Science.gov

Sample records for deep exclusive charged

  1. Deep Charging Evaluation of Satellite Power and Communication System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Chu, B.; Wong, F.; Gardiner, G.; Wright, K. H.; Phillips, B.

    2016-01-01

    Deep charging, in contrast to surface charging, focuses on electron penetration deep into insulating materials applied over conductors. A classic example of this scenario is an insulated wire. Deep charging can pose a threat to material integrity, and to sensitive electronics, when it gives rise to an electrostatic discharge or arc. With the advent of Electric Orbit Raising, which requires spiraling through Earth's radiation belts, satellites are subjected to high energy electron environments which they normally would not encounter. Beyond Earth orbit, missions to Jupiter and Saturn face deep charging concerns due to the high energy radiation environments. While predictions can be made about charging in insulating materials, it is difficult to extend those predictions to complicated geometries, such as the case of an insulating coating around a small wire, or a non-uniform silicone grouting on a bus bar. Therefore, to conclusively determine the susceptibility of a system to arcs from deep charging, experimental investigations must be carried out. This paper will describe the evaluation carried out by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center on subscale flight-like samples developed by Space Systems/Loral, LLC. Specifically, deep charging evaluations of solar array wire coupons, a photovoltaic cell coupon, and a coaxial microwave transmission cable, will be discussed. The results of each evaluation will be benchmarked against control sample tests, as well as typical power system levels, to show no significant deep charging threat existed for this set of samples under the conditions tested.

  2. Beam spin asymmetry in deep and exclusive pi0 electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    R. De Masi

    2007-12-07

    The beam spin asymmetry (BSA) in the exclusive reaction ep->ep pi0 was measured with the CEBAF 5.77 GeV polarized electron beam and Large Acceptance Spectrometer(CLAS). The xB, Q2, t and phi dependences of the pi0 BSA are presented in the deep inelastic regime. The asymmetries are fitted with a sin(phi) function and their amplitudes are extracted. Overall, they are of the order of 0.04 - 0.11 and roughly independent of t. This is the signature of a non-zero longitudinal-transverse interference. The implications concerning the applicability of a formalism based on generalized parton distributions, as well as the extension of a Regge formalism at high photon virtualities, are discussed.

  3. Deep Charging Evaluation of Satellite Power and Communication System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Chu, B.; Wong, F.; Gardiner, G.; Wright, K. H.; Phillips, B.

    2016-01-01

    A set of deep charging tests has been carried out by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center on subscale flight-like samples developed by Space Systems/Loral, LLC. The samples, which included solar array wire coupons, a photovoltaic cell coupon, and a coaxial microwave transmission cable, were placed in passive and active (powered) circuit configurations and exposed to electron radiation. The energy of the electron radiation was chosen to deeply penetrate insulating (dielectric) materials on each sample. Each circuit configuration was monitored to determine if potentially damaging electrostatic discharge events (arcs) were developed on the coupon as a result of deep charging. The motivation for the test, along with charging levels, experimental setup, sample details, and results will be discussed.

  4. Charge Transport and Structural Dynamics in Deep Eutectic Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosby, Tyler; Holt, Adam; Terheggen, Logan; Griffin, Philip; Benson, Roberto; Sangoro, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in a series of imidazole and carboxylic acid-based deep eutectic mixtures are investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is found that the extended hydrogen-bonded networks characteristic of imidazoles are broken down upon addition of carboxylic acids, resulting in an increase in dc conductivity of the mixtures. These results are discussed within the framework of recent theories of hydrogen bonding and proton transport.

  5. Size exclusion deep bed filtration: Experimental and modelling uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Badalyan, Alexander You, Zhenjiang; Aji, Kaiser; Bedrikovetsky, Pavel; Carageorgos, Themis; Zeinijahromi, Abbas

    2014-01-15

    A detailed uncertainty analysis associated with carboxyl-modified latex particle capture in glass bead-formed porous media enabled verification of the two theoretical stochastic models for prediction of particle retention due to size exclusion. At the beginning of this analysis it is established that size exclusion is a dominant particle capture mechanism in the present study: calculated significant repulsive Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential between latex particles and glass beads is an indication of their mutual repulsion, thus, fulfilling the necessary condition for size exclusion. Applying linear uncertainty propagation method in the form of truncated Taylor's series expansion, combined standard uncertainties (CSUs) in normalised suspended particle concentrations are calculated using CSUs in experimentally determined parameters such as: an inlet volumetric flowrate of suspension, particle number in suspensions, particle concentrations in inlet and outlet streams, particle and pore throat size distributions. Weathering of glass beads in high alkaline solutions does not appreciably change particle size distribution, and, therefore, is not considered as an additional contributor to the weighted mean particle radius and corresponded weighted mean standard deviation. Weighted mean particle radius and LogNormal mean pore throat radius are characterised by the highest CSUs among all experimental parameters translating to high CSU in the jamming ratio factor (dimensionless particle size). Normalised suspended particle concentrations calculated via two theoretical models are characterised by higher CSUs than those for experimental data. The model accounting the fraction of inaccessible flow as a function of latex particle radius excellently predicts normalised suspended particle concentrations for the whole range of jamming ratios. The presented uncertainty analysis can be also used for comparison of intra- and inter-laboratory particle size exclusion data.

  6. Imaging charge-coupled devices for deep-space surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streuber, D. W., Jr.; Bailis, E. I.

    1980-01-01

    The Ground-Based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance (GEODSS) system will employ a SIT vidicon camera to detect satellites. Imaging charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are being evaluated as a means to improve GEODSS capability. This paper presents performance models and uses them to evaluate currently available CCDs and to determine the characteristics of the ideal CCD array for GEODSS. The analysis includes an approach for determining the CCD pixel size which maximizes signal-to-noise ratio; this approach can be used in many applications. The impact of response nonuniformity and a simple compensation method are also discussed. The combination of a suitable CCD array, response nonuniformity compensation, and moving target indicator (MTI) processing is expected to substantially increase the detection and search rate capability of the GEODSS system.

  7. 26 CFR 48.4216(e)-1 - Exclusion of local advertising charges from sale price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... price. 48.4216(e)-1 Section 48.4216(e)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes § 48.4216(e)-1 Exclusion of local advertising charges from sale price. (a... by section 4216(e) and paragraph (c) of this section has application only if: (1) In the case...

  8. Electrostatic Exclusion of Neutral Solutes from Condensed DNA and Other Charged Phases

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Motivated by experiments on condensed DNA phases in binary mixtures of water and a low-dielectric solute, we develop a theory for the electrostatic contribution to solute exclusion from a highly charged phase, within the continuum approximation of the medium. Because the electric field is maximum at the surface of each ion, the electrostatic energy is dominated by the Born energy; interactions between charges are of secondary importance. Neglecting interactions and considering only the competition between the Born energy and the free energy of mixing, we predict that low dielectric solutes are excluded from condensed DNA phases in water-cosolvent mixtures. This suggests that the traditional continuum electrostatic approach of modeling binary mixtures with a uniform dielectric constant needs to be modified. The linking of solute exclusion to solute dielectric properties also suggests a mechanism for predicting the electrostatic contribution to preferential hydration of polar and charged surfaces. PMID:19619468

  9. Deep Dielectric Charging of Spacecraft Polymers by Energetic Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Nelson W.; Dennison, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of research in the field of spacecraft charging concentrates on electron charging effects with little discussion of charging by protons. For spacecraft orbiting in the traditional LEO and GEO environments this emphasis on electrons is appropriate since energetic electrons are the dominant species in those orbits. But for spacecraft in orbits within the inner radiation belts or for interplanetary and lunar space probes, proton charging (center dot) effects may also be of concern. To examine bulk spacecraft charging effects in these environments several typical highly insulating spacecraft polymers were exposed to energetic protons (center dot) with energies from 1 Me V to lO Me V to simulate protons from the solar wind and from solar energetic proton events. Results indicate that effects in proton charged dielectrics are distinctly different than those observed due to electron charging. In most cases, the positive surface potential continued to increase for periods on the order of minutes to a day, followed by long time scale decay at rates similar to those observed for electron charging. All samples charged to positive potentials with substantially lower magnitudes than for equivalent electron doses. Possible explanations for the different behavior of the measured surface potentials from proton irradiation are discussed; these are related to the evolving internal charge distribution from energy dependent electron and proton transport, electron emission, charge migration due to dark current and radiation induced conductivity, and electron capture by embedded protons.

  10. 76 FR 39790 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... GOA (76 FR 11111, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.82(d)(9)(i)(B), the Administrator... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Catcher Vessels in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY... the deep-water species fishery for catcher vessels subject to sideboard limits established under...

  11. 77 FR 46338 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... groundfish of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., July 1, 2012, through... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska... comprise the deep-water species fishery by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA)....

  12. Measurement of branching fractions and charge asymmetries for exclusive B decays to charmonium.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-04-15

    We report measurements of branching fractions and charge asymmetries of exclusive decays of neutral and charged B mesons into two-body final states containing a charmonium state and a light strange meson. The charmonium mesons considered are J/psi, psi(2S) and chi(c1), and the light meson is either K or K(*). We use a sample of about 124x10(6) BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  13. Exclusion of an Exotic Top Quark with -4/3 Electric Charge Using Soft Lepton Tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-06-01

    We present a measurement of the electric charge of the top quark using p{bar p} collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} at the CDF II detector. We reconstruct t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets final state and use kinematic information to determine which b-jet is associated with the leptonically- or hadronically-decaying t-quark. Soft lepton taggers are used to determine the b-jet flavor. Along with the charge of the W boson decay lepton, this information permits the reconstruction of the top quark's electric charge. Out of 45 reconstructed events with 2.4 {+-} 0.8 expected background events, 29 are reconstructed as tt with the standard model +2/3 charge, whereas 16 are reconstructed as t{bar t} with an exotic -4/3 charge. This is consistent with the standard model and excludes the exotic scenario at 95% confidence level. This is the strongest exclusion of the exotic charge scenario and the first to use soft leptons for this purpose.

  14. 26 CFR 48.4216(e)-3 - No exclusion or readjustment for other advertising charges or reimbursements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... advertising charges or reimbursements. 48.4216(e)-3 Section 48.4216(e)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Special Provisions Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes § 48.4216(e)-3 No exclusion...

  15. DSMC method consistent with the Pauli exclusion principle and comparison with deterministic solutions for charge transport in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Vittorio; Majorana, Armando; Coco, Marco

    2015-12-01

    A new algorithm for Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport in semiconductors is devised in order to properly deal with Pauli's exclusion principle in the degenerate case. Applications are presented in the case of monolayer graphene and comparisons with solutions of the Boltzmann equation obtained by using a discontinuous Galerkin method furnish a cross-validation of the proposed approach.

  16. Deep dielectric and surface charging of regolith in the Moon's permanently shadowed regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) can penetrate into the lunar regolith, causing deep dielectric (or subsurface) charging. The regolith discharges with a timescale that depends on temperature. In permanently shadowed regions (PSRs), for example, this timescale is ~20 days. To estimate the effects of subsurface charging, Jordan et al. [2014] created a data-driven, deep dielectric charging model. The model used GCR data from the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and SEP data from the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). Data-driven runs of the model indicated that GCRs create, throughout the top tens of centimeters of regolith, a persistent electric field of up to ~700 V/m. They also indicated that large SEP events could create episodic subsurface electric fields of ≥106 V/m, possibly inducing dielectric breakdown. Over time, such SEP events may drive "breakdown weathering," preferentially enhancing the fraction of fine and monomineralic grains within PSRs. This model assumed that no other charging processes exist, i.e., that the environment is a vacuum. Solar wind plasma, however, can enter PSRs and charge the regolith's surface, so we revise the model to include this charging. While it cannot simultaneously nullify or decrease all the subsurface electric fields found using the model's previous iteration, adding this process does change the depth profile and maxima of the electric fields. Using the data-driven results of the revised model, we estimate the subsurface electric fields due to the solar wind, GCRs, and SEPs. We also show how including solar wind charging affects the possibility of dielectric breakdown and the importance of breakdown weathering to the regolith in PSRs. Reference: Jordan, A. P., T. J. Stubbs, J. K. Wilson, N. A. Schwadron, H. E. Spence, and C. J. Joyce (2014), Deep dielectric charging of

  17. Charge substitution for a deep-pore residue reveals structural dynamics during BK channel gating.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xixi; Aldrich, Richard W

    2011-08-01

    The pore-lining amino acids of ion channel proteins reside on the interface between a polar (the pore) and a nonpolar environment (the rest of the protein). The structural dynamics of this region, which physically controls ionic flow, are essential components of channel gating. Using large-conductance, Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) (BK) channels, we devised a systematic charge-substitution method to probe conformational changes in the pore region during channel gating. We identified a deep-pore residue (314 in hSlo1) as a marker of structural dynamics. We manipulated the charge states of this residue by substituting amino acids with different valence and pKa, and by adjusting intracellular pH. We found that the charged states of the 314 residues stabilized an open state of the BK channel. With models based on known structures of related channels, we postulate a dynamic rearrangement of the deep-pore region during BK channel opening/closing, which involves a change of the degree of pore exposure for 314.

  18. Deep dielectric charging of the lunar regolith within permanently shadowed regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N.; Smith, S. S.; Spence, H.; Wilson, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) can penetrate within the lunar regolith, causing deep dielectric charging. The discharging timescale depends on the regolith's electrical conductivity and permittivity. In permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) near the lunar poles, this timescale is on the order of a lunation (~20 days). To estimate the resulting electric fields within the regolith, we develop a data-driven, one-dimensional, time-dependent model. For model inputs, we use GCR data from the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and SEP data from the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). We find that, during the recent solar minimum, GCRs create persistent electric fields up to 700 V/m. We also find that large SEP events create sporadic but strong fields (>10^6 V/m) that may induce dielectric breakdown. Meteoritic gardening limits the amount of time the regolith can spend close enough to the surface to be charged by SEPs, and we find that the gardened regolith within PSRs has likely experienced >10^6 breakdown-inducing events. Since dielectric breakdown typically creates cracks along the boundaries of changes in dielectric constant, we predict repeated breakdown to have fragmented a fraction of the regolith within PSRs into its mineralogical components.

  19. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  20. Exclusive Vector Meson Production and Deep Virtual Compton Scattering in Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cazaroto, E. R.; Navarra, F. S.; Carvalho, F.; Kugeratski, M. S.; Goncalves, V. P.

    2010-11-12

    We calculate the nuclear cross section for coherent and incoherent deep virtual Compton scattering as well as for coherent and incoherent vector meson production for the mesons J/{Psi}, {phi} and {rho} within the QCD color dipole picture, including saturation effects. Theoretical estimates for scattering on both light and heavy nuclei are given over a wide range of energy.

  1. Effect of body biasing on single-event induced charge collection in deep N-well technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Hu, Jian-Guo; Qin, Jun-Rui; Tan, Hong-Zhou

    2015-07-01

    As the device size decreases, the soft error induced by space ions is becoming a great concern for the reliability of integrated circuits (ICs). At present, the body biasing technique is widely used in highly scaled technologies. In the paper, using the three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation, we analyze the effect of the body biasing on the single-event charge collection in deep N-well technology. Our simulation results show that the body biasing mainly affects the behavior of the source, and the effect of body biasing on the charge collection for the nMOSFET and pMOSFET is quite different. For the nMOSFET, the RBB will increase the charge collection, while the FBB will reduce the charge collection. For the pMOSFET, the effect of RBB on the SET pulse width is small, while the FBB has an adverse effect. Moreover, the differenceof the effect of body biasing on the charge collection is compared in deep N-well and twin well.

  2. Deep exclusive {pi}{sup +} electroproduction off the proton at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kijun; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Laget, Jean; Adhikari, K P; Bennet, R P; Biselli, A S; Chandavar, S; MacGregor, I. J. D; Munoz Camacho, C; Anefalos-Pereira, S; Rimal, D; Tang, W

    2013-01-01

    The exclusive electroproduction of {pi}{sup +} above the resonance region was studied using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Laboratory by scattering a 6 GeV continuous electron beam off a hydrogen target. The large acceptance and good resolution of CLAS, together with the high luminosity, allowed us to measure the cross section for the {gamma}* p {yields} n {pi}{sup +} process in 140 (Q{sup 2}, x{sub B}, t) bins: 0.16

  3. Determination of phytate in high molecular weight, charged organic matrices by two-dimensional size exclusion-ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Kyle R; Slingsby, Rosanne; Bryant, Ray B

    2016-08-15

    A two-dimensional chromatography method for analyzing phytate or other ionic targets in matrices containing high molecular weight, charged organic species is described. Prior to quantification by anion exchange chromatography, the sample matrix was prepared by size exclusion chromatography, which removed the majority of the matrix. Quantification of phytate on the AS11-HC was sensitive (0.25µM, 0.17mg/l) and reproducible (4.6% RSD) allowing this method to provide baseline separation of phytate from a manure extract within 14min. The method is simple, requiring only sample filtering, reproducible (between-run variation 5% RSD) and linear from 0.38 to 76µM (0.25-50mg/l). The method is suitable for routine determination of phytate in high organic matrices such as manure extracts.

  4. Exclusive Photoproduction of Charged Pions in Hydrogen and Deuterium from 1 to 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lingyan Zhu

    2004-02-28

    The study of the transition region in the description of exclusive processes and hadron structure, from the nucleon-meson degrees of freedom in meson-exchange models at low energy to the quark-gluon degrees of freedom in pQCD at high energy, is essential for us to understand the strong interaction. The differential cross section measurements for exclusive reactions at fixed center-of-mass angles enable us to investigate the constituent counting rule, which explicitly connects the quark-gluon degrees of freedom to the energy dependence of differential cross sections. JLab Experiment E94-104 was carried out in Hall A with two high resolution spectrometers. It included the coincidence cross section measurement for the [gamma]n --> pi{sup -}[p] process with a deuterium target and the singles measurement for the [gamma]p --> pi{sup +}[n] process with a hydrogen target. The untagged real photons were generated by the electron beam impinging on a copper radiator. The photon energies ranged from 1.1 to 5.5 GeV, corresponding to the center-of-mass energies from 1.7 to 3.4 GeV. The pion center-of-mass angles were fixed at 50 deg, 70 deg, 90 deg, and also 100 deg, 110 deg at a few energies. The JLab E94-104 data presented in this thesis contain four interesting features. The data exhibit a global scaling behavior for both [pi]{sup -} and [pi]{sup +} photoproduction at high energies and high transverse momenta, consistent with the constituent counting rule and the existing [pi]{sup +} photoproduction data. This implies that the quark-gluon degrees of freedom start to play a role at this energy scale. The data suggests possible substructure of the scaling behavior, which might be oscillations around the scaling value. There are several possible mechanisms that can cause oscillations, for example the one associated with the generalized constituent counting rule involving quark orbital angular momentum. The data show an enhancement in the scaled cross section at center

  5. Ion exclusion and electrokinetic effects resulting from electro-osmotic flow of salt solutions in charged silica nanopores.

    PubMed

    Haria, Neil R; Lorenz, Christian D

    2012-05-01

    Silica nanopores are the focus of significant scientific interest due to their potential in a wide variety of applications including desalination membranes. In this paper, the results of extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the electro-osmotic flow of 0.5 M monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2)) ionic solutions through cylindrical charged silica nanopores are presented. The silica nanopores are produced such that they capture the experimentally observed interfacial properties. The results provide an atomistic description of the ion transport through pores of diameters of 1.5 nm, 2.0 nm, 2.5 nm and 3.0 nm. In doing so, the effect of pore size on ion pairing, ion hydration, and water orientation for each ionic solution was investigated. Also, the transport of the ions through the nanopores is studied, and it is found that in the monovalent solutions the Cl(-) ions are excluded from the nanopores of all sizes. Whereas in the divalent solutions, there is no such preferential exclusion of either ion. This is due to the fact that the interfacial charge is fully compensated for by the Ca(2+) ions while it is not the case for the Na(+) ions.

  6. Measurements of charged two-particle exclusive states in photon-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.P.

    1986-03-01

    A description is given of an experiment performed at the PEP electron-positron storage ring, using the DELCO detector, to measure the formation of charged particle pairs from interactions of pairs of virtual photons radiated from the colliding electron beams. The final states which are measured are electron-positron pairs, charged pion pairs, charged kaon pairs, and proton pairs. Electron-positron pairs are separated from other data by use of gas Cerenkov counters. The shapes of all kinematic distributions are found to agree with predictions of quantum electrodynamics. These data also are used as an accurate normalization for subtraction of the muon-pair background and for measurement of the cross sections of the three hadronic channels. Pion pairs are measured in the mass range from 0.6 to 2.0 GeV, where production of the f (1270) resonance is observed to interfere with significant continuum production. The continuum is well described by single-pion exchange, allowing a measurement of the f two-photon partial width of 3.47 +- 0.37 keV. No a priori assumption is made about the ratio of helicity amplitudes, and the phenomenological model used in fitting the data is constrained to satisfy elastic unitarity. If unitarity is not required, then the fitted partial width is a factor of 0.83 lower than the quoted value. The Q/sup 2/ dependence of the cross section is found to be consistent with predictions of the Generalized Vector Dominance Model. Kaon pairs and proton pairs are identified by time-of-flight measurements. Kaon pairs are measured in the mass range from 1.3 to 2.0 GeV, where production of the f' (1520) resonance is observed. The ratio of the f and f' two-photon partial widths is found to be consistent with SU(3) quark model predictions with a mixing angle of 28 +- 4 degrees. Twenty-three proton pairs are observed.

  7. Ultrafast Charge Transfer of a Valence Double Hole in Glycine Driven Exclusively by Nuclear Motion.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol; Santra, Robin

    2015-10-01

    We explore theoretically the ultrafast transfer of a double electron hole between the functional groups of glycine after K-shell ionization and subsequent Auger decay. Although a large energy gap of about 15 eV initially exists between the two electronic states involved and coherent electronic dynamics play no role in the hole transfer, we find that the double hole is transferred within 3 to 4 fs between both functional ends of the glycine molecule driven solely by specific nuclear displacements and non-Born-Oppenheimer effects. The nuclear displacements along specific vibrational modes are of the order of 15% of a typical chemical bond between carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms and about 30% for bonds involving hydrogen atoms. The time required for the hole transfer corresponds to less than half a vibrational period of the involved nuclear modes. This finding challenges the common wisdom that nuclear dynamics of the molecular skeleton are unimportant for charge transfer processes at the few-femtosecond time scale and shows that they can even play a prominent role. It also indicates that in x-ray imaging experiments, in which ionization is unavoidable, valence electron redistribution caused by nuclear dynamics might be much faster than previously anticipated. Thus, non-Born-Oppenheimer effects may affect the apparent electron densities extracted from such measurements.

  8. Ultrafast Charge Transfer of a Valence Double Hole in Glycine Driven Exclusively by Nuclear Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol; Santra, Robin

    2015-10-01

    We explore theoretically the ultrafast transfer of a double electron hole between the functional groups of glycine after K -shell ionization and subsequent Auger decay. Although a large energy gap of about 15 eV initially exists between the two electronic states involved and coherent electronic dynamics play no role in the hole transfer, we find that the double hole is transferred within 3 to 4 fs between both functional ends of the glycine molecule driven solely by specific nuclear displacements and non-Born-Oppenheimer effects. The nuclear displacements along specific vibrational modes are of the order of 15% of a typical chemical bond between carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms and about 30% for bonds involving hydrogen atoms. The time required for the hole transfer corresponds to less than half a vibrational period of the involved nuclear modes. This finding challenges the common wisdom that nuclear dynamics of the molecular skeleton are unimportant for charge transfer processes at the few-femtosecond time scale and shows that they can even play a prominent role. It also indicates that in x-ray imaging experiments, in which ionization is unavoidable, valence electron redistribution caused by nuclear dynamics might be much faster than previously anticipated. Thus, non-Born-Oppenheimer effects may affect the apparent electron densities extracted from such measurements.

  9. Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetisyan, E.; Belostotski, S.; Blok, H. P.; Borissov, A.; Bowles, J.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capiluppi, M.; Cisbani, E.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Deconinck, W.; De Leo, R.; De Nardo, L.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Fantoni, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Giordano, F.; Gliske, S.; Golembiovskaya, M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Imazu, Y.; Ivanilov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Kaiser, R.; Karyan, G.; Keri, T.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Kravchenko, P.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; López Ruiz, A.; Lorenzon, W.; Ma, B.-Q.; Mahon, D.; Makins, N. C. R.; Manaenkov, S. I.; Manfré, L.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Marukyan, H.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Movsisyan, A.; Murray, M.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrosyan, A.; Raithel, M.; Reimer, P. E.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanftl, F.; Schäfer, A.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seitz, B.; Shibata, T.-A.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Terkulov, A.; Truty, R. M.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, S.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Yu, W.; Zagrebelnyy, V.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2013-01-01

    The azimuthal cos⁡ϕ and cos⁡2ϕ modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the HERMES experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

  10. Measurements of charge diffusion in deep-depletion CCDs by optical diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Cease, H.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Scarpine, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The charge diffusion is measured in back illuminated, fully depleted, 250 {micro}m thick CCDs by imaging the diffraction pattern of a double slit. The CCDs studied are the focal plane detectors for the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) instrument currently under construction for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The results presented here indicate that the dispersion of charge due to diffusion can be kept below the DES specification ({sigma}{sub d} < 7.0 {micro}m).

  11. 75 FR 38937 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec. 679.82(d)(9)(i)(B), the Administrator... comprise the deep-water species fishery for the sideboard limit include deep-water flatfish, rex sole,...

  12. Nonequilibrium population of charge carriers in structures with InGaN deep quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Sizov, D. S. Zavarin, E. E.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Lundin, V. V.; Musikhin, Yu. G.; Sizov, V. S.; Suris, R. A.; Tsatsul'nikov, A. F.

    2007-05-15

    Electronic and optical properties of ensembles of quantum dots with various energies of activation from the ground-state level to the continuous-spectrum region were studied theoretically and experimentally with the InGaN quantum dots as an example. It is shown that, depending on the activation energy, both the quasi-equilibrium statistic of charge carriers at the levels of quantum dots and nonequilibrium statistic at room temperature are possible. In the latter case, the position of the maximum in the emission spectrum is governed by the value of the demarcation transition: the quantum dots with the transition energy higher than this value feature the quasi-equilibrium population of charge carriers, while the quantum dots with the transition energy lower than the demarcation-transition energy feature the nonequilibrium population. A model based on kinetic equations was used in the theoretical analysis. The key parameters determining the statistic are the parameters of thermal ejection of charge carriers; these parameters depend exponentially on the activation energy. It is shown experimentally that the use of stimulated phase decomposition makes it possible to appreciably increase the activation energy. In this case, the thermal-activation time is found to be much longer than the recombination time for an electron-hole pair, which suppresses the redistribution of charge carriers between the quantum dots and gives rise to the nonequilibrium population. The effect of nonequilibrium population on the luminescent properties of the structures with quantum dots is studied in detail.

  13. Theoretical evidence of charge transfer interaction between SO₂ and deep eutectic solvents formed by choline chloride and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongping; Chang, Yonghui; Zhu, Wenshuai; Wang, Changwei; Wang, Chao; Yin, Sheng; Zhang, Ming; Li, Huaming

    2015-11-21

    The nature of the interaction between deep eutectic solvents (DESs), formed by ChCl and glycerol, and SO2 has been systematically investigated using the M06-2X density functional combined with cluster models. Block-localized wave function energy decomposition (BLW-ED) analysis shows that the interaction between SO2 and DESs is dominated by a charge transfer interaction. After this interaction, the SO2 molecule becomes negatively charged, whereas the ChCl-glycerol molecule is positively charged, which is the result of Lewis acid-base interaction. The current result affords a theoretical proof that it is highly useful and efficient to manipulate the Lewis acidity of absorbents for SO2 capture. Moreover, hydrogen bonding as well as electrostatic interactions may also contribute to the stability of the complex. Structure analysis shows that solvent molecules will adjust their geometries to interact with SO2. In addition, the structure of SO2 is barely changed after interaction. The interaction energy between different cluster models and SO2 ranges from -6.8 to -14.4 kcal mol(-1). It is found that the interaction energy is very sensitive to the solvent structure. The moderate interaction between ChCl-glycerol and SO2 is consistent with the concept that highly efficient solvents for SO2 absorption should not only be solvable but also regenerable.

  14. Elimination of deep surface traps in charged colloidal PbS and CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznyy, Oleksandr; Thon, Susanna; Ip, Alex; Sargent, Edward

    2013-03-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer a promising path towards high efficiency, scalable, solution and room processed photovoltaics and electronics. Their promise is curtailed today by difficulty of doping, inefficient transport, nonradiative recombination, and blinking, all generally attributed to electronic trap formation. Using first-principles simulations on off-stoichiometric colloidal quantum dots, we show that preparing a CQD free of traps is possible. However, self-compensating defects can form deep electronic trap states in response to charging or doping even in the most idealized CQDs. Surface traps arise from atomic dimers whose energy levels reside within the bandgap. The same states can also form upon photoexcitation, providing an atomistic mechanism for blinking. We show that avoiding the trap formation upon doping is possible by incorporation of select cations on the surface which shift the dimer energy levels above the quantum-confined bandedge.

  15. Charge and Nuclear Dynamics Induced by Deep Inner-Shell Multiphoton Ionization of CH3I Molecules by Intense X-ray Free-Electron Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Koji; Kukk, Edwin; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Wada, Shin-ichi; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Ohmura, Satoshi; Mondal, Subhendu; Tachibana, Tetsuya; Ito, Yuta; Koga, Ryosuke; Sakai, Tsukasa; Matsunami, Kenji; Rudenko, Artem; Nicolas, Christophe; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Miron, Catalin; Zhang, Yizhu; Jiang, Yuhai; Chen, Jianhui; Anand, Mailam; Kim, Dong Eon; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Yao, Makoto; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, free-electron lasers operating in the true X-ray regime have opened up access to the femtosecond-scale dynamics induced by deep inner-shell ionization. We have investigated charge creation and transfer dynamics in the context of molecular Coulomb explosion of a single molecule, exposed to sequential deep inner-shell ionization within an ultrashort (10 fs) X-ray pulse. The target molecule was CH3I, methane sensitized to X-rays by halogenization with a heavy element, iodine. Time-of-flight ion spectroscopy and coincident ion analysis was employed to investigate, via the properties of the atomic fragments, single-molecule charge states of up to +22. Experimental findings have been compared with a parametric model of simultaneous Coulomb explosion and charge transfer in the molecule. The study demonstrates that including realistic charge dynamics is imperative when molecular Coulomb explosion experiments using short-pulse facilities are performed.

  16. Determination of phytate in high molecular weight, charged organic matrices by two-dimensional size exclusion-ion chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-dimensional chromatography method for analyzing anionic targets (specifically phytate) in complex matrices is described. Prior to quantification by anion exchange chromatography, the sample matrix was prepared by size exclusion chromatography, which removed the majority of matrix complexities....

  17. 75 FR 23189 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., April 1, 2010, through 1200..., deep-water flatfish, rex sole, and arrowtooth flounder. This closure does not apply to fishing...

  18. 75 FR 38939 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ...(d), the final 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12... deep-water flatfish, rex sole, and arrowtooth flounder. After the effective date of this closure...

  19. Exclusion of exotic top-like quarks with -4/3 electric charge using jet-charge tagging in single-lepton tt¯ events at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucà, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-08-01

    We report on a measurement of the top-quark electric charge in tt¯ events in which one W boson originating from the top-quark pair decays into leptons and the other into hadrons. The event sample was collected by the CDF II detector in s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions and corresponds to 5.6fb-1. We find the data to be consistent with the standard model and exclude the existence of an exotic quark with -4/3 electric charge and mass of the conventional top quark at the 99% confidence level.

  20. Measurement of the cross-section ratio σψ(2S)/σJ/ψ(1S) in deep inelastic exclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    The exclusive deep inelastic electroproduction of ψ (2 S) and J / ψ (1 S) at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 317 GeV has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the kinematic range 2 exclusive vector-meson production.

  1. Measurement of “pretzelosity” asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized He3 target

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Huang, J.; Katich, J.; Wang, Y.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; et al

    2014-11-24

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized ³He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16 < x < 0.35 and 1.4 < Q² < 2.7 GeV². Our results show that both π± on 3He and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  2. Algorithms for minimization of charge sharing effects in a hybrid pixel detector taking into account hardware limitations in deep submicron technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, P.; Baumbaugh, A.; Deptuch, G.; Grybos, P.; Szczygiel, R.

    2012-12-01

    Charge sharing is the main limitation of pixel detectors used in spectroscopic applications, noting that this applies to both time and amplitude/energy spectroscopy. Even though, charge sharing was the subject of many studies, there is still no ultimate solution which could be implemented in the hardware to suppress the negative effects of charge sharing. This is mainly because of strong demand on low power dissipation and small silicon area of a single pixel. The first solution of this problem was proposed by CERN and consequently it was implemented in the Medipix III chip. However, due to pixel-to-pixel threshold dispersions and some imperfections of the simplified algorithm, the hit allocation was not functioning properly. We are presenting novel algorithms which allow proper hit allocation even at the presence of charge sharing. They can be implemented in an integrated circuit using a deep submicron technology. In performed simulations, we assumed not only diffusive charge spread occurring in the course of charge drifting towards the electrodes but also limitations in the readout electronics, i.e. signal fluctuations due to noise and mismatch (gain and offsets). The simulations show that using, for example, a silicon pixel detector in the low X-ray energy range, we have been able to perform proper hit position identification and use the information from summing inter-pixel nodes for spectroscopy measurements.

  3. A new hydrogeological model of charging shallow and deep aquifers in the Lake Neusiedl - Seewinkel region (Northern Burgenland, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, Hermann; Müllegger, Christian; Körner, Wilfried; Ottner, Franz; Prohaska, Thomas; Irrgeher, Johanna; Tchaikovsky, Anastassiya; Dober, Gregor; Gritzmann, Romana; Mykhaylyuk, Ivanna

    2014-05-01

    .5‰ in the catchment of Lake Neusiedl are characteristic for waters derived from the cooler period of the Pleistocene (Rank et al., 1982), we conclude that groundwater of the deepest aquifer of the Seewinkel is not of Badenian to Sarmatian age but only several tens of thousands of years old. The artesian wells of the Seewinkel region drilled down to several hundreds of metres yielded groundwater with oxygen isotope ratio-values ranging between -11.90‰ and -10.83‰, values fitting well to waters of Pleistocene age of that region. Since wells discharging the Leitha Mountains also revealed oxygen isotope ratio-values varying from -11.10‰ to -10.22‰, we conclude that the mountain chains surrounding Lake Neusiedl basically charged both shallow and deeper aquifers of the Seewinkel. From oxygen isotope ratios of these groundwater bodies we therefore conclude that first the majority of aquifers of the Lake Neusiedl region was charged from the surrounding mountain chains, and second that salinity of soils in the Seewinkel region cannot be derived from up welling connate water, as has been proofed for Lake Kelemenszék area south of Budapest (Simon et al., 2011). There is no doubt on the fact, however, that differing amounts of free carbon dioxide in several aquifers of the Seewinkel region originate from deep-seated post volcanic activity in this region. Häusler, H. (2010)(ed.): Geologische Karte der Republik Österreich 1:50.000, Erläuterungen zur Geologischen Karte 78 Rust.- 191 S., 65 Abb., 5 Tab., 2 Taf., (Geologische Bundesanstalt), Wien. Rank, D., Rajner, V., Staudner, F. and Papesch, W. (1982): Zur Altersdatierung der Grundwässer am Ostufer des Neusiedlersees.- BFB-Bericht, 43, 197-204, 2 Abb., (Biologisches Forschungsinstitut für Burgenland), Illmitz. Simon, S., Mádl-Szőnyi, J., Müller, I. and Pogácsás, G. (2011): Conceptual model for surface salinization in an overpressured and a superimposed gravity-flow field, Lake Kelemenszék area, Hungary

  4. Modulating the generation of long-lived charge separated states exclusively from the triplet excited states in palladium porphyrin-fullerene conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O. Obondi, Christopher; Lim, Gary N.; Churchill, Brittani; Poddutoori, Prashanth K.; van der Est, Art; D'Souza, Francis

    2016-04-01

    This study demonstrates molecular engineering of a series of donor-acceptor systems to allow control of the lifetime and initial spin multiplicity of the charge-separated state. By tuning the rate of intersystem crossing (ISC) and the donor-acceptor distance, electron transfer can be made to occur exclusively from the triplet excited state of the electron donor resulting in long-lived charge separation. To achieve this, three new palladium porphyrin-fullerene donor-acceptor systems were synthesized. The heavy Pd atom enhances the rate of ISC in the porphyrin and the rates of electron and energy transfer are modulated by varying the redox potential of the porphyrin and the porphyrin-fullerene distance. In the case of the meso-tris(tolyl)porphyrinato palladium(ii)-fulleropyrrolidine, the donor-acceptor distance is relatively long (13.1 Å) and the driving force for electron transfer is low. As a result, excitation of the porphyrin leads to rapid ISC followed by triplet-triplet energy transfer to fullerene. When the fullerene is bound directly to the porphyrin shortening the donor-acceptor distance to 2.6 Å electron transfer from the singlet excited palladium porphyrin leading to the generation of a short-lived charge separated state is the main process. Finally, when the palladium porphyrin is substituted with three electron rich triphenylamine entities, the lower oxidation potential of the porphyrin and appropriate donor-acceptor distance (~13 Å), lead to electron transfer exclusively from the triplet excited state of palladium porphyrin with high quantum yield. The results show that when electron transfer occurs from the triplet state, its increased lifetime allows the distance between the donor and acceptor to be increased which results in a longer lifetime for the charge separated state.This study demonstrates molecular engineering of a series of donor-acceptor systems to allow control of the lifetime and initial spin multiplicity of the charge-separated state

  5. Safe Exclusion of Deep Vein Thrombosis by a Rapid Sensitive ELISA D-dimer and Compression Ultrasonography in 1330 Outpatients With Suspected DVT.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Jan Jacques; Maasland, Hanny; Moossdorff, Wim; Lao, Mildred; Gadiseur, Alain; Schroyens, Wilfried

    2016-09-01

    Of 1330 outpatients with suspected deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a normal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) d-dimer (VIDAS) of <500 ng/mL was true negative in 382 of 384 and false negative in compression ultrasonography (CUS) in 2, indicating a sensitivity of 99.52% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.48%, with a specificity of 36% irrespective of clinical score. In 1059 outpatients with no DVT, the CUS was positive for the alternative diagnoses (AD): Bakers cyst, muscle hematoma, or old DVT in 62 (5.8%); superficial vein thrombosis without DVT in 78 (7.4%), and leg edema or varices in 17%. A second CUS in 641 patients was positive in 26 (4.0%), indicating an NPV of 96% after a first negative CUS. The NPV of the combination of a negative first CUS and a ELISA d-dimer test <1000 ng/mL was 99.1% at a specificity of 66.9%. As this strategy is cost effective by reduction in the need to repeat CUS by 67%, we designed a novel algorithm for the safe exclusion and diagnosis of DVT and AD for subsequent evaluation in a large prospective study.

  6. Exclusive Muon-Neutrino Charged Current Muon Plus Any Number of Protons Topologies In ArgoNeuT

    SciTech Connect

    Partyka, Kinga Anna

    2013-01-01

    Neutrinos remain among the least understood fundamental particles even after decades of study. As we enter the precision era o f neutrino measurements bigger and more sophisticated detectors have emerged. The leading candidate among them is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC ) detector technology due to its bubble-like chamber imaging, superb background rejection and scalability. I t is a perfect candidate that w ill aim to answer the remaining questions of the nature o f neutrino and perhaps our existence. Studying neutrinos with a detector that employs detection via beautiful images o f neutrino interactions can be both illuminating and surprising. The analysis presented here takes the full advantage of the LArTPC power by exploiting the first topological analysis of charged current muon neutrino p + N p , muon and any number of protons, interactions with the ArgoNeuT LArTPC experiment on an argon target. The results presented here are the first that address the proton multiplicity at the vertex and the proton kinematics. This study also addresses the importance o f nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. Furthermore, the developed here reconstruction techniques present a significant step forward for this technology and can be employed in the future LArTPC detectors.

  7. Simultaneous analysis of silicon and boron dissolved in water by combination of electrodialytic salt removal and ion-exclusion chromatography with corona charged aerosol detection.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Sagara, Katsuya; Arai, Kaori; Nakatani, Nobutake; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Kozaki, Daisuke; Sugo, Yumi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Ishioka, Noriko S; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-29

    Selective separation and sensitive detection of dissolved silicon and boron (DSi and DB) in aqueous solution was achieved by combining an electrodialytic ion isolation device (EID) as a salt remover, an ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) column, and a corona charged aerosol detector (CCAD) in sequence. DSi and DB were separated by IEC on the H(+)-form of a cation exchange resin column using pure water eluent. DSi and DB were detected after IEC separation by the CCAD with much greater sensitivity than by conductimetric detection. The five-channel EID, which consisted of anion and cation acceptors, cathode and anode isolators, and a sample channel, removed salt from the sample prior to the IEC-CCAD. DSi and DB were scarcely attracted to the anion accepter in the EID and passed almost quantitatively through the sample channel. Thus, the coupled EID-IEC-CCAD device can isolate DSi and DB from artificial seawater and hot spring water by efficiently removing high concentrations of Cl(-) and SO4(2-) (e.g., 98% and 80% at 0.10molL(-1) each, respectively). The detection limits at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 0.52μmolL(-1) for DSi and 7.1μmolL(-1) for DB. The relative standard deviations (RSD, n=5) of peak areas were 0.12% for DSi and 4.3% for DB. PMID:26755416

  8. Simultaneous analysis of silicon and boron dissolved in water by combination of electrodialytic salt removal and ion-exclusion chromatography with corona charged aerosol detection.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Sagara, Katsuya; Arai, Kaori; Nakatani, Nobutake; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Kozaki, Daisuke; Sugo, Yumi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Ishioka, Noriko S; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-29

    Selective separation and sensitive detection of dissolved silicon and boron (DSi and DB) in aqueous solution was achieved by combining an electrodialytic ion isolation device (EID) as a salt remover, an ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) column, and a corona charged aerosol detector (CCAD) in sequence. DSi and DB were separated by IEC on the H(+)-form of a cation exchange resin column using pure water eluent. DSi and DB were detected after IEC separation by the CCAD with much greater sensitivity than by conductimetric detection. The five-channel EID, which consisted of anion and cation acceptors, cathode and anode isolators, and a sample channel, removed salt from the sample prior to the IEC-CCAD. DSi and DB were scarcely attracted to the anion accepter in the EID and passed almost quantitatively through the sample channel. Thus, the coupled EID-IEC-CCAD device can isolate DSi and DB from artificial seawater and hot spring water by efficiently removing high concentrations of Cl(-) and SO4(2-) (e.g., 98% and 80% at 0.10molL(-1) each, respectively). The detection limits at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 0.52μmolL(-1) for DSi and 7.1μmolL(-1) for DB. The relative standard deviations (RSD, n=5) of peak areas were 0.12% for DSi and 4.3% for DB.

  9. Distributions of charged hadrons observed in deep-inelastic muon-deuterium scattering at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1991-11-01

    Longitudinal and transverse momentum spectra of final state hadrons produced in deep-inelastic muon-deuterium scattering at incident muon energy of 490 GeV have been measured up to a hadronic center of mass energy of 30 GeV. The longitudinal distributions agree well with data from earlier muon-nucleon scattering experiments; these distributions tend to increase in steepness as the center of mass energy increases. Comparisons with e+e- data at comparable center of mass energies indicate slight differences. The transverse momentum distributions show an increase in mean pT2 with an increase in the center of mass energy.

  10. Measurement of charged and neutral current {ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital p} deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high {ital Q}{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R.L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.; Katz, U.F.; Mari, S.M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, C.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G.P.; Heath, H.F.; Llewellyn, T.J.; Morgado, C.J.S.; Norman, D.J.P.; O`Mara, J.A.; Tapper, R.J.; Wilson, S.S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R.R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J.A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P.B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jelen, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Kotanski, A.; Przybycien, M.; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J.K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasinski, M.; Gilkinson, D.J.; Glasman, C.; Goettlicher, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hessling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Koepke, L.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Loehr, B.; Loewe, M.; Lueke, D.; Manczak, O.; Ng, J.S.T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.

    1995-08-07

    Deep inelastic {ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital p} scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared {ital Q}{sup 2} above 400GeV{sup 2} using the ZEUS detector at the HERA {ital ep} collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections {ital d}{sigma}/{ital dQ}{sup 2} are presented. From the {ital Q}{sup 2} dependence of the CC cross section, the mass term in the CC propagator is determined to be {ital M}{sub {ital W}}=76{plus_minus}16{plus_minus}13 GeV.

  11. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He3 target

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Y. X.; Wang, Y.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; et al

    2014-11-03

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1 < xbj<0.4 for K+ and K– production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for K+ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for K– favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. Whilemore » the K+ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the K– results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.« less

  12. Measurement of “pretzelosity” asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized He3 target

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Huang, J.; Katich, J.; Wang, Y.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. -P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z. -E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J. C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R. D.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L. -G.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.

    2014-11-24

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized ³He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16 < x < 0.35 and 1.4 < Q² < 2.7 GeV². Our results show that both π± on 3He and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  13. Observation of azo chromophore fluorescence and phosphorescence emissions from DBH by applying exclusively the orbital confinement effect in siliceous zeolites devoid of charge-balancing cations.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Francisco; Martí, Vicente; Palomares, Emilio; García, Hermenegildo; Adam, Waldemar

    2002-06-26

    The molecular orbital (MO) confinement theory predicts that the HOMO and LUMO of an organic guest may become distorted when the dimensions of the host cavity approach closely those of the MO (Corma, A.; García, H.; Sastre, G.; Viruela, P. M. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 4575-4582). Generally, quantum chemical calculations assume that the MO extends over all the space. However, the fact that a molecule is confined within a restricted cavity might impose certain limits to its MO. In agreement with this theory, we have observed for the first time the phosphorescence emission from 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene (DBH) upon incorporation in zeolites devoid of charge-balancing cations, even at room temperature. This observation may be rationalized on the basis of two possible effects: (i) Decrease of the HOMO-LUMO gap induced by confinement of the azo np* chromophore favors ISC, and (ii) inhibition of radiationless deactivation pathway by the immobilization of DBH within the zeolite host favors long lifetimes.

  14. Exclusion of metal oxide by an RF sputtered Ti layer in flexible perovskite solar cells: energetic interface between a Ti layer and an organic charge transporting layer.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Sadia; Akhtar, M Shaheer; Seo, Hyung-Kee; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Shin, Hyung-Shik

    2015-04-14

    In this work, the effects of a titanium (Ti) layer on the charge transport and recombination rates of flexible perovskite solar cells were studied. Ti as an efficient barrier layer was deposited directly on PET-ITO flexible substrates through RF magnetic sputtering using a Ti-source and a pressure of ∼5 mTorr. A Ti coated PET-ITO was used for the fabrication of a flexible perovskite solar cell without using any metal oxide layer. The fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell was composed of a PET-ITO/Ti/perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3)/organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis [N,N'-di-p-methoxyphenylamine]-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD)-Li-TFSI/Ag. A high conversion efficiency of ∼8.39% along with a high short circuit current (JSC) of ∼15.24 mA cm(-2), an open circuit voltage (VOC) of ∼0.830 V and a high fill factor (FF) of ∼0.66 was accomplished by the fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell under a light illumination of ∼100 mW cm(-2) (1.5 AM). Intensity-modulated photocurrent (IMPS)/photovoltage spectroscopy (IMVS) studies demonstrated that the fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell considerably reduced the recombination rate.

  15. Characterization of space charge layer deep defects in n+-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells by temperature dependent capacitance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharangarh, P. R.; Misra, D.; Georgiou, G. E.; Chin, K. K.

    2013-04-01

    Temperature Dependent Capacitance Spectroscopy (TDCS) was used to identify carrier trapping defects in thin film n+-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells, made with evaporated Cu as a primary back contact. By investigating the reverse bias junction capacitance, TDCS allows to identify the energy levels of depletion layer defects. The trap energy levels and trap concentrations were derived from temperature-dependent capacitance spectra. Three distinct deep level traps were observed from the high-temperature (T > 300 K) TDCS due to the ionization of impurity centers located in the depletion region of n+-CdS/p-CdTe junction. The observed levels were also reported by other characterization techniques. TDCS seems to be a much simpler characterization technique for accurate evaluation of deep defects in n+-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells.

  16. Charge Exchange with Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Jeremy; Ferri, Kevin; Schmitt, Jaclyn; Hanson, Joshua; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    A detailed study of the physics of highly charged ions (HCIs) is critical for a deep understanding of observed phenomena resulting from interactions of HCIs with neutral atoms in astrophysical and fusion environments. Specifically the charge transfer rates and spectroscopy of the subsequent decay fluorescence are of great interest to these communities. Results from a laboratory based investigation of these rates will be presented. The experiment takes advantage of an energy and charge state selected beam of HCIs from the recently on-line Clemson University EBIT (CUEBIT). Progress towards an experimental apparatus for retrapping HCIs towards precision spectroscopy of HCIs will also be presented.

  17. Beam-Target Double-Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized He3 Target at 1.4

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, J.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Katich, J.; Qian, X.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; et al

    2012-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. The kinematics focused on the valence quark region, 0.16 < x < 0.35 with 1.4 < Q2 < 2.7 GeV2. The corresponding neutron ALT asymmetries were extracted from the measured 3He asymmetries and proton/3He cross section ratios using the effective polarization approximation. These new data probe the transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function g1Tq and therefore provide access to quark spin-orbit correlations. Our results indicate a positive azimuthal asymmetry for π- production on 3Hemore » and the neutron, while our π+ asymmetries are consistent with zero.« less

  18. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He3 target

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y. X.; Wang, Y.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. -P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, C.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z. -E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J. -C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L. -G.; Tobias, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.

    2014-11-03

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1 < xbj<0.4 for K+ and K production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for K+ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for K favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. While the K+ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the K results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.

  19. Scaled energy (z) distributions of charged hadrons observed in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV from xenon and deuterium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H. J.; Venkataramania, H.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1994-08-01

    Fermilab Experiment-665 measured deep-inelastic scattering of 490 GeV muons off deuterium and xenon targets. Events were selected with a range of energy exchange ν from 100 GeV to 500 GeV and with large ranges of Q2 and xBj: 0.1 GeV2/c2

  20. Scaled energy ([ital z]) distributions of charged hadrons observed in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV from xenon and deuterium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.; Aied, S.; Anthony, P.L.; Baker, M.D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A.A.; Braun, H.M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T.; Conrad, J.M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S.K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H.J.; Geesaman, D.F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M.C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V.W.; Jackson, H.E.; Jaffe, D.E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D.M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H.G.E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lubatti, H.J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D.G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H.E.; Morfin, J.G.; Nickerson, R.B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F.M.; Ramberg, E.J.; Roeser, A.; Ryan, J.J.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schueler, K.P.; Seyerlein, H.J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.A.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P.H.; Stier, H.E.; St

    1994-08-01

    Fermilab Experiment-665 measured deep-inelastic scattering of 490 GeV muons off deuterium and xenon targets. Events were selected with a range of energy exchange [nu] from 100 GeV to 500 GeV and with large ranges of [ital Q][sup 2] and [ital x][sub Bj]: 0.1 GeV[sup 2]/[ital c][sup 2][lt][ital Q][sup 2][lt]150 GeV[sup 2]/[ital c][sup 2] and 0.001[lt][ital x][sub Bj][lt]0.5. The fractional energy ([ital z]) distributions of forward-produced hadrons from the two targets have been compared as a function of the kinematics of the scattering; specifically, the kinematic region of shadowing'' has been compared to that of nonshadowing. The dependence of the distributions upon the [ital order] of the hadrons, determined by the fractional energies, has been examined as well; a strong degree of similarity has been observed in the shapes of the distributions of the different order hadrons. These [ital z] distributions, however, show no nuclear dependence, even in the kinematic region of shadowing.

  1. 18 CFR 420.42 - Contracts; minimum charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Contracts; minimum charge. 420.42 Section 420.42 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-WATER SUPPLY CHARGES Charges; Exemptions § 420.42 Contracts; minimum charge. Subject to the exclusions...

  2. 32 CFR 220.3 - Exclusions impermissible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exclusions impermissible. 220.3 Section 220.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES §...

  3. 48 CFR 832.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for Non-Commercial Items 832.404 Exclusions. (a) Under 31 U.S.C. 3324(d)(2), VA allows advance payment for subscriptions or other charges for newspapers.... 3324(a). The term “other publications” includes any publication printed, microfilmed, photocopied...

  4. 48 CFR 832.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for Non-Commercial Items 832.404 Exclusions. (a) Under 31 U.S.C. 3324(d)(2), VA allows advance payment for subscriptions or other charges for newspapers.... 3324(a). The term “other publications” includes any publication printed, microfilmed, photocopied...

  5. 48 CFR 832.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for Non-Commercial Items 832.404 Exclusions. (a) Under 31 U.S.C. 3324(d)(2), VA allows advance payment for subscriptions or other charges for newspapers.... 3324(a). The term “other publications” includes any publication printed, microfilmed, photocopied...

  6. 48 CFR 832.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for Non-Commercial Items 832.404 Exclusions. (a) Under 31 U.S.C. 3324(d)(2), VA allows advance payment for subscriptions or other charges for newspapers.... 3324(a). The term “other publications” includes any publication printed, microfilmed, photocopied...

  7. Deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  8. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  9. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech. PMID:26017442

  10. CHARGE IMBALANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the theory of charge imbalance, and to discuss its relevance to a number of experimental situations. We introduce the concepts of quasiparticle charge and charge imbalance, and discuss the generation and detection of charge imbalance by tunneling. We describe the relaxation of the injected charge imbalance by inelastic scattering processes, and show how the Boltzmann equation can be solved to obtain the steady state quasiparticle distribution and the charge relaxation rate. Details are given of experiments to measure charge imbalance and the charge relaxation rate when inelastic scattering is the predominant relaxation mechanism. Experiments on and theories of other charge relaxation mechanisms are discussed, namely relaxation via elastic scattering in the presence of energy gap anisotropy, or in the presence of a pair breaking mechanism such as magnetic impurities or an applied supercurrent or magnetic field. We describe three other situations in which charge imbalance occurs, namely the resistance of the NS interface, phase slip centers, and the flow of a supercurrent in the presence of a temperature gradient.

  11. Internal Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    (1) High energy (>100keV) electrons penetrate spacecraft walls and accumulate in dielectrics or isolated conductors; (2) Threat environment is energetic electrons with sufficient flux to charge circuit boards, cable insulation, and ungrounded metal faster than charge can dissipate; (3) Accumulating charge density generates electric fields in excess of material breakdown strenght resulting in electrostatic discharge; and (4) System impact is material damage, discharge currents inside of spacecraft Faraday cage on or near critical circuitry, and RF noise.

  12. Deep Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  13. Deep Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popke, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how the safety-related ruling by the National Federation of State High School Associations to eliminate the option of using 18-inch starting platforms in pools less than 4 feet deep may affect operators of swimming pools and the swim teams who use them. (EV)

  14. Spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. John

    1989-01-01

    The effects of spacecraft charging on spacecraft materials are studied. Spacecraft charging interactions seem to couple environment to system performance through materials. Technology is still developing concerning both environment-driven and operating system-driven interactions. The meeting addressed environment but lacked specific mission requirements, as a result system definition are needed to prioritize interactions.

  15. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  16. 8 CFR 1244.18 - Issuance of charging documents; detention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Temporary Protected Status in the deportation or exclusion proceedings. Review by the Board of Immigration... seek such a waiver in deportation or exclusion proceedings. The charging document shall constitute notice to the alien that his or her status in the United States is subject to withdrawal. A final...

  17. Enhanced Information Exclusion Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan; Li-Jost, Xianqing

    2016-07-01

    In Hall’s reformulation of the uncertainty principle, the entropic uncertainty relation occupies a core position and provides the first nontrivial bound for the information exclusion principle. Based upon recent developments on the uncertainty relation, we present new bounds for the information exclusion relation using majorization theory and combinatoric techniques, which reveal further characteristic properties of the overlap matrix between the measurements.

  18. Central Exclusive Dijet Production

    SciTech Connect

    Dechambre, A.; Cudell, J. R.; Ivanov, I. P.; Hernandez, O.

    2008-08-29

    The ingredients of central exclusive production cross section include large perturbative corrections and soft quantities that must be parametrized and fitted to data. In this talk, we summarize the results of a study of the uncertainties coming from these ingredients, in the case of exclusive dijet production.

  19. Enhanced Information Exclusion Relations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan; Li-Jost, Xianqing

    2016-01-01

    In Hall's reformulation of the uncertainty principle, the entropic uncertainty relation occupies a core position and provides the first nontrivial bound for the information exclusion principle. Based upon recent developments on the uncertainty relation, we present new bounds for the information exclusion relation using majorization theory and combinatoric techniques, which reveal further characteristic properties of the overlap matrix between the measurements. PMID:27460975

  20. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  1. Central exclusive production at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Włodek; Turnau, Jacek

    2014-11-01

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment's Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at √ {s} = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two-pion mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudorapidity |η| < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy √ {s} = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging system are presented. Also a possible addition of the RPs to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.

  2. Central exclusive production at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Włodek; Turnau, Jacek

    2014-11-10

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity | | < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.

  3. Deep mantle subduction flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Katherine A.; White, William M.

    2009-12-01

    We assess the flux of incompatible trace elements into the deep mantle in the Aleutian, Central America, Izu-Bonin, Kurile, Lesser Antilles, Mariana, Sunda, and Tonga subduction zones. We use a simple mass balance approach in which we assume that all of the material lost from the subducting crust and sediment (the "slab") is incorporated into the magmas erupted above the subduction zone, and we use these assumptions to calculate a residual slab composition. The calculated residual slabs are enriched in incompatible elements compared to mid-ocean ridge basalts and highly enriched compared to primitive or depleted mantle. Almost all of the subducted Nb, Ta, and intermediate and heavy rare earths survive into the deep mantle, as do most of the light rare earths. On average, 73% of Th and Pb, 74% of K, 79% of U, 80% of Rb, 80% of Sr, and 82% of Ba survive into the deep mantle. Pb/Ce ratios are systematically lower, and Nb/U ratios are systematically higher, in the deep mantle flux than they are in the flux of material into the trench. Nevertheless, most residual slabs have Pb/Ce and Nb/U ratios outside the typical mantle range. Changes to U/Pb and Th/U ratios tend to be small and are not systematic. Rb/Sr ratios significantly decrease in some subduction zones but increase in others. In contrast, Sm/Nd ratios increase by small but significant amounts in most arcs. Based on these results, we attempt to predict the Sr, Nd, and Pb composition of anciently recycled material now in the mantle. We find that such material would most resemble enriched mantle II-type oceanic island basalts (OIB). None of our calculated residual slabs would evolve to Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions similar to either high 238U/204Pb or enriched mantle I. The range of Sr and Pb isotope ratios in anciently recycled material is similar to that seen in modern OIB, but Nd isotopic compositions do not range to ɛNd values as low as those in some modern OIB. Neither radiogenic nor unradiogenic Pb isotope

  4. Deep blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    From southern New Mexico to the Great Slave Lake of Canada, scientists from the United States and Canada recently detonated 10 underground chemical explosions to generate a clearer picture of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. Called Project Deep Probe, the experiment is designed to see through the crust and into the upper mantle to a depth of 300 miles.In the United States, Earth scientists from Rice University, Purdue University, and the University of Oregon are participating in the project. “Researchers hope to get a picture of the upper mantle beneath the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado Plateau, to understand the role the mantle played in formation and uplift,” says Alan Levander of Rice. To enhance that “picture,” 750 portable seismographs were placed along a roughly north-south line extending from Crownpoint, New Mexico to Edmonton, Alberta. The seismic recordings will be used to enhance weak seismic waves that penetrated the upper mantle.

  5. Enhanced Information Exclusion Relations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan; Li-Jost, Xianqing

    2016-01-01

    In Hall’s reformulation of the uncertainty principle, the entropic uncertainty relation occupies a core position and provides the first nontrivial bound for the information exclusion principle. Based upon recent developments on the uncertainty relation, we present new bounds for the information exclusion relation using majorization theory and combinatoric techniques, which reveal further characteristic properties of the overlap matrix between the measurements. PMID:27460975

  6. 36 CFR 71.13 - Exceptions, exclusions, and exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exceptions, exclusions, and exemptions. 71.13 Section 71.13 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... charged for persons who have not reached their 16th birthday. (h) Until July 12, 1975, no entrance...

  7. 36 CFR 71.13 - Exceptions, exclusions, and exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exceptions, exclusions, and exemptions. 71.13 Section 71.13 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... charged for persons who have not reached their 16th birthday. (h) Until July 12, 1975, no entrance...

  8. Recent results from COMPASS on exclusive muoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandacz, Andrzej

    2016-02-01

    The 160 GeV polarised muon beam available at CERN, with positive or negative charge, makes COMPASS a unique place for GPD studies. The first GPD related COMPASS results come from exclusive vector meson production on transversely polarised protons and deuterons. The data were taken in 2003-2010 with large solid-state polarised targets, although without detection of recoil particles. Results on various transverse target spin dependent azimuthal asymmetries are presented and their relations to GPDs are discussed. The dedicated COMPASS GPD program started in 2012 with commissioning of a new long liquid hydrogen target and new detectors such as the large recoil proton detector and the large-angle electromagnetic calorimeter. It was followed by a short pilot 'DVCS run'. The performance of the setup and first results on DVCS and exclusive π0 channels have been demonstrated. The full data taking for the GPD program approved within COMPASS-II proposal is planned for 2016 and 2017.

  9. Charged membranes.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This Teaching Resource provides three animated lessons that describe the storage and utilization of energy across plasma membranes. The "Na,K ATPase" animation explains how these pumps establish the electrochemical gradient that stores energy across plasma membranes. The "ATP synthesizing complexes" animation shows how these complexes transfer energy from the inner mitochondrial membrane to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The "action potential" lesson explains how charged membranes are used to propagate signals along the axons of neurons. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these important factors. Courses that might employ them include introductory biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, pharmacology, and physiology.

  10. Charge transfer transitions in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven

    2010-05-01

    Absorption spectra of cuprates are discussed. Persistent photo-induced conductivity occurs in the visible spectrum (˜2 eV) and is commonly assigned to ligand-metal (LM) charge transfer (CT) transitions. However, LM CT is site local and cannot possibly generate persistent charges. The assignment in this Letter is 'metal to adjacent metal' (MM) CT transitions, while the absorption at hν > 3 eV is still assigned to mainly LM CT. Only MM CT, defining the Mott-Hubbard gap, is exclusively polarized in the CuO 2 plane, as found experimentally. Since MM CT is strongly affected by the local electric field, doping transfers spectral weight to the IR region.

  11. Inclusive and Exclusive |Vub|

    SciTech Connect

    Petrella, Antonio; /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara

    2011-11-17

    The current status of the determinations of CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| via exclusive and inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays is reviewed. The large datasets collected at the B-Factories, and the increased precision of theoretical calculations have allowed an improvement in the determination of |V{sub ub}|. However, there are still significant uncertainties. In the exclusive approach, the most precise measurement of the pion channel branching ratio is obtained by an untagged analysis. This very good precision can be reached by tagged analyses with more data. The problem with exclusive decays is that the strong hadron dynamics can not be calculated from first principles and the determination of the form factor has to rely on light-cone sum rules or lattice QCD calculations. The current data samples allow a comparison of different FF models with data distributions. With further developments on lattice calculations, the theoretical error should shrink to reach the experimental one. The inclusive approach still provides the most precise |V{sub ub}| determinations. With new theoretical calculations, the mild (2.5{sigma}) discrepancy with respect to the |V{sub ub}| value determined from the global UT fit has been reduced. As in the exclusive approach, theoretical uncertainties represent the limiting factor to the precision of the measurement. Reducing the theoretical uncertainties to a level comparable with the statistical error is challenging. New measurements in semileptonic decays of charm mesons could increase the confidence in theoretical calculations and related uncertainties.

  12. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  13. Exclusive channels in semi-inclusive production of pions and kaons

    SciTech Connect

    Markus Diehl; Wolfgang Kugler; Andreas Schaefer; Christian Weiss

    2005-06-01

    We investigate the role of exclusive channels in semi-inclusive electroproduction of pions and kaons. Using the QCD factorization theorem for hard exclusive processes we evaluate the cross sections for exclusive pseudoscalar and vector meson production in terms of generalized parton distributions and meson distribution amplitudes. We investigate the uncertainties arising from the modeling of the nonperturbative input quantities. Combining these results with available experimental data, we compare the cross sections for exclusive channels to that obtained from quark fragmentation in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. We find that rho0 production is the only exclusive channel with significant contributions to semi-inclusive pion production at large z and moderate Q2. The corresponding contribution to kaon production from the decay of exclusively produced phi and Kstar is rather small.

  14. Central exclusive production at RHIC

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Włodek; Turnau, Jacek

    2014-11-10

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity | |more » < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.« less

  15. Deep inelastic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nucleon structure as seen in the context of deep inelastic scattering is discussed. The lectures begin with consideration of the quark-parton model. The model forms the basis of understanding lepton-nucleon inelastic scattering. As improved data in lepton-nucleon scattering at high energies became available, the quark-parton model failed to explain some crucial features of these data. At approximately the same time a candidate theory of strong interactions based on a SU(3) gauge theory of color was being discussed in the literature, and new ideas on the explanation of inelastic scattering data became popular. A new theory of strong interactions, now called quantum chromodynamics provides a new framework for understanding the data, with a much stronger theoretical foundation, and seems to explain well the features of the data. The lectures conclude with a look at some recent experiments which provide new data at very high energies. These lectures are concerned primarily with charged lepton inelastic scattering and to a lesser extent with neutrino results. Furthermore, due to time and space limitations, topics such as final state hadron studies, and multi-muon production are omitted here. The lectures concentrate on the more central issues: the quark-parton model and concepts of scaling, scale breaking and the ideas of quantum chromodynamics, the Q/sup 2/ dependence of structure function, moments, and the important parameter R.

  16. 75 FR 80798 - Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing of Inventions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Department of the Army Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing of... AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Announcement is made of the availability... of the Army, has rights to this invention. ADDRESSES: Commander, U.S. Army Medical Research...

  17. Social exclusion in finite populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2015-04-01

    Social exclusion, keeping free riders from benefit sharing, plays an important role in sustaining cooperation in our world. Here we propose two different exclusion regimes, namely, peer exclusion and pool exclusion, to investigate the evolution of social exclusion in finite populations. In the peer exclusion regime, each excluder expels all the defectors independently, and thus bears the total cost on his own, while in the pool exclusion regime, excluders spontaneously form an institution to carry out rejection of the free riders, and each excluder shares the cost equally. In a public goods game containing only excluders and defectors, it is found that peer excluders outperform pool excluders if the exclusion costs are small, and the situation is converse once the exclusion costs exceed some critical points, which holds true for all the selection intensities and different update rules. Moreover, excluders can dominate the whole population under a suitable parameters range in the presence of second-order free riders (cooperators), showing that exclusion has prominent advantages over common costly punishment. More importantly, our finding indicates that the group exclusion mechanism helps the cooperative union to survive under unfavorable conditions. Our results may give some insights into better understanding the prevalence of such a strategy in the real world and its significance in sustaining cooperation. PMID:25974550

  18. Social exclusion in finite populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2015-04-01

    Social exclusion, keeping free riders from benefit sharing, plays an important role in sustaining cooperation in our world. Here we propose two different exclusion regimes, namely, peer exclusion and pool exclusion, to investigate the evolution of social exclusion in finite populations. In the peer exclusion regime, each excluder expels all the defectors independently, and thus bears the total cost on his own, while in the pool exclusion regime, excluders spontaneously form an institution to carry out rejection of the free riders, and each excluder shares the cost equally. In a public goods game containing only excluders and defectors, it is found that peer excluders outperform pool excluders if the exclusion costs are small, and the situation is converse once the exclusion costs exceed some critical points, which holds true for all the selection intensities and different update rules. Moreover, excluders can dominate the whole population under a suitable parameters range in the presence of second-order free riders (cooperators), showing that exclusion has prominent advantages over common costly punishment. More importantly, our finding indicates that the group exclusion mechanism helps the cooperative union to survive under unfavorable conditions. Our results may give some insights into better understanding the prevalence of such a strategy in the real world and its significance in sustaining cooperation.

  19. Social exclusion in finite populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2015-04-01

    Social exclusion, keeping free riders from benefit sharing, plays an important role in sustaining cooperation in our world. Here we propose two different exclusion regimes, namely, peer exclusion and pool exclusion, to investigate the evolution of social exclusion in finite populations. In the peer exclusion regime, each excluder expels all the defectors independently, and thus bears the total cost on his own, while in the pool exclusion regime, excluders spontaneously form an institution to carry out rejection of the free riders, and each excluder shares the cost equally. In a public goods game containing only excluders and defectors, it is found that peer excluders outperform pool excluders if the exclusion costs are small, and the situation is converse once the exclusion costs exceed some critical points, which holds true for all the selection intensities and different update rules. Moreover, excluders can dominate the whole population under a suitable parameters range in the presence of second-order free riders (cooperators), showing that exclusion has prominent advantages over common costly punishment. More importantly, our finding indicates that the group exclusion mechanism helps the cooperative union to survive under unfavorable conditions. Our results may give some insights into better understanding the prevalence of such a strategy in the real world and its significance in sustaining cooperation.

  20. Space charge generated by wind tunnel fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, Don J.

    Plume clouds resulting from wildland fires (pyrocumulus) sometimes produce lightning discharges to ground. These discharges were found to carry positive charge to ground exclusively in several cases. Emission of space charge was observed from woody materials burned in the presence of an external electric field. Measurements done in a large wind tunnel for this study confirm and extend measurements made in open air. The net charge given up by the fire in the wind tunnel has sign appropriate to reduce an applied electric field (negative for the earth's fair weather field), and magnitude directly proportional to the magnitude of the applied electric field and the fuel consumption: Q=0.034+0.0015 E, where Q is the net charge liberated in nC g -1, and E is the applied electric field in V m -1 (positive upward). There is a weak dependence of the net charge on wind speed, probably due to wind tunnel airflow characteristics. The net charge in the smoke is a small difference between large amounts of charged ions of both signs liberated by the fire. For fires burning under fair-weather electric fields, the amount and sign of charge released by the mechanism studied cannot be the direct cause of anomalous lightning from pyrocumulus.

  1. Recent progress in some exclusive and semi-exclusive processes in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczurek, Antoni; Cisek, Anna; Łuszczak, Marta; Schäfer, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    We present the main results of our recent analyses of exclusive production of vector charmonia (J/ψ and ψ') in kt-factorization approach and for γγ production of charged dilepton pairs in exclusive and semiinclusive processes in a new approach, similar in spirit to kt-factorization. The results for charmonia are compared with recent results of the LHCb collaboration. We include some helicity flip contributions and quantify the effect of absorption correction. The effect of cc̅ wave function is illustrated. We present uncertainties related to F2 structure function which are the main ingredient of the approach. Our results are compared with recent CMS data for dilepton production with lepton isolation cuts imposed.

  2. [Isolated true aneurysm of the deep femoral artery].

    PubMed

    Salomon du Mont, L; Holzer, T; Kazandjian, C; Saucy, F; Corpataux, J M; Rinckenbach, S; Déglise, S

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms of the deep femoral artery, accounting for 5% of all femoral aneurysms, are uncommon. There is a serious risk of rupture. We report the case of an 83-year-old patient with a painless pulsatile mass in the right groin due to an aneurysm of the deep femoral artery. History taking revealed no cardiovascular risk factors and no other aneurysms at other localizations. The etiology remained unclear because no recent history of local trauma or puncture was found. ACT angiography was performed, revealing a true isolated aneurysm of the deep femoral artery with a diameter of 90mm, beginning 1cm after its origin. There were no signs of rupture or distal emboli. Due to unsuitable anatomy for an endovascular approach, the patient underwent open surgery, with exclusion of the aneurysm and interposition of an 8-mm Dacron graft to preserve deep femoral artery flow. Due to their localization, the diagnosis and the management of aneurysms of the deep femoral artery can be difficult. Options are surgical exclusion or an endovascular approach in the absence of symptoms or as a bridging therapy. If possible, blood flow to the distal deep femoral artery should be maintained, the decision depending also on the patency of the superficial femoral artery. In case of large size, aneurysms of the deep femoral artery should be treated without any delay.

  3. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  4. Taoism and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

    1988-01-01

    Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

  5. Exclusion performance and learning by exclusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Zaine, Isabela; Domeniconi, Camila; de Rose, Julio C

    2016-05-01

    Responding by exclusion is a type of emergent repertoire in which an individual chooses an alternative by the apparent exclusion of other available alternatives. In this case it is possible to respond appropriately to an undefined stimulus (one that has not previously acquired discriminative functions) by excluding the defined alternatives. There is evidence of exclusion in humans and nonhuman animals, although learning as an outcome of exclusion does not always occur. This study aimed to investigate exclusion in visual simple discriminations and learning of new simple discriminations resulting from exclusion in four border collies. Subjects were trained to perform simple simultaneous discriminations between pairs of tridimensional objects, and were then tested for exclusion, novelty control and learning of new simple discriminations. All dogs successfully responded by exclusion, choosing an undefined stimulus displayed with an S-. For three dogs, it was possible to conclude that these previously undefined stimuli acquired S+ functions, documenting learning of new simple discriminations. However, this required up to four exposures to exclusion trials with each pair of stimuli.

  6. Mutual exclusivity and exclusion: Converging evidence from two contrasting traditions

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Kenneth R.; Ghezzi, Patrick M.

    1993-01-01

    Mutual exclusivity and exclusion are two terms used by cognitive psychologists and behavior analysts, respectively, to identify essentially the same phenomenon. While cognitive psychologists view mutual exclusivity in terms of a hypothesis that individuals use intuitively while acquiring language, behavior analysts regard exclusion as a derived stimulus relation that bears upon the acquisition and elaboration of verbal behavior. Each research tradition, though at odds with respect to accounting for the phenomenon, employs similar procedures to answer comparable questions. Insofar as both cognitive and behavioral psychologists are studying the same phenomenon, the ground work is established for collaboration between them. PMID:22477081

  7. Deep Web video

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2016-07-12

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  8. Deep Space Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  9. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  10. Hard Exclusive Pion Leptoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this talk it is reported on an analysis of hard exclusive leptoproduction of pions within the handbag approach. It is argued that recent measurements of this process performed by HERMES and CLAS clearly indicate the occurrence of strong contributions from transversely polarized photons. Within the handbag approach such γ ^{ *}_T→ π transitions are described by the transversity GPDs accompanied by twist-3 pion wave functions. It is shown that the handbag approach leads to results on cross sections and single-spin asymmetries in fair agreement with experiment. Predictions for other pseudoscalar meson channels are also briefly discussed.

  11. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating 88Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Morelli, L.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chbihi, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Myalski, S.; Nicolini, R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-03-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the 88Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction 48Ti+40Ca at 300, 450, and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted α particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as deep inelastic collisions or quasifission/quasifusion) different from the compound nucleus formation.

  12. Exclusive Processes in Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Peter Lepage, G.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * NONRELATIVISTIC FORM FACTORS FOR HEAVY-QUARK MESONS * HADRONIC WAVEFUNCTIONS * DEFINITIONS * LIGHT-CONE BOUND-STATE EQUATIONS * GENERAL PROPERTIES OF LIGHT-CONE WAVEFUNCTIONS * RENORMALIZATION * CALCULATING * A PERTURBATIVE ANALYSIS * FACTORIZATION—LEADING ORDER ANALYSIS * THE QUARK DISTRIBUTION AMPLITUDE * DETERMINATION OF DISTRIBUTION AMPLITUDES * HIGHER ORDER ANALYSIS * COMPLICATIONS * How LARGE IS ASYMPTOTIC Q? * APPLICATIONS OF QCD TO THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF EXCLUSIVE REACTIONS * GENERAL FEATURES OF EXCLUSIVE PROCESSES IN QCD * ELECTROMAGNETIC FORM FACTORS * COMPARISON OF QCD SCALING WITH EXPERIMENT * EXCLUSIVE ANTI-PROTON PROTON ANNIHILATION PROCESSES * ADDITIONAL TESTS OF GLUON SPIN IN EXCLUSIVE PROCESSES * HADRONIC WAVEFUNCTION PHENOMENOLOGY * CALCULATING TH * THE PRE-QCD DEVELOPMENT OF EXCLUSIVE REACTIONS * EXCLUSIVE e+ e- ANNIHILATION PROCESSES * J/ψ DECAY TO HADRON PAIRS * THE π-ρ PUZZLE * FORM FACTOR ZEROS IN QCD * EXCLUSIVE γγ REACTIONS * QCD PROCESSES IN NUCLEI * EXCLUSIVE NUCLEAR REACTIONS - REDUCED AMPLITUDES * COLOR TRANSPARENCY * SPIN CORRELATIONS IN PROTON-PROTON SCATTERING * CONCLUSIONS * APPENDIX I BARYON FORM FACTORS AND EVOLUTION EQUATIONS * APPENDIX II LIGHT CONE QUANTIZATION AND PERTURBATION THEORY * APPENDIX III A NONPERTURBATIVE ANALYSIS OF EXCLUSIVE REACTIONS-DISCRETIZED LIGHT-CONE QUANTIZATION * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  13. Quick spacecraft charging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Brian Arthur

    2014-03-12

    This is a presentation in PDF format which is a quick spacecraft charging primer, meant to be used for program training. It goes into detail about charging physics, RBSP examples, and how to identify charging.

  14. Deep Space 1 in Cleanroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA. Deep Space 1 used a unique ion drive propulsion system. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs. The almost imperceptible thrust from the system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Previous ion propulsion systems, like those found on some communications satellites, were not used as the main engines, but only to keep the satellites on track. Deep Space 1 is the first spacecraft to use this important technology as its primary means of propulsion. The importance of ion propulsion is its great efficiency,' says Dr. Marc Rayman, project manager for Deep Space 1. 'It uses very little propellant, and that means it weighs less so it can use a less expensive launch vehicle and ultimately go much faster than other spacecraft. This opens the solar system to many future exciting missions which otherwise would have been unaffordable or even impossible,' added Dr. Rayman. The ion particles travel out at about 68,000 miles per hour. However, Deep Space 1 doesn't move that fast in the other direction, because it is much heavier than the ion particles. By the end of the mission, the ion engine will have changed the spacecraft's speed by about 6,800 mph (over 11,000 kph). The technology is so efficient that it only consumes about 3.5 ounces (100 g) of xenon per day, taking about four days to expend just one pound (0.4 kg

  15. PTTI applications to deep space navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curkendall, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Radio metric deep space navigation relies nearly exclusively upon coherent, two way, Doppler and ranging for all precise applications. These data types and the navigational accuracies they can produce are reviewed. The deployment of hydrogen maser frequency standards and the development of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) systems within the Deep Space Network are used in the development of non-coherent, one way data forms that promise much greater inherent navigational accuracy. The underlying structure between each data class and clock performance is charted. VLBI observations of the natural radio sources are the planned instrument for the synchronization task. This method and a navigational scheme using differential measurements between the spacecraft and nearby quasars are described.

  16. Exclusion processes with avalanches.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Uttam; Krapivsky, P L

    2014-07-01

    In an exclusion process with avalanches, when a particle hops to a neighboring empty site which is adjacent to an island the particle on the other end of the island immediately hops, and if it joins another island this triggers another hop. There are no restrictions on the length of the islands and the duration of the avalanche. This process is well defined in the low-density region ρ < 1/2. We describe the nature of steady states (on a ring) and determine all correlation functions. For the asymmetric version of the process, we compute the steady state current, and we describe shock and rarefaction waves which arise in the evolution of the step-function initial profile. For the symmetric version, we determine the diffusion coefficient and examine the evolution of a tagged particle.

  17. Infrared intensities and charge mobility in hydrogen bonded complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimberti, Daria; Milani, Alberto; Castiglioni, Chiara

    2013-08-01

    The analytical model for the study of charge mobility in the molecules presented by Galimberti et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164115 (2013)] is applied to hydrogen bonded planar dimers. Atomic charges and charge fluxes are obtained from density functional theory computed atomic polar tensors and related first derivatives, thus providing an interpretation of the IR intensity enhancement of the X-H stretching band observed upon aggregation. Our results show that both principal and non-principal charge fluxes have an important role for the rationalization of the spectral behavior; moreover, they demonstrate that the modulation of the charge distribution during vibrational motions of the -XH⋯Y- fragment is not localized exclusively on the atoms directly involved in hydrogen bonding. With these premises we made some correlations between IR intensities, interaction energies, and charge fluxes. The model was tested on small dimers and subsequently to the bigger one cytosine-guanine. Thus, the model can be applied to complex systems.

  18. Deep Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manshadi, Farzin

    2012-01-01

    ITU defines deep space as the volume of Space at distances from the Earth equal to, or greater than, 2 106 km. Deep Space Spacecraft have to travel tens of millions of km from Earth to reach the nearest object in deep space. Spacecraft mass and power are precious. Large ground-based antennas and very high power transmitters are needed to overcome large space loss and spacecraft's small antennas and low power transmitters. Navigation is complex and highly dependent on measurements from the Earth. Every deep space mission is unique and therefore very costly to develop.

  19. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Presented is Deep Space Network (DSN) progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition (TDA) research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  20. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Summaries are given of Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  1. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    DVT - discharge; Blood clot in the legs - discharge; Thromboembolism - discharge; Venous thromboembolism - deep vein thrombosis; Post-phlebitic syndrome - discharge; Post-thrombotic syndrome - discharge

  2. A deep reef in deep trouble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menza, C.; Kendall, M.; Rogers, C.; Miller, J.

    2007-10-01

    The well-documented degradation of shallower reefs which are often closer to land and more vulnerable to pollution, sewage and other human-related stressors has led to the suggestion that deeper, more remote offshore reefs could possibly serve as sources of coral and fish larvae to replenish the shallower reefs. Yet, the distribution, status, and ecological roles of deep (>30 m) Caribbean reefs are not well known. In this report, an observation of a deep reef which has undergone a recent extensive loss of coral cover is presented. In stark contrast to the typical pattern of coral loss in shallow reefs, the deeper corals were most affected. This report is the first description of such a pattern of coral loss on a deep reef.

  3. A deep reef in deep trouble

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menza, Charles; Kendall, M.; Rogers, C.; Miller, J.

    2007-01-01

    The well-documented degradation of shallower reefs which are often closer to land and more vulnerable to pollution, sewage and other human-related stressors has led to the suggestion that deeper, more remote offshore reefs could possibly serve as sources of coral and fish larvae to replenish the shallower reefs. Yet, the distribution, status, and ecological roles of deep (>30 m) Caribbean reefs are not well known. In this report, an observation of a deep reef which has undergone a recent extensive loss of coral cover is presented. In stark contrast to the typical pattern of coral loss in shallow reefs, the deeper corals were most affected. This report is the first description of such a pattern of coral loss on a deep reef.

  4. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, W.G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  5. Effects of Low Temperature on Charging of Spacecraft Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    2008-01-01

    Spacecraft dielectric charging, sometimes called deep-dielectric-charging or bulk-charging, occurs when high energy electrons imbed themselves in dielectric materials, and the charge density builds up, sometimes to breakdown levels. Charges usually bleed off slowly due to material conductivity. At very low (cryogenic) temperatures, the dielectric conductivity decreases until charges may remain and build up over weeks, months, or years. In those cases, the guidelines given in NASA and industry documents for when dielectric charging may become important are misleading. Arcing tests of spacecraft cables at liquid nitrogen temperatures and very low flux levels have been done at NASA MSFC for the JWST Project. In this paper, we describe the results of those tests and analyze their important implications for cryogenic spacecraft cable design and construction.

  6. Deep Space 1 Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The completely assembled Deep Space 1 (DS-1) technology demonstrator spacecraft. The DS-1 spacecraft incorporates a number of advanced technology concepts in its mission, but none so 'high profile' as its Ion propulsion system. The name itself evokes visions of Star Trek and science fiction fantasy, although the idea actually dates from the 1950s. However, unlike the 'Warp Drive' propulsion system that zings the fictional starship Enterprise across the cosmos in minutes, the almost imperceptible thrust from the ion propulsion system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs. Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

  7. Structure Property Relationships in Imidazole-based Deep Eutectic Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terheggen, Logan; Cosby, Tyler; Sangoro, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Deep eutectic mixtures of levulinic acid with a systematic series of imidazoles are measured by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate the impact of steric interactions on charge transport and structural dynamics. An enhancement of dc conductivity is found in each of the imidazoles upon the addition of levulinic acid. However, the extent of increase is dependent upon the alkyl substitution on the imidazole ring. These results highlight the importance of molecular structure on hydrogen bonding and charge transport in deep eutectic mixtures.

  8. Ion exclusion by sub-2-nm carbon nanotube pores

    PubMed Central

    Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K.; Stadermann, Michael; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica

    2008-01-01

    Biological pores regulate the cellular traffic of a large variety of solutes, often with high selectivity and fast flow rates. These pores share several common structural features: the inner surface of the pore is frequently lined with hydrophobic residues, and the selectivity filter regions often contain charged functional groups. Hydrophobic, narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes can provide a simplified model of membrane channels by reproducing these critical features in a simpler and more robust platform. Previous studies demonstrated that carbon nanotube pores can support a water flux comparable to natural aquaporin channels. Here, we investigate ion transport through these pores using a sub-2-nm, aligned carbon nanotube membrane nanofluidic platform. To mimic the charged groups at the selectivity region, we introduce negatively charged groups at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by plasma treatment. Pressure-driven filtration experiments, coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of the permeate and feed, are used to quantify ion exclusion in these membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion that can be as high as 98% under certain conditions. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, whereas steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. PMID:18539773

  9. Charge-exchange born He(+) ions in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of charge transfer between solar wind alpha-particles and hydrogen atoms of interstellar origin is revisited. Singly-charged helium ions born in the charge transfer carry important information on processes in the solar wind and the heliosphere. The velocity distribution of such He(+) ions is substantially different from that of He(+) pick-up ions due to ionization of the interstellar helium atoms. Estimates of the expected abundances of the charge-exchange born He(+) in the solar wind are presented, and the possibility of measuring this plasma component on deep space missions is discussed.

  10. Charge-exchange born He(+) ions in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1992-07-01

    The effect of charge transfer between solar wind alpha-particles and hydrogen atoms of interstellar origin is revisited. Singly-charged helium ions born in the charge transfer carry important information on processes in the solar wind and the heliosphere. The velocity distribution of such He(+) ions is substantially different from that of He(+) pick-up ions due to ionization of the interstellar helium atoms. Estimates of the expected abundances of the charge-exchange born He(+) in the solar wind are presented, and the possibility of measuring this plasma component on deep space missions is discussed.

  11. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The progress is reported of Deep Space Network (DSN) research in the following areas: (1) flight project support, (2) spacecraft/ground communications, (3) station control and operations technology, (4) network control and processing, and (5) deep space stations. A description of the DSN functions and facilities is included.

  12. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition, research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is cited. Topics covered include: tracking and ground based navigation; spacecraft/ground communication; station control and operations technology; ground communications; and deep space stations.

  13. Deep-diving dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, John

    2012-08-01

    Dysbaric bone necrosis demonstrated in ichthyosaurs may be the result of prolonged deep diving rather than rapid ascent to escape predators. The bone lesions show structural and anatomical similarity to those that may occur in human divers and in the deep diving sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus.

  14. Deep Impact Spots Quarry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Sixty-nine days before it gets up-close-and-personal with a comet, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft successfully photographed its quarry, comet Tempel 1, at a distance of 39.7 million miles. The image, taken on April 25, 2005, is the first of many comet portraits Deep Impact will take leading up to its historic comet encounter on July 4.

  15. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  16. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible.

  17. Improving outpatient charge capture.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Daniel; Sanderson, Brian

    2014-10-01

    Hospitals can identify opportunities to enhance revenue collection by closely analyzing outpatient charge-capture data. A hospital can bolster its charge-capture analysis by performing a charge-capture process walk-through and scrutinizing subsystem links, third-party payer contracts, and electronic health record structures. The hospital then can integrate charge-integrity functions into clinical departments as needed by developing charge-reconciliation tools and reports and monitoring their utilization, and incorporating charge-reconciliation responsibilities into clinical department managers' job descriptions and goals. PMID:25647902

  18. Observation of Central Exclusive Diphoton Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brucken, Jens Erik

    2013-01-01

    We have observed exclusive γγ production in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron at √ s = 1.96 TeV. We use data corresponding to 1.11 ± 0.07 fb-1 integrated luminosity taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, with a trigger requiring two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy ET > 2 GeV, and vetoing on hits in the forward beam shower counters. We select events with two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy ET > 2.5 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| < 1.0, with no other particles detected in -7.4 < η < +7.4. The two showers have similar ET and an azimuthal angle separation Δφ ~ π; we find 34 events with exactly two matching charged particle tracks, agreeing with expectations for the QED process p¯p → p+e+e- + ¯p by two photon exchange; and we find 43 events with no tracks. The latter are candidates for the exclusive process p¯p → p + γγ + ¯p by double pomeron exchange. We use the strip and wire chambers at the longitudinal shower maximum position within the calorimeter to measure a possible exclusive background from IP + IP → π0π0, and conclude that it is consistent with zero and is < 15 events at 95% C.L. The measured cross section is σγγ,excl(|η| < 1, ET (γ) > 2.5 GeV) = 2.48 +0.40 -0.35(stat) +0.40 -0.51(syst) pb and in agreement with the theoretical predictions. This process is closely related to exclusive Higgs boson production pp → p + H + p at the Large Hadron Collider. The observation of the exclusive production of diphotons shows that exclusive Higgs production can happen and could be observed with a proper experimental setup.

  19. [Sexuality and exclusion].

    PubMed

    Fontana, E; Béran, M D

    1995-06-01

    In Lausanne, Switzerland, a family planning counselor and a public health physician conducted an action research in an immigrant Portuguese community, which aimed to establish conditions that would allow women to prevent unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS, in order to permit community members to better confront these issues. In this community, the subject of abortion is a taboo. Portuguese women with different backgrounds (e.g., nurse, comedian, and student of modern French), who had received training in family planning counseling from different institutions (e.g., the university hospital center in Vaud canton and the public health service), shared their knowledge in the Portuguese communities in Vaud canton. Implementation of a Portuguese language telephone hot-line and reception place assured continuity of their work in the heart of the community. Thus, the Portuguese women could call on these counselors when they confronted problems of sexuality, contraception, abortion, or risky sexual behavior. Most abortions in Lausanne occurred at the obstetric/gynecologic service of the university hospital center where the family planning counselors had felt powerless due to the recurrence of situations. In this action research, the counselors could evaluate the desire of their patients to take charge. They could then encourage the patients to contact their community through the permanent telephone hot-line or reception place. The sense of powerlessness of the professional counselors decreased when they took a more coherent educative and preventive action. In extrapolating, these situations could take place in medical offices where health problems are revealed. The physician would be able to use the hot-line to avoid repeat consultations with the same patient telling him/her the same story. The action research also included formation of groups where perimenopausal women could receive information on perimenopause, ask questions, and

  20. Deep Moonquakes: Remaining Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    2004-01-01

    We have recently reexamined more than 9000 United States previously unidentified seismic events catalogued during the Apollo landing missions and positively identified for the first time about 30 deep moonquake nests on the far side of the Moon. Although only a few of them are currently locatable, the relative arrival times among stations for the rest and presence or absence of seismic signals at particular stations suggest that either (a) the region within about $40\\deg$ of the antipode is aseismic or (b) the deep interior of the Moon severely attenuates or deflects seismic waves. Aside from the obvious question of how to distinguish between such hypothetical models, this effort raised several more general questions concerning the use of deep moonquake signals to infer the structure and dynamics of the deep interior of the Moon. Among more important ones are: (1) How reliable are the seismic arrival picks from which to compute the seismic velocity variations in the Moon? (2) How do the possible lateral variations in seismic velocity affect the computed radial variation in seismic velocity at depth? (3) Can we tell more about the distribution and mechanism of deep moonquakes from the newly expanded database of identified deep moonquakes? Questions (1) and (2) are especially important because the inferred deep internal structure of the Moon depends critically on their answers. Answering these questions may demand additional data collected on future lunar missions, but some may be resolved with further examination of the existing data.

  1. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  2. Charge regulation circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.

    1992-01-01

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply in the range of 0.01%. The charge regulation circuit is utilized in a preferred embodiment in providing regulated voltage for controlling the operation of a laser.

  3. Deep levels in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, George D.

    1983-03-01

    The 3d transition element ion impurities in silicon are reviewed for the broad insight they provide in understanding deep levels in semiconductors. As interstitials, their interaction with the host tends to confine the d-levels to the forbidden gap, providing many deep states. The interaction at the substitutional site is best considered as an interaction with the lattice vacancy, into which the impurity is placed. This interaction tends to repel deep a1 and t2 levels from the gap. When the levels are present, they are mostly vacancy-like and the defect is likely to display the large lattice relaxations characteristic of the vacancy.

  4. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  5. Particle charge spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An airflow through a tube is used to guide a charged particle through the tube. A detector may be used to detect charge passing through the tube on the particle. The movement of the particle through the tube may be used to both detect its charge and size.

  6. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The third Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference proceedings contain 66 papers on the geosynchronous plasma environment, spacecraft modeling, charged particle environment interactions with spacecraft, spacecraft materials characterization, and satellite design and testing. The proceedings is a compilation of the state of the art of spacecraft charging and environmental interaction phenomena.

  7. Spin versus charge noise from Kondo traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Luis G. G. V. Dias; de Sousa, Rogério

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic and charge noise have a common microscopic origin in solid-state devices, as described by a universal electron trap model. In spite of this common origin, magnetic (spin) and charge noise spectral densities display remarkably different behaviors when many-particle correlations are taken into account, leading to the emergence of the Kondo effect. We derive exact frequency sum rules for trap noise and perform numerical renormalization-group calculations to show that while spin noise is a universal function of the Kondo temperature, charge noise remains well described by single-particle theory even when the trap is deep in the Kondo regime. We obtain simple analytical expressions for charge and spin noise that account for Kondo screening in all frequency and temperature regimes, enabling the study of the impact of disorder and the emergence of magnetic 1 /f noise from Kondo traps. We conclude that the difference between charge and spin noise survives even in the presence of disorder, showing that noise can be more manageable in devices that are sensitive to magnetic (rather than charge) fluctuations and that the signature of the Kondo effect can be observed in spin noise spectroscopy experiments.

  8. Battery charging in float vs. cycling environments

    SciTech Connect

    COREY,GARTH P.

    2000-04-20

    In lead-acid battery systems, cycling systems are often managed using float management strategies. There are many differences in battery management strategies for a float environment and battery management strategies for a cycling environment. To complicate matters further, in many cycling environments, such as off-grid domestic power systems, there is usually not an available charging source capable of efficiently equalizing a lead-acid battery let alone bring it to a full state of charge. Typically, rules for battery management which have worked quite well in a floating environment have been routinely applied to cycling batteries without full appreciation of what the cycling battery really needs to reach a full state of charge and to maintain a high state of health. For example, charge target voltages for batteries that are regularly deep cycled in off-grid power sources are the same as voltages applied to stand-by systems following a discharge event. In other charging operations equalization charge requirements are frequently ignored or incorrectly applied in cycled systems which frequently leads to premature capacity loss. The cause of this serious problem: the application of float battery management strategies to cycling battery systems. This paper describes the outcomes to be expected when managing cycling batteries with float strategies and discusses the techniques and benefits for the use of cycling battery management strategies.

  9. Measurements of Shaped Charge Jet Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2013-06-01

    Penetration depth is an important requirement in oil/gas well perforating jobs. The depth determines how far the wellbore can directly communicate with reservoir fluids. Deep perforation charges are widely used in oilfield industry and most of those are powder metal liner charge for no carrot-like slug left as solid liner does. Comprehensive measurements for the powder metal liner shaped charge jet characteristics, namely, the jet density and velocity, are needed to predict the shaped charge performance and to plan the perforating job. This paper focuses on an experimental work of jet velocity measurements. A medium size of powder metal liner charges (27 grams HMX) is used in the tests. The powder jet shoots through a stack of limestone blocks with shorting switch set in between. Half inch air-gap between two blocks is design to provide space for jet traveling in air to record free fly velocity, meanwhile the jet penetration velocity in the limestone is measured. Aluminum foil switches are used to record the jet Time of Arrival (TOA). The charged switch shorted by the metal jet when it arrives. The shorting signal is recorded. The two velocities can be used to estimate the jet penetration effectiveness. A series of TOA tests show that jet velocity along its length linearly decreases from jet tip to tail until the stagnation points referring to which jet material moves in opposite direction.

  10. Exclusive vector meson production at HERA from QCD with saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Marquet, C.; Peschanski, R.; Soyez, G.

    2007-08-01

    Following recent predictions that the geometric scaling properties of deep inelastic scattering data in inclusive {gamma}*p collisions are expected also in exclusive diffractive processes, we investigate the diffractive production of vector mesons. Using analytic results in the framework of the Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation at nonzero momentum transfer, we extend to the nonforward amplitude a QCD-inspired forward saturation model including charm, following the theoretical predictions for the momentum transfer dependence of the saturation scale. We obtain a good fit to the available HERA data and make predictions for deeply virtual Compton scattering measurements.

  11. Atomic charges derived from electrostatic potentials for molecular and periodic systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Li; Stern, Abraham C; Space, Brian; Johnson, J Karl

    2010-09-23

    We present a method for fitting atomic charges to the electrostatic potential (ESP) of periodic and nonperiodic systems. This method is similar to the method of Campa et al. [ J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2009, 5, 2866]. We compare the Wolf and Ewald long-range electrostatic summation methods in calculating the ESP for periodic systems. We find that the Wolf summation is computationally more efficient than the Ewald summation by about a factor of 5 with comparable accuracy. Our analysis shows that the choice of grid mesh size influences the fitted atomic charges, especially for systems with buried (highly coordinated) atoms. We find that a maximum grid spacing of 0.2−0.3 A is required to obtain reliable atomic charges. The effect of the exclusion radius for point selection is assessed; we find that the common choice of using the van der Waals (vdW) radius as the exclusion radius for each atom may result in large deviations between the ESP generated from the ab initio calculations and that computed from the fitted charges, especially for points closest to the exclusion radii. We find that a larger value of exclusion radius than commonly used, 1.3 times the vdW radius, provides more reliable results. We find that a penalty function approach for fitting charges for buried atoms, with the target charge taken from Bader charge analysis, gives physically reasonable results.

  12. Nurturing Deep Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Rachael

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the missing ingredient in school reform is soul, that is, deep connections among students, teachers, and administrators. Discusses five principles of leadership with soul: Personalize, pacing, permission, protection, and paradox. (PKP)

  13. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The various systems and subsystems are discussed for the Deep Space Network (DSN). A description of the DSN is presented along with mission support, program planning, facility engineering, implementation and operations.

  14. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Deep Space Network progress report is presented dealing with in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  15. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations. The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are emphasized.

  16. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The facilities, programming system, and monitor and control system for the deep space network are described. Ongoing planetary and interplanetary flight projects are reviewed, along with tracking and ground-based navigation, communications, and network and facility engineering.

  17. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress on the Deep Space Network (DSN) supporting research and technology, advanced development, engineering and implementation, and DSN operations is presented. The functions and facilities of the DSN are described.

  18. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A report is given of the Deep Space Networks progress in (1) flight project support, (2) tracking and data acquisition research and technology, (3) network engineering, (4) hardware and software implementation, and (5) operations.

  19. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are considered. Progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is reported.

  20. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization, of the Deep Space Network are summarized. Deep Space stations, ground communications, and network operations control capabilities are described. The network is designed for two-way communications with unmanned spacecraft traveling approximately 1600 km from earth to the farthest planets in the solar system. It has provided tracking and data acquisition support for the following projects: Ranger, Surveyor, Mariner, Pioneer, Apollo, Helios, Viking, and the Lunar Orbiter.

  1. Reading Knee-Deep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Freire told his audience at a seminar at the University of Massachusetts, "You need to read knee-deep in texts, for deeper than surface meanings, and you need to know the words to be able to do it" (quoted in Cleary, 2003). In a children's literature class, fifteen teachers and I traveled along a path that moved us toward reading knee-deep as we…

  2. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized along with deep space station, ground communication, and network operations control capabilities. Mission support of ongoing planetary/interplanetary flight projects is discussed with emphasis on Viking orbiter radio frequency compatibility tests, the Pioneer Venus orbiter mission, and Helios-1 mission status and operations. Progress is also reported in tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  3. Exploration for deep coal

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-15

    The most important factor in safe mining is the quality of the roof. The article explains how the Rosebud Mining Co. conducts drilling and exploration in 11 deep coal mine throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rosebud uses two Atlas Copco CS10 core drilling rigs mounted on 4-wheel drive trucks. The article first appeared in Atlas Copco's in-house magazine, Deep Hole Driller. 3 photos.

  4. Conclusive exclusion of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Jain, Rahul; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Perry, Christopher

    2014-02-01

    In the task of quantum state exclusion, we consider a quantum system prepared in a state chosen from a known set. The aim is to perform a measurement on the system which can conclusively rule that a subset of the possible preparation procedures cannot have taken place. We ask what conditions the set of states must obey in order for this to be possible and how well we can complete the task when it is not. The task of quantum state discrimination forms a subclass of this set of problems. Within this paper, we formulate the general problem as a semidefinite program (SDP), enabling us to derive sufficient and necessary conditions for a measurement to be optimal. Furthermore, we obtain a necessary condition on the set of states for exclusion to be achievable with certainty, and we give a construction for a lower bound on the probability of error. This task of conclusively excluding states has gained importance in the context of the foundations of quantum mechanics due to a result from Pusey, Barrett, and Rudolph (PBR). Motivated by this, we use our SDP to derive a bound on how well a class of hidden variable models can perform at a particular task, proving an analog of Tsirelson's bound for the PBR experiment and the optimality of a measurement given by PBR in the process. We also introduce variations of conclusive exclusion, including unambiguous state exclusion, and state exclusion with worst-case error.

  5. Intrapersonal and interpersonal processes of social exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Taishi; Ura, Mitsuhiro; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    People have a fundamental need to belong with others. Social exclusion impairs this need and has various effects on cognition, affect, and the behavior of excluded individuals. We have previously reported that activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) could be a neurocognitive index of social exclusion (Kawamoto et al., 2012). In this article, we provide an integrative framework for understanding occurrences during and after social exclusion, by reviewing neuroimaging, electrophysiological, and behavioral studies of dACC and rVLPFC, within the framework of intrapersonal and interpersonal processes of social exclusion. As a result, we have indicated directions for future studies to further clarify the phenomenon of social exclusion from the following perspectives: (1) constructional elements of social exclusion, (2) detection sensitivity and interpretation bias in social exclusion, (3) development of new methods to assess the reactivity to social exclusion, and (4) sources of social exclusion. PMID:25798081

  6. Ligand exclusion on acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Berman, H A; Leonard, K

    1990-11-27

    This paper examines covalent reactivity of AchE with respect to cationic and uncharged methylphosphonates and substrates in the absence and presence of cationic ligands selective for the active center and the peripheral anionic site. The organophosphorus inhibitors are enantiomeric alkyl methylphosphonothioates (1-5) containing cycloheptyl and isopropyl phosphono ester groups and S-methyl, S-n-pentyl, and S-[beta-(trimethylammonio)ethyl] leaving groups; these agents differ in their configuration about phosphorus and their steric, hydrophobic, and electrostatic characteristics. The synthetic substrates examined are acetylthiocholine, p-nitrophenyl acetate, and 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (7AMC). Antagonism of the methylphosphonothioate reaction by cationic ligands is strongly dependent on the nature of both the cation and the methylphosphonate but independent of the configuration about phosphorus. While all cations cause linear mixed inhibition of acetylthiocholine hydrolysis, there are observed a variety of inhibition patterns of 7AMC and p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis that are distinctly nonlinear, as well as patterns in which the reciprocal plots intersect in the upper right quadrant. Strong antagonism of cationic (methylphosphonyl)thiocholines correlates very well with linear inhibition of acetylthiocholine. Ligands that cause only negligible antagonism of the uncharged methylphosphonates display nonlinear inhibition of uncharged substrates. These relationships, since they are most pronounced for peripheral site ligands and are strongly dependent on the charge carried by the reactant, suggest that the peripheral anionic site alters enzyme reactivity through an electrostatic interaction with the net negative active center. Such behavior indicates a potential role for the peripheral anionic site in conserving AchE catalytic efficiency within a narrow range of values. PMID:2271673

  7. Deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Gargi; Roy, Subesha Basu; Haldar, Swaraj; Bhattacharya, Rabindra

    2010-12-01

    Occlusive clot formation in the veins causes venous thrombosis, the site most common in the deep veins of leg, called deep vein thrombosis. The clot can block blood flow and when it breaks off, called an embolism which in turn can damage the vital organs. Venous thrombosis occurs via three mechanisms ie, Virchow's triad. The mechanisms are decreased flow rate of blood, damage to the blood vessel wall and an increased tendency of the blood to clot. There are several factors which can increase a person's risk for deep vein thrombosis. The symptoms of deep vein thrombosis in the legs are pain, swelling and redness of the part. One variety of venous thrombosis is phlegmasia alba dolens where the leg becomes pale and cool. Investigations include Doppler ultrasound examination of the limb, D-dimer blood test, plethysmography of the legs, x-rays to show vein in the affected area (venography). Hospitalisation is necessary in some cases with some risk factors. The mainstream of treatment is with anticoagulants, mostly low molecular weight heparin for 6 months. Deep venous thrombosis is a rising problem. Early diagnosis and treatment is associated with a good prognosis.

  8. Polarised HIGH-Q2 Deep Inelastic Scattering at Hera-Ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, K.

    2005-04-01

    The cross sections for neutral and charged-current deep inelastic scattering with longitudinally polarised e+p collisions were first measured at a luminosity-averaged positive polarisation of about 30% and at a negative polarisation of about -40%. The parity-violating nature of the weak charged-current interaction was clearly observed, which is the first direct measurement at large energies.

  9. Deep ocean environmental biotechnology

    PubMed

    Deming

    1998-06-01

    Major recent advances in deep-sea biotechnology have come in the form of continuing discoveries of novel microorganisms, unexpected genetic diversity, and new natural products of potential relevance to human health or environmental bioremediation. Continuing explorations of submarine hydrothermal vent environments have yielded new hyperthermophiles (maximal growth at 90 degreesC or greater) and more evidence that elevated hydrostatic pressure stabilizes cells and enzymes at high temperature. Vent samples have also yielded new mesophiles (optimal growth near 30 degreesC) that produce heparin-like exopolysaccharides or express extraordinary tolerance (removal by precipitation) of heavy metals. From the cold deep sea have come new findings of unexpected microbial diversity and the promise of industrially useful enzymes or secondary metabolites. New classes of predictive models are emerging to guide future exploration of microbial diversity in the deep ocean.

  10. Nonperturbative comparison of QCD effective charges

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Papavassiliou, J.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2009-10-15

    We study the nonperturbative behavior of two versions of the QCD effective charge, one obtained from the pinch technique gluon self-energy, and one from the ghost-gluon vertex. Despite their distinct theoretical origin, due to a fundamental identity relating various ingredients appearing in their respective definitions, the two effective charges are almost identical in the entire range of physical momenta, and coincide exactly in the deep infrared, where they freeze at a common finite value. Specifically, the dressing function of the ghost propagator is related to the two form factors in the Lorentz decomposition of a certain Green's function, appearing in a variety of field-theoretic contexts. The central identity, which is valid only in the Landau gauge, is derived from the Schwinger-Dyson equations governing the dynamics of the aforementioned quantities. The renormalization procedure that preserves the validity of the identity is carried out, and various relevant kinematic limits and physically motivated approximations are studied in detail. A crucial ingredient in this analysis is the infrared finiteness of the gluon propagator, which is inextricably connected with the aforementioned freezing of the effective charges. Some important issues related to the consistent definition of the effective charge in the presence of such a gluon propagator are resolved. We finally present a detailed numerical study of a special set of Schwinger-Dyson equations, whose solutions determine the nonperturbative dynamics of the quantities composing the two effective charges.

  11. Water permeation through a charged channel.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liang; Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia

    2013-06-27

    Transport properties of water molecules through hydrophobic channels have been explored extensively in recent years; however, our knowledge about the transport properties of hydrophilic channels is still rather poor. Herein, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the permeation of water molecules through a charged channel. For comparison, we first consider the pristine hydrophobic channel without charge, and we find an analytic expression that can predict the water flow through it. For uniformly charged channels, with the increase of charge density, the water flow decreases, due to the increase of roughness in the free energy profile experienced by a water molecule along the channel; while the ion flow exhibits a maximum, because of the competition between the increasing ion number and ion-channel attraction. Surprisingly, the water occupancy for positive and negative channels varies in the opposite direction, which is strongly related to the excluded volume effect of ions. Additionally, we also discuss the effect of surface charge patterns and channel sizes. These results not only enrich our understanding of the transport properties of hydrophilic channels, but also have deep implications for the design of nanometer water gates.

  12. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  13. Battery formation charging apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.L.

    1987-08-04

    An apparatus is describe for charging electric storage batteries, the apparatus comprising: (a) a host computer for providing charging information to and receiving status information from at least one slave computer by means of a data link; and (b) at least one control module coupled to the slave computer for applying charging current to at least one electric storage battery in response to instructions received from the slave computer, and for providing feedback and status information to the slave computer.

  14. Measurement of exclusive dijet production in diffractive DIS with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Gach, Grzegorz

    2015-04-10

    The exclusive production of dijets in diffractive deep inelastic lepton–proton scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA with an integrated luminosity of 372 pb{sup −1}. Jets have been reconstructed in the photon–Pomeron rest frame using the exclusive k{sub T} algorithm. The shape of the differential cross-section as a function of the angle between the plane spanned by the incoming and scattered lepton momenta and the plane spanned by the virtual photon and jets momenta is presented. The shape is determined by the jet production mechanism and provides information about the Pomeron structure.

  15. Charging of interplanetary grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baragiola, R. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Newcomb, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this program is to quantify, by laboratory experiments, the charging of ices and other insulators subject to irradiation with electrons, ions and ultraviolet photons and to model special conditions based on the data. The system and conditions to be studied are those relevant for charging of dust in magnetospheric plasmas. The measurements are supplemented by computer simulations of charging or grains under a variety of conditions. Our work for this period involved experiments on water ice, improved models of charging of ice grains for Saturn's E-ring, and the construction of apparatus for electron impact studies and measurements of electron energy distributions.

  16. The deep penetrating nevus.

    PubMed

    Strazzula, Lauren; Senna, Maryanne Makredes; Yasuda, Mariko; Belazarian, Leah

    2014-12-01

    The deep penetrating nevus (DPN), also known as the plexiform spindle cell nevus, is a pigmented lesion that commonly arises on the head and neck in the first few decades of life. Histopathologically, the DPN is wedge-shaped and contains melanocytes that exhibit deep infiltration into the dermis. Given these features, DPN may clinically and histopathologically mimic malignant melanoma, sparking confusion about the appropriate evaluation and management of these lesions. The goal of this review is to summarize the clinical and histopathological features of DPN and to discuss diagnostic and treatment strategies for dermatologists.

  17. Deep space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Srinivasan, Meera; Shaw, Matthew; Piazzolla, Sabino; Wright, Malcolm W.; Farr, William H.

    2016-03-01

    A number of laser communication link demonstrations from near Earth distances extending out to lunar ranges have been remarkably successful, demonstrating the augmented channel capacity that is accessible with the use of lasers for communications. The next hurdle on the path to extending laser communication and its benefits throughout the solar system and beyond is to demonstrate deep-space laser communication links. In this paper, concepts and technology development being advanced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in order to enable deep-space link demonstrations to ranges of approximately 3 AU in the next decade, will be discussed.

  18. 78 FR 55687 - Notice of Intent To Grant an Exclusive, Partially Exclusive or Non-Exclusive License of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Notice of Intent To Grant an Exclusive, Partially Exclusive or Non-Exclusive License of the United States Patent Application No. 13/ 543,217 Filed July 06, 2012 Entitled ''Tie-Down...

  19. 76 FR 38122 - Notice of Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing of an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... Department of the Army Notice of Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing... Agents, Synthesis of and Methods of Use Thereof AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice... United States Government, as represented by the Secretary of the Army, has rights to this...

  20. 78 FR 6814 - Notice of Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing of an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Department of the Army Notice of Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing... Epitopes AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Announcement is made of the... September 22, 2006. The United States Government as represented by the Secretary of the Army has rights...

  1. 76 FR 38122 - Notice of Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing of an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... Department of the Army Notice of Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing..., Synthesis of and Methods of Use Thereof AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... represented by the Secretary of the Army, has rights to this invention. ADDRESSES: Commander, U.S....

  2. Exclusive processes in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Lepage, G.P.

    1981-06-01

    Large momentum transfer exclusive processes and the short distance structure of hadronic wave functions can be systematically analyzed within the context of perturbative QCD. Predictions for meson form factors, two-photon processes ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. M anti M, hadronic decays of heavy quark systems, and a number of other related QCD phenomena are reviewed.

  3. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  4. 5 CFR 551.214 - Statutory exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.214 Statutory exclusion. A....S.C. 267 and under 19 CFR 24.16 for time worked may not receive pay or other compensation for...

  5. 5 CFR 551.214 - Statutory exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.214 Statutory exclusion. A....S.C. 267 and under 19 CFR 24.16 for time worked may not receive pay or other compensation for...

  6. 5 CFR 551.214 - Statutory exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.214 Statutory exclusion. A....S.C. 267 and under 19 CFR 24.16 for time worked may not receive pay or other compensation for...

  7. 5 CFR 551.214 - Statutory exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.214 Statutory exclusion. A....S.C. 267 and under 19 CFR 24.16 for time worked may not receive pay or other compensation for...

  8. 5 CFR 551.214 - Statutory exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.214 Statutory exclusion. A....S.C. 267 and under 19 CFR 24.16 for time worked may not receive pay or other compensation for...

  9. Deep and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather

    2015-05-15

    In this session we focused on the higher energy deep and shallow inelastic particle interactions, DIS and SIS. DIS interactions occur when the energy of the incident particle beam is so large that the beam is able to penetrate the nucleons inside of the target nuclei. These interactions occur at the smallest level possible, that of the quark-gluon, or parton, level. SIS interactions occur in an intermediate energy range, just below the energy required for DIS interactions. The DIS cross section formula contains structure functions that describe our understanding of the underlying parton structure of nature. The full description of DIS interactions requires three structure functions: two may be measured in charged lepton or neutrino scattering, but one can only be extracted from neutrino DIS data. There are reasons to expect that the impact of nuclear effects could be different for neutrinos engaging in the DIS interaction, vs those felt by leptons. In fact, fits by the nCTEQ collaboration have found that the neutrino-Fe structure functions appear to differ from those extracted from lepton scattering data [1]. To better understand the global picture of DIS and SIS, we chose a three-pronged attack that examined recent experimental results, data fits, and latest theory predictions. Experimental results from neutrino and lepton scattering, as well as collider experiments, were presented.

  10. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Work accomplished on the Deep Space Network (DSN) was described, including the following topics: supporting research and technology, advanced development and engineering, system implementation, and DSN operations pertaining to mission-independent or multiple-mission development as well as to support of flight projects.

  11. Deep neck space infections.

    PubMed

    Beasley, D J; Amedee, R G

    1995-05-01

    The incidence of deep neck space infections has dramatically decreased since the advent of antibiotics, but with delayed treatment they carry the potential for significant morbidity and mortality. Odontogenic infections with involvement of the submandibular space are the most common source of deep neck space infections in adults, whereas in the pediatric population the most common cause is acute tonsillitis with involvement of the peritonsillar space. The newest group of patients at risk for deep neck space infections are intravenous drug abusers who inject the major vessels of the neck. Knowledge of neck spaces and fascial relationships is important in understanding the presentation, treatment, and complications of deep neck space infections. The spaces, which are created by various fasciae of the head and neck, are only potential spaces in that under normal conditions they cannot be examined clinically or radiographically. As the spaces are invaded by bacteria, a cellulitis or abscess occurs, and this infection may travel through paths of least resistance from one space to another.

  12. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is the largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation network in the world. Its principal responsibilities are to support unmanned interplanetary spacecraft missions and to support radio and radar astronomy observations in the exploration of the solar system and the universe. The DSN facilities and capabilities as of January 1988 are described.

  13. [Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Chagoya, Gloria Alejandra; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background: despite the proven effectiveness of preventive therapy for deep vein thrombosis, a significant proportion of patients at risk for thromboembolism do not receive prophylaxis during hospitalization. Our objective was to determine the adherence to thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines in a general hospital as a quality control strategy. Methods: a random audit of clinical charts was conducted at the Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico, to determine the degree of adherence to deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines. The instrument used was the Caprini's checklist for thrombosis risk assessment in adult patients. Results: the sample included 300 patient charts; 182 (60.7 %) were surgical patients and 118 were medical patients. Forty six patients (15.3 %) received deep vein thrombosis pharmacologic prophylaxis; 27.1 % of medical patients received deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis versus 8.3 % of surgical patients (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: our results show that adherence to DVT prophylaxis at our hospital is extremely low. Only 15.3 % of our patients at risk received treatment, and even patients with very high risk received treatment in less than 25 % of the cases. We have implemented strategies to increase compliance with clinical guidelines.

  14. Teaching for Deep Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Tracy Wilson; Colby, Susan A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors have been engaged in research focused on students' depth of learning as well as teachers' efforts to foster deep learning. Findings from a study examining the teaching practices and student learning outcomes of sixty-four teachers in seventeen different states (Smith et al. 2005) indicated that most of the learning in these classrooms…

  15. Communicating through deep space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) consists of a worldwide set of communication stations and a central control facility in California, enabling communication with spacecraft thousands of millions of miles from earth. The stations have gone from 26 m diameter antennas operating at 960 MHz to 70 m diameter (by 1988) at 8400 MHz. The DSN provides exceptional performance in high gain steerable antennas, ultra-low noise receivers, high power transmitters, frequency and time standards, and precise radio metric data. Spacecraft missions envisaged in the 1990's for the continuing exploration of the Solar System include an array of increasingly complex visits to the inner planets, asteroids and comets and the outer planets. The Deep Space Network planned for the mid-1980s may not meet all the needs of these missions without substantial change. Deep space stations may require conversion to operation with beam waveguides, higher frequency and relative frequency stability of 10 to the -16th. A deep space relay station in earth orbit could permit operation at higher frequencies, with attendant higher performance. Long range planning to select the appropriate future network configurations and develop the technologies essential to their implementation is underway.

  16. 40 CFR 122.3 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Exclusions. 122.3 Section 122.3... § 122.3 Exclusions. The following discharges do not require NPDES permits: (a) Any discharge of sewage... wastes, or any other discharge incidental to the normal operation of a vessel. This exclusion does...

  17. Exclusive Reactions at High Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly; Stoler, Paul

    2008-03-01

    Hard exclusive scattering at JLab / P. Kroll -- AdS/CFT and exclusive processes in QCD / S. J. Brodsky and G. F. de Téramond -- Hadron structure matters in collisions at high energy and momentum / A. W. Thomas -- Inclusive perspectives / P. Hoyer -- Fitting DVCS at NLO and beyond / K. Kumericki, D. Müller and K. Passek-Kumericki -- Spin-orbit correlations and single-spin asymmetries / M. Burkardt -- Electroproduction of soft pions at large momentum transfers / V. M. Braun, D. Yu. Ivanov and A. Peters -- Color transparency: 33 years and still running / M. Strikman -- Meson clouds and nucleon electromagnetic form factors / G. A. Miller -- Covariance, dynamics and symmetries, and hadron form factors / M. S. Bhagwat, I. C. Cloët and C. D. Roberts -- N to [symbol] electromagnetic and axial form factors in full QCD / C. Alexandrou -- Real and virtual compton scattering in perturbative QCD / C.-R. Ji and R. Thomson -- Deeply virtual compton scattering at Jefferson Lab / F. Sabatie -- DVCS at HERMES: recent results / F. Ellinghaus -- Deeply virtual compton scattering with CLAS / F. X. Girod -- Deeply virtual compton scattering off the neutron at JLab Hall A / M. Mazouz -- The future DVCS experiments in Hall A at JLab / J. Roche -- Deeply virtual compton scattering with CLAS12 / L. Elouadrhiri -- Quark helicity flip and the transverse spin dependence of inclusive DIS / A. Afanasev, M. Strikman and C. Weiss -- Deeply virtual pseudoscalar meson production / V. Kubarovsky and P. Stoler -- Exclusive p[symbol] electroproduction on the proton: GPDs or not GPDs? / M. Guidal and S. Morrow -- p[symbol] transverse target spin asymmetry at HERMES / A. Airapetian -- Electroproduction of ø(1020) mesons / J. P. Santoro and E. S. Smith -- Generalized parton distributions from hadronic observables / S. Ahmad ... [et al.] -- Imaging the proton via hard exclusive production in diffractive pp scattering / G. E. Hyde ... [et al.] -- Regge contributions to exclusive electro-production / A

  18. Nuclear Charge Radii Systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, Krassimira

    2015-09-15

    This paper is a brief overview of the existing systematics on nuclear mean square charge radii, obtained by a combined analysis of data from different types of experiment. The various techniques yielding data on nuclear charge radii are summarized. Their specific feature complexities and the accuracy and precision of the obtained information are also discussed.

  19. Space charge stopband correction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2005-09-01

    It is speculated that the space charge effect cause beam emittance growth through the resonant envelope oscillation. Based on this theory, we propose an approach, called space charge stopband correction, to reduce such emittance growth by compensation of the half-integer stopband width of the resonant oscillation. It is illustrated with the Fermilab Booster model.

  20. Charged particle radiography.

    PubMed

    Morris, C L; King, N S P; Kwiatkowski, K; Mariam, F G; Merrill, F E; Saunders, A

    2013-04-01

    New applications of charged particle radiography have been developed over the past two decades that extend the range of radiographic techniques providing high-speed sequences of radiographs of thicker objects with higher effective dose than can be obtained with conventional radiographic techniques. In this paper, we review the motivation and the development of flash radiography and in particular, charged particle radiography. PMID:23481477

  1. Charged particle radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.; King, N. S. P.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Saunders, A.

    2013-04-01

    New applications of charged particle radiography have been developed over the past two decades that extend the range of radiographic techniques providing high-speed sequences of radiographs of thicker objects with higher effective dose than can be obtained with conventional radiographic techniques. In this paper, we review the motivation and the development of flash radiography and in particular, charged particle radiography.

  2. Charge depletion meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J. F.

    1984-11-01

    This invention relates to a charge depletion meter apparatus having a current to frequency converter to sense and convert the current drain of a battery source to a digital signal which is divided and then accumulated in a counter. An LCD display unit displays the accumulated charge which is received from the counter.

  3. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  4. Charging black Saturn?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chng, Brenda; Mann, Robert; Radu, Eugen; Stelea, Cristian

    2008-12-01

    We construct new charged static solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations in five dimensions via a solution generation technique utilizing the symmetries of the reduced Lagrangian. By applying our method on the multi-Reissner-Nordström solution in four dimensions, we generate the multi-Reissner-Nordström solution in five dimensions. We focus on the five-dimensional solution describing a pair of charged black objects with general masses and electric charges. This solution includes the double Reissner-Nordström solution as well as the charged version of the five-dimensional static black Saturn. However, all the black Saturn configurations that we found contain either a conical or naked singularity. We also obtain a non-extremal configuration of charged black strings that reduces in the extremal limit to a Majumdar-Papapetrou like solution in five dimensions.

  5. Charged topological entanglement entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Shunji; Wen, Xueda; Hung, Ling-Yan; Ryu, Shinsei

    2016-05-01

    A charged entanglement entropy is a new measure which probes quantum entanglement between different charge sectors. We study symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases in (2+1)-dimensional space-time by using this charged entanglement entropy. SPT phases are short-range entangled states without topological order and hence cannot be detected by the topological entanglement entropy. We demonstrate that the universal part of the charged entanglement entropy is nonzero for nontrivial SPT phases and therefore it is a useful measure to detect short-range entangled topological phases. We also discuss that the classification of SPT phases based on the charged topological entanglement entropy is related to that of the braiding statistics of quasiparticles.

  6. Soil moisture depletion under simulated drought in the Amazon: impacts on deep root uptake.

    PubMed

    Markewitz, Daniel; Devine, Scott; Davidson, Eric A; Brando, Paulo; Nepstad, Daniel C

    2010-08-01

    *Deep root water uptake in tropical Amazonian forests has been a major discovery during the last 15 yr. However, the effects of extended droughts, which may increase with climate change, on deep soil moisture utilization remain uncertain. *The current study utilized a 1999-2005 record of volumetric water content (VWC) under a throughfall exclusion experiment to calibrate a one-dimensional model of the hydrologic system to estimate VWC, and to quantify the rate of root uptake through 11.5 m of soil. *Simulations with root uptake compensation had a relative root mean square error (RRMSE) of 11% at 0-40 cm and < 5% at 350-1150 cm. The simulated contribution of deep root uptake under the control was c. 20% of water demand from 250 to 550 cm and c. 10% from 550 to 1150 cm. Furthermore, in years 2 (2001) and 3 (2002) of throughfall exclusion, deep root uptake increased as soil moisture was available but then declined to near zero in deep layers in 2003 and 2004. *Deep root uptake was limited despite high VWC (i.e. > 0.30 cm(3) cm(-3)). This limitation may partly be attributable to high residual water contents (theta(r)) in these high-clay (70-90%) soils or due to high soil-to-root resistance. The ability of deep roots and soils to contribute increasing amounts of water with extended drought will be limited.

  7. Exclusive Dijet production from CDF2LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-04-01

    Exclusive dijet production at the Tevatron can be used as a benchmark to establish predictions on exclusive diffractive Higgs production, a process with a much smaller cross section. Exclusive dijet production in Double Pomeron Exchange processes, including diffractive Higgs production with measurements at the Tevatron and predictions for the Large Hadron Collider are presented. Using new data from the Tevatron and dedicated diffractive triggers, no excess over a smooth falling distribution for exclusive dijet events could be found. Upper limits on the exclusive dijet production cross section are presented and compared to current theoretical predictions.

  8. [Mothers' knowledge about exclusive breastfeeding].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nichelle Monique; Waterkemper, Roberta; da Silva, Eveline Franco; Cordova, Fernanda Peixoto; Bonilha, Ana Lucia de Lourenzi

    2014-01-01

    This is a descriptive study, with a qualitative approach, aimed to identify the knowledge of puerperal women on exclusive breastfeeding. Data were collected between September-October 2011, through semi-structured interview. Thirteen puerperal women, interned in a rooming unit of a public institution in the city of Caxias do Sul-RS, participated in the study. Data analysis was performed using thematic analysis. From the interpretation of information three categories emerged: the knowledge about exclusive breastfeeding, the breastfeeding process and the influences of received information. Even getting information from health professionals in the prenatal period, it is possible to understand that there is a need to improve communication and monitoring of mothers, as a continuity of professional care in the postpartum period, and also later, in the remote.

  9. Incorporating cultural beliefs in promoting exclusive breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Reinsma, Kathryn; Bolima, Nancy; Fonteh, Florence; Okwen, Patrick; Yota, Daniel; Montgomery, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Since 2003, the World Health Organization has recommended exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life. In the Northwest region of Cameroon approximately 90% of women initiate breastfeeding, yet only 34% of these women exclusively breastfeed for the recommended six months. Aim To determine influences on women’s exclusive breastfeeding practices. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six women and six men followed by focus group discussions with three groups of women and three groups of men in the Kumbo West Health District, Northwest region, Cameroon. All participants were selected using theoretical sampling to assure triangulation. Results Three themes emerged that influence exclusive breastfeeding practices: woman’s readiness to exclusively breastfeed; cultural influences towards exclusive breastfeeding; and perceived constraints to exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion These emergent themes were used to create a theoretical framework that is useful for developing a breastfeeding health education intervention in non-Western settings. PMID:26973717

  10. Folding without charges

    PubMed Central

    Kurnik, Martin; Hedberg, Linda; Danielsson, Jens; Oliveberg, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Surface charges of proteins have in several cases been found to function as “structural gatekeepers,” which avoid unwanted interactions by negative design, for example, in the control of protein aggregation and binding. The question is then if side-chain charges, due to their desolvation penalties, play a corresponding role in protein folding by avoiding competing, misfolded traps? To find out, we removed all 32 side-chain charges from the 101-residue protein S6 from Thermus thermophilus. The results show that the charge-depleted S6 variant not only retains its native structure and cooperative folding transition, but folds also faster than the wild-type protein. In addition, charge removal unleashes pronounced aggregation on longer timescales. S6 provides thus an example where the bias toward native contacts of a naturally evolved protein sequence is independent of charges, and point at a fundamental difference in the codes for folding and intermolecular interaction: specificity in folding is governed primarily by hydrophobic packing and hydrogen bonding, whereas solubility and binding relies critically on the interplay of side-chain charges. PMID:22454493

  11. Deep gluteal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Hal David; Reddy, Manoj; Gómez-Hoyos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Deep gluteal syndrome describes the presence of pain in the buttock caused from non-discogenic and extrapelvic entrapment of the sciatic nerve. Several structures can be involved in sciatic nerve entrapment within the gluteal space. A comprehensive history and physical examination can orientate the specific site where the sciatic nerve is entrapped, as well as several radiological signs that support the suspected diagnosis. Failure to identify the cause of pain in a timely manner can increase pain perception, and affect mental control, patient hope and consequently quality of life. This review presents a comprehensive approach to the patient with deep gluteal syndrome in order to improve the understanding of posterior hip anatomy, nerve kinematics, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, differential diagnosis and treatment considerations. PMID:27011826

  12. Deep gluteal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Hal David; Reddy, Manoj; Gómez-Hoyos, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Deep gluteal syndrome describes the presence of pain in the buttock caused from non-discogenic and extrapelvic entrapment of the sciatic nerve. Several structures can be involved in sciatic nerve entrapment within the gluteal space. A comprehensive history and physical examination can orientate the specific site where the sciatic nerve is entrapped, as well as several radiological signs that support the suspected diagnosis. Failure to identify the cause of pain in a timely manner can increase pain perception, and affect mental control, patient hope and consequently quality of life. This review presents a comprehensive approach to the patient with deep gluteal syndrome in order to improve the understanding of posterior hip anatomy, nerve kinematics, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, differential diagnosis and treatment considerations.

  13. Deep-Sarsa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrecut, M.; Ali, M. K.

    In this paper we discuss the application of reinforcement learning algorithms to the problem of autonomous robot navigation. We show that the autonomous navigation using the standard delayed reinforcement learning algorithms is an ill posed problem and we present a more efficient algorithm for which the convergence speed is greatly improved. The proposed algorithm (Deep-Sarsa) is based on a combination between the Depth-First Search (a graph searching algorithm) and Sarsa (a delayed reinforcement learning algorithm).

  14. Understanding deep convolutional networks.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Stéphane

    2016-04-13

    Deep convolutional networks provide state-of-the-art classifications and regressions results over many high-dimensional problems. We review their architecture, which scatters data with a cascade of linear filter weights and nonlinearities. A mathematical framework is introduced to analyse their properties. Computations of invariants involve multiscale contractions with wavelets, the linearization of hierarchical symmetries and sparse separations. Applications are discussed. PMID:26953183

  15. Process for fabricating a charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Young, Bruce K. F.

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  16. Three-dimensional charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Young, Bruce K. F.

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  17. Bilingual deep dysphasia.

    PubMed

    Weekes, Brendan S; Raman, Ilhan

    2008-05-01

    We report B.R.B., a bilingual Turkish-English speaker with deep dysphasia. B.R.B. shows the typical pattern of semantic errors in repetition with effects of lexicality and imageability on performance in both languages. The question we asked is whether language type (Turkish or English) or language status--that is, first acquired (L1) or second acquired (L2)--has a greater impact on performance. Results showed that repetition in L1 (Turkish) was better than that in L2 (English). We also observed effects of language status on oral reading, writing to dictation, and naming (spoken and written) with greater impairment to repetition than other tasks in both languages. An additional finding was that spoken-word translation in both directions was worse than written-word translation, and word class had an effect on translation from L1 to L2. We argue that interactive activation models of deep dysphasia could explain deep dysphasia in bilingual speakers and interactions between task and language, if the weighted connections that support language processing in L2 are assumed to be weaker, thus causing rapid phonological decay to have more impact on task performance in L2. Implications of the results for models of bilingual language processing are also considered.

  18. Imagining Deep Time (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talasek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Imagining Deep Time '...the mind seemed to grow giddy by looking so far into the abyss of time.' John Playfair (1748 -1819), scientist and mathematician "Man cannot afford to conceive of nature and exclude himself." Emmit Gowin, photographer 'A person would have to take themselves out of the human context to begin to think in terms of geologic time. They would have to think like a rock.' Terry Falke, photographer The term Deep Time refers to the vastness of the geological time scale. First conceived in the 18th century, the development of this perspective on time has been pieced together like a jigsaw puzzle of information and observations drawn from the study of the earth's structure and discovered fossilized flora and fauna. Deep time may possibly be the greatest contribution made by the discipline of geology forever impacting our perception of earth and our relationship to it. How do we grasp such vast concepts as deep time which relates to the origins of the earth or cosmic time which relates to the origins of the universe - concepts that exist far beyond the realm of human experience? Further more how do we communicate this? The ability to visualize is a powerful tool of discovery and communication for the scientist and it is part and parcel of the work of visual artists. The scientific process provides evidence yet it is imagination on the part of the scientists and artists alike that is needed to interpret that information. This exhibition represents an area where both rational and intuitive thinking come together to explore this question of how we relate to the vastness of time. The answer suggested by the combination of art work assembled here suggests that we do so through a combination of visual metaphors (cycles, circles, arrows, trajectories) and visual evidence (rock formations, strata, fossils of fauna and flora) while being mediated through various technologies. One provides factual and empirical evidence while the other provides a way of grasping

  19. Can Water Store Charge?

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikova, Kate; Pollack, Gerald H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous work from this and other laboratories has demonstrated large pH gradients in water. Established by passing current between immersed electrodes, pH gradients between electrodes were found to disappear slowly, persisting for tens of minutes after the current had been turned off. We find here that these pH gradients reflect a genuine separation of charge: at times well after disconnection of the power supply, current could be drawn through a resistor placed between the charging electrodes or between pairs of electrodes positioned on either side of the midline between original electrodes. In some experiments, it was possible to recover the majority of charge that had been imparted to the water. It appears, then, that water has the capacity to store and release substantial amounts of charge. PMID:19053655

  20. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure. This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  1. Generating charge from diffeomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, James; Kraus, Per

    2006-12-01

    We unravel some subtleties involving the definition of sphere angular momentum charges in AdSq × Sp spacetimes, or equivalently, R-symmetry charges in the dual boundary CFT. In the AdS3 context, it is known that charges can be generated by coordinate transformations, even though the underlying theory is diffeomorphism invariant. This is the bulk version of spectral flow in the boundary CFT. We trace this behavior back to special properties of the p-form field strength supporting the solution, and derive the explicit formulas for angular momentum charges. This analysis also reveals the higher dimensional origin of three dimensional Chern-Simons terms and of chiral anomalies in the boundary theory.

  2. High rate partial-state-of-charge operation of VRLA batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Patrick T.

    The world market for 12 V SLI batteries currently stands at around US$ 12 billion. The lack of a serious challenge from other battery types has allowed lead-acid products to serve this market exclusively, with minimal demand for product improvement through research and development, and a sharp competition has, over time, cut sales prices to commodity levels. The electrochemical storage of energy in automobiles now faces the possibility of a major change, in the form of the proposed 36/42 V electrical systems for vehicles that remain primarily powered by internal combustion engines, and of the hybrid electric vehicle. The duty cycle for these two applications sees the battery held at a partial-state-of-charge (PSoC) for most of its life and required to supply, and to accept, charge at unprecedented rates. The remarkable advances achieved with VRLA battery technology for electric vehicles during the past 8-10 years will be of only passing value in overcoming the challenges posed by high rate PSoC service in 36/42 V and HEV duty. This is because the failure modes seen in PSoC are quite different from those faced in EV (deep cycle) use. The replacement of the 12 V SLI will not take place rapidly. However, if the applications which take its place are to be satisfied by a lead-acid product (probably VRLA), rather than by a battery of a different chemistry, a program of development as successful as that mounted for deep cycle duty will be required. The present phase of the Advanced Lead-Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC) R&D program has begun to shed light on those aspects of the function of a VRLA battery which currently limit its life in high rate PSoC duty. The program is also pursuing the several technologies which show promise of overcoming those limits, including multiple tab plate design, mass transport facilitation and minor component (both beneficial and detrimental impurity) management. This paper presents a brief review of the changes which are taking place in

  3. Modeling of spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of modeling of spacecraft charging are discussed: statistical models, parametric models, and physical models. Local time dependence of circuit upset for DoD and communication satellites, and electron current to a sphere with an assumed Debye potential distribution are presented. Four regions were involved in spacecraft charging: (1) undisturbed plasma, (2) plasma sheath region, (3) spacecraft surface, and (4) spacecraft equivalent circuit.

  4. Particle-Charge Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen; Wilson, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    An instrument for rapidly measuring the electric charges and sizes (from approximately 1 to approximately 100 micrometers) of airborne particles is undergoing development. Conceived for monitoring atmospheric dust particles on Mars, instruments like this one could also be used on Earth to monitor natural and artificial aerosols in diverse indoor and outdoor settings for example, volcanic regions, clean rooms, powder-processing machinery, and spray-coating facilities. The instrument incorporates a commercially available, low-noise, ultrasensitive charge-sensing preamplifier circuit. The input terminal of this circuit--the gate of a field-effect transistor--is connected to a Faraday-cage cylindrical electrode. The charged particles of interest are suspended in air or other suitable gas that is made to flow along the axis of the cylindrical electrode without touching the electrode. The flow can be channeled and generated by any of several alternative means; in the prototype of this instrument, the gas is drawn along a glass capillary tube (see upper part of figure) coaxial with the electrode. The size of a particle affects its rate of acceleration in the flow and thus affects the timing and shape of the corresponding signal peak generated by the charge-sensing amplifier. The charge affects the magnitude (and thus also the shape) of the signal peak. Thus, the signal peak (see figure) conveys information on both the size and electric charge of a sensed particle. In experiments thus far, the instrument has been found to be capable of measuring individual aerosol particle charges of magnitude greater than 350 e (where e is the fundamental unit of electric charge) with a precision of +/- 150 e. The instrument can sample particles at a rate as high as several thousand per second.

  5. Electrically charged targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  6. MOSFET Electric-Charge Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Paul A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Charged-particle probe compact and consumes little power. Proposed modification enables metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) to act as detector of static electric charges or energetic charged particles. Thickened gate insulation acts as control structure. During measurements metal gate allowed to "float" to potential of charge accumulated in insulation. Stack of modified MOSFET'S constitutes detector of energetic charged particles. Each gate "floats" to potential induced by charged-particle beam penetrating its layer.

  7. Charging Algorithm Extends the Life of Lead-acid Batteries: 2001 R and D 100 Award Recipient

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.

    2001-09-27

    Fact sheet describing NREL's work with Recombination Technologies and Optima Batteries to develop a current interrupt charging algorithm to extend the deep life cycle of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries.

  8. Backside Charging of Ccds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Venkatraman

    1997-10-01

    Backside illuminated thinned CCDs have the highest response in the UV and blue spectral region. Their use in detectors is limited due to the instability of the CCD. A low temperature oxide nearly 30 A thick is grown on the acid thinned backside to tie up dangling bonds. The oxide carries fixed positive charges that attract and trap photogenerated electrons. A permanent and stable backside charging procedure is necessary to create a negative bias that will drive electrons to the frontside collection wells. We have shown chemisorption charging to be a novel method to permanently charge CCDs. The catalytic nature of certain metals are exploited to chemisorb oxygen as negative atomic species at the metal/oxide interface. Charging is shown to occur by depositing a thin film 10 A of platinum on the backside. No tunneling occurs because of the thick oxide. The Passivated Platinum Film (PPtF) which utilizes a hafnium oxide antireflection coating to passivate the platinum is an effective process, but it is sensitive to the environment and discharges quickly upon hydrogen exposure. A silver catalytic coating is shown to be far superior to other charging techniques. Silver irreversibly chemisorbs oxygen and hydrogen is not dissociatively adsorbed except at temperatures <100oK. High quantum efficiencies have been recorded for the UV-blue ranges. A slight drop is seen at cold temperatures due to interaction of water with oxygen to form hydroxyl ions. No change in QE is seen upon exposure to hydrogen or during outgassing. Silver is also one of the most transparent metals and easily deposited by evaporation. We therefore have developed a charging process which is nearly ideal for CCD imaging.

  9. Deep shadow occulter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for occulting light. The occulter shape suppresses diffraction at any given size or angle and is practical to build because it can be made binary to avoid scatter. Binary structures may be fully opaque or fully transmitting at specific points. The diffraction suppression is spectrally broad so that it may be used with incoherent white light. An occulter may also include substantially opaque inner portion and an at least partially transparent outer portion. Such occulters may be used on the ground to create a deep shadow in a short distance, or may be used in space to suppress starlight and reveal exoplanets.

  10. Deep Space Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Andrew T. (Inventor); Riedel, Joseph E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single, compact, lower power deep space positioning system (DPS) configured to determine a location of a spacecraft anywhere in the solar system, and provide state information relative to Earth, Sun, or any remote object. For example, the DPS includes a first camera and, possibly, a second camera configured to capture a plurality of navigation images to determine a state of a spacecraft in a solar system. The second camera is located behind, or adjacent to, a secondary reflector of a first camera in a body of a telescope.

  11. Charge Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennerl, Konrad

    2010-12-01

    Charge transfer, or charge exchange, describes a process in which an ion takes one or more electrons from another atom. Investigations of this fundamental process have accompanied atomic physics from its very beginning, and have been extended to astrophysical scenarios already many decades ago. Yet one important aspect of this process, i.e. its high efficiency in generating X-rays, was only revealed in 1996, when comets were discovered as a new class of X-ray sources. This finding has opened up an entirely new field of X-ray studies, with great impact due to the richness of the underlying atomic physics, as the X-rays are not generated by hot electrons, but by ions picking up electrons from cold gas. While comets still represent the best astrophysical laboratory for investigating the physics of charge transfer, various studies have already spotted a variety of other astrophysical locations, within and beyond our solar system, where X-rays may be generated by this process. They range from planetary atmospheres, the heliosphere, the interstellar medium and stars to galaxies and clusters of galaxies, where charge transfer may even be observationally linked to dark matter. This review attempts to put the various aspects of the study of charge transfer reactions into a broader historical context, with special emphasis on X-ray astrophysics, where the discovery of cometary X-ray emission may have stimulated a novel look at our universe.

  12. Taming Highly Charged Radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Usman; Eberhardt, Benjamin; Jang, Fuluni; Schultz, Brad; Simon, Vanessa; Delheij, Paul; Dilling, Jens; Gwinner, Gerald

    2012-10-01

    The precise and accurate mass of short-lived radioisotopes is a very important parameter in physics. Contribution to the improvement of nuclear models, metrological standard fixing and tests of the unitarity of the Caibbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are a few examples where the mass value plays a major role. TRIUMF's ion trap for atomic and nuclear physics (TITAN) is a unique facility of three online ion traps that enables the mass measurement of short-lived isotopes with high precision (˜10-8). At present TITAN's electron beam ion trap (EBIT) increases the charge state to increase the precision, but there is no facility to significantly reduce the energy spread introduced by the charge breeding process. The precision of the measured mass of radioisotopes is linearly dependent on the charge state while the energy spread of the charged radioisotopes affects the precision adversely. To boost the precision level of mass measurement at TITAN without loosing too many ions, a cooler Penning trap (CPET) is being developed. CPET is designed to use either positively (proton) or negatively (electron) charged particles to reduce the energy spread via sympathetic cooling. Off-line setup of CPET is complete. Details of the working principles and updates are presented

  13. Nanoparticle coagulation in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kondo, Michio; Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yukio

    2008-08-15

    The kinetics of nanoparticle coagulation has been studied in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas. The coagulation occurs when the mutual collision frequency among nanoparticles exceeds their charging and decharging/neutralization frequency. Interestingly, the coagulation is suppressed while a fraction (several percent) of nanoparticles are negatively charged in a plasma, in which stochastic charging plays an important role. A model is developed to predict a phase diagram of the coagulation and its suppression.

  14. NONFUEL MINERAL RESOURCES OF THE PACIFIC EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David; Bischoff, James; Howell, David

    1984-01-01

    The Pacific Exclusive Economic Zone contains a variety of hard mineral resources. Sand and gravel and their associated placer deposits of heavy minerals are the most likely to be developed in the near future, but offshore and deep water deposits of phosphorite, abyssal manganese nodules, ferromanganese crusts enriched in cobalt, and massive sulfide deposits all represent future resources. The distribution, extent, and formation of these deposits are poorly understood and will be clarified only with additional exploration, framework geologic mapping, and study of the processes by which these resources form. It is pointed out that the initial discovery of most hard-mineral resources in the EEZ was made during routine scientific marine-geologic surveys aimed at understanding the framework geology and geologic processes of an offshore region.

  15. Petroleum and mineral resources in Exclusive Economic Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.T.

    1986-05-01

    The US Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) was established by presidential proclamation on March 10, 1983. It gives the US the sovereign right over living and nonliving resources out to 200 nmi from its coast and island territories, an area of about 6,100,000 mi/sup 2/. Within this vast frontier, petroleum, metallic, and nonmetallic mineral deposits have been discovered or are believed to exist. Petroleum exploration has moved into progressively deeper water throughout this century, and has expanded to include all the varied and complex margins of North America. Some areas (e.g., the Gulf of Mexico, offshore California, and the North Slope of Alaska) have become major petroleum provinces with considerable future deep-water potential. Other regions (e.g., the Atlantic margin and Gulf of Alaska) have been disappointing. Too little is known about basins associated with the Pacific volcanic islands to evaluate them as yet.

  16. The study of the phase structure of hadronic matter by searching for the deconfined quark-gluon phase transition using 2 TeV [bar p]p collisions; and by searching for critical phenomena in an exclusive study of multifragmentation using 1 GeV/nucleon heavy ion collisions. [Detect ionization of charged particles directly in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Scharenberg, R.P.; Hirsch, A.S.; Tincknell, M.L.

    1992-09-15

    An experiment to search for the production of quark[endash]gluon plasma in proton[endash]antiproton interactions is described with emphasis on 1992 results. Next, a search for critical phenomena using the EOS Time Projection Chamber is similarly described, including the results of 1992 test runs, nucleus[endash]nucleus collision simulations, and the extraction of critical indices from small percolation lattices. Analysis of results from experiments to detect the possible production of anomalous photons in the central rapidity region with transverse momentum between 5 and 50 MeV/c are discussed. Initial work on an experiment to study the high-density, high-temperature state of matter formed in collisions of heavy nuclei at relativistic energies, planned to begin in fall 1997, is related. Finally, work on a research and development project to investigate silicon avalanche diodes as time-of-flight detectors for nuclear and particle physics applications is reviewed. The principle is to detect the ionization of charged particles directly in the Si; feasibility has been demonstrated.

  17. 42 CFR 411.31 - Authority to bill primary payers for full charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authority to bill primary payers for full charges. 411.31 Section 411.31 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT...

  18. 42 CFR 411.31 - Authority to bill primary payers for full charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Authority to bill primary payers for full charges. 411.31 Section 411.31 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT...

  19. Quick charge battery

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    Electric and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs) will become a significant reality in the near future of the automotive industry. Both types of vehicles will need a means to store energy on board. For the present, the method of choice would be lead-acid batteries, with the HEV having auxiliary power supplied by a small internal combustion engine. One of the main drawbacks to lead-acid batteries is internal heat generation as a natural consequence of the charging process as well as resistance losses. This limits the re-charging rate to the battery pack for an EV which has a range of about 80 miles. A quick turnaround on recharge is needed but not yet possible. One of the limiting factors is the heat buildup. For the HEV the auxiliary power unit provides a continuous charge to the battery pack. Therefore heat generation in the lead-acid battery is a constant problem that must be addressed. Presented here is a battery that is capable of quick charging, the Quick Charge Battery with Thermal Management. This is an electrochemical battery, typically a lead-acid battery, without the inherent thermal management problems that have been present in the past. The battery can be used in an all-electric vehicle, a hybrid-electric vehicle or an internal combustion engine vehicle, as well as in other applications that utilize secondary batteries. This is not restricted to only lead-acid batteries. The concept and technology are flexible enough to use in any secondary battery application where thermal management of the battery must be addressed, especially during charging. Any battery with temperature constraints can benefit from this advancement in the state of the art of battery manufacturing. This can also include nickel-cadmium, metal-air, nickel hydroxide, zinc-chloride or any other type of battery whose performance is affected by the temperature control of the interior as well as the exterior of the battery.

  20. A decade of emerging indications: deep brain stimulation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Youngerman, Brett E; Chan, Andrew K; Mikell, Charles B; McKhann, Guy M; Sheth, Sameer A

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging treatment option for an expanding set of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Despite growing enthusiasm, the patterns and implications of this rapid adoption are largely unknown. National trends in DBS surgery performed for all indications between 2002 and 2011 are reported. METHODS Using a national database of hospital discharges, admissions for DBS for 14 indications were identified and categorized as either FDA approved, humanitarian device exempt (HDE), or emerging. Trends over time were examined, differences were analyzed by univariate analyses, and outcomes were analyzed by hierarchical regression analyses. RESULTS Between 2002 and 2011, there were an estimated 30,490 discharges following DBS for approved indications, 1647 for HDE indications, and 2014 for emerging indications. The volume for HDE and emerging indications grew at 36.1% annually in comparison with 7.0% for approved indications. DBS for emerging indications occurred at hospitals with more neurosurgeons and neurologists locally, but not necessarily at those with the highest DBS caseloads. Patients treated for HDE and emerging indications were younger with lower comorbidity scores. HDE and emerging indications were associated with greater rates of reported complications, longer lengths of stay, and greater total costs. CONCLUSIONS DBS for HDE and emerging indications underwent rapid growth in the last decade, and it is not exclusively the most experienced DBS practitioners leading the charge to treat the newest indications. Surgeons may be selecting younger and healthier patients for their early experiences. Differences in reported complication rates warrant further attention and additional costs should be anticipated as surgeons gain experience with new patient populations and targets. PMID:26722851

  1. Impact of surface properties on the dust grain charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlů, J.; Richterová, I.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Dust grains are common in the space environment and being immersed in plasma, they become charged. It is well known that a motion of grains in space is driven mainly by electrodynamic forces and thus the grain charge is important for processes like the coagulation or dust cloud formations. Among other charging currents, emission processes are very important for setting the dust charge. It is believed that emission processes are connected exclusively with surface properties of dust grains but it is not evident for the surfaces covered by a very thin layer of different material (e.g., oxidized metal). For this reason, we investigate surface effects experimentally. Our experiment is based on an 3D electrodynamic trap. We caught a single dust grain for several days inside the vacuum vessel and exposed it to the electron/ion beam and studied charging/discharging processes. We have chosen spherically shaped melamine formaldehyde resin grains of a diameter 2.35 μm either with a clean surface or covered with a thin nickel film. An advantage of these samples is that the properties of bulk and surface materials are completely different. The effect of a surface modification was studied for ion and electron field emissions. We determined field intensities needed for significant emission currents as well as effective work functions for charged dust grains of particular material.

  2. Infrared intensities and charge mobility in hydrogen bonded complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Galimberti, Daria; Milani, Alberto; Castiglioni, Chiara

    2013-08-21

    The analytical model for the study of charge mobility in the molecules presented by Galimberti et al.[J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164115 (2013)] is applied to hydrogen bonded planar dimers. Atomic charges and charge fluxes are obtained from density functional theory computed atomic polar tensors and related first derivatives, thus providing an interpretation of the IR intensity enhancement of the X–H stretching band observed upon aggregation. Our results show that both principal and non-principal charge fluxes have an important role for the rationalization of the spectral behavior; moreover, they demonstrate that the modulation of the charge distribution during vibrational motions of the –XH⋯Y– fragment is not localized exclusively on the atoms directly involved in hydrogen bonding. With these premises we made some correlations between IR intensities, interaction energies, and charge fluxes. The model was tested on small dimers and subsequently to the bigger one cytosine-guanine. Thus, the model can be applied to complex systems.

  3. Effect of charge distribution on RDX adsorption in IRMOF-10

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ruichang; Keffer, David J.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Nicholson, Don M; Michalkova, Andrea; Petrova, Tetyana; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; Doss, Bryant; Lewis, James

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, classical grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations, and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to test the effect of charge distribution on hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) adsorption and diffusion in IRMOF-10. Several different methods for mapping QM electron distributions onto atomic point charges are explored, including the electrostatic potential (ESP) method, Mulliken population analysis, L{sub 0}wdin population analysis, and natural bond orbital analysis. Classical GCMC and MD simulations of RDX in IRMOF-10 are performed using 15 combinations of charge sources of RDX and IRMOF-10. As the charge distributions vary, interaction potential energies, the adsorption loading, and the self-diffusivities are significantly different. None of the 15 combinations are able to quantitatively capture the dependence of the energy of adsorption on local configuration of RDX as observed in the QM calculations. We observe changes in the charge distributions of RDX and IRMOF-10 with the introduction of an RDX molecule into the cage. We also observe a large dispersion contribution to the interaction energy from QM calculations that is not reproduced in the classical simulations, indicating that the source of discrepancy may not lie exclusively with the assignment of charges.

  4. Exclusion and Education in South Africa: An Education Law Perspective of Emerging Alternative Understandings of Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The new democratic dispensation in South Africa (1994) was accompanied by law and policy aimed at preventing unfair exclusion from educational opportunities and promoting equal access to educational opportunities. However, feelings of unfair exclusion remain and new understandings of exclusion are emerging. This paper examines the new policy and…

  5. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  6. HIV charge dropped.

    PubMed

    1997-07-25

    Guilford County Superior Court Judge James Webb ruled there was not enough evidence to convict HIV-positive [name removed] on charges of attempted murder and assault with a deadly weapon in connection with the rape of a 12-year-old girl. Prosecutors argued [name removed] knew he was HIV-positive when the rape occurred and defense attorney Randy Jones argued that there was no medical proof of [name removed]'s HIV status at the time of the attack. The judge dismissed the two charges against [name removed]. A jury later convicted [name removed] of statutory rape and taking indecent liberties with a minor. PMID:11364510

  7. Composition and ecology of deep-water coral associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühlmann, D. H. H.

    1983-06-01

    Between 1966 and 1978 SCUBA investigations were carried out in French Polynesia, the Red Sea, and the Caribbean, at depths down to 70 m. Although there are fewer coral species in the Caribbean, the abundance of Scleractinia in deep-water associations below 20 m almost equals that in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. The assemblages of corals living there are described and defined as deep-water coral associations. They are characterized by large, flattened growth forms. Only 6 to 7 % of the species occur exclusively below 20 m. More than 90 % of the corals recorded in deep waters also live in shallow regions. Depth-related illumination is not responsible for depth differentiations of coral associations, but very likely, a complex of mechanical factors, such as hydrodynamic conditions, substrate conditions, sedimentation etc. However, light intensity determines the general distribution of hermatypic Scleractinia in their bathymetric range as well as the platelike shape of coral colonies characteristic for deep water associations. Depending on mechanical factors, Leptoseris, Montipora, Porites and Pachyseris dominate as characteristic genera in the Central Pacific Ocean, Podabacia, Leptoseris, Pachyseris and Coscinarea in the Red Sea, Agaricia and Leptoseris in the tropical western Atlantic Ocean.

  8. Species distribution models of tropical deep-sea snappers.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Céline; Williams, Ashley J; Nicol, Simon J; Mellin, Camille; Loeun, Kim L; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2015-01-01

    Deep-sea fisheries provide an important source of protein to Pacific Island countries and territories that are highly dependent on fish for food security. However, spatial management of these deep-sea habitats is hindered by insufficient data. We developed species distribution models using spatially limited presence data for the main harvested species in the Western Central Pacific Ocean. We used bathymetric and water temperature data to develop presence-only species distribution models for the commercially exploited deep-sea snappers Etelis Cuvier 1828, Pristipomoides Valenciennes 1830, and Aphareus Cuvier 1830. We evaluated the performance of four different algorithms (CTA, GLM, MARS, and MAXENT) within the BIOMOD framework to obtain an ensemble of predicted distributions. We projected these predictions across the Western Central Pacific Ocean to produce maps of potential deep-sea snapper distributions in 32 countries and territories. Depth was consistently the best predictor of presence for all species groups across all models. Bathymetric slope was consistently the poorest predictor. Temperature at depth was a good predictor of presence for GLM only. Model precision was highest for MAXENT and CTA. There were strong regional patterns in predicted distribution of suitable habitat, with the largest areas of suitable habitat (> 35% of the Exclusive Economic Zone) predicted in seven South Pacific countries and territories (Fiji, Matthew & Hunter, Nauru, New Caledonia, Tonga, Vanuatu and Wallis & Futuna). Predicted habitat also varied among species, with the proportion of predicted habitat highest for Aphareus and lowest for Etelis. Despite data paucity, the relationship between deep-sea snapper presence and their environments was sufficiently strong to predict their distribution across a large area of the Pacific Ocean. Our results therefore provide a strong baseline for designing monitoring programs that balance resource exploitation and conservation planning, and

  9. Species Distribution Models of Tropical Deep-Sea Snappers

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Céline; Williams, Ashley J.; Nicol, Simon J.; Mellin, Camille; Loeun, Kim L.; Bradshaw, Corey J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep-sea fisheries provide an important source of protein to Pacific Island countries and territories that are highly dependent on fish for food security. However, spatial management of these deep-sea habitats is hindered by insufficient data. We developed species distribution models using spatially limited presence data for the main harvested species in the Western Central Pacific Ocean. We used bathymetric and water temperature data to develop presence-only species distribution models for the commercially exploited deep-sea snappers Etelis Cuvier 1828, Pristipomoides Valenciennes 1830, and Aphareus Cuvier 1830. We evaluated the performance of four different algorithms (CTA, GLM, MARS, and MAXENT) within the BIOMOD framework to obtain an ensemble of predicted distributions. We projected these predictions across the Western Central Pacific Ocean to produce maps of potential deep-sea snapper distributions in 32 countries and territories. Depth was consistently the best predictor of presence for all species groups across all models. Bathymetric slope was consistently the poorest predictor. Temperature at depth was a good predictor of presence for GLM only. Model precision was highest for MAXENT and CTA. There were strong regional patterns in predicted distribution of suitable habitat, with the largest areas of suitable habitat (> 35% of the Exclusive Economic Zone) predicted in seven South Pacific countries and territories (Fiji, Matthew & Hunter, Nauru, New Caledonia, Tonga, Vanuatu and Wallis & Futuna). Predicted habitat also varied among species, with the proportion of predicted habitat highest for Aphareus and lowest for Etelis. Despite data paucity, the relationship between deep-sea snapper presence and their environments was sufficiently strong to predict their distribution across a large area of the Pacific Ocean. Our results therefore provide a strong baseline for designing monitoring programs that balance resource exploitation and conservation planning, and

  10. Species distribution models of tropical deep-sea snappers.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Céline; Williams, Ashley J; Nicol, Simon J; Mellin, Camille; Loeun, Kim L; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2015-01-01

    Deep-sea fisheries provide an important source of protein to Pacific Island countries and territories that are highly dependent on fish for food security. However, spatial management of these deep-sea habitats is hindered by insufficient data. We developed species distribution models using spatially limited presence data for the main harvested species in the Western Central Pacific Ocean. We used bathymetric and water temperature data to develop presence-only species distribution models for the commercially exploited deep-sea snappers Etelis Cuvier 1828, Pristipomoides Valenciennes 1830, and Aphareus Cuvier 1830. We evaluated the performance of four different algorithms (CTA, GLM, MARS, and MAXENT) within the BIOMOD framework to obtain an ensemble of predicted distributions. We projected these predictions across the Western Central Pacific Ocean to produce maps of potential deep-sea snapper distributions in 32 countries and territories. Depth was consistently the best predictor of presence for all species groups across all models. Bathymetric slope was consistently the poorest predictor. Temperature at depth was a good predictor of presence for GLM only. Model precision was highest for MAXENT and CTA. There were strong regional patterns in predicted distribution of suitable habitat, with the largest areas of suitable habitat (> 35% of the Exclusive Economic Zone) predicted in seven South Pacific countries and territories (Fiji, Matthew & Hunter, Nauru, New Caledonia, Tonga, Vanuatu and Wallis & Futuna). Predicted habitat also varied among species, with the proportion of predicted habitat highest for Aphareus and lowest for Etelis. Despite data paucity, the relationship between deep-sea snapper presence and their environments was sufficiently strong to predict their distribution across a large area of the Pacific Ocean. Our results therefore provide a strong baseline for designing monitoring programs that balance resource exploitation and conservation planning, and

  11. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM (CHARGE CUPS)

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.W.

    1959-04-21

    The problems of confining a charge material in a calutron and uniformly distributing heat to the charge is described. The charge is held in a cup of thermally conductive material removably disposed within the charge chamber of the ion source block. A central thermally conducting stem is incorporated within the cup for conducting heat to the central portion of the charge contained within the cup.

  12. Deep drawing of uranium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R J; Lundberg, M R

    1987-01-19

    A procedure was developed to fabricate uranium forming blanks with high ''draw-ability'' so that cup shapes could be easily and uniformly deep drawn. The overall procedure involved a posttreatment to develop optimum mechanical and structural properties in the deep-drawn cups. The fabrication sequence is casting high-purity logs, pucking cast logs, cross-rolling pucks to forming blanks, annealing and outgassing forming blanks, cold deep drawing to hemispherical shapes, and stress relieving, outgassing, and annealing deep-drawn parts to restore ductility and impart dimensional stability. The fabrication development and the resulting fabrication procedure are discussed in detail. The mechanical properties and microstructural properties are discussed.

  13. Deep learning for image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoppin, Ryan; Rizki, Mateen

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of deep learning and introduces the several subfields of deep learning including a specific tutorial of convolutional neural networks. Traditional methods for learning image features are compared to deep learning techniques. In addition, we present our preliminary classification results, our basic implementation of a convolutional restricted Boltzmann machine on the Mixed National Institute of Standards and Technology database (MNIST), and we explain how to use deep learning networks to assist in our development of a robust gender classification system.

  14. Neurological effects of deep diving.

    PubMed

    Grønning, Marit; Aarli, Johan A

    2011-05-15

    Deep diving is defined as diving to depths more than 50 m of seawater (msw), and is mainly used for occupational and military purposes. A deep dive is characterized by the compression phase, the bottom time and the decompression phase. Neurological and neurophysiologic effects are demonstrated in divers during the compression phase and the bottom time. Immediate and transient neurological effects after deep dives have been shown in some divers. However, the results from the epidemiological studies regarding long term neurological effects from deep diving are conflicting and still not conclusive. Prospective clinical studies with sufficient power and sensitivity are needed to solve this very important issue.

  15. Visualization of charged particle traversals in cells

    SciTech Connect

    Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.

    1997-12-31

    This research addresses the early events that occur in the cell, and particularly in the cell nucleus, after passage of a charged particle. The authors present an assay system which locates the path of a charged particle through the cell nucleus, and speculate that this will be a valuable tool to define a start point for cell signaling of DNA repair processes, as well as signaling of cell-cycle checkpoint proteins. This study of the biological effects of low doses of high LET particles stems from the need to understand molecular mechanisms of long term health effects originating from the heavy particle component of galactic cosmic rays, a major concern in extended space missions. In the deep-space environment each target cell would be traversed only once a month, on average, by a heavy charged particle (1); therefore it was important to use very low particle fluences for subsequent analysis and understanding of resulting measurements. The Single-Cell/Single-particle Irradiator at PNNL was used to deliver particles from an electrostatic accelerator, and thus eliminate most of the experimental variability in the exposure of cells to high LET radiation. The number of tracks through each cell can be specified, rather than the random number obtained with conventional irradiation. Irradiation can be limited to a specified portion of the cell, and the variation in stopping power of the particles as they enter the cell can be minimized.

  16. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  17. Method of deep drilling

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, Stirling A.

    1984-01-01

    Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

  18. Deep Imaging Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This is the first Deep Imaging Survey image taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. On June 22 and 23, 2003, the spacecraft obtained this near ultraviolet image of the Groth region by adding multiple orbits for a total exposure time of 14,000 seconds. Tens of thousands of objects can be identified in this picture.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission is led by the California Institute of Technology, which is also responsible for the science operations and data analysis. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., a division of Caltech, manages the mission and built the science instrument. The mission was developed under NASA's Explorers Program, managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The mission's international partners include South Korea and France.

  19. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  20. Neptune's deep atmosphere revealed

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I. ); Atreya, S.K. ); Romani, P.N.

    1989-08-01

    The brightness temperature of Uranus at 20 cm is 260 {plus minus} 10K, while for Neptune it is 318 {plus minus} 16K. Since NH{sub 3} is the dominant absorber at this wavelength the authors have modeled the microwave spectra of Neptune based upon an assumed deep gaseous mixing ratio of NH{sub 3} and subsequent loss into clouds. The difference between the two brightness temperatures implies that the NH{sub 3} mixing ratio below the level of cloud formation on Neptune compared to Uranus is lower by nearly 2 order of magnitude. An alternative explanation is that the 20 cm radiation from Neptune is a combination of thermal plus synchrotron emission as proposed by de Pater and Goertz (1989).

  1. Thunderstorm Charge Structures in South Dakota, Colorado, and New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilles, J.; Thomas, R. J.; Rison, W.; Warner, T. A.; Helsdon, J.; Krehbiel, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    With little exception, New Mexico thunderstorms contain a main negative charge region and a lower (weaker) positive region, whereby the dominate polarity of cloud-to-ground lightning is negative. This Normal Polarity (NP) charge structure is observable via the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), which has been operated by Langmuir Laboratory since the late 1990s. In contrast, an LMA deployed for the 2012 Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) project revealed that thunderstorm charge structures were predominantly anomalous—i.e. not NP—in north-central Colorado. These anomalous charge structures are characterized by positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning, and lower-than-normal CG rates. The difference in charge structure between the two geographic locations could possibly be correlated with the scale of forcing: New Mexico storms are predominantly formed by mesoscale (small-scale) forcing, whereas Colorado can have larger synoptically-forced thunderstorms. To gain further insight into the relationship between the scale of forcing and the resulting charge structures, LMA data from the 2014 Upward Lightning Triggering Study (UPLIGHTS) will be used to determine electrical characteristics of thunderstorms in western South Dakota. The charge structures of similar storm morphologies from each geographic location—central New Mexico, north-central Colorado, and western South Dakota—will be compared.

  2. Who's in Charge Here?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Jack W.

    1986-01-01

    Even though most decisions are made before they reach the superintendent's desk, and even though these are times of "litigious paranoia," the superintendent is still in charge of the public schools. Some of the responsibilities of the superintendent are outlined. (MLW)

  3. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  4. Disciplinary Exclusion: The Influence of School Ethos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Lucy Ann

    2013-01-01

    Disciplinary exclusion is a strategy used by some schools in response to challenging behaviour. While some studies have explored interventions that can be implemented to reduce the exclusion of "at risk" pupils, others have considered how the underlying school ethos influences how challenging behaviour is understood and managed. The current study…

  5. 40 CFR 763.99 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exclusions. 763.99 Section 763.99... Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.99 Exclusions. (a) A local education agency shall not be required to perform an inspection under § 763.85(a) in any sampling area as defined in 40 CFR 763.103...

  6. 12 CFR 229.42 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exclusions. 229.42 Section 229.42 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.42 Exclusions....

  7. 10 CFR 830.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exclusions. 830.2 Section 830.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT § 830.2 Exclusions. This part does not apply to: (a) Activities that are... 1974, as amended; and (e) Activities related to the launch approval and actual launch of nuclear...

  8. 10 CFR 830.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exclusions. 830.2 Section 830.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT § 830.2 Exclusions. This part does not apply to: (a) Activities that are... 1974, as amended; and (e) Activities related to the launch approval and actual launch of nuclear...

  9. 10 CFR 830.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exclusions. 830.2 Section 830.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT § 830.2 Exclusions. This part does not apply to: (a) Activities that are... 1974, as amended; and (e) Activities related to the launch approval and actual launch of nuclear...

  10. 10 CFR 830.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exclusions. 830.2 Section 830.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT § 830.2 Exclusions. This part does not apply to: (a) Activities that are... 1974, as amended; and (e) Activities related to the launch approval and actual launch of nuclear...

  11. 10 CFR 830.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exclusions. 830.2 Section 830.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT § 830.2 Exclusions. This part does not apply to: (a) Activities that are... 1974, as amended; and (e) Activities related to the launch approval and actual launch of nuclear...

  12. Strategic Alternatives to Exclusion from School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Carl

    2009-01-01

    This original study shows that local authorities, working collaboratively with their schools and clusters, can dramatically reduce exclusions and make permanent exclusions unnecessary. And through research in three low excluding local authorities and five high excluding local authorities, it shows how this is done. The challenges and barriers are…

  13. 12 CFR 367.5 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... EXCLUSION OF CONTRACTOR AND TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS § 367.5 Exclusions. (a) The Ethics Counselor may... also prohibited from conducting business with FDIC as agents or representatives of other contractors... Ethics Counselor's decision to exclude the contractor pursuant to § 367.16. Provided further, that...

  14. 48 CFR 19.1504 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exclusions. 19.1504 Section 19.1504 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB) Program 19.1504 Exclusions. This...

  15. 48 CFR 19.1504 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exclusions. 19.1504 Section 19.1504 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB) Program 19.1504 Exclusions. This...

  16. 47 CFR 76.107 - Exclusivity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusivity contracts. 76.107 Section 76.107 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports...

  17. 48 CFR 32.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exclusions. 32.404 Section 32.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for Non-Commercial Items 32.404 Exclusions. (a) This subpart does not apply to advance...

  18. 12 CFR 229.42 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exclusions. 229.42 Section 229.42 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.42 Exclusions....

  19. 12 CFR 229.42 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exclusions. 229.42 Section 229.42 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.42 Exclusions....

  20. 12 CFR 229.42 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exclusions. 229.42 Section 229.42 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.42 Exclusions....

  1. 12 CFR 229.42 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exclusions. 229.42 Section 229.42 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.42 Exclusions....

  2. Exclusion from School: The Public Cost. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Carl; Castle, Frances; Howlett, Keith; Worrall, John

    The true expense, in cash terms, of exclusion from school in England is investigated. Data were gathered in six English local education authorities (LEAs): two in London, two metropolitan authorities, and two country authorities. Permanent exclusion is a matter of concern to the Commission for Racial Equality because some ethnic minorities are…

  3. 7 CFR 1b.3 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Categorical exclusions. 1b.3 Section 1b.3 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.3 Categorical exclusions... individual or cumulative effect on the human environment and are excluded from the preparation...

  4. 7 CFR 1b.3 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Categorical exclusions. 1b.3 Section 1b.3 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.3 Categorical exclusions... individual or cumulative effect on the human environment and are excluded from the preparation...

  5. 33 CFR 87.3 - Exclusive use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exclusive use. 87.3 Section 87.3 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX IV: DISTRESS SIGNALS § 87.3 Exclusive use. The use or exhibition of any of the foregoing signals except for...

  6. 47 CFR 76.107 - Exclusivity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exclusivity contracts. 76.107 Section 76.107 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports...

  7. 47 CFR 76.107 - Exclusivity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exclusivity contracts. 76.107 Section 76.107 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports...

  8. 47 CFR 76.107 - Exclusivity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exclusivity contracts. 76.107 Section 76.107 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports...

  9. 47 CFR 76.107 - Exclusivity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exclusivity contracts. 76.107 Section 76.107 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports...

  10. CMS results on exclusive and diffractive production

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Gilvan A.

    2015-04-10

    We present recent CMS measurements of diffractive and exclusive processes, using data collected at 7 TeV at the LHC. Measurements of soft single- and double-diffractive cross sections are presented, as well as measurements of photon-induced processes including studies of exclusive WW production via photon-photon exchange.

  11. Exclusion from School and Recognition of Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Gillean; Riddell, Sheila; Weedon, Elisabet; Fordyce, Mariela

    2016-01-01

    There has been an overall decrease in exclusion rates and numbers in recent years across the UK. This change has often been heralded as evidence that national inclusion policies are "working" and that schools themselves are becoming increasingly inclusive. This article examines findings from a recent study on school exclusion in Wales,…

  12. Hard Exclusive Reactions at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Kubarovsky, Valery P.

    2011-09-20

    Dedicated experiments to study Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) have been carried out at Jefferson Lab. DVCS helicity--dependent and helicity--independent cross sections and beam spin asymmetries have been measured, as well as cross sections and asymmetries for the $\\pi^0$, $\\eta$, $\\rho^0$, $\\rho^+$, $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ for exclusive electroproduction. The data were taken in a wide kinematic range in $Q^2$=1--4.5 GeV$^2$, $x_B$=0.1--0.5, and $|t|$ up to 2 GeV$^2$. The presented results offer a unique opportunity to study the structure of the nucleon at the parton level as one has access to Bjorken $x_B$ and momentum transfer to the nucleon $t$ at the same time.

  13. Looking Deep with Infrared Eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-07-01

    Today, British astronomers are releasing the first data from the largest and most sensitive survey of the heavens in infrared light to the ESO user community. The UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) has completed the first of seven years of data collection, studying objects that are too faint to see at visible wavelengths, such as very distant or very cool objects. New data on young galaxies is already challenging current thinking on galaxy formation, revealing galaxies that are massive at a much earlier stage of development than expected. These first science results already show how powerful the full survey will be at finding rare objects that hold vital clues to how stars and galaxies in our Universe formed. UKIDSS will make an atlas of large areas of the sky in the infrared. The data become available to the entire ESO user community immediately after they are entered into the archive [2]. Release to the world follows 18 months after each release to ESO. "Astronomers across Europe will jump on these exciting new data. We are moving into new territory - our survey is both wide and deep, so we are mapping huge volumes of space. That's how we will locate rare objects - the very nearest and smallest stars, and young galaxies at the edge of the universe," said Andy Lawrence from the University of Edinburgh, UKIDSS Principal Investigator. The UKIDSS data are collected by the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope [3] situated near the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii using the Wide Field Camera (WFCAM) built by the United Kingdom Astronomy Technology Centre (UKATC) in Edinburgh. WFCAM is the most powerful infrared imager in the world, generating enormous amounts of data - 150 gigabytes per night (equivalent to more than 200 CDs) - and approximately 10.5 Terabytes in total so far (or 15,000 CDs). Mark Casali, now at ESO, was the Project Scientist in charge of the WFCAM instrument construction at the UKATC. "WFCAM was a bold technological undertaking," said Mark Casali

  14. Central exclusive production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab

    2008-12-01

    In CDF we have observed several exclusive processes: 2-photon {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, photon+pomeron {yields} J/{psi} and {psi}(2S), and pomeron+pomeron {yields} {chi}{sub c}. The cross sections agree with QED, HERA photoproduction data, and theoretical estimates of gg {yields} {chi}{sub c} with another gluon exchanged to screen the color. This observation of exclusive {chi}{sub c}, together with earlier observations of exclusive dijets and exclusive 2-photon candidates, support some theoretical predictions for p+p {yields} p+H+p at the LHC. Exclusive dileptons offer the best means of precisely calibrating forward proton spectrometers.

  15. Central Exclusive Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael

    2009-03-23

    In CDF we have observed several exclusive processes: {gamma}{gamma}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {gamma}+IP{yields}J/{psi}, {psi}(2S) and IP+IP{yields}{chi}{sub c}. The cross sections agree with QED, HERA photoproduction data, and theoretical estimates of gg{yields}{chi}{sub c} with another gluon exchanged to screen the color. This observation of exclusive {chi}{sub c}, together with earlier observations of exclusive dijets and exclusive {gamma}{gamma} candidates, support some theoretical predictions for p+p{yields}p+SMH+p at the LHC. Exclusive dileptons offer the best means of precisely calibrating forward proton spectrometers.

  16. 42 CFR 402.308 - Waivers of exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PROVISIONS CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS, AND EXCLUSIONS Exclusions § 402.308 Waivers of exclusions. (a... authorization to obtain information from private health insurers, peer review organizations (including, but...

  17. The Charging of Composites in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czepiela, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    Deep dielectric charging and subsequent electrostatic discharge in composite materials used on spacecraft have become greater concerns since composite materials are being used more extensively as main structural components. Deep dielectric charging occurs when high energy particles penetrate and deposit themselves in the insulating material of spacecraft components. These deposited particles induce an electric field in the material, which causes the particles to move and thus changes the electric field. The electric field continues to change until a steady state is reached between the incoming particles from the space environment and the particles moving away due to the electric field. An electrostatic discharge occurs when the electric field is greater than the dielectric strength of the composite material. The goal of the current investigation is to investigate deep dielectric charging in composite materials and ascertain what modifications have to be made to the composite properties to alleviate any breakdown issues. A 1-D model was created. The space environment, which is calculated using the Environmental Workbench software, the composite material properties, and the electric field and voltage boundary conditions are input into the model. The output from the model is the charge density, electric field, and voltage distributions as functions of the depth into the material and time. Analysis using the model show that there should be no deep dielectric charging problem with conductive composites such as carbon fiber/epoxy. With insulating materials such as glass fiber/epoxy, Kevlar, and polymers, there is also no concern of deep dielectric charging problems with average day-to-day particle fluxes. However, problems can arise during geomagnetic substorms and solar particle events where particle flux levels increase by several orders of magnitude, and thus increase the electric field in the material by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, the second part of this

  18. Construal Level and Social Exclusion: Concrete Thinking Impedes Recovery From Social Exclusion.

    PubMed

    Pfundmair, Michaela; Lermer, Eva; Frey, Dieter; Aydin, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    Social exclusion is a painful experience. Recent research has shown, however, that coping with exclusion can be facilitated by favorable conditions. In the current research, we investigated whether construal level affects recovery from social exclusion. We hypothesized that an abstract vs. concrete mindset would moderate coping with exclusion. Indeed, lower compared to higher concrete thinking (Study 1) and abstract compared to concrete thinking (Study 2) bolstered the basic need of belonging when excluded. Priming of abstract thinking, moreover, increased participants' sense of belonging both in response to exclusion and inclusion relative to no priming (Study 3). Our results are the first to establish a relationship between construal level and social exclusion, thereby suggesting an alleviating "abstraction discount" effect for the consequences of social exclusion.

  19. Electrostatic, elastic and hydration-dependent interactions in dermis influencing volume exclusion and macromolecular transport.

    PubMed

    Øien, Alf H; Wiig, Helge

    2016-07-01

    Interstitial exclusion refers to the limitation of space available for plasma proteins and other macromolecules based on collagen and negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the interstitial space. It is of particular importance to interstitial fluid and plasma volume regulation. Here we present a novel mechanical and mathematical model of the dynamic interactions of structural elements within the interstitium of the dermis at the microscopic level that may explain volume exclusion of charged and neutral macroparticles. At this level, the interstitium is considered to consist of elements called extracellular matrix (ECM) cells, again containing two main interacting structural components on a fluid background including anions and cations setting up osmotic forces: one smaller GAG component, having an intrinsic expansive electric force, and one bigger collagen component, having an intrinsic elastic force. Because of size differences, the GAG component interacts with a fraction of the collagen component only at normal hydration. This fraction, however, increases with rising hydration as a consequence of the modeled form of the interaction force between the GAGs and collagen. Collagen is locally displaced at variable degrees as hydration changes. Two models of GAGs are considered, having largely different geometries which demands different, but related, forms of GAG-collagen interaction forces. The effects of variable fixed charges on GAGs and of GAG density in tissue are evaluated taking into account observed volume exclusion properties of charged macromolecules as a function of tissue hydration. The presented models may improve our biophysical understanding of acting forces influencing tissue fluid dynamics. Such knowledge is significant when evaluating the transport of electrically charged and neutral macromolecules into and through the interstitium, and therefore to drug uptake and the therapeutic effects of macromolecular agents. PMID:27079466

  20. Optimization of BEV Charging Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei

    This paper presents different approaches to optimize fast charging and workplace charging strategy of battery electric vehicle (BEV) drivers. For the fast charging analysis, a rule-based model was built to simulate BEV charging behavior. Monte Carlo analysis was performed to explore to the potential range of congestion at fast charging stations which could be more than four hours at the most crowded stations. Genetic algorithm was performed to explore the theoretical minimum waiting time at fast charging stations, and it can decrease the waiting time at the most crowded stations to be shorter than one hour. A deterministic approach was proposed as a feasible suggestion that people should consider to take fast charging when the state of charge is approaching 40 miles. This suggestion is hoped to help to minimize potential congestion at fast charging stations. For the workplace charging analysis, scenario analysis was performed to simulate temporal distribution of charging demand under different workplace charging strategies. It was found that if BEV drivers charge as much as possible and as late as possible at workplace, it could increase the utility of solar-generated electricity while relieve grid stress of extra intensive electricity demand at night caused by charging electric vehicles at home.

  1. Sedimentation of a charged colloidal sphere in a charged cavity.

    PubMed

    Keh, Huan J; Cheng, Tsung F

    2011-12-01

    An analytical study is presented for the quasisteady sedimentation of a charged spherical particle located at the center of a charged spherical cavity. The overlap of the electric double layers is allowed, and the polarization (relaxation) effect in the double layers is considered. The electrokinetic equations that govern the ionic concentration distributions, electric potential profile, and fluid flow field in the electrolyte solution are linearized assuming that the system is only slightly distorted from equilibrium. Using a perturbation method, these linearized equations are solved for a symmetric electrolyte with the surface charge densities of the particle and cavity as the small perturbation parameters. An analytical expression for the settling velocity of the charged sphere is obtained from a balance among the gravitational, electrostatic, and hydrodynamic forces acting on it. Our results indicate that the presence of the particle charge reduces the magnitude of the sedimentation velocity of the particle in an uncharged cavity and the presence of the fixed charge at the cavity surface increases the magnitude of the sedimentation velocity of an uncharged particle in a charged cavity. For the case of a charged sphere settling in a charged cavity with equivalent surface charge densities, the net effect of the fixed charges will increase the sedimentation velocity of the particle. For the case of a charged sphere settling in a charged cavity with their surface charge densities in opposite signs, the net effect of the fixed charges in general reduces/increases the sedimentation velocity of the particle if the surface charge density of the particle has a greater/smaller magnitude than that of the cavity. The effect of the surface charge at the cavity wall on the sedimentation of a colloidal particle is found to increase with a decrease in the particle-to-cavity size ratio and can be significant in appropriate situations.

  2. Sedimentation of a charged colloidal sphere in a charged cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keh, Huan J.; Cheng, Tsung F.

    2011-12-01

    An analytical study is presented for the quasisteady sedimentation of a charged spherical particle located at the center of a charged spherical cavity. The overlap of the electric double layers is allowed, and the polarization (relaxation) effect in the double layers is considered. The electrokinetic equations that govern the ionic concentration distributions, electric potential profile, and fluid flow field in the electrolyte solution are linearized assuming that the system is only slightly distorted from equilibrium. Using a perturbation method, these linearized equations are solved for a symmetric electrolyte with the surface charge densities of the particle and cavity as the small perturbation parameters. An analytical expression for the settling velocity of the charged sphere is obtained from a balance among the gravitational, electrostatic, and hydrodynamic forces acting on it. Our results indicate that the presence of the particle charge reduces the magnitude of the sedimentation velocity of the particle in an uncharged cavity and the presence of the fixed charge at the cavity surface increases the magnitude of the sedimentation velocity of an uncharged particle in a charged cavity. For the case of a charged sphere settling in a charged cavity with equivalent surface charge densities, the net effect of the fixed charges will increase the sedimentation velocity of the particle. For the case of a charged sphere settling in a charged cavity with their surface charge densities in opposite signs, the net effect of the fixed charges in general reduces/increases the sedimentation velocity of the particle if the surface charge density of the particle has a greater/smaller magnitude than that of the cavity. The effect of the surface charge at the cavity wall on the sedimentation of a colloidal particle is found to increase with a decrease in the particle-to-cavity size ratio and can be significant in appropriate situations.

  3. The Capodimonte Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-04-01

    A Window towards the Distant Universe Summary The Osservatorio Astronomico Capodimonte Deep Field (OACDF) is a multi-colour imaging survey project that is opening a new window towards the distant universe. It is conducted with the ESO Wide Field Imager (WFI) , a 67-million pixel advanced camera attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory (Chile). As a pilot project at the Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte (OAC) [1], the OACDF aims at providing a large photometric database for deep extragalactic studies, with important by-products for galactic and planetary research. Moreover, it also serves to gather experience in the proper and efficient handling of very large data sets, preparing for the arrival of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) with the 1 x 1 degree 2 OmegaCam facility. PR Photo 15a/01 : Colour composite of the OACDF2 field . PR Photo 15b/01 : Interacting galaxies in the OACDF2 field. PR Photo 15c/01 : Spiral galaxy and nebulous object in the OACDF2 field. PR Photo 15d/01 : A galaxy cluster in the OACDF2 field. PR Photo 15e/01 : Another galaxy cluster in the OACDF2 field. PR Photo 15f/01 : An elliptical galaxy in the OACDF2 field. The Capodimonte Deep Field ESO PR Photo 15a/01 ESO PR Photo 15a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 426 pix - 73k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 851 pix - 736k] [Hi-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 3190 pix - 7.3M] Caption : This three-colour image of about 1/4 of the Capodimonte Deep Field (OACDF) was obtained with the Wide-Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope at the la Silla Observatory. It covers "OACDF Subfield no. 2 (OACDF2)" with an area of about 35 x 32 arcmin 2 (about the size of the full moon), and it is one of the "deepest" wide-field images ever obtained. Technical information about this photo is available below. With the comparatively few large telescopes available in the world, it is not possible to study the Universe to its outmost limits in all directions. Instead, astronomers try to obtain the most detailed

  4. Deep Ecology: Beyond Mere Environmentalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Suzanne

    1994-01-01

    Outlines the principles of deep ecology, a movement that questions the societal values that have resulted in damage to the earth's life-supporting biosphere. In contrast to shallow reform, deep ecology encourages individuals to examine their values and relationship to nature to address the environmental crisis. (LP)

  5. Context and Deep Learning Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Tom; Ravenscroft, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual clarification is essential if we are to establish a stable and deep discipline of technology enhanced learning. The technology is alluring; this can distract from deep design in a surface rush to exploit the affordances of the new technology. We need a basis for design, and a conceptual unit of organization, that are applicable across…

  6. Deep space network energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesema, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    If the Deep Space Network is to exist in a cost effective and reliable manner in the next decade, the problems presented by international energy cost increases and energy availability must be addressed. The Deep Space Network Energy Program was established to implement solutions compatible with the ongoing development of the total network.

  7. Control Algorithms Charge Batteries Faster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    On March 29, 2011, NASA s Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft beamed a milestone image to Earth: the first photo of Mercury taken from orbit around the solar system s innermost planet. (MESSENGER is also the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury.) Like most of NASA s deep space probes, MESSENGER is enabled by a complex power system that allows its science instruments and communications to function continuously as it travels millions of miles from Earth. "Typically, there isn't one particular power source that can support the entire mission," says Linda Taylor, electrical engineer in Glenn Research Center s Power Systems Analysis Branch. "If you have solar arrays and you are in orbit, at some point you re going to be in eclipse." Because of this, Taylor explains, spacecraft like MESSENGER feature hybrid power systems. MESSENGER is powered by a two-panel solar array coupled with a nickel hydrogen battery. The solar arrays provide energy to the probe and charge the battery; when the spacecraft s orbit carries it behind Mercury and out of the Sun s light, the spacecraft switches to battery power to continue operations. Typically, hybrid systems with multiple power inputs and a battery acting alternately as storage and a power source require multiple converters to handle the power flow between the devices, Taylor says. (Power converters change the qualities of electrical energy, such as from alternating current to direct current, or between different levels of voltage or frequency.) This contributes to a pair of major concerns for spacecraft design. "Weight and size are big drivers for any space application," Taylor says, noting that every pound added to a space vehicle incurs significant costs. For an innovative solution to managing power flows in a lightweight, cost-effective manner, NASA turned to a private industry partner.

  8. Line10 Charge Injection Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia

    2012-10-01

    Radiation damage on-orbit, in the form of charge traps, gradually reduces the charge transfer efficiency {CTE} of CCDs over time. In WFC3, one option for mitigating CTE losses is charge injection i.e. electronically inserting charge every Nth row. The benefit of this method is the significantly lower noise penalty, much less than the traditional Poissonian noise imparted by a pre- or post-flash of the same charge level. This program acquires the calibration data necessary to support science observations using charge injection.

  9. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  10. Deep sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical cycle of sulfur in near-surface reservoirs has been a subject of intense studies for decades. It has been shown that sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates record interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere, with δ34S of sedimentary sulfides continuously decreasing from 0‰ toward present-day values of ~-30 to -40‰ over the Phanerozoic (e.g., Canfield, 2004). It has also been shown that microbial reduction of the present-day seawater sulfate (δ34S=+21‰) results in large shifts in isotopic compositions of secondary pyrites in altered oceanic crust (to δ34S=-70‰: Rouxel et al., 2009). How much of these near surface isotopic variations survive during deep geochemical cycle of sulfur interacting with the mantle infinite reservoir with δ34S=0‰? Could extent of their survival be used as a tracer of processes and dynamics involved in deep geochemical cycle? As a first step toward answering these questions, δ34S was determined in-situ using a Cameca IMS 1280 ion microprobe at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in materials representing various domains of deep geochemical cycle. They include pyrites in altered MORB as potential subducting materials and pyrites in UHP eclogites as samples that have experienced subduction zone processes, and mantle-derived melts are represented by olivine-hosted melt inclusions in MORB and those in IAB, and undegassed submarine OIB glasses. Salient features of the results include: (1) pyrites in altered MORB (with O. Rouxel; from ODP site 801 and ODP Hole 1301B) range from -70 to +19‰, (2) pyrites in UHP eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norway (with B. Hacker and A. Kylander-Clark) show a limited overall range from -3.4 to + 2.8‰ among five samples, with one of them covering almost the entire range, indicating limited scale lengths of isotopic equilibration during subduction, (3) olivine-hosted melt inclusions in arc basalts from Galunggung (-2

  11. 23. 175 TON CAPACITY CHARGING LADLE ON THE CHARGING AISLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. 175 TON CAPACITY CHARGING LADLE ON THE CHARGING AISLE OF THE BOP SHOP LOOKING SOUTH. HISTORIAN FOR SCALE. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  12. Deep Space Test Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, Martha E.; Christl, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The DSTB Facility provides a new capability for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA s) Space Radiation Shielding Project (SRSP). The objective of the DSTB is to provide a platform to conduct radiation shielding investigations in an environment more similar to deep space than most Low Earth orbits or is achievable at a particle accelerator. The DSTB provides a means to experimentally test radiation shielding effectiveness of various materials and to test the accuracy of radiation transport code predictions in the deep space cosmic ray environment more frequently and at a lower cost compared to space flight missions. New spectrometers, dosimeters and other techniques may be exercised and verified using the DSTB before space flight. The DSTB will be implemented through NASA s National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF) which provides polar balloon flights that lift science payloads to high altitude (120,000 A. (36.58km)) to escape much of the shielding effects of the Earth s atmosphere and magnetosphere. Polar flights are conducted through NSBF in coordination with the United States Polar Program. The DSTB will be launched on a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) from McMurdo, Antarctica (77.86 degrees south latitude) for circumpolar flights, nominally 20 days, traveling to the west and typically bounded between 73 to 82 degrees south latitude. Float altitudes for these balloons with payload are 115,000 to 130,000 feet (35.05 to 39.62km). The DSTB will be able to accommodate up to 20 investigations per flight. Annual flight opportunities are planned starting in December 2005. Balloon campaigns in Antarctica occur in December and January during the Austral summer. Since a key goal of the DSTB facility is to efficiently serve the varied needs of the radiation shielding community; it must be designed with a flexible architecture. By implementing the DSTB facility with NASA s balloon program, which operates under reduced formalities compared to space flight

  13. The accessory deep peroneal nerve and anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Sinanović, Osman; Zukić, Sanela; Šakić, Alma; Muftić, Mirsad

    2013-10-01

    The accessory deep peroneal (ADPN) nerve has been regarded as an anomalous nerve derived from the superficial peroneal nerve or its branch and supplies motor innervations for extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) and sensory innervations for the lateral part of the ankle and foot regions. The EDB is usually innervated exclusively by the deep peroneal nerve, a major branch of the the common peroneal nerve, however, in as many as 28% of patients (with same male/female frequency), one or both of the EDB muscles are (partially or exclusively) innervated by the ADPN nerve. This anomaly appears to be inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with incomplete gene penetrance. ADPN existence is of great clinical and surgical importance, and the aim of this study is to describe a very rare case of coexistence ADPN and anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. PMID:24399869

  14. Intelligent battery charging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Hobert R., Jr.

    1991-09-01

    The present invention is a battery charging system that provides automatic voltage selection, short circuit protection, and delayed output to prevent arcing or pitting. A second embodiment of the invention provides a homing beacon which transmits a signal so that a battery powered mobile robot may home in on and contact the invention to charge its battery. The invention includes electric terminals isolated from one another. One terminal is grounded and the other has a voltage applied to it through a resistor connected to the output of a DC power supply. A voltage scaler is connected between the resistor and the hot terminal. An On/Off controller and a voltage mode selector sense the voltage provided at the output of the voltage scaler.

  15. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation. PMID:17580951

  16. The influence of early oil and gas charging on diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HU, J.; Guo, Q.; Zheng, M.; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.

    2015-12-01

    With the increase of depth, the growing influence of compaction and diagenetic cementation should make reservoir physical properties worse and worse, but we found that the reservoir property deviated from the normal compaction curve through researching the development of high porosity and its control factors in deep sandstone reservoirs all over the world. Some data from different basins at home and abroad showed the bigger solubility of carbonate type (such as calcite) and aluminum silicate type (such as feldspar) and good development of secondary pore in oil-bearing sandstone than that in the no oil-bearing sandstone. And, calcite cementation, dolomite cementation, quartz cementation in the oil reservoir are more than that of the no oil-bearing reservoir. The effect of oil and gas charging on the diagenetic evolution is complicated. The degree of mineral cementation is also relevant to the saturation of oil and gas, influence of low oil saturation on diagenetic environment was not distinct. By studying different basin, different geology, we found that the oil and gas filling impacts on deep sandstone properties by influencing the diagenetic compaction, cementation and dissolution of deep reservoir: (1) the overpressure of oil and gas charging can buffer compaction of overlying strata; (2) the early oil and gas filling inhibit or slow down the cementation process, especially to illite and quartz, (3) the organic acid dissolution in oil and gas can improve the physical properties of deep reservoir. These three aspects are essentially improved reservoir for deep hydrocarbon accumulation, having very realistic significance for the deep oil and gas exploration.

  17. Laminar flame propagation in a stratified charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Youngchul

    The propagation of laminar flame from a rich or stoichiometric mixture to a lean mixture in a stratified methane-air charge was investigated experimentally and numerically. Emphasis was on the understanding of the flame behavior in the transition region; in particular, on the mechanism of burning velocity enhancement in this region. In the experimental setup, mixtures of two different equivalence ratios were separated by a soap bubble in a spherical constant volume combustion vessel. The richer mixture inside the bubble was ignited by a focused laser beam. The flame development was observed by Schlieren technique and flame speeds were measured by heat release analysis of the pressure data. An one-dimensional, time- dependant numerical simulation of the flame propagation in a charge with step-stratification was used to interpret the experimental results. Both the experimental and numerical studies showed that the instantaneous flame speed depended on the previous flame history. Thus a `strong' (with mixture equivalence ratio close to stoichiometric) flame can sustain propagation into finite regions of substantially lean equivalence ratio. Both thermal and chemical effects were crucial for explaining the mechanism of the flame speed enhancement in the transition period. Because of the presence of this `back- support' effect, the usual concept of specifying the burning velocity as a function of the end gas state is inadequate for a stratified charge. A simple correlation for instantaneous flame velocity based on the local burned gas temperature is developed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253- 1690.)

  18. Interaction between heterogeneously charged surfaces: Surface patches and charge modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2013-02-01

    When solid surfaces are immersed in aqueous solutions, some of their charges can dissociate and leave behind charged patches on the surface. Although the charges are distributed heterogeneously on the surface, most of the theoretical models treat them as homogeneous. For overall non-neutral surfaces, the assumption of surface charge homogeneity is rather reasonable since the leading terms of two such interacting surfaces depend on the nonzero average charge. However, for overall neutral surfaces the nature of the surface charge distribution is crucial in determining the intersurface interaction. In the present work we study the interaction between two charged surfaces across an aqueous solution for several charge distributions. The analysis is preformed within the framework of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann theory. For periodic charge distributions the interaction is found to be repulsive at small separations, unless the two surface distributions are completely out-of-phase with respect to each other. For quenched random charge distributions we find that due to the presence of the ionic solution in between the surfaces, the intersurface repulsion dominates over the attraction in the linear regime of the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. The effect of quenched charge heterogeneity is found to be particularly substantial in the case of large charged domains.

  19. Operation Deep Sweep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Fifty scientists and a crew of 18 have embarked on a 64,000 km odyssey to explore the Pacific from pole to pole—the most ambitious program in the history of the marine geology branch of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Called Operation Deep Sweep, the 1-year cruise will search areas above the Arctic Circle, off of Alaska, to McMurdo Sound in Antarctica. The 63-m, 1,300-tonne research vessel Samuel P. Lee sailed from its home port of Redwood City, Calif., to San Francisco to begin the first leg of the lengthy journey.According to USGS officials and the cosponsoring Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, the cruise will ultimately involve 150 scientists, some of them representing Germany, France, Australia, and New Zealand. David Howell, branch chief of Pacific Marine Geology for the USGS, said the voyage of the Lee was “the most far reaching and of the longest duration” ever attempted by his unit. He said the cruise would string together a large number of scientific experiments spanning the Pacific. Howell likened the voyage to the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1803-1806 (which explored Louisiana and the western United States) because “we're going into unknown territory and into regions not studied except in the most cursory manner.”

  20. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  1. Distributed charging of electrical assets

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Phan, Dung; Sharma, Mayank; Wu, Chai Wah; Xiong, Jinjun

    2016-02-16

    The present disclosure relates generally to the field of distributed charging of electrical assets. In various examples, distributed charging of electrical assets may be implemented in the form of systems, methods and/or algorithms.

  2. Submerged AUV Charging Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are becoming increasingly important for military surveillance and mine detection. Most AUVs are battery powered and have limited lifetimes of a few days to a few weeks. This greatly limits the distance that AUVs can travel underwater. Using a series of submerged AUV charging stations, AUVs could travel a limited distance to the next charging station, recharge its batteries, and continue to the next charging station, thus traveling great distances in a relatively short time, similar to the Old West “Pony Express.” One solution is to use temperature differences at various depths in the ocean to produce electricity, which is then stored in a submerged battery. It is preferred to have the upper buoy submerged a reasonable distance below the surface, so as not to be seen from above and not to be inadvertently destroyed by storms or ocean going vessels. In a previous invention, a phase change material (PCM) is melted (expanded) at warm temperatures, for example, 15 °C, and frozen (contracted) at cooler temperatures, for example, 8 °C. Tubes containing the PCM, which could be paraffin such as pentadecane, would be inserted into a container filled with hydraulic oil. When the PCM is melted (expanded), it pushes the oil out into a container that is pressurized to about 3,000 psi (approx equals 20.7 MPa). When a valve is opened, the high-pressure oil passes through a hydraulic motor, which turns a generator and charges a battery. The low-pressure oil is finally reabsorbed into the PCM canister when the PCM tubes are frozen (contracted). Some of the electricity produced could be used to control an external bladder or a motor to the tether line, such that depth cycling is continued for a very long period of time. Alternatively, after the electricity is generated by the hydraulic motor, the exiting low-pressure oil from the hydraulic motor could be vented directly to an external bladder on the AUV, such that filling of the bladder

  3. Charging Mechanism for Polymer Particles in Nonpolar Surfactant Solutions: Influence of Polymer Type and Surface Functionality.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyung; Zhou, Zhang-Lin; Behrens, Sven Holger

    2016-05-17

    Surface charging phenomena in nonpolar dispersions are exploited in a wide range of industrial applications, but their mechanistic understanding lags far behind. We investigate the surface charging of a variety of polymer particles with different surface functionality in alkane solutions of a custom-synthesized and purified polyisobutylene succinimide (PIBS) polyamine surfactant and a related commercial surfactant mixture commonly used to control particle charge. We find that the observed electrophoretic particle mobility cannot be explained exclusively by donor-acceptor interactions between surface functional groups and surfactant polar moieties. Our results instead suggest an interplay of multiple charging pathways, which likely include the competitive adsorption of ions generated among inverse micelles in the solution bulk. We discuss possible factors affecting the competitive adsorption of micellar ions, such as the chemical nature of the particle bulk material and the size asymmetry between inverse micelles of opposite charge. PMID:27135950

  4. Modular Battery Charge Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert; Gonzalez, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to masterless, distributed, digital-charge control for batteries requiring charge control has been developed and implemented. This approach is required in battery chemistries that need cell-level charge control for safety and is characterized by the use of one controller per cell, resulting in redundant sensors for critical components, such as voltage, temperature, and current. The charge controllers in a given battery interact in a masterless fashion for the purpose of cell balancing, charge control, and state-of-charge estimation. This makes the battery system invariably fault-tolerant. The solution to the single-fault failure, due to the use of a single charge controller (CC), was solved by implementing one CC per cell and linking them via an isolated communication bus [e.g., controller area network (CAN)] in a masterless fashion so that the failure of one or more CCs will not impact the remaining functional CCs. Each micro-controller-based CC digitizes the cell voltage (V(sub cell)), two cell temperatures, and the voltage across the switch (V); the latter variable is used in conjunction with V(sub cell) to estimate the bypass current for a given bypass resistor. Furthermore, CC1 digitizes the battery current (I1) and battery voltage (V(sub batt) and CC5 digitizes a second battery current (I2). As a result, redundant readings are taken for temperature, battery current, and battery voltage through the summation of the individual cell voltages given that each CC knows the voltage of the other cells. For the purpose of cell balancing, each CC periodically and independently transmits its cell voltage and stores the received cell voltage of the other cells in an array. The position in the array depends on the identifier (ID) of the transmitting CC. After eight cell voltage receptions, the array is checked to see if one or more cells did not transmit. If one or more transmissions are missing, the missing cell(s) is (are) eliminated from cell

  5. Microbial Life in the Deep Subsurface: Deep, Hot and Radioactive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeStefano, Andrea L.; Ford, Jill C.; Winsor, Seana K.; Allen, Carlton C.; Miller, Judith; McNamara, Karen M.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies, motivated in part by the search for extraterrestrial life, continue to expand the recognized limits of Earth's biosphere. This work explored evidence for life a high-temperature, radioactive environment in the deep subsurface.

  6. Do plasma proteins distinguish between liposomes of varying charge density?

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caracciolo, Giulio; Cavaliere, Chiara; Foglia, Patrizia; Pozzi, Daniela; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2012-03-16

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are one of the most employed nonviral nanovector systems in gene therapy. However, their transfection efficiency is strongly affected by interactions with plasma components, that lead to the formation of a "protein corona" onto CL surface. The interactions between nanoparticles entering the body and biomolecules have an essential role for their biodistribution. Because the knowledge of proteins adsorbed onto vector surface could be useful in the screening of new, more efficient and more biocompatible liposomal formulations, the behavior of three CLs with different membrane charge densities was investigated. The proteins of the three coronas were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified with label-free spectral counting strategy. Fibrinogen displayed higher association with CLs with high membrane charge density, while apolipoproteins and C4b-binding protein with CLs with low membrane charge density. These results are discussed in terms of the different lipid compositions of CLs and may have a deep biological impact for in vivo applications. Surface charge of nanoparticles is emerging as a relevant factor determining the corona composition after interaction with plasma proteins. Remarkably, it is also shown that the charge of the protein corona formed around CLs is strongly related to their membrane charge density.

  7. Deep Learning in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Gawehn, Erik; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks had their first heyday in molecular informatics and drug discovery approximately two decades ago. Currently, we are witnessing renewed interest in adapting advanced neural network architectures for pharmaceutical research by borrowing from the field of "deep learning". Compared with some of the other life sciences, their application in drug discovery is still limited. Here, we provide an overview of this emerging field of molecular informatics, present the basic concepts of prominent deep learning methods and offer motivation to explore these techniques for their usefulness in computer-assisted drug discovery and design. We specifically emphasize deep neural networks, restricted Boltzmann machine networks and convolutional networks. PMID:27491648

  8. Deep Learning in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Gawehn, Erik; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks had their first heyday in molecular informatics and drug discovery approximately two decades ago. Currently, we are witnessing renewed interest in adapting advanced neural network architectures for pharmaceutical research by borrowing from the field of "deep learning". Compared with some of the other life sciences, their application in drug discovery is still limited. Here, we provide an overview of this emerging field of molecular informatics, present the basic concepts of prominent deep learning methods and offer motivation to explore these techniques for their usefulness in computer-assisted drug discovery and design. We specifically emphasize deep neural networks, restricted Boltzmann machine networks and convolutional networks.

  9. Jack Dymond's Deep Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, R. E.; Delaney, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Most people do not know that Jack Dymond was a major influence on several aspects of current deep-sea research. Along with Margaret Leinen and Jack, we were part of the first Alvin dive program on the Endeavour hydrothermal field in 1984. Jack was working with Rick, on a sediment-trap study of the overall carbon fluxes in the vicinity of the Endeavour hydrothermal systems in an effort to address a question that Cindy Lee had posed about the overall carbon production from hydrothermal vents. At the time we were recognizing and naming many of the 20- to 40-meter-high sulfide structures in the Endeavour field (Hulk, Grotto, Dante, Dudley, Bastille), Jack commented that it was a shame that the world could not see these magnificent edifices or watch endlessly awesome black smokers. His feeling was that some vent sites should be converted to National Parks to preserve them from invasion by enthusiastic scientists, yet he clearly had the vision that the public should be given a sense of the grandeur involved locally, as well as the vastness of the 70,000-km ridge-crest system running through every ocean. Within a year we started talking about the RIDGE Program, and Jack was an early and enthusiastic participant in the design and development of RIDGE. Jack was among the first to encourage multi-disciplinary research at the hydrothermal vent sites. Recognizing that deep currents are important to vent processes, he urged physical oceanographers to work with the chemists, biologists, and geologists and was personally responsible for Rick becoming interested in studying vents. We, the co-authors of this abstract, became close friends as a result of having been introduced to each other by Jack. Several years ago, we co-authored the first paper ever written on the possible influence of hydrothermal activity on the circulation of the Europan Ocean, a paper that we here dedicate to the memory of Jack. Finally, it was in part because of Jack's conviction that the world should know

  10. Deep UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Schowalter, Leo

    2014-06-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) photons interact strongly with a broad range of chemical and biological molecules; compact DUV light sources could enable a wide range of applications in chemi/bio-sensing, sterilization, agriculture, and industrial curing. The much shorter wavelength also results in useful characteristics related to optical diffraction (for lithography) and scattering (non-line-of-sight communication). The family of III-N (AlGaInN) compound semiconductors offers a tunable energy gap from infrared to DUV. While InGaN-based blue light emitters have been the primary focus for the obvious application of solid state lighting, there is a growing interest in the development of efficient UV and DUV light-emitting devices. In the past few years we have witnessed an increasing investment from both government and industry sectors to further the state of DUV light-emitting devices. The contributions in Semiconductor Science and Technology 's special issue on DUV devices provide an up-to-date snapshot covering many relevant topics in this field. Given the expected importance of bulk AlN substrate in DUV technology, we are pleased to include a review article by Hartmann et al on the growth of AlN bulk crystal by physical vapour transport. The issue of polarization field within the deep ultraviolet LEDs is examined in the article by Braut et al. Several commercial companies provide useful updates in their development of DUV emitters, including Nichia (Fujioka et al ), Nitride Semiconductors (Muramoto et al ) and Sensor Electronic Technology (Shatalov et al ). We believe these articles will provide an excellent overview of the state of technology. The growth of AlGaN heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy, in contrast to the common organo-metallic vapour phase epitaxy, is discussed by Ivanov et al. Since hexagonal boron nitride (BN) has received much attention as both a UV and a two-dimensional electronic material, we believe it serves readers well to include the

  11. Lunar deep drill apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Proposed as a baseline configuration, this rotary drill apparatus is designed to produce 100-mm diameter holes in the lunar surface at depths up to 50 meters. The drill is intended to acquire samples for scientific analysis, mineral resource location, calibration of electronic exploration devices, and foundation analysis at construction sites. It is also intended to prepare holes for emplacement of scientific instruments, the setting of structural anchors, and explosive methods in excavation and mining activities. Defined as a deep drill because of the modular drill string, it incorporates an automatic rod changer. The apparatus is teleoperated from a remote location, such as earth, utilizing supervisory control techniques. It is thus suitable for unmanned and man-tended operation. Proven terrestrial drilling technology is used to the extent it is compatible with the lunar environment. Augers and drive tubes form holes in the regolith and may be used to acquire loose samples. An inertial cutting removal system operates intermittently while rock core drilling is in progress. The apparatus is carried to the work site by a three-legged mobile platform which also provides a 2-meter feed along the hole centerline, an off-hole movement of approximately .5 meters, an angular alignment of up to 20 deg. from gravity vertical, and other dexterity required in handling rods and samples. The technology can also be applied using other carriers which incorporate similar motion capabilities. The apparatus also includes storage racks for augers, rods, and ancillary devices such as the foot-plate that holds the down-hole tooling during rod changing operations.

  12. Central Exclusive Production in Proton-Proton Collisions with the STAR Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guryn, Włodek

    2016-07-01

    We shall describe the physics program with tagged forward protons, focusing on Central Exclusive Production in polarized proton-proton collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with the STAR detector at √s = 200 GeV. Preliminary results in CEP of two oppositely charged pions and kaons produced in the processes pp → ppπ+π- and pp → ppK+K- shall be presented. Those Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) processes, allow the final states to be dominated by gluonic exchanges. Silicon strip detectors placed in Roman Pots were used for measuring forward protons. The preliminary results are based on the measurement of the recoil system of charged particles in the STAR experiment's Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Ionization energy loss, dE/dx, of charged particles was used for particle identification (PID).

  13. Charge transport model in nanodielectric composites based on quantum tunneling mechanism and dual-level traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guochang; Chen, George; Li, Shengtao

    2016-08-01

    Charge transport properties in nanodielectrics present different tendencies for different loading concentrations. The exact mechanisms that are responsible for charge transport in nanodielectrics are not detailed, especially for high loading concentration. A charge transport model in nanodielectrics has been proposed based on quantum tunneling mechanism and dual-level traps. In the model, the thermally assisted hopping (TAH) process for the shallow traps and the tunnelling process for the deep traps are considered. For different loading concentrations, the dominant charge transport mechanisms are different. The quantum tunneling mechanism plays a major role in determining the charge conduction in nanodielectrics with high loading concentrations. While for low loading concentrations, the thermal hopping mechanism will dominate the charge conduction process. The model can explain the observed conductivity property in nanodielectrics with different loading concentrations.

  14. The Deep Space Network, volume 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  15. Modeling of nanoscale transport using fractional exclusion statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemnes, George; Anghel, Dragos

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, with the continuous development of nanostructured materials, many-body quantum effects were observed in the charge, spin or phonon transport. Fractional exclusion statistics (FES) has already proved to be an important tool in the study of thermodynamical properties of interacting Bose and Fermi systems, which are regarded as ideal FES gases. Recently, the transition rates for FES gases were established, which opens the possibility of analyzing interacting boson and fermion systems in non-equilibrium. We make here a step further and introduce a transport model based on FES, using Monte Carlo simulations. The transport model based on FES is applied on quasi-1D systems, such as core-shell structures. The statistical FES parameters are extracted from the interacting electron gas, taking into account the Coulomb interaction. We also investigate transport in systems with quenched disorder. Within our approach we are able to point out some particularities of charge transport of interacting fermions in nanoscale systems with multiple interfaces. PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0960

  16. 40 CFR 113.5 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exclusions. 113.5 Section 113.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS LIABILITY LIMITS FOR... capacity. (b) Vehicles and rolling stock....

  17. 40 CFR 113.5 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exclusions. 113.5 Section 113.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS LIABILITY LIMITS FOR... capacity. (b) Vehicles and rolling stock....

  18. 40 CFR 113.5 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Exclusions. 113.5 Section 113.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS LIABILITY LIMITS FOR... capacity. (b) Vehicles and rolling stock....

  19. Exclusion of pneumothorax by radionuclide lung scan

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.E.

    1986-05-01

    A case is reported in which ventilation lung imaging was useful in excluding a large pneumothorax. This technique may be helpful in patients with emphysema in whom exclusion of pneumothorax by radiographic criteria might be difficult.

  20. 48 CFR 37.202 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING SERVICE CONTRACTING Advisory and Assistance Services 37.202 Exclusions. The following activities...) Routine information technology services unless they are an integral part of a contract for the acquisition... research involving medical, biological, physical, social, psychological, or other phenomena....

  1. 48 CFR 832.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for Non-Commercial Items 832.404 Exclusions. (a) Under 31 U.S.... 3324(a). The term “other publications” includes any publication printed, microfilmed, photocopied...

  2. Definition of Exclusion Zones Using Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartal, Y.; Villagran, M.; Ben Horin, Y.; Leonard, G.; Joswig, M.

    - In verifying compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), there is a motivation to be effective, efficient and economical and to prevent abuse of the right to conduct an On-site Inspection (OSI) in the territory of a challenged State Party. In particular, it is in the interest of a State Party to avoid irrelevant search in specific areas. In this study we propose several techniques to determine `exclusion zones', which are defined as areas where an event could not have possibly occurred. All techniques are based on simple ideas of arrival time differences between seismic stations and thus are less prone to modeling errors compared to standard event location methods. The techniques proposed are: angular sector exclusion based on a tripartite micro array, half-space exclusion based on a station pair, and closed area exclusion based on circumferential networks.

  3. 7 CFR 520.5 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Department of Agriculture categorical exclusions (7 CFR 1b.3). (1) Policy development, planning and... environment; (iii) Testing outside of the laboratory, such as in small isolated field plots, which does...

  4. 7 CFR 520.5 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Department of Agriculture categorical exclusions (7 CFR 1b.3). (1) Policy development, planning and... environment; (iii) Testing outside of the laboratory, such as in small isolated field plots, which does...

  5. High resolution printing of charge

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-06-16

    Provided are methods of printing a pattern of charge on a substrate surface, such as by electrohydrodynamic (e-jet) printing. The methods relate to providing a nozzle containing a printable fluid, providing a substrate having a substrate surface and generating from the nozzle an ejected printable fluid containing net charge. The ejected printable fluid containing net charge is directed to the substrate surface, wherein the net charge does not substantially degrade and the net charge retained on the substrate surface. Also provided are functional devices made by any of the disclosed methods.

  6. Charge sniffer for electrostatics demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Mihai P.

    2011-02-01

    An electronic electroscope with a special design for demonstrations and experiments on static electricity is described. It operates as an electric charge sniffer by detecting slightly charged objects when they are brought to the front of its sensing electrode. The sniffer has the advantage of combining high directional sensitivity with a logarithmic bar display. It allows for the identification of electric charge polarity during charge separation by friction, peeling, electrostatic induction, batteries, or secondary coils of power transformers. Other experiments in electrostatics, such as observing the electric field of an oscillating dipole and the distance dependence of the electric field generated by simple charge configurations, are also described.

  7. Droplet charging for wet scrubbers.

    PubMed

    Pilat, Michael J; Lukas, John C

    2004-01-01

    Water droplet charge/mass of wet scrubbers was measured over the direct charging applied potential range of 0-20 kV, 30-70 pounds per square inch gauge (206.8-482.6 kPa) water pressure, and with spiral, impingement, and whirl nozzles. The measured charge/mass ranged from -0.0005 to 0.2 microcoulomb/gm and was directly related to the applied voltage. The water charge/mass was a function of the spray nozzle, with the smaller orifice lower-flow nozzles having the higher charge/mass.

  8. Viability of Carbon Dioxide Storage in Deep Sea Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielicki, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Despite the public's general aversion to using the ocean to dispose of captured carbon dioxide (CO2), recent revisions of the London Protocol have removed a hurdle to subsea injection of CO2. This paper constructs a map of the worldwide "prospectivity" of CO2 storage in deep sea sediment, i.e. amenable locations are determined and storage capacities estimated. CO2 injected into deep sea sediment is expected to be gravitationally trapped and secondarily capped by CO2 hydrate formation. Capture, transport, and storage costs are estimated and a mixed-integer linear programming model that generates spatially optimized infrastructure networks is applied. The model captures CO2 from fixed point sources, uses minimum cost routing paths, aggregates CO2 flow into trunk distribution pipelines where appropriate, and injects the CO2 in potential deep sea injection sites. Economies of scale for this climate change mitigation intervention in the United States Exclusive Economic Zone are discussed, including provisions for destabilizing and/or harvesting methane from in situ gas hydrates.

  9. Deep Space Telecommunications Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Descriptive and analytical information useful for the optimal design, specification, and performance evaluation of deep space telecommunications systems is presented. Telemetry, tracking, and command systems, receiver design, spacecraft antennas, frequency selection, interference, and modulation techniques are addressed.

  10. Exclusive processes in strong and weak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsokos, K.

    1983-01-01

    Evolution equations for flavor singlet mesons are derived; these are solved in terms of Gegenbauer polynomials. These results have been applied to exclusive processes at large momentum transfer which involve flavor singlet mesons and glueballs - two glueball decays of the Upsilon, radiative psi decays and two-photon processes involving the eta. Exclusive, weak decays of heavy mesons are examined and the heavy mass scaling behavior of decay rates is obtained.

  11. Exclusive Reactions Involving Pions and Nucleons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    The HZETRN code requires inclusive cross sections as input. One of the methods used to calculate these cross sections requires knowledge of all exclusive processes contributing to the inclusive reaction. Conservation laws are used to determine all possible exclusive reactions involving strong interactions between pions and nucleons. Inclusive particle masses are subsequently determined and are needed in cross-section calculations for inclusive pion production.

  12. 42 CFR 405.506 - Charges higher than customary or prevailing charges or lowest charge levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Charges higher than customary or prevailing charges or lowest charge levels. 405.506 Section 405.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE...

  13. Deep Percolation in Devegetated Hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, B. A.; Hinckley, E. S.

    2011-12-01

    Deep percolation has recently been recognized as a critical component in hillslope hydrology studies. In devegetated hillslopes where vegetation is killed and, in some cases, removed, deep percolation may be substantially enhanced beyond pre-disturbance magnitudes. We discuss two examples of devegetated hillslopes where water balance partitioning shifted to favor increased deep percolation fluxes for some hydrologic conditions. The first is the Coos Bay Experimental Catchment in Oregon, USA, where commercial forestry resulted in the complete removal of trees. An intensive field campaign in the 1990's resulted in a long term record of precipitation, discharge, piezometric response, and groundwater levels. Hydrologic response modeling confirms hypotheses from the field-data analysis and points to unresolved questions regarding feedbacks between deep percolation and near-surface hydrologic processes. The second example is the area burned by the Fourmile Canyon Fire in Colorado, USA, where a severe wildland fire removed all vegetation from a north-aspect hillslope in 2010. Precipitation, atmospheric conditions, soil-water content, matric potential, and runoff have been measured since the fire devegetated the site. Subsurface sampling of the vadose zone is accomplished using suction lysimeters to capture total nitrate, ammonium, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Darcian flux calculations of net infiltration from the shallow soil into fractured granodiorite bedrock are used to estimate solute fluxes to a deeper groundwater system. Virtual experiments using numerical models of unsaturated fluid flow and solute transport further elucidate the temporal dynamics of deep percolation and associated solute fluxes during spring snowmelt and frontal rainstorms, which are the major hydrologic drivers of deep percolation in this fire-impacted system. Together, these examples serve to illustrate the critical importance of deep percolation in disturbed landscapes. The

  14. Prospects bleak for deep gas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.H.

    1982-10-01

    The incentive for producing unregulated deep gas has dropped along with oil prices. Until the oil glut ends and shallow gas is deregulated and allowed to reach market-clearing levels, producers will continue to slow production and delay new drilling ventures. Deep gas will not be competitive in most markets after deregulation is complete in 1985 even if there is another Middle East oil shock. New drilling for controlled shallow gas will also wait for deregulation. (DCK)

  15. 27 CFR 8.52 - Practices which result in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Practices which result in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.52 Practices which result in exclusion. The practices specified in this section result in exclusion under section 105(a) of the Act....

  16. 27 CFR 8.53 - Practice not resulting in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Practice not resulting in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.53 Practice not resulting in exclusion. The practice specified in this section is deemed not to result in exclusion under section 105(a)...

  17. 27 CFR 8.53 - Practice not resulting in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Practice not resulting in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.53 Practice not resulting in exclusion. The practice specified in this section is deemed not to result in exclusion under section 105(a)...

  18. 27 CFR 8.52 - Practices which result in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Practices which result in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.52 Practices which result in exclusion. The practices specified in this section result in exclusion under section 105(a) of the Act....

  19. 27 CFR 8.53 - Practice not resulting in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Practice not resulting in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.53 Practice not resulting in exclusion. The practice specified in this section is deemed not to result in exclusion under section 105(a)...

  20. 27 CFR 8.52 - Practices which result in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Practices which result in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.52 Practices which result in exclusion. The practices specified in this section result in exclusion under section 105(a) of the Act....

  1. 27 CFR 8.53 - Practice not resulting in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Practice not resulting in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.53 Practice not resulting in exclusion. The practice specified in this section is deemed not to result in exclusion under section 105(a)...

  2. 27 CFR 8.52 - Practices which result in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Practices which result in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.52 Practices which result in exclusion. The practices specified in this section result in exclusion under section 105(a) of the Act....

  3. 27 CFR 8.52 - Practices which result in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Practices which result in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.52 Practices which result in exclusion. The practices specified in this section result in exclusion under section 105(a) of the Act....

  4. 27 CFR 8.53 - Practice not resulting in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Practice not resulting in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.53 Practice not resulting in exclusion. The practice specified in this section is deemed not to result in exclusion under section 105(a)...

  5. 49 CFR 1542.111 - Exclusive area agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... exclusive area. (b) An exclusive area agreement must be in writing, signed by the airport operator and... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusive area agreements. 1542.111 Section 1542... § 1542.111 Exclusive area agreements. (a) TSA may approve an amendment to an airport security...

  6. 21 CFR 316.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Orphan-drug Exclusive Approval § 316.34 FDA recognition of... written notice recognizing exclusive approval once the marketing application for a designated orphan-drug... orphan-drug exclusive approval for the full 7-year term of exclusive approval. (b) When a...

  7. Model of reversible vesicular transport with exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Karamched, Bhargav R.

    2016-08-01

    A major question in neurobiology concerns the mechanics behind the motor-driven transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets along the axon of a neuron. Experimental evidence suggests that the distribution of vesicles along the axon is relatively uniform and that vesicular delivery to synapses is reversible. A recent modeling study has made explicit the crucial role that reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses plays in achieving uniformity in vesicle distribution, so called synaptic democracy (Bressloff et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 168101). In this paper we generalize the previous model by accounting for exclusion effects (hard-core repulsion) that may occur between molecular motor-cargo complexes (particles) moving along the same microtubule track. The resulting model takes the form of an exclusion process with four internal states, which distinguish between motile and stationary particles, and whether or not a particle is carrying vesicles. By applying a mean field approximation and an adiabatic approximation we reduce the system of ODEs describing the evolution of occupation numbers of the sites on a 1D lattice to a system of hydrodynamic equations in the continuum limit. We find that reversibility in vesicular delivery allows for synaptic democracy even in the presence of exclusion effects, although exclusion does exacerbate nonuniform distributions of vesicles in an axon when compared with a model without exclusion. We also uncover the relationship between our model and other models of exclusion processes with internal states.

  8. Unitary constraints on charged pion photoproduction at large p⊥

    DOE PAGES

    Laget, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-25

    Aroundmore » $$\\theta_{\\pi}=$$90$$^\\circ$$, the coupling to the $$\\rho^\\circ N$$ channel leads to a good accounting of the charged pion exclusive photoproduction cross section in the energy range 3 < Eγ < 10 GeV, where experimental data exist. Starting from a Regge Pole approach that successfully describes vector meson production, the singular part of the corresponding box diagrams (where the intermediate vector meson-baryon pair propagates on-shell) is evaluated without any further assumptions (unitarity). Such a treatment provides an explanation of the $$s^{-7}$$ scaling of the cross section. Furthermore, elastic rescattering of the charged pion improves the basic Regge pole model at forward and backward angles.« less

  9. Effect of surface charge on colloidal charge reversal.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, A; Rodríguez-Beas, C; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R; Quesada-Pérez, M

    2009-05-14

    The objective of this research work is to understand the effect of the surface charge density on the charge reversal phenomenon. To this end, we use experimental results and computer simulations. In particular, we measure the electrophoretic mobility of latex particles (macroions) in the presence of a multivalent electrolyte. We have focused on the electrolyte concentration range at which a reversal in the electrophoretic mobility is expected to happen. In particular, the role of the surface charge on the charge reversal process is looked into from several latexes with the same functional group but different surface charge densities. Although the mechanism responsible for the colloidal charge reversal is still a controversial issue, it is proved that ionic correlations are behind the appearance of such phenomenon (especially near the macroion surface). This conclusion can be inferred from a great variety of theoretical models. According to them, one of the factors that determine the charge reversal is the surface charge density of the macroions. However, this feature has been rarely analyzed in experiments. Our results appear therefore as a demanded survey to test the validity of the theoretical predictions. Moreover, we have also performed Monte Carlo simulations that take the ion size into account. The correlation found between experiments and simulations is fairly good. The combination of these techniques provides new insight into the colloidal charge reversal phenomena showing the effect of surface charge. PMID:19385634

  10. Hot, deep origin of petroleum: deep basin evidence and application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Leigh C.

    1978-01-01

    Use of the model of a hot deep origin of oil places rigid constraints on the migration and entrapment of crude oil. Specifically, oil originating from depth migrates vertically up faults and is emplaced in traps at shallower depths. Review of petroleum-producing basins worldwide shows oil occurrence in these basins conforms to the restraints of and therefore supports the hypothesis. Most of the world's oil is found in the very deepest sedimentary basins, and production over or adjacent to the deep basin is cut by or directly updip from faults dipping into the basin deep. Generally the greater the fault throw the greater the reserves. Fault-block highs next to deep sedimentary troughs are the best target areas by the present concept. Traps along major basin-forming faults are quite prospective. The structural style of a basin governs the distribution, types, and amounts of hydrocarbons expected and hence the exploration strategy. Production in delta depocenters (Niger) is in structures cut by or updip from major growth faults, and structures not associated with such faults are barren. Production in block fault basins is on horsts next to deep sedimentary troughs (Sirte, North Sea). In basins whose sediment thickness, structure and geologic history are known to a moderate degree, the main oil occurrences can be specifically predicted by analysis of fault systems and possible hydrocarbon migration routes. Use of the concept permits the identification of significant targets which have either been downgraded or ignored in the past, such as production in or just updip from thrust belts, stratigraphic traps over the deep basin associated with major faulting, production over the basin deep, and regional stratigraphic trapping updip from established production along major fault zones.

  11. Exclusive, Hard Diffraction in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Andreas

    1999-03-01

    In the first chapter we give an introduction to hard diffractive scattering in QCD to introduce basic concepts and terminology. In the second chapter we make predictions for the evolution of skewed parton distributions in a proton in the LLA. We calculate the DGLAP-type evolution kernels in the LLA and solve the skewed GLAP evolution equations with a modified version of the CTEQ-package. In the third chapter, we discuss the algorithms used in the LO evolution program for skewed parton distributions in the DGLAP region, discuss the stability of the code and reproduce the LO diagonal evolution within less than 0.5% of the original CTEQ-code. In chapter 4, we show that factorization holds for the deeply virtual Compton scattering amplitude in QCD, up to power suppressed terms, to all orders in perturbation theory. In chapter 5, we demonstrate that perturbative QCD allows one to calculate the absolute cross section of diffractive, exclusive production of photons (DVCS) at large Q^2 at HERA, while the aligned jet model allows one to estimate the cross section for intermediate Q^2 ˜ 2 GeV^2. We find a significant DVCS counting rate for the current generation of experiments at HERA and a large azimuthal angle asymmetry for HERA kinematics. In the last chapter, we propose a new methodology of gaining shape fits to skewed parton distributions and, for the first time, to determine the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the DIS amplitude. We do this by using several recent fits to F_2(x,Q^2) to compute the asymmetry A for the combined DVCS and Bethe-Heitler cross section. In the appendix, we give an application of distributional methods as discussed abstractly in chapter 4.

  12. Charged Galileon black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar E-mail: christos.charmousis@th.u-psud.fr

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  13. Like Charges Attract?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianshan; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2016-07-21

    Using multiscale first-principles calculations, we show that two interacting negatively charged B12I9(-) monoanions not only attract, in defiance of the Coulomb's law, but also the energy barrier at 400 K is small enough that these two moieties combine to form a stable B24I18(2-) moiety. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations further confirm its stability up to 1500 K. Studies of other B12X9(-) (X = Br, Cl, F, H, Au, CN) show that while all of these B24X18(2-) moieties are stable against dissociation, the energy barrier, with the exception of B24Au18(2-), is large so as to hinder their experimental observation. Our results explain the recent experimental observation of the "spontaneous" formation of B24I18(2-) in an ion trap. A simple model based upon electrostatics shows that this unusual behavior is due to competition between the attractive dipole-dipole interaction caused by the aspherical shape of the particle and the repulsive interaction between the like charges. PMID:27351125

  14. Charged pion production in $$\

    DOE PAGES

    Eberly, B.; et al.

    2015-11-23

    Charged pion production via charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI wideband neutrino beam at Fermilab. Events with hadronic invariant mass W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV are selected in separate analyses: the lower W cut isolates single pion production, which is expected to occur primarily through the Δ(1232) resonance, while results from the higher cut include the effects of higher resonances. Cross sections as functions of pion angle and kinetic energy are compared to predictions from theoretical calculations and generator-based models for neutrinos ranging in energymore » from 1.5–10 GeV. The data are best described by calculations which include significant contributions from pion intranuclear rescattering. As a result, these measurements constrain the primary interaction rate and the role of final state interactions in pion production, both of which need to be well understood by neutrino oscillation experiments.« less

  15. Proton charge extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryker, Jesse R.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine how corrections to S -state energy levels En S in hydrogenic atoms due to the finite proton size are affected by moments of the proton charge distribution. The corrections to En S are computed moment by moment. The results demonstrate that the next-to-leading order term in the expansion is of order rp/aB times the size of the leading order term. Our analysis thus dispels any concern that the larger relative size of this term for muonic hydrogen versus electronic hydrogen might account for the current discrepancy of proton radius measurements extracted from the two systems. Furthermore, the next-to-leading order term in powers of rp/aB that we derive from a dipole proton form factor is proportional to , rather than , as would be expected from the scalar nature of the form factor. The dependence of the finite-size correction on and higher odd-power moments is shown to be a general result for any spherically symmetric proton charge distribution. A method for computing the moment expansion of the finite-size correction to arbitrary order is introduced and the results are tabulated for principal quantum numbers up to n =7 .

  16. Charge disproportionation, everywhere!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Hiraki, K.; Moroto, S.; Tajima, N.; Takano, Y.; Kubo, Y.; Satsukawa, H.; Chiba, R.; Yamamoto, H. M.; Kato, R.; Naito, T.

    2005-12-01

    Charge disproportionation (CD) recently observed in many organic conductors is reviewed. CD is closely related to the charge ordering (CO) but is observed even when no long range CO is established. In a θ -phase BEDT-TTF salt, (BEDT-TTF){2}RbZn(SCN){4}, an extremely slow dynamics of CD has been observed above T_MI. A similar phenomenon is also observed in the Cs-analog, (BEDT-TTF){2}CsZn(SCN){4}. However, a spin-singlet ground state without CD is suggested in this salt at low temperatures. It is shown that α -(BETS){2}I{3} exhibits CD at low temperatures, as in α -(BET-TTF){2}I{3}. Recently, an abnormal line broadening has been observed in 13C-NMR of (TMTSF){2}FSO{3} under pressure as well as in 77Se-NMR of λ-(BETS){2}FeCl{4} in a high field. We expect that both are very likely caused by a large CD among the organic molecular sites. The current investigation is a part of a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas of Molecular Conductors (No. 15073221) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, and the “Japan-Korea Joint Research Project” from Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (03-01-8) and Korea Science and Engineering Foundation (F01-2003-000-20023-0).

  17. Charged pion production in $\

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, B.; et al.

    2015-11-23

    Charged pion production via charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI wideband neutrino beam at Fermilab. Events with hadronic invariant mass W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV are selected in separate analyses: the lower W cut isolates single pion production, which is expected to occur primarily through the Δ(1232) resonance, while results from the higher cut include the effects of higher resonances. Cross sections as functions of pion angle and kinetic energy are compared to predictions from theoretical calculations and generator-based models for neutrinos ranging in energy from 1.5–10 GeV. The data are best described by calculations which include significant contributions from pion intranuclear rescattering. As a result, these measurements constrain the primary interaction rate and the role of final state interactions in pion production, both of which need to be well understood by neutrino oscillation experiments.

  18. The role of interfacial water layer in atmospherically relevant charge separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Indrani

    Charge separation at interfaces is important in various atmospheric processes, such as thunderstorms, lightning, and sand storms. It also plays a key role in several industrial processes, including ink-jet printing and electrostatic separation. Surprisingly, little is known about the underlying physics of these charging phenomena. Since thin films of water are ubiquitous, they may play a role in these charge separation processes. This talk will focus on the experimental investigation of the role of a water adlayer in interfacial charging, with relevance to meteorologically important phenomena, such as atmospheric charging due to wave actions on oceans and sand storms. An ocean wave generates thousands of bubbles, which upon bursting produce numerous large jet droplets and small film droplets that are charged. In the 1960s, Blanchard showed that the jet droplets are positively charged. However, the charge on the film droplets was not known. We designed an experiment to exclusively measure the charge on film droplets generated by bubble bursting on pure water and aqueous salt solution surfaces. We measured their charge to be negative and proposed a model where a slight excess of hydroxide ions in the interfacial water layer is responsible for generating these negatively charged droplets. The findings from this research led to a better understanding of the ionic disposition at the air-water interface. Sand particles in a wind-blown sand layer, or 'saltation' layer, become charged due to collisions, so much so, that it can cause lightning. Silica, being hydrophilic, is coated with a water layer even under low-humidity conditions. To investigate the importance of this water adlayer in charging the silica surfaces, we performed experiments to measure the charge on silica surfaces due to contact and collision processes. In case of contact charging, the maximum charge separation occurred at an optimum relative humidity. On the contrary, in collisional charging process, no

  19. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Pratt, Richard M.

    2012-05-22

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  20. Initial results from a ROSAT deep survey in Lynx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. F.; Windhorst, R. A.; Maccacaro, T.; Burstein, D.; Franklin, B. E.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koo, D. C.; Mathis, D. F.; Morgan, W. A.; Neuschaefer, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results from a deep (70 ksec) Rosat survey of the high galactic latitude selected area Lynx.3A are presented. Lynx.3A sensitivity was previously studied in both the optical radio, with deep Westerbork surveys and deep multicolor Charge Couple Device (CCD) images form the Palomar 200 inch Four-Shooter. About 70 x-ray sources were detected within the central 40 foot diameter region of the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC), observed surface densities of approximately 200 x-ray sources/sq deg are suggested, and these x-ray sources alone account for approximately 30 percent of the cosmic x-ray background (0.9 to 2.2 keV). An initial look at the observed x-ray logN - logS curve is presented, but a detailed assessment requires further study. The 4 sigma limit of about 7 times 10 to the minus 15th power erg/s.sq cm (0.5 to 2.0 keV) is considerably deeper then the Einstein deep surveys, and of comparable sensitivity to the deepest current Rosat surveys. Cross correlation with our Four Shooter optical catalogs yields at least one likely optical candidate for nearly all of the Rosat x-ray sources; a number of the likely optical identifications have colors of quasi-stellar objects (and stellar PSF), but in other cases galaxies/groups are also viable candidates.

  1. Effect of deep native defects on ultrasound propagation in TlInS2 layered crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu.; Suleymanov, Rauf A.; Odrinsky, Andrei P.; Kırbaş, Cafer

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated p-type semiconductor-ferroelectric TlInS2 by means of Photo-Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy (PICTS) technique in the temperature range 77-350 K for the detection of native deep defect levels in TlInS2. Five native deep defect levels were detected and their energy levels and capture cross sections were evaluated. Focusing on these data, the influence of these defects on the longitudinal and transverse ultrasound waves propagation as well as the effect of electric field on ultrasound waves were studied at different temperatures. The acoustic properties were investigated by the pulse-echo method. The direct contribution of thermally activated charged defects to the acoustic properties of TlInS2 was demonstrated. The key role of charged native deep level defects in elastic properties of TlInS2 was shown.

  2. PEPE is installed on Deep Space 1 in the PHSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Plasma Experiment for Planetary Exploration (PEPE), one of two advanced science experiments flying on the Deep Space l mission, is prepared for installation on the spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. PEPE combines several instruments that study space plasma in one compact 13-pound (6- kilogram) package. Space plasma is composed of charged particles, most of which flow outward from the Sun. The first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 1 is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch during a period opening Oct. 15 and closing Nov. 10, 1998. Most of its mission objectives will be completed within the first two months. A near-earth asteroid, 1992 KD, has also been selected for a possible flyby.

  3. Semiconductor nanocrystals in photoconductive polymers: Charge generation and charge transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Herron, Norman; Suna, A.

    1996-10-01

    A new class of photoconductive polymer composites, based on semiconductor nanocrystals (clusters) and carder-transporting polymers, have been developed. These materials are interesting for their potentials in laser printing, imaging, and photorefractives. We will describe material synthesis, charge transport and charge generation mechanisms. In particular, a model of field-dependent charge generation and separation in nonpolar media (e.g. polymers) will be discussed.

  4. FORT UNION DEEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-09-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback

  5. FORT UNION DEEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-03-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback

  6. Deep-Sea, Deep-Sequencing: Metabarcoding Extracellular DNA from Sediments of Marine Canyons

    PubMed Central

    Guardiola, Magdalena; Uriz, María Jesús; Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric; Wangensteen, Owen Simon; Turon, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Marine sediments are home to one of the richest species pools on Earth, but logistics and a dearth of taxonomic work-force hinders the knowledge of their biodiversity. We characterized α- and β-diversity of deep-sea assemblages from submarine canyons in the western Mediterranean using an environmental DNA metabarcoding. We used a new primer set targeting a short eukaryotic 18S sequence (ca. 110 bp). We applied a protocol designed to obtain extractions enriched in extracellular DNA from replicated sediment corers. With this strategy we captured information from DNA (local or deposited from the water column) that persists adsorbed to inorganic particles and buffered short-term spatial and temporal heterogeneity. We analysed replicated samples from 20 localities including 2 deep-sea canyons, 1 shallower canal, and two open slopes (depth range 100–2,250 m). We identified 1,629 MOTUs, among which the dominant groups were Metazoa (with representatives of 19 phyla), Alveolata, Stramenopiles, and Rhizaria. There was a marked small-scale heterogeneity as shown by differences in replicates within corers and within localities. The spatial variability between canyons was significant, as was the depth component in one of the canyons where it was tested. Likewise, the composition of the first layer (1 cm) of sediment was significantly different from deeper layers. We found that qualitative (presence-absence) and quantitative (relative number of reads) data showed consistent trends of differentiation between samples and geographic areas. The subset of exclusively benthic MOTUs showed similar patterns of β-diversity and community structure as the whole dataset. Separate analyses of the main metazoan phyla (in number of MOTUs) showed some differences in distribution attributable to different lifestyles. Our results highlight the differentiation that can be found even between geographically close assemblages, and sets the ground for future monitoring and conservation efforts on

  7. Deep-Sea, Deep-Sequencing: Metabarcoding Extracellular DNA from Sediments of Marine Canyons.

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Magdalena; Uriz, María Jesús; Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric; Wangensteen, Owen Simon; Turon, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Marine sediments are home to one of the richest species pools on Earth, but logistics and a dearth of taxonomic work-force hinders the knowledge of their biodiversity. We characterized α- and β-diversity of deep-sea assemblages from submarine canyons in the western Mediterranean using an environmental DNA metabarcoding. We used a new primer set targeting a short eukaryotic 18S sequence (ca. 110 bp). We applied a protocol designed to obtain extractions enriched in extracellular DNA from replicated sediment corers. With this strategy we captured information from DNA (local or deposited from the water column) that persists adsorbed to inorganic particles and buffered short-term spatial and temporal heterogeneity. We analysed replicated samples from 20 localities including 2 deep-sea canyons, 1 shallower canal, and two open slopes (depth range 100-2,250 m). We identified 1,629 MOTUs, among which the dominant groups were Metazoa (with representatives of 19 phyla), Alveolata, Stramenopiles, and Rhizaria. There was a marked small-scale heterogeneity as shown by differences in replicates within corers and within localities. The spatial variability between canyons was significant, as was the depth component in one of the canyons where it was tested. Likewise, the composition of the first layer (1 cm) of sediment was significantly different from deeper layers. We found that qualitative (presence-absence) and quantitative (relative number of reads) data showed consistent trends of differentiation between samples and geographic areas. The subset of exclusively benthic MOTUs showed similar patterns of β-diversity and community structure as the whole dataset. Separate analyses of the main metazoan phyla (in number of MOTUs) showed some differences in distribution attributable to different lifestyles. Our results highlight the differentiation that can be found even between geographically close assemblages, and sets the ground for future monitoring and conservation efforts on

  8. Deep-Sea, Deep-Sequencing: Metabarcoding Extracellular DNA from Sediments of Marine Canyons.

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Magdalena; Uriz, María Jesús; Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric; Wangensteen, Owen Simon; Turon, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Marine sediments are home to one of the richest species pools on Earth, but logistics and a dearth of taxonomic work-force hinders the knowledge of their biodiversity. We characterized α- and β-diversity of deep-sea assemblages from submarine canyons in the western Mediterranean using an environmental DNA metabarcoding. We used a new primer set targeting a short eukaryotic 18S sequence (ca. 110 bp). We applied a protocol designed to obtain extractions enriched in extracellular DNA from replicated sediment corers. With this strategy we captured information from DNA (local or deposited from the water column) that persists adsorbed to inorganic particles and buffered short-term spatial and temporal heterogeneity. We analysed replicated samples from 20 localities including 2 deep-sea canyons, 1 shallower canal, and two open slopes (depth range 100-2,250 m). We identified 1,629 MOTUs, among which the dominant groups were Metazoa (with representatives of 19 phyla), Alveolata, Stramenopiles, and Rhizaria. There was a marked small-scale heterogeneity as shown by differences in replicates within corers and within localities. The spatial variability between canyons was significant, as was the depth component in one of the canyons where it was tested. Likewise, the composition of the first layer (1 cm) of sediment was significantly different from deeper layers. We found that qualitative (presence-absence) and quantitative (relative number of reads) data showed consistent trends of differentiation between samples and geographic areas. The subset of exclusively benthic MOTUs showed similar patterns of β-diversity and community structure as the whole dataset. Separate analyses of the main metazoan phyla (in number of MOTUs) showed some differences in distribution attributable to different lifestyles. Our results highlight the differentiation that can be found even between geographically close assemblages, and sets the ground for future monitoring and conservation efforts on

  9. Deep-sea biodiversity in the Mediterranean Sea: the known, the unknown, and the unknowable.

    PubMed

    Danovaro, Roberto; Company, Joan Batista; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; D'Onghia, Gianfranco; Galil, Bella; Gambi, Cristina; Gooday, Andrew J; Lampadariou, Nikolaos; Luna, Gian Marco; Morigi, Caterina; Olu, Karine; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Sabbatini, Anna; Sardà, Francesc; Sibuet, Myriam; Tselepides, Anastasios

    2010-01-01

    Deep-sea ecosystems represent the largest biome of the global biosphere, but knowledge of their biodiversity is still scant. The Mediterranean basin has been proposed as a hot spot of terrestrial and coastal marine biodiversity but has been supposed to be impoverished of deep-sea species richness. We summarized all available information on benthic biodiversity (Prokaryotes, Foraminifera, Meiofauna, Macrofauna, and Megafauna) in different deep-sea ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea (200 to more than 4,000 m depth), including open slopes, deep basins, canyons, cold seeps, seamounts, deep-water corals and deep-hypersaline anoxic basins and analyzed overall longitudinal and bathymetric patterns. We show that in contrast to what was expected from the sharp decrease in organic carbon fluxes and reduced faunal abundance, the deep-sea biodiversity of both the eastern and the western basins of the Mediterranean Sea is similarly high. All of the biodiversity components, except Bacteria and Archaea, displayed a decreasing pattern with increasing water depth, but to a different extent for each component. Unlike patterns observed for faunal abundance, highest negative values of the slopes of the biodiversity patterns were observed for Meiofauna, followed by Macrofauna and Megafauna. Comparison of the biodiversity associated with open slopes, deep basins, canyons, and deep-water corals showed that the deep basins were the least diverse. Rarefaction curves allowed us to estimate the expected number of species for each benthic component in different bathymetric ranges. A large fraction of exclusive species was associated with each specific habitat or ecosystem. Thus, each deep-sea ecosystem contributes significantly to overall biodiversity. From theoretical extrapolations we estimate that the overall deep-sea Mediterranean biodiversity (excluding prokaryotes) reaches approximately 2805 species of which about 66% is still undiscovered. Among the biotic components investigated

  10. Deep-sea biodiversity in the Mediterranean Sea: the known, the unknown, and the unknowable.

    PubMed

    Danovaro, Roberto; Company, Joan Batista; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; D'Onghia, Gianfranco; Galil, Bella; Gambi, Cristina; Gooday, Andrew J; Lampadariou, Nikolaos; Luna, Gian Marco; Morigi, Caterina; Olu, Karine; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Sabbatini, Anna; Sardà, Francesc; Sibuet, Myriam; Tselepides, Anastasios

    2010-08-02

    Deep-sea ecosystems represent the largest biome of the global biosphere, but knowledge of their biodiversity is still scant. The Mediterranean basin has been proposed as a hot spot of terrestrial and coastal marine biodiversity but has been supposed to be impoverished of deep-sea species richness. We summarized all available information on benthic biodiversity (Prokaryotes, Foraminifera, Meiofauna, Macrofauna, and Megafauna) in different deep-sea ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea (200 to more than 4,000 m depth), including open slopes, deep basins, canyons, cold seeps, seamounts, deep-water corals and deep-hypersaline anoxic basins and analyzed overall longitudinal and bathymetric patterns. We show that in contrast to what was expected from the sharp decrease in organic carbon fluxes and reduced faunal abundance, the deep-sea biodiversity of both the eastern and the western basins of the Mediterranean Sea is similarly high. All of the biodiversity components, except Bacteria and Archaea, displayed a decreasing pattern with increasing water depth, but to a different extent for each component. Unlike patterns observed for faunal abundance, highest negative values of the slopes of the biodiversity patterns were observed for Meiofauna, followed by Macrofauna and Megafauna. Comparison of the biodiversity associated with open slopes, deep basins, canyons, and deep-water corals showed that the deep basins were the least diverse. Rarefaction curves allowed us to estimate the expected number of species for each benthic component in different bathymetric ranges. A large fraction of exclusive species was associated with each specific habitat or ecosystem. Thus, each deep-sea ecosystem contributes significantly to overall biodiversity. From theoretical extrapolations we estimate that the overall deep-sea Mediterranean biodiversity (excluding prokaryotes) reaches approximately 2805 species of which about 66% is still undiscovered. Among the biotic components investigated

  11. Deep-Sea Biodiversity in the Mediterranean Sea: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable

    PubMed Central

    Danovaro, Roberto; Company, Joan Batista; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; D'Onghia, Gianfranco; Galil, Bella; Gambi, Cristina; Gooday, Andrew J.; Lampadariou, Nikolaos; Luna, Gian Marco; Morigi, Caterina; Olu, Karine; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Sabbatini, Anna; Sardà, Francesc; Sibuet, Myriam; Tselepides, Anastasios

    2010-01-01

    Deep-sea ecosystems represent the largest biome of the global biosphere, but knowledge of their biodiversity is still scant. The Mediterranean basin has been proposed as a hot spot of terrestrial and coastal marine biodiversity but has been supposed to be impoverished of deep-sea species richness. We summarized all available information on benthic biodiversity (Prokaryotes, Foraminifera, Meiofauna, Macrofauna, and Megafauna) in different deep-sea ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea (200 to more than 4,000 m depth), including open slopes, deep basins, canyons, cold seeps, seamounts, deep-water corals and deep-hypersaline anoxic basins and analyzed overall longitudinal and bathymetric patterns. We show that in contrast to what was expected from the sharp decrease in organic carbon fluxes and reduced faunal abundance, the deep-sea biodiversity of both the eastern and the western basins of the Mediterranean Sea is similarly high. All of the biodiversity components, except Bacteria and Archaea, displayed a decreasing pattern with increasing water depth, but to a different extent for each component. Unlike patterns observed for faunal abundance, highest negative values of the slopes of the biodiversity patterns were observed for Meiofauna, followed by Macrofauna and Megafauna. Comparison of the biodiversity associated with open slopes, deep basins, canyons, and deep-water corals showed that the deep basins were the least diverse. Rarefaction curves allowed us to estimate the expected number of species for each benthic component in different bathymetric ranges. A large fraction of exclusive species was associated with each specific habitat or ecosystem. Thus, each deep-sea ecosystem contributes significantly to overall biodiversity. From theoretical extrapolations we estimate that the overall deep-sea Mediterranean biodiversity (excluding prokaryotes) reaches approximately 2805 species of which about 66% is still undiscovered. Among the biotic components investigated

  12. Charge Storage, Conductivity and Charge Profiles of Insulators as Related to Spacecraft Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Swaminathan, Prasanna; Frederickson, A. R.

    2004-01-01

    Dissipation of charges built up near the surface of insulators due to space environment interaction is central to understanding spacecraft charging. Conductivity of insulating materials is key to determine how accumulated charge will distribute across the spacecraft and how rapidly charge imbalance will dissipate. To understand these processes requires knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and charge transport within the insulator, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators. One must consider generation of mobile electrons and holes, their trapping, thermal de-trapping, mobility and recombination. Conductivity is more appropriately measured for spacecraft charging applications as the "decay" of charge deposited on the surface of an insulator, rather than by flow of current across two electrodes around the sample. We have found that conductivity determined from charge storage decay methods is 102 to 104 smaller than values obtained from classical ASTM and IEC methods for a variety of thin film insulating samples. For typical spacecraft charging conditions, classical conductivity predicts decay times on the order of minutes to hours (less than typical orbit periods); however, the higher charge storage conductivities predict decay times on the order of weeks to months leading to accumulation of charge with subsequent orbits. We found experimental evidence that penetration profiles of radiation and light are exceedingly important, and that internal electric fields due to charge profiles and high-field conduction by trapped electrons must be considered for space applications. We have also studied whether the decay constants depend on incident voltage and flux or on internal charge distributions and electric fields; light-activated discharge of surface charge to distinguish among differing charge trapping centers; and radiation-induced conductivity. Our

  13. Understanding the Linkage between Charging Network Coverage and Charging Opportunity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changzheng; Lin, Zhenhong; Kontou, Eleftheria; Wu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Using GPS-based travel survey data, this paper estimates the relationship between public charging network coverage and charging opportunity, defined as the probability of being able to access public charging for a driver at one of his/her stops or at one travel day. Understanding this relationship is of important interests to the electric vehicle industry and government in determining appropriate charging infrastructure deployment level and estimating the impact of public charging on market adoption of electric vehicles. The analysis finds that drivers trip destinations concentrate on a few popular places. If top 1% of most popular places are installed with public chargers, on average, drivers will be able to access public charging at 20% of all their stops and 1/3 of their travel days; If 20% of most popular places are installed with public chargers, drivers will be able to access public charging at 89% of all their stops and 94% of their travel days. These findings are encouraging, implying charging network can be efficiently designed by concentrating at a few popular places while still providing a high level of charging opportunity.

  14. Surface charge compensation for a highly charged Ion emissionmicroscope

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.W.; Hamza, A.V.; Newman, M.W.; Holder, J.P.; Schneider, D.H.G.; Schenkel, T.

    2003-04-01

    A surface charge compensation electron flood gun has been added to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) highly charged ion (HCI) emission microscope. HCI surface interaction results in a significant charge residue being left on the surface of insulators and semiconductors. This residual charge causes undesirable aberrations in the microscope images and a reduction of the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) mass resolution when studying the surfaces of insulators and semiconductors. The benefits and problems associated with HCI microscopy and recent results of the electron flood gun enhanced HCI microscope are discussed.

  15. 75 FR 65614 - Availability for Non-Exclusive or Partially-Exclusive Licensing of Invention Concerning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... Department of the Army Availability for Non-Exclusive or Partially-Exclusive Licensing of Invention Concerning Obstetrics Simulation and Training Method System AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... States Government, as represented by the Secretary of the Army, has rights to this invention....

  16. Deep ocean communities impacted by changing climate over 24 y in the abyssal northeast Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth L; Ruhl, Henry A; Kahru, Mati; Huffard, Christine L; Sherman, Alana D

    2013-12-01

    The deep ocean, covering a vast expanse of the globe, relies almost exclusively on a food supply originating from primary production in surface waters. With well-documented warming of oceanic surface waters and conflicting reports of increasing and decreasing primary production trends, questions persist about how such changes impact deep ocean communities. A 24-y time-series study of sinking particulate organic carbon (food) supply and its utilization by the benthic community was conducted in the abyssal northeast Pacific (~4,000-m depth). Here we show that previous findings of food deficits are now punctuated by large episodic surpluses of particulate organic carbon reaching the sea floor, which meet utilization. Changing surface ocean conditions are translated to the deep ocean, where decadal peaks in supply, remineralization, and sequestration of organic carbon have broad implications for global carbon budget projections.

  17. Battery charging stations

    SciTech Connect

    Bergey, M.

    1997-12-01

    This paper discusses the concept of battery charging stations (BCSs), designed to service rural owners of battery power sources. Many such power sources now are transported to urban areas for recharging. A BCS provides the opportunity to locate these facilities closer to the user, is often powered by renewable sources, or hybrid systems, takes advantage of economies of scale, and has the potential to provide lower cost of service, better service, and better cost recovery than other rural electrification programs. Typical systems discussed can service 200 to 1200 people, and consist of stations powered by photovoltaics, wind/PV, wind/diesel, or diesel only. Examples of installed systems are presented, followed by cost figures, economic analysis, and typical system design and performance numbers.

  18. Explosive bulk charge

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  19. Stable Charged Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, H.; Quandt, M.; Graham, N.

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius {approx_equal}10{sup -18} m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  20. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored. PMID:21469786

  1. Impact of surface properties on the dust grain charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlu, J.; Richterova, I.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.

    Dust grains are common in the space environment and being embosomed with plasma they become charged. It is well known that a motion of grains in the space is driven mainly by electrodynamic forces and thus the grain charge is of a significant importance for processes like the coagulation or dust cloud formations. Among others, emission processes are very important for setting of the dust charge. It is believed that emission processes are connected exclusively with surface properties of dust grains but it is not evident for the surfaces covered by a very thin layer of different material (e.g., oxidized metal). For this reason, we investigate surface effects experimentally. Our experiment is based on an electrodynamic trap. We can catch a single dust grain for several days inside the vacuum vessel and exposed it by the electron/ion beam and study charging/discharging processes. We have chosen spherically shaped melamine formaldehyde resin grains of a diameter 2.5 μm either with a clean surface or covered with a thin film from different metals. An advantage of these samples is that the properties of bulk and surface materials are completely different. The effect of surface modification was studied for several types of emissions, including secondary electron emission and field emissions.

  2. High dynamic range charge measurements

    DOEpatents

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2012-09-04

    A charge amplifier for use in radiation sensing includes an amplifier, at least one switch, and at least one capacitor. The switch selectively couples the input of the switch to one of at least two voltages. The capacitor is electrically coupled in series between the input of the amplifier and the input of the switch. The capacitor is electrically coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. A method of measuring charge in radiation sensing includes selectively diverting charge from an input of an amplifier to an input of at least one capacitor by selectively coupling an output of the at least one capacitor to one of at least two voltages. The input of the at least one capacitor is operatively coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. The method also includes calculating a total charge based on a sum of the amplified charge and the diverted charge.

  3. 12 CFR 226.4 - Finance charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Finance charge. 226.4 Section 226.4 Banks and... LENDING (REGULATION Z) General § 226.4 Finance charge. (a) Definition. The finance charge is the cost of...) Charges by third parties. The finance charge includes fees and amounts charged by someone other than...

  4. 12 CFR 226.4 - Finance charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Finance charge. 226.4 Section 226.4 Banks and...) TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) General § 226.4 Finance charge. (a) Definition. The finance charge is... transaction. (1) Charges by third parties. The finance charge includes fees and amounts charged by...

  5. Deep learning regularized Fisher mappings.

    PubMed

    Wong, W K; Sun, Mingming

    2011-10-01

    For classification tasks, it is always desirable to extract features that are most effective for preserving class separability. In this brief, we propose a new feature extraction method called regularized deep Fisher mapping (RDFM), which learns an explicit mapping from the sample space to the feature space using a deep neural network to enhance the separability of features according to the Fisher criterion. Compared to kernel methods, the deep neural network is a deep and nonlocal learning architecture, and therefore exhibits more powerful ability to learn the nature of highly variable datasets from fewer samples. To eliminate the side effects of overfitting brought about by the large capacity of powerful learners, regularizers are applied in the learning procedure of RDFM. RDFM is evaluated in various types of datasets, and the results reveal that it is necessary to apply unsupervised regularization in the fine-tuning phase of deep learning. Thus, for very flexible models, the optimal Fisher feature extractor may be a balance between discriminative ability and descriptive ability.

  6. Study on temperature distribution effect on internal charging by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Internal charging (or deep dielectric charging) is a great threaten to spacecraft. Dielectric conductivity is an important parameter for internal charging and it is sensitive to temperature. Considering the exposed dielectric outside a spacecraft may experience a relatively large temperature range, temperature effect can't be ignored in internal charging assessment. We can see some reporters on techniques of computer simulation of internal charging, but the temperature effect has not been taken into accounts. In this paper, we realize the internal charging simulation with consideration of temperature distribution inside the dielectric. Geant4 is used for charge transportation, and a numerical method is proposed for solving the current reservation equation. The conductivity dependences on temperature, radiation dose rate and intense electric field are considered. Compared to the case of uniform temperature, the internal charging with temperature distribution is more complicated. Results show that temperature distribution can cause electric field distortion within the dielectric. This distortion refers to locally considerable enlargement of electric field. It usually corresponds to the peak electric field which is critical for dielectric breakdown judgment. The peak electric field can emerge inside the dielectric, or appear on the boundary. This improvement of internal charging simulation is beneficial for the assessment of internal charging under multiple factors.

  7. Ichnology of pelagic carbonate in New Zealand and Denmark: Shelf Sea or Deep Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdale, A.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Today, pelagic carbonate ooze is an exclusive feature of deep-sea environments 1 km or more in depth. In contrast, the extensive epicratonic seas that characterized the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary received great thicknesses of pelagic carbonate sediment in environments only a few hundred meters deep. Distinguishing between deep-sea and shelf-sea carbonate is not an easy task, but ichnologic investigation helps. Biogenic sedimentary structures, ichnofacies, and ichnofabrics in Cretaceous-Tertiary epicratonic pelagic deposits display many similarities to those in deep-sea sediment. Ichnologic features in shelf-sea chalk and limestone in both New Zealand and northern Europe reveal some interesting paleobathymetric trends. These trends include a general decrease in crustacean traces (Thalassinoides, etc.) and bioerosion traces (Trypanites, etc.) with increasing water depth, accompanied by a concomitant increase in worm burrows (Zoophycos, etc.). Maastrichtian-Oligocene pelaic limestone in New Zealand and Maastrichtian-Paleocene chalk in Denmark neither of which represent a truly deep-sea setting, exhibit similar ichnofacies and ichnofabrics. Some notable differences exist because the New Zealand platform was less extensive and more tectonically active than the northern European shelf. Pelagic strata in New Zealand are associated with shallow-water quartzose sandstone beneath and fossiliferous calcarenite above, as well as deep-water bedded chert within, the pelagic carbonate sequence. In New Zealand strata Zoophycos-rich facies dominate Thalassinoides-rich facies, and bored hardgrounds are uncommon; in Danish chalk sequences the opposite is true in both cases.

  8. Charge contribution to patch-charged microparticle adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallabh, Chaitanya Krishna Prasad; Vahdat, Armin Saeedi; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2014-11-01

    Microparticle adhesion influenced by electrostatic charge has been a significant research interest for over past three decades or so in a wide spectrum of areas of interest from manufacturing (electrophotography, powder technology, metallurgy, and semi-conductor manufacturing) to natural phenomena (desert sandstorms and northern lights (auroras)). However, over the years, as a result of the strong discrepancies between the experimental adhesion measurements data and theoretical predictions, some key issues regarding the contributors of adhesion forces in charged microparticles and the nature of surface charge distribution still remain unresolved. In the current work, a non-contact ultrasonic approach is presented and employed for understanding the nature of charge distribution on a single microparticle and determining the effect of electrostatic charge on its adhesion in a non-invasive manner. From the vibrational spectra of the charged particle response to the ultrasonic substrate oscillations under various electrostatic loading conditions, three distinct shifting patterns of vibrational (rocking) resonance frequencies are observed for each level of applied substrate surface voltage, implying an un-symmetric force field on the particle, thus depicting non-uniform non-symmetric surface charge distribution on its surface. Also, a simple mathematical model was presented and employed for predicting the equivalent bulk charge on a single microparticle (toner) from resonance frequency shifts. In summary, it is found that the charge levels reported here are consistent with the previously published data, and it is demonstrated that, in a non-invasive manner, non-uniform charge distribution on a single microparticle can be observed and its total charge can be predicted.

  9. Clinical characteristics of CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahn, B S; Oh, S Y

    1998-12-01

    CHARGE syndrome, first described by Pagon, was named for its six major clinical features. They are: coloboma of the eye, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retarded growth and development including CNS anomalies, genital hypoplasia and/or urinary tract anomalies, and ear anomalies and/or hearing loss. We experienced three cases of CHARGE syndrome who displayed ocular coloboma, heart defects, retarded growth and development, and external ear anomalies, and we also review the previously reported literature concerning CHARGE syndrome. PMID:10188375

  10. Photoelectric Charging of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sickafoose, A.; Colwell, J.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.; Walch, B.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the photoelectric charging of dust particles which are either isolated or adjacent to a surface that is also a photoemitter. We find that zinc dust charges to a positive potential of a few volts when isolated in vacuum and that it charges to a negative potential of a few volts when passed by a photoemitting surface. The illumination is an arc lamp emitting wavelengths longer than 200 nm and the emitting surface is a zirconium foil.

  11. The surface charge of trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Souto-Padrón, Thaïs

    2002-12-01

    The surface charge of trypanosomatids was evaluated by means of the binding of cationic particles, as visualized by electron microscopy and by direct measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of cells. The results obtained indicate that most of the trypanosomatids exhibit a negatively charged surface whose value is species specific and varies according to the developmental stages. Sialic acids associated with glycoproteins, glycolipids and phosphate groups are the major components responsible for the net negative surface charge of the trypanosomatids.

  12. 27 CFR 53.100 - Exclusion of local advertising charges from sale price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... readjustments authorized under section 6416(b)(1) of the Code (relating to credits or refunds for price.... (b) Definition of local advertising—(1) In general. For purposes of the regulations under sections 4216(e) and 6416(b)(1) of the Code (§§ 53.100-53.102 and 53.173-53.176), the term “local...

  13. 27 CFR 53.100 - Exclusion of local advertising charges from sale price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... must be described sufficiently, as, for example, by reference to a particular named shopping area or shopping center, to enable customers to find the retail establishment. (4) Determination of costs of...

  14. 27 CFR 53.100 - Exclusion of local advertising charges from sale price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... must be described sufficiently, as, for example, by reference to a particular named shopping area or shopping center, to enable customers to find the retail establishment. (4) Determination of costs of...

  15. 27 CFR 53.100 - Exclusion of local advertising charges from sale price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... must be described sufficiently, as, for example, by reference to a particular named shopping area or shopping center, to enable customers to find the retail establishment. (4) Determination of costs of...

  16. 27 CFR 53.100 - Exclusion of local advertising charges from sale price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... must be described sufficiently, as, for example, by reference to a particular named shopping area or shopping center, to enable customers to find the retail establishment. (4) Determination of costs of...

  17. 26 CFR 48.4216(e)-1 - Exclusion of local advertising charges from sale price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... by one or more of the persons in the chain of distribution of the article (wholesale distributor... manufacturer is not considered to be one of the persons in the chain of distribution of the article. In general, advertising of an article is considered to be initiated or obtained by one or more persons in the chain...

  18. ''Follow that quarkexclamation'' (and other exclusive stories)

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, A.S.

    1987-06-17

    Quarks are considered to be the basic constituents of matter. In a series of recent experiments, Carroll studied exclusive reactions as a means of determining the interactions between quarks. Quantum Chromo-dynamics (QCD) is the modern theory of the interaction of quarks. This theory explains how quarks are held together via the strong interaction in particles known as hadrons. Hadrons consisting of three quarks are called baryons. Hadrons made up of a quark and an antiquark are called mesons. In his lecture, Carroll describes what happens when two hadrons collide and scatter to large angles. The violence of the collision causes the gluons that bind the quarks in a particular hadron to temporarily lose their grip on particular quarks. Quarks scramble toward renewed unity with other quarks, and they undergo rearrangement, which generally results in additional new particles. A two-body exclusive reaction has occurred when the same number of particles exist before and after the collisions. At large angles these exclusive reactions are very rare. The labels on the quarks known as flavor enable the experimenter to follow the history of individual quarks in detail during these exclusive reactions. Carroll describes the equipment used in the experiment to measure short distance, hard collisions at large angles. The collisions he discusses occur when a known beam of mesons or protons collide with a stationary proton target. Finally, Carroll summarizes what the experiments have shown from the study of exclusive reactions and what light some of their results shed on the theory of QCD.

  19. Cooperation induced by random sequential exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wang, Long

    2016-06-01

    Social exclusion is a common and powerful tool to penalize deviators in human societies, and thus to effectively elevate collaborative efforts. Current models on the evolution of exclusion behaviors mostly assume that each peer excluder independently makes the decision to expel the defectors, but has no idea what others in the group would do or how the actual punishment effect will be. Thus, a more realistic model, random sequential exclusion, is proposed. In this mechanism, each excluder has to pay an extra scheduling cost and then all the excluders are arranged in a random order to implement the exclusion actions. If one free rider has already been excluded by an excluder, the remaining excluders will not participate in expelling this defector. We find that this mechanism can help stabilize cooperation under more unfavorable conditions than the normal peer exclusion can do, either in well-mixed population or on social networks. However, too large a scheduling cost may undermine the advantage of this mechanism. Our work validates the fact that collaborative practice among punishers plays an important role in further boosting cooperation.

  20. Low-charge-state linac

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K.W.; Kim, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    A design is being developed for a low-charge-state linac suitable for injecting ATLAS with a low-charge-state, radioactive beam. Initial work indicates that the existing ATLAS interdigital superconducting accelerating structures, together with the superconducting quadrupole transverse focussing element discussed above, provides a basis for a high-performance low-charge-state linac. The initial 2 or 3 MV of such a linac could be based on a normally-conducting, low-frequency RFQ, possibly combined with 24-MHz superconducting interdigital structures. Beam dynamics studies of the whole low-charge-state post-accelerator section were carried out in early FY 1995.

  1. Butterflies with rotation and charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Alan P.; Ross, Simon F.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the butterfly effect for black holes with rotation or charge. We perturb rotating BTZ and charged black holes in 2 + 1 dimensions by adding a small perturbation on one asymptotic region, described by a shock wave in the spacetime, and explore the effect of this shock wave on the length of geodesics through the wormhole and hence on correlation functions. We find the effect of the perturbation grows exponentially at a rate controlled by the temperature; dependence on the angular momentum or charge does not appear explicitly. We comment on issues affecting the extension to higher-dimensional charged black holes.

  2. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  3. Charged doubly spinning black ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskisson, James

    2009-05-15

    This paper devises a procedure for adding fundamental and momentum charges to a neutral 5d solution of Einstein's vacuum equations, when the solution has three Killing vectors. This procedure uses the standard method of boosting and T-dualising a generic metric to give a new two-charge 5d solution to Einstein's vacuum equations. The physical properties of the charged solution are derived and their implications for the solution are then examined, with the two-charge dual spinning black ring being used as an example.

  4. [Respiratory changes in deep diving].

    PubMed

    Segadal, K; Gulsvik, A; Nicolaysen, G

    1989-01-30

    Deep diving refers to saturation diving to a depth of more than 180 m (1.9 MPa ambient pressure). In the 1990s diving to 400 m may be necessary on the Norwegian continental shelf. The safety margins are narrow and at such depths the respiratory system is subject to great strain. Respiratory resistance increases and the dynamic lung volumes are reduced as the pressure increases due to enhanced gas density. Helium is used together with oxygen as breathing gas and the lower density partly normalises the dynamic lung volumes. The respiratory system imposes clear limitations on the intensity and duration of physical work during deep diving. We lack systematic studies of lung mechanics, gas exchange and respiratory regulation in the different phases of deep dives. Demonstration of possible chronic occupational respiratory diseases connected to diving is dependent on follow-up over a long time.

  5. Respiratory changes with deep diving.

    PubMed

    Segadal, K; Gulsvik, A; Nicolaysen, G

    1990-01-01

    Deep diving refers to saturation diving to a depth of more than 180 m (1.9 MPa ambient pressure). In the 1990s diving to 400 m may be necessary on the Norwegian continental shelf. The safety margins are narrow and the respiratory system is subject to great strain at such depths. The respiratory resistance increases and the dynamic lung volumes are reduced as the pressure increases due to enhanced gas density. Helium is used together with oxygen as breathing gas and its lower density partly normalises the dynamic lung volumes. The respiratory system puts clear limitations on intensity and duration of physical work in deep diving. Systematic studies of lung mechanics, gas exchange and respiratory regulation in the different phases of deep dives are lacking. Detection of occupational respiratory disorder following diving are dependent on long-term follow-up.

  6. H1 F{sub 2}{sup D} and Diffractive Charged Current Results

    SciTech Connect

    Laycock, Paul

    2005-10-06

    The high precision measurements of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering are presented with the NLO DGLAP QCD fits to this data. The first differential measurements of the diffractive charged current cross-section are also presented and compared with the predictions of the fit to the neutral current data.

  7. A focused assignment encouraging deep reading in undergraduate biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Spiegelberg, Bryan D

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging undergraduate students to access, read, and analyze current primary literature can positively impact learning, especially in advanced courses. The incorporation of literature into coursework typically involves reading and responding to full research reports. Such exercises have clear value as students make connections between experiments and are able to probe and critique scientific logic. The exclusive use of full papers, though, may reinforce certain students' tendencies to rely on textual clues rather than a critical analysis of the actual data presented. I propose that structured activities requiring students to focus on individual parts of research papers, even on a single figure, are beneficial in a literature-centered advanced undergraduate course, because they promote the deep reading that is critical to scientific discourse. In addition, I describe how one such focused assignment boosted learning and was well received by students in a second-semester biochemistry course.

  8. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-12-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson's disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  9. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson’s disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  10. A Study for Doubly-Charged Higgs Boson at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Baroiant, Sasha

    2006-01-01

    We search for the pair production of doubly charged Higgs particles followed by the lepton-flavor violating decay of each Higgs into electron-and-tau and muonand- tau pairs using 350 pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. Separate searches investigate cases where three or four finalstate leptons are detected, and the limits for each exclusive decay mode reflect the combined results of both searches. Assuming the H$±±\\atop{L}$ decays exclusively into likesign electron-and-tau pairs, we set a lower limit on its mass of 114 GeV/c2 at the 95 % confidence level. In the case of exclusive muon-and-tau decays, we set a lower mass limit of 112 GeV/c2 also at the 95% confidence level.

  11. A search for double-charged Higgs bosons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Baraoiant, Sasha

    2006-01-01

    We search for the pair production of doubly charged Higgs particles followed by the lepton-flavor violating decay of each Higgs into electron-and-tau and muon-and-tau pairs using 350 pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. Separate searches investigate cases where three or four final state leptons are detected, and the limits for each exclusive decay mode reflect the combined results of both searches. Assuming the H$±±\\atop{L}$ decays exclusively into like sign electron-and-tau pairs, we set a lower limit on its mass of 114 GeV/c2 at the 95 % confidence level. In the case of exclusive muon-and-tau decays, we set a lower mass limit of 112 GeV/c2 also at the 95% confidence level.

  12. Evaluation of Bulk Charging in Geostationary Transfer Orbit and Earth Escape Trajectories Using the Numit 1-D Charging Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Victoria N.; Parker, Linda N.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.; Jun, Insoo; Garrett, Henry B.

    2007-01-01

    The NUMIT 1-dimensional bulk charging model is used as a screening to ol for evaluating time-dependent bulk internal or deep dielectric) ch arging of dielectrics exposed to penetrating electron environments. T he code is modified to accept time dependent electron flux time serie s along satellite orbits for the electron environment inputs instead of using the static electron flux environment input originally used b y the code and widely adopted in bulk charging models. Application of the screening technique ts demonstrated for three cases of spacecraf t exposure within the Earth's radiation belts including a geostationa ry transfer orbit and an Earth-Moon transit trajectory for a range of orbit inclinations. Electric fields and charge densities are compute d for dielectric materials with varying electrical properties exposed to relativistic electron environments along the orbits. Our objectiv e is to demonstrate a preliminary application of the time-dependent e nvironments input to the NUMIT code for evaluating charging risks to exposed dielectrics used on spacecraft when exposed to the Earth's ra diation belts. The results demonstrate that the NUMIT electric field values in GTO orbits with multiple encounters with the Earth's radiat ion belts are consistent with previous studies of charging in GTO orb its and that potential threat conditions for electrostatic discharge exist on lunar transit trajectories depending on the electrical proper ties of the materials exposed to the radiation environment.

  13. Exclusive, hard diffraction in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Andreas

    In the first chapter we give an introduction to hard diffractive scattering in QCD to introduce basic concepts and terminology, thus setting the stage for the following chapters. In the second chapter we make predictions for nondiagonal parton distributions in a proton in the LLA. We calculate the DGLAP-type evolution kernels in the LLA, solve the nondiagonal GLAP evolution equations with a modified version of the CTEQ-package and comment on the range of applicability of the LLA in the asymmetric regime. We show that the nondiagonal gluon distribution g(x1,x2,t,μ2) can be well approximated at small x by the conventional gluon density xG(x,μ2). In the third chapter, we discuss the algorithms used in the LO evolution program for nondiagonal parton distributions in the DGLAP region and discuss the stability of the code. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can reproduce the case of the LO diagonal evolution within less than 0.5% of the original code as developed by the CTEQ-collaboration. In chapter 4, we show that factorization holds for the deeply virtual Compton scattering amplitude in QCD, up to power suppressed terms, to all orders in perturbation theory. Furthermore, we show that the virtuality of the produced photon does not influence the general theorem. In chapter 5, we demonstrate that perturbative QCD allows one to calculate the absolute cross section of diffractive exclusive production of photons at large Q2 at HERA, while the aligned jet model allows one to estimate the cross section for intermediate Q2~2GeV2. Furthermore, we find that the imaginary part of the amplitude for the production of real photons is larger than the imaginary part of the corresponding DIS amplitude, leading to predictions of a significant counting rate for the current generation of experiments at HERA. We also find a large azimuthal angle asymmetry in ep scattering for HERA kinematics which allows one to directly measure the real part of the DVCS amplitude and hence the

  14. Deep space infections of neck.

    PubMed

    Kaluskar, S; Bajaj, P; Bane, P

    2007-03-01

    A retrospective study was performed on fourteen cases of deep cervical space infections in the neck admitted for diagnosis and treatment to the ENT Department, during a period of seven years from 1989-1997. Of the fourteen, four patients had Ludwig's angina and of the fourteen, one had a very serious complication resulting in death. Early diagnosis and adequate treatment were of paramount importance. The role of tracheostomy and management of airway in deep cervical space infections of the neck is discussed to gether with bacteriology, antibiotic treatment and surgical management.

  15. Decreased interoceptive accuracy following social exclusion.

    PubMed

    Durlik, Caroline; Tsakiris, Manos

    2015-04-01

    The need for social affiliation is one of the most important and fundamental human needs. Unsurprisingly, humans display strong negative reactions to social exclusion. In the present study, we investigated the effect of social exclusion on interoceptive accuracy - accuracy in detecting signals arising inside the body - measured with a heartbeat perception task. We manipulated exclusion using Cyberball, a widely used paradigm of a virtual ball-tossing game, with half of the participants being included during the game and the other half of participants being ostracized during the game. Our results indicated that heartbeat perception accuracy decreased in the excluded, but not in the included, participants. We discuss these results in the context of social and physical pain overlap, as well as in relation to internally versus externally oriented attention. PMID:25701592

  16. Ion exclusion chromatography of aromatic acids.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Fotouh R; Kirkpatrick, Christine L; Danielson, Neil D

    2013-08-01

    The determination of aromatic acids by ion exclusion chromatography is challenging due to peak tailing and the long retention time of hydrophobic solutes. This review discusses the retention mechanisms and the factors affecting retention, eluents and detection methods used in ion exclusion chromatography of aromatic acids such as mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-carboxylic acids, amino acids, sulfonates and phenol. In addition, the different approaches used to improve the chromatographic separation of these compounds are also discussed. These approaches include introducing an internal gradient of the ionic strength, using vacancy ion exclusion chromatography, employing a hydrophilic cation exchange resin or adding a modifier such as heptanol to the dilute sulfuric acid mobile phase. The applications of these methods in the analysis of aromatic acids are provided with a table summarizing the stationary phases, the mobile phases and the detection methods.

  17. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    DOE PAGES

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Adams, G. S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Angelescu, T.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; et al

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (π±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 < Q2 < 4 (GeV/c)2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 < x < 0.6. The fractional energy of the pions spans a range 0.3 < z < 1, with small transverse momenta with respect to the virtual-photon direction, Pt2 < 0.2 (GeV/c)2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W',more » is in the nucleon resonance region, W' < 2 GeV. The new data conclusively show the onset of quark-hadron duality in this process, and the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark → pion production mechanisms. The x, z and Pt2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for π+ and π-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.« less

  18. Charge transfer in multicomponent oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohan, A. F.; Ceder, G.

    1998-02-01

    The transfer of charge between different ions in an oxide plays an essential role in the stability of these compounds. Since small variations in charge can introduce large changes in the total energy, a correct description of this phenomenon is critical. In this work, we show that the ionic charge in oxides can strongly depend on its atomic environment. A model to assign point charges to atoms as a function of their atomic environment has recently been proposed for binary alloys [C. Wolverton, A. Zunger, S. Froyen, and S.-H. Wei, Phys. Rev. B 54, 7843 (1996)] and proven to be very successful in screened solids such as semiconductors and metals. Here, we extend this formalism to multicomponent oxides and we assess its applicability. The simple point-charge model predicts a linear relation between the charge on an atom and the number of unlike neighbors, and between the net value of the charge and the Coulomb field at a given site. The applicability of this approach is tested in a large-supercell self-consistent tight-binding calculation for a random Zr-Ca-O alloy. The observed fluctuations of the ionic charge about the average linear behavior (as a function of the number of unlike neighbors) was larger than 0.25 electrons even when many shells of atomic neighbors were considered in the fit. This variation is significant since it can introduce large errors in the electrostatic energy. On the other hand, for small absolute values of the charge, the ionic charge varied linearly with the Coulomb field, in agreement with previous findings. However, for large Coulomb fields, this function saturates at the formal chemical charge.

  19. Ion-Exclusion Chromatography for Analyzing Organics in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard; Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, John R.

    2006-01-01

    A liquid-chromatography technique has been developed for use in the quantitative analysis of urea (and of other nonvolatile organic compounds typically found with urea) dissolved in water. The technique involves the use of a column that contains an ion-exclusion resin; heretofore, this column has been sold for use in analyzing monosaccharides and food softeners, but not for analyzing water supplies. The prior technique commonly used to analyze water for urea content has been one of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), with reliance on hydrophobic interactions between analytes in a water sample and long-chain alkyl groups bonded to an HPLC column. The prior technique has proven inadequate because of a strong tendency toward co-elution of urea with other compounds. Co-elution often causes the urea and other compounds to be crowded into a narrow region of the chromatogram (see left part of figure), thereby giving rise to low chromatographic resolution and misidentification of compounds. It is possible to quantitate urea or another analyte via ultraviolet- and visible-light absorbance measurements, but in order to perform such measurements, it is necessary to dilute the sample, causing a significant loss of sensitivity. The ion-exclusion resin used in the improved technique is sulfonated polystyrene in the calcium form. Whereas the alkyl-chain column used in the prior technique separates compounds on the basis of polarity only, the ion-exclusion-resin column used in the improved technique separates compounds on the basis of both molecular size and electric charge. As a result, the degree of separation is increased: instead of being crowded together into a single chromatographic peak only about 1 to 2 minutes wide as in the prior technique, the chromatographic peaks of different compounds are now separated from each other and spread out over a range about 33 minutes wide (see right part of figure), and the urea peak can readily be distinguished from the other

  20. On the nature of high field charge transport in reinforced silicone dielectrics: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanhui; Schadler, Linda S.

    2016-08-01

    The high field charge injection and transport properties in reinforced silicone dielectrics were investigated by measuring the time-dependent space charge distribution and the current under dc conditions up to the breakdown field and were compared with the properties of other dielectric polymers. It is argued that the energy and spatial distribution of localized electronic states are crucial in determining these properties for polymer dielectrics. Tunneling to localized states likely dominates the charge injection process. A transient transport regime arises due to the relaxation of charge carriers into deep traps at the energy band tails and is successfully verified by a Monte Carlo simulation using the multiple-hopping model. The charge carrier mobility is found to be highly heterogeneous due to the non-uniform trapping. The slow moving electron packet exhibits a negative field dependent drift velocity possibly due to the spatial disorder of traps.

  1. Medium Deep High Temperature Heat Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, Kristian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel; Welsch, Bastian; Chauhan, Swarup; Homuth, Sebastian; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Heating of buildings requires more than 25 % of the total end energy consumption in Germany. Shallow geothermal systems for indirect use as well as shallow geothermal heat storage systems like aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) or borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) typically provide low exergy heat. The temperature levels and ranges typically require a coupling with heat pumps. By storing hot water from solar panels or thermal power stations with temperatures of up to 110 °C a medium deep high temperature heat storage (MDHTS) can be operated on relatively high temperature levels of more than 45 °C. Storage depths of 500 m to 1,500 m below surface avoid conflicts with groundwater use for drinking water or other purposes. Permeability is typically also decreasing with greater depth; especially in the crystalline basement therefore conduction becomes the dominant heat transport process. Solar-thermal charging of a MDHTS is a very beneficial option for supplying heat in urban and rural systems. Feasibility and design criteria of different system configurations (depth, distance and number of BHE) are discussed. One system is designed to store and supply heat (300 kW) for an office building. The required boreholes are located in granodioritic bedrock. Resulting from this setup several challenges have to be addressed. The drilling and completion has to be planned carefully under consideration of the geological and tectonical situation at the specific site.

  2. Exclusive hadronic and nuclear processes in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-12-01

    Hadronic and nuclear processes are covered, in which all final particles are measured at large invariant masses compared with each other, i.e., large momentum transfer exclusive reactions. Hadronic wave functions in QCD and QCD sum rule constraints on hadron wave functions are discussed. The question of the range of applicability of the factorization formula and perturbation theory for exclusive processes is considered. Some consequences of quark and gluon degrees of freedom in nuclei are discussed which are outside the usual domain of traditional nuclear physics. 44 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  3. Charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. W.; Hornbeck, L. J.; Stubbs, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a program to design, fabricate, and test CCD arrays suitable for operation in an electron-bombarded mode. These intensified charge coupled devices have potential application to astronomy as photon-counting arrays. The objectives of this program were to deliver arrays of 250 lines of 400 pixels each and some associated electronics. Some arrays were delivered on tube-compatible headers and some were delivered after incorporation in vacuum tubes. Delivery of these devices required considerable improvements to be made in the processing associated with intensified operation. These improvements resulted in a high yield in the thinning process, reproducible results in the accumulation process, elimination of a dark current source in the accumulation process, solution of a number of header related problems, and the identification of a remaining major source of dark current. Two systematic failure modes were identified and protective measures established. The effects of tube processing on the arrays in the delivered ICCDs were determined and are reported along with the characterization data on the arrays.

  4. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

  5. Battery-Charge-State Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivian, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    Charge-state model for lead/acid batteries proposed as part of effort to make equivalent of fuel gage for battery-powered vehicles. Models based on equations that approximate observable characteristics of battery electrochemistry. Uses linear equations, easier to simulate on computer, and gives smooth transitions between charge, discharge, and recuperation.

  6. Graphene-based charge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, C.; Volk, C.; Engels, S.; Stampfer, C.

    2013-11-01

    We discuss graphene nanoribbon-based charge sensors and focus on their functionality in the presence of external magnetic fields and high frequency pulses applied to a nearby gate electrode. The charge detectors work well with in-plane magnetic fields of up to 7 T and pulse frequencies of up to 20 MHz. By analyzing the step height in the charge detector’s current at individual charging events in a nearby quantum dot, we determine the ideal operation conditions with respect to the applied charge detector bias. Average charge sensitivities of 1.3 × 10-3e Hz-1/2 can be achieved. Additionally, we investigate the back action of the charge detector current on the quantum transport through a nearby quantum dot. By varying the charge detector bias from 0 to 4.5 mV, we can increase the Coulomb peak currents measured at the quantum dot by a factor of around 400. Furthermore, we can completely lift the Coulomb blockade in the quantum dot.

  7. MODELING PARTICULATE CHARGING IN ESPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In electrostatic precipitators there is a strong interaction between the particulate space charge and the operating voltage and current of an electrical section. Calculating either the space charge or the operating point when the other is fixed is not difficult, but calculating b...

  8. Dust Charge in Cryogenic Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, J.; Kojima, C.; Sekine, W.; Ishihara, O.

    2008-09-07

    Dust charges in a complex helium gas plasma, surrounded by cryogenic liquid, are studied experimentally. The charge is determined by frequency and equilibrium position of damped dust oscillation proposed by Tomme et al.(2000) and is found to decrease with ion temperature of the complex plasma.

  9. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  10. Unnecessary Child Care Exclusions in a State That Endorses National Exclusion Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Hashikawa, Andrew N.; Juhn, Young J.; Nimmer, Mark; Copeland, Kristen; Shun-Hwa, Li; Simpson, Pippa; Stevens, Martha W.; Brousseau, David C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE No study has evaluated the association between state endorsement of American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and American Public Health Association (APHA) national guidelines and unnecessary exclusion decisions. We sought to determine the rate of unnecessary exclusion decisions by child care directors in a state that endorses AAP/APHA guidelines and to identify factors that are associated with higher unnecessary exclusion decisions. METHODS A telephone survey was administered to directors in metropolitan Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Directors were randomly sampled from a list of 971 registered centers. Director, center, and neighborhood characteristics were obtained. Directors reported whether immediate exclusion was indicated for 5 vignettes that featured children with mild illness that do not require exclusion by AAP/APHA guidelines. Weighted data were summarized by using descriptive statistics. Regression analysis was used to identify factors that were associated with directors’ exclusion decisions. RESULTS A total of 305 directors completed the survey. Overall, directors would unnecessarily exclude 57% of children. More than 62% had never heard of the AAP/APHA guidelines. Regression analysis showed fewer exclusions among more experienced compared with less experienced directors, among larger centers compared with smaller centers, and among centers that were located in areas with a higher percentage of female heads of household. Centers with ≤10% children on state-assisted tuition excluded more. CONCLUSIONS High rates of inappropriate exclusion persist despite state endorsement of AAP/APHA guidelines. Focused initial and ongoing training of directors regarding AAP/APHA guidelines may help to reduce high rates of unnecessary exclusions. PMID:20403929

  11. Fork truck battery charging system

    SciTech Connect

    Ducharme, R.L.; Taylor, R.

    1983-11-01

    A battery charging system includes a highrise storage rack system for holding a plurality of battery chargers and defining a plurality of battery locations. Each battery to be charged is placed on a pallet which has a connection block with a cable connectable to the battery and a male connector. A load carrier carries the pallet and the battery to a selected battery location in the rack and deposits it thereat in a charging position, thereby connecting the male connector to a female connector on the rack connected to one of the chargers. The load carrier also retrieves charged batteries on their pallets from the rack, the retrieval motion effecting disconnection of the pallet from the charger. Each pallet has a fluid receiving trough provided with a drain which cooperates with fluid inlets of a fluid collection system on the rack for collecting fluids emitted during the charging process.

  12. Gravitational duality, branes and charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, C. M.

    1998-03-01

    D = 10 type II strings and M-theory in D = 11 have D - 5 branes and 9-branes that are not standard p-branes coupled to anti-symmetric tensors. The global charges in a D-dimensional theory of gravity consist of a momentum PM and a dual D - 5 form charge KM1… MD-5 , which is related to the NUT charge. On dimensional reduction, P gives the electric charge and K the magnetic charge of the graviphoton. Supersymmetry and U-duality imply that the type IIB theory has ( p, q) 9-branes. Orientifolding with 32 (0,1) 9-branes gives the type I string, while modding out by a related discrete symmetry with 32 (1,0) 9-branes gives the SO(32) heterotic string. Some of this material appeared in Nuclear Physics B509 (1997) 252, hep-th/9705162.

  13. Static Gas-Charging Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indoe, William

    2012-01-01

    A gas-charging plug can be easily analyzed for random vibration. The design features two steeped O-rings in a radial configuration at two different diameters, with a 0.050-in. (.1.3-mm) diameter through-hole between the two O-rings. In the charging state, the top O-ring is engaged and sealing. The bottom O-ring outer diameter is not squeezed, and allows air to flow by it into the tank. The inner diameter is stretched to plug the gland diameter, and is restrained by the O-ring groove. The charging port bushing provides mechanical stop to restrain the plug during gas charge removal. It also prevents the plug from becoming a projectile when removing gas charge from the accumulator. The plug can easily be verified after installation to ensure leakage requirements are met.

  14. State-of-charge coulometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A coulometer for accurately measuring the state-of-charge of an open-cell battery utilizing an aqueous electrolyte, includes a current meter for measuring the battery/discharge current and a flow meter for measuring the rate at which the battery produces gas during charge and discharge. Coupled to the flow meter is gas analyzer which measures the oxygen fraction of the battery gas. The outputs of the current meter, flow meter, and gas analyzer are coupled to a programmed microcomputer which includes a CPU and program and data memories. The microcomputer calculates that fraction of charge and discharge current consumed in the generation of gas so that the actual state-of-charge can be determined. The state-of-charge is then shown on a visual display.

  15. EBIS charge breeder for CARIBU.

    PubMed

    Kondrashev, S; Barcikowski, A; Dickerson, C; Fischer, R; Ostroumov, P N; Vondrasek, R; Pikin, A

    2014-02-01

    A high-efficiency charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) is being developed by the ANL Physics Division to increase the intensity and improve the purity of accelerated radioactive ion beams. A wide variety of low-energy neutron-rich ion beams are produced by the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). These beams will be charge-bred by an EBIS charge breeder to a charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) ≥ 1/7 and accelerated by ATLAS to energies of about 10 MeV/u. The assembly of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder except the injection/extraction beam lines has been completed. This summer we started electron beam commissioning of the EBIS. The first results on electron beam extraction, transport from the electron gun to a high power electron collector are presented and discussed. PMID:24593606

  16. EBIS charge breeder for CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashev, S.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Fischer, R.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Vondrasek, R.; Pikin, A.

    2014-02-01

    A high-efficiency charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) is being developed by the ANL Physics Division to increase the intensity and improve the purity of accelerated radioactive ion beams. A wide variety of low-energy neutron-rich ion beams are produced by the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). These beams will be charge-bred by an EBIS charge breeder to a charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) ≥ 1/7 and accelerated by ATLAS to energies of about 10 MeV/u. The assembly of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder except the injection/extraction beam lines has been completed. This summer we started electron beam commissioning of the EBIS. The first results on electron beam extraction, transport from the electron gun to a high power electron collector are presented and discussed.

  17. Sonograph mosaic of U. S. west coast Exclusive Economic Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.V.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.; Edwards, B.D.; Field, M.E.; Hampton, M.A.; Karl, H.A.; McCulloch, D.S.; Kenyon, N.H.; Masson, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    The Geological Long-Range Inclined Asdic (GLORIA) side-scanning sonar system was used to obtain data that were compiled as an image-enhanced acoustic mosaic, similar to an aerial photograph, of the sea floor from the edge of the continental shelf to 200 nmi offshore within the US Exclusive Economic Zone off California, Oregon, and Washington. The mosaic clearly displays the large-scale geomorphic and sedimentologic features of the sea floor, including spreading centers, seamounts, fracture zones, sediment fans, continental-slope canyons, and abyssal-plain channels. Hundreds of seamounts (some previously uncharted) dot the deep sea floor, and many have large summit craters and attendant volcanic flows. The major Nitinat, Astoria, Delgada, and Monterey sediment fans are traversed by lengthy channel-levee complexes that extend from morphologically diverse canyons on the adjacent continental slope. Areally extensive sediment-wave fields occur adjacent to the complexes. Some channels on the abyssal plain are straight whereas others are highly sinuous, suggesting that various channel-forming processes occur on the sea floor. The contrast between the transform tectonic regime south of Cape Mendocino and the convergent tectonic regime to the north is particularly apparent on the mosaic. The linear basement ridges that were generated at the Gorda and Juan de Fuca spreading centers and were later moved apart by sea-floor spreading are abruptly truncated by the Mendocino and Blanco fracture zones that accommodate horizontal slip between adjacent lithospheric plates.

  18. STAR results on central exclusive production in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybycien, Mariusz

    2015-04-01

    We present a preliminary measurement of the Central Exclusive Production of the two oppositely charged pions produced in the process pp → ppπ+ π-, obtained with the STAR detector at RHIC at √{s }=200 GeV. Silicon strip detectors placed in Roman Pots were used for tagging forward protons while pion pair tracks were reconstructed in the STAR Time Projection Chamber. Predictions of models based on Regge phenomenology are compared to the spectra of the kinematical variables corrected for detector acceptance and efficiency.

  19. STAR results on central exclusive production in proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Przybycien, Mariusz

    2015-04-10

    We present a preliminary measurement of the Central Exclusive Production of the two oppositely charged pions produced in the process pp → ppπ{sup +} π{sup −}, obtained with the STAR detector at RHIC at √(s)=200 GeV. Silicon strip detectors placed in Roman Pots were used for tagging forward protons while pion pair tracks were reconstructed in the STAR Time Projection Chamber. Predictions of models based on Regge phenomenology are compared to the spectra of the kinematical variables corrected for detector acceptance and efficiency.

  20. Ploughing the deep sea floor.

    PubMed

    Puig, Pere; Canals, Miquel; Company, Joan B; Martín, Jacobo; Amblas, David; Lastras, Galderic; Palanques, Albert

    2012-09-13

    Bottom trawling is a non-selective commercial fishing technique whereby heavy nets and gear are pulled along the sea floor. The direct impact of this technique on fish populations and benthic communities has received much attention, but trawling can also modify the physical properties of seafloor sediments, water–sediment chemical exchanges and sediment fluxes. Most of the studies addressing the physical disturbances of trawl gear on the seabed have been undertaken in coastal and shelf environments, however, where the capacity of trawling to modify the seafloor morphology coexists with high-energy natural processes driving sediment erosion, transport and deposition. Here we show that on upper continental slopes, the reworking of the deep sea floor by trawling gradually modifies the shape of the submarine landscape over large spatial scales. We found that trawling-induced sediment displacement and removal from fishing grounds causes the morphology of the deep sea floor to become smoother over time, reducing its original complexity as shown by high-resolution seafloor relief maps. Our results suggest that in recent decades, following the industrialization of fishing fleets, bottom trawling has become an important driver of deep seascape evolution. Given the global dimension of this type of fishery, we anticipate that the morphology of the upper continental slope in many parts of the world’s oceans could be altered by intensive bottom trawling, producing comparable effects on the deep sea floor to those generated by agricultural ploughing on land. PMID:22951970

  1. Electrochemical Machining Removes Deep Obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catania, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) is effective way of removing obstructing material between two deep holes supposed to intersect but do not because of misalignment of drilling tools. ECM makes it possible to rework costly castings otherwise scrapped. Method fast even for tough or hard alloys and complicated three-dimensional shapes.

  2. A Deep-Sea Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montes, Georgia E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity that simulates exploration techniques used in deep-sea explorations and teaches students how this technology can be used to take a closer look inside volcanoes, inspect hazardous waste sites such as nuclear reactors, and explore other environments dangerous to humans. (DDR)

  3. Creating food for deep space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-07-01

    Explorers and scientists have to eat, whether they're on top of a mountain, deep in the sea, or in space. NASA scientists are working to develop a viable food program by 2030 that could feed six crew members for a 3-year mission to Mars.

  4. Digging Deeper: The Deep Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the Deep Web, defined as Web content in searchable databases of the type that can be found only by direct query. Discusses the problems of indexing; inability to find information not indexed in the search engine's database; and metasearch engines. Describes 10 sites created to access online databases or directly search them. Lists ways…

  5. Lessons from Earth's Deep Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soreghan, G. S.

    2005-01-01

    Earth is a repository of data on climatic changes from its deep-time history. Article discusses the collection and study of these data to predict future climatic changes, the need to create national study centers for the purpose, and the necessary cooperation between different branches of science in climatic research.

  6. Diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, J. D.; Ginsberg, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a common disease, can be difficult to diagnose because its clinical features are nonspecific. Venography is the standard test, but other less expensive, easily performed, noninvasive tests are available. At present, duplex ultrasonography is the noninvasive test of choice. PMID:8616289

  7. Ploughing the deep sea floor.

    PubMed

    Puig, Pere; Canals, Miquel; Company, Joan B; Martín, Jacobo; Amblas, David; Lastras, Galderic; Palanques, Albert

    2012-09-13

    Bottom trawling is a non-selective commercial fishing technique whereby heavy nets and gear are pulled along the sea floor. The direct impact of this technique on fish populations and benthic communities has received much attention, but trawling can also modify the physical properties of seafloor sediments, water–sediment chemical exchanges and sediment fluxes. Most of the studies addressing the physical disturbances of trawl gear on the seabed have been undertaken in coastal and shelf environments, however, where the capacity of trawling to modify the seafloor morphology coexists with high-energy natural processes driving sediment erosion, transport and deposition. Here we show that on upper continental slopes, the reworking of the deep sea floor by trawling gradually modifies the shape of the submarine landscape over large spatial scales. We found that trawling-induced sediment displacement and removal from fishing grounds causes the morphology of the deep sea floor to become smoother over time, reducing its original complexity as shown by high-resolution seafloor relief maps. Our results suggest that in recent decades, following the industrialization of fishing fleets, bottom trawling has become an important driver of deep seascape evolution. Given the global dimension of this type of fishery, we anticipate that the morphology of the upper continental slope in many parts of the world’s oceans could be altered by intensive bottom trawling, producing comparable effects on the deep sea floor to those generated by agricultural ploughing on land.

  8. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Wolhart

    2005-06-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

  9. 48 CFR 19.1006 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusions. 19.1006 Section 19.1006 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program 19.1006...

  10. 40 CFR 763.99 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... management plan for that school. (5) An accredited inspector has determined that, based on records of an... management plan for that school. (7) An architect or project engineer responsible for the construction of a... Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.99 Exclusions. (a) A local education agency shall not...

  11. Teaching the Exclusion Principle with Philosophical Flavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadmi, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Outlines an approach to the teaching of a chapter in a quantum mechanics course. The exclusion principle is confronted with the principle of the "identity of the indiscernible" of Leibnitz. Concludes that philosophy can never replace scientific research, thus predicting directions of advances of physical theories. (GA)

  12. Sexism and Permanent Exclusion from School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlile, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Focussing on narratives collected during a two year participant observation research project in the children's services department of an urban local authority, this article addresses the intersection between incidents of permanent exclusion from school and assumptions made on the basis of a young person's gender. The article considers gendered…

  13. 41 CFR 101-26.802 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Exclusions. 101-26.802 Section 101-26.802 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM...

  14. A Phenomenographical Study of Voluntary Digital Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Derrick L.

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally scholars have used the digital divide and technology acceptance model definitions when examining why some people elect not to use certain information and communications technologies. When examining the phenomenon referred to as voluntary digital exclusion, the use of these classic definitions is woefully inadequate. They do not…

  15. 21 CFR 110.19 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusions. 110.19 Section 110.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD...

  16. 21 CFR 110.19 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusions. 110.19 Section 110.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD...

  17. 21 CFR 110.19 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusions. 110.19 Section 110.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD...

  18. 21 CFR 110.19 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusions. 110.19 Section 110.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD...

  19. 21 CFR 110.19 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusions. 110.19 Section 110.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD...

  20. 7 CFR 520.5 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Department of Agriculture categorical exclusions (7 CFR 1b.3). (1) Policy development, planning and... with only short-term effects on the environment. Examples are: (i) Research operations conducted within any laboratory, greenhouse or other contained facility where research practices and safeguards...

  1. 7 CFR 3407.6 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... only short-term effects on the environment: (A) Research conducted within any laboratory, greenhouse... significant environmental effect prior to recommending to the official responsible for approving a formula... Categorical Exclusions (7 CFR 1b.3). (i) Policy development, planning and implementation which are related...

  2. 40 CFR 122.3 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wastes, or any other discharge incidental to the normal operation of a vessel. This exclusion does not..., contiguous zone or waters of the United States for the purpose of mineral or oil exploration or development. (b) Discharges of dredged or fill material into waters of the United States which are regulated...

  3. 19 CFR 10.304 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....304 Exclusions. (a) Changes based on simple processing. No goods shall be considered originating for purposes of eligibility under the Agreement if they have merely undergone simple packaging or simple combining operations, or have undergone mere dilution with water or with another substance that does...

  4. 44 CFR 350.4 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SECURITY PREPAREDNESS REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF STATE AND LOCAL RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PLANS AND PREPAREDNESS... respect to, any evaluation, assessment or determination regarding the NRC licensee's emergency plans or... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusions. 350.4 Section...

  5. 44 CFR 350.4 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SECURITY PREPAREDNESS REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF STATE AND LOCAL RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PLANS AND PREPAREDNESS... respect to, any evaluation, assessment or determination regarding the NRC licensee's emergency plans or... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exclusions. 350.4 Section...

  6. New College Diversity Laws: Banning Racial Exclusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Race-exclusive programs of American universities and colleges, created initially to level the playing fields for under-represented students in higher education, are now considered discriminatory and illegal. The concerns levied against higher education institutions have been in response to two 2003 U.S. Supreme Court cases on race and admission at…

  7. Exclusive breakup measurements for {sup 9}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, B.R.; Cowin, R.L.; Woolliscroft, R.J.; Clarke, N.M.; Donadille, L.; Freer, M.; Leask, P.J.; Singer, S.M.; Nicoli, M.P.; Benoit, B.; Hanappe, F.; Ninane, A.; Orr, N.A.; Tillier, J.; Stuttge, L.

    2004-10-01

    The first exclusive breakup measurements for the nucleus {sup 9}Be are presented. Breakup via several discrete states is observed following scattering off {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb. The results support the prediction of a recent microscopic cluster calculation for a strong n+{sup 8}Be(2{sup +}) state component in the second excited state.

  8. 40 CFR 21.6 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL SMALL BUSINESS § 21.6 Exclusions. (a... imposed by municipalities, counties or other forms of local or regional authorities and governments, except for areawide management agencies designated and approved under section 208 of the Act, shall...

  9. 40 CFR 21.6 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL SMALL BUSINESS § 21.6 Exclusions. (a... imposed by municipalities, counties or other forms of local or regional authorities and governments, except for areawide management agencies designated and approved under section 208 of the Act, shall...

  10. 40 CFR 21.6 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL SMALL BUSINESS § 21.6 Exclusions. (a... imposed by municipalities, counties or other forms of local or regional authorities and governments, except for areawide management agencies designated and approved under section 208 of the Act, shall...

  11. 40 CFR 21.6 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL SMALL BUSINESS § 21.6 Exclusions. (a... imposed by municipalities, counties or other forms of local or regional authorities and governments, except for areawide management agencies designated and approved under section 208 of the Act, shall...

  12. 40 CFR 21.6 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL SMALL BUSINESS § 21.6 Exclusions. (a... imposed by municipalities, counties or other forms of local or regional authorities and governments, except for areawide management agencies designated and approved under section 208 of the Act, shall...

  13. 32 CFR 651.55 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Categorical exclusions. 651.55 Section 651.55 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Effects of Major Army Action Abroad §...

  14. 43 CFR 20.302 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and Payment of Travel and Related Expenses § 20.302 Exclusions. (a) Where employee travel is for... relates to the employee's official duties; (ii) The travel, subsistence and related expenses are with...) at a meeting or similar function. This includes a conference, seminar, speaking engagement,...

  15. 32 CFR 536.46 - Other exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Other exclusions. 536.46 Section 536.46 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE...-justiciable political question. See DA Pam 27-162, paragraph 2-43. (f) National Vaccine Act. (42 U.S.C....

  16. 48 CFR 232.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exclusions. 232.404 Section 232.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for...

  17. 48 CFR 232.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusions. 232.404 Section 232.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for...

  18. 48 CFR 32.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for Non-Commercial Items 32.404 Exclusions. (a) This subpart does not apply to advance payments authorized by law for— (1) Rent; (2) Tuition; (3) Insurance premiums... equivalent amount of the applicable foreign currency); and (ii) The advance payment is required by the...

  19. 48 CFR 232.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exclusions. 232.404 Section 232.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for...

  20. 48 CFR 232.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exclusions. 232.404 Section 232.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for...