issues associated with CLDBS systems including feedback signal recording and processing, stimulation parameters setting, control algorithm, wireless telemetry, size, and power consumption. The benefits and limitations of the existing CLDBS systems are also presented. Whilst robust clinical proof of the benefits of the technology remains to be achieved, it has the potential to offer several advantages over open loop DBS. The CLDBS can improve efficiency and efficacy of therapy, eliminate lengthy start-up period for programming and adjustment, provide a personalized treatment, and make parameters setting automatic and adaptive.

  1. Deep brain stimulation devices: a brief technical history and review.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Robert J

    2009-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS)--a broadly accepted therapeutic modality with tens of thousands of patients currently implanted--is the application of implantable electrical stimulation devices to treat neurological disorders. Approved indications include involuntary movement disorders; investigational applications include epilepsy, selected psychiatric disorders, and other conditions. DBS differs fundamentally from functional electrical stimulation and sensory prosthetics in that DBS therapies do not substitute for or replace injured tissues, organs, or body functions. DBS--targeted to particular brain nuclei or pathways that are specific for the disorder under treatment--influences brain function and behavioral output in ways that can relieve symptoms and improve the overall functioning of the patient. We will briefly review the history and present status of DBS from a technical and device-oriented perspective, with an eye toward future advances.

  2. Paradoxical augmented relapse in alcohol-dependent rats during deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Hadar, R; Vengeliene, V; Barroeta Hlusicke, E; Canals, S; Noori, H R; Wieske, F; Rummel, J; Harnack, D; Heinz, A; Spanagel, R; Winter, C

    2016-01-01

    Case reports indicate that deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens may be beneficial to alcohol-dependent patients. The lack of clinical trials and our limited knowledge of deep-brain stimulation call for translational experiments to validate these reports. To mimic the human situation, we used a chronic-continuous brain-stimulation paradigm targeting the nucleus accumbens and other brain sites in alcohol-dependent rats. To determine the network effects of deep-brain stimulation in alcohol-dependent rats, we combined electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and studied neurotransmitter levels in nucleus accumbens-stimulated versus sham-stimulated rats. Surprisingly, we report here that electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens led to augmented relapse behavior in alcohol-dependent rats. Our associated fMRI data revealed some activated areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex and caudate putamen. However, when we applied stimulation to these areas, relapse behavior was not affected, confirming that the nucleus accumbens is critical for generating this paradoxical effect. Neurochemical analysis of the major activated brain sites of the network revealed that the effect of stimulation may depend on accumbal dopamine levels. This was supported by the finding that brain-stimulation-treated rats exhibited augmented alcohol-induced dopamine release compared with sham-stimulated animals. Our data suggest that deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens enhances alcohol-liking probably via augmented dopamine release and can thereby promote relapse. PMID:27327255

  3. Perspective on the Economic Evaluation of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Emma Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an example of a disease area experiencing increasing use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat symptoms. PD is a major cause of morbidity and has a substantial economic impact on the patients, their caregivers, the health service, and broader social and community services. The PDSURG Collaborators Group reported that DBS surgery for patients with advanced PD improves motor function and quality of life that medical therapy alone at 1 year but there are surgery related side effects in a minority (Williams et al., 2010). The aim of this paper however is to build upon the knowledge generated from evaluating DBS in PD and to provide a detailed perspective on the economic evaluation of DBS more generally with a view to providing a framework for informative design of DBS economic evaluations. This perspective will outline the key categories of resource use pertinent to DBS beyond the surgical scenario and into the broader aspects of follow-up care, adverse events, repeat procedures, social and community care, patient and carer costs, and will explore the importance of handling capital costs of DBS equipment appropriately as well as including costs occurring in the future. In addition, this perspective article will outline the importance of capturing broader aspects of “outcome” or benefits as compared to those traditional clinical measures used. The key message is the importance of employing a broad “perspective” on the measurement and valuation of costs and benefits as well as the importance of adopting the appropriate time horizon for evaluating the costs and benefits of DBS. In order to do this effectively it may be that alternative methods of economic evaluation in health care to the commonly used cost-effectiveness analysis may have to be used, such as cost-benefit analysis (McIntosh et al., 2010). PMID:21779238

  4. Particle swarm optimization for programming deep brain stimulation arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Edgar; Zhang, Simeng; Deyo, Steve; Xiao, YiZi; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy relies on both precise neurosurgical targeting and systematic optimization of stimulation settings to achieve beneficial clinical outcomes. One recent advance to improve targeting is the development of DBS arrays (DBSAs) with electrodes segmented both along and around the DBS lead. However, increasing the number of independent electrodes creates the logistical challenge of optimizing stimulation parameters efficiently. Approach. Solving such complex problems with multiple solutions and objectives is well known to occur in biology, in which complex collective behaviors emerge out of swarms of individual organisms engaged in learning through social interactions. Here, we developed a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to program DBSAs using a swarm of individual particles representing electrode configurations and stimulation amplitudes. Using a finite element model of motor thalamic DBS, we demonstrate how the PSO algorithm can efficiently optimize a multi-objective function that maximizes predictions of axonal activation in regions of interest (ROI, cerebellar-receiving area of motor thalamus), minimizes predictions of axonal activation in regions of avoidance (ROA, somatosensory thalamus), and minimizes power consumption. Main results. The algorithm solved the multi-objective problem by producing a Pareto front. ROI and ROA activation predictions were consistent across swarms (<1% median discrepancy in axon activation). The algorithm was able to accommodate for (1) lead displacement (1 mm) with relatively small ROI (⩽9.2%) and ROA (⩽1%) activation changes, irrespective of shift direction; (2) reduction in maximum per-electrode current (by 50% and 80%) with ROI activation decreasing by 5.6% and 16%, respectively; and (3) disabling electrodes (n  =  3 and 12) with ROI activation reduction by 1.8% and 14%, respectively. Additionally, comparison between PSO predictions and multi-compartment axon

  5. Sustained deep-tissue pain alters functional brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L; Edwards, Robert R; Wasan, Ajay D; Gollub, Randy L; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-08-01

    Recent functional brain connectivity studies have contributed to our understanding of the neurocircuitry supporting pain perception. However, evoked-pain connectivity studies have employed cutaneous and/or brief stimuli, which induce sensations that differ appreciably from the clinical pain experience. Sustained myofascial pain evoked by pressure cuff affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate functional connectivity change to more clinically relevant sustained deep-tissue pain. Connectivity in specific networks known to be modulated by evoked pain (sensorimotor, salience, dorsal attention, frontoparietal control, and default mode networks: SMN, SLN, DAN, FCN, and DMN) was evaluated with functional-connectivity magnetic resonance imaging, both at rest and during a sustained (6-minute) pain state in healthy adults. We found that pain was stable, with no significant changes of subjects' pain ratings over the stimulation period. Sustained pain reduced connectivity between the SMN and the contralateral leg primary sensorimotor (S1/M1) representation. Such SMN-S1/M1 connectivity decreases were also accompanied by and correlated with increased SLN-S1/M1 connectivity, suggesting recruitment of activated S1/M1 from SMN to SLN. Sustained pain also increased DAN connectivity to pain processing regions such as mid-cingulate cortex, posterior insula, and putamen. Moreover, greater connectivity during pain between contralateral S1/M1 and posterior insula, thalamus, putamen, and amygdala was associated with lower cuff pressures needed to reach the targeted pain sensation. These results demonstrate that sustained pain disrupts resting S1/M1 connectivity by shifting it to a network known to process stimulus salience. Furthermore, increased connectivity between S1/M1 and both sensory and affective processing areas may be an important contribution to interindividual differences in pain sensitivity.

  6. Is deep brain stimulation a treatment option for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric disorder with high rates of morbidity, comorbidity and mortality, which in a subset of patients (21%) takes on a chronic course. Since an evidence based treatment for AN is scarce, it is crucial to investigate new treatment options, preferably focused on influencing the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of AN. The objective of the present paper was to review the evidence for possible neurobiological correlates of AN, and to hypothesize about potential targets for Deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for chronic, therapy-refractory AN. One avenue for exploring new treatment options based on the neurobiological correlates of AN, is the search for symptomatologic and neurobiologic parallels between AN and other compulsivity- or reward-related disorders. As in other compulsive disorders, the fronto-striatal circuitry, in particular the insula, the ventral striatum (VS) and the prefrontal, orbitofrontal, temporal, parietal and anterior cingulate cortices, are likely to be implicated in the neuropathogenesis of AN. In this paper we will review the few available cases in which DBS has been performed in patients with AN (either as primary diagnosis or as comorbid condition). Given the overlap in symptomatology and neurocircuitry between reward-related disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and AN, and the established efficacy of accumbal DBS in OCD, we hypothesize that DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and other areas associated with reward, e.g. the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC), might be an effective treatment for patients with chronic, treatment refractory AN, providing not only weight restoration, but also significant and sustained improvement in AN core symptoms and associated comorbidities and complications. Possible targets for DBS in AN are the ACC, the ventral anterior limb of the capsula interna (vALIC) and the VS. We suggest conducting larger efficacy studies that also explore the

  7. Uncommon Applications of Deep Brain Stimulation in Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kara M.; Spindler, Meredith A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In addition to the established indications of tremor and dystonia, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been utilized less commonly for several hyperkinetic movement disorders, including medication-refractory myoclonus, ballism, chorea, and Gilles de la Tourette (GTS) and tardive syndromes. Given the lack of adequate controlled trials, it is difficult to translate published reports into clinical use. We summarize the literature, draw conclusions regarding efficacy when possible, and highlight concerns and areas for future study. Methods A Pubmed search was performed for English-language articles between January 1980 and June 2014. Studies were selected if they focused primarily on DBS to treat the conditions of focus. Results We identified 49 cases of DBS for myoclonus-dystonia, 21 for Huntington's disease, 15 for choreacanthocytosis, 129 for GTS, and 73 for tardive syndromes. Bilateral globus pallidus interna (GPi) DBS was the most frequently utilized procedure for all conditions except GTS, in which medial thalamic DBS was more common. While the majority of cases demonstrate some improvement, there are also reports of no improvement or even worsening of symptoms in each condition. The few studies including functional or quality of life outcomes suggest benefit. A limited number of studies included blinded on/off testing. There have been two double-blind controlled trials performed in GTS and a single prospective double-blind, uncontrolled trial in tardive syndromes. Patient characteristics, surgical target, stimulation parameters, and duration of follow-up varied among studies. Discussion Despite these extensive limitations, the literature overall supports the efficacy of DBS in these conditions, in particular GTS and tardive syndromes. For other conditions, the preliminary evidence from small studies is promising and encourages further study. PMID:25713746

  8. Sustained deep-tissue pain alters functional brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L.; Edwards, Robert; Wasan, Ajay D.; Gollub, Randy L.; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    Recent functional brain connectivity studies have contributed to our understanding of the neurocircuitry supporting pain perception. However, evoked-pain connectivity studies have employed cutaneous and/or brief stimuli, which induce sensations that differ appreciably from the clinical pain experience. Sustained myofascial pain evoked by pressure cuff affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate functional connectivity change to more clinically-relevant sustained deep-tissue pain. Connectivity in specific networks known to be modulated by evoked pain (sensorimotor, salience, dorsal attention, fronto-parietal control and default mode networks; SMN, SLN, DAN, FCN and DMN) was evaluated with functional-connectivity MRI, both at rest and during a sustained (6-minute) pain state in healthy adults. We found that pain was stable with no significant changes of subjects’ pain ratings over the stimulation period. Sustained pain reduced connectivity between the SMN and the contralateral leg primary sensorimotor (S1/M1) representation. Such SMN-S1/M1 connectivity decreases were also accompanied by and correlated with increased SLN-S1/M1 connectivity, suggesting recruitment of activated S1/M1 from SMN to SLN. Sustained pain also increased DAN connectivity to pain processing regions such as mid-cingulate cortex, posterior insula and putamen. Moreover, greater connectivity during pain between contralateral S1/M1 and posterior insula, thalamus, putamen, and amygdala, was associated with lower cuff pressures needed to reach the targeted pain sensation. These results demonstrate that sustained pain disrupts resting S1/M1 connectivity by shifting it to a network known to process stimulus salience. Furthermore, increased connectivity between S1/M1 and both sensory and affective processing areas may be an important contribution to inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity. PMID:23718988

  9. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of implanted deep brain stimulation electrodes and brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gabran, S R I; Saad, J H; Salama, M M A; Mansour, R R

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the electromagnetic modeling and simulation of an implanted Medtronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode using finite difference time domain (FDTD). The model is developed using Empire XCcel and represents the electrode surrounded with brain tissue assuming homogenous and isotropic medium. The model is created to study the parameters influencing the electric field distribution within the tissue in order to provide reference and benchmarking data for DBS and intra-cortical electrode development.

  10. External trial deep brain stimulation device for the application of desynchronizing stimulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, C.; Roulet, J.-C.; Niederhauser, J. J.; Döll, W.; Kirlangic, M. E.; Lysyansky, B.; Krachkovskyi, V.; Bhatti, M. A.; Barnikol, U. B.; Sasse, L.; Bührle, C. P.; Speckmann, E.-J.; Götz, M.; Sturm, V.; Freund, H.-J.; Schnell, U.; Tass, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the past decade deep brain stimulation (DBS)—the application of electrical stimulation to specific target structures via implanted depth electrodes—has become the standard treatment for medically refractory Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. These diseases are characterized by pathological synchronized neuronal activity in particular brain areas. We present an external trial DBS device capable of administering effectively desynchronizing stimulation techniques developed with methods from nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics according to a model-based approach. These techniques exploit either stochastic phase resetting principles or complex delayed-feedback mechanisms. We explain how these methods are implemented into a safe and user-friendly device.

  11. Deep brain stimulation in Huntington's disease: assessment of potential targets.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayur; Deogaonkar, Milind

    2015-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder that has very few effective therapeutic interventions. Since the disease has a defined neural circuitry abnormality, neuromodulation could be an option. Case reports, original research, and animal model studies were selected from the databases of Medline and PubMed. All related studies published up to July 2014 were included in this review. The following search terms were used: "Deep brain stimulation," "DBS," "thalamotomy," "pallidal stimulation," and "Huntington's Disease," "HD," "chorea," or "hyperkinetic movement disorders." This review examines potential nodes in the HD circuitry that could be modulated using deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy. With rapid evolution of imaging and ability to reach difficult targets in the brain with refined DBS technology, some phenotypes of HD could potentially be treated with DBS in the near future. Further clinical studies are warranted to validate the efficacy of neuromodulation and to determine the most optimal target for HD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Perfusion brain SPECT in assessing motor improvement after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Paschali, Anna; Constantoyannis, Constantinos; Angelatou, Fevronia; Vassilakos, Pavlos

    2013-03-01

    High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become an established therapeutic approach for the management of patients with late-stage idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the present study was to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes related to motor improvement. Twenty-one PD patients underwent two rCBF SPECT studies at rest, once preoperatively in the off-meds state and the other postoperatively (at 6 ± 2 months) in the off medication/on stimulation state. Patients were classified according to the UPDRS and H&Y scale. NeuroGam software was used to register, quantify, and compare two sequential brain SPECT studies of the same patient in order to investigate rCBF changes during STN stimulation in comparison with preoperative rCBF. The relationship between rCBF and UPDRS scores was used as a covariate of interest. Twenty patients showed clinical improvement during the first months after surgery, resulting in a 44 % reduction of the UPDRS motor score. The administered mean daily levodopa dose significantly decreased from 850 ± 108 mg before surgery to 446 ± 188 mg during the off-meds state (p < 0.001, paired t test). At the 6-month postoperative assessment, we noticed rCBF increases in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the premotor cortex (PMC) (mean rCBF increase = 10.2 %, p < 0.05), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and in associative and limbic territories of the frontal cortex (mean rCBF increase = 8.2 %, p > 0.05). A correlation was detected between the improvement in motor scores and the rCBF increase in the pre-SMA and PMC (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). Our study suggests that STN stimulation leads to improvement in neural activity and rCBF increase in higher-order motor cortical areas.

  13. Anesthesia for deep brain stimulation in traumatic brain injury-induced hemidystonia.

    PubMed

    Jani, Jill M; Oluigbo, Chima O; Reddy, Srijaya K

    2015-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation in an awake patient presents several unique challenges to the anesthesiologist. It is important to understand the various stages of the procedure and the complexities of anesthetic management in order to have a successful surgical outcome and provide a safe environment for the patient.

  14. A mammalian neural tissue opsin (Opsin 5) is a deep brain photoreceptor in birds.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Yusuke; Ikegami, Keisuke; Ono, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yoshida, Shosei; Hirunagi, Kanjun; Ebihara, Shizufumi; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2010-08-24

    It has been known for many decades that nonmammalian vertebrates detect light by deep brain photoreceptors that lie outside the retina and pineal organ to regulate seasonal cycle of reproduction. However, the identity of these photoreceptors has so far remained unclear. Here we report that Opsin 5 is a deep brain photoreceptive molecule in the quail brain. Expression analysis of members of the opsin superfamily identified as Opsin 5 (OPN5; also known as Gpr136, Neuropsin, PGR12, and TMEM13) mRNA in the paraventricular organ (PVO), an area long believed to be capable of phototransduction. Immunohistochemistry identified Opsin 5 in neurons that contact the cerebrospinal fluid in the PVO, as well as fibers extending to the external zone of the median eminence adjacent to the pars tuberalis of the pituitary gland, which translates photoperiodic information into neuroendocrine responses. Heterologous expression of Opsin 5 in Xenopus oocytes resulted in light-dependent activation of membrane currents, the action spectrum of which showed peak sensitivity (lambda(max)) at approximately 420 nm. We also found that short-wavelength light, i.e., between UV-B and blue light, induced photoperiodic responses in eye-patched, pinealectomized quail. Thus, Opsin 5 appears to be one of the deep brain photoreceptive molecules that regulates seasonal reproduction in birds.

  15. Orthostatic Tremor Responds to Bilateral Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Mark K.; Behbahani, Mandana; Boucher, Orland K.; Caviness, John N.; Evidente, Virgilio Gerald H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Orthostatic tremor (OT) is a disabling movement disorder manifested by postural and gait disturbance. Primarily a condition of elderly people, it can be progressive in up to 15% of patients. The primary treatments are medications that are often ineffective. Case Report A 75-year-old male presented with a 10-year history of progressive and disabling OT. He had tried various medications without significant benefits. He underwent bilateral thalamic Vim deep brain stimulation (DBS). At 30-month follow-up, he has had continued significant improvement of his OT. Discussion Bilateral thalamic DBS may be a viable option for medically refractory OT. PMID:23439685

  16. The Use of Deep Brain Stimulation in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akbarian-Tefaghi, Ladan; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Foltynie, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood neurobehavioural disorder, characterised by the presence of motor and vocal tics, typically starting in childhood but persisting in around 20% of patients into adulthood. In those patients who do not respond to pharmacological or behavioural therapy, deep brain stimulation (DBS) may be a suitable option for potential symptom improvement. This manuscript attempts to summarise the outcomes of DBS at different targets, explore the possible mechanisms of action of DBS in TS, as well as the potential of adaptive DBS. There will also be a focus on the future challenges faced in designing optimized trials. PMID:27548235

  17. Deep brain stimulation as a therapy for alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Münte, Thomas F; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been firmly established as a therapy for movement disorders. Recently, evidence from case reports and small case series also suggests DBS to be effective in psychiatric disorders including addiction. Here we review the rationale of DBS in addiction and the selection of possible targets. We then consider evidence from animal models as well as human case studies. We conclude that DBS in particular of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) represents a promising treatment option in addiction which deserves further investigation.

  18. Authenticity or autonomy? When deep brain stimulation causes a dilemma.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Felicitas

    2013-12-01

    While deep brain stimulation (DBS) for patients with Parkinson's disease has typically raised ethical questions about autonomy, accountability and personal identity, recent research indicates that we need to begin taking into account issues surrounding the patients' feelings of authenticity and alienation as well. In order to bring out the relevance of this dimension to ethical considerations of DBS, I analyse a recent case study of a Dutch patient who, as a result of DBS, faced a dilemma between autonomy and authenticity. This case study is meant to point out the normatively meaningful tension patients under DBS experience between authenticity and autonomy.

  19. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  20. Current Topics in Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    UMEMURA, Atsushi; OYAMA, Genko; SHIMO, Yasushi; NAKAJIMA, Madoka; NAKAJIMA, Asuka; JO, Takayuki; SEKIMOTO, Satoko; ITO, Masanobu; MITSUHASHI, Takumi; HATTORI, Nobutaka; ARAI, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    There is a long history of surgical treatment for Parkinson disease (PD). After pioneering trials and errors, the current primary surgical treatment for PD is deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS is a promising treatment option for patients with medically refractory PD. However, there are still many problems and controversies associated with DBS. In this review, we discuss current issues in DBS for PD, including patient selection, clinical outcomes, complications, target selection, long-term outcomes, management of axial symptoms, timing of surgery, surgical procedures, cost-effectiveness, and new technology. PMID:27349658

  1. Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on Autonomic Function

    PubMed Central

    Basiago, Adam; Binder, Devin K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the course of the development of deep brain stimulation (DBS) into a well-established therapy for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia, its utility as a potential treatment for autonomic dysfunction has emerged. Dysfunction of autonomic processes is common in neurological diseases. Depending on the specific target in the brain, DBS has been shown to raise or lower blood pressure, normalize the baroreflex, to alter the caliber of bronchioles, and eliminate hyperhidrosis, all through modulation of the sympathetic nervous system. It has also been shown to improve cortical control of the bladder, directly induce or inhibit the micturition reflex, and to improve deglutition and gastric emptying. In this review, we will attempt to summarize the relevant available studies describing these effects of DBS on autonomic function, which vary greatly in character and magnitude with respect to stimulation target. PMID:27537920

  2. Brain areas involved in synaesthesia: a review.

    PubMed

    Rouw, Romke; Scholte, H Steven; Colizoli, Olympia

    2011-09-01

    Despite a recent upsurge of research, much remains unknown about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying synaesthesia. By integrating results obtained so far in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies, this contribution sheds light on the role of particular brain regions in synaesthetic experiences. First, in accordance with its sensory nature, it seems that the sensory brain areas corresponding to the type of synaesthetic experience are activated. Synaesthetic colour experiences can activate colour regions in occipito-temporal cortex, but this is not necessarily restricted to V4. Furthermore, sensory and motor brain regions have been obtained that extend beyond the particular type of synaesthesia studied. Second, differences in experimental setup, number and type of synaesthetes tested, and method to delineate regions of interest may help explain inconsistent results obtained in the BOLD-MRI (Blood Oxygen Level Dependent functional MRI) studies. Third, an overview of obtained results shows that a network of brain areas rather than a single brain region underlies synaesthesia. Six brain regions of overlapping results emerge, these regions are in sensory and motor regions as well as 'higher level' regions in parietal and frontal lobe. We propose that these regions are related to three different cognitive processes inherently part of synaesthesia; the sensory processes, the (attentional) 'binding' processes, and cognitive control processes. Finally, we discuss how these functional and structural brain properties might relate to the development of synaesthesia. In particular, we believe this relationship is better understood by separating the question what underlies the presence of synaesthesia ('trait') from what determines particular synaesthetic associations ('type').

  3. Cortical effects of deep brain stimulation: implications for pathogenesis and treatment of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Arbuthnott, Gordon W; Ke, Ya; Yung, Wing-Ho

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation that targets the subthalamic nucleus has proved to be beneficial in alleviating the motor symptoms in many patients with Parkinson disease. The mechanism of action for this paradigm of deep brain stimulation is still not fully understood, and this is, in part, attributed to the fact that there are diverse cellular elements at the stimulation site that could bring about local and distal effects. Recent studies in both human and animal models strongly suggest that the activity in the cortex, especially in the motor cortical areas, is directly altered by deep brain stimulation by signals traveling in an antidromic fashion from the subthalamic nucleus. Herein, we discuss the evidence for this proposition, as well as the mechanism by which antidromic activation desynchronizes motor cortical activity. The implications of these new findings for the pathogenesis and treatment of Parkinson disease are highlighted.

  4. Diffusion Tractography in Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is believed to exert its therapeutic effects through modulation of brain circuitry, yet conventional preoperative planning does not allow direct targeting or visualization of white matter pathways. Diffusion MRI tractography (DT) is virtually the only non-invasive method of visualizing structural connectivity in the brain, leading many to suggest its use to guide DBS targeting. DT-guided DBS not only has the potential to allow direct white matter targeting for established applications [e.g., Parkinson’s disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), dystonia], but may also aid in the discovery of new therapeutic targets for a variety of other neurologic and psychiatric diseases. Despite these exciting opportunities, DT lacks standardization and rigorous anatomic validation, raising significant concern for the use of such data in stereotactic brain surgery. This review covers the technical details, proposed methods, and initial clinical data for the use of DT in DBS surgery. Rather than focusing on specific disease applications, this review focuses on methods that can be applied to virtually any DBS target. PMID:27199677

  5. Automated deep-phenotyping of the vertebrate brain

    PubMed Central

    Allalou, Amin; Wu, Yuelong; Ghannad-Rezaie, Mostafa; Eimon, Peter M; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Here, we describe an automated platform suitable for large-scale deep-phenotyping of zebrafish mutant lines, which uses optical projection tomography to rapidly image brain-specific gene expression patterns in 3D at cellular resolution. Registration algorithms and correlation analysis are then used to compare 3D expression patterns, to automatically detect all statistically significant alterations in mutants, and to map them onto a brain atlas. Automated deep-phenotyping of a mutation in the master transcriptional regulator fezf2 not only detects all known phenotypes but also uncovers important novel neural deficits that were overlooked in previous studies. In the telencephalon, we show for the first time that fezf2 mutant zebrafish have significant patterning deficits, particularly in glutamatergic populations. Our findings reveal unexpected parallels between fezf2 function in zebrafish and mice, where mutations cause deficits in glutamatergic neurons of the telencephalon-derived neocortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23379.001 PMID:28406399

  6. Manifold learning of brain MRIs by deep learning.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Tom; Tam, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Manifold learning of medical images plays a potentially important role for modeling anatomical variability within a population with pplications that include segmentation, registration, and prediction of clinical parameters. This paper describes a novel method for learning the manifold of 3D brain images that, unlike most existing manifold learning methods, does not require the manifold space to be locally linear, and does not require a predefined similarity measure or a prebuilt proximity graph. Our manifold learning method is based on deep learning, a machine learning approach that uses layered networks (called deep belief networks, or DBNs) and has received much attention recently in the computer vision field due to their success in object recognition tasks. DBNs have traditionally been too computationally expensive for application to 3D images due to the large number of trainable parameters. Our primary contributions are (1) a much more computationally efficient training method for DBNs that makes training on 3D medical images with a resolution of up to 128 x 128 x 128 practical, and (2) the demonstration that DBNs can learn a low-dimensional manifold of brain volumes that detects modes of variations that correlate to demographic and disease parameters.

  7. Dynamics of Parkinsonian tremor during deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titcombe, Michèle S.; Glass, Leon; Guehl, Dominique; Beuter, Anne

    2001-12-01

    The mechanism by which chronic, high frequency, electrical deep brain stimulation (HF-DBS) suppresses tremor in Parkinson's disease is unknown. Rest tremor in subjects with Parkinson's disease receiving HF-DBS was recorded continuously throughout switching the deep brain stimulator on (at an effective frequency) and off. These data suggest that the stimulation induces a qualitative change in the dynamics, called a Hopf bifurcation, so that the stable oscillations are destabilized. We hypothesize that the periodic stimulation modifies a parameter affecting the oscillation in a time dependent way and thereby induces a Hopf bifurcation. We explore this hypothesis using a schematic network model of an oscillator interacting with periodic stimulation. The mechanism of time-dependent change of a control parameter in the model captures two aspects of the dynamics observed in the data: (1) a gradual increase in tremor amplitude when the stimulation is switched off and a gradual decrease in tremor amplitude when the stimulation is switched on and (2) a time delay in the onset and offset of the oscillations. This mechanism is consistent with these rest tremor transition data and with the idea that HF-DBS acts via the gradual change of a network property.

  8. Deep Brain Stimulation: Current and Future Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has developed during the past 20 years as a remarkable treatment option for several different disorders. Advances in technology and surgical techniques have essentially replaced ablative procedures for most of these conditions. Stimulation of the ventralis intermedius nucleus of the thalamus has clearly been shown to markedly improve tremor control in patients with essential tremor and tremor related to Parkinson disease. Symptoms of bradykinesia, tremor, gait disturbance, and rigidity can be significantly improved in patients with Parkinson disease. Because of these improvements, a decrease in medication can be instrumental in reducing the disabling features of dyskinesias in such patients. Primary dystonia has been shown to respond well to DBS of the globus pallidus internus. The success of these procedures has led to application of these techniques to multiple other debilitating conditions such as neuropsychiatric disorders, intractable pain, epilepsy, camptocormia, headache, restless legs syndrome, and Alzheimer disease. The literature analysis was performed using a MEDLINE search from 1980 through 2010 with the term deep brain stimulation, and several double-blind and larger case series were chosen for inclusion in this review. The exact mechanism of DBS is not fully understood. This review summarizes many of the current and potential future clinical applications of this technology. PMID:21646303

  9. Pallidal deep brain stimulation relieves camptocormia in primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hagenacker, Tim; Gerwig, Marcus; Gasser, Thomas; Miller, Dorothea; Kastrup, Oliver; Jokisch, Daniel; Sure, Ulrich; Frings, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Camptocormia, characterised by a forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine may occur in various movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease or in primary dystonia. In severe cases, patients with camptocormia are unable to walk. While treatment options are limited, deep brain stimulation (DBS) with bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or globus pallidus internus (GPi) has been proposed as a therapeutic option in refractory cases of Parkinson's disease. Here we present two patients with severe camptocormia as an isolated form of dystonia and as part of generalised dystonia, respectively, which were both treated with bilateral stimulation of the GPi. Symptoms of dystonia were assessed using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale (BFM) before and during deep brain stimulation. In both patients there was a significant functional improvement following long-term bilateral GPi stimulation and both patients gained ability to walk. In the first patient with an isolated dystonic camptocormia the BFM motor subscore for the truncal flexion improved by 75 %. The total BFM motor score in the second patient with a camptocormia in generalised dystonia improved by 45 %, while the BFM score for truncal flexion improved by 87 %. In both patients the effect of the bilateral GPi stimulation on camptocormia was substantial, independent of generalisation of dystonia. Therefore, GPi DBS is a possible treatment option for this rare disease.

  10. Chaotic Desynchronization as the Therapeutic Mechanism of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Charles J.; Beverlin, Bryce; Netoff, Theoden

    2011-01-01

    High frequency deep-brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (deep brain stimulation, DBS) relieves many of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in humans and animal models. Although the treatment has seen widespread use, its therapeutic mechanism remains paradoxical. The subthalamic nucleus is excitatory, so its stimulation at rates higher than its normal firing rate should worsen the disease by increasing subthalamic excitation of the globus pallidus. The therapeutic effectiveness of DBS is also frequency and intensity sensitive, and the stimulation must be periodic; aperiodic stimulation at the same mean rate is ineffective. These requirements are not adequately explained by existing models, whether based on firing rate changes or on reduced bursting. Here we report modeling studies suggesting that high frequency periodic excitation of the subthalamic nucleus may act by desynchronizing the firing of neurons in the globus pallidus, rather than by changing the firing rate or pattern of individual cells. Globus pallidus neurons are normally desynchronized, but their activity becomes correlated in Parkinson's disease. Periodic stimulation may induce chaotic desynchronization by interacting with the intrinsic oscillatory mechanism of globus pallidus neurons. Our modeling results suggest a mechanism of action of DBS and a pathophysiology of Parkinsonism in which synchrony, rather than firing rate, is the critical pathological feature. PMID:21734868

  11. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M.; Tan, Huiling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson’s disease, elevations in beta activity (13–35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson’s disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this

  12. Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jonathan R. Jagid, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0559 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project aims to study electrical deep brain

  13. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M; Tan, Huiling; Brown, Peter

    2017-02-13

    Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson's disease, elevations in beta activity (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson's disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this approach could

  14. Reversing cognitive-motor impairments in Parkinson's disease patients using a computational modelling approach to deep brain stimulation programming.

    PubMed

    Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Ho, Jason C; Vitek, Jerrold L; McIntyre, Cameron C; Alberts, Jay L

    2010-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus is an effective and safe surgical procedure that has been shown to reduce the motor dysfunction of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, however, has been associated with declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. It has been hypothesized that spread of current to nonmotor areas of the subthalamic nucleus may be responsible for declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. The aim of this study was to assess the cognitive-motor performance in advanced Parkinson's disease patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation parameters determined clinically (Clinical) to settings derived from a patient-specific computational model (Model). Data were collected from 10 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease bilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation systems. These patients were assessed off medication and under three deep brain stimulation conditions: Off, Clinical or Model based stimulation. Clinical stimulation parameters had been determined based on clinical evaluations and were stable for at least 6 months prior to study participation. Model-based parameters were selected to minimize the spread of current to nonmotor portions of the subthalamic nucleus using Cicerone Deep Brain Stimulation software. For each stimulation condition, participants performed a working memory (n-back task) and motor task (force tracking) under single- and dual-task settings. During the dual-task, participants performed the n-back and force-tracking tasks simultaneously. Clinical and Model parameters were equally effective in improving the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale III scores relative to Off deep brain stimulation scores. Single-task working memory declines, in the 2-back condition, were significantly less under Model compared with Clinical deep brain stimulation settings. Under dual-task conditions, force

  15. Tourette syndrome deep brain stimulation: a review and updated recommendations.

    PubMed

    Schrock, Lauren E; Mink, Jonathan W; Woods, Douglas W; Porta, Mauro; Servello, Dominico; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Silburn, Peter A; Foltynie, Thomas; Walker, Harrison C; Shahed-Jimenez, Joohi; Savica, Rodolfo; Klassen, Bryan T; Machado, Andre G; Foote, Kelly D; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Hu, Wei; Ackermans, Linda; Temel, Yasin; Mari, Zoltan; Changizi, Barbara K; Lozano, Andres; Auyeung, M; Kaido, Takanobu; Agid, Yves; Welter, Marie L; Khandhar, Suketu M; Mogilner, Alon Y; Pourfar, Michael H; Walter, Benjamin L; Juncos, Jorge L; Gross, Robert E; Kuhn, Jens; Leckman, James F; Neimat, Joseph A; Okun, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may improve disabling tics in severely affected medication and behaviorally resistant Tourette syndrome (TS). Here we review all reported cases of TS DBS and provide updated recommendations for selection, assessment, and management of potential TS DBS cases based on the literature and implantation experience. Candidates should have a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM V) diagnosis of TS with severe motor and vocal tics, which despite exhaustive medical and behavioral treatment trials result in significant impairment. Deep brain stimulation should be offered to patients only by experienced DBS centers after evaluation by a multidisciplinary team. Rigorous preoperative and postoperative outcome measures of tics and associated comorbidities should be used. Tics and comorbid neuropsychiatric conditions should be optimally treated per current expert standards, and tics should be the major cause of disability. Psychogenic tics, embellishment, and malingering should be recognized and addressed. We have removed the previously suggested 25-year-old age limit, with the specification that a multidisciplinary team approach for screening is employed. A local ethics committee or institutional review board should be consulted for consideration of cases involving persons younger than 18 years of age, as well as in cases with urgent indications. Tourette syndrome patients represent a unique and complex population, and studies reveal a higher risk for post-DBS complications. Successes and failures have been reported for multiple brain targets; however, the optimal surgical approach remains unknown. Tourette syndrome DBS, though still evolving, is a promising approach for a subset of medication refractory and severely affected patients. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation as Clinical Innovation: An Ethical and Organizational Framework to Sustain Deliberations About Psychiatric Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bell, Emily; Leger, Philip; Sankar, Tejas; Racine, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) for psychiatric disorders needs to be investigated in proper research trials. However, there are rare circumstances in which DBS could be offered to psychiatric patients as a form of surgical innovation, therefore potentially blurring the lines between these research trials and health care. In this article, we discuss the conditions under which surgical innovation may be accepted as a practice falling at the frontiers of standard clinical care and research per se. However, recognizing this distinction does not settle all ethical issues. Our article offers ethical guideposts to allow clinicians, surgical teams, institutions, and institutional review boards to deliberate about some of the fundamental issues that should be considered before surgical innovation with psychiatric DBS is undertaken. We provide key guiding questions to sustain this deliberation. Then we review the normative and empirical literature that exists to guide reflection about the ethics of surgical innovation and psychiatric DBS with respect to general ethical questions pertinent to psychiatric DBS, multidisciplinary team perspectives in psychiatric DBS, mechanisms for oversight in psychiatric DBS, and capacity and consent in psychiatric DBS. The considerations presented here are to recognize the very specific nature of surgical innovation and to ensure that surgical innovation in the context of psychiatric DBS remains a limited, special category of activity that does not replace appropriate surgical research or become the standard of care based on limited evidence. DBS, deep brain stimulationIRB, institutional review boardOCD, obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  17. Two-step tunneling technique of deep brain stimulation extension wires-a description.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Denys; Vandersteen, Clair; Saleh, Christian; von Langsdorff, Daniel; Poissonnet, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    While a significant body of literature exists on the intracranial part of deep brain stimulation surgery, the equally important second part of the intervention related to the subcutaneous tunneling of deep brain stimulation extension wires is rarely described. The tunneling strategy can consist of a single passage of the extension wires from the frontal incision site to the subclavicular area, or of a two-step approach that adds a retro-auricular counter-incision. Each technique harbors the risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. At our center, we perform a two-step tunneling procedure that we developed based on a cadaveric study. In 125 consecutive patients operated since 2002, we did not encounter any complication related to our tunneling method. Insufficient data exist to fully evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each tunneling technique. It is of critical importance that authors detail their tunneling modus operandi and report the presence or absence of complications. This gathered data pool may help to formulate a definitive conclusions on the safest method for subcutaneous tunneling of extension wires in deep brain stimulation.

  18. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson’s disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease, but its influence on synchronous activity in cortico-basal-ganglia loops remains to be fully characterized. Here, we demonstrate that deep brain stimulation selectively suppresses certain spatially and spectrally segregated resting state subthalamic nucleus–cortical networks. To this end we used a validated and novel approach for performing simultaneous recordings of the subthalamic nucleus and cortex using magnetoencephalography (during concurrent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation). Our results highlight that clinically effective subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation suppresses synchrony locally within the subthalamic nucleus in the low beta oscillatory range and furthermore that the degree of this suppression correlates with clinical motor improvement. Moreover, deep brain stimulation relatively selectively suppressed synchronization of activity between the subthalamic nucleus and mesial premotor regions, including the supplementary motor areas. These mesial premotor regions were predominantly coupled to the subthalamic nucleus in the high beta frequency range, but the degree of deep brain stimulation-associated suppression in their coupling to the subthalamic nucleus was not found to correlate with motor improvement. Beta band coupling between the subthalamic nucleus and lateral motor areas was not influenced by deep brain stimulation. Motor cortical coupling with subthalamic nucleus predominantly involved driving of the subthalamic nucleus, with those drives in the higher beta frequency band having much shorter net delays to subthalamic nucleus than those in the lower beta band. These observations raise

  19. Deep brain stimulation suppresses pallidal low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonic movements.

    PubMed

    Barow, Ewgenia; Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Brücke, Christof; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Brown, Peter; Krauss, Joachim K; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus alleviates involuntary movements in patients with dystonia. However, the mechanism is still not entirely understood. One hypothesis is that deep brain stimulation suppresses abnormally enhanced synchronized oscillatory activity within the motor cortico-basal ganglia network. Here, we explore deep brain stimulation-induced modulation of pathological low frequency (4-12 Hz) pallidal activity that has been described in local field potential recordings in patients with dystonia. Therefore, local field potentials were recorded from 16 hemispheres in 12 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for severe dystonia using a specially designed amplifier allowing simultaneous high frequency stimulation at therapeutic parameter settings and local field potential recordings. For coherence analysis electroencephalographic activity (EEG) over motor areas and electromyographic activity (EMG) from affected neck muscles were recorded before and immediately after cessation of high frequency stimulation. High frequency stimulation led to a significant reduction of mean power in the 4-12 Hz band by 24.8 ± 7.0% in patients with predominantly phasic dystonia. A significant decrease of coherence between cortical EEG and pallidal local field potential activity in the 4-12 Hz range was revealed for the time period of 30 s after switching off high frequency stimulation. Coherence between EMG activity and pallidal activity was mainly found in patients with phasic dystonic movements where it was suppressed after high frequency stimulation. Our findings suggest that high frequency stimulation may suppress pathologically enhanced low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonia. These dystonic features are the quickest to respond to high frequency stimulation and may thus directly relate to modulation of pathological basal ganglia activity, whereas improvement in tonic features may depend on long-term plastic changes within the

  20. Penfield’s Prediction: A Mechanism for Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Murrow, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Despite its widespread use, the precise mechanism of action of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy remains unknown. The modern urgency to publish more and new data can obscure previously learned lessons by the giants who have preceded us and whose shoulders we now stand upon. Wilder Penfield extensively studied the effects of artificial electrical brain stimulation and his comments on the subject are still very relevant today. In particular, he noted two very different (and seemingly opposite) effects of stimulation within the human brain. In some structures, artificial electrical stimulation has an effect, which mimics ablation, while, in other structures, it produces a stimulatory effect on that tissue. Hypothesis: The hypothesis of this paper is fourfold. First, it proposes that some neural circuits are widely synchronized with other neural circuits, while some neural circuits are unsynchronized and operate independently. Second, it proposes that artificial high-frequency electrical stimulation of a synchronized neural circuit results in an ablative effect, but artificial high-frequency electrical stimulation of an unsynchronized neural circuit results in a stimulatory effect. Third, it suggests a part of the mechanism by which large-scale physiologic synchronization of widely distributed independently processed information streams may occur. This may be the neural mechanism underlying Penfield’s “centrencephalic system,” which he emphasized so many years ago. Fourth, it outlines the specific anatomic distribution of this physiologic synchronization, which Penfield has already clearly delineated as the distribution of his centrencephalic system. Evidence: This paper draws on a brief overview of previous theory regarding the mechanism of action of DBS and on historical, as well as widely known modern clinical data regarding the observed effects of stimulation delivered to various targets within the brain. Basic science investigations, which

  1. Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of vegetative state.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takamitsu; Katayama, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Kazutaka; Oshima, Hideki; Fukaya, Chikashi; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    One hundred and seven patients in vegetative state (VS) were evaluated neurologically and electrophysiologically over 3 months (90 days) after the onset of brain injury. Among these patients, 21 were treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The stimulation sites were the mesencephalic reticular formation (two patients) and centromedian-parafascicularis nucleus complex (19 cases). Eight of the patients recovered from VS and were able to obey verbal commands at 13 and 10 months in the case of head trauma and at 19, 14, 13, 12, 12 and 8 months in the case of vascular disease after comatose brain injury, and no patients without DBS recovered from VS spontaneously within 24 months after brain injury. The eight patients who recovered from VS showed desynchronization on continuous EEG frequency analysis. The Vth wave of the auditory brainstem response and N20 of the somatosensory evoked potential could be recorded, although with a prolonged latency, and the pain-related P250 was recorded with an amplitude of > 7 μV. Sixteen (14.9%) of the 107 VS patients satisfied these criteria in our electrophysiological evaluation, 10 of whom were treated with DBS and six of whom were not treated with DBS. In these 16 patients, the recovery rate from VS was different between the DBS therapy group and the no DBS therapy group (P < 0.01, Fisher's exact probability test) These findings indicate that DBS may be useful for the recovery of patients from VS if the candidates are selected on the basis of electrophysiological criteria.

  2. Fiber-based tissue identification for electrode placement in deep brain stimulation neurosurgery (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaoli, Damon T.; Lapointe, Nicolas; Goetz, Laurent; Parent, Martin; Prudhomme, Michel; Cantin, Léo.; Galstian, Tigran; Messaddeq, Younès.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation's effectiveness relies on the ability of the stimulating electrode to be properly placed within a specific target area of the brain. Optical guidance techniques that can increase the accuracy of the procedure, without causing any additional harm, are therefore of great interest. We have designed a cheap optical fiber-based device that is small enough to be placed within commercially available DBS stimulating electrodes' hollow cores and that is capable of sensing biological information from the surrounding tissue, using low power white light. With this probe we have shown the ability to distinguish white and grey matter as well as blood vessels, in vitro, in human brain samples and in vivo, in rats. We have also repeated the in vitro procedure with the probe inserted in a DBS stimulating electrode and found the results were in good agreement. We are currently validating a second fiber optic device, with micro-optical components, that will result in label free, molecular level sensing capabilities, using CARS spectroscopy. The final objective will be to use this data in real time, during deep brain stimulation neurosurgery, to increase the safety and accuracy of the procedure.

  3. Neuronal Organization of Deep Brain Opsin Photoreceptors in Adult Teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Chong Yee; Kitahashi, Takashi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological impacts of light beyond vision, i.e., non-visual functions of light, signify the need to better understand light detection (or photoreception) systems in vertebrates. Photopigments, which comprise light-absorbing chromophores bound to a variety of G-protein coupled receptor opsins, are responsible for visual and non-visual photoreception. Non-visual opsin photopigments in the retina of mammals and extra-retinal tissues of non-mammals play an important role in non-image-forming functions of light, e.g., biological rhythms and seasonal reproduction. This review highlights the role of opsin photoreceptors in the deep brain, which could involve conserved neurochemical systems that control different time- and light-dependent physiologies in in non-mammalian vertebrates including teleost fish. PMID:27199680

  4. The rationale for deep brain stimulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Bari, Ausaf; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a major worldwide health problem with no effective therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a useful therapy for certain movement disorders and is increasingly being investigated for treatment of other neural circuit disorders. Here we review the rationale for investigating DBS as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Phase I clinical trials of DBS targeting memory circuits in Alzheimer's disease patients have shown promising results in clinical assessments of cognitive function, neurophysiological tests of cortical glucose metabolism, and neuroanatomical volumetric measurements showing reduced rates of atrophy. These findings have been supported by animal studies, where electrical stimulation of multiple nodes within the memory circuit have shown neuroplasticity through stimulation-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and improved performance in memory tasks. The precise mechanisms by which DBS may enhance memory and cognitive functions in Alzheimer's disease patients and the degree of its clinical efficacy continue to be examined in ongoing clinical trials.

  5. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson’s disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  6. Patient specific Parkinson's disease detection for adaptive deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ameer; Zamani, Majid; Bayford, Richard; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Continuous deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients results in side effects and shortening of the pacemaker battery life. This can be remedied using adaptive stimulation. To achieve adaptive DBS, patient customized PD detection is required due to the inconsistency associated with biomarkers across patients and time. This paper proposes the use of patient specific feature extraction together with adaptive support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to create a patient customized detector for PD. The patient specific feature extraction is obtained using the extrema of the ratio between the PD and non-PD spectra bands of each patient as features, while the adaptive SVM classifier adjusts its decision boundary until a suitable model is obtained. This yields individualised features and classifier pairs for each patient. Datasets containing local field potentials of PD patients were used to validate the method. Six of the nine patient datasets tested achieved a classification accuracy greater than 98%. The adaptive detector is suitable for realization on chip.

  7. Vocal Tremor: Novel Therapeutic Target for Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Vinod K.; Ho, Allen L.; Parker, Jonathon J.; Erickson-DiRenzo, Elizabeth; Halpern, Casey H.

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous voice is characteristically associated with essential tremor, and is referred to as essential vocal tremor (EVT). Current estimates suggest that up to 40% of individuals diagnosed with essential tremor also present with EVT, which is associated with an impaired quality of life. Traditional EVT treatments have demonstrated limited success in long-term management of symptoms. However, voice tremor has been noted to decrease in patients receiving deep brain stimulation (DBS) with the targeting of thalamic nuclei. In this study, we describe our multidisciplinary procedure for awake, frameless DBS with optimal stimulation targets as well as acoustic analysis and laryngoscopic assessment to quantify tremor reduction. Finally, we investigate the most recent clinical evidence regarding the procedure. PMID:27735866

  8. Engineering the Next Generation of Clinical Deep Brain Stimulation Technology

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Cameron C.; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Shamir, Reuben R.; Lempka, Scott F.

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has evolved into a powerful clinical therapy for a range of neurological disorders, but even with impressive clinical growth, DBS technology has been relatively stagnant over its history. However, enhanced collaborations between neural engineers, neuroscientists, physicists, neurologists, and neurosurgeons are beginning to address some of the limitations of current DBS technology. These interactions have helped to develop novel ideas for the next generation of clinical DBS systems. This review attempts collate some of that progress and with two goals in mind. First, provide a general description of current clinical DBS practices, geared toward educating biomedical engineers and computer scientists on a field that needs their expertise and attention. Second, describe some of the technological developments that are currently underway in surgical targeting, stimulation parameter selection, stimulation protocols, and stimulation hardware that are being directly evaluated for near term clinical application. PMID:25161150

  9. Carbon nanotube yarns for deep brain stimulation electrode.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changqing; Li, Luming; Hao, Hongwei

    2011-12-01

    A new form of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode was proposed that was made of carbon nanotube yarns (CNTYs). Electrode interface properties were examined using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS). The CNTY electrode interface exhibited large charge storage capacity (CSC) of 12.3 mC/cm(2) which increased to 98.6 mC/cm(2) after acid treatment, compared with 5.0 mC/cm(2) of Pt-Ir. Impedance spectrum of both untreated and treated CNTY electrodes showed that finite diffusion process occurred at the interface due to their porous structure and charge was delivered through capacitive mechanism. To evaluate stability electrical stimulus was exerted for up to 72 h and CV and EIS results of CNTY electrodes revealed little alteration. Therefore CNTY could make a good electrode material for DBS.

  10. Deep brain stimulation for other tremors, myoclonus, and chorea.

    PubMed

    Starr, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well established treatment for essential tremor and for the tremor associated with Parkinson's disease. The efficacy of DBS in these common tremors has led some investigators to apply the technique to rarer tremors such as such as Holmes' tremor, posttraumatic tremor, orthostatic tremor, and the tremor associated with multiple sclerosis. Likewise, DBS of the thalamus and globus pallidus directly suppresses levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease, suggesting the application of DBS to other hyperkinetic states such as Huntington's disease, tardive dyskinesia, and hemiballism. Myoclonus has also been treated with DBS, especially in cases where it is associated with dystonia. This chapter reviews the reported results of DBS for these conditions. Due to the rarity of these indications, most of the literature reviewed takes the form of case reports or small single-center case series.

  11. Differential effects of deep brain stimulation on verbal fluency.

    PubMed

    Ehlen, Felicitas; Schoenecker, Thomas; Kühn, Andrea A; Klostermann, Fabian

    2014-07-01

    We aimed at gaining insights into principles of subcortical lexical processing. Therefore, effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in different target structures on verbal fluency (VF) were tested. VF was assessed with active vs. inactivated DBS in 13 and 14 patients with DBS in the vicinity of the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) and, respectively, of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Results were correlated to electrode localizations in postoperative MRI, and compared to those of 12 age-matched healthy controls. Patients' VF performance was generally below normal. However, while activation of DBS in the vicinity of VIM provoked marked VF decline, it induced subtle phonemic VF enhancement in the vicinity of STN. The effects correlated with electrode localizations in left hemispheric stimulation sites. The results show distinct dependencies of VF on DBS in the vicinity of VIM vs. STN. Particular risks for deterioration occur in patients with relatively ventromedial thalamic electrodes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Engineering the next generation of clinical deep brain stimulation technology.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Cameron C; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Shamir, Reuben R; Lempka, Scott F

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has evolved into a powerful clinical therapy for a range of neurological disorders, but even with impressive clinical growth, DBS technology has been relatively stagnant over its history. However, enhanced collaborations between neural engineers, neuroscientists, physicists, neurologists, and neurosurgeons are beginning to address some of the limitations of current DBS technology. These interactions have helped to develop novel ideas for the next generation of clinical DBS systems. This review attempts collate some of that progress with two goals in mind. First, provide a general description of current clinical DBS practices, geared toward educating biomedical engineers and computer scientists on a field that needs their expertise and attention. Second, describe some of the technological developments that are currently underway in surgical targeting, stimulation parameter selection, stimulation protocols, and stimulation hardware that are being directly evaluated for near term clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Authenticity and autonomy in deep-brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wardrope, Alistair

    2014-08-01

    Felicitas Kraemer draws on the experiences of patients undergoing deep-brain stimulation (DBS) to propose two distinct and potentially conflicting principles of respect: for an individual's autonomy (interpreted as mental competence), and for their authenticity. I argue instead that, according to commonly-invoked justifications of respect for autonomy, authenticity is itself in part constitutive of an analysis of autonomy worthy of respect; Kraemer's argument thus highlights the shortcomings of practical applications of respect for autonomy that emphasise competence while neglecting other important dimensions of autonomy such as authenticity, since it shows that competence alone cannot be interpreted as a reliable indicator of an individual's capacity for exercising autonomy. I draw from relational accounts to suggest how respect for a more expansive conception of autonomy might be interpreted for individuals undergoing DBS and in general.

  14. Early application of deep brain stimulation: clinical and ethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Woopen, Christiane; Pauls, K Amande M; Koy, Anne; Moro, Elena; Timmermann, Lars

    2013-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has proven to be a successful therapeutic approach in several patients with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease and dystonia. Hitherto its application was mainly restricted to advanced disease patients resistant to medication or with severe treatment side effects. However, there is now growing interest in earlier application of DBS, aimed at improving clinical outcomes, quality of life, and avoiding psychosocial consequences of chronic disease-related impairments. We address the clinical and ethical aspects of two "early" uses of DBS, (1) DBS early in the course of the disease, and (2) DBS early in life (i.e. in children). Possible benefits, risks and burdens are discussed and thoroughly considered. Further research is needed to obtain a careful balance between exposing vulnerable patients to potential severe surgical risks and excluding them from a potentially good outcome.

  15. Area Prostriata in the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Mikellidou, Kyriaki; Kurzawski, Jan W; Frijia, Francesca; Montanaro, Domenico; Greco, Vincenzo; Burr, David C; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2017-10-09

    Area prostriata is a cortical area at the fundus of the calcarine sulcus, described anatomically in humans [1-5] and other primates [6-9]. It is lightly myelinated and lacks the clearly defined six-layer structure evident throughout the cerebral cortex, with a thinner layer 4 and thicker layer 2 [10], characteristic of limbic cortex [11]. In the marmoset and rhesus monkey, area prostriata has cortical connections with MT+ [12], the cingulate motor cortex [8], the auditory cortex [13], the orbitofrontal cortex, and the frontal polar cortices [14]. Here we use functional magnetic resonance together with a wide-field projection system to study its functional properties in humans. With population receptive field mapping [15], we show that area prostriata has a complete representation of the visual field, clearly distinct from the adjacent area V1. As in the marmoset, the caudal-dorsal border of human prostriata-abutting V1-represents the far peripheral visual field, with eccentricities decreasing toward its rostral boundary. Area prostriata responds strongly to very fast motion, greater than 500°/s. The functional properties of area prostriata suggest that it may serve to alert the brain quickly to fast visual events, particularly in the peripheral visual field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychosurgery and deep brain stimulation as ultima ratio treatment for refractory depression.

    PubMed

    Juckel, Georg; Uhl, Idun; Padberg, Frank; Brüne, Martin; Winter, Christine

    2009-02-01

    For decades, the most severe, protracted and therapy-resistant forms of major depression have compelled clinicians and researchers to look for last resort treatment. Early psychosurgical procedures were hazardous and often associated with severe and persistent side effects including avolition, apathy and change of personality. With the introduction of psychopharmacological treatments in the 1950s, the frequency of ablative procedures declined rapidly. The past decade, however, has witnessed the resurgence of surgical strategies as a result of refined techniques and advances such as high frequency stimulation of deep brain nuclei. Recent data suggest that the overall effect of high frequency stimulation lies in the functional inhibition of neural activity in the region stimulated. Contrary to other psychosurgical procedures, high frequency stimulation reversibly modulates targeted brain areas and allows a postsurgical adaption of the stimulation parameters according to clinical outcome. With increased understanding of the brain regions and functional circuits involved in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, major depression has emerged as a target for new psychosurgical approaches to selectively and precisely modulate neural areas involved in the disease process. Recent studies of minimally intervening procedures report good clinical outcome in the treatment of therapy-resistant forms of major depression. High frequency stimulation was successfully applied in several small samples of patients with treatment-resistant depression when the stimulation focused on different areas, e.g., nucleus accumbens, the lateral habenula or cortical areas. Nevertheless, the reticence toward psychosurgery, even for those patients suffering from the most debilitating forms of depression, still prevails, even though recent studies have shown significant improvement in terms of quality of life with the limitation that the number of treated cases has been small. In any event, valid

  17. Functional imaging of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Boertien, Tessel; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Kahan, Joshua; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Hariz, Marwan; Mancini, Laura; Limousin, Patricia; Foltynie, Thomas

    2011-08-15

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an accepted treatment for the motor complications of Parkinson's disease. The therapeutic mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. Although the results of deep brain stimulation are similar to the results that can be obtained by lesional surgery, accumulating evidence from functional imaging and clinical neurophysiology suggests that the effects of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation are not simply the result of inhibition of subthalamic nucleus activity. Positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography has consistently demonstrated changes in cortical activation in response to subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation. However, the technique has limited spatial and temporal resolution, and therefore the changes in activity of subcortical projection sites of the subthalamic nucleus (such as the globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and thalamus) are not as clear. Clarifying whether clinically relevant effects from subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation in humans are mediated through inhibition or excitation of orthodromic or antidromic pathways (or both) would contribute to our understanding of the precise mechanism of action of deep brain stimulation and may allow improvements in safety and efficacy of the technique. In this review we discuss the published evidence from functional imaging studies of patients with subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation to date, together with how these data inform the mechanism of action of deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Differential impact of thalamic versus subthalamic deep brain stimulation on lexical processing.

    PubMed

    Krugel, Lea K; Ehlen, Felicitas; Tiedt, Hannes O; Kühn, Andrea A; Klostermann, Fabian

    2014-10-01

    Roles of subcortical structures in language processing are vague, but, interestingly, basal ganglia and thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation can go along with reduced lexical capacities. To deepen the understanding of this impact, we assessed word processing as a function of thalamic versus subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation. Ten essential tremor patients treated with thalamic and 14 Parkinson׳s disease patients with subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation performed an acoustic Lexical Decision Task ON and OFF stimulation. Combined analysis of task performance and event-related potentials allowed the determination of processing speed, priming effects, and N400 as neurophysiological correlate of lexical stimulus processing. 12 age-matched healthy participants acted as control subjects. Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation prolonged word decisions and reduced N400 potentials. No comparable ON-OFF effects were present in patients with subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation. In the latter group of patients with Parkinson' disease, N400 amplitudes were, however, abnormally low, whether under active or inactive Deep Brain Stimulation. In conclusion, performance speed and N400 appear to be influenced by state functions, modulated by thalamic, but not subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation, compatible with concepts of thalamo-cortical engagement in word processing. Clinically, these findings specify cognitive sequels of Deep Brain Stimulation in a target-specific way.

  19. Deep brain stimulation for severe autism: from pathophysiology to procedure.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Saurabh; McGovern, Robert A; Sheth, Sameer A

    2015-06-01

    Autism is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by early-onset impairment in social interaction and communication and by repetitive, restricted behaviors and interests. Because the degree of impairment may vary, a spectrum of clinical manifestations exists. Severe autism is characterized by complete lack of language development and potentially life-threatening self-injurious behavior, the latter of which may be refractory to medical therapy and devastating for affected individuals and their caretakers. New treatment strategies are therefore needed. Here, the authors propose deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) as a therapeutic intervention to treat severe autism. The authors review recent developments in the understanding of the pathophysiology of autism. Specifically, they describe the genetic and environmental alterations that affect neurodevelopment. The authors also highlight the resultant microstructural, macrostructural, and functional abnormalities that emerge during brain development, which create a pattern of dysfunctional neural networks involved in socioemotional processing. They then discuss how these findings implicate the BLA as a key node in the pathophysiology of autism and review a reported case of BLA DBS for treatment of severe autism. Much progress has been made in recent years in understanding the pathophysiology of autism. The BLA represents a logical neurosurgical target for treating severe autism. Further study is needed that considers mechanistic and operative challenges.

  20. In vivo impedance spectroscopy of deep brain stimulation electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lempka, Scott F; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Johnson, Matthew D; Vitek, Jerrold L; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2009-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a powerful clinical technology, but a systematic characterization of the electrical interactions between the electrode and the brain is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the in vivo changes in the DBS electrode impedance that occur after implantation and during clinically relevant stimulation. Clinical DBS devices typically apply high-frequency voltage-controlled stimulation, and as a result, the injected current is directly regulated by the impedance of the electrode-tissue interface. We monitored the impedance of scaled-down clinical DBS electrodes implanted in the thalamus and subthalamic nucleus of a rhesus macaque using electrode impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements ranging from 0.5 Hz to 10 kHz. To further characterize our measurements, equivalent circuit models of the electrode-tissue interface were used to quantify the role of various interface components in producing the observed electrode impedance. Following implantation, the DBS electrode impedance increased and a semicircular arc was observed in the high-frequency range of the EIS measurements, commonly referred to as the tissue component of the impedance. Clinically relevant stimulation produced a rapid decrease in electrode impedance with extensive changes in the tissue component. These post-operative and stimulation-induced changes in impedance could play an important role in the observed functional effects of voltage-controlled DBS and should be considered during clinical stimulation parameter selection and chronic animal research studies.

  1. Probabilistic analysis of activation volumes generated during deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Cooper, Scott E; Henderson, Jaimie M; Wolgamuth, Barbara; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2011-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) and shows great promise for the treatment of several other disorders. However, while the clinical analysis of DBS has received great attention, a relative paucity of quantitative techniques exists to define the optimal surgical target and most effective stimulation protocol for a given disorder. In this study we describe a methodology that represents an evolutionary addition to the concept of a probabilistic brain atlas, which we call a probabilistic stimulation atlas (PSA). We outline steps to combine quantitative clinical outcome measures with advanced computational models of DBS to identify regions where stimulation-induced activation could provide the best therapeutic improvement on a per-symptom basis. While this methodology is relevant to any form of DBS, we present example results from subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS for PD. We constructed patient-specific computer models of the volume of tissue activated (VTA) for 163 different stimulation parameter settings which were tested in six patients. We then assigned clinical outcome scores to each VTA and compiled all of the VTAs into a PSA to identify stimulation-induced activation targets that maximized therapeutic response with minimal side effects. The results suggest that selection of both electrode placement and clinical stimulation parameter settings could be tailored to the patient's primary symptoms using patient-specific models and PSAs.

  2. Preclinical evaluation of a miniaturized Deep Brain Stimulation electrode lead.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B; McNeill, Peter M; Allison, Rachel K; Bibari, Olivier; Williams, Chris E; McDermott, Hugh J

    2015-01-01

    The effect of miniaturizing the electrode lead for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy was investigated in this work. A direct comparison was made between a miniature lead (0.65 mm diameter) and a lead of standard size (1.3 mm). Acute in vivo implantation in two cat brains was performed to evaluate surgical trauma and confirm capacity to target thalamic nuclei. Insertion into a homogeneous gel model of neural tissue was used to compare insertion forces while visualizing the process. The standard size cannula, used first to guide lead insertion, required substantially higher insertion force compared with the miniature version and produced a significantly larger region of tissue disruption. The characteristic hemorrhage and edema extended 119-352 μm from the implanted track surface of the miniature lead and cannula, while these extended 311-571 μm for the standard size lead and cannula. A miniature DBS implant can reduce the extent of trauma and could potentially help improve neural function preservation after functional neurosurgery.

  3. In vivo impedance spectroscopy of deep brain stimulation electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempka, Scott F.; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Johnson, Matthew D.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2009-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a powerful clinical technology, but a systematic characterization of the electrical interactions between the electrode and the brain is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the in vivo changes in the DBS electrode impedance that occur after implantation and during clinically relevant stimulation. Clinical DBS devices typically apply high-frequency voltage-controlled stimulation, and as a result, the injected current is directly regulated by the impedance of the electrode-tissue interface. We monitored the impedance of scaled-down clinical DBS electrodes implanted in the thalamus and subthalamic nucleus of a rhesus macaque using electrode impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements ranging from 0.5 Hz to 10 kHz. To further characterize our measurements, equivalent circuit models of the electrode-tissue interface were used to quantify the role of various interface components in producing the observed electrode impedance. Following implantation, the DBS electrode impedance increased and a semicircular arc was observed in the high-frequency range of the EIS measurements, commonly referred to as the tissue component of the impedance. Clinically relevant stimulation produced a rapid decrease in electrode impedance with extensive changes in the tissue component. These post-operative and stimulation-induced changes in impedance could play an important role in the observed functional effects of voltage-controlled DBS and should be considered during clinical stimulation parameter selection and chronic animal research studies.

  4. Probabilistic Analysis of Activation Volumes Generated During Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Butson, Christopher R.; Cooper, Scott E.; Henderson, Jaimie M.; Wolgamuth, Barbara; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and shows great promise for the treatment of several other disorders. However, while the clinical analysis of DBS has received great attention, a relative paucity of quantitative techniques exists to define the optimal surgical target and most effective stimulation protocol for a given disorder. In this study we describe a methodology that represents an evolutionary addition to the concept of a probabilistic brain atlas, which we call a probabilistic stimulation atlas (PSA). We outline steps to combine quantitative clinical outcome measures with advanced computational models of DBS to identify regions where stimulation-induced activation could provide the best therapeutic improvement on a per-symptom basis. While this methodology is relevant to any form of DBS, we present example results from subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS for PD. We constructed patient-specific computer models of the volume of tissue activated (VTA) for 163 different stimulation parameter settings which were tested in six patients. We then assigned clinical outcome scores to each VTA and compiled all of the VTAs into a PSA to identify stimulation-induced activation targets that maximized therapeutic response with minimal side effects. The results suggest that selection of both electrode placement and clinical stimulation parameter settings could be tailored to the patient’s primary symptoms using patient-specific models and PSAs. PMID:20974269

  5. Deep brain stimulation in addiction due to psychoactive substance use.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Jens; Bührle, Christian P; Lenartz, Doris; Sturm, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is one of the most challenging health problems. It is associated with enormous individual distress and tremendous socioeconomic consequences. Unfortunately, its underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, and pharmacological, psychological, or social interventions often fail to achieve long-lasting remission. Next to genetic, social, and contextual factors, a substance-induced dysfunction of the brain's reward system is considered a decisive factor for the establishment and maintenance of addiction. Due to its successful application and approval for several neurological disorders, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is known as a powerful tool for modulating dysregulated networks and has also been considered for substance addiction. Initial promising case reports of DBS in alcohol and heroin addiction in humans have recently been published. Likewise, results from animal studies mimicking different kinds of substance addiction point in a similar direction. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the published results on DBS in addiction, and to discuss whether these preliminary results justify further research, given the novelty of this treatment approach.

  6. Use of deep brain stimulation for major affective disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Kuanqing

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of major affective disorders, such as major depression and bipolar disorder, poses a challenge for identification of effective treatments. In a substantial number of patients, psychopharmacologic treatment does not lead to effective continuous symptom relief. The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treatment-resistant patients is an investigational approach that has recently produced promising results. The recent development of safer stereotaxic neurosurgery, and the combination with functional neuroimaging to map the affected brain circuits, have led to the investigation of DBS as a potential strategy to treat major mood disorders. Several independent clinical studies have recently shown that chronic DBS treatment leads to remission of symptoms in a high number of treatment-resistant patients for major depression and bipolar disorder. In conclusion, the existing proof-of-principle that DBS can be an effective intervention for treatment-resistant depression opens new avenues for treatment. However, multicenter, randomized and blind trials need to confirm efficacy and be approved after the most recent failures. Patient selection and surgical-related improvements are key issues that remain to be addressed to help deliver more precise and customized treatment. PMID:27698736

  7. Deep Learning for Brain MRI Segmentation: State of the Art and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Zeynettin; Galimzianova, Alfiia; Hoogi, Assaf; Rubin, Daniel L; Erickson, Bradley J

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of brain MRI is routine for many neurological diseases and conditions and relies on accurate segmentation of structures of interest. Deep learning-based segmentation approaches for brain MRI are gaining interest due to their self-learning and generalization ability over large amounts of data. As the deep learning architectures are becoming more mature, they gradually outperform previous state-of-the-art classical machine learning algorithms. This review aims to provide an overview of current deep learning-based segmentation approaches for quantitative brain MRI. First we review the current deep learning architectures used for segmentation of anatomical brain structures and brain lesions. Next, the performance, speed, and properties of deep learning approaches are summarized and discussed. Finally, we provide a critical assessment of the current state and identify likely future developments and trends.

  8. Optogenetically inspired deep brain stimulation: linking basic with clinical research.

    PubMed

    Lüscher, Christian; Pollak, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, optogenetics has revolutionised the neurosciences. The technique, which allows for cell-type specific excitation and inhibition of neurons in the brain of freely moving rodents, has been used to tighten the links of causality between neural activity and behaviour. Optogenetics is also enabling an unprecedented characterisation of circuits and their dysfunction in a number of brain diseases, above all those conditions that are not caused by neurodegeneration. Notable progress has been made in addiction, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders, as well as other anxiety disorders. By extension, the technique has also been used to propose blueprints for innovative rational treatment of these diseases. The goal is to design manipulations that disrupt pathological circuit function or restore normal activity. This can be achieved by targeting specific projections in order to apply specific stimulation protocols validated by ex-vivo analysis of the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction. In a number of cases, specific forms of pathological synaptic plasticity have been implicated. For example, addictive drugs via strong increase of dopamine trigger a myriad of alterations of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid transmission, also called drug-evoked synaptic plasticity. This opens the way to the design of optogenetic reversal protocols, which might restore normal transmission with the hope to abolish the pathological behaviour. Several proof of principle studies for this approach have recently been published. However, for many reasons, optogenetics will not be translatable to human applications in the near future. Here, we argue that an intermediate step is novel deep brain stimulation (DBS) protocols that emulate successful optogenetic approaches in animal models. We provide a roadmap for a translational path to rational, optogenetically inspired DBS protocols to refine existing approaches and expand to novel indications.

  9. Adaptive Deep Brain Stimulation In Advanced Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Little, Simon; Pogosyan, Alex; Neal, Spencer; Zavala, Baltazar; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Ashkan, Keyoumars; FitzGerald, James; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu Z; Brown, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) could potentially be used to interact with pathological brain signals to intervene and ameliorate their effects in disease states. Here, we provide proof-of-principle of this approach by using a BCI to interpret pathological brain activity in patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD) and to use this feedback to control when therapeutic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is delivered. Our goal was to demonstrate that by personalizing and optimizing stimulation in real time, we could improve on both the efficacy and efficiency of conventional continuous DBS. Methods: We tested BCI-controlled adaptive DBS (aDBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in 8 PD patients. Feedback was provided by processing of the local field potentials recorded directly from the stimulation electrodes. The results were compared to no stimulation, conventional continuous stimulation (cDBS), and random intermittent stimulation. Both unblinded and blinded clinical assessments of motor effect were performed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Results: Motor scores improved by 66% (unblinded) and 50% (blinded) during aDBS, which were 29% (p = 0.03) and 27% (p = 0.005) better than cDBS, respectively. These improvements were achieved with a 56% reduction in stimulation time compared to cDBS, and a corresponding reduction in energy requirements (p < 0.001). aDBS was also more effective than no stimulation and random intermittent stimulation. Interpretation BCI-controlled DBS is tractable and can be more efficient and efficacious than conventional continuous neuromodulation for PD. Ann Neurol 2013;74:449–457 PMID:23852650

  10. Microrecording and image-guided stereotactic biopsy of deep-seated brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Keiya; Hirato, Masafumi; Miyagishima, Takaaki; Horiguchi, Keishi; Sugawara, Kenichi; Hirato, Junko; Yokoo, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided stereotactic brain tumor biopsy cannot easily obtain samples of small deep-seated tumor or selectively sample the most viable region of malignant tumor. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy in combination with depth microrecording was evaluated to solve such problems. Operative records, MRI findings, and pathological specimens were evaluated in 12 patients with small deep-seated brain tumor, in which image-guided stereotactic biopsy was performed with the aid of depth microrecording. The tumors were located in the caudate nucleus (1 patient), thalamus (7 patients), midbrain (2 patients), and cortex (2 patients). Surgery was performed with a frameless stereotactic system in 3 patients and with a frame-based stereotactic system in 9 patients. Microrecording was performed to study the electrical activities along the trajectory in the deep brain structures and the tumor. The correlations were studied between the electrophysiological, MRI, and pathological findings. Thirty-two patients with surface or large brain tumor were also studied, in whom image-guided stereotactic biopsy without microrecording was performed. The diagnostic yield in the group with microrecording was 100% (low-grade glioma 4, high-grade glioma 4, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma 3, and germinoma 1), which was comparable to 93.8% in the group without microrecording. The postoperative complication rate was as low as that of the conventional image-guided method without using microelectrode recording, and the mortality rate was 0%, although the target lesions were small and deep-seated in all cases. Depth microrecording revealed disappearance of neural activity in the tumor regardless of the tumor type. Neural activity began to decrease from 6.3 ± 4.5 mm (mean ± SD) above the point of complete disappearance along the trajectory. Burst discharges were observed in 6 of the 12 cases, from 3 ± 1.4 mm above the point of decrease of neural activity. Injury discharges were often found at 0.5-1 mm

  11. In vivo mapping of current density distribution in brain tissues during deep brain stimulation (DBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2017-01-01

    New methods for in vivo mapping of brain responses during deep brain stimulation (DBS) are indispensable to secure clinical applications. Assessment of current density distribution, induced by internally injected currents, may provide an alternative method for understanding the therapeutic effects of electrical stimulation. The current flow and pathway are affected by internal conductivity, and can be imaged using magnetic resonance-based conductivity imaging methods. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an imaging method that can enable highly resolved mapping of electromagnetic tissue properties such as current density and conductivity of living tissues. In the current study, we experimentally imaged current density distribution of in vivo canine brains by applying MREIT to electrical stimulation. The current density maps of three canine brains were calculated from the measured magnetic flux density data. The absolute current density values of brain tissues, including gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid were compared to assess the active regions during DBS. The resulting current density in different tissue types may provide useful information about current pathways and volume activation for adjusting surgical planning and understanding the therapeutic effects of DBS.

  12. Automated 3-Dimensional Brain Atlas Fitting to Microelectrode Recordings from Deep Brain Stimulation Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Luján, J. Luis; Noecker, Angela M.; Butson, Christopher R.; Cooper, Scott E.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgeries commonly rely on brain atlases and microelectrode recordings (MER) to help identify the target location for electrode implantation. We present an automated method for optimally fitting a 3-dimensional brain atlas to intraoperative MER and predicting a target DBS electrode location in stereotactic coordinates for the patient. Methods We retrospectively fit a 3-dimensional brain atlas to MER points from 10 DBS surgeries targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN). We used a constrained optimization algorithm to maximize the MER points correctly fitted (i.e., contained) within the appropriate atlas nuclei. We compared our optimization approach to conventional anterior commissure-posterior commissure (AC/PC) scaling, and to manual fits performed by four experts. A theoretical DBS electrode target location in the dorsal STN was customized to each patient as part of the fitting process and compared to the location of the clinically defined therapeutic stimulation contact. Results The human expert and computer optimization fits achieved significantly better fits than the AC/PC scaling (80, 81, and 41% of correctly fitted MER, respectively). However, the optimization fits were performed in less time than the expert fits and converged to a single solution for each patient, eliminating interexpert variance. Conclusions and Significance DBS therapeutic outcomes are directly related to electrode implantation accuracy. Our automated fitting techniques may aid in the surgical decision-making process by optimally integrating brain atlas and intraoperative neurophysiological data to provide a visual guide for target identification. PMID:19556832

  13. Effect of electrical vs. chemical deep brain stimulation at midbrain sites on micturition in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Stone, E; Coote, J H; Lovick, T A

    2015-05-01

    To understand how deep brain stimulation of the midbrain influences control of the urinary bladder. In urethane-anaesthetized male rats, saline was infused continuously into the bladder to evoke cycles of filling and voiding. The effect of electrical (0.1-2.0 ms pulses, 5-180 Hz, 0.5-2.5 V) compared to chemical stimulation (microinjection of D,L-homocysteic acid, 50 nL 0.1 M solution) at the same midbrain sites was tested. Electrical stimulation of the periaqueductal grey matter and surrounding midbrain disrupted normal coordinated voiding activity in detrusor and sphincters muscles and suppressed urine output. The effect occurred within seconds was reversible and not secondary to cardiorespiratory changes. Bladder compliance remained unchanged. Chemical stimulation over the same area using microinjection of D,L-homocysteic acid (DLH) to preferentially activate somatodendritic receptors decreased the frequency of micturition but did not disrupt the coordinated pattern of voiding. In contrast, chemical stimulation within the caudal ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, in the area where critical synapses in the micturition reflex pathway are located, increased the frequency of micturition. Electrical deep brain stimulation within the midbrain can inhibit reflex micturition. We suggest that the applied stimulus entrained activity in the neural circuitry locally, thereby imposing an unphysiological pattern of activity. In a way similar to the use of electrical signals to 'jam' radio transmission, this may prevent a synchronized pattern of efferent activity being transmitted to the spinal outflows to orchestrate a coordinated voiding response. Further experiments to record neuronal firing in the midbrain during the deep brain stimulation will be necessary to test this hypothesis. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Deep brain stimulation mechanisms: beyond the concept of local functional inhibition.

    PubMed

    Deniau, Jean-Michel; Degos, Bertrand; Bosch, Clémentine; Maurice, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    Deep brain electrical stimulation has become a recognized therapy in the treatment of a variety of motor disorders and has potentially promising applications in a wide range of neurological diseases including neuropsychiatry. Behavioural observation that electrical high-frequency stimulation of a given brain area induces an effect similar to a lesion suggested a mechanism of functional inhibition. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as per operative recordings in patients have revealed a variety of effects involving local changes of neuronal excitability as well as widespread effects throughout the connected network resulting from activation of axons, including antidromic activation. Here we review current data regarding the local and network activity changes induced by high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus and discuss this in the context of motor restoration in Parkinson's disease. Stressing the important functional consequences of axonal activation in deep brain stimulation mechanisms, we highlight the importance of developing anatomical knowledge concerning the fibre connections of the putative therapeutic targets.

  15. PEDiDBS: The pediatric international deep brain stimulation registry project.

    PubMed

    Marks, Warren; Bailey, Laurie; Sanger, Terence D

    2017-01-01

    Interactive neuromodulation represents the evolving frontier in surgical treatment of a variety of disorders involving the sensory organs and nervous system. Building on the advances of pioneering neurologists and neurosurgeons, progress has been made since the introduction of deep brain stimulation (DBS). Microelectrode recording has greatly aided our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of movement disorders and the effects of electrical stimulation. The introduction of image - guided systems to provide targeted, controlled neuro-stimulation to specific brain areas is an emerging technique for implantation and may have special appeal for pediatric patients. DBS is generally accepted as a treatment for some forms of childhood dystonia. Its potential role in other pediatric movement disorders is less well established. This is important, as most forms of dystonia begin in childhood or adolescence and many are inadequately responsive to current pharmacotherapy and other interventions. Nonetheless, many aspects of deep brain stimulation need clarification. This can only be accomplished through an organized platform for data sharing that will allow questions to be asked and hopefully answered, with the ultimate goal of developing evidence based practice based guidelines elucidating the role of DBS in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Deep brain optical measurements of cell type–specific neural activity in behaving mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guohong; Jun, Sang Beom; Jin, Xin; Luo, Guoxiang; Pham, Michael D; Lovinger, David M; Vogel, Steven S; Costa, Rui M

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genetically encoded fluorescent sensors enable the monitoring of cellular events from genetically defined groups of neurons in vivo. In this protocol, we describe how to use a time-correlated single-photon counting (tcspc)–based fiber optics system to measure the intensity, emission spectra and lifetime of fluorescent biosensors expressed in deep brain structures in freely moving mice. When combined with cre-dependent selective expression of genetically encoded ca2+ indicators (GecIs), this system can be used to measure the average neural activity from a specific population of cells in mice performing complex behavioral tasks. as an example, we used viral expression of GcaMps in striatal projection neurons (spns) and recorded the fluorescence changes associated with calcium spikes from mice performing a lever-pressing operant task. the whole procedure, consisting of virus injection, behavior training and optical recording, takes 3–4 weeks to complete. With minor adaptations, this protocol can also be applied to recording cellular events from other cell types in deep brain regions, such as dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area. the simultaneously recorded fluorescence signals and behavior events can be used to explore the relationship between the neural activity of specific brain circuits and behavior. PMID:24784819

  17. Deep brain optical measurements of cell type-specific neural activity in behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guohong; Jun, Sang Beom; Jin, Xin; Luo, Guoxiang; Pham, Michael D; Lovinger, David M; Vogel, Steven S; Costa, Rui M

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genetically encoded fluorescent sensors enable the monitoring of cellular events from genetically defined groups of neurons in vivo. In this protocol, we describe how to use a time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC)-based fiber optics system to measure the intensity, emission spectra and lifetime of fluorescent biosensors expressed in deep brain structures in freely moving mice. When combined with Cre-dependent selective expression of genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators (GECIs), this system can be used to measure the average neural activity from a specific population of cells in mice performing complex behavioral tasks. As an example, we used viral expression of GCaMPs in striatal projection neurons (SPNs) and recorded the fluorescence changes associated with calcium spikes from mice performing a lever-pressing operant task. The whole procedure, consisting of virus injection, behavior training and optical recording, takes 3-4 weeks to complete. With minor adaptations, this protocol can also be applied to recording cellular events from other cell types in deep brain regions, such as dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area. The simultaneously recorded fluorescence signals and behavior events can be used to explore the relationship between the neural activity of specific brain circuits and behavior.

  18. Functional MRI during Hippocampal Deep Brain Stimulation in the Healthy Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Vanhove, Christian; Descamps, Benedicte; Dauwe, Ine; van Mierlo, Pieter; Vonck, Kristl; Keereman, Vincent; Raedt, Robrecht; Boon, Paul; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders. The mechanism of action and the effects of electrical fields administered to the brain by means of an electrode remain to be elucidated. The effects of DBS have been investigated primarily by electrophysiological and neurochemical studies, which lack the ability to investigate DBS-related responses on a whole-brain scale. Visualization of whole-brain effects of DBS requires functional imaging techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), which reflects changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses throughout the entire brain volume. In order to visualize BOLD responses induced by DBS, we have developed an MRI-compatible electrode and an acquisition protocol to perform DBS during BOLD fMRI. In this study, we investigate whether DBS during fMRI is valuable to study local and whole-brain effects of hippocampal DBS and to investigate the changes induced by different stimulation intensities. Seven rats were stereotactically implanted with a custom-made MRI-compatible DBS-electrode in the right hippocampus. High frequency Poisson distributed stimulation was applied using a block-design paradigm. Data were processed by means of Independent Component Analysis. Clusters were considered significant when p-values were <0.05 after correction for multiple comparisons. Our data indicate that real-time hippocampal DBS evokes a bilateral BOLD response in hippocampal and other mesolimbic structures, depending on the applied stimulation intensity. We conclude that simultaneous DBS and fMRI can be used to detect local and whole-brain responses to circuit activation with different stimulation intensities, making this technique potentially powerful for exploration of cerebral changes in response to DBS for both preclinical and clinical DBS. PMID:26193653

  19. Classification of CT brain images based on deep learning networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Hui, Rui; Tian, Zengmin

    2017-01-01

    While computerised tomography (CT) may have been the first imaging tool to study human brain, it has not yet been implemented into clinical decision making process for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On the other hand, with the nature of being prevalent, inexpensive and non-invasive, CT does present diagnostic features of AD to a great extent. This study explores the significance and impact on the application of the burgeoning deep learning techniques to the task of classification of CT brain images, in particular utilising convolutional neural network (CNN), aiming at providing supplementary information for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Towards this end, three categories of CT images (N = 285) are clustered into three groups, which are AD, lesion (e.g. tumour) and normal ageing. In addition, considering the characteristics of this collection with larger thickness along the direction of depth (z) (~3-5 mm), an advanced CNN architecture is established integrating both 2D and 3D CNN networks. The fusion of the two CNN networks is subsequently coordinated based on the average of Softmax scores obtained from both networks consolidating 2D images along spatial axial directions and 3D segmented blocks respectively. As a result, the classification accuracy rates rendered by this elaborated CNN architecture are 85.2%, 80% and 95.3% for classes of AD, lesion and normal respectively with an average of 87.6%. Additionally, this improved CNN network appears to outperform the others when in comparison with 2D version only of CNN network as well as a number of state of the art hand-crafted approaches. As a result, these approaches deliver accuracy rates in percentage of 86.3, 85.6 ± 1.10, 86.3 ± 1.04, 85.2 ± 1.60, 83.1 ± 0.35 for 2D CNN, 2D SIFT, 2D KAZE, 3D SIFT and 3D KAZE respectively. The two major contributions of the paper constitute a new 3-D approach while applying deep learning technique to extract signature information

  20. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  1. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Using internal illumination with an optical fiber in the oral cavity, we demonstrate, for the first time, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) of the deep brain of rats in vivo. The experiment was performed on a full-ring-array PACT system, with the capability of providing high-speed cross-sectional imaging of the brain. Compared with external illumination through the cranial skull, internal illumination delivers more light to the base of the brain. Consequently, in vivo photoacoustic images clearly reveal deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  2. The epistemology of Deep Brain Stimulation and neuronal pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Erwin B

    2012-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a remarkable therapy succeeding where all manner of pharmacological manipulations and brain transplants fail. The success of DBS has resurrected the relevance of electrophysiology and dynamics on the order of milliseconds. Despite the remarkable effects of DBS, its mechanisms of action are largely unknown. There has been an expanding catalogue of various neuronal and neural responses to DBS or DBS-like stimulation but no clear conceptual encompassing explanatory scheme has emerged despite the technological prowess and intellectual sophistication of the scientists involved. Something is amiss. If the scientific observations are sound, then why has there not been more progress? The alternative is that it may be the hypotheses that frame the questions are at fault as well as the methods of inference (logic) used to validate the hypotheses. An analysis of the past and current notions of the DBS mechanisms of action is the subject in order to identify the presuppositions (premises) and logical fallacies that may be at fault. The hope is that these problems will be avoided in the future so the DBS can realize its full potential quickly. In this regard, the discussion of the methods of inference and presuppositions that underlie many current notions is no different then a critique of experimental methods common in scientific discussions and consequently, examinations of the epistemology and logic are appropriate. This analysis is in keeping with the growing appreciation among scientists and philosophers of science, the scientific observations (data) to not "speak for themselves" nor is the scientific method self-evidently true and that consideration of the underlying inferential methods is necessary.

  3. The Present Indication and Future of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    SUGIYAMA, Kenji; NOZAKI, Takao; ASAKAWA, Tetsuya; KOIZUMI, Shinichiro; SAITOH, Osamu; NAMBA, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    The use of electrical stimulation to treat pain in human disease dates back to ancient Rome or Greece. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS) was initially applied for pain treatment in the 1960s, and was later used to treat movement disorders in the 1990s. After recognition of DBS as a therapy for central nervous system (CNS) circuit disorders, DBS use showed drastic increase in terms of adaptability to disease and the patient’s population. More than 100,000 patients have received DBS therapy worldwide. The established indications for DBS are Parkinson’s disease, tremor, and dystonia, whereas global indications of DBS expanded to other neuronal diseases or disorders such as neuropathic pain, epilepsy, and tinnitus. DBS is also experimentally used to manage cognitive disorders and psychiatric diseases such as major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette’s syndrome, and eating disorders. The importance of ethics and conflicts surrounding the regulation and freedom of choice associated with the application of DBS therapy for new diseases or disorders is increasing. These debates are centered on the use of DBS to treat new diseases and disorders as well as its potential to enhance ability in normal healthy individuals. Here we present three issues that need to be addressed in the future: (1) elucidation of the mechanisms of DBS, (2) development of new DBS methods, and (3) miniaturization of the DBS system. With the use of DBS, functional neurosurgery entered into the new era that man can manage and control the brain circuit to treat intractable neuronal diseases and disorders. PMID:25925757

  4. Temporally-Patterned Deep Brain Stimulation in a Mouse Model of Multiple Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tabansky, Inna; Quinkert, Amy Wells; Rahman, Nadera; Muller, Salomon Zev; Löfgren, Jesper; Rudling, Johan; Goodman, Alyssa; Wang, Yingping; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2014-01-01

    We report that mice with closed-head multiple traumatic brain injury (TBI) show a decrease in the motoric aspects of generalized arousal, as measured by automated, quantitative behavioral assays. Further, we found that temporally-patterned deep brain stimulation (DBS) can increase generalized arousal and spontaneous motor activity in this mouse model of TBI. This arousal increase is input-pattern-dependent, as changing the temporal pattern of DBS can modulate its effect on motor activity. Finally, an extensive examination of mouse behavioral capacities, looking for deficits in this model of TBI, suggest that the strongest effects of TBI in this model are found in the initiation of any kind of movement. PMID:25072520

  5. Affective brain areas and sleep disordered breathing

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Woo, Mary A.; Ogren, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The neural damage accompanying the hypoxia, reduced perfusion, and other consequences of sleep-disordered breathing found in obstructive sleep apnea, heart failure (HF), and congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), appears in areas that serve multiple functions, including emotional drives to breathe, and involve systems that serve affective, cardiovascular, and breathing roles. The damage, assessed with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures, shows tissue loss or water content and diffusion changes indicative of injury, and impaired axonal integrity between structures; damage is preferentially unilateral. Functional MRI responses in affected areas also are time- or amplitude- distorted to ventilatory or autonomic challenges. Among the structures injured are the insular, cingulate, and ventral medial prefrontal cortices, as well as cerebellar deep nuclei and cortex, anterior hypothalamus, raphé, ventrolateral medulla, basal ganglia and, in CCHS, the locus coeruleus. Raphé and locus coeruleus injury may modify serotonergic and adrenergic modulation of upper airway and arousal characteristics. Since both axons and gray matter show injury, the consequences to function, especially to autonomic, cognitive, and mood regulation, are major. Several affected rostral sites, including the insular and cingulate cortices and hippocampus, mediate aspects of dyspnea, especially in CCHS, while others, including the anterior cingulate and thalamus, participate in initiation of inspiration after central breathing pauses, and the medullary injury can impair baroreflex and breathing control. The ancillary injury associated with sleep-disordered breathing to central structures can elicit multiple other distortions in cardiovascular, cognitive, and emotional functions in addition to effects on breathing regulation. PMID:24746053

  6. Lesion Analysis of the Brain Areas Involved in Language Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronkers, Nina F.; Wilkins, David P.; Van Valin, Robert D., Jr.; Redfern, Brenda B.; Jaeger, Jeri J.

    2004-01-01

    The cortical regions of the brain traditionally associated with the comprehension of language are Wernicke's area and Broca's area. However, recent evidence suggests that other brain regions might also be involved in this complex process. This paper describes the opportunity to evaluate a large number of brain-injured patients to determine which…

  7. Lesion Analysis of the Brain Areas Involved in Language Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronkers, Nina F.; Wilkins, David P.; Van Valin, Robert D., Jr.; Redfern, Brenda B.; Jaeger, Jeri J.

    2004-01-01

    The cortical regions of the brain traditionally associated with the comprehension of language are Wernicke's area and Broca's area. However, recent evidence suggests that other brain regions might also be involved in this complex process. This paper describes the opportunity to evaluate a large number of brain-injured patients to determine which…

  8. Potential surgical targets for deep brain stimulation in treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Hauptman, Jason S; DeSalles, Antonio A F; Espinoza, Randall; Sedrak, Mark; Ishida, Warren

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the definition of treatment-resistant depression (TRD), review the literature regarding deep brain stimulation (DBS) for TRD, and identify potential anatomical and functional targets for future widespread clinical application. A comprehensive literature review was performed to determine the current status of DBS for TRD, with an emphasis on the scientific support for various implantation sites. The definition of TRD is presented, as is its management scheme. The rationale behind using DBS for depression is reviewed. Five potential targets have been identified in the literature: ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens, subgenual cingulate cortex (area 25), inferior thalamic peduncle, rostral cingulate cortex (area 24a), and lateral habenula. Deep brain stimulation electrodes thus far have been implanted and activated in only the first 3 of these structures in humans. These targets have proven to be safe and effective, albeit in a small number of cases. Surgical intervention for TRD in the form of DBS is emerging as a viable treatment alternative to existing modalities. Although the studies reported thus far have small sample sizes, the results appear to be promising. Various surgical targets, such as the subgenual cingulate cortex, inferior thalamic peduncle, and nucleus accumbens, have been shown to be safe and to lead to beneficial effects with various stimulation parameters. Further studies with larger patient groups are required to adequately assess the safety and efficacy of these targets, as well as the optimal stimulation parameters and long-term effects.

  9. Deep brain stimulation for vocal tremor: a comprehensive, multidisciplinary methodology.

    PubMed

    Ho, Allen L; Erickson-Direnzo, Elizabeth; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Sung, Chih-Kwang; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-06-01

    Tremulous voice is a characteristic feature of a multitude of movement disorders, but when it occurs in individuals diagnosed with essential tremor, it is referred to as essential vocal tremor (EVT). For individuals with EVT, their tremulous voice is associated with significant social embarrassment and in severe cases may result in the discontinuation of employment and hobbies. Management of EVT is extremely difficult, and current behavioral and medical interventions for vocal tremor result in suboptimal outcomes. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic avenue for EVT, but few studies can be identified that have systematically examined improvements in EVT following DBS. The authors describe a case of awake bilateral DBS targeting the ventral intermediate nucleus for a patient suffering from severe voice and arm tremor. They also present their comprehensive, multidisciplinary methodology for definitive treatment of EVT via DBS. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time comprehensive intraoperative voice evaluation has been used to guide microelectrode/stimulator placement, as well as the first time that standard pre- and post-DBS assessments have been conducted, demonstrating the efficacy of this tailored DBS approach.

  10. The impact of deep brain stimulation on tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Jasper V.; Janssen, Marcus L. F.; Engelhard, Malou; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Schuurman, P. Richard; Contarino, Maria F.; Mosch, Arne; Temel, Yasin; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tinnitus is a disorder of the nervous system that cannot be adequately treated with current therapies. The effect of neuromodulation induced by deep brain stimulation (DBS) on tinnitus has not been studied well. This study investigated the effect of DBS on tinnitus by use of a multicenter questionnaire study. Methods: Tinnitus was retrospectively assessed prior to DBS and at the current situation (with DBS). From the 685 questionnaires, 443 were returned. A control group was one-to-one matched to DBS patients who had tinnitus before DBS (n = 61). Tinnitus was assessed by the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) and visual analog scales (VAS) of loudness and burden. Results: The THI decreased significantly during DBS compared to the situation prior to surgery (from 18.9 to 15.1, P < .001), which was only significant for DBS in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The THI in the control group (36.9 to 35.5, P = 0.50) and other DBS targets did not change. The VAS loudness increased in the control group (5.4 to 6.0 P < .01). Conclusion: DBS might have a modulatory effect on tinnitus. Our study suggests that DBS of the STN may have a beneficial effect on tinnitus, but most likely other nuclei linked to the tinnitus circuitry might be even more effective. PMID:27994936

  11. Cognitive functioning in psychiatric disorders following deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bergfeld, Isidoor O; Mantione, Mariska; Hoogendoorn, Mechteld L C; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is routinely used as a treatment for treatment-refractory Parkinson's disease and has recently been proposed for psychiatric disorders such as Tourette syndrome (TS), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Although cognitive deterioration has repeatedly been shown in patients with Parkinson's disease following DBS, the impact of DBS on cognitive functioning in psychiatric patients has not yet been reviewed. Reviewing the available literature on cognitive functioning following DBS in psychiatric patients. A systematic literature search in PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science, last updated in September 2012, found 1470 papers. Abstracts were scrutinized and 26 studies examining cognitive functioning of psychiatric patients following DBS were included on basis of predetermined inclusion criteria. Twenty-six studies reported cognitive functioning of 130 psychiatric patients following DBS (37 TS patients, 56 OCD patients, 28 MDD patients, 6 patients with Alzheimer's disease, and 3 patients with other disorders). None of the studies reported substantial cognitive decline following DBS. On the contrary, 13 studies reported cognitive improvement following DBS. Preliminary results suggest that DBS in psychiatric disorders does not lead to cognitive decline. In selected cases cognitive functioning was improved following DBS. However, cognitive improvement cannot be conclusively attributed to DBS since studies are hampered by serious limitations. We discuss the outcomes in light of these limitations and offer suggestions for future work. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Centromedian thalamic nuclei deep brain stimulation in refractory status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Valentín, Antonio; Nguyen, Huy Q; Skupenova, Alena M; Agirre-Arrizubieta, Zaloa; Jewell, Sharon; Mullatti, Nandini; Moran, Nicholas F; Richardson, Mark P; Selway, Richard P; Alarcón, Gonzalo

    2012-10-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is associated with high mortality. We report a potential treatment alternative. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the centromedian thalamic nuclei (CMN) can be effective in the treatment of RSE. Report of the evolution of RSE after DBS of the CMN in a 27-year-old man. In the course of an encephalopathy of unknown origin, and after a cardiac arrest, the patient developed RSE with myoclonic jerks and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. The EEG showed continuous generalized periodic epileptiform discharges (GPEDS). Five weeks after RSE onset, bilateral DBS of the CMN was started. This treatment was immediately followed by disappearance of tonic-clonic seizures and GPEDS, suggesting a resolution of RSE. The patient continued having multifocal myoclonic jerks, probably subcortical in origin, which resolved after 4 weeks. The patient remained clinically stable for 2 months in a persistent vegetative state. The remission of RSE, the abolition of GPEDS, and the patient survival suggest that DBS of the CMN may be efficacious in the treatment of refractory, generalized status epilepticus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of novel stimulus waveforms for deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Foutz, TJ; McIntyre, CC

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. Historically, DBS and other neurostimulation technologies have relied on rectangular stimulation waveforms to impose their effects on the nervous system. Recent work has suggested that non-rectangular waveforms may have advantages over the traditional rectangular pulse. Therefore, we used detailed computer models to compare a range of charge-balanced biphasic waveforms with rectangular, exponential, triangular, Gaussian, and sinusoidal stimulus pulse shapes. We explored the neural activation energy of these waveforms in both intracellular and extracellular stimulation. In the context of extracellular stimulation, we compared their effects on both axonal fibers of passage and projection neurons. Finally, we evaluated the impact of delivering the waveforms through a clinical DBS electrode, as opposed to a theoretical point source. Our results suggest that DBS with a 1 ms centered-triangular pulse can decrease energy consumption by 64 % when compared to the standard 100 μs rectangular pulse (energy cost of 48 nJ and 133 nJ, respectively, to stimulate 50 % of a distributed population of axons) and can decrease energy consumption by 10 % when compared to the most energy efficient rectangular pulse (1.25 ms duration). In turn, there may be measureable energy savings when using appropriately designed non-rectangular pulses in clinical DBS applications, thereby warranting further experimental investigation. PMID:21084732

  14. Computer-Guided Deep Brain Stimulation Programming for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Heldman, Dustin A; Pulliam, Christopher L; Urrea Mendoza, Enrique; Gartner, Maureen; Giuffrida, Joseph P; Montgomery, Erwin B; Espay, Alberto J; Revilla, Fredy J

    2016-02-01

    Pilot study to evaluate computer-guided deep brain stimulation (DBS) programming designed to optimize stimulation settings using objective motion sensor-based motor assessments. Seven subjects (five males; 54-71 years) with Parkinson's disease (PD) and recently implanted DBS systems participated in this pilot study. Within two months of lead implantation, the subject returned to the clinic to undergo computer-guided programming and parameter selection. A motion sensor was placed on the index finger of the more affected hand. Software guided a monopolar survey during which monopolar stimulation on each contact was iteratively increased followed by an automated assessment of tremor and bradykinesia. After completing assessments at each setting, a software algorithm determined stimulation settings designed to minimize symptom severities, side effects, and battery usage. Optimal DBS settings were chosen based on average severity of motor symptoms measured by the motion sensor. Settings chosen by the software algorithm identified a therapeutic window and improved tremor and bradykinesia by an average of 35.7% compared with baseline in the "off" state (p < 0.01). Motion sensor-based computer-guided DBS programming identified stimulation parameters that significantly improved tremor and bradykinesia with minimal clinician involvement. Automated motion sensor-based mapping is worthy of further investigation and may one day serve to extend programming to populations without access to specialized DBS centers. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. Weight change following deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Strowd, Roy E; Cartwright, Michael S; Passmore, Leah V; Ellis, Thomas L; Tatter, Stephen B; Siddiqui, Mustafa S

    2010-08-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET) tend to lose weight progressively over years. Weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for treatment of PD has been documented in several studies that were limited by small sample size and exclusive focus on PD patients with STN stimulation. The current study was undertaken to examine weight change in a large sample of movement disorder patients following DBS. A retrospective review was undertaken of 182 patient charts following DBS of the STN, ventralis intermedius nucleus of the thalamus (VIM), and globus pallidus internus (GPi). Weight was collected preoperatively and postoperatively up to 24 months following surgery. Data were adjusted for baseline weight and multivariate linear regression was performed with repeated measures to assess weight change. Statistically significant mean weight gain of 1.8 kg (2.8% increase from baseline, p = 0.0113) was observed at a rate of approximately 1 kg per year up to 24 months following surgery. This gain was not predicted by age, gender, diagnosis, or stimulation target in a multivariate model. Significant mean weight gain of 2.3 kg (p = 0.0124) or 4.2% was observed in our PD patients. Most patients with PD and ET gain weight following DBS, and this gain is not predicted by age, gender, diagnosis, or stimulation target.

  16. In vivo multiphoton microscopy of deep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Levene, Michael J; Dombeck, Daniel A; Kasischke, Karl A; Molloy, Raymond P; Webb, Watt W

    2004-04-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy has proven to be one of the most powerful tools in biology, its application to the intact animal has been limited to imaging several hundred micrometers below the surface. The rest of the animal has eluded investigation at the microscopic level without excising tissue or performing extensive surgery. However, the ability to image with subcellular resolution in the intact animal enables a contextual setting that may be critical for understanding proper function. Clinical applications such as disease diagnosis and optical biopsy may benefit from minimally invasive in vivo approaches. Gradient index (GRIN) lenses with needle-like dimensions can transfer high-quality images many centimeters from the object plane. Here, we show that multiphoton microscopy through GRIN lenses enables minimally invasive, subcellular resolution several millimeters in the anesthetized, intact animal, and we present in vivo images of cortical layer V and hippocampus in the anesthetized Thy1-YFP line H mouse. Microangiographies from deep capillaries and blood vessels containing fluorescein-dextran and quantum dot-labeled serum in wild-type mouse brain are also demonstrated.

  17. Evaluation of novel stimulus waveforms for deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foutz, Thomas J.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. Historically, DBS and other neurostimulation technologies have relied on rectangular stimulation waveforms to impose their effects on the nervous system. Recent work has suggested that non-rectangular waveforms may have advantages over the traditional rectangular pulse. Therefore, we used detailed computer models to compare a range of charge-balanced biphasic waveforms with rectangular, exponential, triangular, Gaussian and sinusoidal stimulus pulse shapes. We explored the neural activation energy of these waveforms for both intracellular and extracellular current-controlled stimulation conditions. In the context of extracellular stimulation, we compared their effects on both axonal fibers of passage and projection neurons. Finally, we evaluated the impact of delivering the waveforms through a clinical DBS electrode, as opposed to a theoretical point source. Our results suggest that DBS with a 1 ms centered-triangular pulse can decrease energy consumption by 64% when compared with the standard 100 µs rectangular pulse (energy cost of 48 and 133 nJ, respectively, to stimulate 50% of a distributed population of axons) and can decrease energy consumption by 10% when compared with the most energy efficient rectangular pulse (1.25 ms duration). In turn, there may be measureable energy savings when using appropriately designed non-rectangular pulses in clinical DBS applications, thereby warranting further experimental investigation.

  18. Deep brain stimulation for enhancement of learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Suthana, Nanthia; Fried, Itzhak

    2014-01-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a powerful technique to treat a host of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders from Parkinson's disease and dystonia, to depression, and obsessive compulsive disorder (Benabid et al., 1987; Lang and Lozano, 1998; Davis et al., 1997; Vidailhet et al., 2005; Mayberg et al., 2005; Nuttin et al., 1999). More recently, results suggest that DBS can enhance memory for facts and events that are dependent on the medial temporal lobe (MTL), thus raising the possibility for DBS to be used as a treatment for MTL- related neurological disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, temporal lobe epilepsy, and MTL injuries). In the following review, we summarize key results that show the ability of DBS or cortical surface stimulation to enhance memory. We also discuss current knowledge regarding the temporal specificity, underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of action, and generalization of stimulation's effects on memory. Throughout our discussion, we also propose several future directions that will provide the necessary insight into if and how DBS could be used as a therapeutic treatment for memory disorders.

  19. Deep brain stimulation in the treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Delaloye, Sibylle; Holtzheimer, Paul E

    2014-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is a worldwide disease with debilitating effects on a patient's life. Common treatments include pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and electroconvulsive therapy. Many patients do not respond to these treatments; this has led to the investigation of alternative therapeutic modalities. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is one of these modalities. It was first used with success for treating movement disorders and has since been extended to the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Although DBS is still an emerging treatment, promising efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in preliminary trials in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Further, neuroimaging has played a pivotal role in identifying some DBS targets and remains an important tool for evaluating the mechanism of action of this novel intervention. Preclinical animal studies have broadened knowledge about the possible mechanisms of action of DBS for TRD, Given that DBS involves neurosurgery in patients with severe psychiatric impairment, ethical questions concerning capacity to consent arise; these issues must continue to be carefully considered.

  20. Computer-Guided Deep Brain Stimulation Programming for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heldman, Dustin A; Pulliam, Christopher L; Mendoza, Enrique Urrea; Gartner, Maureen; Giuffrida, Joseph P; Montgomery, Erwin B; Espay, Alberto J; Revilla, Fredy J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pilot study to evaluate computer-guided deep brain stimulation (DBS) programming designed to optimize stimulation settings using objective motion sensor-based motor assessments. Materials and Methods Seven subjects (5 males; 54-71 years) with Parkinson's disease (PD) and recently implanted DBS systems participated in this pilot study. Within two months of lead implantation, the subject returned to the clinic to undergo computer-guided programming and parameter selection. A motion sensor was placed on the index finger of the more affected hand. Software guided a monopolar survey during which monopolar stimulation on each contact was iteratively increased followed by an automated assessment of tremor and bradykinesia. After completing assessments at each setting, a software algorithm determined stimulation settings designed to minimize symptom severities, side effects, and battery usage. Results Optimal DBS settings were chosen based on average severity of motor symptoms measured by the motion sensor. Settings chosen by the software algorithm identified a therapeutic window and improved tremor and bradykinesia by an average of 35.7% compared to baseline in the “off” state (p<0.01). Conclusions Motion sensor-based computer-guided DBS programming identified stimulation parameters that significantly improved tremor and bradykinesia with minimal clinician involvement. Automated motion sensor-based mapping is worthy of further investigation and may one day serve to extend programming to populations without access to specialized DBS centers. PMID:26621764

  1. Rescue pallidotomy for dystonia through implanted deep brain stimulation electrode

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric; Taira, Takaomi; Hariz, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS), where removal of implants is indicated due to hardware related infections, are not candidates for later re-implantation. In these patients a rescue lesion through the DBS electrode has been suggested as an option. In this case report we present a patient where a pallidotomy was performed using the DBS electrode. Case Description: An elderly woman with bilateral Gpi DBS suffered an infection around the left burr hole involving the DBS electrode. A unilateral lesion was performed through the DBS electrode before it was removed. No side effects were encountered. Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) dystonia movement scale score was 39 before DBS. With DBS before lesioning BFM score was 2.5 points. The replacement of the left sided stimulation with a pallidotomy resulted in only a minor deterioration of the score to 5 points. Conclusions: In the case presented here a small pallidotomy performed with the DBS electrode provided a satisfactory effect on the patient's dystonic symptoms. Thus, rescue lesions through the DBS electrodes, although off-label, might be considered in patients with Gpi DBS for dystonia when indicated. PMID:27990311

  2. Longterm deep brain stimulation withdrawal: clinical stability despite electrophysiological instability.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Diane; Cif, Laura; Limousin, Patricia; Gonzalez, Victoria; Vasques, Xavier; Coubes, Philippe; Rothwell, John C

    2014-07-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a powerful treatment option for movement disorders, including severe generalised dystonia. After several years of treatment, cases have been reported in which DBS has been stopped without any deterioration in clinical benefit. This might indicate that DBS can restore function in some cases. The mechanism of DBS induced clinical retention effects has been addressed before. Here, the question we asked was if such clinical stability is reflected at the underlying physiology level or whether there is indication to believe that a stand-still of symptoms might be at risk because of neurophysiological instability. We recorded patients with pre-intervention life-threatening or severe genetic dystonia with long lasting clinical benefit when turned off DBS. Despite clinical stability, our physiological studies revealed large changes in the excitability of excitatory and inhibitory motor circuits in the cortex, which exceed normal fluctuation. This discrepancy between instability in the motor network physiology caused by removal of DBS and clinical stability alerts as it potentially indicates a risk to fail and cause symptoms to return. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Personality Changes after Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Uyen; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Skogseid, Inger-Marie; Pripp, Are Hugo; Konglund, Ane Eidahl; Andersson, Stein; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit; Aarsland, Dag; Dietrichs, Espen; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a recognized therapy that improves motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about its impact on personality. To address this topic, we have assessed personality traits before and after STN-DBS in PD patients. Methods. Forty patients with advanced PD were assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI): the Urgency, Premeditation, Perseverance, Sensation Seeking impulsive behaviour scale (UPPS), and the Neuroticism and Lie subscales of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-N, EPQ-L) before surgery and after three months of STN-DBS. Collateral information obtained from the UPPS was also reported. Results. Despite improvement in motor function and reduction in dopaminergic dosage patients reported lower score on the TCI Persistence and Self-Transcendence scales, after three months of STN-DBS, compared to baseline (P = 0.006; P = 0.024). Relatives reported significantly increased scores on the UPPS Lack of Premeditation scale at follow-up (P = 0.027). Conclusion. STN-DBS in PD patients is associated with personality changes in the direction of increased impulsivity. PMID:25705545

  4. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation improves deglutition in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M; Sherman, Scott J

    2008-04-15

    Relatively little is known about the role of the basal ganglia in human deglutition. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) affords us a model for examining deglutition in humans with known impairment of the basal ganglia. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of subthalamic nuclei (STN) DBS on the oral and pharyngeal stages of deglutition in individuals with Parkinson's Disease (PD). It was hypothesized that DBS would be associated with improved deglutition. Within participant, comparisons were made between DBS in the ON and OFF conditions using the dependent variables: pharyngeal transit time, maximal hyoid bone excursion, oral total composite score, and pharyngeal total composite score. Significant improvement occurred for the pharyngeal composite score and pharyngeal transit time in the DBS ON condition compared with DBS OFF. Stimulation of the STN may excite thalamocortical or brainstem targets to sufficiently overcome the bradykinesia/hypokinesia associated with PD and return some pharyngeal stage motor patterns to performance levels approximating those of "normal" deglutition. However, the degree of hyoid bone excursion and oral stage measures did not improve, suggesting that these motor acts may be under the control of different sensorimotor pathways within the basal ganglia. 2007 Movement Disorder Society

  5. Low-frequency deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Alonso-Juarez, Marlene

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders (MDs) is provided using stimulation frequencies equal to or above 100 Hz. However, recent evidence suggests that relatively low-frequency stimulation (LFS) below 100 Hz is an option to treat some patients with MDs. We aimed to review the clinical and pathophysiological evidence supporting the use of stimulation frequencies below 100 Hz in different MDs. Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at 60 Hz has provided benefit in gait and other axial symptoms such as swallowing and speech. Stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus between 20 and 45 Hz can provide benefit in freezing of gait, cognition, and sleep quality in select patients with Parkinson's disease. Stimulation of the globus pallidus internus below 100 Hz in patients with dystonia has provided benefit at the beginning of the therapy, although progressively higher stimulation frequencies seem to be necessary to maintain the clinical benefit. Relative LFS can lower energy requirements and reduce battery usage-a useful feature, particularly in patients treated with high current energy. DBS at frequencies below 100 Hz is a therapeutic option in select cases of Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait and other axial symptoms, and in select patients with dystonia and other hyperkinetic movements, particularly those requiring an energy-saving strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Deep brain stimulation in the globus pallidus externa promotes sleep.

    PubMed

    Qiu, M H; Chen, M C; Wu, J; Nelson, D; Lu, J

    2016-05-13

    The basal ganglia, a network of subcortical structures, play a critical role in movements, sleep and mental behavior. Basal ganglia disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease affect sleep. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease can ameliorate sleep disturbances. Our series of previous studies lead the hypothesis that dopamine, acting on D2 receptors on the striatopallidal terminals, enhances activity in the globus pallidus externa (GPe) and promotes sleep. Here, we tested if DBS in the GPe promotes sleep in rats. We found that unilateral DBS (180 Hz at 100 μA) in the GPe in rats significantly increased both non-rapid eye movement and rapid eye movement sleep compared to sham DBS stimulation. The EEG power spectrum of sleep induced by DBS was similar to that of the baseline sleep, and sleep latency was not affected by DBS. The GPe is potentially a better site for DBS to treat both insomnia and motor disorders caused by basal ganglia dysfunction.

  7. Swallowing Quality of Life After Zona Incerta Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sundstedt, Stina; Nordh, Erik; Linder, Jan; Hedström, Johanna; Finizia, Caterina; Olofsson, Katarina

    2017-02-01

    The management of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been improved, but management of signs like swallowing problems is still challenging. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) alleviates the cardinal motor symptoms and improves quality of life, but its effect on swallowing is not fully explored. The purpose of this study was to examine self-reported swallowing-specific quality of life before and after caudal zona incerta DBS (cZI DBS) in comparison with a control group. Nine PD patients (2 women and 7 men) completed the self-report Swallowing Quality of Life questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) before and 12 months after cZI DBS surgery. The postoperative data were compared to 9 controls. Median ages were 53 years (range, 40-70 years) for patients and 54 years (range, 42-72 years) for controls. No significant differences were found between the pre- or postoperative scores. The SWAL-QOL total scores did not differ significantly between PD patients and controls. The PD patients reported significantly lower scores in the burden subscale and the symptom scale. Patients with PD selected for cZI DBS showed good self-reported swallowing-specific quality of life, in many aspects equal to controls. The cZI DBS did not negatively affect swallowing-specific quality of life in this study.

  8. Deep brain stimulation for intractable tardive dystonia: Literature overview.

    PubMed

    Sobstyl, Michał; Ząbek, Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    Tardive dystonia (TD) represents a side effect of prolonged intake of dopamine receptor blocking compounds. TD can be a disabling movement disorder persisting despite available medical treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been reported successful in this condition although the number of treated patients with TD is still limited to small clinical studies or case reports. The aim of this study was to present the systematical overview of the existing literature regarding DBS for intractable TD. A literature search was carried out in PudMed. Clinical case series or case reports describing the patients with TD after DBS treatment were included in the present overview. Literature search revealed 19 articles reporting 59 individuals operated for TD. GPi was the target in 55 patients, while subthalamic nucleus (STN) was the target in the remaining 4. In most studies the motor part of Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS) was improved by more than 80% when compared to preoperative BFMDRS scores. The performed literature analysis indicates that bilateral GPi DBS is an effective treatment for disabling TD. The response of TD to bilateral GPi DBS may be very rapid and occurs within days/weeks after the procedure. The efficacy of bilateral GPi DBS in TD patients is comparable to results achieved in patients with primary generalized dystonia. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Deep-brain-stimulation does not impair deglutition in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lengerer, Sabrina; Kipping, Judy; Rommel, Natalie; Weiss, Daniel; Breit, Sorin; Gasser, Thomas; Plewnia, Christian; Krüger, Rejko; Wächter, Tobias

    2012-08-01

    A large proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease develop dysphagia during the course of the disease. Dysphagia in Parkinson's disease affects different phases of deglutition, has a strong impact on quality of life and may cause severe complications, i.e., aspirational pneumonia. So far, little is known on how deep-brain-stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus influences deglutition in PD. Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies on 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, which had been performed preoperatively, and postoperatively with deep-brain-stimulation-on and deep-brain-stimulation-off, were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were examined in each condition with three consistencies (viscous, fluid and solid). The 'New Zealand index for multidisciplinary evaluation of swallowing (NZIMES) Subscale One' for qualitative and 'Logemann-MBS-Parameters' for quantitative evaluation were assessed. Preoperatively, none of the patients presented with clinically relevant signs of dysphagia. While postoperatively, the mean daily levodopa equivalent dosage was reduced by 50% and deep-brain-stimulation led to a 50% improvement in motor symptoms measured by the UPDRS III, no clinically relevant influence of deep-brain-stimulation-on swallowing was observed using qualitative parameters (NZIMES). However quantitative parameters (Logemann scale) found significant changes of pharyngeal parameters with deep-brain-stimulation-on as compared to preoperative condition and deep-brain-stimulation-off mostly with fluid consistency. In Parkinson patients without dysphagia deep-brain-stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates the pharyngeal deglutition phase but has no clinically relevant influence on deglutition. Further studies are needed to test if deep-brain-stimulation is a therapeutic option for patients with swallowing disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Virtual Patient Simulator Based on Human Connectome and 7 T MRI for Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bonmassar, Giorgio; Angelone, Leonardo M.; Makris, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a virtual model of patients with Deep Brain Stimulation implants. The model is based on Human Connectome and 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data. We envision that the proposed virtual patient simulator will enable radio frequency power dosimetry on patients with deep brain stimulation implants undergoing MRI. Results from the proposed virtual patient study may facilitate the use of clinical MRI instead of computed tomography scans. The virtual patient will be flexible and morphable to relate to patient-specific neurological and psychiatric conditions such as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, which benefit from deep brain stimulation. PMID:25705324

  11. Progressive gait ataxia following deep brain stimulation for essential tremor: adverse effect or lack of efficacy?

    PubMed

    Reich, Martin M; Brumberg, Joachim; Pozzi, Nicolò G; Marotta, Giorgio; Roothans, Jonas; Åström, Mattias; Musacchio, Thomas; Lopiano, Leonardo; Lanotte, Michele; Lehrke, Ralph; Buck, Andreas K; Volkmann, Jens; Isaias, Ioannis U

    2016-09-21

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation is a mainstay treatment for severe and drug-refractory essential tremor, but postoperative management may be complicated in some patients by a progressive cerebellar syndrome including gait ataxia, dysmetria, worsening of intention tremor and dysarthria. Typically, this syndrome manifests several months after an initially effective therapy and necessitates frequent adjustments in stimulation parameters. There is an ongoing debate as to whether progressive ataxia reflects a delayed therapeutic failure due to disease progression or an adverse effect related to repeated increases of stimulation intensity. In this study we used a multimodal approach comparing clinical stimulation responses, modelling of volume of tissue activated and metabolic brain maps in essential tremor patients with and without progressive ataxia to disentangle a disease-related from a stimulation-induced aetiology. Ten subjects with stable and effective bilateral thalamic stimulation were stratified according to the presence (five subjects) of severe chronic-progressive gait ataxia. We quantified stimulated brain areas and identified the stimulation-induced brain metabolic changes by multiple (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography performed with and without active neurostimulation. Three days after deactivating thalamic stimulation and following an initial rebound of symptom severity, gait ataxia had dramatically improved in all affected patients, while tremor had worsened to the presurgical severity, thus indicating a stimulation rather than disease-related phenomenon. Models of the volume of tissue activated revealed a more ventrocaudal stimulation in the (sub)thalamic area of patients with progressive gait ataxia. Metabolic maps of both patient groups differed by an increased glucose uptake in the cerebellar nodule of patients with gait ataxia. Our data suggest that chronic progressive gait ataxia in essential tremor is a reversible cerebellar

  12. Reduced Verbal Fluency following Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation: A Frontal-Related Cognitive Deficit?

    PubMed Central

    Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Le Jeune, Florence; Dondaine, Thibaut; Esquevin, Aurore; Robert, Gabriel Hadrien; Péron, Julie; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Sophie; Jannin, Pierre; Lozachmeur, Clément; Argaud, Soizic; Duprez, Joan; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc; Sauleau, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective The decrease in verbal fluency in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) undergoing subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is usually assumed to reflect a frontal lobe-related cognitive dysfunction, although evidence for this is lacking. Methods To explore its underlying mechanisms, we combined neuropsychological, psychiatric and motor assessments with an examination of brain metabolism using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, in 26 patients with PD, 3 months before and after surgery. We divided these patients into two groups, depending on whether or not they exhibited a postoperative deterioration in either phonemic (10 patients) or semantic (8 patients) fluency. We then compared the STN-DBS groups with and without verbal deterioration on changes in clinical measures and brain metabolism. Results We did not find any neuropsychological change supporting the presence of an executive dysfunction in patients with a deficit in either phonemic or semantic fluency. Similarly, a comparison of patients with or without impaired fluency on brain metabolism failed to highlight any frontal areas involved in cognitive functions. However, greater changes in cognitive slowdown and apathy were observed in patients with a postoperative decrease in verbal fluency. Conclusions These results suggest that frontal lobe-related cognitive dysfunction could play only a minor role in the postoperative impairment of phonemic or semantic fluency, and that cognitive slowdown and apathy could have a more decisive influence. Furthermore, the phonemic and semantic impairments appeared to result from the disturbance of distinct mechanisms. PMID:26448131

  13. Material and physical model for evaluation of deep brain activity contribution to EEG recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yan; Li, Xiaoping; Wu, Tiecheng; Li, Zhe; Xie, Wenwen

    2015-12-01

    Deep brain activity is conventionally recorded with surgical implantation of electrodes. During the neurosurgery, brain tissue damage and the consequent side effects to patients are inevitably incurred. In order to eliminate undesired risks, we propose that deep brain activity should be measured using the noninvasive scalp electroencephalography (EEG) technique. However, the deeper the neuronal activity is located, the noisier the corresponding scalp EEG signals are. Thus, the present study aims to evaluate whether deep brain activity could be observed from EEG recordings. In the experiment, a three-layer cylindrical head model was constructed to mimic a human head. A single dipole source (sine wave, 10 Hz, altering amplitudes) was embedded inside the model to simulate neuronal activity. When the dipole source was activated, surface potential was measured via electrodes attached on the top surface of the model and raw data were recorded for signal analysis. Results show that the dipole source activity positioned at 66 mm depth in the model, equivalent to the depth of deep brain structures, is clearly observed from surface potential recordings. Therefore, it is highly possible that deep brain activity could be observed from EEG recordings and deep brain activity could be measured using the noninvasive scalp EEG technique.

  14. Potential predictors for the amount of intra-operative brain shift during deep brain stimulation surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datteri, Ryan; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Konrad, Peter E.; Neimat, Joseph S.; D'Haese, Pierre-François; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2011-03-01

    A number of groups have reported on the occurrence of intra-operative brain shift during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. This has a number of implications for the procedure including an increased chance of intra-cranial bleeding and complications due to the need for more exploratory electrodes to account for the brain shift. It has been reported that the amount of pneumocephalus or air invasion into the cranial cavity due to the opening of the dura correlates with intraoperative brain shift. Therefore, pre-operatively predicting the amount of pneumocephalus expected during surgery is of interest toward accounting for brain shift. In this study, we used 64 DBS patients who received bilateral electrode implantations and had a post-operative CT scan acquired immediately after surgery (CT-PI). For each patient, the volumes of the pneumocephalus, left ventricle, right ventricle, third ventricle, white matter, grey matter, and cerebral spinal fluid were calculated. The pneumocephalus was calculated from the CT-PI utilizing a region growing technique that was initialized with an atlas-based image registration method. A multi-atlas-based image segmentation method was used to segment out the ventricles of each patient. The Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software package was utilized to calculate the volumes of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), white matter and grey matter. The volume of individual structures had a moderate correlation with pneumocephalus. Utilizing a multi-linear regression between the volume of the pneumocephalus and the statistically relevant individual structures a Pearson's coefficient of r = 0.4123 (p = 0.0103) was found. This study shows preliminary results that could be used to develop a method to predict the amount of pneumocephalus ahead of the surgery.

  15. Intrathecal opioids for control of chronic low back pain during deep brain stimulation procedures.

    PubMed

    Lotto, Michelle; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2007-11-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain may not be able to endure the supine position required by the lengthy deep brain stimulation procedure. Many neurophysiologists severely restrict the use of opioids and sedative drugs during deep brain stimulation procedures due to the concern for depression of cellular firing frequencies used to map the brain for placement of the stimulator leads. We present two cases in which spinal opioids were used to achieve prolonged pain relief in patients with chronic back pain, without altering cellular firing critical for brain mapping.

  16. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach. Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results. The computational models predicted that: (1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with -3 V monopolar cathodic stimulation; (2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; (3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3 V) (4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at -3 V) and (5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance. We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS.

  17. Randomized clinical trial of deep brain stimulation for poststroke pain.

    PubMed

    Lempka, Scott F; Malone, Donald A; Hu, Bo; Baker, Kenneth B; Wyant, Alexandria; Ozinga, John G; Plow, Ela B; Pandya, Mayur; Kubu, Cynthia S; Ford, Paul J; Machado, Andre G

    2017-05-01

    The experience with deep brain stimulation (DBS) for pain is largely based on uncontrolled studies targeting the somatosensory pathways, with mixed results. We hypothesized that targeting limbic neural pathways would modulate the affective sphere of pain and alleviate suffering. We conducted a prospective, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study of DBS targeting the ventral striatum/anterior limb of the internal capsule (VS/ALIC) in 10 patients with poststroke pain syndrome. One month after bilateral DBS, patients were randomized to active DBS or sham for 3 months, followed by crossover for another 3-month period. The primary endpoint was a ≥50% improvement on the Pain Disability Index in 50% of patients with active DBS compared to sham. This 6-month blinded phase was followed by an 18-month open stimulation phase. Nine participants completed randomization. Although this trial was negative for its primary and secondary endpoints, we did observe significant differences in multiple outcome measures related to the affective sphere of pain (eg, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Affective Pain Rating Index of the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire). Fourteen serious adverse events were recorded and resolved. VS/ALIC DBS to modulate the affective sphere of pain represents a paradigm shift in chronic pain management. Although this exploratory study was negative for its primary endpoint, VS/ALIC DBS demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and statistically significant improvements on multiple outcome measures related to the affective sphere of pain. Therefore, we believe these results justify further work on neuromodulation therapies targeting the affective sphere of pain. Ann Neurol 2017;81:653-663. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  18. Brittle Dyskinesia Following STN but not GPi Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Ashok; Foote, Kelly D.; Oyama, Genko; Kwak, Joshua; Zeilman, Pam R.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of difficult to manage dyskinesia associated with subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS). A small subset of STN DBS patients experience troublesome dyskinesia despite optimal programming and medication adjustments. This group of patients has been referred to by some practitioners as brittle STN DBS-induced dyskinesia, drawing on comparisons with brittle diabetics experiencing severe blood sugar regulation issues and on a single description by McLellan in 1982. We sought to describe, and also to investigate how often the “brittle” phenomenon occurs in a relatively large DBS practice. Methods An Institutional Review Board-approved patient database was reviewed, and all STN and globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS patients who had surgery at the University of Florida from July 2002 to July 2012 were extracted for analysis. Results There were 179 total STN DBS patients and, of those, four STN DBS (2.2%) cases were identified as having dyskinesia that could not be managed without the induction of an “off state,” or by the precipitation of a severe dyskinesia despite vigorous stimulation and medication adjustments. Of 75 GPi DBS cases reviewed, none (0%) was identified as having brittle dyskinesia. One STN DBS patient was successfully rescued by bilateral GPi DBS. Discussion Understanding the potential risk factors for postoperative troublesome and brittle dyskinesia may have an impact on the initial surgical target selection (STN vs. GPI) in DBS therapy. Rescue GPi DBS therapy may be a viable treatment option, though more cases will be required to verify this observation. PMID:24932426

  19. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models, and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results The computational models predicted that: 1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with −3V monopolar cathodic stimulation; 2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; 3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3V); 4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral, or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at −3V); and, 5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS. PMID:23723145

  20. Anatomic correlates of deep brain stimulation electrode impedance.

    PubMed

    Satzer, David; Maurer, Eric W; Lanctin, David; Guan, Weihua; Abosch, Aviva

    2015-04-01

    The location of the optimal target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) remains controversial. Electrode impedance affects tissue activation by DBS and has been found to vary by contact number, but no studies have examined association between impedance and anatomic location. To evaluate the relationship between electrode impedance and anatomic contact location, and to assess the clinical significance of impedance. We gathered retrospective impedance data from 101 electrodes in 73 patients with Parkinson's disease. We determined contact location using microelectrode recording (MER) and high-field 7T MRI, and assessed the relationship between impedance and contact location. For contact location as assessed via MER, impedance was significantly higher for contacts in STN, at baseline (111 Ω vs STN border, p=0.03; 169 Ω vs white matter, p<0.001) and over time (90 Ω vs STN border, p<0.001; 54 Ω vs white matter, p<0.001). Over time, impedance was lowest in contacts situated at STN border (p=0.03). Impedance did not vary by contact location as assessed via imaging. Location determination was 75% consistent between MER and imaging. Impedance was inversely related to absolute symptom reduction during stimulation (-2.5 motor portion of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (mUPDRS) points per 1000 Ω, p=0.01). In the vicinity of DBS electrodes chronically implanted in STN, impedance is lower at the rostral STN border and in white matter, than in STN. This finding suggests that current reaches white matter fibres more readily than neuronal cell bodies in STN, which may help explain anatomic variation in stimulation efficacy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in early stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Charles, David; Konrad, Peter E; Neimat, Joseph S; Molinari, Anna L; Tramontana, Michael G; Finder, Stuart G; Gill, Chandler E; Bliton, Mark J; Kao, Chris; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Salomon, Ronald M; Cannard, Kevin R; Wang, Lily; Song, Yanna; Davis, Thomas L

    2014-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective and approved therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), and a recent study suggests efficacy in mid-stage disease. This manuscript reports the results of a pilot trial investigating preliminary safety and tolerability of DBS in early PD. Thirty subjects with idiopathic PD (Hoehn & Yahr Stage II off medication), age 50-75, on medication ≥6 months but ≤4 years, and without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias were randomized to optimal drug therapy (ODT) (n = 15) or DBS + ODT (n = 15). Co-primary endpoints were the time to reach a 4-point worsening from baseline in the UPDRS-III off therapy and the change in levodopa equivalent daily dose from baseline to 24 months. As hypothesized, the mean UPDRS total and part III scores were not significantly different on or off therapy at 24 months. Medication requirements in the DBS + ODT group were lower at all time points with a maximal difference at 18 months. With a few exceptions, differences in neuropsychological functioning were not significant. Two subjects in the DBS + ODT group suffered serious adverse events; remaining adverse events were mild or transient. This study demonstrates that subjects with early stage PD will enroll in and complete trials testing invasive therapies and provides preliminary evidence that DBS is well tolerated in early PD. The results of this trial provide the data necessary to design a large, phase III, double-blind, multicenter trial investigating the safety and efficacy of DBS in early PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Stepwise Approach: Decreasing Infection in Deep Brain Stimulation for Childhood Dystonic Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Johans, Stephen J; Swong, Kevin N; Hofler, Ryan C; Anderson, Douglas E

    2017-09-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions, which cause twisting movements or abnormal postures. Deep brain stimulation has been used to improve the quality of life for secondary dystonia caused by cerebral palsy. Despite being a viable treatment option for childhood dystonic cerebral palsy, deep brain stimulation is associated with a high rate of infection in children. The authors present a small series of patients with dystonic cerebral palsy who underwent a stepwise approach for bilateral globus pallidus interna deep brain stimulation placement in order to decrease the rate of infection. Four children with dystonic cerebral palsy who underwent a total of 13 surgical procedures (electrode and battery placement) were identified via a retrospective review. There were zero postoperative infections. Using a multistaged surgical plan for pediatric patients with dystonic cerebral palsy undergoing deep brain stimulation may help to reduce the risk of infection.

  3. Embedded Ultrathin Cluster Electrodes for Long-Term Recordings in Deep Brain Centers

    PubMed Central

    Thorbergsson, Palmi Thor; Ekstrand, Joakim; Friberg, Annika; Granmo, Marcus; Pettersson, Lina M. E.; Schouenborg, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Neural interfaces which allow long-term recordings in deep brain structures in awake freely moving animals have the potential of becoming highly valuable tools in neuroscience. However, the recording quality usually deteriorates over time, probably at least partly due to tissue reactions caused by injuries during implantation, and subsequently micro-forces due to a lack of mechanical compliance between the tissue and neural interface. To address this challenge, we developed a gelatin embedded neural interface comprising highly flexible electrodes and evaluated its long term recording properties. Bundles of ultrathin parylene C coated platinum electrodes (N = 29) were embedded in a hard gelatin based matrix shaped like a needle, and coated with Kollicoat™ to retard dissolution of gelatin during the implantation. The implantation parameters were established in an in vitro model of the brain (0.5% agarose). Following a craniotomy in the anesthetized rat, the gelatin embedded electrodes were stereotactically inserted to a pre-target position, and after gelatin dissolution the electrodes were further advanced and spread out in the area of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The performance of the implanted electrodes was evaluated under anesthesia, during 8 weeks. Apart from an increase in the median-noise level during the first 4 weeks, the electrode impedance and signal-to-noise ratio of single-units remained stable throughout the experiment. Histological postmortem analysis confirmed implantation in the area of STN in most animals. In conclusion, by combining novel biocompatible implantation techniques and ultra-flexible electrodes, long-term neuronal recordings from deep brain structures with no significant deterioration of electrode function were achieved. PMID:27159159

  4. Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0559 TITLE: Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation...Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain...as a method for treating pain and autonomic dysreflexia in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). It is collaboration between the

  5. Inferring deep-brain activity from cortical activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Cui, Xu; Bryant, Daniel M; Glover, Gary H; Reiss, Allan L

    2015-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly popular technology for studying brain function because it is non-invasive, non-irradiating and relatively inexpensive. Further, fNIRS potentially allows measurement of hemodynamic activity with high temporal resolution (milliseconds) and in naturalistic settings. However, in comparison with other imaging modalities, namely fMRI, fNIRS has a significant drawback: limited sensitivity to hemodynamic changes in deep-brain regions. To overcome this limitation, we developed a computational method to infer deep-brain activity using fNIRS measurements of cortical activity. Using simultaneous fNIRS and fMRI, we measured brain activity in 17 participants as they completed three cognitive tasks. A support vector regression (SVR) learning algorithm was used to predict activity in twelve deep-brain regions using information from surface fNIRS measurements. We compared these predictions against actual fMRI-measured activity using Pearson's correlation to quantify prediction performance. To provide a benchmark for comparison, we also used fMRI measurements of cortical activity to infer deep-brain activity. When using fMRI-measured activity from the entire cortex, we were able to predict deep-brain activity in the fusiform cortex with an average correlation coefficient of 0.80 and in all deep-brain regions with an average correlation coefficient of 0.67. The top 15% of predictions using fNIRS signal achieved an accuracy of 0.7. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the feasibility of using cortical activity to infer deep-brain activity. This new method has the potential to extend fNIRS applications in cognitive and clinical neuroscience research.

  6. Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of severe, medically refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Sedrak, Mark; Wong, William; Wilson, Paul; Bruce, Diana; Bernstein, Ivan; Khandhar, Suketu; Pappas, Conrad; Heit, Gary; Sabelman, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a rapidly expanding therapy initially designed for the treatment of movement disorders and pain syndromes. The therapy includes implantation of electrodes in specific targets of the brain, delivering programmable small and safe electric impulses, like a pacemaker, that modulates both local and broad neurologic networks. The effects are thought to primarily involve a focus in the brain, probably inhibitory, which then restores a network of neural circuitry. Psychiatric diseases can be refractory and severe, leading to high medical costs, significant morbidity, and even death. Whereas surgery for psychiatric disease used to include destructive procedures, deep brain stimulation allows safe, reversible, and adjustable treatment that can be tailored for each patient. Deep brain stimulation offers new hope for these unfortunate patients, and the preliminary results are promising.

  7. Temporal profile of improvement of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Mewes, Klaus; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Gross, Robert E.; Triche, Shirley D.; Jinnah, H.A.; Boulis, Nicholas; Willie, Jon T.; Freeman, Alan; Alexander, Garrett E.; Aia, Pratibha; Butefisch, Cathrine M.; Esper, Christine D.; Factor, Stewart A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several case reports and small series have indicated that tardive dystonia is responsive to globus pallidus deep brain stimulation. Whether different subtypes or distributions of tardive dystonia are associated with different outcomes remains unknown. Methods We assessed the outcomes and temporal profile of improvement of eight tardive dystonia patients who underwent globus pallidus deep brain stimulation over the past six years through record review. Due to the retrospective nature of this study, it was not blinded or placebo controlled. Results: Consistent with previous studies, deep brain stimulation improved the overall the Burkee–Fahn–Marsden motor scores by 85.1 ± 13.5%. The distributions with best responses in descending order were upper face, lower face, larynx/pharynx, limbs, trunk, and neck. Patients with prominent cervical dystonia demonstrated improvement in the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale but improvements took several months. In four patients the effects of deep brain stimulation on improvement in Burke Fahn Marsden score was rapid, while in four cases there was partial rapid response of neck and trunk dystonia followed by was gradual resolution of residual symptoms over 48 months. Conclusion Our retrospective analysis shows excellent resolution of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep brain stimulation. We found instantaneous response, except with neck and trunk dystonia where partial recovery was followed by further resolution at slower rate. Such outcome is encouraging for using deep brain stimulation in treatment of tardive dystonia. PMID:25465373

  8. Deep Brain Stimulation: A Paradigm Shifting Approach to Treat Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Patrick; Stacy, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder classically characterized by slowed voluntary movements, resting tremor, muscle rigidity, and impaired gait and balance. Medical treatment is highly successful early on, though the majority of people experience significant complications in later stages. In advanced PD, when medications no longer adequately control motor symptoms, deep brain stimulation (DBS) offers a powerful therapeutic alternative. DBS involves the surgical implantation of one or more electrodes into specific areas of the brain, which modulate or disrupt abnormal patterns of neural signaling within the targeted region. Outcomes are often dramatic following DBS, with improvements in motor function and reductions motor complications having been repeatedly demonstrated. Given such robust responses, emerging indications for DBS are being investigated. In parallel with expansions of therapeutic scope, advancements within the areas of neurosurgical technique and the precision of stimulation delivery have recently broadened as well. This review focuses on the revolutionary addition of DBS to the therapeutic armamentarium for PD, and summarizes the technological advancements in the areas of neuroimaging and biomedical engineering intended to improve targeting, programming, and overall management. PMID:27199637

  9. Deep Brain Stimulation: A Paradigm Shifting Approach to Treat Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Patrick; Stacy, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder classically characterized by slowed voluntary movements, resting tremor, muscle rigidity, and impaired gait and balance. Medical treatment is highly successful early on, though the majority of people experience significant complications in later stages. In advanced PD, when medications no longer adequately control motor symptoms, deep brain stimulation (DBS) offers a powerful therapeutic alternative. DBS involves the surgical implantation of one or more electrodes into specific areas of the brain, which modulate or disrupt abnormal patterns of neural signaling within the targeted region. Outcomes are often dramatic following DBS, with improvements in motor function and reductions motor complications having been repeatedly demonstrated. Given such robust responses, emerging indications for DBS are being investigated. In parallel with expansions of therapeutic scope, advancements within the areas of neurosurgical technique and the precision of stimulation delivery have recently broadened as well. This review focuses on the revolutionary addition of DBS to the therapeutic armamentarium for PD, and summarizes the technological advancements in the areas of neuroimaging and biomedical engineering intended to improve targeting, programming, and overall management.

  10. Analysis of deep brain stimulation electrode characteristics for neural recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Closed-loop deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems have the potential to optimize treatment of movement disorders by enabling automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters based on a feedback signal. Evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) and local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from the DBS electrode may serve as suitable closed-loop control signals. The objective of this study was to understand better the factors that influence ECAP and LFP recording, including the physical presence of the electrode, the geometrical dimensions of the electrode, and changes in the composition of the peri-electrode space across recording conditions. Approach. Coupled volume conductor-neuron models were used to calculate single-unit activity as well as ECAP responses and LFP activity from a population of model thalamic neurons. Main results. Comparing ECAPs and LFPs measured with and without the presence of the highly conductive recording contacts, we found that the presence of these contacts had a negligible effect on the magnitude of single-unit recordings, ECAPs (7% RMS difference between waveforms), and LFPs (5% change in signal magnitude). Spatial averaging across the contact surface decreased the ECAP magnitude in a phase-dependent manner (74% RMS difference), resulting from a differential effect of the contact on the contribution from nearby or distant elements, and decreased the LFP magnitude (25% change). Reductions in the electrode diameter or recording contact length increased signal energy and increased spatial sensitivity of single neuron recordings. Moreover, smaller diameter electrodes (500 µm) were more selective for recording from local cells over passing axons, with the opposite true for larger diameters (1500 µm). Changes in electrode dimensions had phase-dependent effects on ECAP characteristics, and generally had small effects on the LFP magnitude. ECAP signal energy and LFP magnitude decreased with tighter contact spacing (100 µm), compared to

  11. Analysis of deep brain stimulation electrode characteristics for neural recording

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Closed-loop deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems have the potential to optimize treatment of movement disorders by enabling automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters based on a feedback signal. Evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) and local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from the DBS electrode may serve as suitable closed-loop control signals. The objective of this study was to understand better the factors that influence ECAP and LFP recording, including the physical presence of the electrode, the geometrical dimensions of the electrode, and changes in the composition of the peri-electrode space across recording conditions. Coupled volume conductor-neuron models were used to calculate single-unit activity as well as ECAP responses and LFP activity from a population of model thalamic neurons. Comparing ECAPs and LFPs measured with and without the presence of the highly conductive recording contacts, we found that the presence of these contacts had a negligible effect on the magnitude of single-unit recordings, ECAPs (7% RMS difference between waveforms), and LFPs (5% change in signal magnitude). Spatial averaging across the contact surface decreased the ECAP magnitude in a phase-dependent manner (74% RMS difference), resulting from a differential effect of the contact on the contribution from nearby or distant elements, and decreased the LFP magnitude (25% change). Reductions in the electrode diameter or recording contact length increased signal energy and increased spatial sensitivity of single neuron recordings. Moreover, smaller diameter electrodes (500 µm) were more selective for recording from local cells over passing axons, with the opposite true for larger diameters (1500 µm). Changes in electrode dimensions had phase-dependent effects on ECAP characteristics, and generally had small effects on the LFP magnitude. ECAP signal energy and LFP magnitude decreased with tighter contact spacing (100 µm), compared to the original dimensions (1500 µm

  12. Resting state functional MRI in Parkinson's disease: the impact of deep brain stimulation on 'effective' connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Joshua; Urner, Maren; Moran, Rosalyn; Flandin, Guillaume; Marreiros, Andre; Mancini, Laura; White, Mark; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia; Friston, Karl; Foltynie, Tom

    2014-04-01

    Depleted of dopamine, the dynamics of the parkinsonian brain impact on both 'action' and 'resting' motor behaviour. Deep brain stimulation has become an established means of managing these symptoms, although its mechanisms of action remain unclear. Non-invasive characterizations of induced brain responses, and the effective connectivity underlying them, generally appeals to dynamic causal modelling of neuroimaging data. When the brain is at rest, however, this sort of characterization has been limited to correlations (functional connectivity). In this work, we model the 'effective' connectivity underlying low frequency blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in the resting Parkinsonian motor network-disclosing the distributed effects of deep brain stimulation on cortico-subcortical connections. Specifically, we show that subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation modulates all the major components of the motor cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loop, including the cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical, direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways, and the hyperdirect subthalamic nucleus projections. The strength of effective subthalamic nucleus afferents and efferents were reduced by stimulation, whereas cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical and direct pathways were strengthened. Remarkably, regression analysis revealed that the hyperdirect, direct, and basal ganglia afferents to the subthalamic nucleus predicted clinical status and therapeutic response to deep brain stimulation; however, suppression of the sensitivity of the subthalamic nucleus to its hyperdirect afferents by deep brain stimulation may subvert the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation. Our findings highlight the distributed effects of stimulation on the resting motor network and provide a framework for analysing effective connectivity in resting state functional MRI with strong a priori hypotheses.

  13. Pulsatile desynchronizing delayed feedback for closed-loop deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lysyansky, Borys; Rosenblum, Michael; Pikovsky, Arkady; Tass, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the gold standard for the treatment of medically refractory movement disorders like Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia, with a significant potential for application to other neurological diseases. The standard setup of HF DBS utilizes an open-loop stimulation protocol, where a permanent HF electrical pulse train is administered to the brain target areas irrespectively of the ongoing neuronal dynamics. Recent experimental and clinical studies demonstrate that a closed-loop, adaptive DBS might be superior to the open-loop setup. We here combine the notion of the adaptive high-frequency stimulation approach, that aims at delivering stimulation adapted to the extent of appropriately detected biomarkers, with specifically desynchronizing stimulation protocols. To this end, we extend the delayed feedback stimulation methods, which are intrinsically closed-loop techniques and specifically designed to desynchronize abnormal neuronal synchronization, to pulsatile electrical brain stimulation. We show that permanent pulsatile high-frequency stimulation subjected to an amplitude modulation by linear or nonlinear delayed feedback methods can effectively and robustly desynchronize a STN-GPe network of model neurons and suggest this approach for desynchronizing closed-loop DBS. PMID:28273176

  14. Accuracy of postoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance image fusion for assessing deep brain stimulation electrodes.

    PubMed

    Thani, Nova B; Bala, Arul; Swann, Gary B; Lind, Christopher R P

    2011-07-01

    Knowledge of the anatomic location of the deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode in the brain is essential in quality control and judicious selection of stimulation parameters. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) imaging coregistered with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used to document the electrode location safely. The accuracy of this method, however, depends on many factors, including the quality of the source images, the area of signal artifact created by the DBS lead, and the fusion algorithm. To calculate the accuracy of determining the location of active contacts of the DBS electrode by coregistering postoperative CT image to intraoperative MRI. Intraoperative MRI with a surrogate marker (carbothane stylette) was digitally coregistered with postoperative CT with DBS electrodes in 8 consecutive patients. The location of the active contact of the DBS electrode was calculated in the stereotactic frame space, and the discrepancy between the 2 images was assessed. The carbothane stylette significantly reduces the signal void on the MRI to a mean diameter of 1.4 ± 0.1 mm. The discrepancy between the CT and MRI coregistration in assessing the active contact location of the DBS lead is 1.6 ± 0.2 mm, P < .001 with iPlan (BrainLab AG, Erlangen, Germany) and 1.5 ± 0.2 mm, P < .001 with Framelink (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota) software. CT/MRI coregistration is an acceptable method of identifying the anatomic location of DBS electrode and active contacts.

  15. Successful management of super-refractory status epilepticus with thalamic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lehtimäki, Kai; Långsjö, Jaakko W; Ollikainen, Jyrki; Heinonen, Hanna; Möttönen, Timo; Tähtinen, Timo; Haapasalo, Joonas; Tenhunen, Jyrki; Katisko, Jani; Öhman, Juha; Peltola, Jukka

    2017-01-01

    Super-refractory status epilepticus is a condition characterized by recurrence of status epilepticus despite use of deep general anesthesia, and it has high morbidity and mortality rates. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy with a prolonged super-refractory status epilepticus that eventually resolved after commencing deep brain stimulation of the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus. Later attempt to reduce stimulation parameters resulted in immediate relapse of status epilepticus, suggesting a pivotal role of deep brain stimulation in the treatment response. Deep brain stimulation may be a treatment option in super-refractory status epilepticus when other treatment options have failed. ANN NEUROL 2017;81:142-146. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  16. Emerging subspecialties in neurology: deep brain stimulation and electrical neuro-network modulation.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Anhar; Okun, Michael S

    2013-01-29

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical therapy that involves the delivery of an electrical current to one or more brain targets. This technology has been rapidly expanding to address movement, neuropsychiatric, and other disorders. The evolution of DBS has created a niche for neurologists, both in the operating room and in the clinic. Since DBS is not always deep, not always brain, and not always simply stimulation, a more accurate term for this field may be electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM). Fellowships will likely in future years evolve their scope to include other technologies, and other nervous system regions beyond typical DBS therapy.

  17. Anaesthetic management of a patient with deep brain stimulation implant for radical nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Monica; Yadav, Monu; Kulkarni, Dilip; Gopinath, R

    2014-07-01

    A 63-year-old man with severe Parkinson's disease (PD) who had been implanted with deep brain stimulators into both sides underwent radical nephrectomy under general anaesthesia with standard monitoring. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an alternative and effective treatment option for severe and refractory PD and other illnesses such as essential tremor and intractable epilepsy. Anaesthesia in the patients with implanted neurostimulator requires special consideration because of the interaction between neurostimulator and the diathermy. The diathermy can damage the brain tissue at the site of electrode. There are no standard guidelines for the anaesthetic management of a patient with DBS electrode in situ posted for surgery.

  18. Variable resolution electromagnetic tomography (VARETA) in evaluation of compression of cerebral arteries due to deep midline brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio; Harmony, Thalía; Fernández, Thalía; Ricardo-Garcell, Josefina; Santiago, Efraín

    2004-01-01

    Hemispheric tumors produced electroencephalographic (EEG) delta activity mainly due to deafferentation of cerebral cortex. In small, deep midline lesions that compressed cerebral arteries, the most important abnormality should have been in EEG theta band that selectively responded to brain ischemia. Frequency domain-variable resolution electromagnetic tomography (FD-VARETA) has been applied satisfactorily to the study of brain tumors, cerebral infarcts, and brain hemorrhages and was shown to localize areas of hypoperfusion. Twelve patients with deep midline lesions compressing different cerebral arteries were studied. Computer tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as quantitative EEG with source calculation in frequency domain were obtained. Brain electromagnetic tomographies (BETs) were calculated to evaluate localization and extension of functional abnormalities. Ten of twelve cases presented abnormal sources in theta band as main abnormal source. In only two cases was the main source in delta band, but these cases also had abnormal Z values in theta band. In four patients there were only abnormal values in theta range. Sources of abnormal theta activity were observed in regions irrigated by the arteries compressed. In deep midline lesions, compression of cerebral arteries producing relative ischemia may explain abnormal EEG sources in theta band. Patients with main source in theta band showed vascular compression and some patients exhibited vasogenic edema. Thus, theta might be due to relative ischemia produced by both hypoperfusion and edema. Once again, VARETA has found to be very useful in evaluation of functional abnormalities.

  19. Deep brain stimulation versus anterior capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Joshua; Hariz, Marwan; Zrinzo, Ludvic

    2015-05-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic and debilitating psychiatric condition. Traditionally, anterior capsulotomy (AC) was an established procedure for treatment of patients with refractory OCD. Over recent decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has gained popularity. In this paper the authors review the published literature and compare the outcome of AC and DBS targeting of the area of the ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Patients in published cases were grouped according to whether they received AC or DBS and according to their preoperative scores on the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS), and then separated according to outcome measures: remission (YBOCS score < 8); response (≥ 35% improvement in YBOCS score); nonresponse (< 35% improvement in YBOCS score); and unfavorable (i.e., worsening of the baseline YBOCS score). Twenty studies were identified reporting on 170 patients; 62 patients underwent DBS of the VC/VS or the NAcc (mean age 38 years, follow-up 19 months, baseline YBOCS score of 33), and 108 patients underwent AC (mean age 36 years, follow-up 61 months, baseline YBOCS score of 30). In patients treated with DBS there was a 40% decrease in YBOCS score, compared with a 51% decrease for those who underwent AC (p = 0.004). Patients who underwent AC were 9% more likely to go into remission than patients treated with DBS (p = 0.02). No difference in complication rates was noted. Anterior capsulotomy is an efficient procedure for refractory OCD. Deep brain stimulation in the VC/VS and NAcc area is an emerging and promising therapy. The current popularity of DBS over ablative surgery for OCD is not due to nonefficacy of AC, but possibly because DBS is perceived as more acceptable by clinicians and patients.

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms triggered by Deep Brain Stimulation in depression: A preclinical and clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Torres-Sanchez, S; Perez-Caballero, L; Berrocoso, E

    2017-02-06

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) was originally developed as a therapeutic approach to manage movement disorders, in particular Parkinson's Disease. However, DBS also seems to be an effective treatment against refractory depression when patients fail to respond satisfactorily to conventional therapies. Thus, DBS targeting specific brain areas can produce an antidepressant response that improves depressive symptomatology, these areas including the subcallosal cingulate region, nucleus accumbens, ventral capsule/ventral striatum, medial forebrain bundle, the inferior thalamic peduncle and lateral habenula. Although the efficacy and safety of this therapy has been demonstrated in some clinical trials and preclinical studies, the intrinsic mechanisms underlying its antidepressant effect remain poorly understood. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of DBS, focusing on the molecular and cellular changes reported after its use that could shed light on the mechanisms underpinning its antidepressant effect. Several potential mechanisms of action of DBS are considered, including monoaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, neurotrophic and neuroinflammatory mechanisms, as well as potential effects on certain intracellular signaling pathways. Although future studies will be necessary to determine the key molecular events underlying the antidepressant effect of DBS, the findings presented provide an insight into some of its possible modes of action.

  1. Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for Movement Disorders: An Experience in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) Involving 12 Patients.

    PubMed

    Hooi, Lim Liang; Fitzrol, Diana Noma; Rajapathy, Senthil Kumar; Chin, Tan Yew; Halim, Sanihah Abdul; Kandasamy, Regunath; Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan; Idris, Badrisyah; Ghani, Abdul Rahman Izaini; Idris, Zamzuri; Tharakan, John; Nunta-Aree, Sarun; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first introduced in 1987 to the developed world. As a developing country Malaysia begun its movement disorder program by doing ablation therapy using the Radionics system. Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia a rural based teaching hospital had to take into consideration both health economics and outcomes in the area that it was providing neurosurgical care for when it initiated its Deep Brain Stimulation program. Most of the patients were from the low to medium social economic groups and could not afford payment for a DBS implant. We concentrated our DBS services to Parkinson's disease, Tourette's Syndrome and dystonia patients who had exhausted medical therapy. The case series of these patients and their follow-up are presented in this brief communication.

  2. Constructing fine-granularity functional brain network atlases via deep convolutional autoencoder.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Dong, Qinglin; Chen, Hanbo; Iraji, Armin; Li, Yujie; Makkie, Milad; Kou, Zhifeng; Liu, Tianming

    2017-08-18

    State-of-the-art functional brain network reconstruction methods such as independent component analysis (ICA) or sparse coding of whole-brain fMRI data can effectively infer many thousands of volumetric brain network maps from a large number of human brains. However, due to the variability of individual brain networks and the large scale of such networks needed for statistically meaningful group-level analysis, it is still a challenging and open problem to derive group-wise common networks as network atlases. Inspired by the superior spatial pattern description ability of the deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs), a novel deep 3D convolutional autoencoder (CAE) network is designed here to extract spatial brain network features effectively, based on which an Apache Spark enabled computational framework is developed for fast clustering of larger number of network maps into fine-granularity atlases. To evaluate this framework, 10 resting state networks (RSNs) were manually labeled from the sparsely decomposed networks of Human Connectome Project (HCP) fMRI data and 5275 network training samples were obtained, in total. Then the deep CAE models are trained by these functional networks' spatial maps, and the learned features are used to refine the original 10 RSNs into 17 network atlases that possess fine-granularity functional network patterns. Interestingly, it turned out that some manually mislabeled outliers in training networks can be corrected by the deep CAE derived features. More importantly, fine granularities of networks can be identified and they reveal unique network patterns specific to different brain task states. By further applying this method to a dataset of mild traumatic brain injury study, it shows that the technique can effectively identify abnormal small networks in brain injury patients in comparison with controls. In general, our work presents a promising deep learning and big data analysis solution for modeling functional connectomes, with

  3. [Mechanism of action for deep brain stimulation and electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM)].

    PubMed

    Okun, Michael S; Oyama, Genko

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become an important treatment option for carefully screened medication resistant neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. DBS therapy is not always applied deep to the brain; does not have to be applied exclusively to the brain; and the mechanism for DBS is not simply stimulation of structures. The applications and target locations for DBS devices are rapidly expanding, with many new regions of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, and muscles now possibly accessed through this technology. We will review the idea of "electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM)"; discuss the importance of the complex neural networks underpinning the effects of DBS; discuss the expansion of brain targets; discuss the use of fiber based targets; and discuss the importance of tailoring DBS therapy to the symptom, rather than the disease.

  4. Twiddler's syndrome in a patient with epilepsy treated with deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Penn, David L; Wu, Chengyuan; Skidmore, Christopher; Sperling, Michael R; Sharan, Ashwini D

    2012-07-01

    Twiddler's syndrome is the conscious or unconscious manipulation of implantable pulse generators (IPGs) or associated wire systems by the patient. Most commonly, this complication has been documented in patients with cardiac pacemakers, but there are reported cases in patients with deep brain stimulators. Twisting of stimulator systems results in dislodgement or damage to leads and loss of stimulation to the desired target. The present case illustrates a rare complication that may have serious consequences in patients with deep brain stimulators. A 21 year-old woman presented with recurrence of seizures from failure of her deep brain stimulator targeting the anterior nuclei of the thalamus to control refractory epilepsy, 6 months after it was implanted. Radiographic imaging revealed that the IPG had been twisted upon itself causing coiling and looping of extension wires. The patient denied any conscious manipulation of the system, which was subsequently surgically revised. Surgical revision achieved the desired stimulation and effects. On 4-month follow-up the deep brain stimulator remained stable and untwisted; however, it was subsequently removed in the fourth month because of infection at the extension site. In conclusion, twiddler's syndrome is a rare complication occurring in patients with deep brain stimulator implants and warrants awareness among neurologic and neurosurgical epilepsy specialists. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. The clinical outcomes of deep gray matter injury in children with cerebral palsy in relation with brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ja Young; Choi, Yoon Seong; Rha, Dong-Wook; Park, Eun Sook

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we investigated the nature and extent of clinical outcomes using various classifications and analyzed the relationship between brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the extent of clinical outcomes in children with cerebral palsy (CP) with deep gray matter injury. The deep gray matter injuries of 69 children were classified into hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and kernicterus patterns. HIE patterns were divided into four groups (I-IV) based on severity. Functional classification was investigated using the gross motor function classification system-expanded and revised, manual ability classification system, communication function classification system, and tests of cognitive function, and other associated problems. The severity of HIE pattern on brain MRI was strongly correlated with the severity of clinical outcomes in these various domains. Children with a kernicterus pattern showed a wide range of clinical outcomes in these areas. Children with severe HIE are at high risk of intellectual disability (ID) or epilepsy and children with a kernicterus pattern are at risk of hearing impairment and/or ID. Grading severity of HIE pattern on brain MRI is useful for predicting overall outcomes. The clinical outcomes of children with a kernicterus pattern range widely from mild to severe. Delineation of the clinical outcomes of children with deep gray matter injury, which are a common abnormal brain MRI finding in children with CP, is necessary. The present study provides clinical outcomes for various domains in children with deep gray matter injury on brain MRI. The deep gray matter injuries were divided into two major groups; HIE and kernicterus patterns. Our study showed that severity of HIE pattern on brain MRI was strongly associated with the severity of impairments in gross motor function, manual ability, communication function, and cognition. These findings suggest that severity of HIE pattern can be useful for predicting the

  6. Deep brain stimulation, brain maps and personalized medicine: lessons from the human genome project.

    PubMed

    Fins, Joseph J; Shapiro, Zachary E

    2014-01-01

    Although the appellation of personalized medicine is generally attributed to advanced therapeutics in molecular medicine, deep brain stimulation (DBS) can also be so categorized. Like its medical counterpart, DBS is a highly personalized intervention that needs to be tailored to a patient's individual anatomy. And because of this, DBS like more conventional personalized medicine, can be highly specific where the object of care is an N = 1. But that is where the similarities end. Besides their differing medical and surgical provenances, these two varieties of personalized medicine have had strikingly different impacts. The molecular variant, though of a more recent vintage has thrived and is experiencing explosive growth, while DBS still struggles to find a sustainable therapeutic niche. Despite its promise, and success as a vetted treatment for drug resistant Parkinson's Disease, DBS has lagged in broadening its development, often encountering regulatory hurdles and financial barriers necessary to mount an adequate number of quality trials. In this paper we will consider why DBS-or better yet neuromodulation-has encountered these challenges and contrast this experience with the more successful advance of personalized medicine. We will suggest that personalized medicine and DBS's differential performance can be explained as a matter of timing and complexity. We believe that DBS has struggled because it has been a journey of scientific exploration conducted without a map. In contrast to molecular personalized medicine which followed the mapping of the human genome and the Human Genome Project, DBS preceded plans for the mapping of the human brain. We believe that this sequence has given personalized medicine a distinct advantage and that the fullest potential of DBS will be realized both as a cartographical or electrophysiological probe and as a modality of personalized medicine.

  7. Reversing cognitive–motor impairments in Parkinson’s disease patients using a computational modelling approach to deep brain stimulation programming

    PubMed Central

    Frankemolle, Anneke M. M.; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M.; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Ho, Jason C.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus is an effective and safe surgical procedure that has been shown to reduce the motor dysfunction of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, however, has been associated with declines in cognitive and cognitive–motor functioning. It has been hypothesized that spread of current to nonmotor areas of the subthalamic nucleus may be responsible for declines in cognitive and cognitive–motor functioning. The aim of this study was to assess the cognitive–motor performance in advanced Parkinson’s disease patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation parameters determined clinically (Clinical) to settings derived from a patient-specific computational model (Model). Data were collected from 10 patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease bilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation systems. These patients were assessed off medication and under three deep brain stimulation conditions: Off, Clinical or Model based stimulation. Clinical stimulation parameters had been determined based on clinical evaluations and were stable for at least 6 months prior to study participation. Model-based parameters were selected to minimize the spread of current to nonmotor portions of the subthalamic nucleus using Cicerone Deep Brain Stimulation software. For each stimulation condition, participants performed a working memory (n-back task) and motor task (force tracking) under single- and dual-task settings. During the dual-task, participants performed the n-back and force-tracking tasks simultaneously. Clinical and Model parameters were equally effective in improving the Unified Parkinson’s disease Rating Scale III scores relative to Off deep brain stimulation scores. Single-task working memory declines, in the 2-back condition, were significantly less under Model compared with Clinical deep brain stimulation settings. Under dual

  8. Shaping reversibility? Long-term deep brain stimulation in dystonia: the relationship between effects on electrophysiology and clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Diane; Cif, Laura; Limousin, Patricia; Gonzalez, Victoria; Vasques, Xavier; Hariz, Marwan I; Coubes, Philippe; Rothwell, John C

    2011-07-01

    Long-term results show that benefits from chronic deep brain stimulation in dystonia are maintained for many years. Despite this, the neurophysiological long-term consequences of treatment and their relationship to clinical effects are not well understood. Previous studies have shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation measures of abnormal long-term potentiation-like plasticity (paired associative stimulation) and GABAa-ergic inhibition (short-interval intracortical inhibition), which are seen in dystonia, normalize after several months of deep brain stimulation. In the present study, we examine the same measures in a homogenous group of 10 DYT1 gene-positive patients after long-term deep brain stimulation treatment for at least 4.5 years. Recordings were made 'on' deep brain stimulation and after stopping deep brain stimulation for 2 days. The results show that: (i) on average, prior to discontinuing deep brain stimulation, the paired associative stimulation response was almost absent and short-interval intracortical inhibition was reduced compared with normal. This pattern differs from that in both healthy volunteers and from the typical pattern of enhanced plasticity and reduced inhibition seen in deep brain stimulation-naïve dystonia. It is similar to that seen in untreated Parkinson's disease and may relate to thus far unexplained clinical phenomena like parkinsonian symptoms that have sometimes been observed in patients treated with deep brain stimulation. (ii) Overall, there was no change in average physiological or clinical status when deep brain stimulation was turned off for 2 days, suggesting that deep brain stimulation had produced long-term neural reorganization in the motor system. (iii) However, there was considerable variation between patients. Those who had higher levels of plasticity when deep brain stimulation was 'on', had the best retention of clinical benefit when deep brain stimulation was stopped and vice versa. This may indicate that

  9. Development of in situ Imaging Probe for Surgical Operation of Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Toshihiko; Yi-Li, Pan; Tagawa, Ayato; Kobayashi, Takuma; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Hatanaka, Yumiko; Nakano, Naoki; Kato, Amami; Shiosaka, Sadao; Ohta, Jun

    A novel clinical medical tool for surgical operation of deep brain stimulation was fabricated and evaluated. Dedicated micro-CMOS image sensor was mounted on the tip of quite fine probe tube. The probe has the same diameter as a probe that is utilized in surgical operation. A light source LED was also mounted on the tip of probe. Imaging trial using a postmortem brain was performed with the fabricated probe. The probe can be inserted into a brain easily and take still images of the brain.

  10. Accurate CT-MR image registration for deep brain stimulation: a multi-observer evaluation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Jan; Derksen, Alexander; Heldmann, Stefan; Hallmann, Marc; Meine, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Since the first clinical interventions in the late 1980s, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus has evolved into a very effective treatment option for patients with severe Parkinson's disease. DBS entails the implantation of an electrode that performs high frequency stimulations to a target area deep inside the brain. A very accurate placement of the electrode is a prerequisite for positive therapy outcome. The assessment of the intervention result is of central importance in DBS treatment and involves the registration of pre- and postinterventional scans. In this paper, we present an image processing pipeline for highly accurate registration of postoperative CT to preoperative MR. Our method consists of two steps: a fully automatic pre-alignment using a detection of the skull tip in the CT based on fuzzy connectedness, and an intensity-based rigid registration. The registration uses the Normalized Gradient Fields distance measure in a multilevel Gauss-Newton optimization framework and focuses on a region around the subthalamic nucleus in the MR. The accuracy of our method was extensively evaluated on 20 DBS datasets from clinical routine and compared with manual expert registrations. For each dataset, three independent registrations were available, thus allowing to relate algorithmic with expert performance. Our method achieved an average registration error of 0.95mm in the target region around the subthalamic nucleus as compared to an inter-observer variability of 1.12 mm. Together with the short registration time of about five seconds on average, our method forms a very attractive package that can be considered ready for clinical use.

  11. The treatment of Parkinson's disease with deep brain stimulation: current issues

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, Alexia-Sabine; Groiss, Stefan Jun; Elben, Saskia; Südmeyer, Martin; Schnitzler, Alfons; Wojtecki, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation has become a well-established symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease during the last 25 years. Besides improving motor symptoms and long-term motor complications, positive effects on patients’ mobility, activities of daily living, emotional well-being and health-related quality of life have been recognized. Apart from that, numerous clinical trials analyzed effects on non-motor symptoms and side effects of deep brain stimulation. Several technical issues and stimulation paradigms have been and are still being developed to optimize the therapeutic effects, minimize the side effects and facilitate handling. This review summarizes current therapeutic issues, i.e., patient and target selection, surgical procedure and programming paradigms. In addition it focuses on neuropsychological effects and side effects of deep brain stimulation. PMID:26330809

  12. Magneto-thermal genetic deep brain stimulation of motor behaviors in awake, freely moving mice.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Rahul; Qadri, Shahnaz M; Zhang, Qian; Castellanos Rubio, Idoia; Del Pino, Pablo; Pralle, Arnd

    2017-08-15

    Establishing how neurocircuit activation causes particular behaviors requires modulating the activity of specific neurons. Here, we demonstrate that magnetothermal genetic stimulation provides tetherless deep brain activation sufficient to evoke motor behavior in awake mice. The approach uses alternating magnetic fields to heat superparamagnetic nanoparticles on the neuronal membrane. Neurons heat-sensitized by expressing TRPV1 are activated with magnetic field application. Magnetothermal genetic stimulation in the motor cortex evoked ambulation, deep brain stimulation in the striatum caused rotation around the body-axis, and stimulation near the ridge between ventral and dorsal striatum caused freezing-of-gait. The duration of the behavior correlated tightly with field application. This approach provides genetically and spatially targetable, repeatable and temporarily precise activation of deep-brain circuits without need for surgical implantation of any device.

  13. Cortico-muscular coherence increases with tremor improvement after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Hame; Kim, June Sic; Paek, Sun Ha; Jeon, Beom Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Chung, Chun Kee

    2009-10-28

    Deep brain stimulation on the subthalamic nucleus has been used to relieve Parkinsonian motor symptoms. However, the underlying physiological mechanism has not been fully understood. Beta-band cortico-muscular coherence increases when healthy humans perform isometric contraction. We hypothesized that this might be a measure of symptomatic improvement in motor performance after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Here, we measured the beta-band cortico-muscular coherence with magnetoencephalography from three Parkinson's disease patients. We then compared the coherence values for stimulator on-state and off-state. We found that when the stimulator is on, the beta cortico-muscular coherence elevates significantly for the tremorous hand compared with that when the stimulator is off. This suggests that deep brain stimulation resulted in better cortico-muscular coordination.

  14. Me, Myself and My Brain Implant: Deep Brain Stimulation Raises Questions of Personal Authenticity and Alienation.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Felicitas

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I explore select case studies of Parkinson patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) in light of the notions of alienation and authenticity. While the literature on DBS has so far neglected the issues of authenticity and alienation, I argue that interpreting these cases in terms of these concepts raises new issues for not only the philosophical discussion of neuro-ethics of DBS, but also for the psychological and medical approach to patients under DBS. In particular, I suggest that the experience of alienation and authenticity varies from patient to patient with DBS. For some, alienation can be brought about by neurointerventions because patients no longer feel like themselves. But, on the other hand, it seems alienation can also be cured by DBS as other patients experience their state of mind as authentic under treatment and retrospectively regard their former lives without stimulation as alienated. I argue that we must do further research on the relevance of authenticity and alienation to patients treated with DBS in order to gain a deeper philosophical understanding, and to develop the best evaluative criterion for the behavior of DBS patients.

  15. Ethical brain stimulation - neuroethics of deep brain stimulation in research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Jens

    2010-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a clinically established procedure for treating severe motor symptoms in patients suffering from end-stage Parkinson's disease, dystonia and essential tremor. Currently, it is tested for further indications including psychiatric disorders like major depression and a variety of other diseases. However, ethical issues of DBS demand continuing discussion. Analysing neuroethical and clinical literature, five major topics concerning the ethics of DBS in clinical practice were identified: thorough examination and weighing of risks and benefits; selecting patients fairly; protecting the health of children in paediatric DBS; special issues concerning patients' autonomy; and the normative impact of quality of life measurements. In exploring DBS for further applications, additionally, issues of research ethics have to be considered. Of special importance in this context are questions such as what additional value is generated by the research, how to realise scientific validity, which patients should be included, and how to achieve an acceptable risk-benefit ratio. Patients' benefit is central for ethical evaluation. This criterion can outweigh very serious side-effects, and can make DBS appropriate even in paediatrics. Because standard test procedures evade central aspects of patients' benefits, measuring quality of life should be supplemented by open in-depth interviews to provide a more adequate picture of patients' post-surgical situation. To examine its entire therapeutic potential, further research in DBS is needed. Studies should be based on solid scientific hypotheses and proceed cautiously to benefit severely suffering patients without putting them to undue risks.

  16. A Low Power Micro Deep Brain Stimulation Device for Murine Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Abulseoud, Osama A.; Tye, Susannah J.; Hosain, Md Kamal; Berk, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation has emerged as an effective medical procedure that has therapeutic efficacy in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Preclinical research involving laboratory animals is being conducted to study the principles, mechanisms, and therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation. A bottleneck is, however, the lack of deep brain stimulation devices that enable long term brain stimulation in freely moving laboratory animals. Most of the existing devices employ complex circuitry, and are thus bulky. These devices are usually connected to the electrode that is implanted into the animal brain using long fixed wires. In long term behavioral trials, however, laboratory animals often need to continuously receive brain stimulation for days without interruption, which is difficult with existing technology. This paper presents a low power and lightweight portable microdeep brain stimulation device for laboratory animals. Three different configurations of the device are presented as follows: 1) single piece head mountable; 2) single piece back mountable; and 3) two piece back mountable. The device can be easily carried by the animal during the course of a clinical trial, and that it can produce non-stop stimulation current pulses of desired characteristics for over 12 days on a single battery. It employs passive charge balancing to minimize undesirable effects on the target tissue. The results of bench, in-vitro, and in-vivo tests to evaluate the performance of the device are presented. PMID:27170861

  17. A Low Power Micro Deep Brain Stimulation Device for Murine Preclinical Research.

    PubMed

    Kouzani, Abbas Z; Abulseoud, Osama A; Tye, Susannah J; Hosain, M D Kamal; Berk, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation has emerged as an effective medical procedure that has therapeutic efficacy in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Preclinical research involving laboratory animals is being conducted to study the principles, mechanisms, and therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation. A bottleneck is, however, the lack of deep brain stimulation devices that enable long term brain stimulation in freely moving laboratory animals. Most of the existing devices employ complex circuitry, and are thus bulky. These devices are usually connected to the electrode that is implanted into the animal brain using long fixed wires. In long term behavioral trials, however, laboratory animals often need to continuously receive brain stimulation for days without interruption, which is difficult with existing technology. This paper presents a low power and lightweight portable microdeep brain stimulation device for laboratory animals. Three different configurations of the device are presented as follows: 1) single piece head mountable; 2) single piece back mountable; and 3) two piece back mountable. The device can be easily carried by the animal during the course of a clinical trial, and that it can produce non-stop stimulation current pulses of desired characteristics for over 12 days on a single battery. It employs passive charge balancing to minimize undesirable effects on the target tissue. The results of bench, in-vitro, and in-vivo tests to evaluate the performance of the device are presented.

  18. Deep brain stimulation for treatment-refractory obsessive compulsive disorder: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Sina; Schönherr, Deva M; Luigjes, Judy; Denys, Damiaan; Mueller, Ulf J; Lenartz, Doris; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Kuhn, Jens

    2014-08-02

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is one of the most disabling of all psychiatric illnesses. Despite available pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments about 10% of patients remain severely affected and are considered treatment-refractory. For some of these patients deep brain stimulation offers an appropriate treatment method. The scope of this article is to review the published data and to compare different target structures and their effectiveness. PubMed search, last update June 2013, was conducted using the terms "deep brain stimulation" and "obsessive compulsive disorder". In total 25 studies were found that reported five deep brain stimulation target structures to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder: the anterior limb of the internal capsule (five studies including 14 patients), nucleus accumbens (eight studies including 37 patients), ventral capsule/ventral striatum (four studies including 29 patients), subthalamic nucleus (five studies including 23 patients) and inferior thalamic peduncle (two studies including 6 patients). Despite the anatomical diversity, deep brain stimulation treatment results in similar response rates for the first four target structures. Inferior thalamic peduncle deep brain stimulation results in higher response rates but these results have to be interpreted with caution due to a very small number of cases. Procedure and device related adverse events are relatively low, as well as stimulation or therapy related side effects. Most stimulation related side effects are transient and decline after stimulation parameters have been changed. Deep brain stimulation in treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder seems to be a relatively safe and promising treatment option. However, based on these studies no superior target structure could be identified. More research is needed to better understand mechanisms of action and response predictors that may help to develop a more personalized approach for these severely affected

  19. Deep brain stimulation effects in dystonia: time course of electrophysiological changes in early treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Diane; Tisch, Stephen; Hariz, Marwan I; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Bhatia, Kailash P; Quinn, Niall P; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Limousin, Patricia; Rothwell, John C

    2011-08-15

    Deep brain stimulation to the internal globus pallidus is an effective treatment for primary dystonia. The optimal clinical effect often occurs only weeks to months after starting stimulation. To better understand the underlying electrophysiological changes in this period, we assessed longitudinally 2 pathophysiological markers of dystonia in patients prior to and in the early treatment period (1, 3, 6 months) after deep brain stimulation surgery. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to track changes in short-latency intracortical inhibition, a measure of excitability of GABA(A) -ergic corticocortical connections and long-term potentiation-like synaptic plasticity (as a response to paired associative stimulation). Deep brain stimulation remained on for the duration of the study. Prior to surgery, inhibition was reduced and plasticity increased in patients compared with healthy controls. Following surgery and commencement of deep brain stimulation, short-latency intracortical inhibition increased toward normal levels over the following months with the same monotonic time course as the patients' clinical benefit. In contrast, synaptic plasticity changed rapidly, following a nonmonotonic time course: it was absent early (1 month) after surgery, and then over the following months increased toward levels observed in healthy individuals. We postulate that before surgery preexisting high levels of plasticity form strong memories of dystonic movement patterns. When deep brain stimulation is turned on, it disrupts abnormal basal ganglia signals, resulting in the absent response to paired associative stimulation at 1 month. Clinical benefit is delayed because engrams of abnormal movement persist and take time to normalize. Our observations suggest that plasticity may be a driver of long-term therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation in dystonia.

  20. Long-Term Efficacy of Constant Current Deep Brain Stimulation in Essential Tremor.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Haddad, Ali; Samuel, Michael; Hulse, Natasha; Lin, Hsin-Ying; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2017-07-01

    Ventralis intermedius deep brain stimulation is an established intervention for medication-refractory essential tremor. Newer constant current stimulation technology offers theoretical advantage over the traditional constant voltage systems in terms of delivering a more biologically stable therapy. There are no previous reports on the outcomes of constant current deep brain stimulation in the treatment of essential tremor. This study aimed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of ventralis intermedius constant current deep brain stimulation in patients diagnosed with essential tremor. Essential tremor patients implanted with constant current deep brain stimulation for a minimum of three years were evaluated. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin tremor rating scale at baseline and postoperatively at the time of evaluation. The quality of life in the patients was assessed using the Quality of Life in Essential Tremor questionnaire. Ten patients were evaluated with a median age at evaluation of 74 years (range 66-79) and a mean follow up time of 49.7 (range 36-78) months since starting stimulation. Constant current ventralis intermedius deep brain stimulation was well tolerated and effective in all patients with a mean score improvement from 50.7 ± 5.9 to 17.4 ± 5.7 (p = 0.0020) in the total Fahn-Tolosa-Marin rating scale score (65.6%). Furthermore, the total combined mean Quality of Life in Essential Tremor score was improved from 56.2 ± 4.9 to 16.8 ± 3.5 (p value = 0.0059) (70.1%). This report shows that long-term constant current ventralis intermedius deep brain stimulation is a safe and effective intervention for essential tremor patients. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  1. Deep brain stimulation of the ventral striatum increases BDNF in the fear extinction circuit

    PubMed Central

    Do-Monte, Fabricio H.; Rodriguez-Romaguera, Jose; Rosas-Vidal, Luis E.; Quirk, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) reduces the symptoms of treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and improves response to extinction-based therapies. We recently reported that DBS-like stimulation of a rat homologue of VC/VS, the dorsal-VS, reduced conditioned fear and enhanced extinction memory (Rodriguez-Romaguera et al., 2012). In contrast, DBS of the ventral-VS had the opposite effects. To examine possible mechanisms of these effects, we assessed the effects of VS DBS on the expression of the neural activity marker Fos and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key mediator of extinction plasticity in prefrontal-amygdala circuits. Consistent with decreased fear expression, DBS of dorsal-VS increased Fos expression in prelimbic and infralimbic prefrontal cortices and in the lateral division of the central nucleus of amygdala, an area that inhibits amygdala output. Consistent with improved extinction memory, we found that DBS of dorsal-VS, but not ventral-VS, increased neuronal BDNF expression in prelimbic and infralimbic prefrontal cortices. These rodent findings are consistent with the idea that clinical DBS of VC/VS may augment fear extinction through an increase in BDNF expression. PMID:23964215

  2. Post-Traumatic Tremor and Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation: Evidence for Use of Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boccard, Sandra G J; Rebelo, Pedro; Cheeran, Binith; Green, Alexander; FitzGerald, James J; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2016-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-established treatment to reduce tremor, notably in Parkinson disease. DBS may also be effective in post-traumatic tremor, one of the most common movement disorders caused by head injury. However, the cohorts of patients often have multiple lesions that may impact the outcome depending on which fiber tracts are affected. A 20-year-old man presented after road traffic accident with severe closed head injury and polytrauma. Computed tomography scan showed left frontal and basal ganglia hemorrhagic contusions and intraventricular hemorrhage. A disabling tremor evolved in step with motor recovery. Despite high-intensity signals in the intended thalamic target, a visual analysis of the preoperative diffusion tensor imaging revealed preservation of connectivity of the intended target, ventralis oralis posterior thalamic nucleus (VOP). This was confirmed by the postoperative tractography study presented here. DBS of the VOP/zona incerta was performed. Six months postimplant, marked improvement of action (postural, kinetic, and intention) tremor was achieved. We demonstrated a strong connectivity between the VOP and the superior frontal gyrus containing the premotor cortex and other central brain areas responsible for movement control. In spite of an existing lesion in the target, the preservation of these tracts may be relevant to the improvement of the patient's symptoms by DBS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ethical safety of deep brain stimulation: A study on moral decision-making in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Manuela; Marceglia, Sara; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Ardolino, Gianluca; Picascia, Marta; Barbieri, Sergio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Pacchetti, Claudio; Priori, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    The possibility that deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) alters patients' decisions and actions, even temporarily, raises important clinical, ethical and legal questions. Abnormal moral decision-making can lead to ethical rules violations. Previous experiments demonstrated the subthalamic (STN) activation during moral decision-making. Here we aim to study whether STN DBS can affect moral decision-making in PD patients. Eleven patients with PD and bilateral STN DBS implant performed a computerized moral task in ON and OFF stimulation conditions. A control group of PD patients without DBS implant performed the same experimental protocol. All patients underwent motor, cognitive and psychological assessments. STN stimulation was not able to modify neither reaction times nor responses to moral task both when we compared the ON and the OFF state in the same patient (reaction times, p = .416) and when we compared DBS patients with those treated only with the best medical treatment (reaction times: p = .408, responses: p = .776). Moral judgment is the result of a complex process, requiring cognitive executive functions, problem-solving, anticipations of consequences of an action, conflict processing, emotional evaluation of context and of possible outcomes, and involving different brain areas and neural circuits. Our data show that STN DBS leaves unaffected moral decisions thus implying relevant clinical and ethical implications for DBS consequences on patients' behavior, on decision-making and on judgment ability. In conclusion, the technique can be considered safe on moral behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Abscess at the implant site following apical parodontitis. Hardware-related complications of deep brain stimulation].

    PubMed

    Sixel-Döring, F; Trenkwalder, C; Kappus, C; Hellwig, D

    2006-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an important treatment option for advanced stages of idiopathic Parkinson's disease, leading to significant improvement of motor symptoms in suited patients. Hardware-related complications such as technical malfunction, skin erosion, and infections however cause patient discomfort and additional expense. The patient presented here suffered a putrid infection of the impulse generator site following only local dental treatment of apical parodontitis. Therefore, prophylactic systemic antibiotic treatment is recommended for patients with implanted deep brain stimulation devices in case of operations, dental procedures, or infectious disease.

  5. Brain Injury in Autonomic, Emotional, and Cognitive Regulatory Areas in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Mary A.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is accompanied by autonomic, emotional, and cognitive deficits, indicating brain alterations. Reduced gray matter volume and isolated white matter infarcts occur in HF, but the extent of damage is unclear. Using magnetic resonance T2 relaxometry, we evaluated the extent of injury across the entire brain in HF. Methods and Results Proton-density and T2-weighted images were acquired from 13 HF (age 54.6 ± 8.3 years; 69% male, LVEF 0.28 ± 0.07) and 49 controls (50.6 ± 7.3 years, 59% male). Whole brain maps of T2 relaxation times were compared at each voxel between groups using analysis of covariance (covariates: age and gender). Higher T2 relaxation values, indicating injured brain areas (p < 0.005), emerged in sites that control autonomic, analgesic, emotional, and cognitive functions (hypothalamus, raphé magnus, cerebellar cortex, deep nuclei and vermis; temporal, parietal, prefrontal, occipital, insular, cingulate, and ventral frontal cortices; corpus callosum; anterior thalamus; caudate nuclei; anterior fornix and hippocampus). No brain areas showed higher T2 values in control vs. HF subjects. Conclusions Brain structural injury emerged in areas involved in autonomic, pain, mood, language, and cognitive function in HF patients. Comorbid conditions accompanying HF may result from neural injury associated with the syndrome. PMID:19327623

  6. Calibration of clinical cerebellar and deep brain stimulation systems.

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, D L; Wright, G D; Renouf, F

    1981-01-01

    The increasing use of electrical stimulation of the brain for relief of pain, spasticity and epilepsy has introduced unfamiliar techniques into clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. In view of the evidence that excessive levels of stimulation can damage brain tissue, it is of great importance to monitor the dose of stimulation. A review of recent clinical papers suggests that many centres do not measure the dose accurately, relying on arbitrary dial settings on external transmitters. This paper reviews that factors that affect the dose received by the patient and suggests methods of measuring them, at operation and subsequently, which should routinely be employed by clinicians implanting stimulators. Images PMID:6973614

  7. Quantifying the effects of the electrode-brain interface on the crossing electric currents in deep brain recording and stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Nada; Bayford, Richard; Wang, Shouyan; Liu, Xuguang

    2009-01-01

    A depth electrode-brain interface (EBI) is formed once electrodes are implanted into the brain. We investigated the impact of the EBI on the crossing electric currents during both deep brain recording (DBR) and deep brain stimulation (DBS) over the acute, chronic and transitional stages post-implantation, in order to investigate and quantify the effect which changes at the EBI have on both DBR and DBS. We combined two complementary methods: (1) physiological recording of local field potentials via the implanted electrode in patients; and (2) computational simulations of an EBI model. Our depth recordings revealed that the physiological modulation of the EBI in the acute stage via brain pulsation selectively affected the crossing neural signals in a frequency-dependent manner, as the amplitude of the electrode potential was inversely correlated with that of the tremor-related oscillation, but not the beta oscillation. Computational simulations of DBS during the transitional period showed that the shielding effect of partial giant cell growth on the injected current could shape the field in an unpredictable manner. These results quantitatively demonstrated that physiological modulation of the EBI significantly affected the crossing currents in both DBR and DBS. Studying the microenvironment of the EBI may be a key step in investigating the mechanisms of DBR and DBS, as well as brain-computer interactions in general. PMID:18304747

  8. An implantable device for neuropsychiatric rehabilitation by chronic deep brain stimulation in freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenguang; Zhang, Fuqiang; Jia, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Successful practice of clinical deep brain stimulation (DBS) calls for basic research on the mechanisms and explorations of new indications in animals. In the article, a new implantable, single-channel, low-power miniature device is proposed, which may transmit pulses chronically into the brain nucleus of freely moving rats. The DBS system consists of an implantable pulse generator (IPG), a bipolar electrode, and an external programmer. The IPG circuit module is assembled as a 20-mm diameter circular board and fixed on a rat’s skull together with an electrode and battery. The rigid electrode may make its fabrication and implantation more easy. The external programmer is designed for bidirectional communication with the IPG by a telecontrol transceiver and adjusts stimulation parameters. A biological validation was performed in which the effects of electrical stimulation in brain nucleus accumbens were detected. The programmed parameters were accurate, implant steady, and power sufficient to allow stimulation for more than 3 months. The larger area of the electrode tip provided a moderate current or charge density and minimized the damage from electrochemistry and pyroelectricity. The rats implanted with the device showed a reduction in morphine-induced conditioned place preference after high-frequency stimulation. In conclusion, the DBS device is based on the criteria of simple technology, minimal invasion, low cost, small in size, light-weight, and wireless controlled. This shows that our DBS device is appropriate and can be used for preclinical studies, indicating its potential utility in the therapy and rehabilitation of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28121810

  9. The reorganization of motor network in hemidystonia from the perspective of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Victoria; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Cif, Laura; van Dokkum, Liesjet E H; Laffont, Isabelle; Bonafé, Alain; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Zanca, Michel; Coubes, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Hemidystonia is usually 'secondary' to structural lesions within the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic or the cerebello-thalamo-cortical loops. Globus pallidus internus Deep Brain Stimulation (GPi DBS) is a validated technique in the treatment of primary dystonia and still under assessment for secondary dystonia. Results of DBS in hemidystonia are limited and heterogeneous. Further knowledge concerning motor network organization after focal brain lesions might contribute to the understanding of this mitigated response to DBS and to the refinement of DBS indications and techniques in secondary dystonia. This study aimed to identify movement-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation patterns in a group of hemidystonic patients in comparison to healthy controls (HC). Further analysis assessed recruitment pattern in different patient subgroups defined according to clinical and radiological criteria relevant to GPi DBS eligibility (hyperkinetic/hypokinetic and prepallidal/postpallidal). Eleven patients and nine HC underwent fMRI with a block-design alternating active and rest conditions. The motor paradigm consisted of self-paced elbow flexion-extension movements. The main results were as follows: single-subject studies revealed several activation patterns involving motor-related network regions; both ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres showed abnormal patterns of activity; compared with HC, hemidystonic patients showed decreased brain activity in ipsilesional thalamus, pallidal and temporal areas during affected arm task execution; 'hypokinetic' subgroup was commonly related to widespread bilateral overactivity. This study provides additional arguments for case-by-case assessment of DBS surgery indication and target selection in hemidystonia. Single-lead approach might be unable to modulate a highly disorganized network activity in certain patients with this clinical syndrome.

  10. Deep brain stimulation of the posterior gyrus rectus region for treatment resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Ettore A; Aust, Sabine; Merkl, Angela; Schneider, Gerd-Helde; Kühn, Andrea A; Bajbouj, Malek; Draganski, Bogdan

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents an alternative symptomatic treatment for major depressive disorder in case of failure of pharmacotherapy. The sub-genual cingulate-Brodmann area 25 (CG-25), is one of the most widely used targets for electrode implantation. Given the diverging clinical outcome after DBS, there is a pressing need for in-depth study of brain anatomy and function allowing accurate and reliable prognosis before surgery. We studied five treatment-resistant major depressive disorder patients planned to undergo DBS targeting the CG-25. Before surgery, we acquired high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted images for each patient followed by post-surgery MRI for electrode localization. To estimate individual anatomical connectivity pattern of the active contact location we performed probabilistic diffusion tractography intra-individually. We then correlated connectivity patterns with outcome assessed with standardized clinical tests. Connectivity results were compared between DBS responders and non-responders. We observed in one patient an excellent clinical response after DBS of the bilateral posterior gyrus rectus rather than the initially targeted CG-25. The remaining four patients with DBS of the CG-25 were considered as non-responders. In the case patient, we demonstrate a strong connectivity of the stimulated regions to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which contrasted to the lower mPFC connectivity in non-responders. Confirmation in larger cohorts is needed. We propose the posterior gyrus rectus as viable alternative new target for DBS in major depressive disorder. High connectivity between target and mPFC supports the pivotal role of this region in brain networks involved in mood processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors of cerebral microbleeds in strictly deep or lobar brain regions differed.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changqing; Li, Zixiao; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Chunxue; Liu, Liping; Pu, Yuehua; Zou, Xinying; Pan, Yuesong; Du, Wanliang; Jing, Jing; Wang, Dongxue; Luo, Yang; Wong, Ka Sing; Wang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    T2*-weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging is sensitive in detecting cerebral microbleeds (MBs), but there are few reports on the risk factors of MBs in different brain regions. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether the risk factors associated with the presence of MBs in strictly deep or lobar brain regions were different. This study consisted of 696 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients from 6 hospitals in the Chinese IntraCranial AtheroSclerosis Study. We evaluated the number and location of MBs, severity of lacune and leukoaraiosis (LA), and etiologic subtype of ischemic stroke. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze risk factors of MBs in different brain regions. Among 696 acute ischemic stroke patients, 162 patients (23.3%) had MBs. Of them, 62 patients had strictly deep brain MBs, 49 patients had strictly lobar MBs. There was a significant correlation between the number of MBs, the number of lacune, and the severity of LA (P < .0001). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, both strictly deep and strictly lobar brain, MBs were significantly associated with history of cerebral hemorrhage (P = .037 and P = .026, respectively), presence of lacune (P = .004 and P = .032, respectively), and severe LA (P = .002 and P = .008, respectively). However, MBs in strictly deep regions were significantly associated with higher mean arterial pressure (P = .030), and those in strictly lobar brain regions were significantly associated with older age (P = .023). The risk factors of MBs in strictly deep or lobar regions differ modestly, which may be related to heterogeneous vascular pathologic changes. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  13. Cavitation-enhanced nonthermal ablation in deep brain targets: feasibility in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Jolesz, Ferenc; Livingstone, Margaret; McDannold, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) is an emerging noninvasive alternative to surgery and radiosurgery that is undergoing testing for tumor ablation and functional neurosurgery. The method is currently limited to central brain targets due to skull heating and other factors. An alternative ablative approach combines very low intensity ultrasound bursts and an intravenously administered microbubble agent to locally destroy the vasculature. The objective of this work was to investigate whether it is feasible to use this approach at deep brain targets near the skull base in nonhuman primates. METHODS In 4 rhesus macaques, targets near the skull base were ablated using a clinical TcMRgFUS system operating at 220 kHz. Low-duty-cycle ultrasound exposures (sonications) were applied for 5 minutes in conjunction with the ultrasound contrast agent Definity, which was administered as a bolus injection or continuous infusion. The acoustic power level was set to be near the inertial cavitation threshold, which was measured using passive monitoring of the acoustic emissions. The resulting tissue effects were investigated with MRI and with histological analysis performed 3 hours to 1 week after sonication. RESULTS Thirteen targets were sonicated in regions next to the optic tract in the 4 animals. Inertial cavitation, indicated by broadband acoustic emissions, occurred at acoustic pressure amplitudes ranging from 340 to 540 kPa. MRI analysis suggested that the lesions had a central region containing red blood cell extravasations that was surrounded by edema. Blood-brain barrier disruption was observed on contrast-enhanced MRI in the lesions and in a surrounding region corresponding to the prefocal area of the FUS system. In histology, lesions consisting of tissue undergoing ischemic necrosis were found in all regions that were sonicated above the inertial cavitation threshold. Tissue damage in prefocal areas was found in several cases, suggesting that in

  14. Observation and modeling of deep brain stimulation electrode depth in the pallidal target of the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Lumsden, Daniel E; Ashmore, Jonathan; Charles-Edwards, Geoffrey; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2015-04-01

    It is unclear how brain growth with age affects electrode position in relation to target for children undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery. We aimed to model projected change in the distance between the entry point of the electrode into the brain and target during growth to adulthood. Modeling was performed using a neurodevelopmental magnetic resonance imaging database of age-specific templates in 6-month increments from 4 to 18 years of age. Coordinates were chosen for a set of entry points into both cerebral hemispheres and target positions within the globus pallidus internus on the youngest magnetic resonance imaging template. The youngest template was nonlinearly registered to the older templates, and the transformations generated by these registrations were applied to the original coordinates of entry and target positions, mapping these positions with increasing age. Euclidean geometry was used to calculate the distance between projected electrode entry and target with increasing age. A projected increase in distance between entry point and target of 5-10 mm was found from age 4 to 18 years. Most change appeared to occur before 7 years of age, after which minimal change in distance was found. Electrodes inserted during deep brain stimulation surgery are tethered at the point of entry to the skull. Brain growth, which could result in a relative retraction with respect to the original target position, appears to occur before 7 years of age, suggesting careful monitoring is needed for children undergoing implantation before this age. Reengineering of electrode design could avoid reimplantation surgery in young children undergoing deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Deep brain stimulation macroelectrodes compared to multiple microelectrodes in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Arcot Desai, Sharanya; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Potter, Steve M.; Gross, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays (wire diameter <50 μm) were compared to traditional macroelectrodes for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Understanding the neuronal activation volume may help solve some of the mysteries associated with DBS, e.g., its mechanisms of action. We used c-fos immunohistochemistry to investigate neuronal activation in the rat hippocampus caused by multi-micro- and macroelectrode stimulation. At ± 1V stimulation at 25 Hz, microelectrodes (33 μm diameter) had a radius of activation of 100 μm, which is 50% of that seen with 150 μm diameter macroelectrode stimulation. Macroelectrodes activated about 5.8 times more neurons than a single microelectrode, but displaced ~20 times more neural tissue. The sphere of influence of stimulating electrodes can be significantly increased by reducing their impedance. By ultrasonic electroplating (sonicoplating) the microelectrodes with platinum to increase their surface area and reduce their impedance by an order of magnitude, the radius of activation increased by 50 μm and more than twice the number of neurons were activated within this increased radius compared to unplated microelectrodes. We suggest that a new approach to DBS, one that uses multiple high-surface area microelectrodes, may be more therapeutically effective due to increased neuronal activation. PMID:24971060

  16. Evaluation of high-perimeter electrode designs for deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Bryan; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for movement disorders and a promising therapy for treating epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Despite its clinical success, complications including infections and mis-programing following surgical replacement of the battery-powered implantable pulse generator adversely impact the safety profile of this therapy. We sought to decrease power consumption and extend battery life by modifying the electrode geometry to increase stimulation efficiency. The specific goal of this study was to determine whether electrode contact perimeter or area had a greater effect on increasing stimulation efficiency. Approach. Finite-element method (FEM) models of eight prototype electrode designs were used to calculate the electrode access resistance, and the FEM models were coupled with cable models of passing axons to quantify stimulation efficiency. We also measured in vitro the electrical properties of the prototype electrode designs and measured in vivo the stimulation efficiency following acute implantation in anesthetized cats. Main results. Area had a greater effect than perimeter on altering the electrode access resistance; electrode (access or dynamic) resistance alone did not predict stimulation efficiency because efficiency was dependent on the shape of the potential distribution in the tissue; and, quantitative assessment of stimulation efficiency required consideration of the effects of the electrode-tissue interface impedance. Significance. These results advance understanding of the features of electrode geometry that are important for designing the next generation of efficient DBS electrodes.

  17. Evaluation of High-Perimeter Electrode Designs for Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Bryan; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for movement disorders and a promising therapy for treating epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Despite its clinical success, complications including infections and mis-programing following surgical replacement of the battery-powered implantable pulse generator impact the safety profile of this therapy. We sought to decrease power consumption and extend battery life by modifying the electrode geometry to increase stimulation efficiency. The specific goal of this study was to determine whether perimeter or area had a greater effect on increasing stimulation efficiency. Finite-element method (FEM) models of eight prototype electrode designs were used to calculate the electrode access resistance, and the FEM models were coupled with cable models of passing axons to quantify stimulation efficiency. We also measured in vitro the electrical properties of the prototype electrode designs and measured in vivo the stimulation efficiency following acute implantation in anesthetized cats. The results indicated that: (1) area had a greater effect than perimeter on altering the electrode access resistance; (2) electrode (access or dynamic) resistance alone did not predict stimulation efficiency, because efficiency was dependent on the shape of the potential distribution in the tissue; and (3) quantitative assessment of stimulation efficiency required consideration of the effects of the electrode-tissue interface impedance. These results advance understanding of the features of electrode geometry that are important for designing the next generation of efficient DBS electrodes. PMID:25029124

  18. A tripolar current-steering stimulator ASIC for field shaping in deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Valente, Virgilio; Demosthenous, Andreas; Bayford, Richard

    2012-06-01

    A significant problem with clinical deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the high variability of its efficacy and the frequency of side effects, related to the spreading of current beyond the anatomical target area. This is the result of the lack of control that current DBS systems offer on the shaping of the electric potential distribution around the electrode. This paper presents a stimulator ASIC with a tripolar current-steering output stage, aiming at achieving more selectivity and field shaping than current DBS systems. The ASIC was fabricated in a 0.35-μ m CMOS technology occupying a core area of 0.71 mm(2). It consists of three current sourcing/sinking channels. It is capable of generating square and exponential-decay biphasic current pulses with five different time constants up to 28 ms and delivering up to 1.85 mA of cathodic current, in steps of 4 μA, from a 12 V power supply. Field shaping was validated by mapping the potential distribution when injecting current pulses through a multicontact DBS electrode in saline.

  19. No Effect of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on Intertemporal Decision-Making in Parkinson Patients123

    PubMed Central

    Wojtecki, Lars; Storzer, Lena; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). DBS or pharmacological treatment is believed to modulate the tendency to, or reverse, impulse control disorders. Several brain areas involved in impulsivity and reward valuation, such as the prefrontal cortex and striatum, are linked to the STN, and activity in these areas might be affected by STN-DBS. To investigate the effect of STN-DBS on one type of impulsive decision-making—delay discounting (i.e., the devaluation of reward with increasing delay until its receipt)—we tested 40 human PD patients receiving STN-DBS treatment and medication for at least 3 months. Patients were pseudo-randomly assigned to one of four groups to test the effects of DBS on/off states as well as medication on/off states on delay discounting. The delay-discounting task consisted of a series of choices among a smaller. sooner or a larger, later monetary reward. Despite considerable effects of DBS on motor performance, patients receiving STN-DBS did not choose more or less impulsively compared with those in the off-DBS group, as well as when controlling for risk attitude. Although null results have to be interpreted with caution, our findings are of significance to other researchers studying the effects of PD treatment on impulsive decision-making, and they are of clinical relevance for determining the therapeutic benefits of using STN-DBS. PMID:27257622

  20. Perturbation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Acoustic Phonatory Signal in Parkinsonian Patients Receiving Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Victoria S.; Zhou, Xiao Ping; Rahn, Douglas A., III; Wang, Emily Q.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen PD patients who received deep brain stimulation (DBS), 10 non-surgical (control) PD patients, and 11 non-pathologic age- and gender-matched subjects performed sustained vowel phonations. The following acoustic measures were obtained on the sustained vowel phonations: correlation dimension (D[subscript 2]), percent jitter, percent shimmer,…

  1. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Velopharyngeal Control in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal…

  2. The Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Speech Motor System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mücke, Doris; Becker, Johannes; Barbe, Michael T.; Meister, Ingo; Liebhart, Lena; Roettger, Timo B.; Dembek, Till; Timmermann, Lars; Grice, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius is an effective treatment for individuals with medication-resistant essential tremor. However, these individuals report that stimulation has a deleterious effect on their speech. The present study investigates one important factor leading to these effects: the…

  3. Review article: anesthetic management of patients undergoing deep brain stimulator insertion.

    PubMed

    Venkatraghavan, Lashmi; Luciano, Michelle; Manninen, Pirjo

    2010-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation is used for the treatment of patients with neurologic disorders who have an alteration of function, such as movement disorders and other chronic illnesses. The insertion of the deep brain stimulator (DBS) is a minimally invasive procedure that includes the placement of electrodes into deep brain structures for microelectrode recordings and intraoperative clinical testing and connection of the DBS to an implanted pacemaker. The anesthetic technique varies depending on the traditions and requirements of each institution performing these procedures and has included monitored anesthesia with local anesthesia, conscious sedation, and general anesthesia. The challenges and demands for the anesthesiologist in the care of these patients relate to the specific concerns of the patients with functional neurologic disorders, the effects of anesthetic drugs on microelectrode recordings, and the requirements of the surgical procedure, which often include an awake and cooperative patient. The purpose of this review is to familiarize anesthesiologists with deep brain stimulation by discussing the mechanism, the effects of anesthetic drugs, and the surgical procedure of DBS insertion, and the perioperative assessment, preparation, intraoperative anesthetic management, and complications in patients with functional neurologic disorders.

  4. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Velopharyngeal Control in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal…

  5. Practical considerations and nuances in anesthesia for patients undergoing deep brain stimulation implantation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Scharpf, Danielle Teresa; Sharma, Mayur; Rezai, Ali; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2015-01-01

    The field of functional neurosurgery has expanded in last decade to include newer indications, new devices, and new methods. This advancement has challenged anesthesia providers to adapt to these new requirements. This review aims to discuss the nuances and practical issues that are faced while administering anesthesia for deep brain stimulation surgery. PMID:26257844

  6. Transmission in near-infrared optical windows for deep brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lingyan; Sordillo, Laura A; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) radiation has been employed using one- and two-photon excitation of fluorescence imaging at wavelengths 650-950 nm (optical window I) for deep brain imaging; however, longer wavelengths in NIR have been overlooked due to a lack of suitable NIR-low band gap semiconductor imaging detectors and/or femtosecond laser sources. This research introduces three new optical windows in NIR and demonstrates their potential for deep brain tissue imaging. The transmittances are measured in rat brain tissue in the second (II, 1,100-1,350 nm), third (III, 1,600-1,870 nm), and fourth (IV, centered at 2,200 nm) NIR optical tissue windows. The relationship between transmission and tissue thickness is measured and compared with the theory. Due to a reduction in scattering and minimal absorption, window III is shown to be the best for deep brain imaging, and windows II and IV show similar but better potential for deep imaging than window I.

  7. Improvement of both dystonia and tics with 60 Hz pallidal deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hwynn, Nelson; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron L; Limotai, Natlada; Zeilman, Pamela; Malaty, Irene A; Foote, Kelly D; Morishita, Takashi; Okun, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been utilized in both dystonia and in medication refractory Tourette syndrome. We present an interesting case of a patient with a mixture of disabling dystonia and Tourette syndrome whose coexistent dystonia and tics were successfully treated with 60 Hz-stimulation of the globus pallidus region.

  8. The Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Speech Motor System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mücke, Doris; Becker, Johannes; Barbe, Michael T.; Meister, Ingo; Liebhart, Lena; Roettger, Timo B.; Dembek, Till; Timmermann, Lars; Grice, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius is an effective treatment for individuals with medication-resistant essential tremor. However, these individuals report that stimulation has a deleterious effect on their speech. The present study investigates one important factor leading to these effects: the…

  9. Perturbation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Acoustic Phonatory Signal in Parkinsonian Patients Receiving Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Victoria S.; Zhou, Xiao Ping; Rahn, Douglas A., III; Wang, Emily Q.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen PD patients who received deep brain stimulation (DBS), 10 non-surgical (control) PD patients, and 11 non-pathologic age- and gender-matched subjects performed sustained vowel phonations. The following acoustic measures were obtained on the sustained vowel phonations: correlation dimension (D[subscript 2]), percent jitter, percent shimmer,…

  10. Posterior occipitocervical instrumented fusion for dropped head syndrome after deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E A C; Wilson-MacDonald, J; Green, A L; Aziz, T Z; Cadoux-Hudson, T A D

    2010-04-01

    We describe dropped head syndrome in a patient with Parkinson's disease receiving subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS). Posterior occipitocervical instrumented fusion after transarticular screw fixation of an odontoid fracture is shown and its rationale explained. Pedunculopontine nucleus DBS as treatment for fall-predominant Parkinson's disease, and globus pallidus interna DBS for dystonia-predominant Parkinson's disease, are discussed.

  11. Cognitive Functioning in Children with Pantothenate-Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration Undergoing Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Rachel; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the cognitive functioning of young people with pantothenate-kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) after pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS). PKAN is characterized by progressive generalized dystonia and has historically been associated with cognitive decline. With growing evidence that DBS can improve motor function in…

  12. Cognitive Functioning in Children with Pantothenate-Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration Undergoing Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Rachel; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the cognitive functioning of young people with pantothenate-kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) after pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS). PKAN is characterized by progressive generalized dystonia and has historically been associated with cognitive decline. With growing evidence that DBS can improve motor function in…

  13. ["Psychosurgery" and deep brain stimulation with psychiatric indication. Current and historical aspects].

    PubMed

    Arends, M; Fangerau, H; Winterer, G

    2009-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a novel and reversible surgical intervention in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Recent studies in small samples of patients with depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder have come up with promising results. Neurosurgical interventions in psychiatric patients raise ethical questions in the context of historical experiences with traditional and irreversible psychosurgical procedures that need to be discussed.

  14. Broca's Area: A Problem in Language-Brain Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, H. A.; Selnes, O. A.

    1975-01-01

    How significantly is Broca's Area related to speech? It is considered here to be definitely a component in the language mechanism of the brain. It is also stated that this area is unique to people and that it has no unitary function, yet it is specialized for certain expressive (motor) functions. (SCC)

  15. Atlas-based segmentation of deep brain structures using non-rigid registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Faisal; Mewes, Klaus; Gross, Robert E.; Škrinjar, Oskar

    2008-03-01

    Deep brain structures are frequently used as targets in neurosurgical procedures. However, the boundaries of these structures are often not visible in clinically used MR and CT images. Techniques based on anatomical atlases and indirect targeting are used to infer the location of these targets intraoperatively. Initial errors of such approaches may be up to a few millimeters, which is not negligible. E.g. subthalamic nucleus is approximately 4x6 mm in the axial plane and the diameter of globus pallidus internus is approximately 8 mm, both of which are used as targets in deep brain stimulation surgery. To increase the initial localization accuracy of deep brain structures we have developed an atlas-based segmentation method that can be used for the surgery planning. The atlas is a high resolution MR head scan of a healthy volunteer with nine deep brain structures manually segmented. The quality of the atlas image allowed for the segmentation of the deep brain structures, which is not possible from the clinical MR head scans of patients. The subject image is non-rigidly registered to the atlas image using thin plate splines to represent the transformation and normalized mutual information as a similarity measure. The obtained transformation is used to map the segmented structures from the atlas to the subject image. We tested the approach on five subjects. The quality of the atlas-based segmentation was evaluated by visual inspection of the third and lateral ventricles, putamena, and caudate nuclei, which are visible in the subject MR images. The agreement of these structures for the five tested subjects was approximately 1 to 2 mm.

  16. Effects of deep brain stimulation in dyskinetic cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Koy, Anne; Hellmich, Martin; Pauls, K Amande M; Marks, Warren; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Fricke, Oliver; Timmermann, Lars

    2013-05-01

    Secondary dystonia encompasses a heterogeneous group with different etiologies. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause. Pharmacological treatment is often unsatisfactory. There are only limited data on the therapeutic outcomes of deep brain stimulation in dyskinetic cerebral palsy. The published literature regarding deep brain stimulation and secondary dystonia was reviewed in a meta-analysis to reevaluate the effect on cerebral palsy. The Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale movement score was chosen as the primary outcome measure. Outcome over time was evaluated and summarized by mixed-model repeated-measures analysis, paired Student t test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Twenty articles comprising 68 patients with cerebral palsy undergoing deep brain stimulation assessed by the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale were identified. Most articles were case reports reflecting great variability in the score and duration of follow-up. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale movement score was 64.94 ± 25.40 preoperatively and dropped to 50.5 ± 26.77 postoperatively, with a mean improvement of 23.6% (P < .001) at a median follow-up of 12 months. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale disability score was 18.54 ± 6.15 preoperatively and 16.83 ± 6.42 postoperatively, with a mean improvement of 9.2% (P < .001). There was a significant negative correlation between severity of dystonia and clinical outcome (P < .05). Deep brain stimulation can be an effective treatment option for dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In view of the heterogeneous data, a prospective study with a large cohort of patients in a standardized setting with a multidisciplinary approach would be helpful in further evaluating the role of deep brain stimulation in cerebral palsy. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Regional anatomy of the pedunculopontine nucleus: relevance for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Gosselin, Marie-Pierre; Lipsman, Nir; Saint-Cyr, Jean A; Hamani, Clement; Lozano, Andres M

    2013-09-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is currently being investigated as a potential deep brain stimulation target to improve gait and posture in Parkinson's disease. This review examines the complex anatomy of the PPN region and suggests a functional mapping of the surrounding nuclei and fiber tracts that may serve as a guide to a more accurate placement of electrodes while avoiding potentially adverse effects. The relationships of the PPN were examined in different human brain atlases. Schematic representations of those structures in the vicinity of the PPN were generated and correlated with their potential stimulation effects. By providing a functional map and representative schematics of the PPN region, we hope to optimize the placement of deep brain stimulation electrodes, thereby maximizing safety and clinical efficacy.

  18. Brain areas and pathways in the regulation of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Diepenbroek, Charlene; Serlie, Mireille J; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is the most important source of fuel for the brain and its concentration must be kept within strict boundaries to ensure the organism's optimal fitness. To maintain glucose homeostasis, an optimal balance between glucose uptake and glucose output is required. Besides managing acute changes in plasma glucose concentrations, the brain controls a daily rhythm in glucose concentrations. The various nuclei within the hypothalamus that are involved in the control of both these processes are well known. However, novel studies indicate an additional role for brain areas that are originally appreciated in other processes than glucose metabolism. Therefore, besides the classic hypothalamic pathways, we will review cortico-limbic brain areas and their role in glucose metabolism.

  19. Deep convolutional neural networks for annotating gene expression patterns in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Li, Rongjian; Mukkamala, Ravi; Ye, Jieping; Ji, Shuiwang

    2015-05-07

    Profiling gene expression in brain structures at various spatial and temporal scales is essential to understanding how genes regulate the development of brain structures. The Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas provides high-resolution 3-D in situ hybridization (ISH) gene expression patterns in multiple developing stages of the mouse brain. Currently, the ISH images are annotated with anatomical terms manually. In this paper, we propose a computational approach to annotate gene expression pattern images in the mouse brain at various structural levels over the course of development. We applied deep convolutional neural network that was trained on a large set of natural images to extract features from the ISH images of developing mouse brain. As a baseline representation, we applied invariant image feature descriptors to capture local statistics from ISH images and used the bag-of-words approach to build image-level representations. Both types of features from multiple ISH image sections of the entire brain were then combined to build 3-D, brain-wide gene expression representations. We employed regularized learning methods for discriminating gene expression patterns in different brain structures. Results show that our approach of using convolutional model as feature extractors achieved superior performance in annotating gene expression patterns at multiple levels of brain structures throughout four developing ages. Overall, we achieved average AUC of 0.894 ± 0.014, as compared with 0.820 ± 0.046 yielded by the bag-of-words approach. Deep convolutional neural network model trained on natural image sets and applied to gene expression pattern annotation tasks yielded superior performance, demonstrating its transfer learning property is applicable to such biological image sets.

  20. Decoupling of the brain's default mode network during deep sleep.

    PubMed

    Horovitz, Silvina G; Braun, Allen R; Carr, Walter S; Picchioni, Dante; Balkin, Thomas J; Fukunaga, Masaki; Duyn, Jeff H

    2009-07-07

    The recent discovery of a circuit of brain regions that is highly active in the absence of overt behavior has led to a quest for revealing the possible function of this so-called default-mode network (DMN). A very recent study, finding similarities in awake humans and anesthetized primates, has suggested that DMN activity might not simply reflect ongoing conscious mentation but rather a more general form of network dynamics typical of complex systems. Here, by performing functional MRI in humans, it is shown that a natural, sleep-induced reduction of consciousness is reflected in altered correlation between DMN network components, most notably a reduced involvement of frontal cortex. This suggests that DMN may play an important role in the sustenance of conscious awareness.

  1. Deep sequencing the circadian and diurnal transcriptome of Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael E.; Grant, Gregory R.; Paquin, Christina; Qian, Jack; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic circadian clocks include transcriptional/translational feedback loops that drive 24-h rhythms of transcription. These transcriptional rhythms underlie oscillations of protein abundance, thereby mediating circadian rhythms of behavior, physiology, and metabolism. Numerous studies over the last decade have used microarrays to profile circadian transcriptional rhythms in various organisms and tissues. Here we use RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to profile the circadian transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster brain from wild-type and period-null clock-defective animals. We identify several hundred transcripts whose abundance oscillates with 24-h periods in either constant darkness or 12 h light/dark diurnal cycles, including several noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that were not identified in previous microarray studies. Of particular interest are U snoRNA host genes (Uhgs), a family of diurnal cycling noncoding RNAs that encode the precursors of more than 50 box-C/D small nucleolar RNAs, key regulators of ribosomal biogenesis. Transcriptional profiling at the level of individual exons reveals alternative splice isoforms for many genes whose relative abundances are regulated by either period or circadian time, although the effect of circadian time is muted in comparison to that of period. Interestingly, period loss of function significantly alters the frequency of RNA editing at several editing sites, suggesting an unexpected link between a key circadian gene and RNA editing. We also identify tens of thousands of novel splicing events beyond those previously annotated by the modENCODE Consortium, including several that affect key circadian genes. These studies demonstrate extensive circadian control of ncRNA expression, reveal the extent of clock control of alternative splicing and RNA editing, and provide a novel, genome-wide map of splicing in Drosophila brain. PMID:22472103

  2. Camptocormia and deep brain stimulation: The interesting overlapping etiologies and the therapeutic role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease with camptocormia.

    PubMed

    Ekmekci, Hakan; Kaptan, Hulagu

    2016-01-01

    Camptocormia is known as "bent spine syndrome" and defined as a forward hyperflexion. The most common etiologic factor is related with the movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease (PD). We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who has been followed with PD for the last 10 years, and also under the therapy for PD. An unappreciated correlation low back pain with camptocormia developed. She underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus bilaterally and improved her bending posture. The relationship between the DBS and camptocormia is discussed in this unique condition.

  3. Camptocormia and deep brain stimulation: The interesting overlapping etiologies and the therapeutic role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease with camptocormia

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekci, Hakan; Kaptan, Hulagu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Camptocormia is known as “bent spine syndrome” and defined as a forward hyperflexion. The most common etiologic factor is related with the movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease (PD). Case Description: We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who has been followed with PD for the last 10 years, and also under the therapy for PD. An unappreciated correlation low back pain with camptocormia developed. She underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus bilaterally and improved her bending posture. Conclusion: The relationship between the DBS and camptocormia is discussed in this unique condition. PMID:26958425

  4. A brain area for visual numerals.

    PubMed

    Shum, Jennifer; Hermes, Dora; Foster, Brett L; Dastjerdi, Mohammad; Rangarajan, Vinitha; Winawer, Jonathan; Miller, Kai J; Parvizi, Josef

    2013-04-17

    Is there a distinct area within the human visual system that has a preferential response to numerals, as there is for faces, words, or scenes? We addressed this question using intracranial electrophysiological recordings and observed a significantly higher response in the high-frequency broadband range (high γ, 65-150 Hz) to visually presented numerals, compared with morphologically similar (i.e., letters and false fonts) or semantically and phonologically similar stimuli (i.e., number words and non-number words). Anatomically, this preferential response was consistently localized in the inferior temporal gyrus and anterior to the temporo-occipital incisure. This region lies within or close to the fMRI signal-dropout zone produced by the nearby auditory canal and venous sinus artifacts, an observation that may account for negative findings in previous fMRI studies of preferential response to numerals. Because visual numerals are culturally dependent symbols that are only learned through education, our novel finding of anatomically localized preferential response to such symbols provides a new example of acquired category-specific responses in the human visual system.

  5. Deep brain stimulation improves behavior and modulates neural circuits in a rodent model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bikovsky, Lior; Hadar, Ravit; Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Klein, Julia; Weiner, Ina; Desco, Manuel; Pascau, Javier; Winter, Christine; Hamani, Clement

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating psychiatric disorder with a significant number of patients not adequately responding to treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical technique currently investigated for medically-refractory psychiatric disorders. Here, we use the poly I:C rat model of schizophrenia to study the effects of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (Nacc) DBS on two behavioral schizophrenia-like deficits, i.e. sensorimotor gating, as reflected by disrupted prepulse inhibition (PPI), and attentional selectivity, as reflected by disrupted latent inhibition (LI). In addition, the neurocircuitry influenced by DBS was studied using FDG PET. We found that mPFC- and Nacc-DBS alleviated PPI and LI abnormalities in poly I:C offspring, whereas Nacc- but not mPFC-DBS disrupted PPI and LI in saline offspring. In saline offspring, mPFC-DBS increased metabolism in the parietal cortex, striatum, ventral hippocampus and Nacc, while reducing it in the brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray. Nacc-DBS, on the other hand, increased activity in the ventral hippocampus and olfactory bulb and reduced it in the septal area, brainstem, periaqueductal gray and hypothalamus. In poly I:C offspring changes in metabolism following mPFC-DBS were similar to those recorded in saline offspring, except for a reduced activity in the brainstem and hypothalamus. In contrast, Nacc-DBS did not induce any statistical changes in brain metabolism in poly I:C offspring. Our study shows that mPFC- or Nacc-DBS delivered to the adult progeny of poly I:C treated dams improves deficits in PPI and LI. Despite common behavioral responses, stimulation in the two targets induced different metabolic effects. PMID:27302677

  6. Deep brain stimulation improves behavior and modulates neural circuits in a rodent model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bikovsky, Lior; Hadar, Ravit; Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Klein, Julia; Weiner, Ina; Desco, Manuel; Pascau, Javier; Winter, Christine; Hamani, Clement

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating psychiatric disorder with a significant number of patients not adequately responding to treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical technique currently investigated for medically-refractory psychiatric disorders. Here, we use the poly I:C rat model of schizophrenia to study the effects of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (Nacc) DBS on two behavioral schizophrenia-like deficits, i.e. sensorimotor gating, as reflected by disrupted prepulse inhibition (PPI), and attentional selectivity, as reflected by disrupted latent inhibition (LI). In addition, the neurocircuitry influenced by DBS was studied using FDG PET. We found that mPFC- and Nacc-DBS alleviated PPI and LI abnormalities in poly I:C offspring, whereas Nacc- but not mPFC-DBS disrupted PPI and LI in saline offspring. In saline offspring, mPFC-DBS increased metabolism in the parietal cortex, striatum, ventral hippocampus and Nacc, while reducing it in the brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray. Nacc-DBS, on the other hand, increased activity in the ventral hippocampus and olfactory bulb and reduced it in the septal area, brainstem, periaqueductal gray and hypothalamus. In poly I:C offspring changes in metabolism following mPFC-DBS were similar to those recorded in saline offspring, except for a reduced activity in the brainstem and hypothalamus. In contrast, Nacc-DBS did not induce any statistical changes in brain metabolism in poly I:C offspring. Our study shows that mPFC- or Nacc-DBS delivered to the adult progeny of poly I:C treated dams improves deficits in PPI and LI. Despite common behavioral responses, stimulation in the two targets induced different metabolic effects.

  7. Isolation of speech area from focal brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, J; Regli, F; Assal, G

    1985-01-01

    A patient with atrial fibrillation and internal carotid artery occlusion developed mixed transcortical aphasia. The CT scan showed two recent distinct infarcts in the dominant hemisphere, one in the precentral artery area (pial artery infarct) and one in the borderzone area between the posterior and middle cerebral arteries territories (watershed infarct). The perisylvian speech areas were spared, but probably disconnected from other areas by the infarcts. The syndrome of isolation of speech area may be caused by vascular conditions which are able to produce simultaneous pial artery and watershed infarcts, and is not necessarily related to more extensive processes of the brain.

  8. Pedunculopontine Nucleus Region Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson Disease: Surgical Anatomy and Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Hamani, Clement; Aziz, Tipu; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Brown, Peter; Chabardes, Stephan; Coyne, Terry; Foote, Kelly; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Lozano, Andres M.; Mazzone, Paolo A.M.; Okun, Michael S.; Hutchison, William; Silburn, Peter; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Alam, Mesbah; Goetz, Laurent; Pereira, Erlick; Rughani, Anand; Thevathasan, Wesley; Moro, Elena; Krauss, Joachim K.

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence over the last few years have been important in ascertaining that the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) region could be considered as a potential target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat freezing and other problems as part of a spectrum of gait disorders in Parkinson disease and other akinetic movement disorders. Since the introduction of PPN DBS, a variety of clinical studies have been published. Most indicate improvements in freezing and falls in patients who are severely affected by these problems. The results across patients, however, have been variable, perhaps reflecting patient selection, heterogeneity in target selection and differences in surgical methodology and stimulation settings. Here we outline both the accumulated knowledge and the domains of uncertainty in surgical anatomy and terminology. Specific topics were assigned to groups of experts, and this work was accumulated and reviewed by the executive committee of the working group. Areas of disagreement were discussed and modified accordingly until a consensus could be reached. We demonstrate that both the anatomy and the functional role of the PPN region need further study. The borders of the PPN and of adjacent nuclei differ when different brainstem atlases and atlas slices are compared. It is difficult to delineate precisely the PPN pars dissipata from the nucleus cuneiformis, as these structures partially overlap. This lack of clarity contributes to the difficulty in targeting and determining the exact localization of the electrodes implanted in patients with akinetic gait disorders. Future clinical studies need to consider these issues. PMID:27723662

  9. Influence of heterogeneous and anisotropic tissue conductivity on electric field distribution in deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Wårdell, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to quantify the influence of heterogeneous isotropic and heterogeneous anisotropic tissue on the spatial distribution of the electric field during deep brain stimulation (DBS). Three finite element tissue models were created of one patient treated with DBS. Tissue conductivity was modelled as (I) homogeneous isotropic, (II) heterogeneous isotropic based on MRI, and (III) heterogeneous anisotropic based on diffusion tensor MRI. Modelled DBS electrodes were positioned in the subthalamic area, the pallidum, and the internal capsule in each tissue model. Electric fields generated during DBS were simulated for each model and target-combination and visualized with isolevels at 0.20 (inner), and 0.05 V mm(-1) (outer). Statistical and vector analysis was used for evaluation of the distribution of the electric field. Heterogeneous isotropic tissue altered the spatial distribution of the electric field by up to 4% at inner, and up to 10% at outer isolevel. Heterogeneous anisotropic tissue influenced the distribution of the electric field by up to 18 and 15% at each isolevel, respectively. The influence of heterogeneous and anisotropic tissue on the electric field may be clinically relevant in anatomic regions that are functionally subdivided and surrounded by multiple fibres of passage.

  10. Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrodes for Neural Stimulation and Chemical Detection: The Era of Smart Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. Here, we report two studies using vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for biomedical applications. CNF arrays are investigated as neural stimulation and neurotransmitter recording electrodes for application in deep brain stimulation (DBS). Polypyrrole coated CNF nanoelectrodes have shown great promise as stimulating electrodes due to their large surface area, low impedance, biocompatibility and capacity for highly localized stimulation. CNFs embedded in SiO2 have been used as sensing electrodes for neurotransmitter detection. Our approach combines a multiplexed CNF electrode chip, developed at NASA Ames Research Center, with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) system, developed at the Mayo Clinic. Preliminary results indicate that the CNF nanoelectrode arrays are easily integrated with WINCS for neurotransmitter detection in a multiplexed array format. In the future, combining CNF based stimulating and recording electrodes with WINCS may lay the foundation for an implantable "smart" therapeutic system that utilizes neurochemical feedback control while likely resulting in increased DBS application in various neuropsychiatric disorders. In total, our goal is to take advantage of the nanostructure of CNF arrays for biosensing studies requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and selective biofunctionalization.

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrical and Optogenetic Deep Brain Stimulation at the Rat Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Daniel L.; Salzwedel, Andrew; Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Gao, Wei; Stuber, Garret D.; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc-DBS) is an emerging therapy for diverse, refractory neuropsychiatric diseases. Although DBS therapy is broadly hypothesized to work through large-scale neural modulation, little is known regarding the neural circuits and networks affected by NAc-DBS. Using a healthy, sedated rat model of NAc-DBS, we employed both evoked- and functional connectivity (fc) MRI to examine the functional circuit and network changes achieved by electrical NAc stimulation. Optogenetic-fMRI experiments were also undertaken to evaluate the circuit modulation profile achieved by selective stimulation of NAc neurons. NAc-DBS directly modulated neural activity within prefrontal cortex and a large number of subcortical limbic areas (e.g., amygdala, lateral hypothalamus), and influenced functional connectivity among sensorimotor, executive, and limbic networks. The pattern and extent of circuit modulation measured by evoked-fMRI was relatively insensitive to DBS frequency. Optogenetic stimulation of NAc cell bodies induced a positive fMRI signal in the NAc, but no other detectable downstream responses, indicating that therapeutic NAc-DBS might exert its effect through antidromic stimulation. Our study provides a comprehensive mapping of circuit and network-level neuromodulation by NAc-DBS, which should facilitate our developing understanding of its therapeutic mechanisms of action. PMID:27601003

  12. Targeting of the Subthalamic Nucleus for Deep Brain Stimulation: A Survey Among Parkinson Disease Specialists.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Wolfgang; Köppen, Johannes A; Alesch, François; Antonini, Angelo; Barcia, Juan A; Bergman, Hagai; Chabardes, Stephan; Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Cornu, Philippe; Demmel, Walter; Deuschl, Günther; Fasano, Alfonso; Kühn, Andrea A; Limousin, Patricia; McIntyre, Cameron C; Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Pilleri, Manuela; Pollak, Pierre; Rodríguez-Oroz, Maria C; Rumià, Jordi; Samuel, Michael; Timmermann, Lars; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Vesper, Jan; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Volkmann, Jens; Lozano, Andres M

    2017-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation within or adjacent to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) represents the most common stereotactic procedure performed for Parkinson disease. Better STN imaging is often regarded as a requirement for improving stereotactic targeting. However, it is unclear whether there is consensus about the optimal target. To obtain an expert opinion on the site regarded optimal for "STN stimulation," movement disorder specialists were asked to indicate their preferred position for an active contact on hard copies of the Schaltenbrand and Wahren atlas depicting the STN in all 3 planes. This represented an idealized setting, and it mimicked optimal imaging for direct target definition in a perfectly delineated STN. The suggested targets were heterogeneous, although some clustering was observed in the dorsolateral STN and subthalamic area. In particular, in the anteroposterior direction, the intended targets differed to a great extent. Most of the indicated targets are thought to also result in concomitant stimulation of structures adjacent to the STN, including the zona incerta, fields of Forel, and internal capsule. This survey illustrates that most sites regarded as optimal for STN stimulation are close to each other, but there appears to be no uniform perception of the optimal anatomic target, possibly influencing surgical results. The anatomic sweet zone for STN stimulation needs further specification, as this information is likely to make magnetic resonance imaging-based target definition less variable when applied to individual patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Network effects and pathways in Deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Koirala, N; Fleischer, V; Granert, O; Deuschl, G; Muthuraman, M; Groppa, S

    2016-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) became a standard therapeutic option in Parkinson's disease (PD), even though the underlying modulated network of STN-DBS is still poorly described. Probabilistic tractography and connectivity analysis as derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed together with modelling of implanted electrode positions and linked postoperative clinical outcome. Fifteen patients with idiopathic PD without dementia were selected for DBS treatment. After pre-processing, probabilistic tractography was run from cortical and subcortical seeds of the hypothesized network to targets represented by the positions of the active DBS contacts. The performed analysis showed that the projections of the stimulation site to supplementary motor area (SMA) and primary motor cortex (M1) are mainly involved in the network effects of STN-DBS. An involvement of the "hyperdirected pathway" and a clear delimitation of the cortico-spinal tract were demonstrated. This study shows the effects of STN-DBS in PD distinctly rely on the network connections of the stimulated region to M1 and SMA, motor and premotor regions.

  14. Barriers to investigator-initiated deep brain stimulation and device research.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michael L; Malone, Donald; Okun, Michael S; Booth, Joan; Machado, Andre G

    2014-04-22

    The success of device-based research in the clinical neurosciences has overshadowed a critical and emerging problem in the biomedical research environment in the United States. Neuroprosthetic devices, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), have been shown in humans to be promising technologies for scientific exploration of neural pathways and as powerful treatments. Large device companies have, over the past several decades, funded and developed major research programs. However, both the structure of clinical trial funding and the current regulation of device research threaten investigator-initiated efforts in neurologic disorders. The current atmosphere dissuades clinical investigators from pursuing formal and prospective research with novel devices or novel indications. We review our experience in conducting a federally funded, investigator-initiated, device-based clinical trial that utilized DBS for thalamic pain syndrome. We also explore barriers that clinical investigators face in conducting device-based clinical trials, particularly in early-stage studies or small disease populations. We discuss 5 specific areas for potential reform and integration: (1) alternative pathways for device approval; (2) eliminating right of reference requirements; (3) combining federal grant awards with regulatory approval; (4) consolidation of oversight for human subjects research; and (5) private insurance coverage for clinical trials. Careful reformulation of regulatory policy and funding mechanisms is critical for expanding investigator-initiated device research, which has great potential to benefit science, industry, and, most importantly, patients.

  15. Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrodes for Neural Stimulation and Chemical Detection: The Era of "Smart" Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. Here, we report two studies using vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for biomedical applications. CNF arrays are investigated as neural stimulation and neurotransmitter recording electrodes for application in deep brain stimulation (DBS). Polypyrrole coated CNF nanoelectrodes have shown great promise as stimulating electrodes due to their large surface area, low impedance, biocompatibility and capacity for highly localized stimulation. CNFs embedded in SiO2 have been used as sensing electrodes for neurotransmitter detection. Our approach combines a multiplexed CNF electrode chip, developed at NASA Ames Research Center, with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) system, developed at the Mayo Clinic. Preliminary results indicate that the CNF nanoelectrode arrays are easily integrated with WINCS for neurotransmitter detection in a multiplexed array format. In the future, combining CNF based stimulating and recording electrodes with WINCS may lay the foundation for an implantable smart therapeutic system that utilizes neurochemical feedback control while likely resulting in increased DBS application in various neuropsychiatric disorders. In total, our goal is to take advantage of the nanostructure of CNF arrays for biosensing studies requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and selective biofunctionalization.

  16. Barriers to investigator-initiated deep brain stimulation and device research

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Donald; Okun, Michael S.; Booth, Joan; Machado, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    The success of device-based research in the clinical neurosciences has overshadowed a critical and emerging problem in the biomedical research environment in the United States. Neuroprosthetic devices, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), have been shown in humans to be promising technologies for scientific exploration of neural pathways and as powerful treatments. Large device companies have, over the past several decades, funded and developed major research programs. However, both the structure of clinical trial funding and the current regulation of device research threaten investigator-initiated efforts in neurologic disorders. The current atmosphere dissuades clinical investigators from pursuing formal and prospective research with novel devices or novel indications. We review our experience in conducting a federally funded, investigator-initiated, device-based clinical trial that utilized DBS for thalamic pain syndrome. We also explore barriers that clinical investigators face in conducting device-based clinical trials, particularly in early-stage studies or small disease populations. We discuss 5 specific areas for potential reform and integration: (1) alternative pathways for device approval; (2) eliminating right of reference requirements; (3) combining federal grant awards with regulatory approval; (4) consolidation of oversight for human subjects research; and (5) private insurance coverage for clinical trials. Careful reformulation of regulatory policy and funding mechanisms is critical for expanding investigator-initiated device research, which has great potential to benefit science, industry, and, most importantly, patients. PMID:24670888

  17. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obesity: From a Theoretical Framework to Practical Application

    PubMed Central

    Nangunoori, Raj K.; Tomycz, Nestor D.; Oh, Michael Y.; Whiting, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity remains a pervasive global health problem. While there are a number of nonsurgical and surgical options for treatment, the incidence of obesity continues to increase at an alarming rate. The inability to curtail the growing rise of the obesity epidemic may be related to a combination of increased food availability and palatability. Research into feeding behavior has yielded a number of insights into the homeostatic and reward mechanisms that govern feeding. However, there remains a gap between laboratory investigations of feeding physiology in animals and translation into meaningful treatment options for humans. In addition, laboratory investigation may not be able to recapitulate all aspects of human food consumption. In a landmark pilot study of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the lateral hypothalamic area for obesity, we found that there was an increase in resting metabolic rate as well as a decreased urge to eat. In this review, the authors will review some of the work relating to feeding physiology and research surrounding two nodes involved in feeding homeostasis, nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hypothalamus, and use this to provide a framework for future investigations of DBS as a viable therapeutic modality for obesity. PMID:26819774

  18. Role of electrode design on the volume of tissue activated during deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2006-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established clinical treatment for a range of neurological disorders. Depending on the disease state of the patient, different anatomical structures such as the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM), the subthalamic nucleus or the globus pallidus are targeted for stimulation. However, the same electrode design is currently used in nearly all DBS applications, even though substantial morphological and anatomical differences exist between the various target nuclei. The fundamental goal of this study was to develop a theoretical understanding of the impact of changes in the DBS electrode contact geometry on the volume of tissue activated (VTA) during stimulation. Finite element models of the electrodes and surrounding medium were coupled to cable models of myelinated axons to predict the VTA as a function of stimulation parameter settings and electrode design. Clinical DBS electrodes have cylindrical contacts 1.27 mm in diameter (d) and 1.5 mm in height (h). Our results show that changes in contact height and diameter can substantially modulate the size and shape of the VTA, even when contact surface area is preserved. Electrode designs with a low aspect ratio (d/h) maximize the VTA by providing greater spread of the stimulation parallel to the electrode shaft without sacrificing lateral spread. The results of this study provide the foundation necessary to customize electrode design and VTA shape for specific anatomical targets, and an example is presented for the VIM. A range of opportunities exist to engineer DBS systems to maximize stimulation of the target area while minimizing stimulation of non-target areas. Therefore, it may be possible to improve therapeutic benefit and minimize side effects from DBS with the design of target-specific electrodes.

  19. Role of electrode design on the volume of tissue activated during deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Christopher R.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2006-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established clinical treatment for a range of neurological disorders. Depending on the disease state of the patient, different anatomical structures such as the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM), the subthalamic nucleus or the globus pallidus are targeted for stimulation. However, the same electrode design is currently used in nearly all DBS applications, even though substantial morphological and anatomical differences exist between the various target nuclei. The fundamental goal of this study was to develop a theoretical understanding of the impact of changes in the DBS electrode contact geometry on the volume of tissue activated (VTA) during stimulation. Finite element models of the electrodes and surrounding medium were coupled to cable models of myelinated axons to predict the VTA as a function of stimulation parameter settings and electrode design. Clinical DBS electrodes have cylindrical contacts 1.27 mm in diameter (d) and 1.5 mm in height (h). Our results show that changes in contact height and diameter can substantially modulate the size and shape of the VTA, even when contact surface area is preserved. Electrode designs with a low aspect ratio (d/h) maximize the VTA by providing greater spread of the stimulation parallel to the electrode shaft without sacrificing lateral spread. The results of this study provide the foundation necessary to customize electrode design and VTA shape for specific anatomical targets, and an example is presented for the VIM. A range of opportunities exist to engineer DBS systems to maximize stimulation of the target area while minimizing stimulation of non-target areas. Therefore, it may be possible to improve therapeutic benefit and minimize side effects from DBS with the design of target-specific electrodes.

  20. Non-invasive parenchymal, vascular and metabolic high-frequency ultrasound and photoacoustic rat deep brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Giustetto, Pierangela; Filippi, Miriam; Castano, Mauro; Terreno, Enzo

    2015-03-02

    Photoacoustics and high frequency ultrasound stands out as powerful tools for neurobiological applications enabling high-resolution imaging on the central nervous system of small animals. However, transdermal and transcranial neuroimaging is frequently affected by low sensitivity, image aberrations and loss of space resolution, requiring scalp or even skull removal before imaging. To overcome this challenge, a new protocol is presented to gain significant insights in brain hemodynamics by photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasounds imaging with the animal skin and skull intact. The procedure relies on the passage of ultrasound (US) waves and laser directly through the fissures that are naturally present on the animal cranium. By juxtaposing the imaging transducer device exactly in correspondence to these selected areas where the skull has a reduced thickness or is totally absent, one can acquire high quality deep images and explore internal brain regions that are usually difficult to anatomically or functionally describe without an invasive approach. By applying this experimental procedure, significant data can be collected in both sonic and optoacoustic modalities, enabling to image the parenchymal and the vascular anatomy far below the head surface. Deep brain features such as parenchymal convolutions and fissures separating the lobes were clearly visible. Moreover, the configuration of large and small blood vessels was imaged at several millimeters of depth, and precise information were collected about blood fluxes, vascular stream velocities and the hemoglobin chemical state. This repertoire of data could be crucial in several research contests, ranging from brain vascular disease studies to experimental techniques involving the systemic administration of exogenous chemicals or other objects endowed with imaging contrast enhancement properties. In conclusion, thanks to the presented protocol, the US and PA techniques become an attractive noninvasive

  1. Non-invasive Parenchymal, Vascular and Metabolic High-frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Rat Deep Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Giustetto, Pierangela; Filippi, Miriam; Castano, Mauro; Terreno, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustics and high frequency ultrasound stands out as powerful tools for neurobiological applications enabling high-resolution imaging on the central nervous system of small animals. However, transdermal and transcranial neuroimaging is frequently affected by low sensitivity, image aberrations and loss of space resolution, requiring scalp or even skull removal before imaging. To overcome this challenge, a new protocol is presented to gain significant insights in brain hemodynamics by photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasounds imaging with the animal skin and skull intact. The procedure relies on the passage of ultrasound (US) waves and laser directly through the fissures that are naturally present on the animal cranium. By juxtaposing the imaging transducer device exactly in correspondence to these selected areas where the skull has a reduced thickness or is totally absent, one can acquire high quality deep images and explore internal brain regions that are usually difficult to anatomically or functionally describe without an invasive approach. By applying this experimental procedure, significant data can be collected in both sonic and optoacoustic modalities, enabling to image the parenchymal and the vascular anatomy far below the head surface. Deep brain features such as parenchymal convolutions and fissures separating the lobes were clearly visible. Moreover, the configuration of large and small blood vessels was imaged at several millimeters of depth, and precise information were collected about blood fluxes, vascular stream velocities and the hemoglobin chemical state. This repertoire of data could be crucial in several research contests, ranging from brain vascular disease studies to experimental techniques involving the systemic administration of exogenous chemicals or other objects endowed with imaging contrast enhancement properties. In conclusion, thanks to the presented protocol, the US and PA techniques become an attractive noninvasive

  2. Stem Cubic-Volume Tables for Tree Species in the Deep South Area

    Treesearch

    Alexander Clark; Ray A. Souter

    1996-01-01

    Stemwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 21 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Deep South Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,390 trees sampled in the Deep South Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for...

  3. Automatic computation of electrode trajectories for Deep Brain Stimulation: a hybrid symbolic and numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Essert, Caroline; Haegelen, Claire; Lalys, Florent; Abadie, Alexandre; Jannin, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The optimal electrode trajectory is needed to assist surgeons in planning Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). A method for image-based trajectory planning was developed and tested. Rules governing the DBS surgical procedure were defined with geometric constraints. A formal geometric solver using multimodal brain images and a template built from 15 brain MRI scans were used to identify a space of possible solutions and select the optimal one. For validation, a retrospective study of 30 DBS electrode implantations from 18 patients was performed. A trajectory was computed in each case and compared with the trajectories of the electrodes that were actually implanted. Computed trajectories had an average difference of 6.45° compared with reference trajectories and achieved a better overall score based on satisfaction of geometric constraints. Trajectories were computed in 2 min for each case. A rule-based solver using pre-operative MR brain images can automatically compute relevant and accurate patient-specific DBS electrode trajectories.

  4. Deep-brain imaging via epi-fluorescence Computational Cannula Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ganghun; Nagarajan, Naveen; Pastuzyn, Elissa; Jenks, Kyle; Capecchi, Mario; Shepherd, Jason; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-03-20

    Here we demonstrate widefield (field diameter = 200 μm) fluorescence microscopy and video imaging inside the rodent brain at a depth of 2 mm using a simple surgical glass needle (cannula) of diameter 0.22 mm as the primary optical element. The cannula guides excitation light into the brain and the fluorescence signal out of the brain. Concomitant image-processing algorithms are utilized to convert the spatially scrambled images into fluorescent images and video. The small size of the cannula enables minimally invasive imaging, while the long length (>2 mm) allow for deep-brain imaging with no additional complexity in the optical system. Since no scanning is involved, widefield fluorescence video at the native frame rate of the camera can be achieved.

  5. Deep-brain imaging via epi-fluorescence Computational Cannula Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ganghun; Nagarajan, Naveen; Pastuzyn, Elissa; Jenks, Kyle; Capecchi, Mario; Shepherd, Jason; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    Here we demonstrate widefield (field diameter = 200 μm) fluorescence microscopy and video imaging inside the rodent brain at a depth of 2 mm using a simple surgical glass needle (cannula) of diameter 0.22 mm as the primary optical element. The cannula guides excitation light into the brain and the fluorescence signal out of the brain. Concomitant image-processing algorithms are utilized to convert the spatially scrambled images into fluorescent images and video. The small size of the cannula enables minimally invasive imaging, while the long length (>2 mm) allow for deep-brain imaging with no additional complexity in the optical system. Since no scanning is involved, widefield fluorescence video at the native frame rate of the camera can be achieved.

  6. Deep-brain imaging via epi-fluorescence Computational Cannula Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ganghun; Nagarajan, Naveen; Pastuzyn, Elissa; Jenks, Kyle; Capecchi, Mario; Shepherd, Jason; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Here we demonstrate widefield (field diameter = 200 μm) fluorescence microscopy and video imaging inside the rodent brain at a depth of 2 mm using a simple surgical glass needle (cannula) of diameter 0.22 mm as the primary optical element. The cannula guides excitation light into the brain and the fluorescence signal out of the brain. Concomitant image-processing algorithms are utilized to convert the spatially scrambled images into fluorescent images and video. The small size of the cannula enables minimally invasive imaging, while the long length (>2 mm) allow for deep-brain imaging with no additional complexity in the optical system. Since no scanning is involved, widefield fluorescence video at the native frame rate of the camera can be achieved. PMID:28317915

  7. Novel fingerprinting method characterises the necessary and sufficient structural connectivity from deep brain stimulation electrodes for a successful outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Henrique M.; Van Hartevelt, Tim J.; Boccard, Sandra G. J.; Owen, Sarah L. F.; Cabral, Joana; Deco, Gustavo; Green, Alex L.; Fitzgerald, James J.; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Kringelbach, Morten L.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a remarkably effective clinical tool, used primarily for movement disorders. DBS relies on precise targeting of specific brain regions to rebalance the oscillatory behaviour of whole-brain neural networks. Traditionally, DBS targeting has been based upon animal models (such as MPTP for Parkinson’s disease) but has also been the result of serendipity during human lesional neurosurgery. There are, however, no good animal models of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia, and progress in this area has been slow. In this paper, we use advanced tractography combined with whole-brain anatomical parcellation to provide a rational foundation for identifying the connectivity ‘fingerprint’ of existing, successful DBS targets. This knowledge can then be used pre-surgically and even potentially for the discovery of novel targets. First, using data from our recent case series of cingulate DBS for patients with treatment-resistant chronic pain, we demonstrate how to identify the structural ‘fingerprints’ of existing successful and unsuccessful DBS targets in terms of their connectivity to other brain regions, as defined by the whole-brain anatomical parcellation. Second, we use a number of different strategies to identify the successful fingerprints of structural connectivity across four patients with successful outcomes compared with two patients with unsuccessful outcomes. This fingerprinting method can potentially be used pre-surgically to account for a patient’s individual connectivity and identify the best DBS target. Ultimately, our novel fingerprinting method could be combined with advanced whole-brain computational modelling of the spontaneous dynamics arising from the structural changes in disease, to provide new insights and potentially new targets for hitherto impenetrable neuropsychiatric disorders.

  8. [Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury].

    PubMed

    Silva, Vinícius Trindade Gomes da; Iglesio, Ricardo; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Siqueira, Mario Gilberto; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: O risco de trombose venosa profunda encontra-se aumentado em doentes vítimas de traumatismo cranioencefálico, mas a profilaxia da trombose venosa profunda se confronta com o possível risco de piora de lesões hemorrágicas relacionados ao traumatismo cranioencefálico. Neste artigo apresentamos uma revisão crítica do tema e propomos um protocolo de profilaxia para estes doentes.Material e Métodos: Foi realizada uma pesquisa na base de dados Medline/PubMed, Cochrane, e Scielo de janeiro de 1998 a janeiro de 2014 com a expressão de busca âÄúdeep venous thrombosis and prophylaxis and traumatic brain injuryâÄù. Foram encontrados 44 artigos usando os termos MeSH definidos. Destes foram selecionados 23 artigos, usando como critérios: publicação em inglês ou português, fase aguda do traumatismo cranioencefálico moderado e grave, profilaxia mecânica não invasiva ou química.Resultados: O traumatismo cranioencefálico é um fator de risco para trombose venosa profunda e tromboembolismo pulmonar. A chance de trombose venosa profunda é 2,59 vezes maior em doentes com traumatismo cranioencefálico. A prevalência de trombose venosa profunda e embolia pulmonar em doentes que sofreram traumatismo cranioencefálico é de 20%, podendo atingir 30% dos doentes em alguns estudos.Discussão e Conclusão: As diversas formas de traumatismo de forma isolada constituem fator de risco para trombose venosa profunda e tromboembolismo pulmonar. Ensaios clínicos são necessários para estabelecer a eficácia da profilaxia e o melhor momento de iniciar medicação para trombose venosa profunda em doentes com traumatismo craniencefálico.

  9. Hyperhidrosis due to deep brain stimulation in a patient with essential tremor. Case report.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Alan; Kenney, Christopher; Almaguer, Michael; Jankovic, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    The authors present a unique case of hyperhidrosis as a side effect of a misplaced deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode near the ventrointermedius (Vim) nucleus in a patient with essential tremor. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed electrode placement in the left anterior thalamus traversing the hypothalamus. High-frequency electrical stimulation possibly resulted in unilateral activation of the efferent sympathetic pathways in the zona incerta. Although a rare complication, hypothalamic dysfunction may occur as a stimulation-related side effect of Vim-DBS.

  10. Microelectrode Guided Implantation of Electrodes into the Subthalamic Nucleus of Rats for Long-term Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Fluri, Felix; Bieber, Micheal; Volkmann, Jens; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a widely used and effective therapy for several neurologic disorders, such as idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, dystonia or tremor. DBS is based on the delivery of electrical stimuli to specific deep anatomic structures of the central nervous system. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of DBS remain enigmatic. This has led to an interest in investigating the impact of DBS in animal models, especially in rats. As DBS is a long-term therapy, research should be focused on molecular-genetic changes of neural circuits that occur several weeks after DBS. Long-term DBS in rats is challenging because the rats move around in their cage, which causes problems in keeping in place the wire leading from the head of the animal to the stimulator. Furthermore, target structures for stimulation in the rat brain are small and therefore electrodes cannot easily be placed at the required position. Thus, a set-up for long-lasting stimulation of rats using platinum/iridium electrodes with an impedance of about 1 MΩ was developed for this study. An electrode with these specifications allows for not only adequate stimulation but also recording of deep brain structures to identify the target area for DBS. In our set-up, an electrode with a plug for the wire was embedded in dental cement with four anchoring screws secured onto the skull. The wire from the plug to the stimulator was protected by a stainless-steel spring. A swivel was connected to the circuit to prevent the wire from becoming tangled. Overall, this stimulation set-up offers a high degree of free mobility for the rat and enables the head plug, as well as the wire connection between the plug and the stimulator, to retain long-lasting strength. PMID:26485522

  11. Deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder: using functional magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological techniques: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kenneth B; Kopell, Brian H; Malone, Donald; Horenstein, Craig; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Micheal D; Rezai, Ali R

    2007-11-01

    To demonstrate the pattern of activation associated with electrical stimulation through bilateral deep brain stimulation electrodes placed within the anterior limb of the internal capsule to the level of the ventral striatum for treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. A 44-year-old man with a 26-year history of obsessive-compulsive disorder underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and deep brain stimulation-evoked cortical potential testing after bilateral implantation of deep brain stimulation leads. Stimulation was delivered independently through the distal two contacts of each percutaneously extended lead using an external pulse generator. On postoperative Day 2, we used a 3-Tesla magnetic resonance system to measure changes in the fMRI blood oxygen level-dependent signal using stimulation parameters that were predetermined to demonstrate behavioral effects. All studies were well tolerated. Trial stimulations performed intraoperatively as well as on postsurgical Day 1 were associated with acutely elevated mood and reduced anxiety. Although the benefit achieved acutely was relatively symmetric between the bilaterally placed leads, follow-up programming showed a clear advantage to right-sided stimulation. Three of the four fMRI trials demonstrated good activation, with the fourth being moderately corrupted by motion artifact. The beneficial effects observed with right-sided stimulation were associated with activation of the ipsilateral head of the caudate, medial thalamus, and anterior cingulate cortex as well as the contralateral cerebellum. The distribution of the cortical evoked potentials was consistent with the locus of cortical activation observed with fMRI. High-frequency stimulation via a lead placed in the anterior limb of the internal capsule induced widespread hemodynamic changes at both the cortical and subcortical levels including areas typically associated with the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  12. Development of Demand-Controlled Deep Brain Stimulation Techniques Based on Stochastic Phase Resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, Peter A.

    2003-05-01

    Stimulation techniques are discussed here which make it possible to effectively desynchronize a synchronized cluster of globally coupled phase oscillators in the presence of noise. To this end composite stimuli are used which consist of a first, stronger stimulus followed by a second, weaker stimulus after a constant time delay. The first stimulus controls the dynamics of the cluster by resetting it, whereas the second stimulus desynchronizes the cluster by hitting it in a vulnerable state. The first, resetting stimulus can be a strong single pulse, a high-frequency pulse train or a low-frequency pulse train. The cluster's resynchronization can effectively be blocked by repeated administration of a composite stimulus. Demand controlled deep brain stimulation with these desynchronizing stimulation techniques is suggested for the therapy of patients suffering from tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease or essential tremor as a milder and more efficient therapy compared to the standard permanent high-frequency deep brain stimulation.

  13. The reconstructive management of hardware-related scalp erosion in deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Raúl; Hontanilla, Bernardo

    2014-09-01

    The presence of foreign material in deep brain stimulation is a risk factor for infection, and hardware-related pressure under the scalp may cause skin erosion. The aim of this article is to present our experience in the coverage of scalp in relation to underlying hardware. We analyzed 21 patients with Parkinson disease who had undergone deep brain stimulation surgery and developed scalp erosion with hardware exposition during follow-up. Nine patients were programmed for a scalp rotation flap, whereas free tisue transfer was performed in the rest of the patients. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. A hardware-related ulcer appeared in 5 of 9 rotation flap patients. No ulceration or major complications were observed in free flap patients. Free flaps are probably the best option for stable coverage in hardware-related scalp erosion with a high rate of success.

  14. A PC-based system for predicting movement from deep brain signals in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Constantinos; Brown, Peter

    2012-07-01

    There is much current interest in deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). This type of surgery has enabled unprecedented access to deep brain signals in the awake human. In this paper we present an easy-to-use computer based system for recording, displaying, archiving, and processing electrophysiological signals from the STN. The system was developed for predicting self-paced hand-movements in real-time via the online processing of the electrophysiological activity of the STN. It is hoped that such a computerised system might have clinical and experimental applications. For example, those sites within the STN most relevant to the processing of voluntary movement could be identified through the predictive value of their activities with respect to the timing of future movement.

  15. Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease prior to L-dopa treatment: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Servello, Domenico; Saleh, Christian; Bona, Alberto R.; Zekaj, Edvin; Zanaboni, Carlotta; Porta, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leva-dopa (L-dopa) is the gold-standard treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation is generally reserved for patients who become refractory to l-dopa treatment. Case Description: We present a male patient with a 9-year course of PD who at 53 years of age preferred deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus over initial l-dopa treatment. The patient argued that he wanted to avoid the serious adverse effects of l-dopa, which would have presented within his time of full professional activity. DBS resulted in significant motor improvement lasting for 6 years without l-dopa treatment. Conclusion: Large multicentre-based international trials with long follow-ups are needed to answer the effectiveness of early DBS in PD. PMID:27990314

  16. A case of brain abscess extended from deep fascial space infection.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Haruo; Karakida, Kazunari; Otsuru, Mitsunobu; Arai, Masayuki; Shimoda, Masami

    2009-09-01

    A case of brain abscess in the temporal lobe caused by direct intracranial extension of deep neck abscess is described. The abscess also spread to the orbital cavity through infraorbital fissure. The possible etiology of this case might be dental surgery. The diagnostic imaging clearly showed the routes of intracranial and -orbital extension of parapharyngeal and masticator space abscesses. From the abscess specimens, oral streptococci, anaerobic streptococci, and anaerobic gram-negative bacilli were isolated. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of isolates showed that some Prevotella and Fusobacterium strains had decreased susceptibility to penicillin, and these bacteria produced beta-lactamase. The bacteria from the deep neck abscess were consistent with those detected from the brain abscess. Proper diagnosis, aggressive surgical intervention, and antibiotics chemotherapy saved the patient from this life-threatening condition.

  17. Quantitative analysis of axonal fiber activation evoked by deep brain stimulation via activation density heat maps

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Christian J.; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Lujan, J. Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cortical modulation is likely to be involved in the various therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, it is currently difficult to predict the changes of cortical modulation during clinical adjustment of DBS. Therefore, we present a novel quantitative approach to estimate anatomical regions of DBS-evoked cortical modulation. Methods: Four different models of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS were created to represent variable electrode placements (model I: dorsal border of the posterolateral STN; model II: central posterolateral STN; model III: central anteromedial STN; model IV: dorsal border of the anteromedial STN). Axonal fibers of passage near each electrode location were reconstructed using probabilistic tractography and modeled using multi-compartment cable models. Stimulation-evoked activation of local axon fibers and corresponding cortical projections were modeled and quantified. Results: Stimulation at the border of the STN (models I and IV) led to a higher degree of fiber activation and associated cortical modulation than stimulation deeply inside the STN (models II and III). A posterolateral target (models I and II) was highly connected to cortical areas representing motor function. Additionally, model I was also associated with strong activation of fibers projecting to the cerebellum. Finally, models III and IV showed a dorsoventral difference of preferentially targeted prefrontal areas (models III: middle frontal gyrus; model IV: inferior frontal gyrus). Discussion: The method described herein allows characterization of cortical modulation across different electrode placements and stimulation parameters. Furthermore, knowledge of anatomical distribution of stimulation-evoked activation targeting cortical regions may help predict efficacy and potential side effects, and therefore can be used to improve the therapeutic effectiveness of individual adjustments in DBS patients. PMID:25713510

  18. Deep brain electrophysiological recordings provide clues to the pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Priori, Alberto; Giannicola, Gaia; Rosa, Manuela; Marceglia, Sara; Servello, Domenico; Sassi, Marco; Porta, Mauro

    2013-07-01

    Although ample evidence suggests that high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective therapy in patients with Tourette syndrome (TS), its pathophysiology and the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying these benefits remain unclear. The DBS targets mainly used to date in TS are located within the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuit compromised in this syndrome: the medial and ventral thalamic nuclei, which are way stations within the circuit, the globus pallidus and the nucleus accumbens. Neuronal activity can be electrophysiologically recorded from deep brain structures during DBS surgery (intraoperative microrecordings) or within few days after DBS electrode implantation (local field potentials, LFPs). Recordings from the thalamus in patients with TS showed that the power in low-frequency oscillations (2-15 Hz) was higher than power in high frequency oscillations (<45 Hz) and that activity in gamma band (25-45 Hz) increases when patients' clinical status improved. Effective thalamic DBS for tic reduction seems to increase high frequency band oscillations (25-45 Hz). The same oscillatory pattern persists after DBS for 1 year, therefore showing that in TS DBS does not induce persistent neuroplastic changes in the neural activity in the stimulated structures. Neurophysiological recordings from deep brain structures suggest that tics originate not from the cortex but from neuronal dysfunction in deep brain structures such as the thalamus and globus pallidus. In conclusion, DBS can induce its beneficial effects in TS by modulating specific neural rhythms in the cortico-basal ganglia thalamic network. DBS could reduce tics related increased low-frequency activity by shifting the basal ganglia-thalamic oscillation power to higher frequencies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Improved Efficacy of Temporally Non-Regular Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, David T; Swan, Brandon D; Turner, Dennis A; Gross, Robert E; Tatter, Stephen B; Koop, Mandy Miller; Bronte-Stewart, Helen; Grill, Warren M

    2012-01-01

    High frequency deep brain stimulation is an effective therapy for motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. However, the relative clinical efficacy of regular versus non-regular temporal patterns of stimulation in Parkinson's disease remains unclear. To determine the temporal characteristics of non-regular temporal patterns of stimulation important for treatment of Parkinson's disease, we compared the efficacy of temporally regular stimulation with four non-regular patterns of stimulation in subjects with Parkinson's disease using an alternating finger tapping task. The patterns of stimulation were also evaluated in a biophysical model of the parkinsonian basal ganglia that exhibited prominent oscillatory activity in the beta frequency range. The temporal patterns of stimulation differentially improved motor task performance. Three of the non-regular patterns of stimulation improved performance of the finger tapping task more than temporally regular stimulation. In the computational model all patterns of deep brain stimulation suppressed beta band oscillatory activity, and the degree of suppression was strongly correlated with the clinical efficacy across stimulation patterns. The three non-regular patterns of stimulation that improved motor performance over regular stimulation also suppressed beta band oscillatory activity in the computational model more effectively than regular stimulation. These data demonstrate that the temporal pattern of stimulation is an important consideration for the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, non-regular patterns of stimulation may ameliorate motor symptoms and suppress pathological rhythmic activity in the basal ganglia more effectively than regular stimulation. Therefore, non-regular patterns of deep brain stimulation may have useful clinical and experimental applications. PMID:23022917

  20. Deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus in Parkinson's disease. Preliminary experience at Oxford.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E A; Muthusamy, K A; De Pennington, N; Joint, C A; Aziz, T Z

    2008-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a novel neurosurgical therapy developed to address symptoms of gait freezing and postural instability in Parkinson's disease and related disorders. Here, we summarize our non-human primate and neuroimaging research of relevance to our surgical targeting of the PPN. We also describe our clinical experience of PPN DBS with greatest motor improvements achieved by stimulation at low frequencies.

  1. Deep Brain Stimulation in Huntington’s Disease—Preliminary Evidence on Pathophysiology, Efficacy and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Wojtecki, Lars; Groiss, Stefan Jun; Hartmann, Christian Johannes; Elben, Saskia; Omlor, Sonja; Schnitzler, Alfons; Vesper, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is one of the most disabling degenerative movement disorders, as it not only affects the motor system but also leads to cognitive disabilities and psychiatric symptoms. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the pallidum is a promising symptomatic treatment targeting the core motor symptom: chorea. This article gives an overview of preliminary evidence on pathophysiology, safety and efficacy of DBS in HD. PMID:27589813

  2. Primary experimental study on safety of deep brain stimulation in RF electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Jun, Xu; Luming, Li; Hongwei, Hao

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid growth of clinical application of Deep Brain Stimulation, its safety and functional concern in the electromagnetic field, another pollution becoming much more serious, has become more and more significant. Meanwhile, the measuring standards on Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) for DBS are still incomplete. Particularly, the knowledge of the electromagnetic field induced signals on the implanted lead is ignorant while some informal reports some side effects. This paper briefly surmised the status of EMC standards on implantable medical devices. Based on the EMC experiments of DBS device we developed, two experiments for measuring the induced voltage of the deep brain stimulator in RF electromagnetic field were reported. The measured data showed that the induced voltage in some frequency was prominent, for example over 2V. As a primary research, we think these results would be significant to cause researcher to pay more attention to the EMC safety problem and biological effects of the induced voltage in deep brain stimulation and other implantable devices.

  3. Low-frequency deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Great expectation or false hope?

    PubMed

    di Biase, Lazzaro; Fasano, Alfonso

    2016-07-01

    The long-term efficacy of subthalamic deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease is not always retained, and many patients lose the improvement achieved during the "second honeymoon" following surgery. Deep brain stimulation is a versatile tool, as stimulation parameters may undergo a fine-tuning depending on clinical needs. Among them, frequency is the parameter that leads to more complex scenarios because there is no generalizable relationship between its modulation and the overall clinical response, which also depends on the specific considered sign. High-frequency stimulation (>100 Hz) has shown to be effective in improving most parkinsonian signs, particularly the levodopa-responsive ones. However, its effect on axial signs (such as balance, gait, speech, or swallowing) may not be sustained, minimal, or even detrimental. For these reasons, several studies have explored the effectiveness of low-frequency stimulation (generally 60 or 80 Hz). Methods, results, and especially interpretations of these studies are quite variable. Although the use of low-frequency stimulation certainly opens new avenues in the field of deep brain stimulation, after having gathered all the available evidence in patients with subthalamic implants, our conclusion is that it might be clinically useful mainly when it lessens the detrimental effects of high-frequency stimulation. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Unilateral neuromodulation of the ventromedial hypothalamus of the rat through deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmkuhle, M. J.; Mayes, S. M.; Kipke, D. R.

    2010-06-01

    This study offers evidence that long-term deep brain stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) can alter weight gain in mammals without affecting feeding behavior. Animals stimulated unilaterally at high frequencies of 150 or 500 Hz demonstrated increased CO2 production that decreased from prestimulation levels after the stimulation was removed. Animals stimulated for up to 6 weeks gained weight at a lower rate than normal animals or animals implanted with an electrode but not stimulated. Stimulated animals exhibited normal food and water consumption. A significant decrease in efficiency was observed during stimulation that coincided with an increase in the amount of feces produced. Whereas the weight of control animals was significantly different from week to week, the weight of stimulated animals did not change accordingly. These data suggest that the VMH may be a viable target for long-term deep brain stimulation for modulation of the neural mechanisms of metabolism. The potential therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation of the hypothalamus are discussed.

  5. Sedation with α2 Agonist Dexmedetomidine During Unilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Morace, Roberta; De Angelis, Michelangelo; Aglialoro, Emiliano; Maucione, Gianni; Cavallo, LuigiMaria; Solari, Domenico; Modugno, Nicola; Santilli, Marco; Esposito, Vincenzo; Aloj, Fulvio

    2016-05-01

    The α2 agonist dexmedetomidine (DEX) is an anesthetic agent that can provide sedation and analgesia without respiratory depression or changes in neuronal activity during microrecordings. The aim of our study was to confirm the efficacy and safety of anesthesia with DEX for unilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson disease. In 2013 and 2014, a series of 11 consecutive patients received continuous low-dose DEX infusion during unilateral deep brain stimulation of the STN. Intraoperative microrecordings, stimulation results, and patient reaction times in executing verbal and motor tasks were retrospectively analyzed. Functional outcomes were evaluated by comparing preoperative and 1-year postoperative Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III scores. Typical activity of the STN was recorded in all patients, and the delay in the execution of both motor and verbal tasks was ≤2 seconds. No hemorrhagic complications occurred, and no postoperative side effects were observed. The mean percentage of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III improvement at last follow-up was 39.01% (range, 23.70%-55.60%). The mean percentage of levodopa equivalent dose reduction was 45.86% (range, 21.50%-65.70%). The results of our study confirm that the use of DEX in managing patients with Parkinson disease during unilateral deep brain stimulation of the STN is safe and effective and can be considered a promising option for sedation during this type of procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Deep brain stimulation and treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Bourgon, Javier; Martino, Juan; Sierra Peña, María; Infante Ceberio, Jon; Martínez Martínez, M Ángeles; Ocón, Roberto; Menchón, José Manuel; Crespo Facorro, Benedicto; Vázquez-Barquero, Alfonso

    2017-07-01

    At least 10% of patients with Obsessive-compulsive Disorder (OCD) are refractory to psychopharmacological treatment. The emergence of new technologies for the modulation of altered neuronal activity in Neurosurgery, deep brain stimulation (DBS), has enabled its use in severe and refractory OCD cases. The objective of this article is to review the current scientific evidence on the effectiveness and applicability of this technique to refractory OCD. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify the main characteristics of deep brain stimulation, its use and applicability as treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Therefore, we reviewed PubMed/Medline, Embase and PsycINFO databases, combining the key-words 'Deep brain stimulation', 'DBS' and 'Obsessive-compulsive disorder' 'OCS'. The articles were selected by two of the authors independently, based on the abstracts, and if they described any of the main characteristics of the therapy referring to OCD: applicability; mechanism of action; brain therapeutic targets; efficacy; side-effects; co-therapies. All the information was subsequently extracted and analysed. The critical analysis of the evidence shows that the use of DBS in treatment-resistant OCD is providing satisfactory results regarding efficacy, with assumable side-effects. However, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of any single brain target over another. Patient selection has to be done following analyses of risks/benefits, being advisable to individualize the decision of continuing with concomitant psychopharmacological and psychological treatments. The use of DBS is still considered to be in the field of research, although it is increasingly used in refractory-OCD, producing in the majority of studies significant improvements in symptomatology, and in functionality and quality of life. It is essential to implement random and controlled studies regarding its long-term efficacy, cost-risk analyses and cost/benefit. Copyright

  7. Brain Areas Responsible for Vigilance: An EEG Source Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Do-Won; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2017-01-04

    Vigilance, sometimes referred to as sustained attention, is an important type of human attention as it is closely associated with cognitive activities required in various daily-life situations. Although many researchers have investigated which brain areas control the maintenance of vigilance, findings have been inconsistent. We hypothesized that this inconsistency might be due to the use of different experimental paradigms in the various studies. We found that most of the previous studies used paradigms that included specific cognitive tasks requiring a high cognitive load, which could complicate identification of brain areas associated only with vigilance. To minimize the influence of cognitive processes other than vigilance on the analysis results, we adopted the d2-test of attention, which is a well-known neuropsychological test of attention that does not require high cognitive load, and searched for brain areas at which EEG source activities were temporally correlated with fluctuation of vigilance over a prolonged period of time. EEG experiments conducted with 31 young adults showed that left prefrontal cortex activity was significantly correlated with vigilance variation in the delta, beta1, beta2, and gamma frequency bands, but not the theta and alpha frequency bands. Our study results suggest that the left prefrontal cortex plays a key role in vigilance modulation, and can therefore be used to monitor individual vigilance changes over time or serve as a potential target of noninvasive brain stimulation.

  8. How Localized are Language Brain Areas? A Review of Brodmann Areas Involvement in Oral Language.

    PubMed

    Ardila, Alfredo; Bernal, Byron; Rosselli, Monica

    2016-02-01

    The interest in understanding how language is "localized" in the brain has existed for centuries. Departing from seven meta-analytic studies of functional magnetic resonance imaging activity during the performance of different language activities, it is proposed here that there are two different language networks in the brain: first, a language reception/understanding system, including a "core Wernicke's area" involved in word recognition (BA21, BA22, BA41, and BA42), and a fringe or peripheral area ("extended Wernicke's area:" BA20, BA37, BA38, BA39, and BA40) involved in language associations (associating words with other information); second, a language production system ("Broca's complex:" BA44, BA45, and also BA46, BA47, partially BA6-mainly its mesial supplementary motor area-and extending toward the basal ganglia and the thalamus). This paper additionally proposes that the insula (BA13) plays a certain coordinating role in interconnecting these two brain language systems.

  9. Nonthermal ablation of deep brain targets: A simulation study on a large animal model

    PubMed Central

    Top, Can Barış; White, P. Jason; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Thermal ablation with transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) is currently limited to central brain targets because of heating and other beam effects caused by the presence of the skull. Recently, it was shown that it is possible to ablate tissues without depositing thermal energy by driving intravenously administered microbubbles to inertial cavitation using low-duty-cycle burst sonications. A recent study demonstrated that this ablation method could ablate tissue volumes near the skull base in nonhuman primates without thermally damaging the nearby bone. However, blood–brain disruption was observed in the prefocal region, and in some cases, this region contained small areas of tissue damage. The objective of this study was to analyze the experimental model with simulations and to interpret the cause of these effects. Methods: The authors simulated prior experiments where nonthermal ablation was performed in the brain in anesthetized rhesus macaques using a 220 kHz clinical prototype transcranial MRI-guided FUS system. Low-duty-cycle sonications were applied at deep brain targets with the ultrasound contrast agent Definity. For simulations, a 3D pseudospectral finite difference time domain tool was used. The effects of shear mode conversion, focal steering, skull aberrations, nonlinear propagation, and the presence of skull base on the pressure field were investigated using acoustic and elastic wave propagation models. Results: The simulation results were in agreement with the experimental findings in the prefocal region. In the postfocal region, however, side lobes were predicted by the simulations, but no effects were evident in the experiments. The main beam was not affected by the different simulated scenarios except for a shift of about 1 mm in peak position due to skull aberrations. However, the authors observed differences in the volume, amplitude, and distribution of the side lobes. In the experiments, a single element passive

  10. Parkinson's disease progression at 30 years: a study of subthalamic deep brain-stimulated patients.

    PubMed

    Merola, Aristide; Zibetti, Maurizio; Angrisano, Serena; Rizzi, Laura; Ricchi, Valeria; Artusi, Carlo A; Lanotte, Michele; Rizzone, Mario G; Lopiano, Leonardo

    2011-07-01

    Clinical findings in Parkinson's disease suggest that most patients progressively develop disabling non-levodopa-responsive symptoms during the course of the disease. Nevertheless, several heterogeneous factors, such as clinical phenotype, age at onset and genetic aspects may influence the long-term clinical picture. In order to investigate the main features of long-term Parkinson's disease progression, we studied a cohort of 19 subjects treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation after >20 years of disease, reporting clinical and neuropsychological data up to a mean of 30 years from disease onset. This group of patients was characterized by an early onset of disease, with a mean age of 38.63 years at Parkinson's disease onset, which was significantly lower than in the other long-term subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation follow-up cohorts reported in the literature. All subjects were regularly evaluated by a complete Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, a battery of neuropsychological tests and a clinical interview, intended to assess the rate of non-levodopa-responsive symptom progression. Clinical data were available for all patients at presurgical baseline and at 1, 3 and 5 years from the subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation surgical procedure, while follow-up data after >7 years were additionally reported in a subgroup of 14 patients. The clinical and neuropsychological performance progressively worsened during the course of follow-up; 64% of patients gradually developed falls, 86% dysphagia, 57% urinary incontinence and 43% dementia. A progressive worsening of motor symptoms was observed both in 'medication-ON' condition and in 'stimulation-ON' condition, with a parallel reduction in the synergistic effect of 'medication-ON/stimulation-ON' condition. Neuropsychological data also showed a gradual decline in the performances of all main cognitive domains, with an initial involvement of executive functions, followed by the impairment

  11. Deep sequencing analysis of the developing mouse brain reveals a novel microRNA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that can exert multilevel inhibition/repression at a post-transcriptional or protein synthesis level during disease or development. Characterisation of miRNAs in adult mammalian brains by deep sequencing has been reported previously. However, to date, no small RNA profiling of the developing brain has been undertaken using this method. We have performed deep sequencing and small RNA analysis of a developing (E15.5) mouse brain. Results We identified the expression of 294 known miRNAs in the E15.5 developing mouse brain, which were mostly represented by let-7 family and other brain-specific miRNAs such as miR-9 and miR-124. We also discovered 4 putative 22-23 nt miRNAs: mm_br_e15_1181, mm_br_e15_279920, mm_br_e15_96719 and mm_br_e15_294354 each with a 70-76 nt predicted pre-miRNA. We validated the 4 putative miRNAs and further characterised one of them, mm_br_e15_1181, throughout embryogenesis. Mm_br_e15_1181 biogenesis was Dicer1-dependent and was expressed in E3.5 blastocysts and E7 whole embryos. Embryo-wide expression patterns were observed at E9.5 and E11.5 followed by a near complete loss of expression by E13.5, with expression restricted to a specialised layer of cells within the developing and early postnatal brain. Mm_br_e15_1181 was upregulated during neurodifferentiation of P19 teratocarcinoma cells. This novel miRNA has been identified as miR-3099. Conclusions We have generated and analysed the first deep sequencing dataset of small RNA sequences of the developing mouse brain. The analysis revealed a novel miRNA, miR-3099, with potential regulatory effects on early embryogenesis, and involvement in neuronal cell differentiation/function in the brain during late embryonic and early neonatal development. PMID:21466694

  12. Current perspectives on deep brain stimulation for severe neurological and psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kocabicak, Ersoy; Temel, Yasin; Höllig, Anke; Falkenburger, Björn; Tan, Sonny KH

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a well-accepted therapy to treat movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Long-term follow-up studies have demonstrated sustained improvement in motor symptoms and quality of life. DBS offers the opportunity to selectively modulate the targeted brain regions and related networks. Moreover, stimulation can be adjusted according to individual patients’ demands, and stimulation is reversible. This has led to the introduction of DBS as a treatment for further neurological and psychiatric disorders and many clinical studies investigating the efficacy of stimulating various brain regions in order to alleviate severe neurological or psychiatric disorders including epilepsy, major depression, and obsessive–compulsive disorder. In this review, we provide an overview of accepted and experimental indications for DBS therapy and the corresponding anatomical targets. PMID:25914538

  13. Temporally Coordinated Deep Brain Stimulation in the Dorsal and Ventral Striatum Synergistically Enhances Associative Learning.

    PubMed

    Katnani, Husam A; Patel, Shaun R; Kwon, Churl-Su; Abdel-Aziz, Samer; Gale, John T; Eskandar, Emad N

    2016-01-04

    The primate brain has the remarkable ability of mapping sensory stimuli into motor behaviors that can lead to positive outcomes. We have previously shown that during the reinforcement of visual-motor behavior, activity in the caudate nucleus is correlated with the rate of learning. Moreover, phasic microstimulation in the caudate during the reinforcement period was shown to enhance associative learning, demonstrating the importance of temporal specificity to manipulate learning related changes. Here we present evidence that extends upon our previous finding by demonstrating that temporally coordinated phasic deep brain stimulation across both the nucleus accumbens and caudate can further enhance associative learning. Monkeys performed a visual-motor associative learning task and received stimulation at time points critical to learning related changes. Resulting performance revealed an enhancement in the rate, ceiling, and reaction times of learning. Stimulation of each brain region alone or at different time points did not generate the same effect.

  14. Therapeutic deep brain stimulation reduces cortical phase-amplitude coupling in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hemptinne, Coralie; Swann, Nicole; Ostrem, Jill L.; Ryapolova-Webb, Elena S.; Luciano, Marta San; Galifianakis, Nicholas; Starr, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is increasingly applied to the treatment of brain disorders, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. Here, we evaluate the effect of basal ganglia DBS on cortical function using invasive cortical recordings in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery. In the primary motor cortex of PD patients neuronal population spiking is excessively synchronized to the phase of network oscillations. This manifests in brain surface recordings as exaggerated coupling between the phase of the β rhythm and the amplitude of broadband activity. We show that acute therapeutic DBS reversibly reduces phase-amplitude interactions over a similar time course as reduction in parkinsonian motor signs. We propose that DBS of the basal ganglia improves cortical function by alleviating excessive β phase locking of motor cortex neurons. PMID:25867121

  15. Temporally Coordinated Deep Brain Stimulation in the Dorsal and Ventral Striatum Synergistically Enhances Associative Learning

    PubMed Central

    Katnani, Husam A.; Patel, Shaun R.; Kwon, Churl-Su; Abdel-Aziz, Samer; Gale, John T.; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2016-01-01

    The primate brain has the remarkable ability of mapping sensory stimuli into motor behaviors that can lead to positive outcomes. We have previously shown that during the reinforcement of visual-motor behavior, activity in the caudate nucleus is correlated with the rate of learning. Moreover, phasic microstimulation in the caudate during the reinforcement period was shown to enhance associative learning, demonstrating the importance of temporal specificity to manipulate learning related changes. Here we present evidence that extends upon our previous finding by demonstrating that temporally coordinated phasic deep brain stimulation across both the nucleus accumbens and caudate can further enhance associative learning. Monkeys performed a visual-motor associative learning task and received stimulation at time points critical to learning related changes. Resulting performance revealed an enhancement in the rate, ceiling, and reaction times of learning. Stimulation of each brain region alone or at different time points did not generate the same effect. PMID:26725509

  16. Therapeutic deep brain stimulation reduces cortical phase-amplitude coupling in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    de Hemptinne, Coralie; Swann, Nicole C; Ostrem, Jill L; Ryapolova-Webb, Elena S; San Luciano, Marta; Galifianakis, Nicholas B; Starr, Philip A

    2015-05-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is increasingly applied for the treatment of brain disorders, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. Here we evaluate the effect of basal ganglia DBS on cortical function using invasive cortical recordings in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery. In the primary motor cortex of PD patients, neuronal population spiking is excessively synchronized to the phase of network oscillations. This manifests in brain surface recordings as exaggerated coupling between the phase of the beta rhythm and the amplitude of broadband activity. We show that acute therapeutic DBS reversibly reduces phase-amplitude interactions over a similar time course as that of the reduction in parkinsonian motor signs. We propose that DBS of the basal ganglia improves cortical function by alleviating excessive beta phase locking of motor cortex neurons.

  17. The influence of reactivity of the electrode-brain interface on the crossing electric current in therapeutic deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Nada; Bayford, Richard; Liu, Xuguang

    2009-01-01

    The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as an effective clinical therapy for a number of neurological disorders has been greatly hindered by the lack of understanding of the mechanisms which underlie the observed clinical improvement in patients. This problem is confounded by the difficulty of investigating the neuronal effects of DBS in situ, and the impossibility of measuring the induced current in vivo. In our recent computational work using a quasi-static finite element (FEM) model we have quantitatively shown that the properties of the depth electrode brain interface (EBI) have a significant effect on the electric field induced in the brain volume surrounding the DBS electrode. In the present work, we explore the influence of the reactivity of the EBI on the crossing electric current using the Fourier-FEM approach to allow the investigation of waveform attenuation in the time domain. Results showed that the EBI affected the waveform shaping differently at different post-implantation stages, and that this in turn had implications on induced current distribution across the EBI. Furthermore, we investigated whether hypothetical waveforms, which were shown to have potential usefulness for neural stimulation but are not yet applied clinically, would have any advantage over the currently used square pulse. In conclusion, the influence of reactivity of the EBI on the crossing stimulation current in therapeutic DBS is significant, and affects the predictive estimation of current distribution around the implanted DBS electrode in the human brain. PMID:18761058

  18. Hierarchical Neural Representation of Dreamed Objects Revealed by Brain Decoding with Deep Neural Network Features.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Tomoyasu; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2017-01-01

    Dreaming is generally thought to be generated by spontaneous brain activity during sleep with patterns common to waking experience. This view is supported by a recent study demonstrating that dreamed objects can be predicted from brain activity during sleep using statistical decoders trained with stimulus-induced brain activity. However, it remains unclear whether and how visual image features associated with dreamed objects are represented in the brain. In this study, we used a deep neural network (DNN) model for object recognition as a proxy for hierarchical visual feature representation, and DNN features for dreamed objects were analyzed with brain decoding of fMRI data collected during dreaming. The decoders were first trained with stimulus-induced brain activity labeled with the feature values of the stimulus image from multiple DNN layers. The decoders were then used to decode DNN features from the dream fMRI data, and the decoded features were compared with the averaged features of each object category calculated from a large-scale image database. We found that the feature values decoded from the dream fMRI data positively correlated with those associated with dreamed object categories at mid- to high-level DNN layers. Using the decoded features, the dreamed object category could be identified at above-chance levels by matching them to the averaged features for candidate categories. The results suggest that dreaming recruits hierarchical visual feature representations associated with objects, which may support phenomenal aspects of dream experience.

  19. Hierarchical Neural Representation of Dreamed Objects Revealed by Brain Decoding with Deep Neural Network Features

    PubMed Central

    Horikawa, Tomoyasu; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2017-01-01

    Dreaming is generally thought to be generated by spontaneous brain activity during sleep with patterns common to waking experience. This view is supported by a recent study demonstrating that dreamed objects can be predicted from brain activity during sleep using statistical decoders trained with stimulus-induced brain activity. However, it remains unclear whether and how visual image features associated with dreamed objects are represented in the brain. In this study, we used a deep neural network (DNN) model for object recognition as a proxy for hierarchical visual feature representation, and DNN features for dreamed objects were analyzed with brain decoding of fMRI data collected during dreaming. The decoders were first trained with stimulus-induced brain activity labeled with the feature values of the stimulus image from multiple DNN layers. The decoders were then used to decode DNN features from the dream fMRI data, and the decoded features were compared with the averaged features of each object category calculated from a large-scale image database. We found that the feature values decoded from the dream fMRI data positively correlated with those associated with dreamed object categories at mid- to high-level DNN layers. Using the decoded features, the dreamed object category could be identified at above-chance levels by matching them to the averaged features for candidate categories. The results suggest that dreaming recruits hierarchical visual feature representations associated with objects, which may support phenomenal aspects of dream experience. PMID:28197089

  20. Detection of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-beta plaque deposition by deep brain impedance profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Fraering, Patrick C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. Toxic brain amyloid-beta (Aß) aggregates and ensuing cell death are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we investigated if we could monitor the presence of these aggregates by performing in situ electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in AD model mice brains. Approach. In this study, electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed post-mortem in APPPS1 transgenic mice brains. This transgenic model is commonly used to study amyloidogenesis, a pathological hallmark of AD. We used flexible probes with embedded micrometric electrodes array to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting senile plaques composed of Aß peptides by localized impedance measurements. Main results. We particularly focused on deep brain structures, such as the hippocampus. Ex vivo experiments using brains from young and old APPPS1 mice lead us to show that impedance measurements clearly correlate with the percentage of Aβ plaque load in the brain tissues. We could monitor the effects of aging in the AD APPPS1 mice model. Significance. We demonstrated that a localized electrical impedance measurement constitutes a valuable technique to monitor the presence of Aβ-plaques, which is complementary with existing imaging techniques. This method does not require prior Aβ staining, precluding the risk of variations in tissue uptake of dyes or tracers, and consequently ensuring reproducible data collection.

  1. Deep potential of Hugoton - evaluation of unexplored and underexplored areas

    SciTech Connect

    Woltz, D.

    1986-05-01

    Structurally, the Hugoton embayment is a large, southward-plunging syncline that represents a northerly extension of the Anadarko basin. It is bounded on the east by the Pratt anticline, on the northeast by the Central Kansas uplift, on the northwest by the Las Animas arch, on the west by the Sierra Grande uplift, and on the southwest by the Amarillo uplift. The embayment is approximately 150 mi wide and 250 mi long. Subsidence began during the Early Ordovician and reached a maximum from the middle Mississippi through the early middle Permian. Rocks of Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic ages are present in the embayment. The section thickens toward the axis of the embayment where it is about 9500 ft. The Ordovician through Cambrian section attains a thickness of about 650 ft. The Devonian and Silurian are largely absent from the area. The Mississippian and Pennsylvanian sections are about 3000 ft thick. Excluding the Permian, the Mississippian and Pennsylvanian contain the highest exploration potential. An evaluation of the deeper zones in the underexplored areas of the embayment identified several structural and stratigraphic trends that are presently untested or remain underexplored. The trends can be separated into those controlled by early structural developments which persisted through the section and later structural stratigraphic events. The probability of finding new fields in the 500,000 to 5,000,000-bbl range is good.

  2. Cortactin is associated with perineural invasion in the deep invasive front area of laryngeal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Eliane Papa; Rosa, Fabíola Encinas; Domingues, Maria Aparecida Custódio; Villacis, Rolando André Rios; Coudry, Renata de Almeida; Tagliarini, José Vicente; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2011-09-01

    The cortactin gene, mapped at 11q13, has been associated with an aggressive clinical course in many cancers because of its function of invasiveness. This study evaluated CTTN protein and its prognostic value in the deep invasive front and superficial areas of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The transcript expression levels were evaluated in a subset of cases. Overexpression of CTTN cytoplasmatic protein (80% of cases in both the deep invasive front and superficial areas) and transcript (30% of samples) was detected in a significant number of cases. In more than 20% of cases, observation verified membrane immunostaining in the deep invasive front and superficial areas. Perineural invasion was significantly associated with N stage and recurrence (P = .0058 and P = .0037, respectively). Higher protein expression levels were correlated with perineural invasion (P = .004) in deep invasive front cells, suggesting that this area should be considered a prognostic tool in laryngeal carcinomas. Although most cases had moderate to strong CTTN expression on the tumor surface, 2 sets of cases revealed a differential expression pattern in the deep invasive front. A group of cases with absent to weak expression of CTTN in the deep invasive front showed good prognosis parameters, and a second group with moderate to strong expression of CTTN were associated with an unfavorable prognosis, suggesting an association with worse outcome. Taken together, these results suggest that the deep invasive front might be considered a grading system in laryngeal carcinomas and that cortactin is a putative marker of worse outcome in the deep invasive front of laryngeal carcinomas.

  3. Deep ensemble learning of sparse regression models for brain disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Suk, Heung-Il; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies on brain imaging analysis witnessed the core roles of machine learning techniques in computer-assisted intervention for brain disease diagnosis. Of various machine-learning techniques, sparse regression models have proved their effectiveness in handling high-dimensional data but with a small number of training samples, especially in medical problems. In the meantime, deep learning methods have been making great successes by outperforming the state-of-the-art performances in various applications. In this paper, we propose a novel framework that combines the two conceptually different methods of sparse regression and deep learning for Alzheimer's disease/mild cognitive impairment diagnosis and prognosis. Specifically, we first train multiple sparse regression models, each of which is trained with different values of a regularization control parameter. Thus, our multiple sparse regression models potentially select different feature subsets from the original feature set; thereby they have different powers to predict the response values, i.e., clinical label and clinical scores in our work. By regarding the response values from our sparse regression models as target-level representations, we then build a deep convolutional neural network for clinical decision making, which thus we call 'Deep Ensemble Sparse Regression Network.' To our best knowledge, this is the first work that combines sparse regression models with deep neural network. In our experiments with the ADNI cohort, we validated the effectiveness of the proposed method by achieving the highest diagnostic accuracies in three classification tasks. We also rigorously analyzed our results and compared with the previous studies on the ADNI cohort in the literature.

  4. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell attenuates cocaine reinstatement through local and antidromic activation.

    PubMed

    Vassoler, Fair M; White, Samantha L; Hopkins, Thomas J; Guercio, Leonardo A; Espallergues, Julie; Berton, Olivier; Schmidt, Heath D; Pierce, R Christopher

    2013-09-04

    Accumbal deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of addiction. Here, we demonstrate that DBS in the nucleus accumbens shell, but not the core, attenuates cocaine priming-induced reinstatement of drug seeking, an animal model of relapse, in male Sprague Dawley rats. Next, we compared DBS of the shell with pharmacological inactivation. Results indicated that inactivation using reagents that influenced (lidocaine) or spared (GABA receptor agonists) fibers of passage blocked cocaine reinstatement when administered into the core but not the shell. It seems unlikely, therefore, that intrashell DBS influences cocaine reinstatement by inactivating this nucleus or the fibers coursing through it. To examine potential circuit-wide changes, c-Fos immunohistochemistry was used to examine neuronal activation following DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell. Intrashell DBS increased c-Fos induction at the site of stimulation as well as in the infralimbic cortex, but had no effect on the dorsal striatum, prelimbic cortex, or ventral pallidum. Recent evidence indicates that accumbens DBS antidromically stimulates axon terminals, which ultimately activates GABAergic interneurons in cortical areas that send afferents to the shell. To test this hypothesis, GABA receptor agonists (baclofen/muscimol) were microinjected into the anterior cingulate, and prelimbic or infralimbic cortices before cocaine reinstatement. Pharmacological inactivation of all three medial prefrontal cortical subregions attenuated the reinstatement of cocaine seeking. These results are consistent with DBS of the accumbens shell attenuating cocaine reinstatement via local activation and/or activation of GABAergic interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex via antidromic stimulation of cortico-accumbal afferents.

  5. Theoretical Optimization of Stimulation Strategies for a Directionally Segmented Deep Brain Stimulation Electrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, YiZi; Peña, Edgar; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Goal Programming deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems currently involves a clinician manually sweeping through a range of stimulus parameter settings to identify the setting that delivers the most robust therapy for a patient. With the advent of DBS arrays with a higher number and density of electrodes, this trial and error process becomes unmanageable in a clinical setting. This study developed a computationally efficient, model-based algorithm to estimate an electrode configuration that will most strongly activate tissue within a volume of interest. Methods The cerebellar-receiving area of motor thalamus, the target for treating essential tremor with DBS, was rendered from imaging data and discretized into grid points aligned in approximate afferent and efferent axonal pathway orientations. A finite-element model (FEM) was constructed to simulate the volumetric tissue voltage during DBS. We leveraged the principle of voltage superposition to formulate a convex optimization-based approach to maximize activating function (AF) values at each grid point (via three different criteria), hence increasing the overall probability of action potential initiation and neuronal entrainment within the target volume. Results For both efferent and afferent pathways, this approach achieved global optima within several seconds. The optimal electrode configuration and resulting AF values differed across each optimization criteria and between axonal orientations. Conclusion This approach only required a set of FEM simulations equal to the number of DBS array electrodes, and could readily accommodate anisotropic-inhomogeneous tissue conductances or other axonal orientations. Significance The algorithm provides an efficient, flexible determination of optimal electrode configurations for programming DBS arrays. PMID:26208259

  6. Improved sequence learning with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: evidence for treatment-specific network modulation.

    PubMed

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2012-02-22

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p < 0.02). To determine whether similar changes occurred during dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, we studied the subjects during an intravenous levodopa infusion titrated to achieve a motor response equivalent to stimulation. Despite consistent improvement in motor ratings during infusion, levodopa did not alter learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA-STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation.

  7. Disruption in proprioception from long-term thalamic deep brain stimulation: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Jennifer A.; Herter, Troy M.; Kiss, Zelma H.; Dukelow, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an excellent treatment for tremor and is generally thought to be reversible by turning off stimulation. For tremor, DBS is implanted in the ventrointermedius (Vim) nucleus of the thalamus, a region that relays proprioceptive information for movement sensation (kinaesthesia). Gait disturbances have been observed with bilateral Vim DBS, but the long-term effects on proprioceptive processing are unknown. We aimed to determine whether Vim DBS surgical implantation or stimulation leads to proprioceptive deficits in the upper limb. We assessed two groups of tremor subjects on measures of proprioception (kinaesthesia, position sense) and motor function using a robotic exoskeleton. In the first group (Surgery), we tested patients before and after implantation of Vim DBS, but before DBS was turned on to determine if proprioceptive deficits were inherent to tremor or caused by DBS implantation. In the second group (Stim), we tested subjects with chronically implanted Vim DBS ON and OFF stimulation. Compared to controls, there were no proprioceptive deficits before or after DBS implantation in the Surgery group. Surprisingly, those that received chronic long-term stimulation (LT-stim, 3–10 years) displayed significant proprioceptive deficits ON and OFF stimulation not present in subjects with chronic short-term stimulation (ST-stim, 0.5–2 years). LT-stim had significantly larger variability and reduced workspace area during the position sense assessment. During the kinesthetic assessment, LT-stim made significantly larger directional errors and consistently underestimated the speed of the robot, despite generating normal movement speeds during motor assessment. Chronic long-term Vim DBS may potentially disrupt proprioceptive processing, possibly inducing irreversible plasticity in the Vim nucleus and/or its network connections. Our findings in the upper limb may help explain some of the gait disturbances seen by others following Vim DBS

  8. Evaluation of Interactive Visualization on Mobile Computing Platforms for Selection of Deep Brain Stimulation Parameters.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Tamm, Georg; Jain, Sanket; Fogal, Thomas; Krüger, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant growth in the use of patient-specific models to predict the effects of neuromodulation therapies such as deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, translating these models from a research environment to the everyday clinical workflow has been a challenge, primarily due to the complexity of the models and the expertise required in specialized visualization software. In this paper, we deploy the interactive visualization system ImageVis3D Mobile, which has been designed for mobile computing devices such as the iPhone or iPad, in an evaluation environment to visualize models of Parkinson's disease patients who received DBS therapy. Selection of DBS settings is a significant clinical challenge that requires repeated revisions to achieve optimal therapeutic response, and is often performed without any visual representation of the stimulation system in the patient. We used ImageVis3D Mobile to provide models to movement disorders clinicians and asked them to use the software to determine: 1) which of the four DBS electrode contacts they would select for therapy; and 2) what stimulation settings they would choose. We compared the stimulation protocol chosen from the software versus the stimulation protocol that was chosen via clinical practice (independent of the study). Lastly, we compared the amount of time required to reach these settings using the software versus the time required through standard practice. We found that the stimulation settings chosen using ImageVis3D Mobile were similar to those used in standard of care, but were selected in drastically less time. We show how our visualization system, available directly at the point of care on a device familiar to the clinician, can be used to guide clinical decision making for selection of DBS settings. In our view, the positive impact of the system could also translate to areas other than DBS.

  9. Improved Sequence Learning with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: Evidence for Treatment-Specific Network Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C.; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G.; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H2 15Opositron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p < 0.02). To determine whether similar changes occurred during dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, we studied the subjects during an intravenous levodopa infusion titrated to achieve a motor response equivalent to stimulation. Despite consistent improvement in motor ratings during infusion, levodopa did not alter learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA–STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation. PMID:22357863

  10. Electromagnetic interference of GSM mobile phones with the implantable deep brain stimulator, ITREL-III

    PubMed Central

    Kainz, Wolfgang; Alesch, François; Chan, Dulciana Dias

    2003-01-01

    Background The purpose was to investigate mobile phone interference with implantable deep brain stimulators by means of 10 different 900 Mega Hertz (MHz) and 10 different 1800 MHz GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) mobile phones. Methods All tests were performed in vitro using a phantom especially developed for testing with deep brain stimulators. The phantom was filled with liquid phantom materials simulating brain and muscle tissue. All examinations were carried out inside an anechoic chamber on two implants of the same type of deep brain stimulator: ITREL-III from Medtronic Inc., USA. Results Despite a maximum transmitted peak power of mobile phones of 1 Watt (W) at 1800 MHz and 2 W at 900 MHz respectively, no influence on the ITREL-III was found. Neither the shape of the pulse form changed nor did single pulses fail. Tests with increased transmitted power using CW signals and broadband dipoles have shown that inhibition of the ITREL-III occurs at frequency dependent power levels which are below the emissions of GSM mobile phones. The ITREL-III is essentially more sensitive at 1800 MHz than at 900 MHz. Particularly the frequency range around 1500 MHz shows a very low interference threshold. Conclusion These investigations do not indicate a direct risk for ITREL-III patients using the tested GSM phones. Based on the interference levels found with CW signals, which are below the mobile phone emissions, we recommend similar precautions as for patients with cardiac pacemakers: 1. The phone should be used at the ear at the opposite side of the implant and 2. The patient should avoid carrying the phone close to the implant. PMID:12773204

  11. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  12. Human brain activity patterns beyond the isoelectric line of extreme deep coma.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Daniel; Florea, Bogdan; Amzica, Florin

    2013-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) reflects brain electrical activity. A flat (isoelectric) EEG, which is usually recorded during very deep coma, is considered to be a turning point between a living brain and a deceased brain. Therefore the isoelectric EEG constitutes, together with evidence of irreversible structural brain damage, one of the criteria for the assessment of brain death. In this study we use EEG recordings for humans on the one hand, and on the other hand double simultaneous intracellular recordings in the cortex and hippocampus, combined with EEG, in cats. They serve to demonstrate that a novel brain phenomenon is observable in both humans and animals during coma that is deeper than the one reflected by the isoelectric EEG, and that this state is characterized by brain activity generated within the hippocampal formation. This new state was induced either by medication applied to postanoxic coma (in human) or by application of high doses of anesthesia (isoflurane in animals) leading to an EEG activity of quasi-rhythmic sharp waves which henceforth we propose to call ν-complexes (Nu-complexes). Using simultaneous intracellular recordings in vivo in the cortex and hippocampus (especially in the CA3 region) we demonstrate that ν-complexes arise in the hippocampus and are subsequently transmitted to the cortex. The genesis of a hippocampal ν-complex depends upon another hippocampal activity, known as ripple activity, which is not overtly detectable at the cortical level. Based on our observations, we propose a scenario of how self-oscillations in hippocampal neurons can lead to a whole brain phenomenon during coma.

  13. Human Brain Activity Patterns beyond the Isoelectric Line of Extreme Deep Coma

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Daniel; Florea, Bogdan; Amzica, Florin

    2013-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) reflects brain electrical activity. A flat (isoelectric) EEG, which is usually recorded during very deep coma, is considered to be a turning point between a living brain and a deceased brain. Therefore the isoelectric EEG constitutes, together with evidence of irreversible structural brain damage, one of the criteria for the assessment of brain death. In this study we use EEG recordings for humans on the one hand, and on the other hand double simultaneous intracellular recordings in the cortex and hippocampus, combined with EEG, in cats. They serve to demonstrate that a novel brain phenomenon is observable in both humans and animals during coma that is deeper than the one reflected by the isoelectric EEG, and that this state is characterized by brain activity generated within the hippocampal formation. This new state was induced either by medication applied to postanoxic coma (in human) or by application of high doses of anesthesia (isoflurane in animals) leading to an EEG activity of quasi-rhythmic sharp waves which henceforth we propose to call ν-complexes (Nu-complexes). Using simultaneous intracellular recordings in vivo in the cortex and hippocampus (especially in the CA3 region) we demonstrate that ν-complexes arise in the hippocampus and are subsequently transmitted to the cortex. The genesis of a hippocampal ν-complex depends upon another hippocampal activity, known as ripple activity, which is not overtly detectable at the cortical level. Based on our observations, we propose a scenario of how self-oscillations in hippocampal neurons can lead to a whole brain phenomenon during coma. PMID:24058669

  14. Deep-sea genetic resources: New frontiers for science and stewardship in areas beyond national jurisdiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harden-Davies, Harriet

    2017-03-01

    The deep-sea is a large source of marine genetic resources (MGR), which have many potential uses and are a growing area of research. Much of the deep-sea lies in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), including 65% of the global ocean. MGR in ABNJ occupy a significant gap in the international legal framework. Access and benefit sharing of MGR is a key issue in the development of a new international legally-binding instrument under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) for the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in ABNJ. This paper examines how this is relevant to deep-sea scientific research and identifies emerging challenges and opportunities. There is no internationally agreed definition of MGR, however, deep-sea genetic resources could incorporate any biological material including genes, proteins and natural products. Deep-sea scientific research is the key actor accessing MGR in ABNJ and sharing benefits such as data, samples and knowledge. UNCLOS provides the international legal framework for marine scientific research, international science cooperation, capacity building and marine technology transfer. Enhanced implementation could support access and benefit sharing of MGR in ABNJ. Deep-sea scientific researchers could play an important role in informing practical new governance solutions for access and benefit sharing of MGR that promote scientific research in ABNJ and support deep-sea stewardship. Advancing knowledge of deep-sea biodiversity in ABNJ, enhancing open-access to data and samples, standardisation and international marine science cooperation are significant potential opportunity areas.

  15. Frameless Stereotactic Insertion of Viewsite Brain Access System with Microscope-Mounted Tracking Device for Resection of Deep Brain Lesions: Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Lall, Rohan; Fanous, Andrew A; Boockvar, John; Langer, David J

    2017-01-01

    The surgical management of deep brain tumors is often challenging due to the limitations of stereotactic needle biopsies and the morbidity associated with transcortical approaches. We present a novel microscopic navigational technique utilizing the Viewsite Brain Access System (VBAS) (Vycor Medical, Boca Raton, FL, USA) for resection of a deep parietal periventricular high-grade glioma as well as another glioma and a cavernoma with no related morbidity. The approach utilized a navigational tracker mounted on a microscope, which was set to the desired trajectory and depth. It allowed gentle continuous insertion of the VBAS directly to a deep lesion under continuous microscopic visualization, increasing safety by obviating the need to look up from the microscope and thus avoiding loss of trajectory. This technique has broad value for the resection of a variety of deep brain lesions. PMID:28331774

  16. Frameless Stereotactic Insertion of Viewsite Brain Access System with Microscope-Mounted Tracking Device for Resection of Deep Brain Lesions: Technical Report.

    PubMed

    White, Tim; Chakraborty, Shamik; Lall, Rohan; Fanous, Andrew A; Boockvar, John; Langer, David J

    2017-02-04

    The surgical management of deep brain tumors is often challenging due to the limitations of stereotactic needle biopsies and the morbidity associated with transcortical approaches. We present a novel microscopic navigational technique utilizing the Viewsite Brain Access System (VBAS) (Vycor Medical, Boca Raton, FL, USA) for resection of a deep parietal periventricular high-grade glioma as well as another glioma and a cavernoma with no related morbidity. The approach utilized a navigational tracker mounted on a microscope, which was set to the desired trajectory and depth. It allowed gentle continuous insertion of the VBAS directly to a deep lesion under continuous microscopic visualization, increasing safety by obviating the need to look up from the microscope and thus avoiding loss of trajectory. This technique has broad value for the resection of a variety of deep brain lesions.

  17. Metallothionein-I induction by stress in specific brain areas.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, J; Campmany, L; Martí, O; Armario, A

    1991-10-01

    The distribution of metallothionein-I (MT) in several areas of the brain and its induction by immobilization stress has been studied in the rat. MT content was highest in hippocampus and midbrain and lowest in frontal cortex and pons plus medulla oblongata. Immobilization stress for 18 hours (which was accompanied by food and water deprivation) significantly increased MT levels in the frontal cortex, pons plus medulla oblongata and hypothalamus, but not in midbrain and hippocampus. The effect of stress on MT levels was specific as food and water deprivation along had no significant effect on MT levels in any of the brain areas studied. The effect of stress on MT levels was independent of changes in cytosolic Zn content; this was generally unaffected by stress or food and water deprivation but decreased in pons plus medulla oblongata from stressed rats. The results suggest that MT is induced more significantly in the brain areas that are usually involved in the response of animals to stress.

  18. Using Species-Area Relationships to Inform Baseline Conservation Targets for the Deep North East Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Nicola L.; Foggo, Andrew; Howell, Kerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Demands on the resources of the deep-sea have increased in recent years. Consequently, the need to create and implement a comprehensive network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) to help manage and protect these resources has become a global political priority. Efforts are currently underway to implement MPA networks in the deep North East Atlantic. To ensure these networks are effective, it is essential that baseline information be available to inform the conservation planning process. Using empirical data, we calculated conservation targets for sessile benthic invertebrates in the deep North East Atlantic for consideration during the planning process. We assessed Species-Area Relationships across two depth bands (200–1100 m and 1100–1800 m) and nine substrata. Conservation targets were predicted for each substratum within each depth band using z-values obtained from fitting a power model to the Species-Area Relationships of observed and estimated species richness (Chao1). Results suggest an MPA network incorporating 10% of the North East Atlantic’s deep-sea area would protect approximately 58% and 49% of sessile benthic species for the depth bands 200–1100 m and 1100–1800 m, respectively. Species richness was shown to vary with substratum type indicating that, along with depth, substratum information needs to be incorporated into the conservation planning process to ensure the most effective MPA network is implemented in the deep North East Atlantic. PMID:23527053

  19. Response to Deep Brain Stimulation in Three Brain Targets with Implications in Mental Disorders: A PET Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Casquero-Veiga, Marta; Hadar, Ravit; Pascau, Javier; Winter, Christine; Desco, Manuel; Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate metabolic changes in brain networks by deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and dorsomedial thalamus (DM) using positron emission tomography (PET) in naïve rats. Methods 43 male Wistar rats underwent stereotactic surgery and concentric bipolar platinum-iridium electrodes were bilaterally implanted into one of the three brain sites. [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-PET (18FDG-PET) and computed tomography (CT) scans were performed at the 7th (without DBS) and 9th day (with DBS) after surgery. Stimulation period matched tracer uptake period. Images were acquired with a small-animal PET-CT scanner. Differences in glucose uptake between groups were assessed with Statistical Parametric Mapping. Results DBS induced site-specific metabolic changes, although a common increased metabolic activity in the piriform cortex was found for the three brain targets. mPFC-DBS increased metabolic activity in the striatum, temporal and amygdala, and reduced it in the cerebellum, brainstem (BS) and periaqueductal gray matter (PAG). NAcc-DBS increased metabolic activity in the subiculum and olfactory bulb, and decreased it in the BS, PAG, septum and hypothalamus. DM-DBS increased metabolic activity in the striatum, NAcc and thalamus and decreased it in the temporal and cingulate cortex. Conclusions DBS induced significant changes in 18FDG uptake in brain regions associated with the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry. Stimulation of mPFC, NAcc and DM induced different patterns of 18FDG uptake despite interacting with the same circuitries. This may have important implications to DBS research suggesting individualized target selection according to specific neural modulatory requirements. PMID:28033356

  20. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Tongjun; Zhang, Guifeng; Li, Ganlong; Lu, Na; Lai, Xinsheng; Lu, Yangjia; Chen, Jiarong

    2012-01-01

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state, as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture. Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint. Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling, true needling activated Brodmann areas 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 20, 21, 37, 39, 40, 43, and 47, the head of the caudate nucleus, the parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus and red nucleus. True needling also deactivated Brodmann areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 18, 24, 31, 40 and 46. PMID:25538761

  1. Measuring complex behaviors of local oscillatory networks in deep brain local field potentials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongzhi; Geng, Xinyi; Li, Luming; Stein, John F; Aziz, Tipu Z; Green, Alexander L; Wang, Shouyan

    2016-05-01

    Multiple oscillations emerging from the same neuronal substrate serve to construct a local oscillatory network. The network usually exhibits complex behaviors of rhythmic, balancing and coupling between the oscillations, and the quantification of these behaviors would provide valuable insight into organization of the local network related to brain states. An integrated approach to quantify rhythmic, balancing and coupling neural behaviors based upon power spectral analysis, power ratio analysis and cross-frequency power coupling analysis was presented. Deep brain local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from the thalamus of patients with neuropathic pain and dystonic tremor. t-Test was applied to assess the difference between the two patient groups. The rhythmic behavior measured by power spectral analysis showed significant power spectrum difference in the high beta band between the two patient groups. The balancing behavior measured by power ratio analysis showed significant power ratio differences at high beta band to 8-20 Hz, and 30-40 Hz to high beta band between the patient groups. The coupling behavior measured by cross-frequency power coupling analysis showed power coupling differences at (theta band, high beta band) and (45-55 Hz, 70-80 Hz) between the patient groups. The study provides a strategy for studying the brain states in a multi-dimensional behavior space and a framework to screen quantitative characteristics for biomarkers related to diseases or nuclei. The work provides a comprehensive approach for understanding the complex behaviors of deep brain LFPs and identifying quantitative biomarkers for brain states related to diseases or nuclei. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Multi-Modality Isointense Infant Brain Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenlu; Li, Rongjian; Deng, Houtao; Wang, Li; Lin, Weili; Ji, Shuiwang; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    The segmentation of infant brain tissue images into white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an important role in studying early brain development in health and disease. In the isointense stage (approximately 6–8 months of age), WM and GM exhibit similar levels of intensity in both T1 and T2 MR images, making the tissue segmentation very challenging. Only a small number of existing methods have been designed for tissue segmentation in this isointense stage; however, they only used a single T1 or T2 images, or the combination of T1 and T2 images. In this paper, we propose to use deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for segmenting isointense stage brain tissues using multi-modality MR images. CNNs are a type of deep models in which trainable filters and local neighborhood pooling operations are applied alternatingly on the raw input images, resulting in a hierarchy of increasingly complex features. Specifically, we used multimodality information from T1, T2, and fractional anisotropy (FA) images as inputs and then generated the segmentation maps as outputs. The multiple intermediate layers applied convolution, pooling, normalization, and other operations to capture the highly nonlinear mappings between inputs and outputs. We compared the performance of our approach with that of the commonly used segmentation methods on a set of manually segmented isointense stage brain images. Results showed that our proposed model significantly outperformed prior methods on infant brain tissue segmentation. In addition, our results indicated that integration of multi-modality images led to significant performance improvement. PMID:25562829

  3. Deep convolutional neural networks for multi-modality isointense infant brain image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenlu; Li, Rongjian; Deng, Houtao; Wang, Li; Lin, Weili; Ji, Shuiwang; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-03-01

    The segmentation of infant brain tissue images into white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an important role in studying early brain development in health and disease. In the isointense stage (approximately 6-8 months of age), WM and GM exhibit similar levels of intensity in both T1 and T2 MR images, making the tissue segmentation very challenging. Only a small number of existing methods have been designed for tissue segmentation in this isointense stage; however, they only used a single T1 or T2 images, or the combination of T1 and T2 images. In this paper, we propose to use deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for segmenting isointense stage brain tissues using multi-modality MR images. CNNs are a type of deep models in which trainable filters and local neighborhood pooling operations are applied alternatingly on the raw input images, resulting in a hierarchy of increasingly complex features. Specifically, we used multi-modality information from T1, T2, and fractional anisotropy (FA) images as inputs and then generated the segmentation maps as outputs. The multiple intermediate layers applied convolution, pooling, normalization, and other operations to capture the highly nonlinear mappings between inputs and outputs. We compared the performance of our approach with that of the commonly used segmentation methods on a set of manually segmented isointense stage brain images. Results showed that our proposed model significantly outperformed prior methods on infant brain tissue segmentation. In addition, our results indicated that integration of multi-modality images led to significant performance improvement.

  4. Segmenting Brain Tissues from Chinese Visible Human Dataset by Deep-Learned Features with Stacked Autoencoder.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangjun; Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Cryosection brain images in Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset contain rich anatomical structure information of tissues because of its high resolution (e.g., 0.167 mm per pixel). Fast and accurate segmentation of these images into white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid plays a critical role in analyzing and measuring the anatomical structures of human brain. However, most existing automated segmentation methods are designed for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging data, and they may not be applicable for cryosection images due to the imaging difference. In this paper, we propose a supervised learning-based CVH brain tissues segmentation method that uses stacked autoencoder (SAE) to automatically learn the deep feature representations. Specifically, our model includes two successive parts where two three-layer SAEs take image patches as input to learn the complex anatomical feature representation, and then these features are sent to Softmax classifier for inferring the labels. Experimental results validated the effectiveness of our method and showed that it outperformed four other classical brain tissue detection strategies. Furthermore, we reconstructed three-dimensional surfaces of these tissues, which show their potential in exploring the high-resolution anatomical structures of human brain.

  5. Segmenting Brain Tissues from Chinese Visible Human Dataset by Deep-Learned Features with Stacked Autoencoder

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangjun; Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Cryosection brain images in Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset contain rich anatomical structure information of tissues because of its high resolution (e.g., 0.167 mm per pixel). Fast and accurate segmentation of these images into white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid plays a critical role in analyzing and measuring the anatomical structures of human brain. However, most existing automated segmentation methods are designed for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging data, and they may not be applicable for cryosection images due to the imaging difference. In this paper, we propose a supervised learning-based CVH brain tissues segmentation method that uses stacked autoencoder (SAE) to automatically learn the deep feature representations. Specifically, our model includes two successive parts where two three-layer SAEs take image patches as input to learn the complex anatomical feature representation, and then these features are sent to Softmax classifier for inferring the labels. Experimental results validated the effectiveness of our method and showed that it outperformed four other classical brain tissue detection strategies. Furthermore, we reconstructed three-dimensional surfaces of these tissues, which show their potential in exploring the high-resolution anatomical structures of human brain. PMID:27057543

  6. Toward Deep Brain Monitoring with Superficial EEG Sensors Plus Neuromodulatory Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Darvas, Felix; Mehić, Edin; Caler, Connor J; Ojemann, Jeff G; Mourad, Pierre D

    2016-08-01

    Noninvasive recordings of electrophysiological activity have limited anatomic specificity and depth. We hypothesized that spatially tagging a small volume of brain with a unique electroencephalography (EEG) signal induced by pulsed focused ultrasound could overcome those limitations. As a first step toward testing this hypothesis, we applied transcranial ultrasound (2 MHz, 200-ms pulses applied at 1050 Hz for 1 s at a spatial peak temporal average intensity of 1.4 W/cm(2)) to the brains of anesthetized rats while simultaneously recording EEG signals. We observed a significant 1050-Hz electrophysiological signal only when ultrasound was applied to a living brain. Moreover, amplitude demodulation of the EEG signal at 1050 Hz yielded measurement of gamma band (>30 Hz) brain activity consistent with direct measurements of that activity. These results represent preliminary support for use of pulsed focused ultrasound as a spatial tagging mechanism for non-invasive EEG-based mapping of deep brain activity with high spatial resolution. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A surgeon specific automatic path planning algorithm for deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Dawant, Benoit M.; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Neimat, Joseph S.; Konrad, Peter E.; D'Haese, Pierre-Francois; Datteri, Ryan D.; Landman, Bennett A.; Noble, Jack H.

    2012-02-01

    In deep brain stimulation surgeries, stimulating electrodes are placed at specific targets in the deep brain to treat neurological disorders. Reaching these targets safely requires avoiding critical structures in the brain. Meticulous planning is required to find a safe path from the cortical surface to the intended target. Choosing a trajectory automatically is difficult because there is little consensus among neurosurgeons on what is optimal. Our goals are to design a path planning system that is able to learn the preferences of individual surgeons and, eventually, to standardize the surgical approach using this learned information. In this work, we take the first step towards these goals, which is to develop a trajectory planning approach that is able to effectively mimic individual surgeons and is designed such that parameters, which potentially can be automatically learned, are used to describe an individual surgeon's preferences. To validate the approach, two neurosurgeons were asked to choose between their manual and a computed trajectory, blinded to their identity. The results of this experiment showed that the neurosurgeons preferred the computed trajectory over their own in 10 out of 40 cases. The computed trajectory was judged to be equivalent to the manual one or otherwise acceptable in 27 of the remaining cases. These results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of computer-assisted path planning.

  8. Stereotactic biopsy with electrical monitoring for deep-seated brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Ooba, Hiroshi; Abe, Tatsuya; Momii, Yasutomo; Fujiki, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    The stereotactic biopsy is widely integrated into clinical practice as an efficient and safe procedure for histologic diagnoses. However, the surgical risk increases when the lesions are close to the eloquence of the adjacent brain. The present report describes two patients with deep-seated brain tumors who underwent a stereotactic biopsy with electrical monitoring and demonstrates the importance of this technique. The tentative target and trajectory were determined on a stereotactic map from the Schaltenbrand and Wahren atlas. A Cosman-Roberts-Wells stereotactic frame was applied to the patient. Electrical recording along a single trajectory was used to identify the circumscribed neuronal structures, and electrical simulation was administered to the target. The biopsy point was decided when no adverse events were observed with a low electric current level. A 34-year-old male patient with anaplastic astrocytoma in the putamen and thalamus and an 81-year-old female patient with malignant lymphoma in the midbrain underwent stereotactic biopsies with electrical monitoring. The biopsies were successfully performed without any resulting neurologic deficits. This report describes two patients with deep-seated brain tumors who underwent stereotactic biopsies with electrical recording and stimulation. The electrical monitoring appears to be a useful technique to complement the ordinary image-guided biopsy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cortical magnetoencephalography of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of postural tremor.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Allison T; Bajwa, Jawad A; Johnson, Matthew D

    2012-10-01

    The effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on motor cortex circuitry in Essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are not well understood, in part, because most imaging modalities have difficulty capturing and localizing motor cortex dynamics on the same temporal scale as motor symptom expression. Here, we report on the use of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to characterize sources of postural tremor activity within the brain of an ET/PD patient and the effects of bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS on these sources. Recordings were performed during unilateral and bilateral DBS at stimulation amplitudes of 0 V, 1 V, and 3 V corresponding to no therapy, subtherapeutic, and therapeutic configurations, respectively. Dipole source localization in reference to the postural tremor frequency recorded with electromyography (EMG) showed prominent sources in both right and left motor cortices when no therapy was provided. These sources dissipated as the amplitude of stimulation increased to a therapeutic level (P = 0.0062). Coherence peaks between the EMG and MEG recordings were seen at both 4 Hz, postural tremor frequency, and at 8 Hz, twice the tremor frequency, with no therapy. Both peaks were reduced with therapeutic DBS. These results demonstrate the capabilities of MEG to record cortical dynamics of tremor during deep brain stimulation and suggest that MEG could be used to examine DBS in the context of motor symptoms of PD and of ET.

  10. Deep brain stimulation for severe treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder: An open-label case series.

    PubMed

    Farrand, Sarah; Evans, Andrew H; Mangelsdorf, Simone; Loi, Samantha M; Mocellin, Ramon; Borham, Adam; Bevilacqua, JoAnne; Blair-West, Scott; Walterfang, Mark A; Bittar, Richard G; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2017-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation can be of benefit in carefully selected patients with severe intractable obsessive-compulsive disorder. The aim of this paper is to describe the outcomes of the first seven deep brain stimulation procedures for obsessive-compulsive disorder undertaken at the Neuropsychiatry Unit, Royal Melbourne Hospital. The primary objective was to assess the response to deep brain stimulation treatment utilising the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale as a measure of symptom severity. Secondary objectives include assessment of depression and anxiety, as well as socio-occupational functioning. Patients with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder were referred by their treating psychiatrist for assessment of their suitability for deep brain stimulation. Following successful application to the Psychosurgery Review Board, patients proceeded to have deep brain stimulation electrodes implanted in either bilateral nucleus accumbens or bed nucleus of stria terminalis. Clinical assessment and symptom rating scales were undertaken pre- and post-operatively at 6- to 8-week intervals. Rating scales used included the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, Obsessive Compulsive Inventory, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale and Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale. Seven patients referred from four states across Australia underwent deep brain stimulation surgery and were followed for a mean of 31 months (range, 8-54 months). The sample included four females and three males, with a mean age of 46 years (range, 37-59 years) and mean duration of obsessive-compulsive disorder of 25 years (range, 15-38 years) at the time of surgery. The time from first assessment to surgery was on average 18 months. All patients showed improvement on symptom severity rating scales. Three patients showed a full response, defined as greater than 35% improvement in Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale score, with the remaining showing responses between 7% and 20%. Deep

  11. Resting state functional MRI in Parkinson’s disease: the impact of deep brain stimulation on ‘effective’ connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Urner, Maren; Moran, Rosalyn; Flandin, Guillaume; Marreiros, Andre; Mancini, Laura; White, Mark; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia; Friston, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Depleted of dopamine, the dynamics of the parkinsonian brain impact on both ‘action’ and ‘resting’ motor behaviour. Deep brain stimulation has become an established means of managing these symptoms, although its mechanisms of action remain unclear. Non-invasive characterizations of induced brain responses, and the effective connectivity underlying them, generally appeals to dynamic causal modelling of neuroimaging data. When the brain is at rest, however, this sort of characterization has been limited to correlations (functional connectivity). In this work, we model the ‘effective’ connectivity underlying low frequency blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in the resting Parkinsonian motor network—disclosing the distributed effects of deep brain stimulation on cortico-subcortical connections. Specifically, we show that subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation modulates all the major components of the motor cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loop, including the cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical, direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways, and the hyperdirect subthalamic nucleus projections. The strength of effective subthalamic nucleus afferents and efferents were reduced by stimulation, whereas cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical and direct pathways were strengthened. Remarkably, regression analysis revealed that the hyperdirect, direct, and basal ganglia afferents to the subthalamic nucleus predicted clinical status and therapeutic response to deep brain stimulation; however, suppression of the sensitivity of the subthalamic nucleus to its hyperdirect afferents by deep brain stimulation may subvert the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation. Our findings highlight the distributed effects of stimulation on the resting motor network and provide a framework for analysing effective connectivity in resting state functional MRI with strong a priori hypotheses. PMID:24566670

  12. Antidepressant-like Effects of Medial Forebrain Bundle Deep Brain Stimulation in Rats are not Associated With Accumbens Dopamine Release.

    PubMed

    Bregman, Tatiana; Reznikov, Roman; Diwan, Mustansir; Raymond, Roger; Butson, Christopher R; Nobrega, José N; Hamani, Clement

    2015-01-01

    Medial forebrain bundle (MFB) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is currently being investigated in patients with treatment-resistant depression. Striking features of this therapy are the large number of patients who respond to treatment and the rapid nature of the antidepressant response. To study antidepressant-like behavioral responses, changes in regional brain activity, and monoamine release in rats receiving MFB DBS. Antidepressant-like effects of MFB stimulation at 100 μA, 90 μs and either 130 Hz or 20 Hz were characterized in the forced swim test (FST). Changes in the expression of the immediate early gene (IEG) zif268 were measured with in situ hybridization and used as an index of regional brain activity. Microdialysis was used to measure DBS-induced dopamine and serotonin release in the nucleus accumbens. Stimulation at parameters that approximated those used in clinical practice, but not at lower frequencies, induced a significant antidepressant-like response in the FST. In animals receiving MFB DBS at high frequency, increases in zif268 expression were observed in the piriform cortex, prelimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens shell, anterior regions of the caudate/putamen and the ventral tegmental area. These structures are involved in the neurocircuitry of reward and are also connected to other brain areas via the MFB. At settings used during behavioral tests, stimulation did not induce either dopamine or serotonin release in the nucleus accumbens. These results suggest that MFB DBS induces an antidepressant-like effect in rats and recruits structures involved in the neurocircuitry of reward without affecting dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic mapping of deep brain structures and associations with symptomatology in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Doyle-Thomas, Krissy A.R.; Card, Dallas; Soorya, Latha V.; Wang, A. Ting; Fan, Jin; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2014-01-01

    Structural neuroimaging studies in autism report atypical volume in deep brain structures which are related to symptomatology. Little is known about metabolic changes in these regions, and how they vary with age and sex, and/or relate to clinical behaviors. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy we measured N-acetylaspartate, choline, creatine, myoinositol and glutamate in the caudate, putamen, and thalamus of 20 children with autism and 16 typically developing controls (7–18 years). Relative to controls, individuals with autism had elevated glutamate/creatine in the putamen. In addition, both groups showed age-related increases in glutamate in this region. Boys, relative to girls had increased choline/creatine in the thalamus. Lastly, there were correlations between glutamate, choline, and myoinositol in all three regions, and behavioral scores in the ASD group. These findings suggest changes in deep gray matter neurochemistry, which are sensitive to diagnosis, age and sex, and are associated with behavioral differences. PMID:24459534

  14. Deep brain stimulation for neurodegenerative disease: a computational blueprint using dynamic causal modeling.

    PubMed

    Moran, Rosalyn

    2015-01-01

    Advances in deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapeutics for neurological and psychiatric disorders represent a new clinical avenue that may potentially augment or adjunct traditional pharmacological approaches to disease treatment. Using modern molecular biology and genomics, pharmacological development proceeds through an albeit lengthy and expensive pipeline from candidate compound to preclinical and clinical trials. Such a pathway, however, is lacking in the field of neurostimulation, with developments arising from a selection of early sources and motivated by diverse fields including surgery and neuroscience. In this chapter, I propose that biophysical models of connected brain networks optimized using empirical neuroimaging data from patients and healthy controls can provide a principled computational pipeline for testing and developing neurostimulation interventions. Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) provides such a computational framework, serving as a method to test effective connectivity between and within regions of an active brain network. Importantly, the methodology links brain dynamics with behavior by directly assessing experimental task effects under different behavioral or cognitive sets. Therefore, healthy brain dynamics in circuits of interest can be defined mathematically with stimulation interventions in pathological counterparts simulated with the goal of restoring normal functionality. In this chapter, I outline the dynamic characterization of brain circuits using DCM and propose a blueprint for testing in silico, the effects of stimulation in neurodegenerative disorders affecting cognition. In particular, the models can be simulated to test whether neuroimaging correlates of nondiseased brain dynamics can be reinstantiated in a pathological setting using DBS. Thus, the key advantage of this framework is that distributed effects of DBS on neural circuitry and network connectivity can be predicted in silico. The chapter also includes a review of how

  15. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2016-05-01

    Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high-dose hormone application in adult female-to-male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel-based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting-state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone-dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language-specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738-1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  17. Neurocognitive Brain Response to Transient Impairment of Wernicke's Area

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert A.; Prat, Chantel S.; Just, Marcel Adam

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how the brain system adapts and reconfigures its information processing capabilities to maintain cognitive performance after a key cortical center [left posterior superior temporal gyrus (LSTGp)] is temporarily impaired during the performance of a language comprehension task. By applying repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to LSTGp and concurrently assessing the brain response with functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that adaptation consisted of 1) increased synchronization between compensating regions coupled with a decrease in synchronization within the primary language network and 2) a decrease in activation at the rTMS site as well as in distal regions, followed by their recovery. The compensatory synchronization included 3 centers: The contralateral homolog (RSTGp) of the area receiving rTMS, areas adjacent to the rTMS site, and a region involved in discourse monitoring (medial frontal gyrus). This approach reveals some principles of network-level adaptation to trauma with potential application to traumatic brain injury, stroke, and seizure. PMID:23322403

  18. Addiction in Parkinson's disease: impact of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Witjas, Tatiana; Baunez, Christelle; Henry, Jean Marc; Delfini, Marie; Regis, Jean; Cherif, André Ali; Peragut, Jean Claude; Azulay, Jean Philippe

    2005-08-01

    In Parkinson's disease, dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) is characterized by severe dopamine addiction and behavioral disorders such as manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling, and mood swings. Here, we describe the case of 2 young parkinsonian patients suffering from disabling motor fluctuations and dyskinesia associated with severe DDS. In addition to alleviating the motor disability in both patients, subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation greatly reduced the behavioral disorders as well as completely abolished the addiction to dopaminergic treatment. Dopaminergic addiction in patients with Parkinson's disease, therefore, does not constitute an obstacle to high-frequency STN stimulation, and this treatment may even cure the addiction.

  19. Selective enhancement of rapid eye movement sleep by deep brain stimulation of the human pons.

    PubMed

    Lim, Andrew S; Moro, Elena; Lozano, Andres M; Hamani, Clement; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O; Hutchison, William D; Lang, Anthony E; Wennberg, Richard A; Murray, Brian J

    2009-07-01

    Animal studies suggest that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is governed by the interaction of REM-promoting and REM-inhibiting nuclei in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum. The pedunculopontine nucleus is proposed to be REM promoting. Using polysomnography, we studied sleep in five parkinsonian patients undergoing unilateral pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS). We demonstrated a near doubling of nocturnal REM sleep between the DBS "off" and DBS "on" states, without significant changes in other sleep states. This represents the first demonstration that DBS can selectively modulate human sleep, and it supports an important role for the pedunculopontine nucleus region in modulating human REM sleep. Ann Neurol 2009;66:110-114.

  20. Proceedings of the second annual deep brain stimulation think tank: What's in the pipeline

    DOE PAGES

    Gunduz, Aysegul; Morita, Hokuto; Rossi, P. Justin; ...

    2015-05-25

    Here the proceedings of the 2nd Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank summarize the most contemporary clinical, electrophysiological, and computational work on DBS for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease and represent the insights of a unique multidisciplinary ensemble of expert neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, scientists, engineers and members of industry. Presentations and discussions covered a broad range of topics, including advocacy for DBS, improving clinical outcomes, innovations in computational models of DBS, understanding of the neurophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) and evolving sensor and device technologies.

  1. Who qualifies for deep brain stimulation for OCD? Data from a naturalistic clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Garnaat, Sarah L; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Sibrava, Nicholas J; Goodman, Wayne K; Mancebo, Maria C; Eisen, Jane L; Rasmussen, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    A few patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) remain severely impaired despite exhausting best-practice treatments. For them, neurosurgery (stereotactic ablation or deep brain stimulation) might be considered. The authors investigated the proportion of treatment-seeking OCD patients, in a naturalistic clinical sample, who met contemporary neurosurgery selection criteria. Using comprehensive baseline data on diagnosis, severity, and treatment history for adult patients from the NIMH-supported Brown Longitudinal OCD Study, only 2 of 325 patients met screening criteria for neurosurgery. This finding prompts consideration of new models for clinical trials with limited samples as well as methods of refining entry criteria for such invasive treatments.

  2. The effect of deep brain stimulation on quality of life in movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, A; Jankovic, J

    2005-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a viable treatment alternative for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), dystonia, and cerebellar outflow tremors. When poorly controlled, these disorders have detrimental effects on the patient's health related quality of life (HRQoL). Instruments that measure HRQoL are useful tools to assess burden of disease and the impact of therapeutic interventions on activities of daily living, employment, and other functions. We systematically and critically reviewed the literature on the effects of DBS on HRQoL in PD, ET, dystonia, and cerebellar outflow tremor related to multiple sclerosis. PMID:16107348

  3. Demand driven deep brain stimulation: regimes and autoregressive hidden Markov implementation.

    PubMed

    Brittain, John-Stuart; Probert-Smith, Penny; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is an increasingly prevalent surgical option in the treatment of a multitude of neurological conditions, most notably Parkinson's disease. The development of a neurofeedback device is driven primarily by stimulator habituation, surgical risk factors, the cost of battery replacement, and reported neuropsychiatric side-effects under prolonged chronic administration. Here we present two distinct regimes for stimulation delivery in chronic and acute symptomatic conditions, presented in the context of Parkinsonian bradykinesias and tremor. Implementation strategies are discussed with a focus on vector-autoregressive hidden Markov models for tremor prediction. Detection of simple motor actions versus tremor are compared in a preliminary performance analysis.

  4. High incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Loizon, Marine; Laurencin, Chloé; Vial, Christophe; Danaila, Teodor; Thobois, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    We observed several cases of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) revealed after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). 115 consecutive PD patients who underwent STN-DBS between 2010 and 2014 at the Neurological Hospital in Lyon were retrospectively included. CTS was accepted as the diagnosis only if clinical examination and ENMG both confirmed it. Nine patients (7.8 %) developed CTS in the 2 years following surgery, which is far beyond the 2.7/1000 incidence in the general population. The present study shows an overrepresentation of CTS occurrence after STN-DBS in PD.

  5. Application of non-linear control theory to a model of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Clare M; Lowery, Madeleine M; de Paor, Annraoi M

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) effectively alleviates the pathological neural activity associated with Parkinson's disease. Its exact mode of action is not entirely understood. This paper explores theoretically the optimum stimulation parameters necessary to quench oscillations in a neural-mass type model with second order dynamics. This model applies well established nonlinear control system theory to DBS. The analysis here determines the minimum criteria in terms of amplitude and pulse duration of stimulation, necessary to quench the unwanted oscillations in a closed loop system, and outlines the relationship between this model and the actual physiological system.

  6. Weight and body mass index in Parkinson's disease patients after deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Paul J; Maxwell, Robert E; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Kotz, Catherine M; Kotzd, Catherine M; Billington, Charles J; Billingtond, Charles J; Laseski, Maggie A; Thielen, Scott D

    2005-06-01

    A retrospective chart review characterizing changes in 17 male and 10 female Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery indicated that 6 mo before surgery, patients lost a mean of 5.1 lbs, whereas in the 6 mo after surgery, subjects gained a mean of 10.1 lbs; 22% gained more than 14 lbs. In 10 patients followed an additional 6 mo, weight gain continued. This weight gain may be associated with decreased energy expenditure due to subsidence of chronic tremor. The magnitude of gain underscores the need for proactive management of body weight in PD patients undergoing DBS.

  7. Deep Brain Stimulation Salvages a Flourishing Dental Practice: A Dentist with Essential Tremor Recounts his Experience

    PubMed Central

    Giacopuzzi, Guy; Lising, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    In recounting his experience with deep brain stimulation (DBS), a practicing dentist challenged with long-standing bilateral essential tremor of the hands shares insights into his diagnosis, treatments, and ultimately successful DBS surgery at Stanford University Medical Center, CA, USA. Now nearly one year after his surgery, his practice continues to flourish and he encourages others in his profession to consider the possibility of DBS as a definitive treatment for tremors of the hand, which may salvage their practice. PMID:27909628

  8. Scientific and Ethical Issues Related to Deep Brain Stimulation for Disorders of Mood, Behavior and Thought

    PubMed Central

    Rabins, Peter; Appleby, Brian S.; Brandt, Jason; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Dunn, Laura B.; Gabriëls, Loes; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Haber, Suzanne N.; Holtzheimer, Paul E.; Mari, Zoltan; Mayberg, Helen S.; McCann, Evelyn; Mink, Sallie P; Rasmussen, Steven; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Vawter, Dorothy E.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Walkup, John; Mathews, Debra J. H.

    2009-01-01

    A two-day consensus conference was held in order to examine scientific and ethical issues in the application of deep brain stimulation in the treatment of mood and behavioral disorders such as major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome. The primary objectives of the conference were to 1) establish consensus among participants about the design of future clinical trials of DBS for disorders of mood, behavior and thought and 2) develop standards for the protection of human subjects participating in such studies. Conference participants identified 16 key points for guiding research in this growing field. PMID:19736349

  9. Predicting acute affective symptoms after deep brain stimulation surgery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Frank; Reske, Martina; Finkelmeyer, Andreas; Wojtecki, Lars; Timmermann, Lars; Brosig, Timo; Backes, Volker; Amir-Manavi, Atoosa; Sturm, Volker; Habel, Ute; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate predictive markers for acute symptoms of depression and mania following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery of the subthalamic nucleus for the treatment of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fourteen patients with PD (7 males) were included in a prospective longitudinal study. Neuropsychological tests, psychopathology scales and tests of motor functions were administered at several time points prior to and after neurosurgery. Pre-existing psychopathological and motor symptoms predicted postoperative affective side effects of DBS surgery. As these can easily be assessed, they should be considered along with other selection criteria for DBS surgery.

  10. Proceedings of the Second Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: What's in the Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Aysegul; Morita, Hokuto; Rossi, P. Justin; Allen, William L.; Alterman, Ron L.; Bronte-Stewart, Helen; Butson, Christopher R.; Charles, David; Deckers, Sjaak; de Hemptinne, Coralie; DeLong, Mahlon; Dougherty, Darin; Ellrich, Jens; Foote, Kelly D.; Giordano, James; Goodman, Wayne; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Greene, David; Gross, Robert; Judy, Jack W.; Karst, Edward; Kent, Alexander; Kopell, Brian; Lang, Anthony; Lozano, Andres; Lungu, Codrin; Lyons, Kelly E.; Machado, Andre; Martens, Hubert; McIntyre, Cameron; Min, Hoon-Ki; Neimat, Joseph; Ostrem, Jill; Pannu, Sat; Ponce, Francisco; Pouratian, Nader; Reymers, Donnie; Schrock, Lauren; Sheth, Sameer; Shih, Ludy; Stanslaski, Scott; Steinke, G. Karl; Stypulkowski, Paul; Tröster, Alexander I.; Verhagen, Leo; Walker, Harrison; Okun, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The proceedings of the 2nd Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank summarize the most contemporary clinical, electrophysiological, and computational work on DBS for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease and represent the insights of a unique multidisciplinary ensemble of expert neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, scientists, engineers and members of industry. Presentations and discussions covered a broad range of topics, including advocacy for DBS, improving clinical outcomes, innovations in computational models of DBS, understanding of the neurophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) and evolving sensor and device technologies. PMID:25526555

  11. Mapping the "Depression Switch" During Intraoperative Testing of Subcallosal Cingulate Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki Sueng; Riva-Posse, Patricio; Gross, Robert E; Mayberg, Helen S

    2015-11-01

    The clinical utility of monitoring behavioral changes during intraoperative testing of subcallosal cingulate deep brain stimulation is unknown. To characterize the structural connectivity correlates of deep brain stimulation-evoked behavioral effects using probabilistic tractography in depression. Categorization of acute behavioral effects was conducted in 9 adults undergoing deep brain stimulation implantation surgery for chronic treatment-resistant depression in a randomized and blinded testing session at Emory University. Patients were studied from September 1, 2011, through June 30, 2013. Post hoc analyses of the structural tractography patterns mediating distinct categories of evoked behavioral effects were defined, including the best response overall. Data analyses were performed from May 1 through July 1, 2015. Categorization of stimulation-induced transient behavioral effects and delineation of the shared white matter tracts mediating response subtypes. Among the 9 patients, 72 active and 36 sham trials were recorded. The following stereotypical behavior patterns were identified: changes in interoceptive (noted changes in body state in 30 of 72 active and 4 of 36 sham trials) and in exteroceptive (shift in attention from patient to others in 9 of 72 active and 0 sham trials) awareness. The best response was a combination of exteroceptive and interoceptive changes at a single left contact for all 9 patients. Structural connectivity showed that the best response contacts had a pattern of connections to the bilateral ventromedial frontal cortex (via forceps minor and left uncinate fasciculus) and to the cingulate cortex (via left cingulum bundle), whereas behaviorally salient but nonbest contacts had only cingulate involvement. The involvement of the 3 white matter bundles during stimulation of the best contacts suggests a mechanism for the observed transient "depression switch." This analysis of transient behavior changes during intraoperative deep brain

  12. Proceedings of the Second Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: What's in the Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Aysegul; Morita, Hokuto; Rossi, P Justin; Allen, William L; Alterman, Ron L; Bronte-Stewart, Helen; Butson, Christopher R; Charles, David; Deckers, Sjaak; de Hemptinne, Coralie; DeLong, Mahlon; Dougherty, Darin; Ellrich, Jens; Foote, Kelly D; Giordano, James; Goodman, Wayne; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Greene, David; Gross, Robert; Judy, Jack W; Karst, Edward; Kent, Alexander; Kopell, Brian; Lang, Anthony; Lozano, Andres; Lungu, Codrin; Lyons, Kelly E; Machado, Andre; Martens, Hubert; McIntyre, Cameron; Min, Hoon-Ki; Neimat, Joseph; Ostrem, Jill; Pannu, Sat; Ponce, Francisco; Pouratian, Nader; Reymers, Donnie; Schrock, Lauren; Sheth, Sameer; Shih, Ludy; Stanslaski, Scott; Steinke, G Karl; Stypulkowski, Paul; Tröster, Alexander I; Verhagen, Leo; Walker, Harrison; Okun, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    The proceedings of the 2nd Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank summarize the most contemporary clinical, electrophysiological, and computational work on DBS for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease and represent the insights of a unique multidisciplinary ensemble of expert neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, scientists, engineers and members of industry. Presentations and discussions covered a broad range of topics, including advocacy for DBS, improving clinical outcomes, innovations in computational models of DBS, understanding of the neurophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) and evolving sensor and device technologies.

  13. Mood Response to Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Meghan C.; Black, Kevin J.; Weaver, Patrick M.; Lugar, Heather M.; Videen, Tom O.; Tabbal, Samer D.; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Hershey, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) in Parkinson disease (PD) improves motor function but has variable effects on mood. Little is known about the relationship between electrode contact location and mood response. We identified the anatomical location of electrode contacts and measured mood response to stimulation with the Visual Analog Scale in 24 STN DBS PD patients. Participants reported greater positive mood, decreased anxiety and apathy with bilateral and unilateral stimulation. Left DBS improved mood more than right DBS. Right DBS-induced increase in positive mood was related to more medial and dorsal contact locations. These results highlight the functional heterogeneity of the STN. PMID:22450611

  14. Deep brain stimulation improves quality of life in pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Kiran P.; Hegde, Anaita U.; Doshi, Paresh K.

    2013-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an uncommon extrapyramidal movement disorder characterized by the progressive incapacitating dystonia. Medical management is often incapable of reversing the dystonic symptoms. In recent years, stereotactic procedure like deep brain stimulation has been found effective in resolving the disabling dystonia and improving the quality of life. There are few cases in the world literature highlighting the usefulness of this technique. We report a case of 10-year-old girl who underwent bilateral Globus pallidus internus stimulation for PKAN. PMID:23772245

  15. Deep brain stimulation improves quality of life in pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Kiran P; Hegde, Anaita U; Doshi, Paresh K

    2013-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an uncommon extrapyramidal movement disorder characterized by the progressive incapacitating dystonia. Medical management is often incapable of reversing the dystonic symptoms. In recent years, stereotactic procedure like deep brain stimulation has been found effective in resolving the disabling dystonia and improving the quality of life. There are few cases in the world literature highlighting the usefulness of this technique. We report a case of 10-year-old girl who underwent bilateral Globus pallidus internus stimulation for PKAN.

  16. Deep brain stimulation for medically refractory life-threatening status dystonicus in children.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Nahed, Brian V; Kahle, Kristopher T; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Sharma, Nutan; Eskandar, Emad N

    2012-01-01

    Generalized dystonic syndromes may escalate into persistent episodes of generalized dystonia known as status dystonicus that can be life-threatening due to dystonia-induced rhabdomyolysis and/or respiratory compromise. Treatment of these conditions usually entails parenteral infusion of antispasmodic agents and sedatives and occasionally necessitates a medically induced coma for symptom control. The authors report a series of 3 children who presented with medically intractable, life-threatening status dystonicus and were successfully treated with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation. Bilateral globus pallidus internus stimulation appears to be effective in the urgent treatment of medically refractory and life-threatening movement disorders.

  17. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens for the treatment of addiction.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulf J; Voges, Jürgen; Steiner, Johann; Galazky, Imke; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Möller, Michaela; Pisapia, Jared; Halpern, Casey; Caplan, Arthur; Bogerts, Bernhard; Kuhn, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Despite novel medications and other therapeutic strategies, addiction to psychotropic substances remains one of the most serious public health problems worldwide. In this review, beginning with an introduction of deep brain stimulation (DBS), we highlight the importance of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the context of the reward circuitry and addictive behavior. We will provide a short historic overview of other neurosurgical approaches to treat addiction and describe the experimental and preclinical data on DBS in addiction. Finally, we call attention to key ethical issues related to using DBS to treat addiction that are important for future research and the design of clinical trials.

  18. Inside tract: can deep brain stimulation survive its reputation for success?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    When she was 37, Clare developed a tremor down her left side. At 39, she was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and put on a series of medications. These helped for a time, but the effect didn't last. Within a few years, her tremors had grown so severe that Clare was dropping food at her waitressing job. She couldn't seat guests, and she burned herself when she tried to help out in the kitchen. Increasingly unable to support herself and at a loss for other options, Clare began to look into something called deep brain stimulation (DBS).

  19. Physical Therapy for a Patient with Essential Tremor and Prolonged Deep Brain Stimulation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ulanowski, Elizabeth A.; Danzl, Megan M.; Sims, Kara M.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a lack of evidence examining the role of physical therapy (PT) to address movement dysfunction for individuals with essential tremor (ET). Case Report A 61-year-old male with ET and prolonged bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) completed 14 sessions of outpatient PT that emphasized balance, functional movements, and proximal stability training with an integration of principles of body awareness training and visual motor coordination. Improvements were noted in all outcome measures. Discussion This report describes a novel PT approach that offers a promising means of improving functional mobility and balance while decreasing falls risk in patients with ET. PMID:28316875

  20. From psychosurgery to neuromodulation: deep brain stimulation for intractable Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Irene; Podoll, Klaus; Janouschek, Hildegard; Michel, Tanja M; Sheldrick, Abigail J; Schneider, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics. It is often associated with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, self-injurious behaviour and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In intractable patients, neuromodulation using deep brain stimulation (DBS) has widely replaced psychosurgery. Three different key structures are defined for DBS, the medial portion of the thalamus, the globus pallidus internus and the anterior limb of the internal capsule/nucleus accumbens. This is a comprehensive overview on the effect of DBS on motor and non-motor symptoms using different case series and two larger studies.

  1. High-voltage VIM Region Deep Brain Stimulation Mimicking Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Addie; Okun, Michael S.; Hess, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) for essential tremor (ET) can cause unwanted side effects. Case Report A patient with ET underwent unilateral dual-lead thalamic DBS. He later developed parkinsonism with atypical features and was diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy. During presentation for a second opinion, stimulation-induced side effects were suspected. Inactivation of DBS resolved atypical features and superimposed idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) was diagnosed. Discussion This case illustrates the importance of recognizing the possible influence of stimulation-induced side effects and discusses when to utilize dual-lead DBS for ET and the co-occurrence of ET and PD. PMID:28373925

  2. Deep brain stimulation and continuous dopaminergic stimulation in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Erik Ch

    2007-09-01

    Patients receiving oral levodopa, the standard treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), eventually develop motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. Treatment options for patients with these symptoms include high-frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) or continuous dopaminergic stimulation (CDS). STN-DBS is the prevalent surgical therapy for PD and has shown efficacy, but behavioural disorders, including cognitive problems, depression and suicidality have been reported. CDS can be achieved with oral dopamine agonists with a long half-life, transdermal or subcutaneous delivery of dopamine agonists, or intestinal levodopa infusion. Of these, duodenal levodopa infusion appears to be the most promising option in terms of both efficacy and safety.

  3. Patient Perspectives on Deep Brain Stimulation Clinical Research in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Heusinkveld, Lauren; Hacker, Mallory; Turchan, Maxim; Bollig, Madelyn; Tamargo, Christina; Fisher, William; McLaughlin, Lauren; Martig, Adria; Charles, David

    2017-01-01

    The FDA has approved a multicenter, double-blind, Phase III, pivotal trial testing deep brain stimulation (DBS) in 280 people with very early stage Parkinson's disease (PD; IDE#G050016). In partnership with The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, we conducted a survey to investigate motivating factors, barriers, and gender differences among potentially eligible patients for participation in a trial testing DBS in early PD compared to standard medical treatment. The majority of survey respondents (72%) indicated they would consider learning more about participating. Early PD patients are therefore likely to consider enrolling in trials of invasive therapies that may slow symptom progression and help future patients.

  4. Selectivity to Translational Egomotion in Human Brain Motion Areas

    PubMed Central

    Pitzalis, Sabrina; Sdoia, Stefano; Bultrini, Alessandro; Committeri, Giorgia; Di Russo, Francesco; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio; Galati, Gaspare

    2013-01-01

    The optic flow generated when a person moves through the environment can be locally decomposed into several basic components, including radial, circular, translational and spiral motion. Since their analysis plays an important part in the visual perception and control of locomotion and posture it is likely that some brain regions in the primate dorsal visual pathway are specialized to distinguish among them. The aim of this study is to explore the sensitivity to different types of egomotion-compatible visual stimulations in the human motion-sensitive regions of the brain. Event-related fMRI experiments, 3D motion and wide-field stimulation, functional localizers and brain mapping methods were used to study the sensitivity of six distinct motion areas (V6, MT, MST+, V3A, CSv and an Intra-Parietal Sulcus motion [IPSmot] region) to different types of optic flow stimuli. Results show that only areas V6, MST+ and IPSmot are specialized in distinguishing among the various types of flow patterns, with a high response for the translational flow which was maximum in V6 and IPSmot and less marked in MST+. Given that during egomotion the translational optic flow conveys differential information about the near and far external objects, areas V6 and IPSmot likely process visual egomotion signals to extract information about the relative distance of objects with respect to the observer. Since area V6 is also involved in distinguishing object-motion from self-motion, it could provide information about location in space of moving and static objects during self-motion, particularly in a dynamically unstable environment. PMID:23577096

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging and neuromodulation: DTI as key technology for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Coenen, Volker Arnd; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Allert, Niels; Mädler, Burkhard

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is more than just a useful adjunct to invasive techniques like optogenetics which recently have tremendously influenced our understanding of the mechanisms of deep brain stimulation (DBS). In combination with other technologies, DTI helps us to understand which parts of the brain tissue are connected to others and which ones are truly influenced with neuromodulation. The complex interaction of DBS with the surrounding tissues-scrutinized with DTI-allows to create testable hypotheses that can explain network interactions. Those interactions are vital for our understanding of the net effects of neuromodulation. This work naturally was first done in the field of movement disorder surgery, where a lot of experience regarding therapeutic effects and only a short latency between initiation of neuromodulation and alleviation of symptoms exist. This chapter shows the journey over the past 10 years with first applications in DBS toward current research in affect regulating network balances and their therapeutic alterations with the neuromodulation technology.

  6. Limbic, associative, and motor territories within the targets for deep brain stimulation: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Bova, Frank J; Foote, Kelly D; Rosado, Christian A; Kirsch-Darrow, Lindsey; Okun, Michael S

    2007-07-01

    The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) has recently been expanding for the treatment of many neurologic disorders such as Parkinson disease, dystonia, essential tremor, Tourette's syndrome, cluster headache, epilepsy, depression, and obsessive compulsive disorder. The target structures for DBS include specific segregated territories within limbic, associative, or motor regions of very small subnuclei. In this review, we summarize current clinical techniques for DBS, the cognitive/mood/motor outcomes, and the relevant neuroanatomy with respect to functional territories within specific brain targets. Future development of new techniques and technology that may include a more direct visualization of "motor" territories within target structures may prove useful for avoiding side effects that may result from stimulation of associative and limbic regions. Alternatively, newer procedures may choose and specifically target non-motor territories for chronic electrical stimulation.

  7. Bio-heat transfer model of deep brain stimulation-induced temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwassif, Maged M.; Kong, Qingjun; Vazquez, Maribel; Bikson, Marom

    2006-12-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of medically refractory movement disorders and other neurological and psychiatric conditions. Fundamental questions remain about the physiologic effects of DBS. Previous basic research studies have focused on the direct polarization of neuronal membranes by electrical stimulation. The goal of this paper is to provide information on the thermal effects of DBS using finite element models to investigate the magnitude and spatial distribution of DBS-induced temperature changes. The parameters investigated include stimulation waveform, lead selection, brain tissue electrical and thermal conductivities, blood perfusion, metabolic heat generation during the stimulation and lead thermal conductivity/heat dissipation through the electrode. Our results show that clinical DBS protocols will increase the temperature of surrounding tissue by up to 0.8 °C depending on stimulation/tissue parameters.

  8. Neuroplasticity-dependent and -independent mechanisms of chronic deep brain stimulation in stressed rats

    PubMed Central

    Bambico, F R; Bregman, T; Diwan, M; Li, J; Darvish-Ghane, S; Li, Z; Laver, B; Amorim, B O; Covolan, L; Nobrega, J N; Hamani, C

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) deep brain stimulation (DBS) improves depressive-like behaviour in rats via serotonergic and neurotrophic-related mechanisms. We hypothesise that, in addition to these substrates, DBS-induced increases in hippocampal neurogenesis may also be involved. Our results show that stress-induced behavioural deficits in the sucrose preference test, forced swim test, novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT) and elevated plus maze were countered by chronic vmPFC DBS. In addition, stressed rats receiving stimulation had significant increases in hippocampal neurogenesis, PFC and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. To block neurogenesis, stressed animals given DBS were injected with temozolomide. Such treatment reversed the anxiolytic-like effect of stimulation in the NSFT without significantly affecting performance in other behavioural tests. Taken together, our findings suggest that neuroplastic changes, including neurogenesis, may be involved in specific anxiolytic effects of DBS without affecting its general antidepressant-like response. PMID:26529427

  9. A Novel Human Body Area Network for Brain Diseases Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai; Xu, Tianlang

    2016-10-01

    Development of wireless sensor and mobile communication technology provide an unprecedented opportunity for realizing smart and interactive healthcare systems. Designing such systems aims to remotely monitor the health and diagnose the diseases for users. In this paper, we design a novel human body area network for brain diseases analysis, which is named BABDA. Considering the brain is one of the most complex organs in the human body, the BABDA system provides four function modules to ensure the high quality of the analysis result, which includes initial data collection, data correction, data transmission and comprehensive data analysis. The performance evaluation conducted in a realistic environment with several criteria shows the availability and practicability of the BABDA system.

  10. Deep brain stimulation mechanisms: the control of network activity via neurochemistry modulation.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Cameron C; Anderson, Ross W

    2016-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has revolutionized the clinical care of late-stage Parkinson's disease and shows promise for improving the treatment of intractable neuropsychiatric disorders. However, after over 25 years of clinical experience, numerous questions still remain on the neurophysiological basis for the therapeutic mechanisms of action. At their fundamental core, the general purpose of electrical stimulation therapies in the nervous system are to use the applied electric field to manipulate the opening and closing of voltage-gated sodium channels on neurons, generate stimulation induced action potentials, and subsequently, control the release of neurotransmitters in targeted pathways. Historically, DBS mechanisms research has focused on characterizing the effects of stimulation on neurons and the resulting impact on neuronal network activity. However, when electrodes are placed within the central nervous system, glia are also being directly (and indirectly) influenced by the stimulation. Mounting evidence shows that non-neuronal tissue can play an important role in modulating the neurochemistry changes induced by DBS. The goal of this review is to evaluate how DBS effects on both neuronal and non-neuronal tissue can potentially work together to suppress oscillatory activity (and/or information transfer) between brain regions. These resulting effects of ~ 100 Hz electrical stimulation help explain how DBS can disrupt pathological network activity in the brain and generate therapeutic effects in patients. Deep brain stimulation is an effective clinical technology, but detailed therapeutic mechanisms remain undefined. This review provides an overview of the leading hypotheses, which focus on stimulation-induced disruption of network oscillations and integrates possible roles for non-neuronal tissue in explaining the clinical response to therapeutic stimulation. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Society for

  11. Albumin outflow into deep cervical lymph from different regions of rabbit brain.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; DePasquale, M; Patlak, C S; Cserr, H F

    1991-10-01

    Dynamics and pathways of 125I-labeled albumin (RISA) outflow from brain to deep cervical lymph have been studied in anesthetized rabbits between 4 and 25 h after microinjection of 1 microliter RISA into the internal capsule or midbrain. Lymph from the jugular lymph trunks was collected for periods of 2-11 h. RISA was cleared from brain with half-times of disappearance from internal capsule and midbrain of 18.2 and 11.9 h, respectively. RISA was distributed in high concentration to subarachnoid arteries that supplied the tissue injection site; this was consistent with RISA drainage from brain via perivascular spaces. Outflow through lymph rose to a maximum value 15-20 h after tracer injection. Mean recovery of RISA from lymph over the 25-h collection period accounted for 22% of total loss from internal capsule and 18% from midbrain. This result compares with mean recoveries from caudate nucleus and cerebrospinal fluid of 47% and 30%, respectively [M.W.B. Bradbury, H.F. Cserr, and R.J. Westrop, Am. J. Physiol. 240 (Renal Fluid Electrolyte Physiol. 9): F329-F336, 1981]. These are minimal estimates of total outflow to lymph because of the 15- to 20-h delay in RISA passage from brain to lymph.

  12. Predicting the effects of deep brain stimulation with diffusion tensor based electric field models.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Cooper, Scott E; Henderson, Jaimie M; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2006-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of movement disorders, and has shown promising results for the treatment of a wide range of other neurological disorders. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of DBS or the volume of brain tissue affected by stimulation. We have developed methods that use anatomical and diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) data to predict the volume of tissue activated (VTA) during DBS. We co-register the imaging data with detailed finite element models of the brain and stimulating electrode to enable anatomically and electrically accurate predictions of the spread of stimulation. One critical component of the model is the DTI tensor field that is used to represent the 3-dimensionally anisotropic and inhomogeneous tissue conductivity. With this system we are able to fuse structural and functional information to study a relevant clinical problem: DBS of the subthalamic nucleus for the treatment of Parkinsons disease (PD). Our results show that inclusion of the tensor field in our model caused significant differences in the size and shape of the VTA when compared to a homogeneous, isotropic tissue volume. The magnitude of these differences was proportional to the stimulation voltage. Our model predictions are validated by comparing spread of predicted activation to observed effects of oculomotor nerve stimulation in a PD patient. In turn, the 3D tissue electrical properties of the brain play an important role in regulating the spread of neural activation generated by DBS.

  13. Optical coherence tomography and optical coherence domain reflectometry for deep brain stimulation probe guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Sung W.; Shure, Mark A.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Chahlavi, Ali; Hatoum, Nagi; Turbay, Massud; Rollins, Andrew M.; Rezai, Ali R.; Huang, David

    2005-04-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is FDA-approved for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. Currently, placement of DBS leads is guided through a combination of anatomical targeting and intraoperative microelectrode recordings. The physiological mapping process requires several hours, and each pass of the microelectrode into the brain increases the risk of hemorrhage. Optical Coherence Domain Reflectometry (OCDR) in combination with current methodologies could reduce surgical time and increase accuracy and safety by providing data on structures some distance ahead of the probe. For this preliminary study, we scanned a rat brain in vitro using polarization-insensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). For accurate measurement of intensity and attenuation, polarization effects arising from tissue birefringence are removed by polarization diversity detection. A fresh rat brain was sectioned along the coronal plane and immersed in a 5 mm cuvette with saline solution. OCT images from a 1294 nm light source showed depth profiles up to 2 mm. Light intensity and attenuation rate distinguished various tissue structures such as hippocampus, cortex, external capsule, internal capsule, and optic tract. Attenuation coefficient is determined by linear fitting of the single scattering regime in averaged A-scans where Beer"s law is applicable. Histology showed very good correlation with OCT images. From the preliminary study using OCT, we conclude that OCDR is a promising approach for guiding DBS probe placement.

  14. Mood stability in Parkinson disease following deep brain stimulation: a 6-month prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Amit; Abulseoud, Osama A; Sampson, Shirlene; Lee, Kendall H; Klassen, Bryan T; Fields, Julie A; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Adams, Andrea C; Stoppel, Cynthia J; Geske, Jennifer R; Frye, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease has been associated with psychiatric adverse effects including anxiety, depression, mania, psychosis, and suicide. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of deep brain stimulation in a large Parkinson disease clinical practice. Patients approved for surgery by the Mayo Clinic deep brain stimulation clinical committee participated in a 6-month prospective naturalistic follow-up study. In addition to the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, stability and psychiatric safety were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and Young Mania Rating scale. Outcomes were compared in patients with Parkinson disease who had a psychiatric history to those with no co-morbid psychiatric history. The study was completed by 49 of 54 patients. Statistically significant 6-month baseline to end-point improvement was found in motor and mood scales. No significant differences were found in psychiatric outcomes based on the presence or absence of psychiatric comorbidity. Our study suggests that patients with Parkinson disease who have a history of psychiatric co-morbidity can safely respond to deep brain stimulation with no greater risk of psychiatric adverse effect occurrence. A multidisciplinary team approach, including careful psychiatric screening ensuring mood stabilization and psychiatric follow-up, should be viewed as standard of care to optimize the psychiatric outcome in the course of deep brain stimulation treatment. © 2013 Published by The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine on behalf of The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine.

  15. Hemodynamic measurements in deep brain tissues of humans by near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Oda, Motoki; Yamaki, Etsuko; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Daisuke; Yoshimoto, Kenji; Homma, Shu; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    Using near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS), we measured the human head in transmittance mode to obtain the optical properties, tissue oxygenation, and hemodynamics of deep brain tissues in 50 healthy adult volunteers. The right ear canal was irradiated with 3-wavelengths of pulsed light (760, 795, and 835nm), and the photons passing through the human head were collected at the left ear canal. Optical signals with sufficient intensity could be obtained from 46 of the 50 volunteers. By analyzing the temporal profiles based on the photon diffusion theory, we successfully obtained absorption coefficients for each wavelength. The levels of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2), deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb), total hemoglobin (tHb), and tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) were then determined by referring to the hemoglobin spectroscopic data. Compared with the SO2 values for the forehead measurements in reflectance mode, the SO2 values of the transmittance measurements of the human head were approximately 10% lower, and tHb values of the transmittance measurements were always lower than those of the forehead reflectance measurements. Moreover, the level of hemoglobin and the SO2 were strongly correlated between the human head measurements in transmittance mode and the forehead measurements in the reflectance mode, respectively. These results demonstrated a potential application of this TRS system in examining deep brain tissues of humans.

  16. Subpectoral Implantation of Internal Pulse Generators for Deep Brain Stimulation: Technical Note for Improved Cosmetic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A; Lake, Wendell; Neimat, Joseph S

    2017-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation is increasingly used to treat a variety of disorders. As the prevalence of this technology increases, greater demands are placed on neurosurgical practitioners to improve cosmetic results, maximize patient comfort, and minimize complication rates. We have increasingly employed subpectoral implantation of internal pulse generators (IPGs) to improve patient satisfaction. To determine the complication rates of subpectorally placed IPGs as compared to those placed in a subcutaneous location. We reviewed a series of 301 patients from a single institution. Complication rates including infection, hematoma, and lead fracture were recorded. Rates were compared for subcutaneously and subpectorally located devices. Of the records reviewed, we found 301 patients who underwent 308 procedures for initial IPG implantation. Of these, 275 were subpectoral IPG implantation, 19 were infraclavicular subcutaneous implantation, and 14 were subcutaneous implantation in the abdomen. A total of 6 IPG pocket infections occurred, 2 subpectoral and 4 infraclavicular subcutaneous. Of the IPG infections, 2 of the infraclavicular subcutaneous devices had associated erosions. Two patients had their devices relocated from a subpectoral pocket to a subcutaneous pocket in the abdomen due to discomfort. Two patients in the subpectoral group suffered from hematoma requiring evacuation. Two patients in the infraclavicular subcutaneous group had lead fracture occur. Subpectoral implantation of deep brain stimulation IPGs is a viable alternative with a low complication rate. This technique may offer a lower rate of infection and wound erosion.

  17. Postmortem studies of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Gaddum Duemani; Lozano, Andres M

    2017-08-23

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS), arguably the greatest therapeutic advancement in the treatment of Parkinson's disease since dopamine replacement therapy, is now routinely used. While the exact mechanisms by which DBS works still remain unknown, over the past three decades since it was first described, we have gained significant insight into several of the processes involved. Though often overlooked in this regard, increasing numbers of postmortem and autopsy studies are contributing significantly to our understanding. In this manuscript, we review the literature involving the pathological findings from autopsies in patients who have undergone deep brain stimulation surgeries for Parkinson's disease. The major results show that multiple stereotactic targeting methods can be accurate at placing leads in the desired nuclei that help with clinically effective results, that perioperative complications and inaccurate diagnosis as determined by autopsy can lead to suboptimal stimulation effect and that the normal long-term effects of chronic stimulation include fibrosis around the electrodes and a mild immune response. In addition, recent results suggest mechanisms by which DBS might be effective in Parkinson's disease i.e., through rescuing pathological changes in microvasculature and by promoting the proliferation of neural progenitor cells.

  18. Programming Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease: The Toronto Western Hospital Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Picillo, Marina; Lozano, Andres M; Kou, Nancy; Puppi Munhoz, Renato; Fasano, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established and effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). After surgery, a number of extensive programming sessions are performed to define the most optimal stimulation parameters. Programming sessions mainly rely only on neurologist's experience. As a result, patients often undergo inconsistent and inefficient stimulation changes, as well as unnecessary visits. We reviewed the literature on initial and follow-up DBS programming procedures and integrated our current practice at Toronto Western Hospital (TWH) to develop standardized DBS programming protocols. We propose four algorithms including the initial programming and specific algorithms tailored to symptoms experienced by patients following DBS: speech disturbances, stimulation-induced dyskinesia and gait impairment. We conducted a literature search of PubMed from inception to July 2014 with the keywords "deep brain stimulation", "festination", "freezing", "initial programming", "Parkinson's disease", "postural instability", "speech disturbances", and "stimulation induced dyskinesia". Seventy papers were considered for this review. Based on the literature review and our experience at TWH, we refined four algorithms for: (1) the initial programming stage, and management of symptoms following DBS, particularly addressing (2) speech disturbances, (3) stimulation-induced dyskinesia, and (4) gait impairment. We propose four algorithms tailored to an individualized approach to managing symptoms associated with DBS and disease progression in patients with PD. We encourage established as well as new DBS centers to test the clinical usefulness of these algorithms in supplementing the current standards of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies of the neural mechanisms of deep brain stimulation in rodent models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jing-Yu; Shi, Li-Hong; Luo, Fei; Zhang, Wang-Ming; Woodward, Donald J

    2007-01-01

    Several rodent models of deep brain stimulation (DBS) have been developed in recent years. Electrophysiological and neurochemical studies have been performed to examine the mechanisms underlying the effects of DBS. In vitro studies have provided deep insights into the role of ion channels in response to brain stimulation. In vivo studies reveal neural responses in the context of intact neural circuits. Most importantly, recording of neural responses to behaviorally effective DBS in freely moving animals provides a direct means for examining how DBS modulates the basal ganglia thalamocortical circuits and thereby improves motor function. DBS can modulate firing rate, normalize irregular burst firing patterns and reduce low-frequency oscillations associated with the Parkinsonian state. Our current efforts are focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which DBS effects on neural circuitry improve motor performance. New behavioral models and improved recording techniques will aide researchers conducting future DBS studies in a variety of behavioral modalities and enable new treatment strategies to be explored, such as closed-loop stimulations based on real-time computation of ensemble neural activity.

  20. Studies of the neural mechanisms of deep brain stimulation in rodent models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jing-Yu; Shi, Li-Hong; Luo, Fei; Zhang, Wang-Ming; Woodward, Donald J

    2008-01-01

    Several rodent models of deep brain stimulation (DBS) have been developed in recent years. Electrophysiological and neurochemical studies have been performed to examine the mechanisms underlying the effects of DBS. In vitro studies have provided deep insights into the role of ion channels in response to brain stimulation. In vivo studies reveal neural responses in the context of intact neural circuits. Most importantly, recording of neural responses to behaviorally effective DBS in freely moving animals provides a direct means for examining how DBS modulates the basal ganglia thalamocortical circuits and thereby improves motor function. DBS can modulate firing rate, normalize irregular burst firing patterns and reduce low frequency oscillations associated with the Parkinsonian state. Our current efforts are focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which DBS effects on neural circuitry improve motor performance. New behavioral models and improved recording techniques will aide researchers conducting future DBS studies in a variety of behavioral modalities and enable new treatment strategies to be explored, such as closed-loop stimulations based on real time computation of ensemble neural activity.

  1. A Novel Lead Design for Modulation and Sensing of Deep Brain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Allison T.; Vetter, Rio J.; Hetke, Jamille F.; Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Kipke, Daryl R.; Pellinen, David S.; Anderson, David J.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Goal Develop and characterize the functionality of a novel thin-film probe technology with a higher density of electrode contacts than are currently available with commercial deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead technology. Such technology has potential to enhance the spatial precision of DBS and enable a more robust approach to sensing local field potential activity in the context of adaptive DBS strategies. Methods Thin-film planar arrays were microfabricated and then assembled on a cylindrical carrier to achieve a lead with 3D conformation. Using an integrated and removable stylet, the arrays were chronically implanted in the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus in two parkinsonian non-human primates. Results This study provides the first in vivo data from chronically implanted DBS arrays for translational non-human primate studies. Stimulation through the arrays induced a decrease in parkinsonian rigidity, and directing current around the lead showed an orientation dependency for eliciting motor capsule side effects. The array recordings also showed that oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia is heterogeneous at a smaller scale than detected by current DBS lead technology. Conclusion These 3D DBS arrays provide an enabling tool for future studies that seek to monitor and modulate deep brain activity through chronically implanted leads. Significance DBS lead technology with a higher density of electrode contacts have potential to enable sculpting DBS current flow and sensing biomarkers of disease and therapy. PMID:26529747

  2. Dynamics of scene representations in the human brain revealed by magnetoencephalography and deep neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Khosla, Aditya; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Oliva, Aude

    2017-01-01

    Human scene recognition is a rapid multistep process evolving over time from single scene image to spatial layout processing. We used multivariate pattern analyses on magnetoencephalography (MEG) data to unravel the time course of this cortical process. Following an early signal for lower-level visual analysis of single scenes at ~100 ms, we found a marker of real-world scene size, i.e. spatial layout processing, at ~250 ms indexing neural representations robust to changes in unrelated scene properties and viewing conditions. For a quantitative model of how scene size representations may arise in the brain, we compared MEG data to a deep neural network model trained on scene classification. Representations of scene size emerged intrinsically in the model, and resolved emerging neural scene size representation. Together our data provide a first description of an electrophysiological signal for layout processing in humans, and suggest that deep neural networks are a promising framework to investigate how spatial layout representations emerge in the human brain. PMID:27039703

  3. Restoring Conscious Arousal During Focal Limbic Seizures with Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kundishora, Adam J; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Ma, Chanthia; Liu, Mengran; McCafferty, Cian; Schiff, Nicholas D; Willie, Jon T; Gross, Robert E; Gerrard, Jason; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2016-03-03

    Impaired consciousness occurs suddenly and unpredictably in people with epilepsy, markedly worsening quality of life and increasing risk of mortality. Focal seizures with impaired consciousness are the most common form of epilepsy and are refractory to all current medical and surgical therapies in about one-sixth of cases. Restoring consciousness during and following seizures would be potentially transformative for these individuals. Here, we investigate deep brain stimulation to improve level of conscious arousal in a rat model of focal limbic seizures. We found that dual-site stimulation of the central lateral nucleus of the intralaminar thalamus (CL) and the pontine nucleus oralis (PnO) bilaterally during focal limbic seizures restored normal-appearing cortical electrophysiology and markedly improved behavioral arousal. In contrast, single-site bilateral stimulation of CL or PnO alone was insufficient to achieve the same result. These findings support the "network inhibition hypothesis" that focal limbic seizures impair consciousness through widespread inhibition of subcortical arousal. Driving subcortical arousal function would be a novel therapeutic approach to some forms of refractory epilepsy and may be compatible with devices already in use for responsive neurostimulation. Multisite deep brain stimulation of subcortical arousal structures may benefit not only patients with epilepsy but also those with other disorders of consciousness.

  4. Deep brain stimulation for treatment refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder--a case report.

    PubMed

    Csigó, Katalin; Dome, Lászó; Valálik, I; Harsányi, András; Demeter, Gyula; Racsmány, Mihály

    2010-03-30

    In the past 30 years it has been a great development in the unders-anding and therapy of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Adequate pharmaco- and cognitive-behavior therapies reduce the symptoms in 40-60% of patients, so a remarkable portion of patients still remains refractory to conventional treatment. Neurosurgery--with it's reversible and irreversible techniques--brought a breakthrough in the therapy of treatment refractory patients. In the present case, we represent a 3 months follow-up of an obsessive-compulsive pctient treated by deep brain stimulation. In our case, the stimulation target was the anterior limb of internal capsule. The clinical symptoms were measured by Y-BOCS. In addition various neuropsychological tests were used to monitor patient's executive functions before and 3 months after the deep brain stimulation. We found that obsessive-compu sive symptoms improved after three months of the stimulation. The neuropsychological tests showed improvement in some executive functions (e.g. fluency, set-shifting, decision making). On the other hand our results revealed severe neurocognitive--mainly attention skill--deficits in a treatment refractory obsessive-compulsive patient.

  5. Nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation in a rat model of binge eating.

    PubMed

    Doucette, W T; Khokhar, J Y; Green, A I

    2015-12-15

    Binge eating (BE) is a difficult-to-treat behavior with high relapse rates, thus complicating several disorders including obesity. In this study, we tested the effects of high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a rodent model of BE. We hypothesized that BE rats receiving high-frequency DBS in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core would have reduced binge sizes compared with sham stimulation in both a 'chronic BE' model as well as in a 'relapse to chronic BE' model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (N=18) were implanted with stimulating electrodes in bilateral NAc core, and they received either active stimulation (N=12) or sham stimulation (N=6) for the initial chronic BE experiments. After testing in the chronic BE state, rats did not engage in binge sessions for 1 month, and then resumed binge sessions (relapse to chronic BE) with active or sham stimulation (N=5-7 per group). A significant effect of intervention group was observed on binge size in the chronic BE state, but no significant difference between intervention groups was observed in the relapse to chronic BE experiments. This research, making use of both a chronic BE model as well as a relapse to chronic BE model, provides data supporting the hypothesis that DBS of the NAc core can decrease BE. Further research will be needed to learn how to increase the effect size and decrease deep brain stimulation-treatment outcome variability across the continuum of BE behavior.

  6. Dynamics of scene representations in the human brain revealed by magnetoencephalography and deep neural networks.

    PubMed

    Martin Cichy, Radoslaw; Khosla, Aditya; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Oliva, Aude

    2017-06-01

    Human scene recognition is a rapid multistep process evolving over time from single scene image to spatial layout processing. We used multivariate pattern analyses on magnetoencephalography (MEG) data to unravel the time course of this cortical process. Following an early signal for lower-level visual analysis of single scenes at ~100ms, we found a marker of real-world scene size, i.e. spatial layout processing, at ~250ms indexing neural representations robust to changes in unrelated scene properties and viewing conditions. For a quantitative model of how scene size representations may arise in the brain, we compared MEG data to a deep neural network model trained on scene classification. Representations of scene size emerged intrinsically in the model, and resolved emerging neural scene size representation. Together our data provide a first description of an electrophysiological signal for layout processing in humans, and suggest that deep neural networks are a promising framework to investigate how spatial layout representations emerge in the human brain. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of deep brain stimulation on the speech motor system.

    PubMed

    Mücke, Doris; Becker, Johannes; Barbe, Michael T; Meister, Ingo; Liebhart, Lena; Roettger, Timo B; Dembek, Till; Timmermann, Lars; Grice, Martine

    2014-08-01

    Chronic deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius is an effective treatment for individuals with medication-resistant essential tremor. However, these individuals report that stimulation has a deleterious effect on their speech. The present study investigates one important factor leading to these effects: the coordination of oral and glottal articulation. Sixteen native-speaking German adults with essential tremor, between 26 and 86 years old, with and without chronic deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius and 12 healthy, age-matched subjects were recorded performing a fast syllable repetition task (/papapa/, /tatata/, /kakaka/). Syllable duration and voicing-to-syllable ratio as well as parameters related directly to consonant production, voicing during constriction, and frication during constriction were measured. Voicing during constriction was greater in subjects with essential tremor than in controls, indicating a perseveration of voicing into the voiceless consonant. Stimulation led to fewer voiceless intervals (voicing-to-syllable ratio), indicating a reduced degree of glottal abduction during the entire syllable cycle. Stimulation also induced incomplete oral closures (frication during constriction), indicating imprecise oral articulation. The detrimental effect of stimulation on the speech motor system can be quantified using acoustic measures at the subsyllabic level.

  8. [Psychiatric symptoms of Parkinson's disease following deep brain stimulation surgery on the subthalamic nucleus].

    PubMed

    Salvador-Aguiar, C; Menéndez-Guisasola, L; Blázquez-Estrada, M; Fernández-González, F; Seijo-Fernández, F

    To review the increasing number of papers that report diverse neuropsy