Science.gov

Sample records for deep hypothermic cardiac

  1. Transfusion-free complex cardiac surgery: with use of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in a preterm 2.96-kg Jehovah's witness neonate.

    PubMed

    Huebler, Michael; Habazettl, Helmut; Boettcher, Wolfgang; Kuppe, Hermann; Hetzer, Roland; Redlin, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    In neonates, the major obstacle to transfusion-free complex cardiac surgery is the severe hemodilution that can result from the mismatch between the priming volume of the circuit and the patients' blood volume. Herein, we report the case of a 13-day-old, 2.96-kg preterm neonate who had a hypoplastic aortic arch and atrial and ventricular septal defects. At the insistence of her Jehovah's Witness parents, we performed corrective surgery without transfusing homologous blood products--using deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in the process. A specially designed cardiopulmonary bypass circuit with a priming volume of only 95 mL was the key component of an interdisciplinary effort to avoid transfusion while maintaining the patient's safety. To our knowledge, this is the 1st report of the use of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in blood-transfusion-free surgery to correct congenital heart defects in a small Jehovah's Witness neonate. PMID:22163136

  2. Resuscitation of a Pediatric Drowning in Hypothermic Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Dragann, Brendan N; Melnychuk, Eric M; Wilson, Christopher J; Lambert, Richard L; Maffei, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of pediatric patients who require prolonged resuscitation after ice water drowning and hypothermic cardiac arrest remains guarded. We report a case of successful prolonged resuscitation of a pediatric patient in hypothermic cardiac arrest who showed severe metabolic derangements and went on to make a rapid and full neurologic recovery without the use of extracoproreal rewarming or mechanical cardiac support. Many ground and air medical emergency medical service programs have policies against interfacility transfer of patients in hypothermic cardiac arrest, calling into question the need to revise current protocols. PMID:27021675

  3. [Thoracic lavage and open cardiac massage as treatment of hypothermic cardiac arrest--case report].

    PubMed

    Koponen, Timo; Vänni, Ville; Kettunen, Minna; Reinikainen, Matti; Hakala, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass is the treatment of choice for a severely hypothermic patient with cardiac arrest. However, the treatment is not always available. We describe a successful three-and-a-half hour resuscitation of a hypothermic cardiac arrest patient with manual chest compressions followed by open cardiac massage and rewarming with thoracic lavage. PMID:27188092

  4. Hypothermic cardiac arrest rescued with cardiopulmonary bypass and decompressive laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Simon G; Davidson, Michael J; Javid, Sara; Patel, Amy N; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Patel, Vihas

    2010-12-01

    Hypothermic cardiac arrest is a relatively uncommon presentation to United States Emergency Departments. During 1979-2002, the Centers for Disease Control reported that an average of 689 deaths per year in the US were attributed to exposure to excessive natural cold. Severe hypothermia (<30°C) confers marked depression of critical metabolic and biochemical functions, but may also provide protection to the brain and other organs while resuscitation is undertaken. For all hypothermic patients, measures designed to prevent further heat loss and begin rewarming should be instituted, but should not delay routine Advanced Cardiac and Trauma Life Support procedures. Rewarming methods include passive rewarming (insulation, removal from environment), active external rewarming (heating blankets, radiant heat, warm water immersion), and active core rewarming (warm inhalation, warmed intravenous fluids, gastrointestinal irrigation, bladder irrigation, dialysis, thoracostomy lavage, and cardiopulmonary bypass). PMID:21036798

  5. Hypothermic cardiac arrest far away from the center providing rewarming with extracorporeal circulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A 41-year-old man suffered hypothermic cardiac arrest after water immersion and was transported to our university hospital by ambulance helicopter for rewarming on cardiopulmonary bypass. He resumed spontaneous cardiac activity 6 h 52 min after cardiac arrest and recovered completely. PMID:22296952

  6. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest: real-life suspended animation.

    PubMed

    Chau, Katherine H; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2013-01-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a cerebral protection technique that was developed in the 1950s and popularized in the 1970s. It has become one of the three most common cerebral protection techniques currently used in aortic arch surgeries, with the other two being antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). At our institution, DHCA has been the cerebral protection technique of choice for over a quarter century. Our clinical experience with DHCA has been very positive, and our clinical studies have shown DHCA to have outcomes equal to (and sometimes better than) those of ACP and RCP, and DHCA to be very effective at preserving neurocognitive function. Other institutions, however, prefer ACP or RCP to DHCA. Each technique has its own set of pros and cons, and the question regarding which technique is the superior method for cerebral protection is hotly debated.

  7. Does the use of thiopental provide added cerebral protection during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest?

    PubMed

    Al-Hashimi, Sara; Zaman, Mahvash; Waterworth, Paul; Bilal, Haris

    2013-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: Does the use of thiopental provide added cerebral protection during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA)? Altogether, more than 62 papers were found using the reported search, of which 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Four of the seven papers used thiopental alongside other neuroprotective methods and agents. The methods included the use of ice packs to the head and core systemic hypothermia. Agents used alongside thiopental included nicardipine and mannitol. Thiopental was found to have the ability to lower oxygen consumption, where oxygen consumption was measured using the phosphocreatinine and adenosine triphosphate ratio. The neuroprotective effect of thiopental was evaluated by assessing the electrical activity of the brain during circulatory arrest, by which it was shown to be advantageous. However, other trials suggested that adding thiopental during circulatory arrest did not provide any extra protection to the brain. The timing of thiopental administration is of importance in order to gain positive outcomes, as it's ability to lower the cerebral energy state may result in unfavourable results if added before hypothermic circulatory arrest, where this may lead to an ischaemic event. We conclude that the use of thiopental during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest is beneficial, but if administered too early, it may replete the cerebral energy state before arrest and prove to be detrimental. PMID:23644730

  8. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  9. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  10. Usefulness of Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest and Regional Cerebral Perfusion in Children

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zheng; Hu, Ren-Jie; Zhu, De-Ming; Zhu, Zhong-Qun; Zhang, Hai-Bo

    2013-01-01

    To compare the safety and usefulness of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) and regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) during pediatric open heart surgery. Between January 1, 2004 and September 30, 2012, 1250 children with congenital cardiac defect underwent corrective operation with the DHCA or RCP technique in the Shanghai Children's Medical Center. Of them, 947 cases underwent the operation with the aid of DHCA (DHCA group), and 303 cases with RCP (RCP group). The mean DHCA time was 30.64±15.81 (7–63) minutes and mean RCP time was 36.18±12.86 (10–82) minutes. The mortality rate was 7.18% (68/947) and 6.60% (20/30) in two groups, respectively. The postoperative incidences of temporary and permanent neurological dysfunction were 6.23% (59/947) in the DHCA group and 2.64% (8/303) in the RCP group (p<0.01). The incidence of other complications such as low cardiac output, renal dysfunction, and lung issues are similar in both groups. RCP is a reliable technique for cerebral protection and it facilitates time-consuming corrected procedures for complex congenital cardiac defect repair procedures. PMID:24066266

  11. Continuous cerebral hemodynamic measurement during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David R.; Rusin, Craig G.; Miller-Hance, Wanda; Kibler, Kathy; Baker, Wesley B.; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Fraser, Charles D.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.; Brady, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-01

    While survival of children with complex congenital heart defects has improved in recent years, roughly half suffer neurological deficits suspected to be related to cerebral ischemia. Here we report the first demonstration of optical diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for continuous and non-invasive monitoring of cerebral microvascular blood flow during complex human neonatal or cardiac surgery. Comparison between DCS and Doppler ultrasound flow measurements during deep hypothermia, circulatory arrest, and rewarming were in good agreement. Looking forward, DCS instrumentation, alone and with NIRS, could provide access to flow and metabolic biomarkers needed by clinicians to adjust neuroprotective therapy during surgery. PMID:27699112

  12. Continuous cerebral hemodynamic measurement during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David R.; Rusin, Craig G.; Miller-Hance, Wanda; Kibler, Kathy; Baker, Wesley B.; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Fraser, Charles D.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.; Brady, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-01

    While survival of children with complex congenital heart defects has improved in recent years, roughly half suffer neurological deficits suspected to be related to cerebral ischemia. Here we report the first demonstration of optical diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for continuous and non-invasive monitoring of cerebral microvascular blood flow during complex human neonatal or cardiac surgery. Comparison between DCS and Doppler ultrasound flow measurements during deep hypothermia, circulatory arrest, and rewarming were in good agreement. Looking forward, DCS instrumentation, alone and with NIRS, could provide access to flow and metabolic biomarkers needed by clinicians to adjust neuroprotective therapy during surgery.

  13. Is moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion superior to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in elective aortic arch surgery?

    PubMed

    Poon, Shi Sum; Estrera, Anthony; Oo, Aung; Field, Mark

    2016-09-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether moderate hypothermia circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) is more beneficial than deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in elective aortic arch surgery. Altogether, 1028 papers were found using the reported search, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. There were four retrospective observational studies, one prospective randomized controlled trial and one meta-analysis study. There were no local or neuromuscular complications related to axillary arterial cannulation reported. In the elective setting, four studies showed that the in-hospital mortality for moderate hypothermia is consistently low, ranging from 1.0 to 4.3%. In a large series of hemiarch replacement comparing 682 cases of deep hypothermia with 94 cases of moderate hypothermia with SACP, 20 cases (2.8%) of permanent neurological deficit were reported, compared to 3 cases (3.2%) in moderate hypothermia. Three observational studies and a meta-analysis study did not identify an increased risk of postoperative renal failure and dialysis following either deep or moderate hypothermia although a higher incidence of stroke was reported in the meta-analysis study with deep hypothermia (12.7 vs 7.3%). Longer cardiopulmonary bypass time and circulatory arrest time were reported in four studies for deep hypothermia, suggesting an increased time required for systemic cooling and rewarming in that group. Overall, these findings suggested that in elective aortic arch surgery, moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion adapted to the duration of circulatory arrest can be performed safely with acceptable mortality and morbidity outcomes. The risk of spinal cord

  14. Current status of antifibrinolytics in cardiopulmonary bypass and elective deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeffrey A; Spiess, Bruce D

    2003-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) results in many physiologic derangements, including activation of the hemostatic and fibrinolytic pathways. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) adds a further insult to the coagulation systems because it involves more extreme hypothermia and organ ischemia related to blood stasis. The abnormalities induced by CPB disrupt the checks and balances in the hemostatic and fibrinolytic systems, resulting in a pathologic state that leads to excessive bleeding and other perioperative complications. Prophylactic antifibrinolytic therapy can attenuate the response to this insult by restoring the delicate balance within these systems, potentially reducing the complication rate and improving patient outcomes.

  15. The postoperative care of adult patients exposed to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    PubMed

    Stier, Gary R; Verde, Edward W

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest with cardiopulmonary bypass is indicated for complex surgical operations in adult patients involving the aortic arch, thoracoabdominal aorta, cerebral vasculature, and tumors extending into the vena cava and heart. Understanding the principles of ischemic-reperfusion injury and the effects of hypothermia in attenuating this process is fundamental to the delivery of effective postoperative care. Neurologic injury is the most troublesome adverse effect after the use of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and cardiopulmonary bypass, presenting as either a transient neurologic deficit (5.9% to 28.1%) or an irreversible neurologic injury (1.8% to 13.6%). In patients with neurological injury, early postoperative mortality is markedly increased (18.2%), and for those patients that survive, long-term cognitive disability is still evident 6 months later. Early postoperative support of organ function, along with timely diagnosis and treatment of organ injury, is essential in minimizing perioperative morbidity, particularly neurologic morbidity. Meticulous management of fluids, maintaining stable cardiovascular hemodynamics with particular attention to systolic blood pressure, optimizing oxygen delivery, limiting ventilator-associated lung injury, intensive insulin therapy for control of blood glucose levels, and avoidance of hyperthermia are essential in limiting organ injury and reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality.

  16. Myocardial protection during aortic valve replacement. Cardiac metabolism and enzyme release following hypothermic cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, V; Kaijser, L; Bendz, R; Sylvén, C; Olin, C

    1980-01-01

    Cardiac metabolism following hypothermic potassium cardioplegia was studied in 23 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement. All had normal coronary arteries. Cardioplegia was induced by infusing 700-1 000 ml of cold Ringer's acetate containing 20 mekv K+ selectively into the left coronary artery. Simultaneous blood samples were taken from the radial artery, a central vein and from the coronary sinus before and after cardioplegia. The PO2, O2-saturation and content, PCO2, pH, lactate, glucose, potassium, myoglobin, total creatine kinase (CK), its isoenzyme CK-MB, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) were assessed. Before bypass lactate was extracted by the heart. During the initial 10 to 20 min after cardioplegia there was a marked release of lactate in the coronary sinus. Myoglobin concentration and CK-MB serum activity peaked during the first 4 hours after the release of the aortic cross-clamping. In order to determine the best indicator of myocardial damage after cardioplegia, duration of extracorporeal circulation (ECC-time), aortic occlusion time (AOT), mean myocardial temperature (MMT) and the product of AOT and MMT, referred to as time-temperature area (TTA), were related to possible indicators of myocardial injury, such as enzyme and myoglobin release. The TTA was the best way of expressing the degree of exposure of the heart to ischaemia. The CK-MB to peak area (CK-MB max area) was the best indicator of the degree of ischaemic injury sustained by the heart during operation. PMID:7375890

  17. Long-term hypothermic preservation of cardiac myocytes isolated from the neonatal rat ventricle: a comparison of various crystalloid solutions.

    PubMed

    Orita, H; Fukasawa, M; Uchino, H; Uchida, T; Shiono, S; Washio, M

    1995-01-01

    In this study, the functional and biochemical effects of crystalloid solutions on immature cardiac myocytes incubated under hypothermic conditions were evaluated. Cardiac myocytes were isolated from neonatal rat ventricles and cultured for 4 days, following which 12.5 x 10(5) myocytes per flask were incubated at 4 degrees C for 3, 6, 12, and 18 h in five types of crystalloid solutions: lactated Ringer's (LR), St. Thomas' Hospital (ST), University of Wisconsin (UW), 5% glucose-based potassium (GK), and normal saline (NS). The levels of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the solutions were measured after each hypothermic incubation, following which the myocytes were cultured for an additional 24 h at 37 degrees C to evaluate the recovery of the myocyte beating rate. In the LR, UW, and NS groups, the recovery ratios of the myocyte beating rate were over 95% of the control (the beating rate prior to hypothermic incubation) at 3 h, but decreased to 20.3, 15.1, and 0%, respectively, at 18 h. The ST and GK groups had significantly lower recovery ratios than the other three groups (72.9% and 63.4%, respectively) at 3 h. The release of CPK and LDH in the LR, UW, and NS groups was significantly suppressed compared to the ST and GK groups, with the greatest suppression observed in the LR group. Moreover, the ST and GK groups had the highest CPK and LDH levels, respectively. Thus, LR solution had the least cytotoxic effects, indicating that it could be the most suitable basic solution of the various cardioplegic or preservation solutions during the neonatal period. PMID:7640455

  18. Minocycline attenuates brain tissue levels of TNF-α produced by neurons after prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest in rats

    PubMed Central

    Drabek, Tomas; Janata, Andreas; Wilson, Caleb D.; Stezoski, Jason; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Foley, Lesley M.; Verrier, Jonathan; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuro-cognitive disabilities are a well-recognized complication of hypothermic circulatory arrest. We and others have reported that prolonged cardiac arrest (CA) produces neuronal death and microglial proliferation and activation that are only partially mitigated by hypothermia. Microglia, and possibly other cells, are suggested to elaborate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) which can trigger neuronal death cascades and exacerbate edema after CNS insults. Minocycline is neuroprotective in some brain ischemia models in part by blunting the microglial response. We tested the hypothesis that minocycline would attenuate neuroinflammation as reflected by brain tissue levels of TNF-α after hypothermic CA in rats. Rats were subjected to rapid exsanguination, followed by a 6 min normothermic CA. Hypothermia (30 °C) was then induced by an aortic saline flush. After a total of 20 min CA, resuscitation was achieved via cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). After 5 min reperfusion, minocycline (90 mg/kg; n=6) or vehicle (PBS; n=6) were given. Hypothermia (34 °C) was maintained for 6 h. Rats were sacrificed at 6 or 24 h. TNF-α was quantified (ELISA) in four brain regions (cerebellum, CEREB; cortex, CTX; hippocampus, HIP; striatum, STRI). Naïve rats (n=6) and rats subjected to the same anesthesia and CPB but no CA served as controls (n=6). Immunocytochemistry was used to localize TNF-α. Naïve rats and CPB controls had no detectable TNF-α in any brain region. CA markedly increased brain TNF-α. Regional differences were seen, with the highest TNF-α levels in striatum in CA groups (10-fold higher, P<0.05 vs. all other brain regions). TNF-α was undetectable at 24 h. Minocycline attenuated TNF-α levels in CTX, HIP and STRI (P<0.05). TNF-α showed unique co-localization with neurons. In conclusion, we report region-dependent early increases in brain TNF-α levels after prolonged hypothermic CA, with maximal increases in striatum. Surprisingly, TNF-α co-localized in neurons and

  19. Feasibility of measuring superior mesenteric artery blood flow during cardiac surgery under hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass using transesophageal echocardiography: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Naveen G.; Nagaraja, P. S.; Gopal, Divya; Manjunath, V.; Nagesh, K. S.; Manjunatha, N.; Patel, Guru Police; Mishra, Satish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abdominal complications being rare but results in high mortality, commonly due to splanchnic organ hypoperfusion during the perioperative period of cardiac surgery. There are no feasible methods to monitor intraoperative superior mesenteric artery blood flow (SMABF). Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and to measure SMABF using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during cardiac surgery under hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methodology: Thirty-five patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery under CPB were enrolled. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), SMABF, superior mesenteric artery (SMA) diameter, superior mesentric artery blood flow over cardiac output (SMA/CO) ratio and arterial blood lactates were recorded at three time intervals. T0: before sternotomy, T1: 30 min after initiation of CPB and T2: after sternal closure. Results: SMA was demonstrated in 32 patients. SMABF, SMA diameter, SMA/CO, MAP and CO decreased significantly (P < 0.0001) between T0 and T1, increased significantly (P ≤ 0.001) between T0 and T2. Lactates increased progressively from T0 to T2. Conclusion: Study shows that there is decrease in SMABF during CPB and returns to baseline after CPB. Hence, it is feasible to measure SMABF using TEE in patients undergoing cardiac surgery under hypothermic CPB. TEE can be a promising tool in detecting and preventing splanchnic hypoperfusion during perioperative period. PMID:27397442

  20. A cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest rat model for the investigation of the systemic inflammation response and induced organ damage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a commonly used technique in cardiac surgery. CPB is however associated with a strong induction of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) which in conjunction with ischemia and reperfusion may lead to multiple organ failure. The aim of the study was to establish and characterize a CPB rat model incorporating deep hypothermic circulatory arrest with a specific focus on the extent of the inflammatory reactions and organ damage as a groundwork for novel therapeutics against SIRS and I/R induced organ injury. Materials and methods Male Wistar rats (n = 6) were cannulated for CPB, connected to a heart-lung-machine (HLM) and cooled to a temperature of 16°C before they underwent 45 minutes of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest with global ischaemia. Arrest was followed by rewarming and 60 minutes of reperfusion. Haemodynamic and vital parameters were recorded throughout the CPB procedure. Only animals displaying sinus rhythm throughout reperfusion were utilized for analysis. Rats were euthanized and tissue samples were harvested. Blood gas analysis was performed and blood samples were taken. Induction of organ damage was examined by analysis of protein levels and phosphorylation status of kinases and stress proteins. Results were compared to animals (n = 6) which did not undergo CPB. Results CPB induced leucocytosis and an increase of interleukin-6 and TNF-α plasma values indicating an inflammatory response. Markers of tissue damage and dysfunction, such as troponin T, creatinine and AST were elevated. Phosphorylation of STAT3 was induced in all examined organs. Activation of MAPK and induction of heat shock proteins occurred in an organ-specific manner with most pronounced effects in heart, lungs and kidneys. Conclusions The presented CPB rat model shows the induction of SIRS and activation of specific signalling cascades. SIRS seems not to be provoked during DHCA and is elicited mainly during reperfusion

  1. Successful fibrinolytic and therapeutic hypothermic management of cardiac arrest following massive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eunsil; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Chae, Minjung Kathy; Lee, Tae Rim; Sim, Min Seob; Shin, Tae Gun; Cha, Won Chul; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Keun Jeong; Rhee, Joong Eui; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (MPE) with hemodynamic instability is a clinical condition with a poor prognosis and high mortality rates. There are no definitive treatment options for cardiac arrest due to MPE. A 52-year-old female presented at our emergency department with cardiac arrest, and a 62-year-old female presented after achieving return of spontaneous circulation of cardiac arrest from a local hospital, respectively. In each case, computed tomographic pulmonary angiography after return of spontaneous circulation demonstrated heavy burdens of pulmonary embolism in the pulmonary arteries. We immediately started therapeutic hypothermia and fibrinolytic therapy. They were transferred to the thoracic surgery and cardiology departments respectively, and then discharged with a cerebral performance categories scale score of 1. In summary, we report two cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to MPE in which fibrinolytic therapy was successfully combined with therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:27752597

  2. Neurologic Injury Associated with Rewarming from Hypothermia: Is Mild Hypothermia on Bypass Better than Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest?

    PubMed Central

    Bhalala, Utpal S.; Appachi, Elumalai; Mumtaz, Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Many known risk factors for adverse cardiovascular and neurological outcomes in children with congenital heart defects (CHD) are not modifiable; however, the temperature and blood flow during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), are two risk factors, which may be altered in an attempt to improve long-term neurological outcomes. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, traditionally used for aortic arch repair, has been associated with short-term and long-term neurologic sequelae. Therefore, there is a rising interest in using moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral blood flow on CPB during aortic arch repair. Rewarming from moderate-to-deep hypothermia has been shown to be associated with neuronal injury, neuroinflammation, and loss of cerebrovascular autoregulation. A significantly lesser degree of rewarming is required following mild (33–35°C) hypothermia as compared with moderate (28–32°C), deep (21–27°C), and profound (less than 20°C) hypothermia. Therefore, we believe that mild hypothermia is associated with a lower risk of rewarming-induced neurologic injury. We hypothesize that mild hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion during CPB for neonatal aortic arch repair would be associated with improved neurologic outcome. PMID:27734011

  3. Similar cerebral protective effectiveness of antegrade and retrograde cerebral perfusion during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in aortic surgery: a meta-analysis of 7023 patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shasha; Sun, Yanhua; Ji, Bingyang; Liu, Jinping; Wang, Guyan; Zheng, Zhe

    2015-04-01

    In aortic arch surgery, deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) combined with cerebral perfusion is employed worldwide as a routine practice. Even though antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) is more widely used than retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP), the difference in benefit and risk between ACP and RCP during DHCA is uncertain. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare neurologic outcomes and early mortality between ACP and RCP in patients who underwent aortic surgery during DHCA. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched using the key words "antegrade," "retrograde," "cerebral perfusion," "cardiopulmonary bypass," "extracorporeal circulation," and "cardiac surgery" for studies reporting on clinical endpoints including early mortality, stroke, temporary neurologic dysfunction (TND), and permanent neurologic dysfunction (PND) in aortic surgery requiring DHCA with ACP or RCP. Heterogeneity was analyzed with the Cochrane Q statistic and I(2) statistic. Publication bias was tested with Begg's funnel plot and Egger's test. Thirty-four studies were included in this meta-analysis, with 4262 patients undergoing DHCA + ACP and 2761 undergoing DHCA + RCP. The overall pooled relative risk for TND was 0.722 (95% CI = [0.579, 0.900]), and the z-score for overall effect was 2.9 (P = 0.004). There was low heterogeneity (I(2) = 18.7%). The analysis showed that patients undergoing DHCA + ACP had better outcomes than those undergoing DHCA + RCP in terms of TND, while there were no significant differences between groups in terms of PND, stroke, and early mortality. This meta-analysis indicates that DHCA + ACP has an advantage over DHCA + RCP in terms of TND, while the two methods show similar results in terms of PND, early mortality, and stroke.

  4. An Analysis of the Effects and the Molecular Mechanism of Deep Hypothermic Low Flow on Brain Tissue in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuzhong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the effects and molecular mechanisms of deep hypothermic low flow (DHLF) on brain tissue in three genotypes of 3-week-old C57BL/6 mice (N = 180). Methods: Mice in the model condition were subjected to cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) while undergoing DHLF, then reperfused and rewarmed. Brain tissue damage was measured with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, and protein expression was measured by Western blot at 2 h, 24 h, and 72 h after treatment; messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expressions were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at 2 h, 24 h, and 72 h. Results: The expressions of p-Akt1 and p-GSK-3β were significantly higher in the model condition than the condition across genotypes, but both were significantly lower in the Akt1 mice. The expressions of Akt1 mRNA and Akt3 mRNA, but not Akt2 mRNA, were significantly higher in the model condition across genotypes. Brain damage was significantly greater in the Akt1 knockout gene mice compared with Akt2 gene knockout and wild type mice at 24 h and 72 h. Conclusion: These results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of DHLF reflect increased expression of p-GSK-3β induced through the PI3K/Akt signal pathway. Findings of real-time PCR imply that Akt1 mRNA and Akt3 mRNA may influence the expression of p-Akt1 and p-GSK-3β in mice undergoing DHLF. PMID:26961480

  5. Hypothermic Machine Perfusion Reduced Inflammatory Reaction by Downregulating the Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in a Reperfusion Model of Donation After Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhen; Ye, Qifa; Zhang, Yang; Zhong, Zibiao; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Yanfeng; Hu, Long; Wang, Wei; Huang, Wei; Ko, Dicken Shiu-Chung

    2016-06-01

    The exact mechanism by which hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) improves the graft quality in kidney transplantation of donation after cardiac death (DCD) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and inflammatory reaction in kidney ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury injury followed by cold storage (CS) or HMP model of DCD. New Zealand white rabbit kidneys were subjected to 35 min of warm ischemia and 1 h reperfusion, then preserved by either 1 h reperfusion (sham-operated group), 4 h CS or 4 h HMP in vivo. Kidneys were reperfused 24 h followed by further analysis. No treatment was given to rabbits in the normal control group. The expression of MMP-9, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and MMP-2 mRNA were detected by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). MMP-9 was located by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence methods. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), myeloperoxidase (MPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by kits for each groups. Compared with the CS group, the expression of MMP-9 and NF-κB mRNA were downregulated in HMP group (P < 0.05). In contrast, expression of MMP-2 mRNA had no statistical significance between CS group and HMP group (P > 0.05). In normal control and sham-operated groups, a low level of MMP-9 expression was detected in glomeruli. However, positive signals of MMP-9 were mostly located in the tubulointerstitium and the vascular wall of CS and HMP groups. Expression of TNF-α, IL-6, MDA, and activity of MPO decreased while activity of SOD in the HMP group increased in contrast to the CS group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, inflammatory cytokines mediated MMP-9 expression through NF-κB band to MMP-9 promoter region, resulting in renal injury. Therefore, HMP reduced inflammatory reaction by downregulating the expression of MMP-9, which may be the mechanism of kidney protection in I

  6. Effects of Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Internal Jugular Bulb Venous Oxygen Saturation, Cerebral Oxygen Saturation, and Bispectral Index in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiyong; Xu, Lili; Zhu, Zhirui; Seal, Robert; McQuillan, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2), internal jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), and bispectral index (BIS) used to monitor cerebral oxygen balance in pediatric patients.Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists Class II-III patients aged 1 to 4 years old with congenital heart disease scheduled for elective cardiac surgery were included in this study. Temperature, BIS, rSO2, mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and hematocrit were recorded. Internal jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation and SvO2 were obtained from blood gas analysis at the time points: after induction of anesthesia (T0), beginning of CPB (T1), ascending aortic occlusion (T2), 20 minutes after initiating CPB (T3), coronary reperfusion (T4), separation from CPB (T5), and at the end of operation (T6). The effect of hypothermia or changes in CPP on rSO2, SjvO2, SvO2, and BIS were analyzed.Compared with postinduction baseline values, rSO2 significantly decreased at all-time points: onset of extracorporeal circulation, ascending aortic occlusion, 20 minutes after CPB initiation, coronary reperfusion, and separation from CPB (P < 0.05). Compared with measurements made following induction of anesthesia, SjvO2 significantly increased with initiation of CPB, ascending aortic occlusion, 20 minutes after initiating CPB, coronary reperfusion, and separation from CPB (P < 0.05). Compared with induction of anesthesia, BIS significantly decreased with the onset of CPB, aortic cross clamping, 20 minutes after initiating CPB, and coronary reperfusion (P < 0.05). Bispectral index increased following separation from CPB. There was no significant change in SvO2 during cardiopulmonary bypass (P > 0.05). Correlation analysis demonstrated that rSO2 was positively related to CPP (r = 0.687, P = 0

  7. Sodium bicarbonate use and the risk of hypernatremia in thoracic aortic surgical patients with metabolic acidosis following deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Ghadimi, Kamrouz; Gutsche, Jacob T.; Ramakrishna, Harish; Setegne, Samuel L.; Jackson, Kirk R.; Augoustides, John G.; Ochroch, E. Andrew; Weiss, Stuart J.; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Cheung, Albert T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Metabolic acidosis after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) for thoracic aortic operations is commonly managed with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between total NaHCO3 dose and the severity of metabolic acidosis, duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of vasoactive infusions, and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or hospital length of stay (LOS). Methods: In a single center, retrospective study, 87 consecutive elective thoracic aortic operations utilizing DHCA, were studied. Linear regression analysis was used to test for the relationships between the total NaHCO3 dose administered through postoperative day 2, clinical variables, arterial blood gas values, and short-term clinical outcomes. Results: Seventy-five patients (86%) received NaHCO3. Total NaHCO3 dose averaged 136 ± 112 mEq (range: 0.0–535 mEq) per patient. Total NaHCO3 dose correlated with minimum pH (r = 0.41, P < 0.0001), minimum serum bicarbonate (r = −0.40, P < 0.001), maximum serum lactate (r = 0.46, P = 0.007), duration of metabolic acidosis (r = 0.33, P = 0.002), and maximum serum sodium concentrations (r = 0.29, P = 0.007). Postoperative hypernatremia was present in 67% of patients and peaked at 12 h following DHCA. Eight percent of patients had a serum sodium ≥ 150 mEq/L. Total NaHCO3 dose did not correlate with anion gap, serum chloride, not the duration of mechanical ventilator support, vasoactive infusions, ICU or hospital LOS. Conclusion: Routine administration of NaHCO3 was common for the management of metabolic acidosis after DHCA. Total dose of NaHCO3 was a function of the severity and duration of metabolic acidosis. NaHCO3 administration contributed to postoperative hypernatremia that was often severe. The total NaHCO3 dose administered was unrelated to short-term clinical outcomes. PMID:27397449

  8. Is extracorporeal rewarming indicated in avalanche victims with unwitnessed hypothermic cardiorespiratory arrest?

    PubMed

    Mair, Peter; Brugger, Hermann; Mair, Birgit; Moroder, Luca; Ruttmann, Elfriede

    2014-12-01

    International guidelines recommend using extracorporeal rewarming in all hypothermic avalanche victims with prolonged cardiac arrest if they have patent airways and a plasma potassium level≤12 mmol/L. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome data to determine if available experience with extracorporeal rewarming of avalanche victims supports this recommendation. At Innsbruck Medical University Hospital, 28 patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest following an avalanche accident were resuscitated using extracorporeal circulation. Of these patients, 25 were extricated from the snow masses with no vital signs and did not survive to hospital discharge. Three patients had witnessed cardiac arrest after extrication and a core temperature of 21.7°C, 22°C, and 24.0°C, two of whom survived long-term with full neurological recovery. A search of the literature revealed only one asystolic avalanche victim with unwitnessed hypothermic cardiac arrest (core temperature 19°C) surviving long-term. All other avalanche victims in the medical literature surviving prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest suffered witnessed arrest after extrication with a core temperature below 24°C. Our results suggest that prognosis of hypothermic avalanche victims with unwitnessed asystolic cardiac arrest and a core temperature>24°C is extremely poor. Available outcome data do not support the use of extracorporeal rewarming in these patients.

  9. Is extracorporeal rewarming indicated in avalanche victims with unwitnessed hypothermic cardiorespiratory arrest?

    PubMed

    Mair, Peter; Brugger, Hermann; Mair, Birgit; Moroder, Luca; Ruttmann, Elfriede

    2014-12-01

    International guidelines recommend using extracorporeal rewarming in all hypothermic avalanche victims with prolonged cardiac arrest if they have patent airways and a plasma potassium level≤12 mmol/L. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome data to determine if available experience with extracorporeal rewarming of avalanche victims supports this recommendation. At Innsbruck Medical University Hospital, 28 patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest following an avalanche accident were resuscitated using extracorporeal circulation. Of these patients, 25 were extricated from the snow masses with no vital signs and did not survive to hospital discharge. Three patients had witnessed cardiac arrest after extrication and a core temperature of 21.7°C, 22°C, and 24.0°C, two of whom survived long-term with full neurological recovery. A search of the literature revealed only one asystolic avalanche victim with unwitnessed hypothermic cardiac arrest (core temperature 19°C) surviving long-term. All other avalanche victims in the medical literature surviving prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest suffered witnessed arrest after extrication with a core temperature below 24°C. Our results suggest that prognosis of hypothermic avalanche victims with unwitnessed asystolic cardiac arrest and a core temperature>24°C is extremely poor. Available outcome data do not support the use of extracorporeal rewarming in these patients. PMID:25531463

  10. Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery: Evidences and controversies.

    PubMed

    Cotogni, Paolo; Barbero, Cristina; Rinaldi, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Despite many advances in prevention and perioperative care, deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) remains a pressing concern in cardiac surgery, with a still relevant incidence and with a considerable impact on in-hospital mortality and also on mid- and long-term survival. The permanent high impact of this complication is partially related to the increasing proportion of patients at high-risk for infection, as well as to the many patient and surgical risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of DSWI. The prophylactic antibiotic therapy is one of the most important tools in the prevention of DSWI. However, the choice of antibiotic, the dose, the duration, the adequate levels in serum and tissue, and the timing of antimicrobial prophylaxis are still controversial. The treatment of DSWI ranges from surgical revision with primary closure to surgical revision with open dressings or closed irrigation, from reconstruction with soft tissue flaps to negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, to date, there have been no accepted recommendations regarding the best management of DSWI. Emerging evidence in the literature has validated the efficacy and safety of NPWT either as a single-line therapy, or as a "bridge" prior to final surgical closure. In conclusion, the careful control of patient and surgical risk factors - when possible, the proper antimicrobial prophylaxis, and the choice of validated techniques of treatment could contribute to keep DSWIs at a minimal rate. PMID:26557476

  11. Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery: Evidences and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Barbero, Cristina; Rinaldi, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Despite many advances in prevention and perioperative care, deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) remains a pressing concern in cardiac surgery, with a still relevant incidence and with a considerable impact on in-hospital mortality and also on mid- and long-term survival. The permanent high impact of this complication is partially related to the increasing proportion of patients at high-risk for infection, as well as to the many patient and surgical risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of DSWI. The prophylactic antibiotic therapy is one of the most important tools in the prevention of DSWI. However, the choice of antibiotic, the dose, the duration, the adequate levels in serum and tissue, and the timing of antimicrobial prophylaxis are still controversial. The treatment of DSWI ranges from surgical revision with primary closure to surgical revision with open dressings or closed irrigation, from reconstruction with soft tissue flaps to negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, to date, there have been no accepted recommendations regarding the best management of DSWI. Emerging evidence in the literature has validated the efficacy and safety of NPWT either as a single-line therapy, or as a “bridge” prior to final surgical closure. In conclusion, the careful control of patient and surgical risk factors - when possible, the proper antimicrobial prophylaxis, and the choice of validated techniques of treatment could contribute to keep DSWIs at a minimal rate. PMID:26557476

  12. Normothermic Versus Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Children Undergoing Open Heart Surgery (Thermic-2): Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Baos, Sarah; Sheehan, Karen; Culliford, Lucy; Pike, Katie; Ellis, Lucy; Parry, Andrew J; Stoica, Serban; Ghorbel, Mohamed T; Caputo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background During open heart surgery, patients are connected to a heart-lung bypass machine that pumps blood around the body (“perfusion”) while the heart is stopped. Typically the blood is cooled during this procedure (“hypothermia”) and warmed to normal body temperature once the operation has been completed. The main rationale for “whole body cooling” is to protect organs such as the brain, kidneys, lungs, and heart from injury during bypass by reducing the body’s metabolic rate and decreasing oxygen consumption. However, hypothermic perfusion also has disadvantages that can contribute toward an extended postoperative hospital stay. Research in adults and small randomized controlled trials in children suggest some benefits to keeping the blood at normal body temperature throughout surgery (“normothermia”). However, the two techniques have not been extensively compared in children. Objective The Thermic-2 study will test the hypothesis that the whole body inflammatory response to the nonphysiological bypass and its detrimental effects on different organ functions may be attenuated by maintaining the body at 35°C-37°C (normothermic) rather than 28°C (hypothermic) during pediatric complex open heart surgery. Methods This is a single-center, randomized controlled trial comparing the effectiveness and acceptability of normothermic versus hypothermic bypass in 141 children with congenital heart disease undergoing open heart surgery. Children having scheduled surgery to repair a heart defect not requiring deep hypothermic circulatory arrest represent the target study population. The co-primary clinical outcomes are duration of inotropic support, intubation time, and postoperative hospital stay. Secondary outcomes are in-hospital mortality and morbidity, blood loss and transfusion requirements, pre- and post-operative echocardiographic findings, routine blood gas and blood test results, renal function, cerebral function, regional oxygen saturation of

  13. Automatic localization of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI images using deep learning.

    PubMed

    Emad, Omar; Yassine, Inas A; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2015-08-01

    Automatic localization of the left ventricle (LV) in cardiac MRI images is an essential step for automatic segmentation, functional analysis, and content based retrieval of cardiac images. In this paper, we introduce a new approach based on deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) to localize the LV in cardiac MRI in short axis views. A six-layer CNN with different kernel sizes was employed for feature extraction, followed by Softmax fully connected layer for classification. The pyramids of scales analysis was introduced in order to take account of the different sizes of the heart. A publically-available database of 33 patients was used for learning and testing. The proposed method was able it localize the LV with 98.66%, 83.91% and 99.07% for accuracy, sensitivity and specificity respectively. PMID:26736354

  14. Exercise at depth alters bradycardia and incidence of cardiac anomalies in deep-diving marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Terrie M; Fuiman, Lee A; Kendall, Traci; Berry, Patrick; Richter, Beau; Noren, Shawn R; Thometz, Nicole; Shattock, Michael J; Farrell, Edward; Stamper, Andy M; Davis, Randall W

    2015-01-16

    Unlike their terrestrial ancestors, marine mammals routinely confront extreme physiological and physical challenges while breath-holding and pursuing prey at depth. To determine how cetaceans and pinnipeds accomplish deep-sea chases, we deployed animal-borne instruments that recorded high-resolution electrocardiograms, behaviour and flipper accelerations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) diving from the surface to >200 m. Here we report that both exercise and depth alter the bradycardia associated with the dive response, with the greatest impacts at depths inducing lung collapse. Unexpectedly, cardiac arrhythmias occurred in >73% of deep, aerobic dives, which we attribute to the interplay between sympathetic and parasympathetic drivers for exercise and diving, respectively. Such marked cardiac variability alters the common view of a stereotypic 'dive reflex' in diving mammals. It also suggests the persistence of ancestral terrestrial traits in cardiac function that may help explain the unique sensitivity of some deep-diving marine mammals to anthropogenic disturbances.

  15. Exercise at depth alters bradycardia and incidence of cardiac anomalies in deep-diving marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Terrie M; Fuiman, Lee A; Kendall, Traci; Berry, Patrick; Richter, Beau; Noren, Shawn R; Thometz, Nicole; Shattock, Michael J; Farrell, Edward; Stamper, Andy M; Davis, Randall W

    2015-01-01

    Unlike their terrestrial ancestors, marine mammals routinely confront extreme physiological and physical challenges while breath-holding and pursuing prey at depth. To determine how cetaceans and pinnipeds accomplish deep-sea chases, we deployed animal-borne instruments that recorded high-resolution electrocardiograms, behaviour and flipper accelerations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) diving from the surface to >200 m. Here we report that both exercise and depth alter the bradycardia associated with the dive response, with the greatest impacts at depths inducing lung collapse. Unexpectedly, cardiac arrhythmias occurred in >73% of deep, aerobic dives, which we attribute to the interplay between sympathetic and parasympathetic drivers for exercise and diving, respectively. Such marked cardiac variability alters the common view of a stereotypic 'dive reflex' in diving mammals. It also suggests the persistence of ancestral terrestrial traits in cardiac function that may help explain the unique sensitivity of some deep-diving marine mammals to anthropogenic disturbances. PMID:25592286

  16. Cardiac Motion During Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold: Implications for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Pan Tinsu; Pinnix, Chelsea; Zhang, Sean X.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sun, Tzouh Liang; Gladish, Gregory; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Hoffman, Karen E.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Many patients with left-sided breast cancer receive adjuvant radiotherapy during deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) to minimize radiation exposure to the heart. We measured the displacement of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and heart owing to cardiac motion during DIBH, relative to the standard tangential fields for left breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients who had undergone computed tomography-based coronary angiography with retrospective electrocardiographic gating were randomly selected for the present study. The patients underwent scanning during DIBH to control the influence of respiration on cardiac motion. Standard medial and lateral tangential fields were placed, and the LADs were contoured on the systolic- and diastolic-phase computed tomography data sets by the clinicians. Displacement of the LAD during cardiac contractions was calculated in three directions: toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, left-right, and anteroposterior. Displacement of the entire heart was measured on the maximal and minimal intensity projection computed tomography images. Results: The mean displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction without the influence of respiration for 20 patients was 2.3 mm (range, 0.7-3.8) toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, 2.6 mm (range, 1.0-6.8) in the left-right direction, and 2.3 mm (range, 0.6-6.5) in the anteroposterior direction. At least 30% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in any direction in 2 patients (10%), and <10% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in 10 patients (50%). The extent of displacement of the heart periphery during cardiac motion was negligible near the treatment fields. Conclusions: Displacement of the heart periphery near the treatment fields was negligible during DIBH; however, displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction varied substantially between and within patients. We recommend maintaining {>=}5 mm of distance between

  17. A role for glucose in hypothermic hamsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1976-01-01

    Hypothermic hamsters at a rectal temperature of 7 C showed a fivefold increase in survival times from 20 to 100.5 hr when infused with glucose which maintained a blood level at about 45 mg/100 ml. A potential role for osmotic effects of the infusion was tested and eliminated. There was no improvement in survival of 3-O-methylglucose or dextran 40-infused animals. The fact that death eventually occurs even in the glucose-infused animal after about 4 days and that oxygen consumption undergoes a slow decrement in that period suggests that hypothermic survival is not wholly substrate limited. Radioactive tracer showed that localization of the C-14 was greatest in brain tissue and diaphragm, intermediate in heart and kidney, and lowest in skeletal muscle and liver. The significance of the label at sites important to respiration and circulation was presented.

  18. Contact Force-Guided Deep Engagement with a Steerable Sheath in the Distal Great Cardiac Vein: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Y U; Arimoto, Takanori; Iwayama, Tadateru; Hashimoto, Naoaki; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kubota, Isao

    2016-05-01

    Ablation of ventricular tachycardia originating from the great cardiac vein involves the difficult step of deep engagement with an ablation catheter. The catheter and a steerable sheath (MobiCath, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, USA) were advanced alternately only when the contact force vector was parallel to the coronary venous system. Deep engagement with a steerable sheath ensured a powerful backup force during ablation. PMID:26854279

  19. Role of hypothermic machine perfusion in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Andrea; Dutkowski, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Machine liver perfusion has significantly evolved during the last ten years to optimize extended criteria liver grafts and to address the worldwide organ shortage. This review gives an overview on available ex vivo and in vivo data on hypothermic machine liver perfusion. We discuss also possible protective pathways and show most recent clinical applications of hypothermic machine liver perfusion in human.

  20. Moesin functionality in hypothermic liver preservation injury.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tao; Lindell, Susanne L; Kowalski, Chris; Mangino, Martin J

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how expression and functionality of the cytoskeletal linker protein moesin is involved in hepatic hypothermic preservation injury. Mouse livers were cold stored in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and reperfused on an isolated perfused liver (IPL) device for one hour. Human hepatocytes (HepG2) and human or murine sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs) were cold stored and rewarmed to induce hypothermic preservation injury. The cells were transfected with: wild type moesin, an siRNA duplex specific for moesin, and the moesin mutants T558D and T558A. Tissue and cell moesin expression and its binding to actin were determined by Western blot. Liver IPL functional outcomes deteriorated proportional to the length of cold storage, which correlated with moesin disassociation from the actin cytoskeleton. Cell viability (LDH and WST-8) in the cell models progressively declined with increasing preservation time, which also correlated with moesin disassociation. Transfection of a moesin containing plasmid or an siRNA duplex specific for moesin into HepG2 cells resulted in increased and decreased moesin expression, respectively. Overexpression of moesin protected while moesin knock-down potentiated preservation injury in the HepG2 cell model. Hepatocytes expressing the T558A (inactive) and T558D (active) moesin binding mutants demonstrated significantly more and less preservation injury, respectively. Cold storage time dependently caused hepatocyte detachment from the matrix and cell death, which was prevented by the T558D active moesin mutation. In conclusion, moesin is causally involved in hypothermic liver cell preservation injury through control of its active binding molecular functionality.

  1. Rationale for Implementation of Warm Cardiac Surgery in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Durandy, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery was developed thanks to the introduction of hypothermia and cardiopulmonary bypass in the early 1950s. The deep hypothermia protective effect has been essential to circulatory arrest complex cases repair. During the early times of open-heart surgery, a major concern was to decrease mortality and to improve short-term outcomes. Both mortality and morbidity dramatically decreased over a few decades. As a consequence, the drawbacks of deep hypothermia, with or without circulatory arrest, became more and more apparent. The limitation of hypothermia was particularly evident for the brain and regional perfusion was introduced as a response to this problem. Despite a gain in popularity, the results of regional perfusion were not fully convincing. In the 1990s, warm surgery was introduced in adults and proved to be safe and reliable. This option eliminates the deleterious effect of ischemia–reperfusion injuries through a continuous, systemic coronary perfusion with warm oxygenated blood. Intermittent warm blood cardioplegia was introduced later, with impressive results. We were convinced by the easiness, safety, and efficiency of warm surgery and shifted to warm pediatric surgery in a two-step program. This article outlines the limitations of hypothermic protection and the basic reasons that led us to implement pediatric warm surgery. After tens of thousands of cases performed across several centers, this reproducible technique proved a valuable alternative to hypothermic surgery. PMID:27200324

  2. The cardiac dose-sparing benefits of deep inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation: a systematic review

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Lloyd M; Knight, Kellie A; Aarons, Yolanda K; Wasiak, Jason

    2015-03-15

    Despite technical advancements in breast radiation therapy, cardiac structures are still subject to significant levels of irradiation. As the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery continues to improve survival for early breast cancer patients, the associated radiation-induced cardiac toxicities become increasingly relevant. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cardiac-sparing benefits of the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database from 1966 to July 2014 was used to identify articles published in English relating to the dosimetric benefits of DIBH. Studies comparing the mean heart dose of DIBH and free breathing treatment plans for left breast cancer patients were eligible to be included in the review. Studies evaluating the reproducibility and stability of the DIBH technique were also reviewed. Ten studies provided data on the benefits of DIBH during left breast irradiation. From these studies, DIBH reduced the mean heart dose by up to 3.4 Gy when compared to a free breathing approach. Four studies reported that the DIBH technique was stable and reproducible on a daily basis. According to current estimates of the excess cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy, a 3.4 Gy reduction in mean heart dose is equivalent to a 13.6% reduction in the projected increase in risk of heart disease. DIBH is a reproducible and stable technique for left breast irradiation showing significant promise in reducing the late cardiac toxicities associated with radiation therapy.

  3. Twelve-Hour Hypothermic Machine Perfusion for Donor Heart Preservation Leads to Improved Ultrastructural Characteristics Compared to Conventional Cold Storage.

    PubMed

    Michel, Sebastian G; La Muraglia, Glenn M; Madariaga, Maria Lucia L; Titus, James S; Selig, Martin K; Farkash, Evan A; Allan, James S; Anderson, Lisa M; Madsen, Joren C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypothermic machine perfusion of donor hearts has the theoretical advantage of continuous aerobic metabolism and washes out toxic metabolic byproducts. Here, we studied the effect of hypothermic machine perfusion on cardiac myocyte integrity when hearts are preserved for longer ischemic times (12 hours). MATERIAL AND METHODS Pig hearts were harvested and stored in Celsior® solution for 12 hours using either conventional cold storage on ice (12 h CS, n=3) or pulsatile perfusion with the Paragonix Sherpa Perfusion™ Cardiac Transport System at different flow rates (12 h PP, n=3 or 12 h PP low flow, n=2). After cold preservation, hearts were reperfused using an LV isovolumic Langendorff system. Controls (n=3) were reperfused immediately after organ harvest. Biopsies were taken from the apex of the left ventricle before storage, after storage and after reperfusion to measure ATP and endothelin-1 content in the tissue. TUNEL staining for signs of apoptosis and electron microscopy of the donor hearts were performed. RESULTS 12 h PP hearts showed significantly more weight gain than 12 h CS and controls after preservation. Pulsatile perfused hearts showed less ATP depletion, lower endothelin-1 levels and less apoptosis after preservation compared to CS. Electron microscopy showed damaged muscle fibers, endothelial cell rupture, and injury of mitochondria in the 12 h CS group, while machine perfusion could preserve the cell structures. CONCLUSIONS Hypothermic machine perfusion of donor hearts can preserve the cell structures better than conventional cold storage in prolonged ischemic times. Hypothermic pulsatile perfusion may therefore enable longer preservation times of donor hearts. Whether this method is able to avoid primary graft failure after orthotopic heart transplantation remains to be evaluated in further studies.

  4. Charles Drew and the origins of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    PubMed

    Dobell, A R; Bailey, J S

    1997-04-01

    Convinced that the high risk of operation using the early heart-lung machines was due to a toxic effect of the oxygenators in use in the 1950s, Charles Drew of Westminster Hospital in London devised a circulatory support system in which the patient's own lungs functioned as the oxygenator. With this support, body temperature was reduced to the point where circulatory arrest could be tolerated for the time required to carry out the intracardiac operation. He used only this technique for the rest of his surgical career, a period of 22 years. We have attempted to record how this came to pass and to describe the qualities of this man that led him to be original and creative.

  5. Randomised trial of normothermic versus hypothermic coronary bypass surgery. The Warm Heart Investigators.

    PubMed

    1994-03-01

    Warm heart surgery--37 degrees C cardioplegia with systemic normothermia--has been introduced as an alternative to conventional hypothermic cardiac surgery. A randomised trial comparing warm (W) and cold (C) methods was done in 1732 patients undergoing isolated coronary bypass surgery in three adult cardiac surgery centres at the University of Toronto, Canada. Allocation to W (860 patients) or C (872) was stratified by urgent versus elective operations and by surgeon. There were no striking baseline differences in patients' demographics, angiographic findings, or operative procedures. All but 4.2% of patients initially received antegrade cardioplegia; a further 2.1% switched to retrograde delivery intra-operatively. Crossovers to C occurred in 7.7% of cases either due to difficulty in sustaining cardiac arrest or due to coronary flooding. Analysis, however, was on an intention-to-treat basis. The 30-day all-cause mortality was 2.5% in C patients and 1.4% in the W group (p 0.12). There was no difference in non-fatal Q-wave infarction rates (W 10.1%, C 11.1%), but enzymatic infarction by serial creatine kinase MB fraction (CK-MB) measurements was reduced (W 12.3% vs C 17.3%, p < 0.001) as was the mean area under the CK-MB curve. Postoperative low-output syndrome was less frequent in W patients (6.1% vs 9.3%, p 0.01). There were no differences in the rates of stroke, reoperation for bleeding or tamponade, or sternal rewiring/debridement for dehiscence or infection. Warm heart surgery is a safe and effective alternative to conventional hypothermic techniques for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery.

  6. Secondary omental and pectoralis major double flap reconstruction following aggressive sternectomy for deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery carries high morbidity and mortality. Our strategy for deep sternal wound infection is aggressive strenal debridement followed by vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy and omental-muscle flap reconstrucion. We describe this strategy and examine the outcome and long-term quality of life (QOL) it achieves. Methods We retrospectively examined 16 patients treated for deep sternal wound infection between 2001 and 2007. The most recent nine patients were treated with total sternal resection followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with omental-muscle flap reconstruction (recent group); whereas the former seven patients were treated with sternal preservation if possible, without VAC therapy, and four of these patients underwent primary closure (former group). We assessed long-term quality of life after DSWI by using the Short Form 36-Item Health Survey, Version 2 (SF36v2). Results One patient died and four required further surgery for recurrence of deep sternal wound infection in the former group. The duration of treatment for deep sternal wound infection in the recent group was significantly shorter than that in previous group (63.4 ± 54.1 days vs. 120.0 ± 31.8 days, respectively; p = 0.039). Despite aggressive sternal resection, the QOL of patients treated for DSWI was only minimally compromised compared with age-, sex-, surgical procedures-matched patients without deep sternal wound infection. Conclusions Aggressive sternal debridement followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with an omental-muscle flap is effective for deep sternal wound infection. In this series, it resulted in a lower incidence of recurrent infection, shorter hospitalization, and it did not compromise long-term QOL greatly. PMID:21501461

  7. Surgical Treatment Strategies of Intravenous Leiomyomatosis withRight Cardiac Cavities Extension.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guo-Tao; Miao, Qi; Liu, Xing-Rong; Zhang, Chao-Ji; Zheng, Yue-Hong; Shao, Jiang; Cheng, Ning-Hai; DU, Shun-da; Liu, Jian-Zhou; Jiang, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies of intravenous leiomyomatosis(IVL)extending through inferior vena cava into the right cardiac cavities. Methods Thirty patients of IVL extending through inferior vena cava into the right cardiac cavities were treated in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from November 2002 to January 2015.The following variables were studied: age,cardiopulmonary bypass time,deep hypothermic circulatory arrest time,origins of IVL,blood loss,duration of post-operative hospital stay,hospitalization expenses,edema of lower extremity,blood transfusion,postoperative complication,residual IVL,and re-grow or recurrence. Results Thirteen of 30 patients reported double lower limb edema. The cardiopulmonary bypass was applied in 27 cases,and the average duration of cardiopulmonary bypass was(106.9±53.7)min. Then,21 patients were treated with the deep hypothermic circulatory arrest,and the mean time was(28.2±11.6) min. The tumors originated from the genital veins in 9 cases,the iliac vein in 13 cases,and both veins in 8 cases. The average intra-operative blood loss volume was (2060.5±2012.3)ml,and 21 patients received blood transfusion. The average hospitalization time was(18.9±8.3)days and the average hospitalization expenses was (80 840.4±28 264.2)RMB yuan. While 14 patients had postoperative complications,there was no serious postoperative complication or death.All patients have shown a favorable outcome.Conclusions Tumor embolus extending through inferior vena cava into the right cardiac cavities should be suspected in patients with multiple hysteromyoma. Successful therapy for IVL with right cardiac cavities extension is dependent on reasonable surgical treatment strategies. Surgical removal of the ovaries is vital to avoid IVL re-grow or recurrence. PMID:27594158

  8. Hypothermic storage of human hepatocytes for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gramignoli, Roberto; Dorko, Kenneth; Tahan, Veysel; Skvorak, Kristen J; Ellis, Ewa; Jorns, Carl; Ericzon, Bo-Goran; Fox, Ira J; Strom, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of human hepatocytes is gaining recognition as a bridge or an alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation for patients with acute liver failure and genetic defects. Since most patients require multiple cell infusions over an extended period of time, we investigated hepatic functions in cells maintained in University of Wisconsin solution at 4°C up to 72 h. Eleven different assessments of hepatic viability and function were investigated both pre- and posthypothermic storage, including plating efficiency, caspase-3/7 activity, ammonia metabolism, and drug-metabolizing capacity of isolated hepatocytes. Long-term function, basal, and induced cytochrome P450 activities were measured after exposure to prototypical inducing agents. Cells from 47 different human liver specimens were analyzed. Viability significantly decreased in cells cold stored in UW solution, while apoptosis level and plating efficiency were not significantly different from fresh cells. Luminescent and fluorescent methods assessed phases I and II activities both pre- and post-24-72 h of cold preservation. A robust induction (up to 200-fold) of phase I enzymes was observed in cultured cells. Phase II and ammonia metabolism remained stable during hypothermic storage, although the inductive effect of culture on each metabolic activity was eventually lost. Using techniques that characterize 11 measurements of hepatic viability and function from plating efficiency, to ammonia metabolism, to phases I and II drug metabolism, it was determined that while viability decreased, the remaining viable cells in cold-stored suspensions retained critical hepatic functions for up to 48 h at levels not significantly different from those observed in freshly isolated cells. PMID:23768881

  9. Cerebral blood flow response to changes in arterial carbon dioxide tension during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in children

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, F.H.; Ungerleider, R.M.; Quill, T.J.; Baldwin, B.; White, W.D.; Reves, J.G.; Greeley, W.J. )

    1991-04-01

    We examined the relationship of changes in partial pressure of carbon dioxide on cerebral blood flow responsiveness in 20 pediatric patients undergoing hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. Cerebral blood flow was measured during steady-state hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with the use of xenon 133 clearance methodology at two different arterial carbon dioxide tensions. During these measurements there was no significant change in mean arterial pressure, nasopharyngeal temperature, pump flow rate, or hematocrit value. Cerebral blood flow was found to be significantly greater at higher arterial carbon dioxide tensions (p less than 0.01), so that for every millimeter of mercury rise in arterial carbon dioxide tension there was a 1.2 ml.100 gm-1.min-1 increase in cerebral blood flow. Two factors, deep hypothermia (18 degrees to 22 degrees C) and reduced age (less than 1 year), diminished the effect carbon dioxide had on cerebral blood flow responsiveness but did not eliminate it. We conclude that cerebral blood flow remains responsive to changes in arterial carbon dioxide tension during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in infants and children; that is, increasing arterial carbon dioxide tension will independently increase cerebral blood flow.

  10. Glutamate Excitotoxicity Mediates Neuronal Apoptosis After Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Elaine E.; Brock, Malcolm V.; Lange, Mary S.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Blue, Mary E.; Lowenstein, Charles J.; Johnston, Michael V.; Baumgartner, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prolonged hypothermic circulatory arrest results in neuronal cell death and neurologic injury. We have previously shown that hypothermic circulatory arrest causes both neuronal apoptosis and necrosis in a canine model. Inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase reduced neuronal apoptosis, while glutamate receptor antagonism reduced necrosis in our model. This study was undertaken to determine whether glutamate receptor antagonism reduces nitric oxide formation and neuronal apoptosis after hypothermic circulatory arrest. Methods Sixteen hound dogs underwent 2 hours of circulatory arrest at 18°C and were sacrificed after 8 hours. Group 1 (n=8) was treated with MK-801, 0.75 mg/kg IV prior to arrest followed by 75 μg/kg/hr infusion. Group 2 dogs (n=8) received vehicle only. Intracerebral levels of excitatory amino acids and citrulline, an equal co-product of nitric oxide, were measured. Apoptosis, identified by H&E staining and confirmed by electron microscopy, was blindly scored from 0 (normal) to 100 (severe injury), while nick-end labeling demonstrated DNA fragmentation. Results Group 1 and 2 dogs had similar intracerebral levels of glutamate. However, MK-801 significantly reduced intracerebral glycine and citrulline levels as compared to HCA controls. MK-801 significantly inhibited apoptosis (7.92 ± 7.85 vs. 62.08 ± 6.28, Group 1 vs. 2, p<0.001). Conclusions Our results showed that glutamate receptor antagonism significantly reduced nitric oxide formation and neuronal apoptosis. We provide evidence that glutamate excitotoxicity mediates neuronal apoptosis in addition to necrosis after hypothermic circulatory arrest. Clinical glutamate receptor antagonists may have therapeutic benefit in ameliorating both types of neurologic injury after hypothermic circulatory arrest. PMID:20103318

  11. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.02–17.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.85–12.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion.

  12. Reduced cardiac autonomic response to deep breathing: A heritable vulnerability trait in patients with schizophrenia and their healthy first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Yeh, Chin-Bin; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An

    2016-09-30

    Reduced resting heart rate variability (HRV) has been observed in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives, suggesting genetic predispositions. However, findings have not been consistent. We assessed cardiac autonomic response to deep breathing in first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia (n=45; 26 female; aged 39.69±14.82 years). Data were compared to healthy controls (n=45; 26 female; aged 38.27±9.79 years) matched for age, gender, body mass index and physical activity as well as to unmedicated patients with acute schizophrenia (n=45; 25 female; aged 37.31±12.65 years). Electrocardiograms were recorded under supine resting and deep-breathing conditions (10-12breaths/min). We measured HRV components including variance, low-frequency (LF) power, which may reflect baroreflex function, high-frequency (HF) power, which reflects cardiac parasympathetic activity, and LF/HF ratio, which may reflect sympatho-vagal balance. Patients rather than relatives exhibited lower resting-state HRV (variance, LF, and HF) than controls. As expected, deep breathing induced an increase in variance and HF-HRV in controls. However, such a response was significantly reduced in both patients and their relatives. In conclusion, the diminished cardiac autonomic reactivity to deep breathing seen in patients and their unaffected relatives indicates that this pattern of cardiac autonomic dysregulation may be regarded as a genetic trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:27442977

  13. Reduced cardiac autonomic response to deep breathing: A heritable vulnerability trait in patients with schizophrenia and their healthy first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Yeh, Chin-Bin; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An

    2016-09-30

    Reduced resting heart rate variability (HRV) has been observed in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives, suggesting genetic predispositions. However, findings have not been consistent. We assessed cardiac autonomic response to deep breathing in first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia (n=45; 26 female; aged 39.69±14.82 years). Data were compared to healthy controls (n=45; 26 female; aged 38.27±9.79 years) matched for age, gender, body mass index and physical activity as well as to unmedicated patients with acute schizophrenia (n=45; 25 female; aged 37.31±12.65 years). Electrocardiograms were recorded under supine resting and deep-breathing conditions (10-12breaths/min). We measured HRV components including variance, low-frequency (LF) power, which may reflect baroreflex function, high-frequency (HF) power, which reflects cardiac parasympathetic activity, and LF/HF ratio, which may reflect sympatho-vagal balance. Patients rather than relatives exhibited lower resting-state HRV (variance, LF, and HF) than controls. As expected, deep breathing induced an increase in variance and HF-HRV in controls. However, such a response was significantly reduced in both patients and their relatives. In conclusion, the diminished cardiac autonomic reactivity to deep breathing seen in patients and their unaffected relatives indicates that this pattern of cardiac autonomic dysregulation may be regarded as a genetic trait marker for schizophrenia.

  14. Evidence for a metabolic limitation of survival in hypothermic hamsters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewitt, R. L.; Anderson, G. L.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1972-01-01

    The underlying factors limiting survival in the hypothermic state are studied. Hamsters of both sexes, clipped and unclipped, were inducted into profound hypothermia by the helium cold method until they reached a temperature between 7 and 10 C. It appears that the primary cause of death is failure of respiration due to the depletion of carbohydrate energy supplies and may explain why survival time in hypothermia is shorter than the normal hibernation time of the hamster.

  15. Dielectric relaxation of normothermic and hypothermic rat corneas.

    PubMed

    Marzec, E; Sosnowski, P; Olszewski, J; Krauss, H; Bahloul, K; Samborski, W; Krawczyk-Wasielewska, A

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims at the presentation of the results of in vitro research on the dielectric properties of the cornea specimen collected from the rats subjected to in vivo hypothermia. The average values of the relative permittivity and dielectric loss are about 40% higher for the hypothermic cornea than those for the normothermic tissue at the same water content of 12% for both samples and at 25°C. Whereas, at 50°C this effect of increase in the dielectric properties of the hypothermic cornea when compared to the normothermic one is observed clearly only in the relative permittivity of about 19%. In the temperature range of 25-50°C, the activation energy of conductivity associated with the release of loosely bound water takes the average values of 45kJ/mol and 30kJ/mol for the normothermic and hypothermic corneas, respectively. The study provided information on dielectric polarization and conductance mechanisms in the cornea which may be helpful in interpreting clinical results of human cornea examination, currently obtained by means of such electrodiagnostic methods as conductive keratoplasty, electroretinography or electrooculography.

  16. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Reduces Cerebral Oxidative Stress Following Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Arvola, Oiva; Haapanen, Henri; Herajärvi, Johanna; Anttila, Tuomas; Puistola, Ulla; Karihtala, Peeter; Tuominen, Hannu; Anttila, Vesa; Juvonen, Tatu

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic precondition has become prominent as one of the most promising methods to mitigate neurological damage following ischemic insult. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning can be seen in the markers of oxidative stress or in redox-regulating enzymes in a porcine model. A total of 12 female piglets were randomly assigned to 2 groups. The study group underwent an intervention of 4 cycles of 5-minute ischemic preconditioning on the right hind leg. All piglets underwent 60-minute hypothermic circulatory arrest. Oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was measured from blood samples with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After 7 days of follow-up, samples from the brain, heart, kidney, and ovary were harvested for histopathologic examination. The immunohistochemical stainings of hypoxia marker hypoxia-inducible factor-1-α, oxidative stress marker 8-OHdG, DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, and antioxidant response regulators nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and protein deglycase were analyzed. The level of 8-OHdG referred to baseline was decreased in the sagittal sinus׳ blood samples in the study group after a prolonged deep hypothermic circulatory arrest at 360 minutes after reperfusion. Total histopathologic score was 3.8 (1.8-6.0) in the study group and was 4.4 (2.5-6.5) in the control group (P = 0.72), demonstrating no statistically significant difference in cerebral injury. Our findings demonstrate that the positive effects of remote ischemic preconditioning can be seen in cellular oxidative balance regulators in an animal model after 7 days of preconditioned ischemic insult. PMID:27568144

  17. A combined deep-learning and deformable-model approach to fully automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Avendi, M R; Kheradvar, Arash; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is an essential step for calculation of clinical indices such as ventricular volume and ejection fraction. In this work, we employ deep learning algorithms combined with deformable models to develop and evaluate a fully automatic LV segmentation tool from short-axis cardiac MRI datasets. The method employs deep learning algorithms to learn the segmentation task from the ground true data. Convolutional networks are employed to automatically detect the LV chamber in MRI dataset. Stacked autoencoders are used to infer the LV shape. The inferred shape is incorporated into deformable models to improve the accuracy and robustness of the segmentation. We validated our method using 45 cardiac MR datasets from the MICCAI 2009 LV segmentation challenge and showed that it outperforms the state-of-the art methods. Excellent agreement with the ground truth was achieved. Validation metrics, percentage of good contours, Dice metric, average perpendicular distance and conformity, were computed as 96.69%, 0.94, 1.81 mm and 0.86, versus those of 79.2-95.62%, 0.87-0.9, 1.76-2.97 mm and 0.67-0.78, obtained by other methods, respectively. PMID:26917105

  18. A combined deep-learning and deformable-model approach to fully automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Avendi, M R; Kheradvar, Arash; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is an essential step for calculation of clinical indices such as ventricular volume and ejection fraction. In this work, we employ deep learning algorithms combined with deformable models to develop and evaluate a fully automatic LV segmentation tool from short-axis cardiac MRI datasets. The method employs deep learning algorithms to learn the segmentation task from the ground true data. Convolutional networks are employed to automatically detect the LV chamber in MRI dataset. Stacked autoencoders are used to infer the LV shape. The inferred shape is incorporated into deformable models to improve the accuracy and robustness of the segmentation. We validated our method using 45 cardiac MR datasets from the MICCAI 2009 LV segmentation challenge and showed that it outperforms the state-of-the art methods. Excellent agreement with the ground truth was achieved. Validation metrics, percentage of good contours, Dice metric, average perpendicular distance and conformity, were computed as 96.69%, 0.94, 1.81 mm and 0.86, versus those of 79.2-95.62%, 0.87-0.9, 1.76-2.97 mm and 0.67-0.78, obtained by other methods, respectively.

  19. Chitosan-based nanocoatings for hypothermic storage of living cells.

    PubMed

    Bulwan, Maria; Antosiak-Iwańska, Magdalena; Godlewska, Ewa; Granicka, Ludomira; Zapotoczny, Szczepan; Nowakowska, Maria

    2013-11-01

    The formation of ultrathin chitosan-based nanocoating on HL-60 model cells and their protective function in hypothermic storage are presented. HL-60 cells are encapsulated in ultrathin shells by adsorbing cationic and anionic chitosan derivatives in a stepwise, layer-by-layer, procedure carried out in an aqueous medium under mild conditions. The chitosan-based films are also deposited on model lipid bilayer and the interactions are studied using ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy. The cells covered with the chitosan-based films and stored at 4 °C for 24 h express viability comparable to that of the control sample incubated at 37 °C, while the unprotected cells stored under the same conditions do not show viability. It is shown that the chitosan-based shell protects HL-60 cells against damaging effect of hypothermic storage. Such nanocoatings provide protection, mechanical stability, and support the cell membrane, while ensuring penetration of small molecules such as nutrients/gases what is essential for cell viability.

  20. TRPA1 mediates the hypothermic action of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Clive; Andersson, David A.; Bevan, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is an effective antipyretic and one of the most commonly used analgesic drugs. Unlike antipyretic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, APAP elicits hypothermia in addition to its antipyretic effect. Here we have examined the mechanisms responsible for the hypothermic activity of APAP. Subcutaneous, but not intrathecal, administration of APAP elicited a dose dependent decrease in body temperature in wildtype mice. Hypothermia was abolished in mice pre-treated with resiniferatoxin to destroy or defunctionalize peripheral TRPV1-expressing terminals, but resistant to inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases. The hypothermic activity was independent of TRPV1 since APAP evoked hypothermia was identical in wildtype and Trpv1−/− mice, and not reduced by administration of a maximally effective dose of a TRPV1 antagonist. In contrast, a TRPA1 antagonist inhibited APAP induced hypothermia and APAP was without effect on body temperature in Trpa1−/− mice. In a model of yeast induced pyrexia, administration of APAP evoked a marked hypothermia in wildtype and Trpv1−/− mice, but only restored normal body temperature in Trpa1−/− and Trpa1−/−/Trpv1−/− mice. We conclude that TRPA1 mediates APAP evoked hypothermia. PMID:26227887

  1. ¹H-MRS before and after resuscitation following selective cerebral ultra-profound hypothermic blood flow occlusion in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Niu, X-Q; Zhao, X-X; Li, B-C; Gao, Y-J; Xu, W; Fan, Y-D; Fu, G-P; Wang, K; Pu, J

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of selective cerebral ultra-profound hypothermic blood flow occlusion on brain tissue and cell metabolism to ascertain the efficacy and safety of selective deep hypothermic technologies using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). The bilateral carotid artery was blocked at room temperature for 10 min. Other neck vessels were then blocked through cold perfusion of the internal carotid artery and reflux of the ipsilateral jugular vein. Thus, selective cerebral extracorporeal circulation was established. Brain temperature was reduced to 15.1° ± 0.9°C. After 60 min, cerebral blood flow recovered naturally. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and (1)H-MRS examination of the bilateral frontal cortex and basal ganglia were performed prior to surgery and 4, 24, 72 h, 21 days after recovery. The formants and areas under the curve (AUC) of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr/Cr2) were analyzed using 1H-MRS. The pre- and postoperative AUC of NAA and Cho at different time points were compared. Conventional MRI and DWI showed no abnormal signal changes in the brain parenchyma or right basal ganglia before and after surgery (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the ratio between NAA/(Cr+Cr2) and Cho/(Cr+Cr2) before and after surgery in the bilateral basal ganglia and frontoparietal regions of the cortex (P > 0.05). Quantitative (1)H-MRS showed that selective deep cerebral hypothermia significantly improved the brain's tolerance to ischemia and hypoxia. Our results could provide a better understanding of the efficacy and safety of selective deep hypothermia and blood flow occlusion. PMID:26505410

  2. Phase transformation of boron nitride under hypothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Gang; Zhang Xiao; Zhu Lingling; Cui Deliang; Wang Qilong; Tao Xutang

    2009-06-15

    Phase transformation among different boron nitride (BN) phases in hydrothermal solution was investigated. It was found that hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) firstly formed in the solution at relatively low temperature (i.e., 220 deg. C). After that, a spot of hBN began to transform into wurtzite boron nitride (wBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) at 230 deg. C. More and more hBN converted into wBN and cBN with the increase in temperature, and this transformation process completed at 300 deg. C. In this paper, we have explained the mechanism of the above phase transformation by using a reported 'puckering mechanism'. - Graphical abstract: Phase transformations from hBN to wBN and cBN happened with the temperature increasing from 230 to 300 deg. C under hypothermal conditions, and nearly pure cBN has been synthesized at 300 deg. C and 12 MPa.

  3. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  4. ACh and 5-HT stimulated thermogenesis at different core temperatures in the He-Cold hypothermic hamster.

    PubMed

    Simpson, C W; Resch, G E

    1985-08-01

    Hamsters in deep experimentally induced hypothermia, at body temperatures between 7 degrees C and 11.5 degrees C, were microinjected with 5-HT and ACh at brain sites in the anterior-preoptic area of the hypothalamus (AH/POA). ACh or 5-HT was injected into an AH/POA site at different starting core temperatures in different groups of hypothermic hamsters. Colonic temperatures (Tc) were maintained, following He-Cold induction, in a temperature controlled environmental chamber and measured with a YSI thermister probe and YSI telethermometer. Injections of either 5-HT or ACh at Tc's between 7.0 degrees C and 9.0 degrees C elicited only modest increases in Tc i.e., 0.3 degrees C--0.6 degrees C, respectively. As Tc increased, however, to ranges between 9.1 degrees C--10.0 degrees C and in different animals to greater than 10 degrees C both ACh and 5-HT at the same sites elicited significant increases in Tc, 1.5 degrees C for 5-HT and 2.2 degrees C for ACh compared to saline injections. These data suggest that at the lowest Tc's we are observing a "cold block" of temperature sensitive sites in the AH/POA. Increasing the starting Tc beyond 9.0 degrees C however, evokes significant increases in heat-gain following AH/POA injection of either ACh or 5-HT. These data are consistent with Myers' observations concerning the organization of heat-gain mechanisms at AH/POA sites. In addition, they suggest that both the afferent limb of the heat-gain circuit (5-HT) and the efferent limb of the circuit (ACh) are functionally impaired when Tc is close to the physiological limit in the He-Cold hypothermic hamster.

  5. Hematologic values in hypothermic and rewarmed young calves.

    PubMed

    Olson, D P; South, P J; Hendrix, K

    1983-04-01

    Hematologic values were determined in cold-stressed and rewarmed 1- to 7-day-old Holstein bull calves. The animals were anesthetized and then cold-stressed by immersion in water until their core body temperature (colonic) had decreased by 10 C. They were kept at the hypothermic state for an additional 1 hour and then were rewarmed by 1 of 3 external rewarming methods or by natural (unassisted) recovery. Changes observed in the hematologic values of the cold-stressed calves during cooling represented a trend, rather than a direct effect of cold exposure because the values did not differ (P greater than 0.05) from those obtained from the noncold-stressed animals. Nevertheless, a linear decrease (P less than 0.05) in the total number of leukocytes was observed in the cold-stressed calves during cooling when compared with preimmersion values. The leukopenia resulted primarily from a neutropenia (P less than 0.05) and secondarily from decreases in the number of other leukocytes. Minor increases were noticed in the total number of erythrocytes, hemoglobin concentration, and PCV, whereas mean corpuscular values generally remained unchanged during cooling. A rapid and linear increase in the total number of leukocytes was noticed in all cold-stressed calves during recovery. The increase in total leukocytes occurred in all types of leukocytes and particularly in segmented and nonsegmented neutrophils.

  6. Cross correlation of heart rate and respiration versus deep breathing. Assessment of new test of cardiac autonomic function in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, L; Rossi, M; Soffiantino, F; Marti, G; Ricordi, L; Finardi, G; Fratino, P

    1989-05-01

    Cross correlation is a mathematical function whereby spectral analysis is used to describe the relationship between heart-rate fluctuations (256 R-R intervals) and respiration (simultaneously obtained by pneumotacograph). To assess its usefulness for testing autonomic integrity, cross correlation and deep breathing were compared in 141 diabetic subjects (aged 39 +/- 14 yr) and in 77 control subjects (aged 33 +/- 13 yr). To characterize patients, Valsalva maneuver, 30:15 ratio, tilt, and handgrip tests were performed in 96 of these patients; 23 had two or more abnormal tests (group A), 28 had one (group B), and 45 had none (group C). Sensitivity to parasympathetic withdrawal was compared in 9 control subjects (aged 26 +/- 4 yr) by four sequential 0.01-mg/kg i.v. atropine administrations. Reproducibility was compared in 11 control subjects (aged 25 +/- 2 yr) by repeating the tests four times for 2 consecutive days. Considering all 141 patients, cross correlation and deep breathing were less than 2SD of the mean of control subjects in 64 and 36 subjects, respectively. Considering patients who also performed other tests of autonomic function, cross correlation and deep breathing were less than 2SD of the mean of controls in 42 and 30 subjects, respectively (group A, 20 and 15; group B, 12 and 9; group C, 10 and 6). Cross correlation had better reproducibility than deep breathing (C.V. 10.3 vs. 30.6% at 6 breaths/min) and greater sensitivity to atropine (after the 1st injection, cross correlation and deep breathing decreased to 34.6 and 48.2% of baseline values, respectively; P less than .05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Alterations of field potentials in isotropic cardiomyocyte cell layers induced by multiple endogenous pacemakers under normal and hypothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Kienast, R; Stöger, M; Handler, M; Hanser, F; Baumgartner, C

    2014-10-01

    The use of autonomous contracting randomly grown cardiomyocyte monolayers cultivated on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) represents an accepted experimental setting for preclinical experimental research in the field of cardiac electrophysiology. A dominant pacemaker forces a monolayer to adhere to a regular and synchronized contraction. Randomly distributed multiple pacemakers interfere with this dominant center, resulting in more or less frequent changes of propagation direction. This study aims to characterize the impact of changing propagation directions at single electrodes of the MEA on the four intrinsic parameters of registered field potentials (FPs) FPrise, FPMIN, FPpre, and FPdur and conduction velocity (CV) under normal and hypothermal conditions. Primary cultures of chicken cardiomyocytes (n = 18) were plated directly onto MEAs and FPs were recorded in a temperature range between 37 and 29°C. The number and spatiotemporal distribution of biological and artificial pacemakers of each cell layer inside and outside of the MEA registration area were evaluated using an algorithm developed in-house. In almost every second myocardial cell layer, interfering autonomous pacemakers were detected at stable temperatures, showing random spatial distributions with similar beating rates. Additionally, a temperature-dependent change of the dominant pacemaker center was observed in n = 16 experiments. A significant spread-direction-dependent variation of CV, FPrise, FPMIN, and FPpre up to 14% could be measured between different endogenous pacemakers. In conclusion, based on our results, disregarding the spatial origin of excitation may lead to misinterpretations and erroneous conclusions of FP parameters in the verification of research hypotheses in cellular electrocardiology.

  8. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  9. The effect of liposome treatment on the quality of hypothermically stored red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Stadnick, Hart; Stoll, Cristoph; Wolkers, Wim F; Acker, Jason Paul; Holovati, Jelena Lecak

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that liposome treatment of red blood cells (RBCs) leads to improved recovery and membrane integrity following cryopreservation protocols. However, the effect of liposome treatment on hypothermically stored RBCs has not been previously investigated. The current study has investigated whether liposome treatment could modify the membrane quality and deformability of hypothermically stored RBCs. Unilamellar liposomes were synthesized using an extrusion protocol. Three lipid bilayer compositions were investigated: 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC):PE:PS (8:1:1); 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC):PE:PS (8:1:1); and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC):PE:PS (8:1:1). RBCs were treated with liposomes and subsequently stored for 42 days in HEPES-NaCl buffer and saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol. RBC quality was assessed by percent hemolysis, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), and RBC deformability (ektacytometry). DOPC and DMPC liposome treatment resulted in destabilization of the RBC membrane. Percent hemolysis values for DMPC-treated RBCs were higher than untreated controls throughout storage (P<0.05). DOPC-treated RBCs showed elevated levels of hemolysis compared to controls from day 21 of storage onward (P<0.05). In addition, DOPC and DMPC-treated RBCs were less deformable than untreated controls from days 21(P=0.02) and 14 (P<0.001) of storage onward respectively. [We suggest that these changes in RBC hemolysis and deformability are due to cholesterol extraction from the RBC membrane into the liposome fraction.] In contrast, DPPC-treated RBCs maintained hemolysis, MCV, and deformability values comparable to untreated controls. Future research addressing the optimal liposome composition for stabilizing the RBC membrane at cold temperatures could lead to effective strategies to combat the RBC membrane hypothermic storage lesion and ultimately improve the quality of hypothermically preserved blood.

  10. The hypothermic action of carbachol in the rat brain periaqueductal grey area may involve neurotensin.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, E. C.; Slater, P.; Widdowson, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) and carbachol both caused hypothermia when injected into the periaqueductal grey area (PAG) of rat brain. Atropine prevented carbachol- but not NT-induced hypothermia. NT-induced hypothermia was unaffected by various neurotransmitter agonists and antagonists in the PAG. Both NT antibodies and thyrotrophin releasing hormone prevented carbachol hypothermia. It is concluded that the hypothermic action of carbachol in the PAG is mediated via endogenous NT. PMID:3742153

  11. Serotonin is involved in the psychostimulant and hypothermic effect of 4-methylamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Mar; López-Arnau, Raúl; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena; Camarasa, Jorge

    2015-03-17

    4-Methylamphetamine (4-MA) has recently emerged as a designer drug of abuse in Europe and it is consumed always with amphetamine. There have been reported some deaths and non-fatal intoxications related to 4-MA. We investigated the changes in locomotor activity and body temperature after 4-MA administration to male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our experiments were carried out at a normal or high ambient temperature. 4-MA (2.5-10mg/Kg, given subcutaneously) increased, in a dose-dependent manner, the horizontal locomotor activity that was significantly reduced by ketanserin, p-cholorophenylalanine (pCPA) or haloperidol, but not by pindolol. In addition, we have studied the effect of 4-MA on core body temperature by means of an implanted electronic thermograph, enabling continuous measurement of body temperature. We observed a dose-dependent hypothermic response to 4-MA that reached a maximum 45 min after a single injection. We also evidenced slight tachyphylaxis to the hypothermic effect when 4-MA was administered four times in a 2h interval. The pre-treatment of animals with pCPA or pindolol, but not with ketanserin, fully abolished the hypothermic effect of 4-MA. With all that, we conclude that hypothermia induced by 4-MA is due to the release of 5-HT which activates postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors. PMID:25641130

  12. Cardiac dosimetric evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold level variances using computed tomography scans generated from deformable image registration displacement vectors.

    PubMed

    Harry, Taylor; Rahn, Doug; Semenov, Denis; Gu, Xuejun; Yashar, Catheryn; Einck, John; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-01-01

    There is a reduction in cardiac dose for left-sided breast radiotherapy during treatment with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) when compared with treatment with free breathing (FB). Various levels of DIBH may occur for different treatment fractions. Dosimetric effects due to this and other motions are a major component of uncertainty in radiotherapy in this setting. Recent developments in deformable registration techniques allow displacement vectors between various temporal and spatial patient representations to be digitally quantified. We propose a method to evaluate the dosimetric effect to the heart from variable reproducibility of DIBH by using deformable registration to create new anatomical computed tomography (CT) scans. From deformable registration, 3-dimensional deformation vectors are generated with FB and DIBH. The obtained deformation vectors are scaled to 75%, 90%, and 110% and are applied to the reference image to create new CT scans at these inspirational levels. The scans are then imported into the treatment planning system and dose calculations are performed. The average mean dose to the heart was 2.5Gy (0.7 to 9.6Gy) at FB, 1.2Gy (0.6 to 3.8Gy, p < 0.001) at 75% inspiration, 1.1Gy (0.6 to 3.1Gy, p = 0.004) at 90% inspiration, 1.0Gy (0.6 to 3.0Gy) at 100% inspiration or DIBH, and 1.0Gy (0.6 to 2.8Gy, p = 0.019) at 110% inspiration. The average mean dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was 19.9Gy (2.4 to 46.4Gy), 8.6Gy (2.0 to 43.8Gy, p < 0.001), 7.2Gy (1.9 to 40.1Gy, p = 0.035), 6.5Gy (1.8 to 34.7Gy), and 5.3Gy (1.5 to 31.5Gy, p < 0.001), correspondingly. This novel method enables numerous anatomical situations to be mimicked and quantifies the dosimetric effect they have on a treatment plan. PMID:26206154

  13. Cardiac dosimetric evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold level variances using computed tomography scans generated from deformable image registration displacement vectors.

    PubMed

    Harry, Taylor; Rahn, Doug; Semenov, Denis; Gu, Xuejun; Yashar, Catheryn; Einck, John; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-01-01

    There is a reduction in cardiac dose for left-sided breast radiotherapy during treatment with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) when compared with treatment with free breathing (FB). Various levels of DIBH may occur for different treatment fractions. Dosimetric effects due to this and other motions are a major component of uncertainty in radiotherapy in this setting. Recent developments in deformable registration techniques allow displacement vectors between various temporal and spatial patient representations to be digitally quantified. We propose a method to evaluate the dosimetric effect to the heart from variable reproducibility of DIBH by using deformable registration to create new anatomical computed tomography (CT) scans. From deformable registration, 3-dimensional deformation vectors are generated with FB and DIBH. The obtained deformation vectors are scaled to 75%, 90%, and 110% and are applied to the reference image to create new CT scans at these inspirational levels. The scans are then imported into the treatment planning system and dose calculations are performed. The average mean dose to the heart was 2.5Gy (0.7 to 9.6Gy) at FB, 1.2Gy (0.6 to 3.8Gy, p < 0.001) at 75% inspiration, 1.1Gy (0.6 to 3.1Gy, p = 0.004) at 90% inspiration, 1.0Gy (0.6 to 3.0Gy) at 100% inspiration or DIBH, and 1.0Gy (0.6 to 2.8Gy, p = 0.019) at 110% inspiration. The average mean dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was 19.9Gy (2.4 to 46.4Gy), 8.6Gy (2.0 to 43.8Gy, p < 0.001), 7.2Gy (1.9 to 40.1Gy, p = 0.035), 6.5Gy (1.8 to 34.7Gy), and 5.3Gy (1.5 to 31.5Gy, p < 0.001), correspondingly. This novel method enables numerous anatomical situations to be mimicked and quantifies the dosimetric effect they have on a treatment plan.

  14. The association between tranexamic acid and convulsive seizures after cardiac surgery: a multivariate analysis in 11 529 patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V; Katznelson, R; Jerath, A; Garrido-Olivares, L; Carroll, J; Rao, V; Wasowicz, M; Djaiani, G

    2014-02-01

    Because of a lack of contemporary data regarding seizures after cardiac surgery, we undertook a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 11 529 patients in whom cardiopulmonary bypass was used from January 2004 to December 2010. A convulsive seizure was defined as a transient episode of disturbed brain function characterised by abnormal involuntary motor movements. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of postoperative seizures. A total of 100 (0.9%) patients developed postoperative convulsive seizures. Generalised and focal seizures were identified in 68 and 32 patients, respectively. The median (IQR [range]) time after surgery when the seizure occurred was 7 (6-12 [1-216]) h and 8 (6-11 [4-18]) h, respectively. Epileptiform findings on electroencephalography were seen in 19 patients. Independent predictors of postoperative seizures included age, female sex, redo cardiac surgery, calcification of ascending aorta, congestive heart failure, deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, duration of aortic cross-clamp and tranexamic acid. When tested in a multivariate regression analysis, tranexamic acid was a strong independent predictor of seizures (OR 14.3, 95% CI 5.5-36.7; p < 0.001). Patients with convulsive seizures had 2.5 times higher in-hospital mortality rates and twice the length of hospital stay compared with patients without convulsive seizures. Mean (IQR [range]) length of stay in the intensive care unit was 115 (49-228 [32-481]) h in patients with convulsive seizures compared with 26 (22-69 [14-1080]) h in patients without seizures (p < 0.001). Convulsive seizures are a serious postoperative complication after cardiac surgery. As tranexamic acid is the only modifiable factor, its administration, particularly in doses exceeding 80 mg.kg(-1), should be weighed against the risk of postoperative seizures. PMID:24588023

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coronary artery disease - cardiac rehab; Angina - cardiac rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab ... have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery ...

  16. Moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest in total arch repair for acute type A aortic dissection: clinical safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ming; Ma, Wei-Guo; Guan, Xin-Liang; Wang, Long-Fei; Li, Jia-Chen; Lan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Continued debates exist regarding the optimal temperature during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) in aortic arch repair for patients with type A aortic dissection (TAAD). This study seeks to examine whether the use of moderate HCA in emergency aortic arch surgery provides comparable operative outcomes to deep HCA for patients with acute TAAD. Methods We prospectively enrolled 74 consecutive patients (mean age 47.7±9.8 years, 54 males) with acute TAAD, who underwent emergency total arch replacement and frozen elephant trunk implantation under HCA (18–28 °C) with unilateral selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (uSACP). Patients were divided into two groups based on the nasopharyngeal temperature at the initiation of HCA: deep HCA (DHCA, <20 °C) in 35 (47.3%) and moderate HCA (MHCA, 20–28 °C) in 39 (52.7%). Operative outcomes including mortality, morbidity and visceral organ functions were compared between the two groups. Results The mean times of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross-clamp were 211±54 and 238±62 minutes (P=0.053) and 118±27 and 142±45 minutes (P=0.005) in the MHCA and DHCA groups, respectively. Operative mortality did not differ between two groups (10.2% in MHCA vs. 14.3% in DHCA groups, P=0.862). Nor did the incidence of morbidities differ between the two groups (P>0.05). The temporal trend in the changes of postoperative levels of creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin and lactate did not differ between two groups (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis found that the temperature during HCA (MHCA vs. DHCA) did not affect operative mortality, morbidities and neurologic complications. Instead, CPB time (in minutes) was the risk factor for operative mortality (odds ratio, 1.032; 95% confidence interval, 1.004–1.061; P=0.023). Conclusions: Moderate HCA is associated with equivalent operative mortality and morbidity and visceral organ functions compared to deep HCA in patients with acute TAAD undergoing

  17. Hypothermic activity of acetaminophen; involvement of GABAA receptor, theoretical and experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahangar, Nematollah; Esam, Zohreh; Bekhradnia, Ahmadreza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The mechanism of hypothermia action of acetaminophen (APAP) remains unclear even 125 years after its synthesis. Acetaminophen produces hypothermia. The mechanism of this reduction in core body temperature is not clear but evidence shows that it is not dependent on opioid and cannabinoid receptors. Because of strong documents about the roles of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors in hypothemic activity of some drugs such as diazepam, we determined if these receptors also contributes to the hypothermic effect of APAP. Materials and Methods: Diazepam (5 mg/kg, IP) was used for induction of hypothermia. Flumazenil (10 mg/kg, IP) or picrotoxin (2 mg/kg, IP) used for reversal of this effect. Rats injected with APAP (100, 200 or 300 mg/kg, IP). Baseline temperature measurements were taken with a digital thermometer via rectum. To evaluate the structural correlation between APAP and benzodiazepine receptor ligands, numerous models are selected and studied at HF/6-31G* level of theory. Relative energies, enthalpies and Gibbs free energies were calculated for all selected drugs. Results Diazepam induced hypothermia was reversed by flumazenil or picrotoxin. Rats injected with APAP displayed dose- and time-related hypothermia. For combined administration, the hypothermic effect of APAP (200 mg/kg) was strongly reduced by pretreatment with picrotoxin or flumazenil P<0.0001and P<0.01, respectively. Selective structural data, bond length, dihedral angles, and related distance in pharmacophore of APAP and BZDR models were the same. Some significant structural analogues were obtained between these drugs. Conclusion: Results suggest hypothermic action of acetaminophen may be mediate by its effect at GABAA benzodiazepine receptor. PMID:27403252

  18. Differential Response in Downstream Processing of CHO Cells Grown Under Mild Hypothermic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Andrew S; Tarrant, Richard D R; Velez-Suberbie, M Lourdes; Spencer, Daniel I R; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2013-01-01

    The manufacture of complex therapeutic proteins using mammalian cells is well established, with several strategies developed to improve productivity. The application of sustained mild hypothermic conditions during culture has been associated with increases in product titer and improved product quality. However, despite associated cell physiological effects, very few studies have investigated the impact on downstream processing (DSP). Characterization of cells grown under mild hypothermic conditions demonstrated that the stationary phase was prolonged by delaying the onset of apoptosis. This enabled cells to maintain viability for extended periods and increase volumetric productivity from 0.74 to 1.02 g L−1. However, host cell proteins, measured by ELISA, increased by ∼50%, attributed to the extended time course and higher peak and harvest cell densities. The individual components making up this impurity, as determined by SELDI-TOF MS and 2D-PAGE, were shown to be largely comparable. Under mild hypothermic conditions, cells were less shear sensitive than those maintained at 37°C, enhancing the preliminary primary recovery step. Adaptive changes in membrane fluidity were further investigated by adopting a pronounced temperature shift immediately prior to primary recovery and the improvement observed suggests that such a strategy may be implementable when shear sensitivity is of concern. Early and late apoptotic cells were particularly susceptible to shear, at either temperature, even under the lowest shear rate investigated. These findings demonstrate the importance of considering the impact of cell culture strategies and cell physiology on DSP, by implementing a range of experimental methods for process characterization. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 29:688–696, 2013 PMID:23636936

  19. The Pre-Optic Anterior Hypothalamus (POAH) partially mediates the hypothermic response to hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin W; Whitehurst, Marvin E; Gordon, Christopher J; Carroll, Robert G

    2005-04-11

    Two sets of experiments were performed to characterize the role of the Pre-Optic Area of the Anterior Hypothalamus (POAH) in the decrease in set point and hypothermia that follows severe hemorrhage. In the first set, lidocaine or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) was microinjected into the POAH of rats at the time of hemorrhage. Lidocaine microinjection attenuated the hemorrhagic hypothermia by approximately 50%. The mean drop in core temperature (Tc) following hemorrhage was 1.5 degrees C with ACSF microinjection (N = 6), 0.70 degrees C (N = 6) with lidocaine, and 1.77 degrees C (N = 6) after sham microinjection. This partial attenuation of the hemorrhagic hypothermic response indicates that an intact POAH is necessary for at least some of the hypothermia following hemorrhage. In the second experimental set, hypothalamic tissue temperature (Thyp) was modulated in an attempt to alter the hemorrhagic hypothermic response. Bilateral closed-ended cannulas were inserted into the POAH. One cannula consisted of a water-perfused thermode to change local tissue temperature. The other housed a thermocouple to measure local temperature. The effectiveness of the thermode was first confirmed in conscious rats, evidenced by an inverse deflection in Tc upon Thyp modulation. Then, the POAH region was either heated, cooled, or sham perfused following hemorrhage. The mean drop in Tc following hemorrhage was 2.16 degrees C (N = 5) with hypothalamic heating, 1.35 degrees C (N = 5) with cooling, and 1.44 degrees C (N = 5) following the sham perfusion control. Heating of the POAH significantly exacerbated the hemorrhagic hypothermic response. These data further suggest that the POAH is at least partially responsible for mediating hemorrhagic hypothermia. PMID:15804494

  20. JWH-018 in rhesus monkeys: differential antagonism of discriminative stimulus, rate-decreasing, and hypothermic effects

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jesse S.; McMahon, Lance R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Several effects of the abused synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 were compared to those of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) in rhesus monkeys. JWH-018 (0.1 mg/kg i.v.) was established as a discriminative stimulus and rimonabant was used to examine mechanisms responsible for discrimination as well as operant response rate-decreasing and hypothermic effects. JWH-018 dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding (ED50 = 0.01 mg/kg) and decreased response rate (ED50 = 0.064 mg/kg). Among various cannabinoids, the relative potency for producing discriminative stimulus and rate-decreasing effects was the same: CP-55940 = JWH-018 > Δ9-THC = WIN-55212-2 = JWH-073. The benzodiazepine agonist midazolam and the NMDA antagonist ketamine did not exert JWH-018 like discriminative stimulus effects up to doses that disrupted responding. JWH-018 and 9-THC decreased rectal temperature by 2.2 and 2.8 °C, respectively; the doses decreasing temperature by 2 °C were 0.21 and 1.14 mg/kg, respectively. Antagonism did not differ between JWH-018 and 9-THC, but did differ among effects. The apparent affinities of rimonabant calculated in the presence of JWH-018 and Δ9-THC were not different from each other for antagonism of discriminative stimulus effects (6.58 and 6.59, respectively) or hypothermic effects (7.08 and 7.19, respectively). Apparent affinity estimates are consistent with the same receptors mediating the discriminative stimulus and hypothermic effects of both JWH-018 and Δ9-THC. However, there was more limited and less orderly antagonism of rate-decreasing effects, suggesting that an additional receptor mechanism is involved in mediating the effects of cannabinoid on response rate. Overall, these results strongly suggest that JWH-018 and Δ9-THC act at the same receptors to produce several of their shared psychopharmacological effects. PMID:24972243

  1. JWH-018 in rhesus monkeys: differential antagonism of discriminative stimulus, rate-decreasing, and hypothermic effects.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jesse S; McMahon, Lance R

    2014-10-01

    Several effects of the abused synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 were compared to those of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) in rhesus monkeys. JWH-018 (0.1 mg/kg i.v.) was established as a discriminative stimulus and rimonabant was used to examine mechanisms responsible for discrimination as well as operant response rate-decreasing and hypothermic effects. JWH-018 dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding (ED50=0.01 mg/kg) and decreased response rate (ED50=0.064 mg/kg). Among various cannabinoids, the relative potency for producing discriminative stimulus and rate-decreasing effects was the same: CP-55940=JWH-018>Δ9-THC=WIN-55212-2=JWH-073. The benzodiazepine agonist midazolam and the NMDA antagonist ketamine did not exert JWH-018 like discriminative stimulus effects up to doses that disrupted responding. JWH-018 and Δ9-THC decreased rectal temperature by 2.2 and 2.8°C, respectively; the doses decreasing temperature by 2°C were 0.21 and 1.14 mg/kg, respectively. Antagonism did not differ between JWH-018 and Δ9-THC, but did differ among effects. The apparent affinities of rimonabant calculated in the presence of JWH-018 and Δ9-THC were not different from each other for antagonism of discriminative stimulus effects (6.58 and 6.59, respectively) or hypothermic effects (7.08 and 7.19, respectively). Apparent affinity estimates are consistent with the same receptors mediating the discriminative stimulus and hypothermic effects of both JWH-018 and Δ9-THC. However, there was more limited and less orderly antagonism of rate-decreasing effects, suggesting that an additional receptor mechanism is involved in mediating the effects of cannabinoids on response rate. Overall, these results strongly suggest that JWH-018 and Δ9-THC act at the same receptors to produce several of their shared psychopharmacological effects.

  2. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Hypothermic Anaesthesia of a Disease Model in Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Hiraishi, Masahiro; Amano, Hideaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Sugimoto, Naozo

    2016-01-01

    In medical and pharmacological research, various human disease models in small fish, such as medaka (Oryzias latipes), have been created. To investigate these disease models noninvasively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is suitable because these small fish are no longer transparent as adults. However, their small body size requires a high spatial resolution, and a water pool should be avoided to maximize the strength of MRI. We developed in vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MR microscopy) without a water pool by combining hypothermic anaesthesia and a 14.1 T MR microscope. Using in vivo MR microscopy, we noninvasively evaluated the hepatic steatosis level of a non-alcoholic fatty liver disease model in medaka and followed the individual disease progression. The steatosis level was quantified by the MRI-estimated proton density fat-fraction (MRI-PDFF), which estimates the triglyceride fat concentration in liver tissue and is recognized as an imaging biomarker. The MRI-PDFF results agreed with a histological analysis. Moreover, we optimized the hypothermic anaesthesia procedure to obtain a recovery proportion of 1 in the experiment involving MR microscopy. Recovered medaka could not be distinguished from naïve medaka after the experiment. Therefore, the in vivo MR microscopy will expand the possibilities of a human disease model in fish. PMID:27251889

  3. Spontaneous Packaging and Hypothermic Storage of Mammalian Cells with a Cell-Membrane-Mimetic Polymer Hydrogel in a Microchip.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Mawatari, Kazuma; Konno, Tomohiro; Kitamori, Takehiko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-21

    Currently, continuous culture/passage and cryopreservation are two major, well-established methods to provide cultivated mammalian cells for experiments in laboratories. Due to the lack of flexibility, however, both laboratory-oriented methods are unable to meet the need for rapidly growing cell-based applications, which require cell supply in a variety of occasions outside of laboratories. Herein, we report spontaneous packaging and hypothermic storage of mammalian cells under refrigerated (4 °C) and ambient conditions (25 °C) using a cell-membrane-mimetic methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer hydrogel incorporated within a glass microchip. Its capability for hypothermic storage of cells was comparatively evaluated over 16 days. The results reveal that the cytocompatible MPC polymer hydrogel, in combination with the microchip structure, enabled hypothermic storage of cells with quite high viability, high intracellular esterase activity, maintained cell membrane integrity, and small morphological change for more than 1 week at 4 °C and at least 4 days at 25 °C. Furthermore, the stored cells could be released from the hydrogel and exhibited the ability to adhere to a surface and achieve confluence under standard cell culture conditions. Both hypothermic storage conditions are ordinary flexible conditions which can be easily established in places outside of laboratories. Therefore, cell packaging and storage using the hydrogel incorporated within the microchip would be a promising miniature and portable solution for flexible supply and delivery of small amounts of cells from bench to bedside.

  4. Hypothermic Preconditioning Reverses Tau Ontogenesis in Human Cortical Neurons and is Mimicked by Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Connick, Peter; Livesey, Matthew R.; Borooah, Shyamanga; Patani, Rickie; Burr, Karen; Story, David; Wyllie, David J.A.; Hardingham, Giles E.; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is potently neuroprotective, but the molecular basis of this effect remains obscure. Changes in neuronal tau protein are of interest, since tau becomes hyperphosphorylated in injury-resistant, hypothermic brains. Noting inter-species differences in tau isoforms, we have used functional cortical neurons differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hCNs) to interrogate tau modulation during hypothermic preconditioning at clinically-relevant temperatures. Key tau developmental transitions (phosphorylation status and splicing shift) are recapitulated during hCN differentiation and subsequently reversed by mild (32 °C) to moderate (28 °C) cooling — conditions which reduce oxidative and excitotoxic stress-mediated injury in hCNs. Blocking a major tau kinase decreases hCN tau phosphorylation and abrogates hypothermic neuroprotection, whilst inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A mimics cooling-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and protects normothermic hCNs from oxidative stress. These findings indicate a possible role for phospho-tau in hypothermic preconditioning, and suggest that cooling drives human tau towards an earlier ontogenic phenotype whilst increasing neuronal resilience to common neurotoxic insults. This work provides a critical step forward in understanding how we might exploit the neuroprotective benefits of cooling without cooling patients. PMID:26870825

  5. Spontaneous Packaging and Hypothermic Storage of Mammalian Cells with a Cell-Membrane-Mimetic Polymer Hydrogel in a Microchip.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Mawatari, Kazuma; Konno, Tomohiro; Kitamori, Takehiko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-21

    Currently, continuous culture/passage and cryopreservation are two major, well-established methods to provide cultivated mammalian cells for experiments in laboratories. Due to the lack of flexibility, however, both laboratory-oriented methods are unable to meet the need for rapidly growing cell-based applications, which require cell supply in a variety of occasions outside of laboratories. Herein, we report spontaneous packaging and hypothermic storage of mammalian cells under refrigerated (4 °C) and ambient conditions (25 °C) using a cell-membrane-mimetic methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer hydrogel incorporated within a glass microchip. Its capability for hypothermic storage of cells was comparatively evaluated over 16 days. The results reveal that the cytocompatible MPC polymer hydrogel, in combination with the microchip structure, enabled hypothermic storage of cells with quite high viability, high intracellular esterase activity, maintained cell membrane integrity, and small morphological change for more than 1 week at 4 °C and at least 4 days at 25 °C. Furthermore, the stored cells could be released from the hydrogel and exhibited the ability to adhere to a surface and achieve confluence under standard cell culture conditions. Both hypothermic storage conditions are ordinary flexible conditions which can be easily established in places outside of laboratories. Therefore, cell packaging and storage using the hydrogel incorporated within the microchip would be a promising miniature and portable solution for flexible supply and delivery of small amounts of cells from bench to bedside. PMID:26436637

  6. Hypothermic Preconditioning Reverses Tau Ontogenesis in Human Cortical Neurons and is Mimicked by Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rzechorzek, Nina M; Connick, Peter; Livesey, Matthew R; Borooah, Shyamanga; Patani, Rickie; Burr, Karen; Story, David; Wyllie, David J A; Hardingham, Giles E; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is potently neuroprotective, but the molecular basis of this effect remains obscure. Changes in neuronal tau protein are of interest, since tau becomes hyperphosphorylated in injury-resistant, hypothermic brains. Noting inter-species differences in tau isoforms, we have used functional cortical neurons differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hCNs) to interrogate tau modulation during hypothermic preconditioning at clinically-relevant temperatures. Key tau developmental transitions (phosphorylation status and splicing shift) are recapitulated during hCN differentiation and subsequently reversed by mild (32 °C) to moderate (28 °C) cooling--conditions which reduce oxidative and excitotoxic stress-mediated injury in hCNs. Blocking a major tau kinase decreases hCN tau phosphorylation and abrogates hypothermic neuroprotection, whilst inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A mimics cooling-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and protects normothermic hCNs from oxidative stress. These findings indicate a possible role for phospho-tau in hypothermic preconditioning, and suggest that cooling drives human tau towards an earlier ontogenic phenotype whilst increasing neuronal resilience to common neurotoxic insults. This work provides a critical step forward in understanding how we might exploit the neuroprotective benefits of cooling without cooling patients. PMID:26870825

  7. Comparison of Integrated Responses to Nonlethal and Lethal Hypothermal Stress in Milkfish (Chanos chanos): A Proteomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Tang, Cheng-Hao; Kang, Chao-Kai; Lo, Wan-Yu; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Milkfish is an important aquaculture species in Taiwan, and its high mortality during cold snaps in winter usually causes huge economic losses. To understand the effect of hypothermal stress and the corresponding compensatory stress response in milkfish, this study aimed to compare liver and gill protein levels between milkfish exposed to nonlethal (18°C), lethal (16°C), and control (28°C) temperatures. Using a proteomics approach based on two-dimensional electrophoresis and nano-LC-MS/MS analysis, this study identified thirty unique protein spots from milkfish livers and gills for which protein abundance was significantly different between nonlethal, lethal, and control temperature groups. Proteins identified in the liver were classified into three different categories according to their cellular function: (1) anti-oxidative stress, (2) apoptotic pathway, and (3) cytoskeleton. Similarly, proteins identified in the gill were sorted in five different functional categories: (1) cytoskeleton, (2) immune response, (3) protein quality control, (4) energy production, and (5) intracellular homeostasis. Based on functional information derived from the identified proteins, we assumed that different levels of hypothermal stress had a different effect and induced a different cellular response. Upon nonlethal hypothermal stress, the identified proteins were involved in anti-oxidative stress and anti-inflammation pathways, suggesting that milkfish had high levels of oxidative stress in the liver and exhibited inflammation response in the gill. Upon lethal hypothermal stress, however, identified proteins were associated with apoptosis in the liver and regulation of intracellular homeostasis in the gill. The present study provided evidence to illustrate different multi-physiological responses to nonlethal and lethal hypothermal stress in milkfish livers and gills. PMID:27657931

  8. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  9. Activation of NK cells in subjects exposed to mild hyper- or hypothermic load.

    PubMed

    Lackovic, V; Borecký, L; Vigas, M; Rovenský, J

    1988-06-01

    The effect of mild hyper- and hypothermic stress on release of selected hormones (somatotropin, noradrenaline, etc.), interferon (IFN), and activity of NK cells in the blood was examined in groups of young males during a 30 min exposure to 39 degrees C and 4 degrees C. A quick release of somatotropin was registered in 44% of examinees in the hyperthermic group, while the persons exposed to 4 degrees C reacted with a release of noradrenaline only. Concurrently, an elevation of NK cell activity was observed both in the subgroup releasing somatotropin after hyperthermic stress and in the group exposed to cold. Since these forms of mild stress did not lead to an appearance of IFN in the serum, the possibility of an NK cell activating effect of somatotropin and/or the adrenal hormones was tested. While the adrenal hormones stimulated the NK cell activity in vitro, no support for a similar role for somatotropin was found. PMID:2457640

  10. Pharmacology of the hypothermic response to 5-HT1A receptor activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Lesch, K P; Poten, B; Söhnle, K; Schulte, H M

    1990-01-01

    The selective 5-HT1A receptor ligand ipsapirone (IPS) caused dose-related hypothermia in humans. The response was attenuated by the nonselective 5-HT1/2 receptor antagonist metergoline and was completely antagonized by the nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist pindolol, which interacts stereoselectively with the 5-HT1A receptor. The selective beta 1-adrenergic antagonist betaxolol had no effect. The findings indicate that IPS-induced hypothermia specifically involves activation of (presynaptic) 5-HT1A receptors. Therefore, the hypothermic response to IPS may provide a convenient in vivo paradigma to assess the function of the presynaptic 5-HT receptor in affective disorders and its involvement in the effects of psychotropic drugs. PMID:1980461

  11. Pharmacology of the hypothermic response to 5-HT1A receptor activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Lesch, K P; Poten, B; Söhnle, K; Schulte, H M

    1990-01-01

    The selective 5-HT1A receptor ligand ipsapirone (IPS) caused dose-related hypothermia in humans. The response was attenuated by the nonselective 5-HT1/2 receptor antagonist metergoline and was completely antagonized by the nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist pindolol, which interacts stereoselectively with the 5-HT1A receptor. The selective beta 1-adrenergic antagonist betaxolol had no effect. The findings indicate that IPS-induced hypothermia specifically involves activation of (presynaptic) 5-HT1A receptors. Therefore, the hypothermic response to IPS may provide a convenient in vivo paradigma to assess the function of the presynaptic 5-HT receptor in affective disorders and its involvement in the effects of psychotropic drugs.

  12. Hypothermic machine perfusion of kidneys retrieved from standard and high-risk donors.

    PubMed

    Jochmans, Ina; O'Callaghan, John M; Pirenne, Jacques; Ploeg, Rutger J

    2015-06-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) of kidneys is a long-established alternative to static cold storage and has been suggested to be a better preservation method. Today, as our deceased donor profile continues to change towards higher-risk kidneys of lower quality, we are confronted with the limits of cold storage. Interest in HMP as a preservation technique is on the rise. Furthermore, HMP also creates a window of opportunity during which to assess the viability and quality of the graft before transplantation. The technology might also provide a platform during which the graft could be actively repaired, making it particularly attractive for higher-risk kidneys. We review the current evidence on HMP in kidney transplantation and provide an outlook for the use of the technology in the years to come.

  13. Current State of Hypothermic Machine Perfusion Preservation of Organs: The Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael J.; Baicu, Simona, C.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the application of hypothermic perfusion technology as a topic of current interest with the potential to have a salutary impact on the mounting clinical challenges to improve the quantity and quality of donor organs and the outcome of transplantation. The ex vivo perfusion of donor organs on a machine prior to transplant, as opposed to static cold storage on ice, is not a new idea but is being re-visited because of the prospects of making available more and better organs for transplantation. The rationale for pursuing perfusion technology will be discussed in relation to emerging data on clinical outcomes and economic benefits for kidney transplantation. Reference will also be made to on-going research using other organs with special emphasis on the pancreas for both segmental pancreas and isolated islet transplantation. Anticipated and emerging benefits of hypothermic machine perfusion of organs are: i) maintaining the patency of the vascular bed, ii) providing nutrients and low demand oxygen to support reduced energy demands, iii) removal of metabolic by-products and toxins, iv) provision of access for administration of cytoprotective agents and/or immunomodulatory drugs, v) increase of available assays for organ viability assessment and tissue matching, vi) facilitation of a change from emergency to elective scheduled surgery with reduced costs and improved outcomes, vii) improved clinical outcomes as demonstrated by reduced PNF and DGF parameters, viii) improved stabilization or rescue of ECD kidneys or organs from NHBD that increase the size of the donor pool, ix) significant economic benefit for the transplant centers and reduced health care costs, and x) provision of a technology for ex vivo use of non-transplanted human organs for pharmaceutical development research. PMID:19857479

  14. 31P-NMR SPECTROSCOPY OF RAT LIVER DURING SIMPLE STORAGE OR CONTINUOUS HYPOTHERMIC PERFUSION1

    PubMed Central

    Rossaro, Lorenzo; Murase, Noriko; Caldwell, Cary; Farghali, Hassan; Casavilla, Adrian; Starzl, Thomas E.; Ho, Chien; Van Thiel, David H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The ATP content and intracellular pH (pHi)3 of isolated rat liver before, during, and after cold preservation in either UW-lactobionate (UW, n=10) or Euro-Collins (EC, n=8) solutions were monitored using phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy. The 31P-NMR spectra were obtained on a 4.7-Tesla system operating at 81 MHz. Fructose metabolism, liver enzyme release, O2 consumption, and rat survival after liver transplantation were also evaluated. During simple cold storage (SCS), the ATP level declined to undetectable levels with both preservation solutions while the pHi declined to approximately 7.0. In contrast, during continuous hypothermic perfusion (CHP), hepatic ATP levels remained measurable during the 24-hour EC preservation and actually increased significantly (p>0.01) during UW preservation. After reperfusion at 37°C with Krebs-lactate, the SCS livers treated with EC differed significantly from the UW livers in terms of their ATP and pHi as well as their response to a fructose challenge. In contrast, livers undergoing CHP demonstrated similar behaviors with both solutions. These results demonstrate an increase in the hepatic ATP content during CHP which occurs with UW but is not seen with EC. On the other hand, only livers that were simply stored with UW achieved significant survival after transplant, while CHP livers were affected by vascular damage as demonstrated by fatal thrombosis after transplant. These data suggest that ATP content is not the only determinant of good liver function although a system of hypothermic perfusion might further improve liver preservation efficacy should injury to vascular endothelium be avoided. PMID:1402332

  15. Cerebral ischemia initiates an immediate innate immune response in neonates during cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A robust inflammatory response occurs in the hours and days following cerebral ischemia. However, little is known about the immediate innate immune response in the first minutes after an ischemic insult in humans. We utilized the use of circulatory arrest during cardiac surgery to assess this. Methods Twelve neonates diagnosed with an aortic arch obstruction underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and approximately 30 minutes of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA, representing cerebral ischemia). Blood samples were drawn from the vena cava superior immediately after DHCA and at various other time points from preoperatively to 24 hours after surgery. The innate immune response was assessed by neutrophil and monocyte count and phenotype using FACS, and concentrations of cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNFα, sVCAM-1 and MCP-1 were assessed using multiplex immunoassay. Results were compared to a simultaneously drawn sample from the arterial cannula. Twelve other neonates were randomly allocated to undergo the same procedure but with continuous antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP). Results Immediately after cerebral ischemia (DHCA), neutrophil and monocyte counts were higher in venous blood than arterial (P = 0.03 and P = 0.02 respectively). The phenotypes of these cells showed an activated state (both P <0.01). Most striking was the increase in the ‘non-classical’ monocyte subpopulations (CD16intermediate; arterial 6.6% vs. venous 14%; CD16+ 13% vs. 22%, both P <0.01). Also, higher IL-6 and lower sVCAM-1 concentrations were found in venous blood (both P = 0.03). In contrast, in the ACP group, all inflammatory parameters remained stable. Conclusions In neonates, approximately 30 minutes of cerebral ischemia during deep hypothermia elicits an immediate innate immune response, especially of the monocyte compartment. This phenomenon may hold important clues for the understanding of the inflammatory response to stroke and its

  16. Resuscitation after prolonged cardiac arrest: effects of cardiopulmonary bypass and sodium–hydrogen exchange inhibition on myocardial and neurological recovery☆

    PubMed Central

    Liakopoulos, Oliver J.; Hristov, Nikola; Buckberg, Gerald D.; Triana, Jonathan; Trummer, Georg; Allen, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine if cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), together with inhibition of the sodium–hydrogen exchanger (NHE), limits myocardial and neurological injury and improves recovery after prolonged (unwitnessed) cardiac arrest (CA), as NHE inhibition improved recovery after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Methods: Twenty-seven pigs (31–39 kg) underwent 15 min of prolonged (no-flow) CA followed by 10 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation-advanced life support (CPR-ALS). Subjects with restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) during CPR-ALS received either no drug (n = 6) or an inhibitor of the NHE (HOE-642; n = 5). In the 16 unsuccessfully resuscitated animals, peripheral normothermic CPB was instituted, and either no drug (n = 9) or similar HOE-642 (n = 7) therapy started. Hemodynamic data, a species-specific neurological deficit score (0 = normal to 500 = brain death), and mortality were recorded at 24 h, and biochemical variables of organ injury measured. Results: CPR-ALS restored ROSC in 41% (11/27) of animals, but was unsuccessful in 59% (16/27) that required CPB. Without CPB, HOE-642 increased cardiac index and decreased vascular resistance; with CPB, HOE-642 caused higher pump flows (3.4 ± 0.6 l min−1 m−2 vs 2.5 ± 0.7 l min−1 m−2; p ≪ 0.001) and higher post-arrest cardiac index; but animals required more vasopressors (p = 0.019) from drug-induced vasodilation. No differences between biochemical markers of oxidative and organ injury and overall 24-h mortality (20%) were found between groups. Neurological score was improved at 24 h compared with 4 h only after HOE-642 treatment with (150 ± 34 vs 220 ± 43; p = 0.003) or without CPB (162 ± 39 vs 238 ± 48; p ≤ 0.001), but failed to reach statistical difference with respect to the untreated group. Conclusions: CPB is an effective resuscitative tool to treat prolonged CA but there is limited improvement of neurological function

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Cultured Limbal Epithelial Cells on an Intact Amniotic Membrane following Hypothermic Storage in Optisol-GS.

    PubMed

    Utheim, Tor Paaske; Salvanos, Panagiotis; Utheim, Øygunn Aass; Ræder, Sten; Pasovic, Lara; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; de la Paz, Maria Fideliz; Sehic, Amer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying activation of cell death pathways using genome-wide transcriptional analysis in human limbal epithelial cell (HLEC) cultures following conventional hypothermic storage in Optisol-GS. Three-week HLEC cultures were stored in Optisol-GS for 2, 4, and 7 days at 4 °C. Partek Genomics Suite software v.6.15.0422, (Partec Inc., St. Louis, MO, USA) was used to identify genes that showed significantly different (P < 0.05) levels of expression following hypothermic storage compared to non-stored cell sheets. There were few changes in gene expression after 2 days of storage, but several genes were differently regulated following 4 and 7 days of storage. The histone-coding genes HIST1H3A and HIST4H4 were among the most upregulated genes following 4 and 7 days of hypothermic storage. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that these two genes are involved in a functional network highly associated with cell death, necrosis, and transcription of RNA. HDAC1, encoding histone deacetylase 1, was the most downregulated gene after 7 days of storage. Together with other downregulated genes, it is suggested that HDAC1 is involved in a regulating network significantly associated with cellular function and maintenance, differentiation of cells, and DNA repair. Our data suggest that the upregulated expression of histone-coding genes together with downregulated genes affecting cell differentiation and DNA repair may be responsible for increased cell death following hypothermic storage of cultured HLEC. In summary, our results demonstrated that a higher number of genes changed with increasing storage time. Moreover, in general, larger differences in absolute gene expression values were observed with increasing storage time. Further understanding of these molecular mechanisms is important for optimization of storage technology for limbal epithelial sheets. PMID:26901233

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Cultured Limbal Epithelial Cells on an Intact Amniotic Membrane following Hypothermic Storage in Optisol-GS

    PubMed Central

    Paaske Utheim, Tor; Salvanos, Panagiotis; Aass Utheim, Øygunn; Ræder, Sten; Pasovic, Lara; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Fideliz de la Paz, Maria; Sehic, Amer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying activation of cell death pathways using genome-wide transcriptional analysis in human limbal epithelial cell (HLEC) cultures following conventional hypothermic storage in Optisol-GS. Three-week HLEC cultures were stored in Optisol-GS for 2, 4, and 7 days at 4 °C. Partek Genomics Suite software v.6.15.0422, (Partec Inc., St. Louis, MO, USA) was used to identify genes that showed significantly different (P < 0.05) levels of expression following hypothermic storage compared to non-stored cell sheets. There were few changes in gene expression after 2 days of storage, but several genes were differently regulated following 4 and 7 days of storage. The histone-coding genes HIST1H3A and HIST4H4 were among the most upregulated genes following 4 and 7 days of hypothermic storage. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that these two genes are involved in a functional network highly associated with cell death, necrosis, and transcription of RNA. HDAC1, encoding histone deacetylase 1, was the most downregulated gene after 7 days of storage. Together with other downregulated genes, it is suggested that HDAC1 is involved in a regulating network significantly associated with cellular function and maintenance, differentiation of cells, and DNA repair. Our data suggest that the upregulated expression of histone-coding genes together with downregulated genes affecting cell differentiation and DNA repair may be responsible for increased cell death following hypothermic storage of cultured HLEC. In summary, our results demonstrated that a higher number of genes changed with increasing storage time. Moreover, in general, larger differences in absolute gene expression values were observed with increasing storage time. Further understanding of these molecular mechanisms is important for optimization of storage technology for limbal epithelial sheets. PMID:26901233

  19. Hypothermic machine perfusion increases A20 expression which protects renal cells against ischemia/reperfusion injury by suppressing inflammation, apoptosis and necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    YANG, ZIXUAN; ZHONG, ZIBIAO; LI, MINGXIA; XIONG, YAN; WANG, YANFENG; PENG, GUIZHU; YE, QIFA

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to improve the quality of donor organs obtained after cardiac death. In the present study, we examined the potential mechanisms through which A20 protects renal cells against ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) following either hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) or static cold storage (CS) of the kidneys in a rabbit model. The expression of markers of apoptosis, necroptosis and inflammation in frozen kidney tissues were detected by western blot analysis, RT-qPCR and ELISA. Compared with the CS group, A20 expression was significantly higher in the tissue from the HMP group (P<0.01). By contrast, the expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was significantly lower in HMP group (P<0.01), whereas IκBα expression was significantly higher (P<0.01). The expression of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), phosphorylated (p-)c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and activated caspase-3 in the HMP group was significantly downregulated compared with that in the CS group (all P<0.01). In addition, A20 inhibited receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated necroptosis in the kidney. RIPK3 expression in the HMP group was significantly lower than that in the CS group (P<0.01), although the levels in both groups were higher than those in the sham group (P<0.01). Based on these findings, we propose a novel mechanism underlying the anti-apoptotic effect of A20 in renal cells in which A20 binds to ASK1 and promotes the degradation of ASK1 leading to the suppression of JNK activation and eventually, to the blockade of apoptosis. Thus, HMP reduces inflammation, apoptosis and necroptosis by upregulating the expression of A20; this mechanism may be responsible for protecting the kidney against IRI. PMID:27177159

  20. Antinociceptive and hypothermic evaluation of the leaf essential oil and isolated terpenoids from Eugenia uniflora L. (Brazilian Pitanga).

    PubMed

    Amorim, Ana Carolina L; Lima, Cleverton Kleiton F; Hovell, Ana Maria C; Miranda, Ana Luisa P; Rezende, Claudia M

    2009-10-01

    Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae), known as Brazilian cherry tree, is a fruity tree spread all over Brazil used in popular medicine to treat inflammations, rheumatic pain and fever, as hypoglycemic, diuretic and has been widely used in the cosmetics industry. The present study discusses the chemical composition, the antinociceptive and hypothermic profile of the essential oil of pitangueira leaves. The chemical composition was evaluated by GC-MS and the main constituent of the oil was characterized, after isolation, as a mixture of atractylone (1) and 3-furanoeudesmene (2). The essential oil, its pentane fraction and the isolated mixture of sesquiterpenes (1 and 2), given orally, significantly inhibited the acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions, increased the latency time in hot plate test and showed a hypothermic effect. The results suggest that the responsible for the antinociceptive and hypothermic effect were the isolated furanosesquiterpenes. These findings provided additional pharmacological information and may contribute for the use of Brazilian cherry tree as a phytomedicine. PMID:19423309

  1. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  2. MicroRNA profiling of the intestine during hypothermic circulatory arrest in swine

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Bin; Liang, Meng-Ya; Chen, Guang-Xian; Yang, Xiao; Qin, Han; Yao, Jian-Ping; Feng, Kang-Ni; Wu, Zhong-Kai

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To perform a profiling analysis of changes in intestinal microRNA (miRNA) expression during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA). METHODS: A total of eight piglets were randomly divided into HCA and sham operation (SO) groups. Under general anesthesia, swine in the HCA group were subjected to hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass at 24 °C followed by 80 min of circulatory arrest, and the reperfusion lasted for 180 min after cross-clamp removal. The counterparts in the SO group were only subjected to median sternotomy. Histopathological analysis was used to detect mucosal injury, and Pick-and-Mix custom miRNA real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) panels containing 306 unique primer sets were utilized to assay unpooled intestinal samples harvested from the two groups. RESULTS: The intestinal mucosa of the animals that were subjected to 24 °C HCA exhibited representative ischemic reperfusion injury of grade 2 or 3 according to the Chiu score. Such intestinal mucosal injuries, with the subepithelial space and epithelial layer lifting away from the lamina propria, were accompanied by shortened and irregular villi. On the contrary, the intestinal mucosa remained normal in the sham-operated animals. In total, twenty-five miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two groups (15 upregulated and 10 downregulated in the HCA group). Among these, eight miRNAs (miR-122, miR-221-5p, miR-31, miR-421-5p, miR-4333, miR-499-3p, miR-542 and let-7d-3p) were significantly dysregulated (four higher and four lower). The expression of miR-122 was significantly (5.37-fold) increased in the HCA group vs the SO group, indicating that it may play a key role in HCA-induced mucosal injury. CONCLUSION: Exposure to HCA caused intestinal miRNA dysregulation and barrier dysfunction in swine. These altered miRNAs might be related to the protection or destruction of the intestinal barrier. PMID:25717255

  3. Effect of age on cerebral blood flow during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Brusino, F.G.; Reves, J.G.; Smith, L.R.; Prough, D.S.; Stump, D.A.; McIntyre, R.W.

    1989-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured in 20 patients by xenon 133 clearance methodology during nonpulsatile hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass to determine the effect of age on regional cerebral blood flow during these conditions. Measurements of cerebral blood flow at varying perfusion pressures were made in patients arbitrarily divided into two age groups at nearly identical nasopharyngeal temperature, hematocrit value, and carbon dioxide tension and with equal cardiopulmonary bypass flows of 1.6 L/min/m2. The range of mean arterial pressure was 30 to 110 mm Hg for group I (less than or equal to 50 years of age) and 20 to 90 mm Hg for group II (greater than or equal to 65 years of age). There was no significant difference (p = 0.32) between the mean arterial pressure in group I (54 +/- 28 mm Hg) and that in group II (43 +/- 21 mm Hg). The range of cerebral blood flow was 14.8 to 29.2 ml/100 gm/min for group I and 13.8 to 37.5 ml/100 gm/min for group II. There was no significant difference (p = 0.37) between the mean cerebral blood flow in group I (21.5 +/- 4.6 ml/100 gm/min) and group II (24.3 +/- 8.1 ml/100 gm/min). There was a poor correlation between mean arterial pressure and cerebral blood flow in both groups: group I, r = 0.16 (p = 0.67); group II, r = 0.5 (p = 0.12). In 12 patients, a second cerebral blood flow measurements was taken to determine the effect of mean arterial pressure on cerebral blood flow in the individual patient. Changes in mean arterial pressure did not correlate with changes in cerebral blood flow (p less than 0.90). We conclude that age does not alter cerebral blood flow and that cerebral blood flow autoregulation is preserved in elderly patients during nonpulsatile hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  4. Cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shanewise, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a proven, accepted mode of therapy for selected patients with end-stage heart failure, but the inadequate number of suitable donor hearts available ultimately limits its application. This chapter reviews adult cardiac transplantation, with an emphasis on the anesthetic considerations of the heart transplant operation itself.

  5. Brain acetylcholinesterase diurnal variations during the rapid development of tolerance to the hypothermic effect of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, O.; Soliman, K.F.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under controlled environmental conditions were used. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was determined in the cerebral cortex, midbrain, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum, pons and medulla oblongata of saline control and ethanol-treated rats, either after a single dose at 06:0 or 18:00h, or after a second dose administered 24 hrs later at the same time scheduled. Results of this experiment indicate that repeated administration with ethanol was associated with the rapid development of tolerance to the hypothermic action of ethanol. A single injection of ethanol at 0600h resulted in a significant decrease in AChE activity in the hypothalamus, medulla, cerebellum, hippocampus and the cortex. However, ethanol administration at 18.00h was associated with significant increases in AChE activity in the same brain regions. The repeated administration of ethanol at 06.00h was associated with tolerance in AChE response to ethanol in the hypothalamus and hippocampus. However, there was no tolerance development in AChE activity in brain regions when ethanol was administered at 18.00h. The results indicate that chronotolerance to ethanol might be related to the brain cholinergic system.

  6. Survey of Apoptosis After Hypothermic Storage of a Pancreatic β-Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lia H; Taylor, Michael J; Brockbank, Kelvin G M

    2016-08-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is one of the leading causes of death world wide. Donor-derived pancreas and islet of Langerhans transplantation are potential cures, however, postmortem ischemia impacts islet quality. The murine βt3 cell line was used as a model to study apoptosis after hypothermic storage by comparing Unisol™ with Belzer's machine perfusion solution (BMPS) and the University of Wisconsin (UW) solution. The objective was to determine which of these solutions provided the best support for βt3 cells and which solution demonstrated the least amount of apoptotic activity. Several apoptosis markers were measured that included the translocation of phosphatidylserine, caspase activity, and the formation of DNA laddering. In addition, metabolic activity and membrane integrity were also measured. The results demonstrated that the three solutions behaved similarly during overnight cold storage at 4°C. However, Unisol was consistently better than UW solution and BMPS, demonstrating better cell viability and recovery, and lower levels of apoptotic activity when all three parameters were measured. These results demonstrated that apoptosis plays an important role in the survival of cells and tissues during cold storage. Development of solutions to help prevent or decrease the levels of apoptosis after cold storage will likely improve overall cell and tissue recovery and survival in a clinical setting.

  7. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  8. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children. PMID:17484172

  9. Cerebral Metabolic Profiling of Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest with and Without Antegrade Selective Cerebral Perfusion: Evidence from Nontargeted Tissue Metabolomics in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li-Hua; Liu, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shu-Bin; Ji, Bing-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (ASCP) is regarded to perform cerebral protection during the thoracic aorta surgery as an adjunctive technique to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA). However, brain metabolism profile after ASCP has not been systematically investigated by metabolomics technology. Methods: To clarify the metabolomics profiling of ASCP, 12 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned into 60 min DHCA with (DHCA+ASCP [DA] group, n = 6) and without (DHCA [D] group, n = 6) ASCP according to the random number table. ASCP was conducted by cannulation on the right subclavian artery and cross-clamping of the innominate artery. Rabbits were sacrificed 60 min after weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass. The metabolic features of the cerebral cortex were analyzed by a nontargeted metabolic profiling strategy based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Variable importance projection values exceeding 1.0 were selected as potentially changed metabolites, and then Student's t-test was applied to test for statistical significance between the two groups. Results: Metabolic profiling of brain was distinctive significantly between the two groups (Q2Y = 0.88 for partial least squares-DA model). In comparing to group D, 62 definable metabolites were varied significantly after ASCP, which were mainly related to amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and lipid metabolism. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis revealed that metabolic pathways after DHCA with ASCP were mainly involved in the activated glycolytic pathway, subdued anaerobic metabolism, and oxidative stress. In addition, L-kynurenine (P = 0.0019), 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid (P = 0.0499), and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (P = 0.0495) in tryptophan metabolism pathways were decreased, and citrulline (P = 0.0158) in urea cycle was increased in group DA comparing to group D. Conclusions: The present study applied metabolomics analysis to identify the cerebral

  10. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heartbeats ( arrhythmias ) ... due to medicine) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  11. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  12. Response of cerebral blood flow to changes in carbon dioxide tension during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Prough, D.S.; Stump, D.A.; Roy, R.C.; Gravlee, G.P.; Williams, T.; Mills, S.A.; Hinshelwood, L.; Howard, G.

    1986-05-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in response to changes in PaCO/sub 2/ were measured by intraaortic injection of /sup 133/Xe in 12 patients during hypothermic (23-30 degrees C) cardiopulmonary bypass. In each patient, CBF was determined at two randomly ordered levels of PaCO/sub 2/ obtained by varying the rate of gas inflow into the pump oxygenator (Group I, n = 6) or by varying the percentage of CO/sub 2/ added to the gas inflow (Group II, n = 6). Nasopharyngeal temperature, mean arterial pressure, pump-oxygenator flow, and hematocrit were maintained within a narrow range. In group I, a PaCO/sub 2/ (uncorrected for body temperature) of 36 +/- 4 mmHg (mean +/- SD) was associated with a CBF of 13 +/- 5 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1, while a PaCO/sub 2/ of 42 +/- 4 mmHg was associated with a CBF of 19 +/- 10 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1. In group II, a PaCO/sub 2/ of 47 +/- 3 mmHg was associated with a CBF of 20 +/- 8 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1, and a PaCO/sub 2/ of 53 +/- 3 mmHg was associated with a CBF of 26 +/- 9 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1. Within group I, the difference in CBF was significant (P less than 0.05); within group II, the difference in CBF was significant at the P less than 0.002 level. All CBF measurements were lower than those reported for normothermic, unanesthetized subjects of similar age.

  13. Effects of hypothermic hypoxia on anaerobic energy metabolism in isolated anuran livers.

    PubMed

    Fedorow, C A; Churchill, T A; Kneteman, N M

    1998-12-01

    Many lower vertebrates (reptilian and amphibian species) are capable of surviving natural episodes of hypoxia and hypothermia. It is by specific metabolic adaptations that anurans are able to tolerate prolonged exposure to harsh environmental stresses. In this study, it was hypothesized that livers from an aquatic frog would possess an inherent metabolic ability to sustain high levels of ATP in an isolated organ system, providing insight into a metabolic system that is well-adapted for low temperature in vitro organ storage. Frogs of the species, R. pipiens were acclimated at 20 degrees C and at 5 degrees C. Livers were preserved using a clinical preservation solution after flushing. Livers from 20 degrees C-acclimated frogs were stored at 20 degrees C and 5 degrees C and livers from 5 degrees C-acclimated frogs were stored at 5 degrees C. The results indicated that hepatic adenylate status was maintained for 96 h during 5 degrees C storage, but not longer than 4-10 h during 20 degrees C storage. In livers from 5 degrees C-acclimated animals subjected to 5 degrees C storage, ATP was maintained at 100% throughout the 96-h period. Warm acclimation (20 degrees C) and 20 degrees C storage resulted in poorer maintenance of ATP; energy charge values dropped to 0.50 within 2 h and by 24 h, only 24% of control ATP remained. Lactate levels remained less than 25 mumol/g dry weight in all 5 degrees C-stored livers; 20 degrees C-stored livers exhibited greater accumulation of this anaerobic endproduct (lactate reached 45-50 mumol/g by 10 h). The data imply that hepatic adenylate status is largely dependent on exposure to hypothermic hypoxia and although small amounts of ATP were accounted for by anaerobic glycolysis, there must have been either a substantial reduction in cellular energy-utilization or an efficient use of low oxygen tensions.

  14. Seventy-two hours hypothermic intestinal preservation study using a new perfluorocarbon emulsion.

    PubMed

    DeRoover, A; Krafft, M P; Deby-Dupont, G; Riess, J; Jacquet, N; Lamy, M; Meurisse, M; D'Silva, M

    2001-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a perfluorocarbon emulsion (FC) added to the University of Wisconsin (UW) solution on hypothermic (4 degrees C, 12-72h) preservation of rat small bowel grafts. The FC was 90%w/v perfluorooctylbromide, 2%w/v egg yolk phospholipids and 1.4%w/v mixed fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon molecular dowels. Four groups were defined: [1] UW flush and UW storage; [2] UW flush and FC storage; [3] flush with FC diluted 2 times with UW (FU) and FU storage; [4] FU flush and storage in oxygenated FU. Preservation was estimated with a histological score based on villus epithelium adhesion, on villus sloughing and on crypt cell adhesion to the basal membrane. Antioxidant potential was estimated by measurement of total thiol functions (SH) and activities of glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-P), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. FC in flush improved preservation during the first 24h (p<0.01). Storage in FC appeared superior to UW for the first 24h (p<0.01). Oxygenation (100% O2) of the storage medium yielded superior results at 12h and 24h (p<0.01 and p<0.001 versus group [1] respectively). After 72h, SOD and catalase activities increased in groups [3] and [4], and SOD decreased in group [1] (p<0.05). SH progressively decreased in group [1] (p<0.05) and GSH-P increased at 24 and 48h in groups [3] and [4] (p<0.01). The increase of O2 in the perfusion flush or storage medium ameliorated the preservation status and protected the antioxidant potential of the small bowel. PMID:11358038

  15. Attempt to rescue discarded human liver grafts by end ischemic hypothermic oxygenated machine perfusion.

    PubMed

    Vekemans, K; van Pelt, J; Komuta, M; Wylin, T; Heedfeld, V; Detry, O; Monbaliu, D; Pirenne, J

    2011-11-01

    In a porcine liver transplant model, a brief period of oxygenated hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) at the end of simple cold storage (SCS) has been shown to improve the viability of damaged liver grafts. To test the clinical validity of this strategy, we randomized SCS-discarded human liver grafts to either 4 hours of HMP (n = 13) or an additional 4 hours of SCS (n = 14). All livers were then warm reperfused to mimic ischemia-reperfusion injury ex vivo. The settings for HMP were: portal vein: 3 mm Hg, 300 mL/min and hepatic artery: 20 mm Hg, pO(2): 300 mm Hg. Perfusion used Kidney Machine Perfusion Solution at 4°C to 8°C. During warm reperfusion, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) values were higher (P < .015) among the SCS versus HMP methods at all times. The AST slope was lower in HMP versus SCS (P = .01). The LDH slope tended to be lower for HMP versus SCS (P = .07). Morphological scores were not different between HMP and SCS. At the start of warm reperfusion, MAPK was lower in HMP versus SCS (P = .02). Endothelin-1 (EDN1) and ICAM-1 tended to be lower in HMP versus SCS (P = .1 and .07, respectively). No difference was noted in MAPK, EDN1, and ICAM-1 after 60 or 120 minutes of warm reperfusion. In conclusion, HMP down-regulated MAPK and tended to reduce EDN1 and ICAM-1 mRNA in human liver grafts. During warm reperfusion, HMP versus SCS livers showed reduced AST and LDH release but no morphological difference. Further optimization of liver HMP may require different timing/duration of perfusion and/or an higher perfusion temperature.

  16. Hypothermic continuous machine perfusion improves metabolic preservation and functional recovery in heart grafts.

    PubMed

    Van Caenegem, Olivier; Beauloye, Christophe; Vercruysse, Jonathan; Horman, Sandrine; Bertrand, Luc; Bethuyne, Noëlla; Poncelet, Alain J; Gianello, Pierre; Demuylder, Peter; Legrand, Eric; Beaurin, Gwen; Bontemps, Françoise; Jacquet, Luc M; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis

    2015-02-01

    The number of heart transplants is decreasing due to organ shortage, yet the donor pool could be enlarged by improving graft preservation. Hypothermic machine perfusion (MP) has been shown to improve kidney, liver, or lung graft preservation. Sixteen pig hearts were recovered following cardioplegia and randomized to two different groups of 4-hour preservation using either static cold storage (CS) or MP (Modified LifePort© System, Organ Recovery Systems, Itasca, Il). The grafts then underwent reperfusion on a Langendorff for 60 min. Energetic metabolism was quantified at baseline, postpreservation, and postreperfusion by measuring lactate and high-energy phosphates. The contractility index (CI) was assessed both in vivo prior to cardioplegia and during reperfusion. Following reperfusion, the hearts preserved using CS exhibited higher lactate levels (56.63 ± 23.57 vs. 11.25 ± 3.92 μmol/g; P < 0.001), increased adenosine monophosphate/adenosine triphosphate (AMP/ATP) ratio (0.4 ± 0.23 vs. 0.04 ± 0.04; P < 0.001), and lower phosphocreatine/creatine (PCr/Cr) ratio (33.5 ± 12.6 vs. 55.3 ± 5.8; P <0.001). Coronary flow was similar in both groups during reperfusion (107 ± 9 vs. 125 + /-9 ml/100 g/min heart; P = ns). CI decreased in the CS group, yet being well-preserved in the MP group. Compared with CS, MP resulted in improved preservation of the energy state and more successful functional recovery of heart graft.

  17. Modified technique of cavoatrial tumor thrombectomy without cardiopulmonary by-pass and hypothermic circulatory arrest: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Sobczyński, Robert; Przydacz, Mikolaj; Wiatr, Tomasz; Bukowczan, Jakub; Sadowski, Jerzy; Chłosta, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, tumor thrombi extending into the right atrium have been managed by open surgery with sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass circulation and hypothermic circulatory arrest, and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates. Here, we evaluate the results of cavoatrial thrombectomy using our own, Foley catheter assisted-technique, obviating the need for thoracotomy, extracorporeal circulation, and/or hypothermic circulatory arrest. Material and methods Between June 2013 and January 2015, 4 consecutive patients underwent cavoatrial thrombectomy performed with our own, Foley catheter assisted technique, via Chevron incision, with no need for extracorporeal circulation or hypothermy for renal cell carcinoma with tumor thrombus extending into the right atrium. Analyses of patients’ data from a prospectively maintained database with respect to perioperative characteristics, morbidity and mortality were performed. Results The total mean duration of surgery was 255 minutes. The mean time of total IVC (inferior vena cava) occlusion was 90 seconds. The average blood loss volume, timed from the beginning of cavotomy incision until its closure, was 1200 ml. The total mean intraoperative blood loss was 3,150 ml. There was no perioperative death. Postoperative complications included one transient acute kidney injury requiring one-off hemodialysis and one re-operation due to bleeding. The follow-up time ranged between 12 to 17 months. None of the patients developed disease recurrence. All patients were still alive at the time of study completion. Conclusions Obtained results support the validity of our own, Foley catheter assisted technique, without cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma with tumor thrombus extending into the right atrium. PMID:26568872

  18. Influence of Factors of Cryopreservation and Hypothermic Storage on Survival and Functional Parameters of Multipotent Stromal Cells of Placental Origin

    PubMed Central

    Pogozhykh, Olena; Mueller, Thomas; Prokopyuk, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Human placenta is a highly perspective source of multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) both for the purposes of patient specific auto-banking and allogeneic application in regenerative medicine. Implementation of new GMP standards into clinical practice enforces the search for relevant methods of cryopreservation and short-term hypothermic storage of placental MSCs. In this paper we analyze the effect of different temperature regimes and individual components of cryoprotective media on viability, metabolic and culture properties of placental MSCs. We demonstrate (I) the possibility of short-term hypothermic storage of these cells; (II) determine DMSO and propanediol as the most appropriate cryoprotective agents; (III) show the possibility of application of volume expanders (plasma substituting solutions based on dextran or polyvinylpyrrolidone); (IV) reveal the priority of ionic composition over the serum content in cryopreservation media; (V) determine a cooling rate of 1°C/min down to -40°C followed by immersion into liquid nitrogen as the optimal cryopreservation regime for this type of cells. This study demonstrates perspectives for creation of new defined cryopreservation methods towards GMP standards. PMID:26431528

  19. Inhaled 45-50% argon augments hypothermic brain protection in a piglet model of perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Broad, Kevin D; Fierens, Igor; Fleiss, Bobbi; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Ezzati, Mojgan; Hassell, Jane; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Bainbridge, Alan; Kawano, Go; Ma, Daqing; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Gressens, Pierre; Golay, Xavier; Sanders, Robert D; Robertson, Nicola J

    2016-03-01

    Cooling to 33.5°C in babies with neonatal encephalopathy significantly reduces death and disability, however additional therapies are needed to maximize brain protection. Following hypoxia-ischemia we assessed whether inhaled 45-50% Argon from 2-26h augmented hypothermia neuroprotection in a neonatal piglet model, using MRS and aEEG, which predict outcome in babies with neonatal encephalopathy, and immunohistochemistry. Following cerebral hypoxia-ischemia, 20 Newborn male Large White piglets<40h were randomized to: (i) Cooling (33°C) from 2-26h (n=10); or (ii) Cooling and inhaled 45-50% Argon (Cooling+Argon) from 2-26h (n=8). Whole-brain phosphorus-31 and regional proton MRS were acquired at baseline, 24 and 48h after hypoxia-ischemia. EEG was monitored. At 48h after hypoxia-ischemia, cell death (TUNEL) was evaluated over 7 brain regions. There were no differences in body weight, duration of hypoxia-ischemia or insult severity; throughout the study there were no differences in heart rate, arterial blood pressure, blood biochemistry and inotrope support. Two piglets in the Cooling+Argon group were excluded. Comparing Cooling+Argon with Cooling there was preservation of whole-brain MRS ATP and PCr/Pi at 48h after hypoxia-ischemia (p<0.001 for both) and lower (1)H MRS lactate/N acetyl aspartate in white (p=0.03 and 0.04) but not gray matter at 24 and 48h. EEG background recovery was faster (p<0.01) with Cooling+Argon. An overall difference between average cell-death of Cooling versus Cooling+Argon was observed (p<0.01); estimated cells per mm(2) were 23.9 points lower (95% C.I. 7.3-40.5) for the Cooling+Argon versus Cooling. Inhaled 45-50% Argon from 2-26h augmented hypothermic protection at 48h after hypoxia-ischemia shown by improved brain energy metabolism on MRS, faster EEG recovery and reduced cell death on TUNEL. Argon may provide a cheap and practical therapy to augment cooling for neonatal encephalopathy.

  20. Effects of hypothermic storage of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage of striped bass sperm cells on viability, intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), mitochondrial membrane potential (D'm), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidation of hydroethidine to ethidium) as determined by flow cy...

  1. Effects of hypothermic storage of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage of striped bass sperm cells (Morone saxatilis) on viability, intracellular Ca2+ [Ca2+]i, mitochondrial membrane potential (''m), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation as determined by flow cytometry; motion activati...

  2. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Caroline; Angermann, Christiane E; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of multisystem disorders, which are characterized by an extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Typically affected are the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. More than half of the patients die due to cardiac involvement. Clinical signs of cardiac amyloidosis are edema of the lower limbs, hepatomegaly, ascites and elevated jugular vein pressure, frequently in combination with dyspnea. There can also be chest pain, probably due to microvessel disease. Dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system or arrhythmias may cause low blood pressure, dizziness, or recurrent syncope. The AL amyloidosis caused by the deposition of immunoglobulin light chains is the most common form. It can be performed by monoclonal gammopathy. The desirable treatment therapy consists of high-dose melphalan therapy twice followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Due to the high peritransplantation mortality, selection of appropriate patients is mandatory. The ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the amyloidogenic form of transthyretin, a plasmaprotein that is synthesized in the liver. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative therapy. The symptomatic treatment of cardiac amyloidosis is based on the current guidelines for chronic heart failure according to the patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) state. Further types of amyloidosis with possible cardiac involvement comprise the senile systemic amyloidosis caused by the wild-type transthyretin, secondary amyloidosis after chronic systemic inflammation, and the beta(2)-microglobulin amyloidosis after long-term dialysis treatment. PMID:18344065

  3. Ondansetron and promethazine have differential effects on hypothermic responses to lithium chloride administration and to provocative motion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Drielle D; Andrews, Paul L R; Rudd, John A; Braga, Valdir A; Nalivaiko, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that provocative motion (rotation in a home cage) causes hypothermic responses in rats, similar to the hypothermic responses associated with motion sickness in humans. Many stimuli inducing emesis in species with an emetic reflex also provoke hypothermia in the rat, therefore we hypothesized that a fall in body temperature may reflect a “nausea-like” state in these animals. As rats do not possess an emetic reflex, we employed a pharmacological approach to test this hypothesis. In humans, motion- and chemically-induced nausea have differential sensitivity to anti-emetics. We thus tested whether the hypothermia induced in rats by provocative motion (rotation at 0.7 Hz) and by the emetic LiCl (63 mg/kg i.p.) have a similar differential pharmacological sensitivity. Both provocations caused a comparable robust fall in core body temperature (−1.9 ± 0.3°C and −2.0 ± 0.2°C for chemical and motion provocations, respectively). LiCl−induced hypothermia was completely prevented by ondansetron (2mg/kg, i.p., a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist that reduces cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting), but was insensitive to promethazine (10 mg/kg, i.p., a predominantly histamine-H1 and muscarinic receptor antagonist that is commonly used to treat motion sickness). Conversely, motion-induced hypothermia was unaffected by ondansetron but promethazine reduced the rate of temperature decline from 0.20 ± 0.02 to 0.11 ± 0.03°C/min (P < 0.05) with a trend to decrease the magnitude. We conclude that this differential pharmacological sensitivity of the hypothermic responses of vestibular vs. chemical etiology in rats mirrors the observations in other pre-clinical models and humans, and thus supports the idea that a “nausea-like” state in rodents is associated with disturbances in thermoregulation. PMID:27227074

  4. Clinical and biochemical outcomes for additive mesenteric and lower body perfusion during hypothermic circulatory arrest for complex total aortic arch replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P; Cleland, A; Adams, C; Chu, M W A

    2012-11-01

    protection strategy for complex aortic arch surgery. This additive perfusion strategy may attenuate visceral and lower body ischemia that normally develops during periods of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

  5. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  6. Oseltamivir produces hypothermic and neuromuscular effects by inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor functions: comparison to procaine and bupropion.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Akihiro; Chazono, Kaori; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Iwajima, Yui; Yamamoto, Shohei; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Ohsawa, Masahiro; Ono, Hideki

    2015-09-01

    Oseltamivir, an anti-influenza virus drug, induces marked hypothermia in normal mice. We have proposed that the hypothermic effect arises from inhibition of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function of sympathetic ganglion neurons which innervate the brown adipose tissue (a heat generator). It has been reported that local anesthetics inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function by acting on its ionic channels, and that bupropion, a nicotinic antagonist, induces hypothermia. In this study, we compared the effects of oseltamivir, procaine and bupropion on body temperature, cardiovascular function and neuromuscular transmission. Intraperitoneal administration of oseltamivir (100mg/kg), procaine (86.6mg/kg) and bupropion (86.7mg/kg) lowered the core body temperature of normal mice. At lower doses (10-30mg/kg oseltamivir, 8.7-26mg/kg procaine and bupropion), when administered subcutaneously, the three drugs antagonized the hypothermia induced by intraperitoneal injection of nicotine (1mg/kg). In anesthetized rats, intravenous oseltamivir (30-100mg/kg), procaine (10mg/kg) and bupropion (10mg/kg) induced hypotension and bradycardia. Oseltamivir alone (100mg/kg) did not inhibit neuromuscular twitch contraction of rats, but at 3-30mg/kg it augmented the muscle-relaxing effect of d-tubocurarine. Similar effects were observed when lower doses of procaine (10-30mg/kg) and bupropion (3-10mg/kg) were administered, suggesting that systemic administration of oseltamivir inhibits muscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These results support the idea that the hypothermic effect of oseltamivir is due to its effects on sympathetic ganglia which innervate the brown adipose tissue, and suggest that oseltamivir may exert non-selective ion channel blocking effects like those of ester-type local anesthetics.

  7. Thrombin generation and fibrin clot formation under hypothermic conditions: an in vitro evaluation of tissue factor initiated whole blood coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Whelihan, Matthew F.; Kiankhooy, Armin; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite trauma-induced hypothermic coagulopathy being familiar in the clinical setting, empirical experimentation concerning this phenomenon is lacking. In this study we investigated the effects of hypothermia on thrombin generation, clot formation and global hemostatic functions in an in vitro environment using a whole blood model and thromboelastography (TEG) which can recapitulate hypothermia. Methods Blood was collected from healthy individuals through venipuncture and treated with corn trypsin inhibitor, to block the contact pathway. Coagulation was initiated with 5pM tissue factor at temperatures 37°C, 32°C, and 27°C. Reactions were quenched over time with soluble and insoluble components of each time point analyzed for thrombin generation, fibrinogen consumption, factor (f)XIII activation and fibrin deposition. Global coagulation potential was evaluated through TEG. Results Data showed that thrombin generation in samples at 37°C and 32°C had comparable rates while 27°C had a much lower rate (39.2 ± 1.1 and 43 ± 2.4 nM/min vs 28.6 ± 4.4 nM/min, respectively). Fibrinogen consumption and fXIII activation were highest at 37°C followed by 32°C and 27°C (13.8 ± 2.9 percent/min vs 7.8 ± 1.8 percent/min, respectively). Fibrin formation as seen through clot weights also followed this trend. TEG data showed clot formation was fastest in samples at 37°C and lowest at 27°C. Maximum clot strength was similar for each temperature. Also, percent lysis of clots was highest at 37°C followed by 32°C and then 27°C. Conclusions Induced hypothermic conditions directly affect the rate of thrombin generation and clot formation while global clot stability remains intact. PMID:24331944

  8. Oseltamivir produces hypothermic and neuromuscular effects by inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor functions: comparison to procaine and bupropion.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Akihiro; Chazono, Kaori; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Iwajima, Yui; Yamamoto, Shohei; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Ohsawa, Masahiro; Ono, Hideki

    2015-09-01

    Oseltamivir, an anti-influenza virus drug, induces marked hypothermia in normal mice. We have proposed that the hypothermic effect arises from inhibition of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function of sympathetic ganglion neurons which innervate the brown adipose tissue (a heat generator). It has been reported that local anesthetics inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function by acting on its ionic channels, and that bupropion, a nicotinic antagonist, induces hypothermia. In this study, we compared the effects of oseltamivir, procaine and bupropion on body temperature, cardiovascular function and neuromuscular transmission. Intraperitoneal administration of oseltamivir (100mg/kg), procaine (86.6mg/kg) and bupropion (86.7mg/kg) lowered the core body temperature of normal mice. At lower doses (10-30mg/kg oseltamivir, 8.7-26mg/kg procaine and bupropion), when administered subcutaneously, the three drugs antagonized the hypothermia induced by intraperitoneal injection of nicotine (1mg/kg). In anesthetized rats, intravenous oseltamivir (30-100mg/kg), procaine (10mg/kg) and bupropion (10mg/kg) induced hypotension and bradycardia. Oseltamivir alone (100mg/kg) did not inhibit neuromuscular twitch contraction of rats, but at 3-30mg/kg it augmented the muscle-relaxing effect of d-tubocurarine. Similar effects were observed when lower doses of procaine (10-30mg/kg) and bupropion (3-10mg/kg) were administered, suggesting that systemic administration of oseltamivir inhibits muscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These results support the idea that the hypothermic effect of oseltamivir is due to its effects on sympathetic ganglia which innervate the brown adipose tissue, and suggest that oseltamivir may exert non-selective ion channel blocking effects like those of ester-type local anesthetics. PMID:26049014

  9. The relationship between oxygenator exhaust P(CO2) and arterial P(CO2) during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Graham, J M; Gibbs, N M; Weightman, W M; Sheminant, M R

    2005-08-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in oxygenator arterial blood (P(a)CO2) can be estimated from the partial pressure of gas exhausting from the oxygenator (P(E)CO2). Our hypothesis is that P(E)CO2 may be used to estimate P(a)CO2 with limits of agreement within 7 mmHg above and below the bias. (This is the reported relationship between arterial and end-tidal carbon dioxide during positive pressure ventilation in supine patients.) During hypothermic (28-32 degrees C) cardiopulmonary bypass using a Terumo Capiox SX membrane oxygenator, 80 oxygenator arterial blood samples were collected from 32 patients during cooling, stable hypothermia, and rewarming as per our usual clinical care. The P(a)CO2 of oxygenator arterial blood at actual patient blood temperature was estimated by temperature correction of the oxygenator arterial blood sample measured in the laboratory at 37 degrees C. P(E)CO2 was measured by connecting a capnograph end-to-side to the oxygenator exhaust outlet. We used an alpha-stat approach to cardiopulmonary bypass management. The mean difference between P(E)CO2 and P(a)CO2 was 0.6 mmHg, with limits of agreement (+/-2 SD) between -5 to +6 mmHg. P(E)CO2 tended to underestimate P(a)CO2 at low arterial temperatures, and overestimate at high arterial temperatures. We have demonstrated that P(E)CO2 can be used to estimate P(a)CO2 during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass using a Terumo Capiox SX oxygenator with a degree of accuracy similar to that associated with the use of end-tidal carbon dioxide measurement during positive pressure ventilation in anaesthetized, supine patients. PMID:16119486

  10. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  11. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) expression in hypothermic machine perfusate may be predictive of early outcomes in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Usman; Ablorsu, Elijah; Szabo, Laszlo; Jenkins, Robert H; Bowen, Timothy; Chavez, Rafael; Fraser, Donald J

    2016-02-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion is effective in improving outcome following kidney transplantation. Molecular analyses of hypothermic machine perfusate (HMP) have the potential to identify biomarkers of organ viability prior to transplantation, offering significant advantages to the transplant surgeon, and leading to a potential increase in the organ donor pool. MicroRNAs are emerging as important biomarkers in the context of kidney injury and transplantation. Recent data demonstrate increased microRNA-21 (miR-21) expression in the kidney following acute kidney injury. This study investigated the potential of miR-21 detected in HMP to act as a sentinel for early kidney transplant outcomes. MiR-21 was found to be readily detectable in HMP by RT-qPCR. Eleven ECD kidneys were maintained on a hypothermic machine perfusion system for a median 627 (range 117-1027) minutes, and evaluation of flow and resistance characteristics suggested stability on the machine from 60 min post-perfusion. MiR-21 quantification at 60 min post-perfusion correlated with eGFR at 6 and 12 months post-transplantation. These data suggest that miR-21 expression in HMP may be predictive of early outcomes following kidney transplantation. In the era of ECD kidneys, a reliable measure of organ quality is urgently needed, and this study suggests miR-21 may be such a marker.

  12. When blood runs cold: cold agglutinins and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Findlater, Rhonda R; Schnell-Hoehn, Karen N

    2011-01-01

    Cold agglutinins are particular cold-reactive antibodies that react with red blood cells when the blood temperature drops below normal body temperature causing increased blood viscosity and red blood cell clumping. Most individuals with cold agglutinins are not aware of their presence, as these antibodies have little effect on daily living, often necessitating no treatment. However, when those with cold agglutinins are exposed to hypothermic situations or undergo procedures such as cardiopulmonary bypass with hypothermia during cardiac surgery, lethal complications of hemolysis, microvascular occlusion and organ failure can occur. By identifying those suspected of possessing cold agglutinins through a comprehensive nursing assessment and patient history, cold agglutinin screening can be performed prior to surgery to determine a diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease. With a confirmed diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease, the plan of care can be focused on measures to maintain the patient's blood temperature above the thermal amplitude throughout their hospitalization including the use of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with warm myocardial preservation techniques to prevent these fatal complications. Using a case report approach, the authors review the mechanism, clinical manifestations, detection and nursing management of a patient with cold agglutinins undergoing scheduled cardiac surgery. Cold agglutinin disease is rare. However, the risk to patients warrants an increased awareness of cold agglutinins and screening for those who are suspected of carrying these antibodies. PMID:21630629

  13. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  14. Exsanguination cardiac arrest in rats treated by 60 min, but not 75 min, emergency preservation and delayed resuscitation is associated with intact outcome.

    PubMed

    Drabek, Tomas; Stezoski, Jason; Garman, Robert H; Han, Fei; Henchir, Jeremy; Tisherman, Samuel A; Stezoski, S William; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2007-10-01

    Emergency preservation and resuscitation (EPR) is a new approach for resuscitation of exsanguination cardiac arrest (CA) victims to buy time for surgical hemostasis. EPR uses a cold aortic flush to induce deep hypothermic preservation, followed by resuscitation with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We previously reported that 20 min of EPR was feasible with intact outcome. In this report, we tested the limits for EPR in rats. Adult male isoflurane-anesthetized rats were subjected to rapid hemorrhage (12.5 ml over 5 min), followed by esmolol/KCl-induced CA and 1 min of no-flow. EPR was then induced by perfusion with 270 ml of ice-cold Plasma-Lyte to decrease body temperature to 15 degrees C. After 60 min (n=7) or 75 min (n=7) of EPR, resuscitation was attempted with CPB over 60 min, blood transfusion, correction of acid-base balance and electrolyte disturbances, and mechanical ventilation for 2h. Survival, overall performance category (OPC: 1=normal, 5=death), neurological deficit score (NDS), and histological damage score (HDS) were assessed in survivors on day 3. While all rats after 60 min EPR survived, only two out of seven rats after 75 min EPR survived (p<0.05). All rats after 60 min EPR achieved OPC 1 and normal NDS by day 3. Survivors after 75 min EPR achieved best OPC 3 (p<0.05 vs. 60 min EPR). HDS of either brain or individual viscera was not statistically different after 60 versus 75 min EPR, except for kidneys (0+/-0 vs. 1.9+/-1.3, respectively; p<0.05), with a strong trend toward greater injury in all extracerebral organs in the 75-min EPR group (p<0.06). Histological findings were dominated by cardiac lesions observed in both groups and acute renal tubular and liver necrosis in the 75-min EPR group. In conclusion, we have shown that 60 min of EPR after exsanguination CA is associated with survival and favorable neurological outcome, while 75 min of EPR results in significant mortality and neurological damage in survivors. Surprisingly, extracerebral

  15. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  16. Brain cholinergic involvement in the diurnal variations of the rapid development of tolerance to the hypothermic effect of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.H.; Soliman, K.F.A. )

    1992-02-26

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under controlled environmental conditions were used. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were determined in the hypothalamus, pons, medulla oblongata, thalamus, midbrain, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus of control rats and rats treated with ethanol either after a single dose at 10:00 and 22:00, or after a second dose administered 24hrs later at the same time schedules. Results of this experiment indicate that repeated administration with ethanol was associated with rapid development of tolerance to the hypothermic action of ethanol. A single injection of ethanol at 10:00 resulted in significant increase in ChAT activity of pons and cerebellum and decline of ChAT activity of midbrain. There were no significant changes in AChE activity at all of these different brain regions. A single injection of ethanol at 22:00 resulted in significant decrease in ChAT activity of the hypothalamus, pons, midbrain, hippocampus. At the same time, there was a significant decline of AChE activity of the pons, medulla and midbrain. These findings indicate that changes in the responsiveness of the brain cholinergic enzymes may explain the increase in hypothermia and the rapid development of tolerance.

  17. A quantitative method to evaluate the donor corneal tissue quality used in a comparative study between two hypothermic preservation media.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Mohit; Salvalaio, Gianni; Ferrari, Stefano; Amoureux, Marie-Claude; Albrecht, Cecile; Fortier, Denis; Ponzin, Diego

    2014-12-01

    To standardize a new evaluation technique for calculating the overall quality (OQ) of the donor cornea and validate it using a comparative study of corneas preserved in Optisol-GS and Cornea Cold®. Thirty pairs of donor corneas were selected for a 4 week in vitro comparative study using masked observers. Physiological parameters like thickness, transparency, viable endothelial cell density (VECD) and morphology were transformed to numerical range (0-4) to obtain the OQ. Microbiological examination was performed using Bactec instrument. Students t test showed statistically better results (p < 0.05) from week 3 for thickness, week 2 for transparency and week 1 for morphology and VECD; statistical significance (p < 0.05) was found for OQ from week 2 for the corneas preserved in Cornea Cold® compared to Optisol-GS. Epithelial quality was similar regardless of the medium. Microbiological examination showed absence of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms in both media. OQ method is efficient, consistent and easy, now validated for comparative studies. Further refinement is necessary for its use at eye-banks, bio-banks and research or transplantation purposes. Cornea Cold® is a promising hypothermic corneal storage medium with preservation time ≤21 days. This permits higher flexibility, evaluation accuracy, longer duration for surgical preparation and ease of transportation.

  18. Hypothermic machine perfusion versus cold storage in the rescuing of livers from non-heart-beating donor rats.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Matías E; Balaban, Cecilia L; Guibert, Edgardo E; Bottai, Hebe; Rodriguez, Joaquin V

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the efficiency of cold storage (CS) and hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) methods of preserving grafts excised from non-heart-beating donors that had suffered 45 minutes of warm ischemia. We developed a new solution for HMP to use in liver transplantation, based on BES, gluconate, and polyethylene glycol (BGP-HMP solution). After 24 h of HMP or CS, livers were reperfused at 37°C with Krebs-Henseleit solution with added dextran. For both procedures, portal pressure and flow were measured and the intrahepatic resistance (IR) was calculated. The pH oscillations and enzyme activities (LDH, AST, and ALT) were evaluated for the perfusion buffer during normothermic reperfusion. O2 consumption of the liver, glycogen production, and bile flow were also measured during the normothermic reperfusion period. Portal flow and IR showed statistical differences (P < 0.05) between the two groups (n = 5). HMP with BGP-HMP solution resulted in higher values of portal flow and lower IR than CS with HTK solution. Enzyme release after 90 min of reperfusion did not show statistical differences between groups. With regard to bile flow and O2 consumption, livers preserved by both processes were able to produce bile, but livers preserved with HMP were able to take up more O2 than livers preserved by CS.

  19. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  20. Implementation of near-infrared spectroscopy in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Juan G.; Xiao, Feng; Ferrara, Davon; Ewing, Jennifer; Zhang, Shu; Alexander, Steven; Battarbee, Harold

    2002-07-01

    Transient global cerebral ischemia accompanying cardiac arrest (CA) often leads to permanent brain damage with poor neurological outcome. The precise chain of events underlying the cerebral damage after CA is still not fully understood. Progress in this area may profit from the development of new non-invasive tools that provide real-time information on the vascular and cellular processes preceding the damage. One way to assess these processes is through near-IR spectroscopy, which has demonstrated the ability to quantify changes in blood volume, hemoglobin oxygenation, cytochrome oxidase redox state, and tissue water content. Here we report on the successful implementation of this form of spectroscopy in a rat model of asphyxial CA and resuscitation, under hypothermic and normothermic conditions. Preliminary results are shown that provide a new temporal insight into the cerebral circulation during CA and post-resuscitation.

  1. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  2. Mild hypothermia during global cardiac ischemia opens a window of opportunity to develop heart donation after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, Mathieu; Dornbierer, Monika; Clément, David; Gahl, Brigitta; Dick, Florian; Carrel, Thierry P; Tevaearai, Hendrik T; Longnus, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Although heart donation after cardiac death (DCD) could greatly improve graft availability, concerns regarding warm ischemic damage typically preclude transplantation. Improving tolerance to warm ischemia may thus open a window of opportunity for DCD hearts. We investigated the hypothesis that, compared with normothermia, mild hypothermia (32° C) initiated after ischemic onset improves cardiac functional recovery upon reperfusion. Isolated, working hearts from adult, male Wistar rats underwent global, no-flow ischemia, and reperfusion (n = 28). After ischemic onset, temperature was maintained at either 37° C for 20 or 30 min or reduced to 32° C for 40, 50, or 60 min. Recovery was measured after 60-min reperfusion. Following normothermic ischemia, recovery of rate-pressure product (RPP; per cent of preischemic value) was almost complete after 20-min ischemia (97 ± 9%), whereas no recovery was detectable after 30-min ischemia. After mildly hypothermic ischemia (32° C), RPP also recovered well after 40 min (86 ± 4%). Markers of metabolism and necrosis were similar in 37° C/20 min and 32° C/40 min groups. Simple reduction in cardiac temperature by a few degrees after the onset of global ischemia dramatically prolongs the interval during which the heart remains resistant to functional deterioration. Preservation of hemodynamic function is associated with improved metabolic recovery and reduced necrosis. The application of mild hypothermia may be a simple first step towards development of clinical protocols for DCD heart recovery.

  3. Cerebral blood flow decreases with time whereas cerebral oxygen consumption remains stable during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Prough, D.S.; Rogers, A.T.; Stump, D.A.; Roy, R.C.; Cordell, A.R.; Phipps, J.; Taylor, C.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Recent investigations demonstrate that cerebral blood flow (CBF) progressively declines during hypothermic, nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). If CBF declines because of brain cooling, the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2) should decline in parallel with the reduction in CBF. Therefore we studied the response of CBF, the cerebral arteriovenous oxygen content difference (A-VDcereO2) and CMRO2 as a function of the duration of CPB in humans. To do this, we compared the cerebrovascular response to changes in the PaCO2. Because sequential CBF measurements using xenon 133 (133Xe) clearance must be separated by 15-25 min, we hypothesized that a time-dependent decline in CBF would accentuate the CBF reduction caused by a decrease in PaCO2, but would blunt the CBF increase associated with a rise in PaCO2. We measured CBF in 25 patients and calculated the cerebral arteriovenous oxygen content difference using radial arterial and jugular venous bulb blood samples. Patients were randomly assigned to management within either a lower (32-48 mm Hg) or higher (50-71 mm Hg) range of PaCO2 uncorrected for temperature. Each patient underwent two randomly ordered sets of measurements, one at a lower PaCO2 and the other at a higher PaCO2 within the respective ranges. Cerebrovascular responsiveness to changes in PaCO2 was calculated as specific reactivity (SR), the change in CBF divided by the change in PaCO2, expressed in mL.100 g-1.min-1.mm Hg-1.

  4. Effects of Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury and Hypothermic Neuroprotection on Neural Progenitor Cells in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Minhye; Lim, Sanghee; Kang, Eunchai; Furmanski, Orion; Song, Hongjun; Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Mintz, C David

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury (HI) results in widespread cerebral encephalopathy and affects structures that are essential for neurocognitive function, such as the hippocampus. The dentate gyrus contains a reservoir of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) that are critical for postnatal development and normal adult function of the hippocampus, and may also facilitate the recovery of function after injury. Using a neonatal mouse model of mild-to-moderate HI and immunohistochemical analysis of NSPC development markers, we asked whether these cells are vulnerable to HI and how they respond to both injury and hypothermic therapy. We found that cleaved caspase-3 labeling in the subgranular zone, where NSPCs are located, is increased by more than 30-fold after HI. The population of cells positive for both proliferating cell nuclear antigen and nestin (PCNA+Nes+), which represent primarily actively proliferating NSPCs, are acutely decreased by 68% after HI. The NSPC population expressing NeuroD1, a marker for NSPCs transitioning to become fate-committed neural progenitors, was decreased by 47%. One week after HI, there was a decrease in neuroblasts and immature neurons in the dentate gyrus, as measured by doublecortin (DCX) immunolabeling, and at the same time PCNA+Nes+ cell density was increased by 71%. NSPCs expressing Tbr2, which identifies a highly proliferative intermediate neural progenitor population, increased by 107%. Hypothermia treatment after HI partially rescues both the acute decrease in PCNA+Nes+ cell density at 1 day after injury and the chronic loss of DCX immunoreactivity and reduction in NeuroD1 cell density measured at 1 week after injury. Thus, we conclude that HI causes an acute loss of dentate gyrus NSPCs, and that hypothermia partially protects NSPCs from HI. PMID:26087836

  5. Flow competition between hepatic arterial and portal venous flow during hypothermic machine perfusion preservation of porcine livers.

    PubMed

    Monbaliu, Diethard R; Debbaut, Charlotte; Hillewaert, Wim J; Laleman, Wim J; Sainz-Barriga, Mauricio; Pirenne, Jacques; Segers, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) is regarded as a better preservation method for donor livers than cold storage. During HMP, livers are perfused through the inlet blood vessels, namely the hepatic artery (HA) and the portal vein (PV). In previous HMP feasibility studies of porcine and human livers, we observed that the PV flow decreased while the HA flow increased. This flow competition restored either spontaneously or by lowering the HA pressure (PHA). Since this phenomenon had never been observed before and because it affects the HMP stability, it is essential to gain more insight into the determinants of flow competition. To this end, we investigated the influence of the HMP boundary conditions on liver flows during controlled experiments. This paper presents the flow effects induced by increasing PHA and by obstructing the outlet blood vessel, which is the vena cava inferior (VCI). Flow competition was evoked by increasing PHA to 55-70 mmHg, as well as by obstructing the VCI. Remarkably, a severe obstruction resulted in a repetitive and alternating tradeoff between the HA and PV flows. These phenomena could be related to intra-sinusoidal pressure alterations. Consequently, a higher PHA is most likely transmitted to the sinusoidal level. This increased sinusoidal pressure reduces the pressure drop between the PV and the sinusoids, leading to a decreased PV perfusion. Flow competition has not been encountered or evoked under physiological conditions and should be taken into account for the design of liver HMP protocols. Nevertheless, more research is necessary to determine the optimal parameters for stable HMP.

  6. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  7. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  8. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  9. Cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamic changes during infant cardiac surgery: measurements by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, Adre J.; Volpe, Joseph J.

    1996-10-01

    Despite dramatic advances in the survival rate among infants undergoing cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease, the incidence of brain injury suffered by survivors remains unacceptably high. This is largely due to our limited understanding of the complex changes in cerebral oxygen utilization and supply occurring during the intraoperative period as a result of hypothermia, neuroactive drugs, and profound circulatory changes. Current techniques for monitoring the adequacy of cerebral oxygen supply and utilization during hypothermic cardiac surgery are inadequate to address this complex problem and consequently to identify the infant at risk for such brain injury. Furthermore, this inability to detect imminent hypoxic- ischemic brain injury is likely to become all the more conspicuous as new neuroprotective strategies, capable of salvaging 'insulated' neuronal tissue form cell death, enter the clinical arena. Near infrared spectroscopy is a relatively new, noninvasive, and portable technique capable of interrogating the oxygenation and hemodynamics of tissue in vivo. These characteristics of the technique have generated enormous interest among clinicians in the ability of near infrared spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanisms of intraoperative brain injury and ultimately to identify infants oat risk for such injury. This paper reviews the experience with this technique to date during infant cardiac surgery.

  10. Effects of hypothermic liquid storage and cryopreservation on basal and induced plasma membrane phospholipid disorder and acrosome exocytosis in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R

    2005-01-01

    Flow cytometry was utilised to determine whether short-term (Day 1) or long-term hypothermic liquid storage (Day 5), or cryopreservation of boar spermatozoa (1) caused changes in plasma membrane phospholipid disorder (MPLD) and acrosome exocytosis (AE), indicative of an advanced stage of capacitation or acrosome status, and (2) facilitated or inhibited the induction of capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Merocyanine with Yo-Pro-1 and peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate with propidium iodide were used to identify MPLD and AE, respectively, in viable spermatozoa. The incidence of basal sperm MPLD and AE in fresh semen was very low (1.1 and 2.2%, respectively) and was increased (P < 0.05) only a small amount in Day 5 and cryopreserved semen (3-8%). Compared to no bicarbonate, incubation with bicarbonate increased MPLD, but the response was greatest (P < 0.05) in fresh sperm (52.3%) compared with Day 1 (36.6%), Day 5 (13.9%) and cryopreserved sperm (13.6%). Incubation with calcium ionophore A23187 increased AE in spermatozoa, but the response was less (P < 0.05) for fresh (34%) and cryopreserved (27%) semen than for Day 1 (45%) and Day 5 (57%) semen. In summary, hypothermic liquid storage and cryopreservation of boar spermatozoa did not advance capacitation or acrosome status in viable spermatozoa, but did alter their responses to induction of capacitation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:15899159

  11. Investigation of factors affecting hypothermic pelvic tissue cooling using bio-heat simulation based on MRI-segmented anatomic models.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuting; Lin, Wei-Ching; Fwu, Peter T; Shih, Tzu-Ching; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Su, Min-Ying; Chen, Jeon-Hor

    2015-10-01

    cool, thus it may provide a conservative prediction of the cooling effect. This feasibility study demonstrated that the simulation tool could potentially be used for adjusting the setting of ECB for individual patients during hypothermic radical prostatectomy. Further studies using MR thermometry are required to validate the in silico results obtained using simulation. PMID:26198131

  12. Chronic voluntary alcohol consumption results in tolerance to sedative/hypnotic and hypothermic effects of alcohol in hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Ozburn, Angela Renee; Harris, R Adron; Blednov, Yuri A

    2013-03-01

    The continuous two-bottle choice test is the most common measure of alcohol consumption but there is remarkably little information about the development of tolerance or dependence with this procedure. We showed that C57BL/6J × FVB/NJ and FVB/NJ×C57BL/6JF1 hybrid mice demonstrate greater preference for and consumption of alcohol than either parental strain. In order to test the ability of this genetic model of high alcohol consumption to produce neuroadaptation, we examined development of alcohol tolerance and dependence after chronic self-administration using a continuous access two-bottle choice paradigm. Ethanol-experienced mice stably consumed about 16-18 g/kg/day of ethanol. Ethanol-induced withdrawal severity was assessed (after 59 days of drinking) by scoring handling-induced convulsions; withdrawal severity was minimal and did not differ between ethanol-experienced and -naïve mice. After 71 days of drinking, the rate of ethanol clearance was similar for ethanol-experienced and -naïve mice. After 77 days of drinking, ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR) was tested daily for 5 days. Ethanol-experienced mice had a shorter duration of LORR. For both ethanol-experienced and -naïve mice, blood ethanol concentrations taken at gain of righting reflex were greater on day 5 than on day 1, indicative of tolerance. After 98 days of drinking, ethanol-induced hypothermia was assessed daily for 3 days. Both ethanol-experienced and -naïve mice developed rapid and chronic tolerance to ethanol-induced hypothermia, with significant group differences on the first day of testing. In summary, chronic, high levels of alcohol consumption in F1 hybrid mice produced rapid and chronic tolerance to both the sedative/hypnotic and hypothermic effects of ethanol; additionally, a small degree of metabolic tolerance developed. The development of tolerance supports the validity of using this model of high alcohol consumption in genetic studies of alcoholism.

  13. Ulinastatin Protects against Acute Kidney Injury in Infant Piglets Model Undergoing Surgery on Hypothermic Low-Flow Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaocou; Xue, Qinghua; Yan, Fuxia; Liu, Jinping; Li, Shoujun; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-01-01

    Objective Infants are more vulnerable to kidney injuries induced by inflammatory response syndrome and ischemia-reperfusion injury following cardiopulmonary bypass especially with prolonged hypothermic low-flow (HLF). This study aims to evaluate the protective role of ulinastatin, an anti-inflammatory agent, against acute kidney injuries in infant piglets model undergoing surgery on HLF cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Eighteen general-type infant piglets were randomly separated into the ulinastatin group (Group U, n = 6), the control group (Group C, n = 6), and the sham operation group (Group S, n = 6), and anaesthetized. The groups U and C received following experimental procedure: median thoracotomy, routine CPB and HLF, and finally weaned from CPB. The group S only underwent sham median thoracotomy. Ulinastatin at a dose of 5,000 units/kg body weight and a certain volume of saline were administrated to animals of the groups U and C at the beginning of CPB and at aortic declamping, respectively. Venous blood samples were collected at 3 different time points: after anesthesia induction in all experimental groups, 5 minutes, and 120 minutes after CPB in the Groups U and C. Markers for inflammation and acute kidney injury were tested in the collected plasma. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) from urine, markers of oxidative stress injury and TUNEL-positive cells in kidney tissues were also detected. Results The expressions of plasma inflammatory markers and acute kidney injury markers increased both in Group U and Group C at 5 min and 120 min after CPB. Also, numbers of TUNEL-positive cells and oxidative stress markers in kidney rose in both groups. At the time point of 120-min after CPB, compared with the Group C, some plasma inflammatory and acute kidney injury markers as well as TUNEL-positive cells and oxidative stress markers in kidney were significantly reduced in the Group U. Histologic analyses showed that HLF promoted acute tubular necrosis and dilatation

  14. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  15. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P < 0.01). Examinations by transmission electron microscopy showed that mitochondria in the left ventricle of rats in the hypothermia group were significantly less swollen compared to such mitochondria in the normothermia group (P < 0.001). Additionally, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P < 0.05). The amount of STAT-3 phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 and its expression in mitochondria were significantly higher under hypothermia treatment compared to normothermia treatment. In vitro studies showed that inhibition STAT-3 activation abolished the ability of hypothermia to protect H9C2 cardiomyocytes against injury produced by simulated ischemia and reperfusion. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment can ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and help preserve both mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity. PMID:26471891

  16. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P < 0.01). Examinations by transmission electron microscopy showed that mitochondria in the left ventricle of rats in the hypothermia group were significantly less swollen compared to such mitochondria in the normothermia group (P < 0.001). Additionally, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P < 0.05). The amount of STAT-3 phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 and its expression in mitochondria were significantly higher under hypothermia treatment compared to normothermia treatment. In vitro studies showed that inhibition STAT-3 activation abolished the ability of hypothermia to protect H9C2 cardiomyocytes against injury produced by simulated ischemia and reperfusion. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment can ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and help preserve both mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity.

  17. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  18. Deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  19. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  20. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech. PMID:26017442

  1. Deep Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  2. Deep Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popke, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how the safety-related ruling by the National Federation of State High School Associations to eliminate the option of using 18-inch starting platforms in pools less than 4 feet deep may affect operators of swimming pools and the swim teams who use them. (EV)

  3. Measurement of cardiac troponins.

    PubMed

    Collinson, P O; Boa, F G; Gaze, D C

    2001-09-01

    The cardiac troponins form part of the regulatory mechanism for muscle contraction. Specific cardiac isoforms of cardiac troponin T and cardiac troponin I exist and commercially available immunoassay systems have been developed for their measurement. A large number of clinical and analytical studies have been performed and the measurement of cardiac troponins is now considered the 'gold standard' biochemical test for diagnosis of myocardial damage. There have been advances in understanding the development and structure of troponins and their degradation following myocardial cell necrosis. This has contributed to the understanding of the problems with current assays. Greater clinical use has also highlighted areas of analytical and clinical confusion. The assays are reviewed based on manufacturers' information, current published material as well as the authors' in-house experience.

  4. Functional cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Zhang, Donghui; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in both men and women worldwide. Stem cell-based therapies, including the use of engineered cardiac tissues, have the potential to treat the massive cell loss and pathological remodeling resulting from heart attack. Specifically, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are a promising source for generation of therapeutically relevant numbers of functional cardiomyocytes and engineering of cardiac tissues in vitro. This review will describe methodologies for successful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards the cardiovascular cell lineages as they pertain to the field of cardiac tissue engineering. The emphasis will be placed on comparing the functional maturation in engineered cardiac tissues and developing heart and on methods to quantify cardiac electrical and mechanical function at different spatial scales. PMID:22397609

  5. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  6. Cloning and characterization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) from the pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, and its expression following pathogen challenge and hypothermal stress.

    PubMed

    Mapanao, Ratchaneegorn; Cheng, Winton

    2016-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) belongs to the biopterin-dependent aromatic amino acid hydroxylase enzyme family, and it represents the first and rate-limiting step in the synthesis of catecholamines that are required for physiological and immune process in invertebrates and vertebrates. Cloned Litopenaeus vannamei TH (LvTH), containing a short alpha helix domain, a catalytic core, a regulatory domain, a phosphorylation site and two potential N-linked glycosylation sites as presented in vertebrate and insect THs without acidic region and signal peptide cleavage sites at the amino-terminal, exhibited a similarity of 60.0-61.2% and 45.0-47.0% to that of invertebrate and vertebrate THs, respectively. Further, LvTH expression was abundant in gill and haemocytes determined by quantitative real-time PCR. L. vannamei challenged with Vibrio alginolyticus at 10(5) cfu shrimp(-1) revealed significant increase of LvTH mRNA expression in haemocytes within 30-120 min and in brain within 15-30 min followed with recuperation. In addition, shrimps exposed to hypothermal stress at 18 °C significantly increased LvTH expression in haemocytes and brain within 30-60 and 15-60 min, respectively. The TH activity and haemolymph glucose level (haemocytes-free) significantly increased in pathogen challenged shrimp at 120 min and 60 min, and in hypothermal stressed shrimp at 30-60 and 30 min, respectively. These results affirm that stress response initiates in the brain while haemocytes display later response. Further, the significant elevation of TH activity in haemolymph is likely to confer by TH that released from haemocytes. In conclusion, the cloned LvTH in our current study is a neural TH enzyme appears to be involved in the physiological and immune responses of whiteleg shrimp, L. vannamei suffering stressful stimulation.

  7. Cloning and characterization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) from the pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, and its expression following pathogen challenge and hypothermal stress.

    PubMed

    Mapanao, Ratchaneegorn; Cheng, Winton

    2016-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) belongs to the biopterin-dependent aromatic amino acid hydroxylase enzyme family, and it represents the first and rate-limiting step in the synthesis of catecholamines that are required for physiological and immune process in invertebrates and vertebrates. Cloned Litopenaeus vannamei TH (LvTH), containing a short alpha helix domain, a catalytic core, a regulatory domain, a phosphorylation site and two potential N-linked glycosylation sites as presented in vertebrate and insect THs without acidic region and signal peptide cleavage sites at the amino-terminal, exhibited a similarity of 60.0-61.2% and 45.0-47.0% to that of invertebrate and vertebrate THs, respectively. Further, LvTH expression was abundant in gill and haemocytes determined by quantitative real-time PCR. L. vannamei challenged with Vibrio alginolyticus at 10(5) cfu shrimp(-1) revealed significant increase of LvTH mRNA expression in haemocytes within 30-120 min and in brain within 15-30 min followed with recuperation. In addition, shrimps exposed to hypothermal stress at 18 °C significantly increased LvTH expression in haemocytes and brain within 30-60 and 15-60 min, respectively. The TH activity and haemolymph glucose level (haemocytes-free) significantly increased in pathogen challenged shrimp at 120 min and 60 min, and in hypothermal stressed shrimp at 30-60 and 30 min, respectively. These results affirm that stress response initiates in the brain while haemocytes display later response. Further, the significant elevation of TH activity in haemolymph is likely to confer by TH that released from haemocytes. In conclusion, the cloned LvTH in our current study is a neural TH enzyme appears to be involved in the physiological and immune responses of whiteleg shrimp, L. vannamei suffering stressful stimulation. PMID:27514780

  8. Query cardiac pain.

    PubMed

    Todd, J W

    1983-08-01

    Query cardiac pain is a common problem, and immense efforts are made to solve it. No test can prove that a patient has not had a cardiac infarct, though in the recent past eminent authorities wrongly stated that a normal ECG supplied this proof. This history is by far the most important means of interpreting recurrent pain. Coronary arteriography is only useful in diagnosis when the pain is certainly due to myocardial ischaemia but it is uncertain whether this is caused by coronary artery disease or some other cardiac lesion. In practice, much pain is not diagnosed. This need be no cause for concern, and patients who in fact have had a small cardiac infarct gain rather than lose if wrongly reassured of its non-existence. The history of cardiology is a depressing catalogue of error. Bogus cardiac diseases have been diagnosed on an enormous scale, mainly because attention has been concentrated on the cardiac manifestations, while the patient was ignored. Much "excluding" is fatuous. Because treatment was derived from theory, treatment for patients who had had cardiac infarcts was disastrous. The great error at present is to overvalue technology.

  9. Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Guyette, Francis X; Reynolds, Joshua C; Frisch, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is a dynamic disease that tests the multitasking and leadership abilities of emergency physicians. Providers must simultaneously manage the logistics of resuscitation while searching for the cause of cardiac arrest. The astute clinician will also realize that he or she is orchestrating only one portion of a larger series of events, each of which directly affects patient outcomes. Resuscitation science is rapidly evolving, and emergency providers must be familiar with the latest evidence and controversies surrounding resuscitative techniques. This article reviews evidence, discusses controversies, and offers strategies to provide quality cardiac arrest resuscitation.

  10. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  11. Neurologic complications of cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Roeltgen, David; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are an uncommon cause for neurologic disease, but if undiagnosed can be associated with devastating neurologic consequences. Primary cardiac tumors, both benign and neoplastic, and metastatic tumors occur. Primary cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with neurologic embolic complications. Metastatic cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with valvular distraction, arrhythmia, diminished cardiac output and indirect neurological dysfunction. Primary and metastatic cardiac tumors may result in cerebral metastatic disease. Atrial myxoma, a benign primary cardiac tumor, is the most common cardiac tumor associated with neurologic disease, and most commonly causes cerebral embolization and stroke. The use of thrombolytic therapy for these strokes is controversial. Additionally, delayed manifestations, including aneurysm formation and intracranial hemorrhage, are possible. Aneurysm formation has been described as occurring after removal of the primary tumor. The availability of noninvasive cardiac imaging has significantly helped decrease the neurologic morbidity of cardiac tumors and has led to frequent successful intervention. PMID:24365298

  12. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Pooja; Luk, Adriana; Rao, Vivek; Butany, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and of these, primary cardiac tumors are even rarer. Metastatic cardiac tumors are about 100 times more common than the primary tumors. About 90% of primary cardiac tumors are benign, and of these the most common are cardiac myxomas. Approximately 12% of primary cardiac tumors are completely asymptomatic while others present with one or more signs and symptoms of the classical triad of hemodynamic changes due to intracardiac obstruction, embolism and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. Echocardiography is highly sensitive and specific in detecting cardiac tumors. Other helpful investigations are chest X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary cardiac tumors and is usually associated with a good prognosis. This review article will focus on the general features of benign cardiac tumors with an emphasis on cardiac myxomas and their molecular basis. PMID:24447924

  13. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  14. Cardiac glycoside overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in the leaves of the digitalis (foxglove) plant. This plant is the original source of this medicine. People ... Digitoxin (Crystodigin) Digoxin (Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin) Besides the foxglove plant, cardiac glycosides also occur naturally in plants such ...

  15. Neuroprotection during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Grocott, Hilary P; Yoshitani, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral injury following cardiac surgery continues to be a significant source of morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. A spectrum of injuries ranging from subtle neurocognitive dysfunction to fatal strokes are caused by a complex series of multifactorial mechanisms. Protecting the brain from these injuries has focused on intervening on each of the various etiologic factors. Although numerous studies have focused on a pharmacologic solution, more success has been found with nonpharmacologic strategies, including optimal temperature management and reducing emboli generation. PMID:17680190

  16. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias.

  17. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Karoff, Marthin; Held, Klaus; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the rehabilitation measures provided for cardiac patients in Germany and to outline its legal basis and outcomes. In Germany the cardiac rehabilitation system is different from rehabilitation measures in other European countries. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany since 1885 is based on specific laws and the regulations of insurance providers. Cardiac rehabilitation has predominantly been offered as an inpatient service, but has recently been complemented by outpatient services. A general agreement on the different indications for offering these two services has yet to be reached. Cardiac rehabilitation is mainly offered after an acute cardiac event and bypass surgery. It is also indicated in severe heart failure and special cases of percutaneous coronary intervention. Most patients are men (>65%) and the age at which events occur is increasing. The benefits obtained during the 3-4 weeks after an acute event, and confirmed in numerous studies, are often later lost under 'usual care' conditions. Many attempts have been made by rehabilitation institutions to improve this deficit by providing intensive aftercare. One instrument set up to achieve this is the nationwide institution currently comprising more than 6000 heart groups with approximately 120000 outpatients. After coronary artery bypass grafting or acute coronary syndrome cardiac rehabilitation can usually be started within 10 days. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team consists of cardiologists, psychologists, exercise therapists, social workers, nutritionists and nurses. The positive effects of cardiac rehabilitation are also important economically, for example, for the improvement of secondary prevention and vocational integration. PMID:17301623

  18. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26459200

  19. Cardiac Munchausen's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, E J; Evans, T R

    1987-01-01

    Ten years' experience of cardiac Munchausen's syndrome in the Cardiac Care Unit of an Inner London teaching hospital is reported. Thirty-six admissions in this category were identified and analysed, and 4 typical cases are described. The common presenting complaints, recurring features and the relationship with other forms of Munchausen's syndrome are discussed, as are possible strategies available to deal with this clinical entity. PMID:3694601

  20. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  1. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  2. Trends in cardiac metastasis.

    PubMed

    Karwinski, B; Svendsen, E

    1989-11-01

    A review of 8571 autopsies disclosed 2833 patients with malignant tumours from 1975 to 1984 at the Department of Pathology, The Gade Institute. Cardiac metastases were found in 130 cases. An increase of cardiac involvement was shown in the autopsy material from 1.2% in 1975-1979 to 1.8% in 1980-1984. The same trend was seen if cardiac metastases were related to malignant tumours. Numerically, lung cancer accounted for most of the metastases seen, but the increase was made up by other tumours than lung cancer. especially malignant melanoma, mesothelioma, breast cancer and sarcomas. These tumours have a high frequency of heart metastases and the increased incidence of these cancers in the material explains the rise of cardiac metastases. Cardiac metastases increased with rising number of distant metastases. This study shows that mesotheliomas have the highest percentage of cardiac spread. The importance of autopsy for detecting metastatic spread in sites that are difficult to detect clinically is emphasized.

  3. Cardiac applications of optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics.

  4. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: Advances in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Olivia; Qian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the lead causes of death worldwide. Many forms of heart disease, including myocardial infarction and pressure-loading cardiomyopathies, result in irreversible cardiomyocyte death. Activated fibroblasts respond to cardiac injury by forming scar tissue, but ultimately this response fails to restore cardiac function. Unfortunately, the human heart has little regenerative ability and long-term outcomes following acute coronary events often include chronic and end-stage heart failure. Building upon years of research aimed at restoring functional cardiomyocytes, recent advances have been made in the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts toward a cardiomyocyte cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. Several experiments show functional improvements in mouse models of myocardial infarction following in situ generation of cardiomyocyte-like cells from endogenous fibroblasts. Though many of these studies are in an early stage, this nascent technology holds promise for future applications in regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the history, progress, methods, challenges, and future directions of direct cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26176012

  5. Impact of static cold storage VS hypothermic machine preservation on ischemic kidney graft: inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules as markers of ischemia/reperfusion tissue damage. Our preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco; Soldini, Gabriele; Ietto, Giuseppe; Chiappa, Corrado; Maritan, Emanuele; Villa, Francesca; Carcano, Giulio; Dionigi, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    At the present time, deceased heart-beating donor kidney allografts are usually stored cold. Extended-criteria donor (ECD) grafts show higher sensitivity to ischemia-reperfusion damage than standard kidneys. The increasing use of marginal organs in clinical transplantation urgently requires a more effective preservation system. Pulsatile hypothermic machine perfusion has shown major advantages over static cold storage in terms of reduced organ injury during preservation and improved early graft function. This preliminary study aims to compare pulsatile hypothermic machine perfusion and static cold storage of kidney allografts, outlining differences in the levels of early inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-1β) and soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (sICAM-1) in perfusion and preservation liquid.

  6. Management of deep pectus excavatum (DPE)

    PubMed Central

    Tedde, Miguel Lia

    2016-01-01

    The correction of deep pectus excavatum, with the Nuss procedure, frequently require a series of maneuvers that is inherently dangerous. Herein we describe 10 technical modifications to prevent potential complications. These modified techniques have certain advantages and according to the authors, with these maneuvers the risk of pericardial sac, cardiac injury, bar displacement and complications during the removal of the bar could be markedly reduced. PMID:27747181

  7. [Psychosomatic aspects of cardiac arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Martin; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2010-07-01

    Emotional stress facilitates the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. The prevalence of anxiety and depression is increased in cardiac patients as compared to the normal population. The risk of cardiovascular mortality is enhanced in patients suffering from depression. Comorbid anxiety disorders worsen the course of cardiac arrhythmias. Disturbance of neurocardiac regulation with predominance of the sympathetic tone is hypothesized to be causative for this. The emotional reaction to cardiac arrhythmias is differing to a large extent between individuals. Emotional stress may result from coping with treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias may influence each other in the sense of a vicious circle. Somatoform cardiac arrhythmias are predominantly of psychogenic origin. Instrumental measures and frequent contacts between physicians and patients may facilitate disease chronification. The present review is dealing with the multifaceted relationships between cardiac arrhythmias and emotional stress. The underlying mechanisms and corresponding treatment modalities are discussed.

  8. Spectral and chemical characterization of hyper-arid and hypo-thermal oxidation processes as an analog for Amazonian alteration on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatore, M. R.; Mustard, J. F.; Head, J. W.; Marchant, D. R.; Cooper, R. F.; Wyatt, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that the martian climatic regime has been conducive to the production of anhydrous iron oxides for the majority of its history (approximately coinciding with the Amazonian era) [Bibring et al., 2006]. The surface conditions during this era have been largely dominated by hyper-arid and hypo-thermal climates with possible less frequent interludes into warmer and/or wetter regimes due to orbital forcing, localized impact-induced climate change, groundwater release, or other processes. The persistence of this cold and dry environment is supported by orbital mineralogy that indicates the dominance of unaltered or only minimally altered basaltic terrains across the planet. The formation process for the oxidative and other alteration products produced during this era, however, has not yet been fully explored. The production of similar alteration products from similar starting compositions under similar environmental conditions has been extensively studied in Beacon Valley, Antarctica, where oxidation processes dominate the chemical weathering regime [Salvatore et al., 2012]. The strong oxidation potential between the Ferrar Dolerite (a shallow-intrusive basalt) and the Antarctic environment results in cation migration and oxidation, producing strong spectral signatures in the thermal infrared that are diagnostic of the mineralogical restructuring of rock surfaces and minor changes in composition. Comparable geochemical trends are found in Adirondack-class basalts studied using the APXS instrument on Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit in Gusev Crater, supporting an Antarctic-like alteration process for the development of the observed alteration rinds [Gellert et al., 2006; Haskin et al., 2005; McSween et al., 2006]. To test if the spectral properties of this Antarctic alteration are comparable to those seen on Mars, the canonical surface types measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft

  9. Deep blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    From southern New Mexico to the Great Slave Lake of Canada, scientists from the United States and Canada recently detonated 10 underground chemical explosions to generate a clearer picture of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. Called Project Deep Probe, the experiment is designed to see through the crust and into the upper mantle to a depth of 300 miles.In the United States, Earth scientists from Rice University, Purdue University, and the University of Oregon are participating in the project. “Researchers hope to get a picture of the upper mantle beneath the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado Plateau, to understand the role the mantle played in formation and uplift,” says Alan Levander of Rice. To enhance that “picture,” 750 portable seismographs were placed along a roughly north-south line extending from Crownpoint, New Mexico to Edmonton, Alberta. The seismic recordings will be used to enhance weak seismic waves that penetrated the upper mantle.

  10. Sedative and hypothermic effects of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in rats alone and in combination with other drugs: assessment using biotelemetry.

    PubMed

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, Petra S; McGregor, Iain S

    2009-08-01

    The recreational drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has euphoric effects and can induce sedation and body temperature changes. GHB is frequently combined with other recreational drugs although these interactions are not well characterised. The present study used biotelemetry to provide a fine-grained analysis of the effects of GHB on body temperature and locomotor activity in freely moving rats, and investigated interactions between GHB and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methamphetamine (METH) and various antagonist drugs. GHB (1000mg/kg) caused profound sedation for more than 2h and a complex triphasic effect on body temperature: an initial hypothermia (5-40min), followed by hyperthermia (40-140min), followed again by hypothermia (140-360min). A lower GHB dose (500mg/kg) also caused sedation but only a hypothermic effect that lasted up to 6h. The dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (1mg/kg), the opioid antagonist naltrexone (1mg/kg), the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (10mg/kg), and the 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist ritanserin (1mg/kg) did not prevent the overall sedative or body temperature effects of GHB (1000mg/kg). However the GABA(B) antagonist SCH 50911 (50mg/kg) prevented the hyperthermia induced by GHB (1000mg/kg). Repeated daily administration of GHB (1000mg/kg) produced tolerance to the sedative and hyperthermic effects of the drug and cross-tolerance to the sedative effects of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen (10mg/kg). A high ambient temperature of 28 degrees C prevented the hypothermia obtained with GHB (500mg/kg) at 20 degrees C, while GHB (500mg/kg) reduced the hyperthermia and hyperactivity produced by co-administered doses of MDMA (5mg/kg) or METH (1mg/kg) at 28 degrees C. These results further confirm a role for GABA(B) receptors in the hypothermic and sedative effects of GHB and show an interaction between GHB and MDMA, and GHB and METH, that may be relevant to the experience of recreational users who mix these

  11. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac

  12. Extra-cardiac stimulators: what do cardiologists need to know?

    PubMed

    Guinand, Alexandre; Noble, Stéphane; Frei, Angela; Renard, Julien; Tramer, Martin R; Burri, Haran

    2016-09-01

    For several decades, treating patients with pacemakers has been the privilege of cardiologists. However, in the last 30 years, researchers have found new targets for electrical stimulation in different clinical subspecialities, such as deep brain stimulation (for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, dystonia, and some psychiatric illnesses); spinal cord stimulation (for refractory angina, chronic pain, and peripheral artery disease); and sacral (for diverse urologic and proctologic conditions), vagal (for epilepsy), and phrenic nerve stimulation (for sleep apnoea). The purpose of this article is to familiarize cardiologists with these 'extra-cardiac pacemakers' and to discuss potential issues that must be addressed when these patients undergo cardiac procedures. PMID:27234870

  13. Cardiac involvement in hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vinay; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Aronow, Wilbert S; Jain, Diwakar; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hemochromatosis or primary iron-overload cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially preventable cause of heart failure. This is initially characterized by diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias and in later stages by dilated cardiomyopathy. Diagnosis of iron overload is established by elevated transferrin saturation (>55%) and elevated serum ferritin (>300 ng/mL). Genetic testing for mutations in the HFE (high iron) gene and other proteins, such as hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor, and ferroportin, should be performed if secondary causes of iron overload are ruled out. Patients should undergo comprehensive 2D and Doppler echocardiography to evaluate their systolic and diastolic function. Newer modalities like strain imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography hold promise for earlier detection of cardiac involvement. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with measurement of T2* relaxation times can help quantify myocardial iron overload. In addition to its value in diagnosis of cardiac iron overload, response to iron reduction therapy can be assessed by serial imaging. Therapeutic phlebotomy and iron chelation are the cornerstones of therapy. The average survival is less than a year in untreated patients with severe cardiac impairment. However, if treated early and aggressively, the survival rate approaches that of the regular heart failure population.

  14. [Preoperative cardiac assessment before non-cardiac surgery: cardiac risk stratification].

    PubMed

    Iglesias, J F; Sierro, C; Aebischer, N; Vogt, P; Eeckhout, E

    2010-06-01

    Perioperative cardiac events occurring in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery are a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines recommend an individualized approach to preoperative cardiac risk stratification prior to non-cardiac surgery, integrating risk factors both for the patient (active cardiac conditions, clinical risk factors, functional capacity) and for the planned surgery. Preoperative cardiac investigations are currently limited to high-risk patients in whom they may contribute to modify the perioperative management. A multidisciplinary approach to such patients, integrating the general practitioner, is recommended in order to define an individualized peri-operative strategy.

  15. Cardiac Imaging In Athletes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asaad A; Safi, Lucy; Wood, Malissa

    2016-01-01

    Athletic heart syndrome refers to the physiological and morphological changes that occur in a human heart after repetitive strenuous physical exercise. Examples of exercise-induced changes in the heart include increases in heart cavity dimensions, augmentation of cardiac output, and increases in heart muscle mass. These cardiac adaptations vary based on the type of exercise performed and are often referred to as sport-specific cardiac remodeling. The hemodynamic effects of endurance and strength training exercise lead to these adaptations. Any abnormalities in chamber dilatation and left ventricular function usually normalize with cessation of exercise. Athletic heart syndrome is rare and should be differentiated from pathologic conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia when assessing a patient for athletic heart syndrome. This paper describes specific adaptations that occur in athletic heart syndrome and tools to distinguish between healthy alterations versus underlying pathology. PMID:27486490

  16. Cardiac Imaging In Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asaad A.; Safi, Lucy; Wood, Malissa

    2016-01-01

    Athletic heart syndrome refers to the physiological and morphological changes that occur in a human heart after repetitive strenuous physical exercise. Examples of exercise-induced changes in the heart include increases in heart cavity dimensions, augmentation of cardiac output, and increases in heart muscle mass. These cardiac adaptations vary based on the type of exercise performed and are often referred to as sport-specific cardiac remodeling. The hemodynamic effects of endurance and strength training exercise lead to these adaptations. Any abnormalities in chamber dilatation and left ventricular function usually normalize with cessation of exercise. Athletic heart syndrome is rare and should be differentiated from pathologic conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia when assessing a patient for athletic heart syndrome. This paper describes specific adaptations that occur in athletic heart syndrome and tools to distinguish between healthy alterations versus underlying pathology. PMID:27486490

  17. Cardiac arrest in the skies.

    PubMed

    Charles, R A

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac arrest occurring on board aeroplanes is rare, but remains a common cause of inflight incidents. This review examines some of the management problems unique to inflight cardiac arrests, and emphasises the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillators.

  18. [Cardiac failure in endocrine diseases].

    PubMed

    Hashizume, K

    1993-05-01

    Several endocrine diseases show the symptoms of cardiac failure. Among them, patients with acromegaly show a specific cardiomyopathy which results in a severe left-sided cardiac failure. Hypoparathyroidism also induces cardiac failure, which is resulted from hypocalcemia and low levels of serum parathyroid hormone. In the cases of hypothyroidism, the patients with myxedemal coma show a severe cardiac failure, which is characterized by disturbance of central nervous system, renal function, and cardiac function. In the patients with thyroid crisis (storm), the cardiac failure comes from the great reduction of cardiac output with dehydration. The reduction of circulation volume, observed in the patients with pheochromocytoma easily induces cardiac failure (shock) just after the removal of adrenal tumor. In patients with malignant carcinoid syndrome, right-sided ventricular failure which may be occurred through the actions of biogenic amines is observed. PMID:8331806

  19. Chromatin modifications remodel cardiac gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mathiyalagan, Prabhu; Keating, Samuel T; Du, Xiao-Jun; El-Osta, Assam

    2014-07-01

    Signalling and transcriptional control involve precise programmes of gene activation and suppression necessary for cardiovascular physiology. Deep sequencing of DNA-bound transcription factors reveals a remarkable complexity of co-activators or co-repressors that serve to alter chromatin modification and regulate gene expression. The regulated complexes characterized by genome-wide mapping implicate the recruitment and exchange of proteins with specific enzymatic activities that include roles for histone acetylation and methylation in key developmental programmes of the heart. As for transcriptional changes in response to pathological stress, co-regulatory complexes are also differentially utilized to regulate genes in cardiac disease. Members of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family catalyse the removal of acetyl groups from proteins whose pharmacological inhibition has profound effects preventing heart failure. HDACs interact with a complex co-regulatory network of transcription factors, chromatin-remodelling complexes, and specific histone modifiers to regulate gene expression in the heart. For example, the histone methyltransferase (HMT), enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), is regulated by HDAC inhibition and associated with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. The challenge now is to target the activity of enzymes involved in protein modification to prevent or reverse the expression of genes implicated with cardiac hypertrophy. In this review, we discuss the role of HDACs and HMTs with a focus on chromatin modification and gene function as well as the clinical treatment of heart failure. PMID:24812277

  20. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  1. Perioperative management of cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Aresti, N A; Malik, A A; Ihsan, K M; Aftab, S M E; Khan, W S

    2014-01-01

    Pre-existing cardiac disease contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality amongst patients undergoing non cardiac surgery. Patients with pre-existing cardiac disease or with risk factors for it, have as much as a 3.9% risk of suffering a major perioperative cardiac event (Lee et al 1999, Devereaux 2005). Furthermore, the incidence of perioperative myocardial infarction (MI) is increased 10 to 50 fold in patients with previous coronary events (Jassal 2008).

  2. Aortic root surgery in combination with hypothermic circulatory arrest: preserve or replace the aortic valve in the context of postoperative neurological outcome? A case match comparison.

    PubMed

    Khaladj, Nawid; Ismail, Issam; Shrestha, Malakh; Peterss, Sven; Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Kallenbach, Klaus; Haverich, Axel; Hagl, Christian

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results of elective composite (C) vs. David (D) operations in patients requiring additional aortic arch surgery using hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP), with the focus on postoperative neurological outcome and quality of life (SF-36). Between November 1999 and March 2006, 333 patients underwent aortic root surgery and ascending aortic replacement with HCA and SACP at our institution. Out of these patients, 46 were matched with respect to age, gender, HCA-time and year of surgery. Two patients, one in each group, died during hospital stay (4%), with no late deaths. Follow-up was completed in 95% [64 (6-90) months]. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time (141 min vs. 168 min, P=0.007) and aortic cross-clamp time (99 min vs. 123 min, P=0.004) were significantly longer in the David-group. The incidence of temporary neurological dysfunction (TND 7%: D n=1, C n=2) was not different between groups, no permanent dysfunction could be detected. Follow-up SF-36 scores were comparable. The combination of aortic arch surgery with more time consuming valve sparing aortic root surgery does not increase the risk for adverse outcome applying comparable periods of HCA and SACP.

  3. Beneficial Effect of Short Pretransplant Period of Hypothermic Pulsatile Perfusion of the Warm-Ischemic Kidney after Cold Storage: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Humanes, Blanca; Jado, Juan Carlos; Mojena, Marina; González-Nicolás, María Ángeles; del Cañizo, Juan Francisco; Lledó-García, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Warm ischemia (WI) produces a significant deleterious effect in potential kidney grafts. Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) seems to improve immediate graft function after transplant. Our aim was to analyze the effect of short pretransplant periods of pulsatile HMP on histology and renal injury in warm-ischemic kidneys. Twelve minipigs were used. WI was achieved in the right kidney by applying a vascular clamp for 45 min. After nephrectomy, autotransplant was performed following one of two strategies: cold storage of the kidneys or cold storage combined with perfusion in pulsatile HMP. The graft was removed early to study renal morphology, inflammation (fibrosis), and apoptosis. Proinflammatory activity and fibrosis were less pronounced after cold storage of the kidneys with HMP than after cold storage only. The use of HMP also decreased apoptosis compared with cold storage only. The detrimental effects on cells of an initial and prolonged period of WI seem to improve with a preservation protocol that includes a short period of pulsatile HMP after cold storage and immediately before the transplant, in comparison with cold storage only. PMID:27556029

  4. Preserving the morphology and evaluating the quality of liver grafts by hypothermic machine perfusion: a proof-of-concept study using discarded human livers.

    PubMed

    Monbaliu, Diethard; Liu, Qiang; Libbrecht, Louis; De Vos, Rita; Vekemans, Katrien; Debbaut, Charlotte; Detry, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; van Pelt, Jos; Pirenne, Jacques

    2012-12-01

    The wider use of livers from expanded criteria donors and donation after circulatory death donors may help to improve access to liver transplantation. A prerequisite for safely using these higher risk livers is the development of objective criteria for assessing their condition before transplantation. Compared to simple cold storage, hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) provides a unique window for evaluating liver grafts between procurement and transplantation. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested basic parameters during HMP that may reflect the condition of human liver grafts, and we assessed their morphology after prolonged HMP. Seventeen discarded human livers were machine-perfused. Eleven livers were nontransplantable (major absolute contraindications and severe macrovesicular steatosis in the majority of the cases). Six livers were found in retrospect to be transplantable but could not be allocated and served as controls. Metabolic parameters (pH, lactate, partial pressure of oxygen, and partial pressure of carbon dioxide), enzyme release in the perfusate [aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)], and arterial/portal resistances were monitored during HMP. Nontransplantable livers released more AST and LDH than transplantable livers. In contrast, arterial/portal vascular resistances and metabolic profiles did not differ between the 2 groups. Morphologically, transplantable livers remained well preserved after 24 hours of HMP. In conclusion, HMP preserves the morphology of human livers for prolonged periods. A biochemical analysis of the perfusate provides information reflecting the extent of the injury endured.

  5. Penetrating Cardiac Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lateef Wani, Mohd; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Irshad, Ifat; Ul-Hassan, Nayeem

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent death. Sometimes serious cardiac injury may manifest only subtle or occult symptoms or signs. As there is an epidemic of cardiac injuries in Kashmir valley due to problems of law and order, we herein present a review on management of such injuries. PMID:24829887

  6. Data analysis in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Pedrón-Torecilla, Jorge; Hernández, Ismael; Liberos, Alejandro; Climent, Andreu M; Guillem, María S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an increasingly present in developed countries and represent a major health and economic burden. The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is closely linked to the electrical function of the heart. Consequently, the analysis of the electrical signal generated by the heart tissue, either recorded invasively or noninvasively, provides valuable information for the study of cardiac arrhythmias. In this chapter, novel cardiac signal analysis techniques that allow the study and diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias are described, with emphasis on cardiac mapping which allows for spatiotemporal analysis of cardiac signals.Cardiac mapping can serve as a diagnostic tool by recording cardiac signals either in close contact to the heart tissue or noninvasively from the body surface, and allows the identification of cardiac sites responsible of the development or maintenance of arrhythmias. Cardiac mapping can also be used for research in cardiac arrhythmias in order to understand their mechanisms. For this purpose, both synthetic signals generated by computer simulations and animal experimental models allow for more controlled physiological conditions and complete access to the organ.

  7. Cardiac Physiology of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    May, Linda

    2015-07-01

    Although the physiology of the heart and vascular system has not changed, there are many things we have learned and are still learning today. Research related to heart adaptations during pregnancy has been performed since the 1930s. Since the mid-1950s, researchers began to look at changes in the maternal cardiovascular system during exercise while pregnant. Research related to exercise during pregnancy and offspring heart development began and has continued since the 1970s. We will review the normal female cardiovascular system adaptations to pregnancy in general. Additionally, topics related to maternal cardiac adaptations to pregnancy during acute exercise, as well as the chronic conditioning response from exercise training will be explored. Since physical activity during pregnancy influences fetal development, the fetal cardiac development will be discussed in regards to acute and chronic maternal exercise. Similarly, the influence of various types of maternal exercise on acute and chronic fetal heart responses will be described. Briefly, the topics related to how and if there is maternal-fetal synchrony will be explained. Lastly, the developmental changes of the fetal cardiovascular system that persist after birth will be explored. Overall, the article will discuss maternal cardiac physiology related to changes with normal pregnancy, and exercise during pregnancy, as well as fetal cardiac physiology related to changes with normal development, and exercise during pregnancy as well as developmental changes in offspring after birth.

  8. The cardiac malpositions.

    PubMed

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2011-11-01

    Dextrocardia was known in the 17th century and was 1 of the first congenital malformations of the heart to be recognized. Fifty years elapsed before Matthew Baillie published his account of complete transposition in a human of the thoracic and abdominal viscera to the opposite side from what is natural. In 1858, Thomas Peacock stated that "the heart may be congenitally misplaced in various ways, occupying either an unusual position within the thorax, or being situated external to that cavity." In 1915, Maude Abbott described ectopia cordis, and Richard Paltauf's remarkable illustrations distinguished the various types of dextrocardia. In 1928, the first useful classification of the cardiac malpositions was proposed, and in 1966, Elliott et al's radiologic classification set the stage for clinical recognition. The first section of this review deals with the 3 basic cardiac malpositions in the presence of bilateral asymmetry. The second section deals with cardiac malpositions in the presence of bilateral left-sidedness or right-sidedness. Previous publications on cardiac malpositions are replete with an arcane vocabulary that confounds rather than clarifies. Even if the terms themselves are understood, inherent complexity weighs against clarity. This review was designed as a guided tour of an unfamiliar subject.

  9. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  10. Comparative cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Brundage, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This book is designed to compare all major cardiac imaging techniques. All major imaging techniques - including conventional angiography, digital angiography, echocardiography and Doppler imaging, conventional radioisotope techniques, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging - are covered in this text as they apply to the major cardiovascular disorders. There is brief coverage of positron emission tomography and an extensive presentation of ultrafast computed tomography.

  11. Time delay between cardiac and brain activity during sleep transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B.; Aarts, Ronald M.; Haakma, Reinder; Fonseca, Pedro; Rolink, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Human sleep consists of wake, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep that includes light and deep sleep stages. This work investigated the time delay between changes of cardiac and brain activity for sleep transitions. Here, the brain activity was quantified by electroencephalographic (EEG) mean frequency and the cardiac parameters included heart rate, standard deviation of heartbeat intervals, and their low- and high-frequency spectral powers. Using a cross-correlation analysis, we found that the cardiac variations during wake-sleep and NREM sleep transitions preceded the EEG changes by 1-3 min but this was not the case for REM sleep transitions. These important findings can be further used to predict the onset and ending of some sleep stages in an early manner.

  12. Ethical Issues in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kavarana, Minoo N.; Sade, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    While ethical behavior has always been part of cardiac surgical practice, ethical deliberation has only recently become an important component of cardiac surgical practice. Issues such as informed consent, conflict of interest, and professional self-regulation, among many others, have increasingly attracted the attention of cardiac surgeons. This review covers several broad topics of interest to cardiac surgeons and cardiologists, and treats several other topics more briefly. There is much uncertainty about what the future holds for cardiac surgical practice, research, and culture, and we discuss the background of ethical issues to serve as a platform for envisioning what is to come. PMID:22642634

  13. Biomechanics of Early Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Goenezen, Sevan; Rennie, Monique Y.

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanics affect early cardiac development, from looping to the development of chambers and valves. Hemodynamic forces are essential for proper cardiac development, and their disruption leads to congenital heart defects. A wealth of information already exists on early cardiac adaptations to hemodynamic loading, and new technologies, including high resolution imaging modalities and computational modeling, are enabling a more thorough understanding of relationships between hemodynamics and cardiac development. Imaging and modeling approaches, used in combination with biological data on cell behavior and adaptation, are paving the road for new discoveries on links between biomechanics and biology and their effect on cardiac development and fetal programming. PMID:22760547

  14. Surgical Management of Vascular Stents in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: Clues for a Staged Partnership.

    PubMed

    Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel; Zunzunegui, José-Luis; Pérez-Caballero, Ramón; Pita, Ana; González-López, María-Teresa; Ballesteros, Fernando; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Medrano, Constancio

    2015-12-01

    Complex cases undergo step surgical and percutaneous procedures, including stent deployment. Concerns arise on stent removal at latest surgery. Our initial experience is presented. Forty-six stents in 35 patients were partially or totally removed at surgery. Univentricular heart was diagnosed in 20 patients. Stents were previously deployed in: ductus (6), right ventricle outflow tract (12), atrial septal defect (4), right pulmonary artery (4), left pulmonary artery (16), inferior vena cava (2), superior vena cava (1) and ascending aorta (1). Surgical procedures performed: 9 transplants, 6 Fontan, 4 Glenn, 1 comprehensive repair (Norwood + Glenn), 1 Glenn takedown, 8 conduit replacement, 2 Fallot, 2 Rastelli, 1 ventricular septal defect closure and 1 iatrogenic aortopulmonary window. Five ductal stents were clipped. Eleven stents in right ventricle, four ones in atrial septal defect, two in right pulmonary artery, seven in the left pulmonary artery and two in inferior vena cava were completely removed. Two stents in right pulmonary artery, one in superior vena cava, one in ascending aorta and nine in the left pulmonary artery were partially retrieved. Handling the stents in ductus, right ventricle and atrial septal defect was straightforward. On the contrary, stent removal in the ductus (comprehensive case), pulmonary branches, both vena cavae or aorta required short periods of deep hypothermia with circulatory arrest. Surgery over stents is increasing in complex, step procedures. Univentricular hearts are most prevalent. Congenital transplant surgery faces new challenges. Stent removal at the time of surgery may require deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

  15. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function.

  16. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  17. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  18. Mild hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation in a swine model of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Zhao, Hong; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Ziren; Mei, Xue; Cui, Juan; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has been implicated in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to determine whether mild hypothermia (HT) inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Sixteen minipigs resuscitated from 8 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation were randomized into two groups: HT group (n=8), treated with HT (33°C) for 12 hours; and normothermia group (n=8), treated similarly as HT group except for cooling. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0.5, 6, 12, and 24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The brain cortex was harvested 24 hours after ROSC. Complement and pro-inflammatory markers were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neurologic deficit scores were evaluated 24 hours after ROSC. C1q, Bb, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), C3b, C3a, C5a, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly increased under normothermia within 24 hours after ROSC. However, these increases were significantly reduced by HT. Hypothermia decreased brain C1q, MBL, C3b, and C5a contents 24 hours after ROSC. Hypothermic pigs had a better neurologic outcome than normothermic pigs. In conclusion, complement is activated through classic, alternative, and MBL pathways after ROSC. Hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation, which may provide an additional mechanism of cerebral protection. PMID:25757755

  19. Mild hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation in a swine model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Zhao, Hong; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Ziren; Mei, Xue; Cui, Juan; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-08-01

    Complement activation has been implicated in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to determine whether mild hypothermia (HT) inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Sixteen minipigs resuscitated from 8 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation were randomized into two groups: HT group (n=8), treated with HT (33°C) for 12 hours; and normothermia group (n=8), treated similarly as HT group except for cooling. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0.5, 6, 12, and 24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The brain cortex was harvested 24 hours after ROSC. Complement and pro-inflammatory markers were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neurologic deficit scores were evaluated 24 hours after ROSC. C1q, Bb, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), C3b, C3a, C5a, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly increased under normothermia within 24 hours after ROSC. However, these increases were significantly reduced by HT. Hypothermia decreased brain C1q, MBL, C3b, and C5a contents 24 hours after ROSC. Hypothermic pigs had a better neurologic outcome than normothermic pigs. In conclusion, complement is activated through classic, alternative, and MBL pathways after ROSC. Hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation, which may provide an additional mechanism of cerebral protection.

  20. Cardiac nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gerson, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book begins with a review of the radionuclide methods available for evaluating cardiac perfusion and function. The authors discuss planar and tomographic thallium myocardial imaging, first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide angiography, and imaging with infarct-avid tracers. Several common but more specialized procedures are then reviewed: nonogemetric measurement of left ventricular volume, phase (Fourier) analysis, stroke volume ratio, right ventricular function, and diastolic function. A separate chapter is devoted to drug interventions and in particular the use of radionuclide ventriculography to monitor doxorubicin toxicity and therapy of congestive heart failure. The subsequent chapters provide a comprehensive guide to test selection, accuracy, and results in acute myocardial infarction, in postmyocardial infarction, in chronic coronary artery disease, before and after medical or surgical revascularization, in valvular heart disease, in cardiomyopathies, and in cardiac trauma.

  1. Cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Robert J; Garan, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    As more women with repaired congenital heart disease survive to their reproductive years and many other women are delaying pregnancy until later in life, a rising concern is the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy. Naturally occurring cardiovascular changes during pregnancy increase the likelihood that a recurrence of a previously experienced cardiac arrhythmia or a de novo arrhythmia will occur. Arrhythmias should be thoroughly investigated to determine if there is a reversible etiology, and risks/benefits of treatment options should be fully explored. We discuss the approach to working up and treating various arrhythmias during pregnancy with attention to fetal and maternal risks as well as treatment of fetal arrhythmias. Acute management in stable patients includes close monitoring and intravenous pharmacologic therapy, while DC cardioversion should be used to terminate arrhythmias in hemodynamically unstable patients. Long-term management may require continued oral antiarrhythmic therapy, with particular attention to fetal safety, to prevent complications associated with arrhythmias.

  2. Recovery after cardiac events.

    PubMed

    Davidson, D M; Maloney, C A

    1985-12-01

    This article describes an interdisciplinary program of cardiac rehabilitation that integrates physical therapy with medical, nursing, nutritional, and psychological assessment and treatment. Hospitalized patients recovering from myocardial infarction or cardiac surgery progress through a seven-level program of physical activity, education, and emotional support. These components of the program continue during their early home period and again are integrated during the active training period. In the active training period, patients participate in support groups and receive nutritional, exercise, and medical education and engage in one hour of exercise three times weekly. In all phases, considerable attention is given to the development of behavioral skills necessary for long-term adherence to healthy life style habits.

  3. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies.

  4. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  5. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies.

  6. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  7. Hypothermal effects on survival, energy homeostasis and expression of energy-related genes of swimming crabs Portunus trituberculatus during air exposure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunliang; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Fang; Dong, Shuanglin

    2016-08-01

    Previously, dry or semi-dry approach under the hypothermal condition is proved to be an alternative method in transport of live swimming crabs Portunus trituberculatus. However, we wondered whether this method can improve crab survival when temperature is kept as cool as possible. In this study, we hypothesized that there is a thermal threshold below which dry or semi-dry approach (air exposure) could cause crab physiological disruption and therefore aggravate their mortality. To test the above hypothesis, crabs (23°C) were exposed to air at temperatures ranging from 4 to 16°C. Results showed that crabs had a worse survival and vigor at temperatures below 12°C. Then we tested crab energy metabolism to explore the possible reason. It was shown that total adenine nucleotide and adenylate energy charge in gills were remarkably reduced by air exposure of below 12°C. This increased the need for crabs to re-balance energy metabolism, which was indicated by the upregulation of AMPKα and HIF-1α. Meanwhile, there was a significant increase of the expression of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, V-type ATPase and HSP90 at temperatures below 12°C, while all treatments shared a similar level of hemocyanin, urate and lactate in hemolymph and expression of cytochrome c oxidase and NADH-ubiquinone reductase in gills. These results implied that dry or semi-dry approach below 12°C could exert detrimental effects on P. trituberculatus, and perturbation of energy homeostasis, which is more related with changes of energy-demanding physiological pathways, is a possible reason of crab death and poor vigor.

  8. Hypothermal effects on survival, energy homeostasis and expression of energy-related genes of swimming crabs Portunus trituberculatus during air exposure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunliang; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Fang; Dong, Shuanglin

    2016-08-01

    Previously, dry or semi-dry approach under the hypothermal condition is proved to be an alternative method in transport of live swimming crabs Portunus trituberculatus. However, we wondered whether this method can improve crab survival when temperature is kept as cool as possible. In this study, we hypothesized that there is a thermal threshold below which dry or semi-dry approach (air exposure) could cause crab physiological disruption and therefore aggravate their mortality. To test the above hypothesis, crabs (23°C) were exposed to air at temperatures ranging from 4 to 16°C. Results showed that crabs had a worse survival and vigor at temperatures below 12°C. Then we tested crab energy metabolism to explore the possible reason. It was shown that total adenine nucleotide and adenylate energy charge in gills were remarkably reduced by air exposure of below 12°C. This increased the need for crabs to re-balance energy metabolism, which was indicated by the upregulation of AMPKα and HIF-1α. Meanwhile, there was a significant increase of the expression of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, V-type ATPase and HSP90 at temperatures below 12°C, while all treatments shared a similar level of hemocyanin, urate and lactate in hemolymph and expression of cytochrome c oxidase and NADH-ubiquinone reductase in gills. These results implied that dry or semi-dry approach below 12°C could exert detrimental effects on P. trituberculatus, and perturbation of energy homeostasis, which is more related with changes of energy-demanding physiological pathways, is a possible reason of crab death and poor vigor. PMID:27503714

  9. Cardiac Signatures of Personality

    PubMed Central

    Koelsch, Stefan; Enge, Juliane; Jentschke, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Background There are well-established relations between personality and the heart, as evidenced by associations between negative emotions on the one hand, and coronary heart disease or chronic heart failure on the other. However, there are substantial gaps in our knowledge about relations between the heart and personality in healthy individuals. Here, we investigated whether amplitude patterns of the electrocardiogram (ECG) correlate with neurotisicm, extraversion, agreeableness, warmth, positive emotion, and tender-mindedness as measured with the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness (NEO) personality inventory. Specifically, we investigated (a) whether a cardiac amplitude measure that was previously reported to be related to flattened affectivity (referred to as values) would explain variance of NEO scores, and (b) whether correlations can be found between NEO scores and amplitudes of the ECG. Methodology/Principal Findings NEO scores and rest ECGs were obtained from 425 healthy individuals. Neuroticism and positive emotion significantly differed between individuals with high and low values. In addition, stepwise cross-validated regressions indicated correlations between ECG amplitudes and (a) agreeableness, as well as (b) positive emotion. Conclusions/Significance These results are the first to demonstrate that ECG amplitude patterns provide information about the personality of an individual as measured with NEO personality scales and facets. These findings open new perspectives for a more efficient personality assessment using cardiac measures, as well as for more efficient risk-stratification and pre-clinical diagnosis of individuals at risk for cardiac, affective and psychosomatic disorders. PMID:22363649

  10. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Andrew P.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  11. Cardiac outflow tract anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Neeb, Zachary; Lajiness, Jacquelyn D.; Bolanis, Esther; Conway, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    The mature outflow tract (OFT) is, in basic terms, a short conduit. It is a simple, although vital, connection situated between contracting muscular heart chambers and a vast embryonic vascular network. Unfortunately, it is also a focal point underlying many multifactorial congenital heart defects (CHDs). Through the use of various animal models combined with human genetic investigations, we are beginning to comprehend the molecular and cellular framework that controls OFT morphogenesis. Clear roles of neural crest cells (NCC) and second heart field (SHF) derivatives have been established during OFT formation and remodeling. The challenge now is to determine how the SHF and cardiac NCC interact, the complex reciprocal signaling that appears to be occurring at various stages of OFT morphogenesis, and finally how endocardial progenitors and primary heart field (PHF) communicate with both these colonizing extra-cardiac lineages. Although we are beginning to understand that this dance of progenitor populations is wonderfully intricate, the underlying pathogenesis and the spatiotemporal cell lineage interactions remain to be fully elucidated. What is now clear is that OFT alignment and septation are independent processes, invested via separate SHF and cardiac neural crest (CNC) lineages. This review will focus on our current understanding of the respective contributions of the SHF and CNC lineage during OFT development and pathogenesis. PMID:24014420

  12. An overview of cardiac morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Abdulla, Tariq; Summers, Ron; Houyel, Lucile

    2013-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of normal cardiac development is essential for properly understanding the morphogenesis of congenital cardiac malformations that represent the most common congenital anomaly in newborns. The heart is the first organ to function during embryonic development and is fully formed at 8 weeks of gestation. Recent studies stemming from molecular genetics have allowed specification of the role of cellular precursors in the field of heart development. In this article we review the different steps of heart development, focusing on the processes of alignment and septation. We also show, as often as possible, the links between abnormalities of cardiac development and the main congenital heart defects. The development of animal models has permitted the unraveling of many mechanisms that potentially lead to cardiac malformations. A next step towards a better knowledge of cardiac development could be multiscale cardiac modelling. PMID:24138816

  13. Cardiac Emergencies in Neurosurgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Andrea; Cappellani, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative safety concerns are a major area of interest in recent years. Severe cardiac perturbation such as cardiac arrest is one of the most dreaded complications in the intraoperative period; however, little is known about the management of these events in the patients undergoing elective neurosurgery. This special group needs further attention, as it is often neither feasible nor appropriate to apply conventional advanced cardiac life support algorithms in patients undergoing neurosurgery. Factors such as neurosurgical procedure and positioning can also have a significant effect on the occurrence of cardiac arrest. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the various causes and management of cardiac emergencies with special reference to cardiac arrest during elective neurosurgical procedures, including discussion of position-related factors and resuscitative considerations in these situations. This will help to formulate possible guidelines for management of such events. PMID:25692145

  14. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Hutter, Adolph M; Weiner, Rory B

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  15. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wasfy, Meagan M.; Hutter, Adolph M.; Weiner, Rory B.

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  16. Cardiac size during prenatal development.

    PubMed

    Jordaan, H V

    1987-06-01

    In this study, the cardiac circumference as measured in a four-chamber view was analyzed to determine its relationship to three linear, sonar measurements--biparietal diameter, femoral length, and abdominal circumference--and two sonographically derived fetal parameters--gestational age and estimated fetal weight. The results showed that the cardiac circumference correlates significantly with these direct and derived variables. It is recommended that the magnitude of the cardiac circumference as a function of any or all of these variables be used as an index of organ size when assessing fetuses at risk for anomalous cardiac development.

  17. Registry of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Cardiac Arrest; Long QT Syndrome; Brugada Syndrome; Catecholaminergi Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia; Idiopathic VentricularFibrillation; Early Repolarization Syndrome; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

  18. UPDATE: CARDIAC XENOTRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Ekser, Burcin; Cooper, David K.C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the latest development in cardiac xenotransplantation in small and large animal models and related in vitro studies. Recent findings With the recent introduction of α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GT-KO) pig organs for xenotransplantation, improved cardiac graft survival has been obtained. However, this experience has demonstrated the importance of pig antigens other than Galα1,3Gal (Gal) antigens (so-called nonGal antigens) as targets for primate anti-pig antibodies. Several in vitro studies have confirmed that, although the incidence and levels of anti-nonGal antibodies in non-human primates and humans are significantly less when compared with total anti-pig antibodies (i.e., anti-Gal + anti-nonGal), they can result in complement-mediated lysis of GT-KO pig cells. More recently, it has been demonstrated that regulatory T cells (Treg) suppress the cellular xenogeneic response, thus potentially preventing or reducing T cell-mediated rejection. The importance of thrombotic microangiopathy as a feature of the immune/inflammatory response and incompatibilities between the coagulation-anticoagulation systems of pig and primate are receiving increasing attention. Development of GT-KO pigs transgenic for one or more ‘anti-thrombotic’ genes, e.g., CD39 or tissue factor pathway inhibitor, may contribute to overcoming these problems. Summary Although GT-KO pigs have provided an advance over wild-type pigs as a source of Organs for transplantation into primates, further genetic modification of GT-KO pigs is required to overcome the remaining immune barriers before a clinical trial of cardiac xenotransplantation can be contemplated. PMID:19060538

  19. Ethanol for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Schurmann, Paul; Peñalver, Jorge; Valderrábano, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol infusion was an early mode of ablative treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. Its initial descriptions involved coronary intra-arterial delivery, targeting arrhythmogenic substrates in drug-refractory ventricular tachycardia or the atrioventricular node. Largely superseded by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and other contact-based technologies as a routine ablation strategy, intracoronary arterial ethanol infusion remains as an alternative option in the treatment of ventricular tachycardia when conventional ablation fails. Arrhythmic foci that are deep-seated in the myocardium may not be amenable to catheter ablation from either the endocardium or the epicardium by RFA, but they can be targeted by an ethanol infusion. Recent findings Recently, we have explored ethanol injection through cardiac venous systems, in order to avoid the risks of complications and limitations of coronary arterial instrumentation. Vein of Marshall ethanol infusion is being studied as an adjunctive procedure in ablation of atrial fibrillation, and coronary venous ethanol infusion for ventricular tachycardia. Conclusion Ethanol ablation remains useful as a bail-out technique for refractory cases to RFA, or as an adjunctive therapy that may improve the efficacy of catheter ablation procedures. PMID:26049378

  20. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  1. Taoism and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

    1988-01-01

    Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

  2. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw and label…

  3. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  4. Psychological aspects of cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J J; Paskewitz, D A; Gimbel, K S; Thomas, S A

    1977-05-01

    A review of data from a wide spectrum of research studies suggests that psychological-emotional factors can significantly influence and alter the incidence of cardiac arrhythmia. While the existing data are, in many cases, difficult to interpret because of theoretical and methodological problems, sufficient evidence does exist to warrant a concerted investigation into the total involvement of psychological factors in cardiac arrhythmia.

  5. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  6. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, J D

    1976-09-01

    The concept of cardiac reconditioning centers for the prevention and rehabilitation of coronary patients has been tremendously successful in Germany over the past 20 years. At least 40 such centers are located throughout the country. Physicians, nurses, and physical therapists work closely together in the various facets of the rehabilitation process. The financial backing for these facilities is primarily through governmental and regional insurance companies, whose officials are apparently convinced that in the long run supporting preventive measures is financially sound. Objective data supporting their convictions come from studies such as that of Brusis, who showed that such as that of 1,500 employees was diminished by nearly 70 percent during a two-year period after cardiac reconditioning, as compared to a similar time period before the rehabilitation experience. Subjective benefits, which are extremely difficult to quantitate in meaningful terms, were nonetheless expressed by nearly all the patients with whom I conversed. Perhaps they have experienced the same feelings that Mark Twain did when he observed that "all frets and worries and chafings sank to sleep in the presence of the benignant serenity of the Alps; the Great Spirit of the Mountains breathed his own peace upon their hurt minds and sore hearts and healed them." PMID:959329

  8. Interventional cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Pihkala, J; Nykanen, D; Freedom, R M; Benson, L N

    1999-04-01

    Over the past decade, transcatheter interventions have become increasingly important in the treatment of patients with congenital heart lesions. These procedures may be broadly grouped as dilations (e.g., septostomy, valvuloplasty, angioplasty, and endovascular stenting) or as closures (e.g., vascular embolization and device closure of defects). Balloon valvuloplasty has become the treatment of choice for patients in all age groups with simple valvar pulmonic stenosis and, although not curative, seems at least comparable to surgery for congenital aortic stenosis in newborns to young adults. Balloon angioplasty is successfully applied to a wide range of aortic, pulmonary artery, and venous stenoses. Stents are useful in dilating lesions of which the intrinsic elasticity results in vessel recoil after balloon dilation alone. Catheter-delivered coils are used to embolize a wide range of arterial, venous, and prosthetic vascular connections. Although some devices remain investigational, they have been successfully used for closure of many arterial ducts and atrial and ventricular septal defects. In the therapy for patients with complex CHD, best results may be achieved by combining cardiac surgery with interventional catheterization. The cooperation among interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons was highlighted in a report of an algorithm to manage patients with tetralogy of Fallot or pulmonary atresia with diminutive pulmonary arteries, involving balloon dilation, coil embolization of collaterals, and intraoperative stent placement. In this setting, well-planned catheterization procedures have an important role in reducing the overall number of procedures that patients may require over a lifetime, with improved outcomes.

  9. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance.

  10. Decoding the Cardiac Message

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    This review reflects and expands upon the contents of the author’s presentation at The Thomas W. Smith Memorial Lecture at AHA Scientific Sessions, 2011. “Decoding the cardiac message” refers to accumulating results from ongoing microRNA research that is altering longstanding concepts of the mechanisms for, and consequences of, messenger RNA (mRNA) regulation in the heart. First, I provide a brief historical perspective of the field of molecular genetics, touching upon seminal research that paved the way for modern molecular cardiovascular research and helped establish the foundation for current concepts of mRNA regulation in the heart. I follow with some interesting details about the specific research that led to the discovery and appreciation of microRNAs as highly conserved pivotal regulators of RNA expression and translation. Finally, I provide a personal viewpoint as to how agnostic genome-wide techniques for measuring microRNAs, their mRNA targets, and their protein products can be applied in an integrated multi-systems approach to uncover direct and indirect effects of microRNAs. Experimental designs integrating next-generation sequencing and global proteomics have the potential to address unanswered questions regarding microRNA-mRNA interactions in cardiac disease, how disease alters mRNA targeting by specific microRNAs, and how mutational and polymorphic nucleotide variation in microRNAs can affect end-organ function and stress-response. PMID:22383710

  11. Effects of frozen and liquid hypothermic storage and extender type on calcium homeostasis in relation to viability and ATP content in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Woods, L C

    2014-05-01

    The effect of hypothermic storage on striped bass sperm calcium homeostasis was determined by Fluo-3 flow cytometry. Calcium homeostasis was defined as the ability of cells to maintain a low concentration of intracellular free calcium as measured by Fluo-3 fluorescence. Sperm were stored frozen in striped bass extender (SBE) and Tris-NaCl medium (T350) modified with 50 mM glycine and 7.5% dimethylsulfoxide and in nonfrozen form diluted 1:3 (vol/vol) in SBE and T350 for 1, 24, and 48 hours at 4 °C in an oxygen atmosphere. Fluo-3 fluorescence was detected in less than 5% of fresh viable sperm cells indicating maintenance of calcium homeostasis. In contrast to sperm in fresh semen, frozen-thawed and nonfrozen sperm cells lost to a considerable extent the ability to maintain low intracellular free calcium even in the absence of exogenous calcium; positive Fluo-3 fluorescence was found in 26% and 39% of thawed sperm frozen in SBE- and T350-based freezing diluents, respectively, and increased (P < 0.05) to 67% during nonfrozen storage in SBE and T350 at 24 and 48 hours. Sperm viability measured by exclusion of propidium iodide by flow cytometry was 99% in fresh milt and maintained at 86% (P > 0.05) in SBE after 48 hours of nonfrozen storage but decreased (P < 0.05) to 55.7% after 48 hours in T350. Energy status in terms of ATP content, determined by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay, was higher (P < 0.05) in sperm frozen in SBE than in T350 during the first 5 minutes post-thaw and decreased to essentially zero by 15 minutes post-thaw and did not differ among nonfrozen storage treatments. In conclusion, sperm cells impervious to propidium iodide after frozen or nonfrozen storage were unable to maintain low intracellular calcium content. SBE is a better medium than T350 for frozen or nonfrozen storage of striped bass sperm. The inability to regulate intracellular calcium in striped bass sperm may be associated with poor activation of motility after 4 °C storage

  12. Effects of hypothermic storage on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and plasma membrane integrity in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Theisen, D D; Woods, L C

    2011-03-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage on striped bass sperm cell plasma membrane integrity, free intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidation of hydroethidine to ethidium) as determined by flow cytometry; motion activation and ATP concentration as determined by Luciferin-Luciferase bioluminescence assay. Semen was stored for 1 or 24 h at 4 °C in an O(2) atmosphere undiluted or diluted (one volume semen with 3 volumes diluent) with T350 (20 mM TRIS base-NaCl, 350 mOsm/mL, pH 8) or with seminal plasma in the presence of various treatments. Viability (% cells excluding propidium iodide) approached 100% after 1 h storage in undiluted or diluted semen. After 1 h of storage the [Ca(2+)](i) marker, Fluo-3, was detected in only 3% of sperm cells in undiluted or diluted semen. In contrast to storage for 1 h, after 24 h the incidence Fluo-3 fluorescence intensity was increased (P < 0.05) in > 50% of the viable cells in undiluted and diluted semen along with increased cell death; the presence of 1 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) blocked CaCl(2)-induced Fluo-3 fluorescence and cell death. Activation of sperm motility was 82% after 1 h in T350 and decreased (P < 0.05) to 30% after 24 h. However, motility activation failed in the presence of EGTA at 1 or 24 h. During storage ΔΨ(m) was not affected by storage time or treatment. In contrast, sperm ATP was greater (P < 0.05) at 1 h than at 24 h and was greater in sperm stored in diluted than undiluted form. While ROS formation was induced by menadione treatment, there was no evidence of storage-induced ROS formation in the absence of menadione. The increased [Ca(2+)](i) found after 24 h indicates a storage induced defect in the maintenance of cellular calcium homeostasis which may be detrimental to sperm activation. PMID:21247623

  13. Effects of hypothermic storage on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and plasma membrane integrity in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Theisen, D D; Woods, L C

    2011-03-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage on striped bass sperm cell plasma membrane integrity, free intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidation of hydroethidine to ethidium) as determined by flow cytometry; motion activation and ATP concentration as determined by Luciferin-Luciferase bioluminescence assay. Semen was stored for 1 or 24 h at 4 °C in an O(2) atmosphere undiluted or diluted (one volume semen with 3 volumes diluent) with T350 (20 mM TRIS base-NaCl, 350 mOsm/mL, pH 8) or with seminal plasma in the presence of various treatments. Viability (% cells excluding propidium iodide) approached 100% after 1 h storage in undiluted or diluted semen. After 1 h of storage the [Ca(2+)](i) marker, Fluo-3, was detected in only 3% of sperm cells in undiluted or diluted semen. In contrast to storage for 1 h, after 24 h the incidence Fluo-3 fluorescence intensity was increased (P < 0.05) in > 50% of the viable cells in undiluted and diluted semen along with increased cell death; the presence of 1 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) blocked CaCl(2)-induced Fluo-3 fluorescence and cell death. Activation of sperm motility was 82% after 1 h in T350 and decreased (P < 0.05) to 30% after 24 h. However, motility activation failed in the presence of EGTA at 1 or 24 h. During storage ΔΨ(m) was not affected by storage time or treatment. In contrast, sperm ATP was greater (P < 0.05) at 1 h than at 24 h and was greater in sperm stored in diluted than undiluted form. While ROS formation was induced by menadione treatment, there was no evidence of storage-induced ROS formation in the absence of menadione. The increased [Ca(2+)](i) found after 24 h indicates a storage induced defect in the maintenance of cellular calcium homeostasis which may be detrimental to sperm activation.

  14. Effects of frozen and liquid hypothermic storage and extender type on calcium homeostasis in relation to viability and ATP content in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Woods, L C

    2014-05-01

    The effect of hypothermic storage on striped bass sperm calcium homeostasis was determined by Fluo-3 flow cytometry. Calcium homeostasis was defined as the ability of cells to maintain a low concentration of intracellular free calcium as measured by Fluo-3 fluorescence. Sperm were stored frozen in striped bass extender (SBE) and Tris-NaCl medium (T350) modified with 50 mM glycine and 7.5% dimethylsulfoxide and in nonfrozen form diluted 1:3 (vol/vol) in SBE and T350 for 1, 24, and 48 hours at 4 °C in an oxygen atmosphere. Fluo-3 fluorescence was detected in less than 5% of fresh viable sperm cells indicating maintenance of calcium homeostasis. In contrast to sperm in fresh semen, frozen-thawed and nonfrozen sperm cells lost to a considerable extent the ability to maintain low intracellular free calcium even in the absence of exogenous calcium; positive Fluo-3 fluorescence was found in 26% and 39% of thawed sperm frozen in SBE- and T350-based freezing diluents, respectively, and increased (P < 0.05) to 67% during nonfrozen storage in SBE and T350 at 24 and 48 hours. Sperm viability measured by exclusion of propidium iodide by flow cytometry was 99% in fresh milt and maintained at 86% (P > 0.05) in SBE after 48 hours of nonfrozen storage but decreased (P < 0.05) to 55.7% after 48 hours in T350. Energy status in terms of ATP content, determined by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay, was higher (P < 0.05) in sperm frozen in SBE than in T350 during the first 5 minutes post-thaw and decreased to essentially zero by 15 minutes post-thaw and did not differ among nonfrozen storage treatments. In conclusion, sperm cells impervious to propidium iodide after frozen or nonfrozen storage were unable to maintain low intracellular calcium content. SBE is a better medium than T350 for frozen or nonfrozen storage of striped bass sperm. The inability to regulate intracellular calcium in striped bass sperm may be associated with poor activation of motility after 4 °C storage

  15. Deep Web video

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2016-07-12

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  16. Deep Space Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  17. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  18. Cardiac Biomarkers and Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bucholz, Emily M.; Whitlock, Richard P.; Zappitelli, Michael; Devarajan, Prasad; Eikelboom, John; Garg, Amit X.; Philbrook, Heather Thiessen; Devereaux, Philip J.; Krawczeski, Catherine D.; Kavsak, Peter; Shortt, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship of cardiac biomarkers with postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) among pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: Data from TRIBE-AKI, a prospective study of children undergoing cardiac surgery, were used to examine the association of cardiac biomarkers (N-type pro–B-type natriuretic peptide, creatine kinase-MB [CK-MB], heart-type fatty acid binding protein [h-FABP], and troponins I and T) with the development of postoperative AKI. Cardiac biomarkers were collected before and 0 to 6 hours after surgery. AKI was defined as a ≥50% or 0.3 mg/dL increase in serum creatinine, within 7 days of surgery. RESULTS: Of the 106 patients included in this study, 55 (52%) developed AKI after cardiac surgery. Patients who developed AKI had higher median levels of pre- and postoperative cardiac biomarkers compared with patients without AKI (all P < .01). Preoperatively, higher levels of CK-MB and h-FABP were associated with increased odds of developing AKI (CK-MB: adjusted odds ratio 4.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.56–13.41; h-FABP: adjusted odds ratio 2.76, 95% CI 1.27–6.03). When combined with clinical models, both preoperative CK-MB and h-FABP provided good discrimination (area under the curve 0.77, 95% CI 0.68–0.87, and 0.78, 95% CI 0.68–0.87, respectively) and improved reclassification indices. Cardiac biomarkers collected postoperatively did not significantly improve the prediction of AKI beyond clinical models. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative CK-MB and h-FABP are associated with increased risk of postoperative AKI and provide good discrimination of patients who develop AKI. These biomarkers may be useful for risk stratifying patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:25755241

  19. Brain hyperperfusion during cardiac operations. Cerebral blood flow measured in man by intra-arterial injection of xenon 133: evidence suggestive of intraoperative microembolism

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, L.; Hjelms, E.; Lindeburgh, T.

    1983-08-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by intra-arterial injection of xenon 133 in 29 patients during cardiac operations. Marked changes occurred in all patients. A normal and significant correlation with temperature and plasma pCO/sub 2/ (p less than 0.01) support the reliability of the method. Mean CBF measured between sternotomy and the onset of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was 38 ml/100 gm . min. The first minute of ECC was associated with a decrease in CBF in nine of 12 patients (p less than 0.02). During steady-state hypothermic ECC (temperature 29 degrees C), CBF increased unexpectedly to 64 ml/100 gm . min (p less than 0.01). Following rewarming steady-state normothermic ECC, mean CBF decreased to 42 ml/100 gm . min with signs of impairment of cerebral autoregulation. Ten and 20 minutes after termination of ECC, mean CBF was 40 and 41 ml/100 gm . min, respectively. Arterial PCO2 was found to be important in regulating CBF. The cerebral autoregulation maintained CBF down to arterial pressures of around 55 mm Hg. Below this level, CBF was significantly correlated with perfusion pressure (p less than 0.01). Multiple small emboli with a hyperemic border zone could cause a brain hyperperfusion, as seen in our patients during bypass. Measurements of CBF during ECC hold promise as a guide toward safer cardiac operations.

  20. Physics of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2013-04-01

    A normal heartbeat is orchestrated by the stable propagation of an excitation wave that produces an orderly contraction. In contrast, wave turbulence in the ventricles, clinically known as ventricular fibrillation (VF), stops the heart from pumping and is lethal without prompt defibrillation. I review experimental, computational, and theoretical studies that have shed light on complex dynamical phenomena linked to the initiation, maintenance, and control of wave turbulence. I first discuss advances made to understand the precursor state to a reentrant arrhythmia where the refractory period of cardiac tissue becomes spatiotemporally disordered; this is known as an arrhythmogenic tissue substrate. I describe observed patterns of transmembrane voltage and intracellular calcium signaling that can contribute to this substrate, and symmetry breaking instabilities to explain their formation. I then survey mechanisms of wave turbulence and discuss novel methods that exploit electrical pacing stimuli to control precursor patterns and low-energy pulsed electric fields to control turbulence.

  1. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N.Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  2. Trends in cardiac pacemaker batteries.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  3. The Pathogenesis of Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ping; Christia, Panagiota; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is characterized by net accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the cardiac interstitium and contributes to both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in many cardiac pathophysiologic conditions. This review manuscript discusses the cellular effectors and molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Although activated myofibroblasts are the main effector cells in the fibrotic heart, monocytes/macrophages, lymphocytes, mast cells, vascular cells and cardiomyocytes may also contribute to the fibrotic response by secreting key fibrogenic mediators. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, reactive oxygen species, mast cell-derived proteases, endothelin-1, the renin/angiotensin/aldosterone system, matricellular proteins and growth factors (such as TGF-β and PDGF) are some of the best-studied mediators implicated in cardiac fibrosis. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggests that cardiac fibrotic alterations may be reversible. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for initiation, progression and resolution of cardiac fibrosis is crucial to design anti-fibrotic treatment strategies for patients with heart disease. PMID:23649149

  4. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  5. Cardiac hypertrophy in chick embryos induced by hypothermia

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, C.; Johnson, T.R.; Caston, J.D.; Przybylski, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A decrease in incubation temperature from 38 to 32/sup 0/C elicits a decrease in chicken embryo size and weight with concomitant heart enlargement if done after day 10 of incubation. When assayed at day 18 of incubation with the hypothermia started on day 11 or 14, evidence is presented that the heart enlargement is an hypertrophy with no detectable hyperplasia. Supporting data are presented for various physical parameters showing increases in heart wet and dry weight, volume, area, wall thickness, and cell size. There was little difference in DNA content and nuclear (/sup 3/H)thymidine labeling index between hearts of control and hypothermic embryos. Hearts of hypothermic embryos showed a slight increase in water content and considerable increases in RNA, protein, and glycogen content per unit DNA. The average size of polysomes isolated from hypothermic hearts was larger than that of polysomes isolated from controls. Microscopic studies showed no obvious increase in amount of capillary beds, connective tissue, and myocardial cells. Annulate lamellae were found only in myocardial cells of hypothermic embryos in sparse amounts and low frequency but always associated with large deposits of glycogen.

  6. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  7. Cardiac Involvement in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is one of the subgroup of diseases called “seronegative spondyloarthropathy”. Frequently, it affects the vertebral colon and sacroiliac joint primarily and affects the peripheral joints less often. This chronic, inflammatory and rheumatic disease can also affect the extraarticular regions of the body. The extraarticular affections can be ophthalmologic, cardiac, pulmonary or neurologic. The cardiac affection can be 2-10% in all patients. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular dysfunction, aortitis, aortic regurgitation, pericarditis and cardiomegaly are reviewed. PMID:27222669

  8. Acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-feng; Wang, Xian

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac injury is the most serious adverse event in acupuncture therapy. The causes include needling chest points near the heart, the cardiac enlargement and pericardial effusion that will enlarge the projected area on the body surface and make the proper depth of needling shorter, and the incorrect needling method of the points. Therefore, acupuncture practitioners must be familiar with the points of the heart projected area on the chest and the correct needling methods in order to reduce the risk of acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

  9. Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery (VACS) offers a minimally invasive platform for most cardiac operations such as coronary and valve procedures. It includes robotic and thoracoscopic approaches and each has strengths and weaknesses. The success depends on appropriate hardware setup, staff training, and troubleshooting efficiency. In our institution, we often use VACS for robotic left-internal-mammary-artery takedown, mitral valve repair, and various intra-cardiac operations such as tricuspid valve repair, combined Maze procedure, atrial septal defect repair, ventricular septal defect repair, etc. Hands-on reminders and updated references are provided for reader’s further understanding of the topic. PMID:24455172

  10. Dual gated nuclear cardiac images

    SciTech Connect

    Zubal, I.G.; Bennett, G.W.; Bizais, Y.; Brill, A.B.

    1984-02-01

    A data acquisition system has been developed to collect camera events simultaneously with continually digitized electrocardiograph signals and respiratory flow measurements. Software processing of the list mode data creates more precisely gated cardiac frames. Additionally, motion blur due to heart movement during breathing is reduced by selecting events within a specific respiratory phase. Thallium myocardium images of a healthy volunteer show increased definition. This technique of combined cardiac and respiratory gating has the potential of improving the detectability of small lesions, and the characterization of cardiac wall motion.

  11. Dietary supplement of banana (Musa acuminata) peels hot-water extract to enhance the growth, anti-hypothermal stress, immunity and disease resistance of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Rattanavichai, Wutti; Cheng, Winton

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, Macrobrachium rosenbergii were fed with diets containing extracts of banana, Musa acuminate, fruit's peel (banana peels extract, BPE) at 0, 1.0, 3.0 and 6.0 g kg(-1). The non-specific immune parameters, disease resistance and anti-hypothermal stress were evaluated at 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 days of post feeding. Also, we demonstrated the percent weight gain (PWG), percent length gain (PLG), feeding efficiency (FE), and survival rate of giant freshwater prawn at 30, 60, 90, and 120 days of post feeding. The PWG, PLG, FE and survival rate of prawns fed at 0, 1.0, 3.0 and 6.0 g kg(-1) BPE-containing diets after 120 days were 69.5%, 75.4%, 77.8% and 83.3%; 21.8%, 23.6%, 27.8% and 33.9%; 0.60, 0.72, 0.75 and 0.90; and 55.4%, 62.2%, 62.3% and 75.3%, respectively. After 32 days of post feeding, a significant increase in total haemocyte count (THC), different haemocyte count (DHC), respiratory bursts (RBs), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, phenoloxidase (PO) activity and transglutaminase (TG) activity, and meanwhile, a decreased haemolymph coagulation time was observed. Furthermore, phagocytic activity and clearance efficiency of prawns against Lactococcus garvieae infection were significantly increased. Prawns challenged with L. garvieae after 32 days of feeding at 1.0, 3.0 and 6.0 g kg(-1) had a significantly higher survival rate (33.3%, 40.0% and 56.7%) than those fed with the control diet. Subsequently, hypothermal (14 °C) stress was 43.4%, 50.0% and 50.0%, respectively. Altogether, we therefore recommend the dietary BPE administration at 6.0 g kg(-1) promotes growth, anti-hypothermal stress, and enhance immunity and resistance against L. garvieae in M. rosenbergii.

  12. Recent developments in cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Rodak, D J

    1995-10-01

    Indications for cardiac pacing continue to expand. Pacing to improve functional capacity, which is now common, relies on careful patient selection and technical improvements, such as complex software algorithms and diagnostic capabilities.

  13. Robot-Assisted Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Go

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of the significant advantages of minimizing surgical trauma has resulted in the development of minimally invasive surgical procedures. Endoscopic surgery offers patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, and surgical robots have enhanced the ability and precision of surgeons. Consequently, technological advances have facilitated totally endoscopic robotic cardiac surgery, which has allowed surgeons to operate endoscopically rather than through a median sternotomy during cardiac surgery. Thus, repairs for structural heart conditions, including mitral valve plasty, atrial septal defect closure, multivessel minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting (MIDCAB), and totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), can be totally endoscopic. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery as minimally invasive cardiac surgery is reviewed. PMID:26134073

  14. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Then and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Philip K.

    1988-01-01

    As more and more patients survive a coronary event, the need for cardiac rehabilitation will increase. The author reviews the history and current status of this field and predicts what lies ahead. (JD)

  15. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Go

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of the significant advantages of minimizing surgical trauma has resulted in the development of minimally invasive surgical procedures. Endoscopic surgery offers patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, and surgical robots have enhanced the ability and precision of surgeons. Consequently, technological advances have facilitated totally endoscopic robotic cardiac surgery, which has allowed surgeons to operate endoscopically rather than through a median sternotomy during cardiac surgery. Thus, repairs for structural heart conditions, including mitral valve plasty, atrial septal defect closure, multivessel minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting (MIDCAB), and totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), can be totally endoscopic. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery as minimally invasive cardiac surgery is reviewed. PMID:26134073

  16. MedlinePlus: Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... available Research Clinical Trials Journal Articles Resources Reference Desk Find an Expert For You Patient Handouts Summary Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or ...

  17. Cardiac effects of noncardiac neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, F.J.; Berger, B.M.; Guerina, N.G.

    1984-11-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular abnormalities may occur as secondary manifestations of noncardiac neoplasms. The principal cardiac effects of noncardiac tumors include the direct results of metastases to the heart or lungs, the indirect effects of circulating tumor products (causing nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, myeloma-associated amyloidosis, pheochromocytoma-associated cardiac hypertrophy and myofibrillar degeneration, and carcinoid heart disease), and the undesired cardiotoxicities of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. 89 references.

  18. Gene Transfer into Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sarah E.; Westfall, Margaret V.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods for DNA transfection are often inefficient and toxic for terminally differentiated cells, such as cardiac myocytes. Vector-based gene transfer is an efficient approach for introducing exogenous cDNA into these types of primary cell cultures. In this chapter, separate protocols for adult rat cardiac myocyte isolation and gene transfer with recombinant adenovirus are provided and are routinely utilized for studying the effects of sarcomeric proteins on myofilament function. PMID:25836585

  19. Cardiac anatomy revisited

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Robert H; Razavi, Reza; Taylor, Andrew M

    2004-01-01

    In tomorrow's world of clinical medicine, students will increasingly be confronted by anatomic displays reconstructed from tomographically derived images. These images all display the structure of the various organs in anatomical orientation, this being determined in time-honoured fashion by describing the individual in the ‘anatomical position’, standing upright and facing the observer. It follows from this approach that all adjectives used to describe the organs should be related to the three orthogonal planes of the body. Unfortunately, at present this convention is not followed for the heart, even though most students are taught that the so-called ‘right chambers’ are, in reality, in front of their ‘left’ counterparts. Rigorous analysis of the tomographic images already available, along with comparison with dissected hearts displayed in attitudinally correct orientation, calls into question this continuing tendency to describe the heart in terms of its own orthogonal axes, but with the organ positioned on its apex, so that the chambers can artefactually be visualized with the right atrium and right ventricle in right-sided position. Although adequate for describing functional aspects, such as ‘right-to-left’ shunting across intracardiac communications, this convention falls short when used to describe the position of the artery that supplies the diaphragmatic surface of the heart. Currently known as the ‘posterior descending artery’, in reality it is positioned inferiorly, and its blockage produces inferior myocardial infarction. In this review, we extend the concept of describing cardiac structure in attitudinally correct orientation, showing also how access to tomographic images clarifies many aspects of cardiac structure previously considered mysterious and arcane. We use images prepared using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography, and compare them with dissection of the heart made in time

  20. Deep Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manshadi, Farzin

    2012-01-01

    ITU defines deep space as the volume of Space at distances from the Earth equal to, or greater than, 2 106 km. Deep Space Spacecraft have to travel tens of millions of km from Earth to reach the nearest object in deep space. Spacecraft mass and power are precious. Large ground-based antennas and very high power transmitters are needed to overcome large space loss and spacecraft's small antennas and low power transmitters. Navigation is complex and highly dependent on measurements from the Earth. Every deep space mission is unique and therefore very costly to develop.

  1. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Presented is Deep Space Network (DSN) progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition (TDA) research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  2. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Summaries are given of Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  3. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    DVT - discharge; Blood clot in the legs - discharge; Thromboembolism - discharge; Venous thromboembolism - deep vein thrombosis; Post-phlebitic syndrome - discharge; Post-thrombotic syndrome - discharge

  4. A deep reef in deep trouble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menza, C.; Kendall, M.; Rogers, C.; Miller, J.

    2007-10-01

    The well-documented degradation of shallower reefs which are often closer to land and more vulnerable to pollution, sewage and other human-related stressors has led to the suggestion that deeper, more remote offshore reefs could possibly serve as sources of coral and fish larvae to replenish the shallower reefs. Yet, the distribution, status, and ecological roles of deep (>30 m) Caribbean reefs are not well known. In this report, an observation of a deep reef which has undergone a recent extensive loss of coral cover is presented. In stark contrast to the typical pattern of coral loss in shallow reefs, the deeper corals were most affected. This report is the first description of such a pattern of coral loss on a deep reef.

  5. A deep reef in deep trouble

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menza, Charles; Kendall, M.; Rogers, C.; Miller, J.

    2007-01-01

    The well-documented degradation of shallower reefs which are often closer to land and more vulnerable to pollution, sewage and other human-related stressors has led to the suggestion that deeper, more remote offshore reefs could possibly serve as sources of coral and fish larvae to replenish the shallower reefs. Yet, the distribution, status, and ecological roles of deep (>30 m) Caribbean reefs are not well known. In this report, an observation of a deep reef which has undergone a recent extensive loss of coral cover is presented. In stark contrast to the typical pattern of coral loss in shallow reefs, the deeper corals were most affected. This report is the first description of such a pattern of coral loss on a deep reef.

  6. Drosophila Models of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Nicole; Wessells, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a useful model for cardiac diseases, both developmental abnormalities and adult functional impairment. Using the tools of both classical and molecular genetics, the study of the developing fly heart has been instrumental in identifying the major signaling events of cardiac field formation, cardiomyocyte specification, and the formation of the functioning heart tube. The larval stage of fly cardiac development has become an important model system for testing isolated preparations of living hearts for the effects of biological and pharmacological compounds on cardiac activity. Meanwhile, the recent development of effective techniques to study adult cardiac performance in the fly has opened new uses for the Drosophila model system. The fly system is now being used to study long-term alterations in adult performance caused by factors such as diet, exercise, and normal aging. The fly is a unique and valuable system for the study of such complex, long-term interactions, as it is the only invertebrate genetic model system with a working heart developmentally homologous to the vertebrate heart. Thus, the fly model combines the advantages of invertebrate genetics (such as large populations, facile molecular genetic techniques, and short lifespan) with physiological measurement techniques that allow meaningful comparisons with data from vertebrate model systems. As such, the fly model is well situated to make important contributions to the understanding of complicated interactions between environmental factors and genetics in the long-term regulation of cardiac performance. PMID:21377627

  7. [Stem cells and cardiac regeneration].

    PubMed

    Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Lorenti, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by virtue of their functional attributes: absence of tissue specific differentitated markers, capable of proliferation, able to self-maintain the population, able to produce a large number of differentiated, functional progeny, able to regenerate the tissue after injury. Cell therapy is an alternative for the treatment of several diseases, like cardiac diseases (cell cardiomyoplasty). A variety of stem cells could be used for cardiac repair: from cardiac and extracardiac sources. Each cell type has its own profile of advantages, limitations, and practicability issues in specific clinical settings. Differentiation of bone marrow stem cells to cardiomyocyte-like cells have been observed under different culture conditions. The presence of resident cardiac stem cell population capable of differentiation into cardiomyocyte or vascular lineage suggests that these cells could be used for cardiac tissue repair, and represent a great promise for clinical application. Stem cells mobilization by cytokines may also offer a strategy for cardiac regeneration. The use of stem cells (embryonic and adult) may hold the key to replacing cells lost in many devastating diseases. This potential benefit is a major focus for stem cell research.

  8. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world.

  9. Global availability of cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Turk-Adawi, Karam; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Grace, Sherry L

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most-prevalent noncommunicable disease and leading cause of death globally. Over 80% of deaths from CVD occur in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). To limit the socioeconomic impact of CVD, a comprehensive approach to health care is needed. Cardiac rehabilitation delivers a cost-effective and structured exercise, education, and risk reduction programme, which can reduce mortality by up to 25% in addition to improving a patient's functional capacity and lowering rehospitalization rates. Despite these benefits and recommendations in clinical practice guidelines, cardiac rehabilitation programmes are grossly under-used compared with revascularization or medical therapy for patients with CVD. Worldwide, only 38.8% of countries have cardiac rehabilitation programmes. Specifically, 68.0% of high-income and 23% of LMICs (8.3% for low-income and 28.2% for middle-income countries) offer cardiac rehabilitation programmes to patients with CVD. Cardiac rehabilitation density estimates range from one programme per 0.1 to 6.4 million inhabitants. Multilevel strategies to augment cardiac rehabilitation capacity and availability at national and international levels, such as supportive public health policies, systematic referral strategies, and alternative models of delivery are needed. PMID:25027487

  10. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W. Robb

    2015-01-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world. PMID:26269526

  11. Cardiac Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Although not available to all patients with narrowed arteries, balloon angioplasty has expanded dramatically since its introduction with an estimated further growth to 562,000 procedures in the U.S. alone by 1992. Growth has fueled demand for higher quality imaging systems that allow the cardiologist to be more accurate and increase the chances of a successful procedure. A major advance is the Digital Cardiac Imaging (DCI) System designed by Philips Medical Systems International, Best, The Netherlands and marketed in the U.S. by Philips Medical Systems North America Company. The key benefit is significantly improved real-time imaging and the ability to employ image enhancement techniques to bring out added details. Using a cordless control unit, the cardiologist can manipulate images to make immediate assessment, compare live x-ray and roadmap images by placing them side-by-side on monitor screens, or compare pre-procedure and post procedure conditions. The Philips DCI improves the cardiologist's precision by expanding the information available to him.

  12. The Implantable Cardiac Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, A. S.; Heimbecker, R. O.; Bigelow, W. G.

    1964-01-01

    The transistorized implanted pacemaker is proving to be an effective and reliable method for long-term pacing of the heart. All patients suffering from Stokes-Adams seizures were first given a trial period of conservative therapy, including isoproterenol (Isuprel), ephedrine, atropine and steroids. Twenty-four pacemaker implants were performed on 23 patients over a 21-month period. The preoperative insertion of a pacemaker cardiac catheter was a very valuable safety precaution. In this way the heart could be safely and reliably paced during the period of preoperative assessment and during the critical periods of anesthetic induction and thoracotomy. Infection did not occur, probably because of careful gas sterilization of the units. Various models of pacemakers are compared, and the reasons for two pacemaker failures are presented. There were two early deaths and one late death in the series. The relationship of progressive coronary disease to recent infarction is stressed. Patients having intermittent heart block frequently showed the picture of “competing pacemakers” postoperatively, but without deleterious effect. Twenty patients, between 54 and 88 years of age, are alive and well at the time of reporting, with excellent pacemaker response and no further Stokes-Adams attacks. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:14118681

  13. Exploring cardiac biophysical properties

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Younss Ait; Bollensdorff, Christian; Cazorla, Olivier; Magdi, Yacoub; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2015-01-01

    The heart is subject to multiple sources of stress. To maintain its normal function, and successfully overcome these stresses, heart muscle is equipped with fine-tuned regulatory mechanisms. Some of these mechanisms are inherent within the myocardium itself and are known as intrinsic mechanisms. Over a century ago, Otto Frank and Ernest Starling described an intrinsic mechanism by which the heart, even ex vivo, regulates its function on a beat-to-beat basis. According to this phenomenon, the higher the ventricular filling is, the bigger the stroke volume. Thus, the Frank-Starling law establishes a direct relationship between the diastolic and systolic function of the heart. To observe this biophysical phenomenon and to investigate it, technologic development has been a pre-requisite to scientific knowledge. It allowed for example to observe, at the cellular level, a Frank-Starling like mechanism and has been termed: Length Dependent Activation (LDA). In this review, we summarize some experimental systems that have been developed and are currently still in use to investigate cardiac biophysical properties from the whole heart down to the single myofibril. As a scientific support, investigation of the Frank-Starling mechanism will be used as a case study. PMID:26779498

  14. [Pharmaca Induced Cardiac Injury].

    PubMed

    Haen, Ekkehard

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs influence vital functions via the sympathetic and the parasympathetic system. Besides that hypersensitivity reactions and reactions by chemical radicals that arise in drug metabolism may directly harm the heart muscle cell. Cardiac adverse drug reactions (ADR) result in disturbances of the heart rhythm, negative inotropic effects, direct damage to the heart muscle cell, and reduced perfusion of heart tissue. Their importance is often neglected because pharmacologically similar drugs are licensed for completely different indications. This is of particular interest if more drugs are prescribed in combination. Now these effects may add up to pharmacodynamic drug-drug-interactions. Data banks like PSIAConline (www.psiac.de), individualization of drug prescription by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) combined with a clinical pharmacological report (www.konbest.de), as well as drug information systems such as AGATE (www.amuep-agate.de) are today of help not just to recognize such drug risks, but also to find professional and evidence based solutions for it. PMID:26800070

  15. Cardiac achalasia in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harjit; Sethi, R. S.; Gupta, H. L.; Khetarpal, S. K.

    1969-01-01

    Cardiac achalasia is a disorder not unknown in the paediatric age-group and may occur even in the neonatal period. This disorder should, therefore, be considered in all cases presenting with persistent vomiting, as well as in those with chronic respiratory disease in whom more common causes have been excluded. It is almost universally accepted that the disorder results from a disturbed function of ganglion cells in the distal oesophagus, as the disease has been reproduced in laboratory animals by denervation of the distal oesophagus. The exact pathogenesis of this degenerative change is not well understood. However, in at least some of the cases congenital absence of the ganglion cells may be responsible for this functional disturbance. This is inferred from the fact that the disease may be found in association with Hirschsprung disease, in which there is a congenital absence of ganglion cells in the terminal colon. Moreover, the occurrence of the disease in the neonatal period itself favours a congenital lesion. Surgery was preferred to other forms of treatment in the paediatric age-group in view of the reported equivocal response to mechanical dilatation and pre-disposition of children to respiratory complications. The results of surgery were satisfactory. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:5790932

  16. Gender and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Koch, Colleen Gorman; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2003-09-01

    The increased operative mortality and morbidity of women compared with men undergoing CABG surgery results from multiple differences in presentation, preoperative risk profile, and surgical factors. Investigators have found consistently that women present with a different preoperative risk profile than do men. Women more commonly have factors associated with increased short- and long-term mortality, such as less frequent use of IMA grafts. Differences in study design and patient population may contribute to variability in short- and long-term mortality among the various studies. The lack of representation of women in older clinical trials has hindered our understanding of the management of CAD in women; this situation must be remedied in future studies, [95]. Known physiologic and anatomic differences must be evaluated for their effects on outcomes. Further studies are needed to evaluate gender-related differences in autonomic responses to acute coronary occlusion, complications related to cardiopulmonary bypass, susceptibility to abnormalities in coagulation, and other factors that might account for discrepant outcomes in men versus women undergoing CABG [96]. Beyond these factors, specific pharmacologic and therapeutic considerations, such as the role of estrogen replacement therapy, need to be clarified. As further knowledge accumulates, it is hoped that gender-specific risk factors can be mitigated and protective factors exploited, thereby improving the outcomes for all cardiac surgery patients.

  17. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The progress is reported of Deep Space Network (DSN) research in the following areas: (1) flight project support, (2) spacecraft/ground communications, (3) station control and operations technology, (4) network control and processing, and (5) deep space stations. A description of the DSN functions and facilities is included.

  18. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition, research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is cited. Topics covered include: tracking and ground based navigation; spacecraft/ground communication; station control and operations technology; ground communications; and deep space stations.

  19. Deep-diving dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, John

    2012-08-01

    Dysbaric bone necrosis demonstrated in ichthyosaurs may be the result of prolonged deep diving rather than rapid ascent to escape predators. The bone lesions show structural and anatomical similarity to those that may occur in human divers and in the deep diving sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus.

  20. Deep Impact Spots Quarry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Sixty-nine days before it gets up-close-and-personal with a comet, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft successfully photographed its quarry, comet Tempel 1, at a distance of 39.7 million miles. The image, taken on April 25, 2005, is the first of many comet portraits Deep Impact will take leading up to its historic comet encounter on July 4.

  1. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators.

  2. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators. PMID:27016583

  3. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  4. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible.

  5. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    PubMed

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly. PMID:1493823

  6. Renal insufficiency in neonates after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Asfour, B; Bruker, B; Kehl, H G; Fründ, S; Scheld, H H

    1996-07-01

    Renal failure after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is well understood for infants, children and adults. The perioperative risk factors after CPB for immature kidneys in newborns are not well known. This retrospective study investigates perioperative risk factors for renal insufficiency in neonates. I) Preoperative: Age; weight, performed angiography, amount of dye used in angiography, renal disease and creatinine. II) Intraoperative: Duration of operation, duration of MAP < 40 mmHg, use of deep hypothermia, in-out fluid balance, duration of CPB, duration of circulatory arrest and cross-clamp time. III) Postoperative: Creatinine, use of catecholamines, use of nitroglycerine (NG) or phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDI) and additional antibiotics. From Jan. 1990 to Dec. 1994 50 neonates underwent cardiac surgery using CPB (n = 23 transposition of the great arteries; n = 4 pulmonary atresia; n = 6 critical pulmonary stenosis; n = 5 hypoplastic left heart syndrome; n = 3 Ebstein's anomaly; n = 2 interrupted arch with hypoplastic left ventricle; n = 2 single ventricle; n = 1 each: double outlet right ventricle, tricuspid atresia, critical aortic stenosis, rhabdo-myosarkoma, corrected transposition of the great arteries.) Thirty-one patients entered the study. Depending on the postoperative creatinine level two groups (group I: creatinine <1 mg/dl and group II: >1 mg/dl) were created. The diureses between the two groups did not differ. Comparing the patients of group I vs. group II, patients of group I were younger (mean age: 7.7 d. vs. 11.4 d), lighter (mean weight: 3260 g vs. 3430 g), less had angiography (44% vs. 77%), received more dye (mean amount: 14 ml vs. 7 ml), the duration of MAP < 40 mmHg while on CPB was longer (mean duration 3 min vs. 21 min), more patients were operated on using deep hypothermia (55% vs. 27%), the postoperative in-out-fluid balance was more positive (mean balance +413 ml vs. +221 ml), received postop. more frequently high

  7. Women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Ginzel, A R

    1996-01-01

    As the incidence of cardiovascular disease in women increases, the process of cardiac rehabilitation in women is becoming increasingly important to nurses. Specifically, the issue of women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation needs to be addressed by nurses. Most past and current research on cardiac rehabilitation and compliance with rehabilitation programs has been conducted on male subjects and cannot be accurately generalized to the female population. This article reviews current literature which addresses the issues of heart disease in women, cardiac rehabilitation and compliance in the general population, gender differences in cardiac rehabilitation, and compliance of women in cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:8657707

  8. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: From Developmental Biology to Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Heart disease affects millions worldwide and is a progressive condition involving loss of cardiomyocytes. The human heart has limited endogenous regenerative capacity and is thus an important target for novel regenerative medicine approaches. While cell-based regenerative therapies hold promise, cellular reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which represent more than half of the cells in the mammalian heart, may be an attractive alternative strategy for regenerating cardiac muscle. Recent advances leveraging years of developmental biology point to the feasibility of generating de novo cardiomyocyte-like cells from terminally differentiated non-myocytes in the heart in situ after ischemic damage. Here, we review the progress in cardiac reprogramming methods and consider the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in refining this technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:24030021

  9. Cardiac injury complicating traumatic asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Rosato, R M; Shapiro, M J; Keegan, M J; Connors, R H; Minor, C B

    1991-10-01

    During a 3-year period (1986-1989), 8 patients were seen at St. Louis University Medical Center exhibiting the stigmata of traumatic asphyxia. Fewer than 200 cases of traumatic asphyxia have been reported and there is only a single report of a cardiac injury. In this series, 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients were found to have an injury to the heart: two cardiac contusions and a ventricular rupture. Five patients were crushed in motor vehicle collisions, one by an elevator counterweight, and two patients by river barges. Injuries associated with these patients include pulmonary contusion, hemopneumothorax, traumatic pneumatocele, traumatic retinopathy, bone fractures, mental confusion, and liver contusion. There was one death in the series, a patient with rupture of the right ventricle and severe splenic and liver injuries. The cardiac status of the patients was evaluated by serial serum cardiac enzyme determinations, electrocardiograms, and echocardiography. This report illustrates the importance of complete cardiac evaluation in patients with traumatic asphyxia. PMID:1942148

  10. Cardiac complications in thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Auger, Dominique; Pennell, Dudley J

    2016-03-01

    The myocardium is particularly susceptible to complications from iron loading in thalassemia major. In the first years of life, severe anemia leads to high-output cardiac failure and death if not treated. The necessary supportive blood transfusions create loading of iron that cannot be naturally excreted, and this iron accumulates within tissues, including the heart. Free unbound iron catalyzes the formation of toxic hydroxyl radicals, which damage cells and cause cardiac dysfunction. Significant cardiac siderosis may present by the age of 10 and may lead to acute clinical heart failure, which must be treated urgently. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequently encountered iron-related arrhythmia. Iron chelation is effective at removing iron from the myocardium, at the expense of side effects that hamper compliance to therapy. Monitoring of myocardial iron content is mandatory for clinical management of cardiac risk. T2* cardiac magnetic resonance measures myocardial iron and is the strongest biomarker for prediction of heart failure and arrhythmic events. It has been calibrated to human myocardial tissue iron concentration and is highly reproducible across all magnetic resonance scanner vendors. As survival and patient age increases, endothelial dysfunction and diabetes may become new factors in the cardiovascular health of thalassemia patients. Promising new imaging technology and therapies could ameliorate the long-term prognosis.

  11. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies. PMID:27317993

  12. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies.

  13. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sandroni, Claudio; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction of neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest remains difficult. Previous guidelines recommended ocular reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and serum biomarkers for predicting poor outcome within 72h from cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines were based on patients not treated with targeted temperature management and did not appropriately address important biases in literature. Recent findings Recent evidence reviews detected important limitations in prognostication studies, such as low precision and, most importantly, lack of blinding, which may have caused a self-fulfilling prophecy and overestimated the specificity of index tests. Maintenance of targeted temperature using sedatives and muscle relaxants may interfere with clinical examination, making assessment of neurological status before 72 h or more after cardiac arrest unreliable. Summary No index predicts poor neurological outcome after cardiac arrest with absolute certainty. Prognostic evaluation should start not earlier than 72 h after ROSC and only after major confounders have been excluded so that reliable clinical examination can be made. Multimodality appears to be the most reasonable approach for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:25922894

  14. Deep Moonquakes: Remaining Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    2004-01-01

    We have recently reexamined more than 9000 United States previously unidentified seismic events catalogued during the Apollo landing missions and positively identified for the first time about 30 deep moonquake nests on the far side of the Moon. Although only a few of them are currently locatable, the relative arrival times among stations for the rest and presence or absence of seismic signals at particular stations suggest that either (a) the region within about $40\\deg$ of the antipode is aseismic or (b) the deep interior of the Moon severely attenuates or deflects seismic waves. Aside from the obvious question of how to distinguish between such hypothetical models, this effort raised several more general questions concerning the use of deep moonquake signals to infer the structure and dynamics of the deep interior of the Moon. Among more important ones are: (1) How reliable are the seismic arrival picks from which to compute the seismic velocity variations in the Moon? (2) How do the possible lateral variations in seismic velocity affect the computed radial variation in seismic velocity at depth? (3) Can we tell more about the distribution and mechanism of deep moonquakes from the newly expanded database of identified deep moonquakes? Questions (1) and (2) are especially important because the inferred deep internal structure of the Moon depends critically on their answers. Answering these questions may demand additional data collected on future lunar missions, but some may be resolved with further examination of the existing data.

  15. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  16. Deep levels in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, George D.

    1983-03-01

    The 3d transition element ion impurities in silicon are reviewed for the broad insight they provide in understanding deep levels in semiconductors. As interstitials, their interaction with the host tends to confine the d-levels to the forbidden gap, providing many deep states. The interaction at the substitutional site is best considered as an interaction with the lattice vacancy, into which the impurity is placed. This interaction tends to repel deep a1 and t2 levels from the gap. When the levels are present, they are mostly vacancy-like and the defect is likely to display the large lattice relaxations characteristic of the vacancy.

  17. Stochastic Aspects of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerma, Claudia; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Guevara, Michael; Glass, Leon

    2007-07-01

    Abnormal cardiac rhythms (cardiac arrhythmias) often display complex changes over time that can have a random or haphazard appearance. Mathematically, these changes can on occasion be identified with bifurcations in difference or differential equation models of the arrhythmias. One source for the variability of these rhythms is the fluctuating environment. However, in the neighborhood of bifurcation points, the fluctuations induced by the stochastic opening and closing of individual ion channels in the cell membrane, which results in membrane noise, may lead to randomness in the observed dynamics. To illustrate this, we consider the effects of stochastic properties of ion channels on the resetting of pacemaker oscillations and on the generation of early afterdepolarizations. The comparison of the statistical properties of long records showing arrhythmias with the predictions from theoretical models should help in the identification of different mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmias.

  18. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  19. Mechanical regulation of cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Yalcin, Huseyin C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces are essential contributors to and unavoidable components of cardiac formation, both inducing and orchestrating local and global molecular and cellular changes. Experimental animal studies have contributed substantially to understanding the mechanobiology of heart development. More recent integration of high-resolution imaging modalities with computational modeling has greatly improved our quantitative understanding of hemodynamic flow in heart development. Merging these latest experimental technologies with molecular and genetic signaling analysis will accelerate our understanding of the relationships integrating mechanical and biological signaling for proper cardiac formation. These advances will likely be essential for clinically translatable guidance for targeted interventions to rescue malforming hearts and/or reconfigure malformed circulations for optimal performance. This review summarizes our current understanding on the levels of mechanical signaling in the heart and their roles in orchestrating cardiac development. PMID:25191277

  20. Cardiac Regenerative Capacity and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    The heart holds the monumental yet monotonous task of maintaining circulation. Although cardiac function is critical to other organs and to life itself, mammals are not equipped with significant natural capacity to replace heart muscle that has been lost by injury. This deficiency plays a role in leaving millions worldwide each year vulnerable to heart failure. By contrast, certain other vertebrate species like zebrafish are strikingly good at heart regeneration. A cellular and molecular understanding of endogenous regenerative mechanisms, combined with advances in methodology to transplant cells, together project a future in which cardiac muscle regeneration can be therapeutically stimulated in injured human hearts. This review will focus on what has been discovered recently about cardiac regenerative capacity and how natural mechanisms of heart regeneration in model systems are stimulated and maintained. PMID:23057748

  1. Cardiac output during human sleep.

    PubMed

    Miller, J C; Horvath, S M

    1976-10-01

    Impedance cardiogram and sleep EEG were recorded from four male and four female subjects, aged 21 to 22 years, during one night in the laboratory following one adaptation night. Cardiac output fell approximately 26% during the night as a consequence of diminished stroke volume, the lowest values of both occurring during the latter portion of the night, dominated by SREM (rapid-eye-movement stage). Intracycle comparisons between SREM and SWS (slow wave sleep) or between eye movement burst and non-burst SREM showed no significant differences in stroke volume or cardiac output. Pre-ejection period and systolic ejection period were measured and discussed. The non-coincidence of the nadir of metabolic activity, expressed as cardiac output, and the apex of slow-wave sleep activity supported the concept of slow-wave sleep as a period of physiological restoration.

  2. Electrophysiological Cardiac Modeling: A Review.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Mohammadali; Umapathy, Karthikeyan; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiological modeling in conjunction with experimental and clinical findings has contributed to better understanding of electrophysiological phenomena in various species. As our knowledge on underlying electrical, mechanical, and chemical processes has improved over time, mathematical models of the cardiac electrophysiology have become more realistic and detailed. These models have provided a testbed for various hypotheses and conditions that may not be easy to implement experimentally. In addition to the limitations in experimentally validating various scenarios implemented by the models, one of the major obstacles for these models is computational complexity. However, the ever-increasing computational power of supercomputers facilitates the clinical application of cardiac electrophysiological models. The potential clinical applications include testing and predicting effects of pharmaceutical agents and performing patient-specific ablation and defibrillation. A review of studies involving these models and their major findings are provided.

  3. Multimodality treatment for cardiac angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Fu, Ganglan; Jiang, Huiqi; Zeng, Kuan; Hua, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac angiosarcoma is a rare and highly malignant condition. Besides performing complete surgical excision, it remains controversial as to whether survival can be improved with additional treatment. We herein describe a 30-year-old man with a right atrial angiosarcoma. He underwent two operations for the resection of the primary lesion, and the patient's metastatic lesions involved an intestinal segment. With chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and molecular targeted therapy, he survived for 33 months. The literature describing adjuvant therapy for cardiac angiosarcoma, which is mostly case reports, is also reviewed. In conclusion, the limited evidence suggests that multimodality treatment for cardiac angiosarcoma is a beacon of hope to improve the survival of such patients.

  4. Electrophysiological Cardiac Modeling: A Review.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Mohammadali; Umapathy, Karthikeyan; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiological modeling in conjunction with experimental and clinical findings has contributed to better understanding of electrophysiological phenomena in various species. As our knowledge on underlying electrical, mechanical, and chemical processes has improved over time, mathematical models of the cardiac electrophysiology have become more realistic and detailed. These models have provided a testbed for various hypotheses and conditions that may not be easy to implement experimentally. In addition to the limitations in experimentally validating various scenarios implemented by the models, one of the major obstacles for these models is computational complexity. However, the ever-increasing computational power of supercomputers facilitates the clinical application of cardiac electrophysiological models. The potential clinical applications include testing and predicting effects of pharmaceutical agents and performing patient-specific ablation and defibrillation. A review of studies involving these models and their major findings are provided. PMID:27652454

  5. [Risk management in cardiac anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Inada, Eiichi

    2008-05-01

    Cardiac anesthesia carries high risk because of the patient's cardiac and coexisting diseases and rapid and complex hemodynamic changes during surgery. We should be ready to treat hemodynamic changes which may rapidly deteriorate into a vicious cycle. Many potent drugs and life-support devices are used. The drugs should be properly labeled to avoid drug error. Prefilled drug syringes and ready-to-use bags are helpful to avoid mixture error. Syringe and infusion pumps should be properly set. All the infusion systems should be checked in a systematical way. Blood management including blood transfusion and coagulation is important. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) may cause thrombosis. Heparin and heparin-coated catheter should be avoided in patients with HIT. Causes of bleeding tendency should be sort out and treated accordingly. Protamine reactions including hypotension and pulmonary hypertension can be catastrophic. Lastly, intimate communication between surgeons, anesthesiologists, medical engineers, and nurses is essential to perform cardiac surgery safely.

  6. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Scheller, RoseAnn L; Johnson, Laurie; Lorts, Angela; Ryan, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the pediatric population is a rare and potentially devastating occurrence. An understanding of the differential diagnosis for the etiology of the cardiac arrest allows for the most effective emergency care and provides the patient with the best possible outcome. Pediatric SCA can occur with or without prodromal symptoms and may occur during exercise or rest. The most common cause is arrhythmia secondary to an underlying channelopathy, cardiomyopathy, or myocarditis. After stabilization, evaluation should include electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, and echocardiogram. Management should focus on decreasing the potential for recurring arrhythmia, maintaining cardiac preload, and thoughtful medication use to prevent exacerbation of the underlying condition. The purpose of this review was to provide the emergency physician with a concise and current review of the incidence, differential diagnosis, and management of pediatric patients presenting with SCA. PMID:27585126

  7. MR and CT appearance of cardiac hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, J.L.; Kessler, R.M.; Raizada, V.; Williamson, M.R.

    1996-05-01

    We present a case of cardiac hemangioma in a symptomatic patient. MR and CT each have specific characteristics that should make one consider including or excluding this in the differential diagnosis of a cardiac tumor. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  9. [Cardiac arrhythmias: Diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Waldmann, V; Marijon, E

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias, with, on top of the list, atrial fibrillation, are frequent conditions and any physician might have to get involved at any stage of patient care (from diagnosis to treatment), without always having the opportunity to immediately refer to the cardiologist. The aim of this review is to present a summary of pathophysiology, clinical and electrocardiographic presentations, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for the main cardiac arrhythmias. Supra-ventricular tachycardias (atrial fibrillation and flutter, atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardias) and ventricular tachycardias will be consecutively presented and discussed.

  10. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  11. Benign cardiac tumours, malignant arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kimberley A; Wong, Kenny K; Tipple, Marion; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2010-01-01

    Four cases of pediatric cardiac tumours (PCTs) associated with ventricular arrhythmias are reported. Sudden cardiac death attributable to the tumour occurred in two children. A third child received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and the fourth had persistent ventricular arrhythmia despite medical therapy. Most PCTs are considered benign; however, the development of malignant arrhythmias may complicate the management of these tumours in some patients. The literature regarding the arrhythmogenic potential of PCTs and the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients is reviewed. The series highlights the deficiency of prognostic information for this cohort. PMID:20151061

  12. Cardiac Metastasis from Invasive Thymoma Via the Superior Vena Cava: Cardiac MRI Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Dursun, Memduh Sarvar, Sadik; Cekrezi, Bledi; Kaba, Erkan; Bakir, Baris; Toker, Alper

    2008-07-15

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and metastatic deposits are more common than primary cardiac tumors. We present cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 50-year-old woman with invasive thymoma. Cardiac MRI revealed a heterogeneous, lobulated anterior mediastinal mass invading the superior vena cava and extending to the right atrium. In cine images there was no invasion to the right atrial wall.

  13. [Cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Seki, S; Mizuguchi, A; Tsuchida, H; Watanabe, H; Namiki, A

    1990-04-01

    The cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography, NCCOM3, was evaluated in adult patients (n = 12) who were subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting. Values of cardiac output measured by impedance cardiography were compared to those by the thermodilution method. Changes of base impedance level used as an index of thoracic fluid volume were also investigated before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Correlation coefficient (r) of the values obtained by thermodilution with impedance cardiography was 0.79 and the mean difference was 1.29 +/- 16.9 (SD)% during induction of anesthesia. During the operation, r was 0.83 and the mean difference was -14.6 +/- 18.7%. The measurement by impedance cardiography could be carried out through the operation except when electro-cautery was used. Base impedance level before CPB was significantly lower as compared with that after CPB. There was a negative correlation between the base impedance level and central venous pressure (CVP). No patients showed any signs suggesting lung edema and all the values of CVP, pulmonary artery pressure and blood gas analysis were within normal ranges. From the result of this study, it was concluded that cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography was useful in cardiac surgery, but further detailed examinations will be necessary on the relationship between the numerical values of base impedance and the clinical state of the patients. PMID:2362347

  14. Health Literacy Predicts Cardiac Knowledge Gains in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Colleen C.; Rawson, Katherine; Hughes, Joel W.; Waechter, Donna; Rosneck, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health literacy is increasingly recognised as a potentially important patient characteristic related to patient education efforts. We evaluated whether health literacy would predict gains in knowledge after completion of patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Method: This was a re-post observational analysis study design based on…

  15. Cardiac torsion and electromagnetic fields: the cardiac bioinformation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Burleson, Katharine O; Schwartz, Gary E

    2005-01-01

    Although in physiology the heart is often referred to as a simple piston pump, there are in fact two additional features that are integral to cardiac physiology and function. First, the heart as it contracts in systole, also rotates and produces torsion due to the structure of the myocardium. Second, the heart produces a significant electromagnetic field with each contraction due to the coordinated depolarization of myocytes producing a current flow. Unlike the electrocardiogram, the magnetic field is not limited to volume conduction and extends outside the body. The therapeutic potential for interaction of this cardioelectromagnetic field both within and outside the body is largely unexplored. It is our hypothesis that the heart functions as a generator of bioinformation that is central to normative functioning of body. The source of this bioinformation is based on: (1) vortex blood flow in the left ventricle; (2) a cardiac electromagnetic field and both; (3) heart sounds; and (4) pulse pressure which produce frequency and amplitude information. Thus, there is a multidimensional role for the heart in physiology and biopsychosocial dynamics. Recognition of these cardiac properties may result in significant implications for new therapies for cardiovascular disease based on increasing cardiac energy efficiency (coherence) and bioinformation from the cardioelectromagnetic field. Research studies to test this hypothesis are suggested.

  16. Nurturing Deep Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Rachael

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the missing ingredient in school reform is soul, that is, deep connections among students, teachers, and administrators. Discusses five principles of leadership with soul: Personalize, pacing, permission, protection, and paradox. (PKP)

  17. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The various systems and subsystems are discussed for the Deep Space Network (DSN). A description of the DSN is presented along with mission support, program planning, facility engineering, implementation and operations.

  18. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Deep Space Network progress report is presented dealing with in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  19. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations. The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are emphasized.

  20. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The facilities, programming system, and monitor and control system for the deep space network are described. Ongoing planetary and interplanetary flight projects are reviewed, along with tracking and ground-based navigation, communications, and network and facility engineering.

  1. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress on the Deep Space Network (DSN) supporting research and technology, advanced development, engineering and implementation, and DSN operations is presented. The functions and facilities of the DSN are described.

  2. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A report is given of the Deep Space Networks progress in (1) flight project support, (2) tracking and data acquisition research and technology, (3) network engineering, (4) hardware and software implementation, and (5) operations.

  3. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are considered. Progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is reported.

  4. Cardiac tamponade: an unusual clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Eakle, J F; Goodin, R R

    2001-02-01

    Pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade is an unusual presentation of lymphoma, although cardiac involvement is often a late finding in widespread malignancy. Clinical identification can be difficult ante-mortem. New cardiac symptoms or classic findings of cardiac tamponade should prompt aggressive investigation. We present a case of B-cell lymphoma that initially presented as pericardial effusion with tamponade and discuss the characteristic physical findings and radiographic data that assist in diagnosis. PMID:11441582

  5. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization, of the Deep Space Network are summarized. Deep Space stations, ground communications, and network operations control capabilities are described. The network is designed for two-way communications with unmanned spacecraft traveling approximately 1600 km from earth to the farthest planets in the solar system. It has provided tracking and data acquisition support for the following projects: Ranger, Surveyor, Mariner, Pioneer, Apollo, Helios, Viking, and the Lunar Orbiter.

  6. Reading Knee-Deep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Freire told his audience at a seminar at the University of Massachusetts, "You need to read knee-deep in texts, for deeper than surface meanings, and you need to know the words to be able to do it" (quoted in Cleary, 2003). In a children's literature class, fifteen teachers and I traveled along a path that moved us toward reading knee-deep as we…

  7. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized along with deep space station, ground communication, and network operations control capabilities. Mission support of ongoing planetary/interplanetary flight projects is discussed with emphasis on Viking orbiter radio frequency compatibility tests, the Pioneer Venus orbiter mission, and Helios-1 mission status and operations. Progress is also reported in tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  8. Exploration for deep coal

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-15

    The most important factor in safe mining is the quality of the roof. The article explains how the Rosebud Mining Co. conducts drilling and exploration in 11 deep coal mine throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rosebud uses two Atlas Copco CS10 core drilling rigs mounted on 4-wheel drive trucks. The article first appeared in Atlas Copco's in-house magazine, Deep Hole Driller. 3 photos.

  9. Cardiac transplantation in Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, R M; Dubowitz, V

    1992-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy is associated with abnormal cardiac features in about 75% of cases; up to one-third will develop ventricular dilatation leading to congestive cardiac failure. As this form of muscular dystrophy is relatively benign, failure to respond to medical treatment warrants assessment for cardiac transplantation.

  10. Telocytes in exercise-induced cardiac growth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junjie; Chen, Ping; Qu, Yi; Yu, Pujiao; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbao; Fu, Siyi; Bei, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong

    2016-05-01

    Exercise can induce physiological cardiac growth, which is featured by enlarged cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes. Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified distinct interstitial cell type, existing in many tissues and organs including heart. TCs have been shown to form a tandem with cardiac stem/progenitor cells in cardiac stem cell niches, participating in cardiac regeneration and repair. Although exercise-induced cardiac growth has been confirmed as an important way to promote cardiac regeneration and repair, the response of cardiac TCs to exercise is still unclear. In this study, 4 weeks of swimming training was used to induce robust healthy cardiac growth. Exercise can induce an increase in cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes as determined by Wheat Germ Lectin and EdU staining respectively. TCs were identified by three immunofluorescence stainings including double labelling for CD34/vimentin, CD34/platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and CD34/PDGF receptor-β. We found that cardiac TCs were significantly increased in exercised heart, suggesting that TCs might help control the activity of cardiac stem/progenitor cells, cardiomyocytes or endothelial cells. Adding cardiac TCs might help promote cardiac regeneration and renewal. PMID:26987685

  11. Mathematics and the Heart: Understanding Cardiac Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champanerkar, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    This paper illustrates a biological application of the concepts of relative change and area under a curve, from mathematics. We study two biological measures "relative change in cardiac output" and "cardiac output", which are predictors of heart blockages and other related ailments. Cardiac output refers to the quantity of…

  12. Cardiac sarcoidosis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, S W; Sharma, R; Underwood, R; Mittal, T

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is one of the most serious and unpredictable aspects of this disease state. Heart involvement frequently presents with arrhythmias or conduction disease, although myocardial infiltration resulting in congestive heart failure may also occur. The prognosis in cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable, which relates to the heterogeneous nature of heart involvement and marked differences between racial groups. Electrocardiography and echocardiography often provide the first clue to the diagnosis, but advanced imaging studies using positron emission tomography and MRI, in combination with nuclear isotope perfusion scanning are now essential to the diagnosis and management of this condition. The identification of clinically occult cardiac sarcoidosis and the management of isolated and/or asymptomatic heart involvement remain both challenging and contentious. Corticosteroids remain the first treatment choice with the later substitution of immunosuppressive and steroid-sparing therapies. Heart transplantation is an unusual outcome, but when performed, the results are comparable or better than heart transplantation for other disease states. We review the epidemiology, developments in diagnostic techniques and the management of cardiac sarcoidosis.

  13. Primary Cardiac Solitary Fibrous Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Primary cardiac solitary fibrous tumors were reviewed. They are classified as pericardial tumors. Their incidences are very rare. Only 16 cases were reported in the literature. Basically, surgical treatments are performed. Their prognoses are generally good, although malignant cases are also reported. PMID:26156195

  14. Real time cardiac radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jarkewicz, G.G.

    1986-04-29

    A data acquisition system is described for use in radionuclide cardiac imaging of a patient having been administered a myocardium specific radionuclide, comprising: (a) means for monitoring the electrical activity of the heart; (b) first temporary storage means for accumulating respective pages of data corresponding to nuclear events during each cardiac cycle; (c) means, responsive to the means for monitoring, for determining the time duration of each successive cardiac cycle; (d) means for comparing each determined duration of a cardiac cycle with a preselected time duration range; (e) second temporary storage means; and (f) means for conditionally transferring pages of data from the first temporary storage means to the second temporary storage means if the measured duration associated with each page has predetermined correspondence with the preselected duration range, whereby pages of data having the predetermined correspondence may be collated into a quasi-real time study, while pages of data having different correspondence with the preselected time duration range are discarded from the study.

  15. Cardiac R-wave detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebben, V. D.

    1968-01-01

    Cardiac R wave detector obtains the systolic contraction signal of the human heart and uses it as a reference signal for the heart-assist pump cycle. It processes the electrocardiac signal /QRS wave complex/ of the natural heart in a sequence of operations which essentially elimates all components from the input signal except the R wave.

  16. The cardiac patient in Ramadan

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam. During this month, the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide observe an absolute fast from dawn to sunset without any drink or food. Our review shows that the impact of fasting during Ramadan on patients with stable cardiac disease is minimal and does not lead to any increase in acute events. Most patients with the stable cardiac disease can fast safely. Most of the drug doses and their regimen are easily manageable during this month and may need not to be changed. Ramadan fasting is a healthy nonpharmacological means for improving cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the Muslims, who suffer from chronic diseases, insist on fasting Ramadan despite being exempted by religion. The Holy Quran specifically exempts the sick from fasting. This is particularly relevant if fasting worsens one's illness or delays recovery. Patients with unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, uncontrolled hypertension, decompensated heart failure, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery or any debilitating diseases should avoid fasting. PMID:27144139

  17. Bifurcation theory and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Karagueuzian, Hrayr S; Stepanyan, Hayk; Mandel, William J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we review two types of dynamic behaviors defined by the bifurcation theory that are found to be particularly useful in describing two forms of cardiac electrical instabilities that are of considerable importance in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. The first is action potential duration (APD) alternans with an underlying dynamics consistent with the period doubling bifurcation theory. This form of electrical instability could lead to spatially discordant APD alternans leading to wavebreak and reentrant form of tachyarrhythmias. Factors that modulate the APD alternans are discussed. The second form of bifurcation of importance to cardiac arrhythmogenesis is the Hopf-homoclinic bifurcation that adequately describes the dynamics of the onset of early afterdepolarization (EAD)-mediated triggered activity (Hopf) that may cause ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF respectively). The self-termination of the triggered activity is compatible with the homoclinic bifurcation. Ionic and intracellular calcium dynamics underlying these dynamics are discussed using available experimental and simulation data. The dynamic analysis provides novel insights into the mechanisms of VT/VF, a major cause of sudden cardiac death in the US.

  18. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  19. The Cardiac Complications of Methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Cunningham, Neil J; MacIsaac, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Methamphetamines are increasingly popular drugs of abuse in Australia, and are rising in purity. The rising popularity and purity of methamphetamines has notably increased demands upon Australian medical services. Methamphetamines are sympathomimetic amines with a range of adverse effects upon multiple organ systems. Cardiovascular complications are the second leading cause of death in methamphetamine abusers, and there appears to be a high prevalence of cardiac pathology. Cardiovascular pathology frequently seen in methamphetamine abusers includes hypertension, aortic dissection, acute coronary syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy. The rising prevalence of methamphetamine abuse is likely to increase the burden of cardiovascular pathology in Australians. A National Parliamentary Enquiry was opened in March 2015 to address concerns regarding the medical and social impacts of methamphetamine abuse. From April 2015, a National 'Ice Taskforce' was also created in parallel. Reversal of cardiac pathology appears to be achievable with abstinence from methamphetamines and initiation of appropriate treatment. It is key to appreciate that the pathogenesis of methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications arises as a result of the specific toxic effects of methamphetamines. Clinical management is hence individualised; suggested management approaches for methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications are detailed within this article.

  20. Phenomics of Cardiac Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2014-01-01

    Forward genetic studies have identified several chloride (Cl−) channel genes, including CFTR, ClC-2, ClC-3, CLCA, Bestrophin, and Ano1, in the heart. Recent reverse genetic studies using gene targeting and transgenic techniques to delineate the functional role of cardiac Cl− channels have shown that Cl− channels may contribute to cardiac arrhythmogenesis, myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure, and cardioprotection against ischemia reperfusion. The study of physiological or pathophysiological phenotypes of cardiac Cl− channels, however, is complicated by the compensatory changes in the animals in response to the targeted genetic manipulation. Alternatively, tissue-specific conditional or inducible knockout or knockin animal models may be more valuable in the phenotypic studies of specific Cl− channels by limiting the effect of compensation on the phenotype. The integrated function of Cl− channels may involve multiprotein complexes of the Cl− channel subproteome. Similar phenotypes can be attained from alternative protein pathways within cellular networks, which are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The phenomics approach, which characterizes phenotypes as a whole phenome and systematically studies the molecular changes that give rise to particular phenotypes achieved by modifying the genotype under the scope of genome/proteome/phenome, may provide more complete understanding of the integrated function of each cardiac Cl− channel in the context of health and disease. PMID:23720326

  1. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  2. Dermatoglyphic's in Congenital Cardiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Brijendra, Singh; Renu, Gupta; Dushyant, Agrawal; Rajneesh, Garg; Sunil, Katri

    2016-02-01

    Various dermatoglyphic parameters like finger print pattern, atd angle, absolute ridge count & ab, bc ,cd, and ad ridge counts were observed in 150 cases of congenital cardiac disease, comprising of 72 cases of Ventricular Septal Defects (VSD), 60 cases of Atrial Septal Defects (ASD), 9 cases of Coarctation of Aorta (COA) & 9 cases of Tetralogy of Fallot's (TOF). Same dermatoglyphic parameters were also studied in 300 controls and statistical comparison of cases and controls was done. In our study it was observed that the congenital cardiac disease cases exhibited preponderance of whorls (55.8%) with decrease in loop pattern (36.2%) as compared to those of controls and the difference was highly significant (P<0.001). The difference in the mean total finger ridge count (TFRC) of the controls and of the cases of Congenital Cardiac Diseases (CCD) was found to be highly significant (P<0.001), while the  mean atd angle in the cases of Congenital Cardiac Disease (CCD) was widen up and was statistically significant too. The mean ab, the mean bc ridge, the mean cd ridge and the mean ad ridge counts were also higher in the various type of CCD as compared to that controls and on statistical comparison, the difference was found to be highly significant.

  3. [Long-term cardiac rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Tormo Alfonso, V

    1995-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation for life-time in a patient who has suffered coronary pathology is considered as appropriate. The reasons for such an opinion are given, as well as the two most indicated courses of action, being this rehabilitation at home and coronary clubs.

  4. MedlinePlus: Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal Articles References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine) Article: A Prospective Study of Sudden Cardiac Death ... Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department ...

  5. MR imaging of cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Patrick J; Kurian, John B; Jones, Tim R; Sivananthan, Mohan U

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an important tool in the evaluation of cardiac neoplasms. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and gadolinium-enhanced sequences are used for anatomic definition and tissue characterization, whereas cine gradient-echo imaging is used to assess functional effects. Recent improvements in pulse sequences for cardiac MR imaging have led to superior image quality, with reduced motion artifact and improved signal-to-noise ratio and tissue contrast. Although there is some overlap in the MR imaging appearances of cardiac tumors, particularly of primary malignancies, differences in characteristic locations and features should allow confident differentiation between benign and malignant tumors. Indicators of malignancy at MR imaging are invasive behavior, involvement of the right side of the heart or the pericardium, tissue inhomogeneity, diameter greater than 5 cm, and enhancement after administration of gadolinium contrast material (as a result of higher tissue vascularity). Concomitant pericardial or pleural effusions are rare in benign processes but occur in about 50% of cases of malignant tumors. MR imaging offers improved resolution, a larger field of view, and superior soft-tissue contrast compared with those of echocardiography, suggesting that knowledge of the MR imaging features of cardiac neoplasms is important for accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:16160110

  6. Molecular Modeling of Cardiac Troponin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Edward P.

    The cardiac thin filament regulates interactions of actin and myosin, the force-generating elements of muscular contraction. Over the past several decades many details have been discovered regarding the structure and function of the cardiac thin filament and its components, including cardiac troponin (cTn). My hypothesis is that signal propagation occurs between distant ends of the cardiac troponin complex through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cTn and tropomyosin (Tm). I propose a model of the thin filament that encompasses known structures of cTn, Tm and actin to gain insight into cardiac troponin's allosteric regulation of thin filament dynamics. By performing molecular dynamics simulations of cTn in conjunction with overlapping Tm in two conditions, with and without calcium bound to site II of cardiac troponin C (cTnC), I found a combination of calcium-dependent changes in secondary structure and dynamics throughout the cTn-Tm complex. I then applied this model to investigate familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), a disease of the sarcomere that is one of the most commonly occurring genetic causes of heart disease. Approximately 15% of known FHC-related mutations are found in cardiac troponin T (cTnT), most of which are in or flank the alpha-helical N-tail domain TNT1. TNT1 directly interacts with overlapping Tm coiled coils. Using this model I identified effects of TNT1 mutations that propagate to the cTn core where site II of cTnC, the regulatory site of calcium binding in the thin filament, is located. Specifically, I found that mutations in TNT1 alter the flexibility of TNT1 and that the flexibility of TNT1 is inversely proportional to the cooperativity of calcium activation of the thin filament. Further, I identified a pathway of propagation of structural and dynamic changes linking TNT1 to site II of cTnC. Mutation-induced changes at site II cTnC alter calcium coordination which corresponds to biophysical measurements of calcium

  7. Carney complex with biatrial cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Havrankova, Eniko; Stenova, Emoke; Olejarova, Ingrid; Sollarova, Katarina; Kinova, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas make up approximately 50% of all benign cardiac tumors and represented 86% of all surgically treated cardiac tumors. Most of them originated from the left atrium, in some cases from both of atria. We report a case of male patient with biatrial myxomas and other extra-cardiac involvement: hypophyseal adenoma, enlargement of thyroid gland, tubular adenoma polyp of colon and bilateral large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumor (LCCSCT) of testis. These findings led to the diagnosis of Carney's complex, which is a syndrome with multiple neoplasias, cardiac myxomas, lentigines, and endocrine abnormalities. A genetic test confirm this diagnosis. PMID:24088910

  8. Bioactive scaffolds for engineering vascularized cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Loraine; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Functional vascularization is a key requirement for the development and function of most tissues, and most critically cardiac muscle. Rapid and irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes during cardiac infarction directly results from the lack of blood supply. Contractile cardiac grafts, engineered using cardiovascular cells in conjunction with biomaterial scaffolds, are an actively studied method for cardiac repair. In this article, we focus on biomaterial scaffolds designed to mediate the development and maturation of vascular networks, by immobilized growth factors. The interactive effects of multiple vasculogenic factors are discussed in the context of cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:20857391

  9. Cardiac Function and Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Kimberly E; Parker, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac function and dysfunction are important in the clinical outcomes of sepsis and septic shock. Cardiac dysfunction is not a single entity, but is a broad spectrum of syndromes that result in biventricular cardiac dysfunction manifested by both systolic and diastolic dysfunction and is influenced by cardiac loading conditions (ie, preload and afterload). Elucidating the underlying pathophysiology has proved to be complex. This article emphasizes the underlying pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction and explores recent evidence related to diagnosis, including the utility of biomarkers, the role of echocardiography, and management goals and treatment. PMID:27229645

  10. Deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Gargi; Roy, Subesha Basu; Haldar, Swaraj; Bhattacharya, Rabindra

    2010-12-01

    Occlusive clot formation in the veins causes venous thrombosis, the site most common in the deep veins of leg, called deep vein thrombosis. The clot can block blood flow and when it breaks off, called an embolism which in turn can damage the vital organs. Venous thrombosis occurs via three mechanisms ie, Virchow's triad. The mechanisms are decreased flow rate of blood, damage to the blood vessel wall and an increased tendency of the blood to clot. There are several factors which can increase a person's risk for deep vein thrombosis. The symptoms of deep vein thrombosis in the legs are pain, swelling and redness of the part. One variety of venous thrombosis is phlegmasia alba dolens where the leg becomes pale and cool. Investigations include Doppler ultrasound examination of the limb, D-dimer blood test, plethysmography of the legs, x-rays to show vein in the affected area (venography). Hospitalisation is necessary in some cases with some risk factors. The mainstream of treatment is with anticoagulants, mostly low molecular weight heparin for 6 months. Deep venous thrombosis is a rising problem. Early diagnosis and treatment is associated with a good prognosis.

  11. Clinically applicable gated cardiac computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cipriano, P.R.; Nassi, M.; Brody, W.R.

    1983-03-01

    Several attempts have been made to improve cardiac images obtained with x-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) by stopping cardiac motion through electrocardiographic gating. These methods reconstruct images that correspond to time intervals of the cardiac cycle identified by electrocardiography using either a pulsed x-ray beam at a selected time in the cardiac cycle or selected measurements in retrospect from regularly pulsed measurements made over several cardiac cycles. Missing CT angles of view (line integrals) have been a major problem contributing to degradation of such gated cardiac CT images. A new method for CT reconstruction from an incomplete set of projection data is presented that can be used clinically with a standard fan-beam reconstruction algorithm to improve gated cardiac CT images.

  12. First evidence of sternal wound biofilm following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Mann, Ethan; Awad, Hamdy; Ganesh, Kasturi; Ghatak, Piya Das; Gordillo, Gayle; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B; Roy, Sashwati; Wozniak, Daniel J; Sen, Chandan K

    2013-01-01

    Management of deep sternal wound infection (SWI), a serious complication after cardiac surgery with high morbidity and mortality incidence, requires invasive procedures such as, debridement with primary closure or myocutaneous flap reconstruction along with use of broad spectrum antibiotics. The purpose of this clinical series is to investigate the presence of biofilm in patients with deep SWI. A biofilm is a complex microbial community in which bacteria attach to a biological or non-biological surface and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric substance. Biofilm related infections represent a major clinical challenge due to their resistance to both host immune defenses and standard antimicrobial therapies. Candidates for this clinical series were patients scheduled for a debridement procedure of an infected sternal wound after a cardiac surgery. Six patients with SWI were recruited in the study. All cases had marked dehiscence of all layers of the wound down to the sternum with no signs of healing after receiving broad spectrum antibiotics post-surgery. After consenting patients, tissue and/or extracted stainless steel wires were collected during the debridement procedure. Debrided tissues examined by Gram stain showed large aggregations of Gram positive cocci. Immuno-fluorescent staining of the debrided tissues using a specific antibody against staphylococci demonstrated the presence of thick clumps of staphylococci colonizing the wound bed. Evaluation of tissue samples with scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging showed three-dimensional aggregates of these cocci attached to the wound surface. More interestingly, SEM imaging of the extracted wires showed attachment of cocci aggregations to the wire metal surface. These observations along with the clinical presentation of the patients provide the first evidence that supports the presence of biofilm in such cases. Clinical introduction of the biofilm infection concept in deep SWI may advance

  13. CARDIAC AND THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSES TO INHALED POLLUTANTS IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS: MODULATION VIA INTERACTION WITH ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Rodents often demonstrate a profound depression in physiological function following acute exposure to toxic xenobiotic agents. This effect, termed the hypothermic response, is primarily characterized by significant decreases in core temperature and heart rate, and is...

  14. Deep ocean environmental biotechnology

    PubMed

    Deming

    1998-06-01

    Major recent advances in deep-sea biotechnology have come in the form of continuing discoveries of novel microorganisms, unexpected genetic diversity, and new natural products of potential relevance to human health or environmental bioremediation. Continuing explorations of submarine hydrothermal vent environments have yielded new hyperthermophiles (maximal growth at 90 degreesC or greater) and more evidence that elevated hydrostatic pressure stabilizes cells and enzymes at high temperature. Vent samples have also yielded new mesophiles (optimal growth near 30 degreesC) that produce heparin-like exopolysaccharides or express extraordinary tolerance (removal by precipitation) of heavy metals. From the cold deep sea have come new findings of unexpected microbial diversity and the promise of industrially useful enzymes or secondary metabolites. New classes of predictive models are emerging to guide future exploration of microbial diversity in the deep ocean.

  15. Stem cells in cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death among people in industrialized nations. Although the heart has some ability to regenerate after infarction, myocardial restoration is inadequate. Consequently, investigators are currently exploring the use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), skeletal myoblasts and adult bone marrow stem cells to limit infarct size. hESCs are pluripotent cells that can regenerate myocardium in infarcted hearts, attenuate heart remodeling and contribute to left ventricle (LV) systolic force development. Since hESCs can form heart teratomas, investigators are differentiating hESCs toward cardiac progenitor cells prior to transplantation into hearts. Large quantities of hESCs cardiac progenitor cells, however, must be generated, immune rejection must be prevented and grafts must survive over the long term to significantly improve myocardial performance. Transplanted autologous skeletal myoblasts can survive in infarcted myocardium in small numbers, proliferate, differentiate into skeletal myofibers and increase the LV ejection fraction. These cells, however, do not form electromechanical connections with host cardiomyocytes. Consequently, electrical re-entry can occur and cause cardiac arrhythmias. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells contain hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells. In several meta-analyses, patients with coronary disease who received autologous bone marrow cells by intracoronary injection show significant 3.7% (range: 1.9-5.4%) increases in LV ejection fraction, decreases in LV end-systolic volume of -4.8 ml (range: -1.4 to -8.2 ml) and reductions in infarct size of 5.5% (-1.9 to -9.1%), without experiencing arrhythmias. Bone marrow cells appear to release biologically active factors that limit myocardial damage. Unfortunately, bone marrow cells from patients with chronic diseases propagate poorly and can die prematurely. Substantial challenges must be addressed and resolved to advance the use of stem cells

  16. Risk stratification for major adverse cardiac events and ventricular tachyarrhythmias by cardiac MRI in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masakazu; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Kato, Takao; Izumi, Toshiaki; Inuzuka, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Miyaji, Yuki; Kawamura, Takayuki; Ikeguchi, Shigeru; Inoko, Moriaki; Kurita, Takashi; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Background The presence of myocardial fibrosis by cardiac MRI has prognostic value in cardiac sarcoidosis, and localisation may be equally relevant to clinical outcomes. Objective We aimed to analyse cardiac damage and function in detail and explore the relationship with clinical outcomes in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis using cardiac MRI. Methods We included 81 consecutive patients with cardiac sarcoidosis undergoing cardiac MR. Left ventricular mass and fibrosis mass were calculated, and localisation was analysed using a 17-segment model. Participants underwent follow-up through 2015, and the development of major adverse cardiac events including ventricular tachyarrhythmias was recorded. Results Increased left ventricular fibrosis mass was associated with increased prevalence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (p<0.001). When localisation was defined as the sum of late gadolinium enhancement in the left ventricular basal anterior and basal anteroseptal areas, or the right ventricular area, it was associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmias (p<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis during a median follow-up of 22.1 months showed that both the mass and localisation groupings for fibrosis were significantly associated with major adverse cardiac events or ventricular tachyarrhythmias and that when combined, the risk stratification was better than for each variable alone (p<0.001, respectively). By Cox-proportional hazard risk analysis, the localisation grouping was an independent predictor for the both. Conclusions In patients with cardiac sarcoidosis, both fibrosis mass and its localisation to the basal anterior/anteroseptal left ventricle, or right ventricle was associated with the development of major adverse cardiac events or ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Cardiac MR with late gadolinium enhancement may be useful for improving risk stratification in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:27547432

  17. The deep penetrating nevus.

    PubMed

    Strazzula, Lauren; Senna, Maryanne Makredes; Yasuda, Mariko; Belazarian, Leah

    2014-12-01

    The deep penetrating nevus (DPN), also known as the plexiform spindle cell nevus, is a pigmented lesion that commonly arises on the head and neck in the first few decades of life. Histopathologically, the DPN is wedge-shaped and contains melanocytes that exhibit deep infiltration into the dermis. Given these features, DPN may clinically and histopathologically mimic malignant melanoma, sparking confusion about the appropriate evaluation and management of these lesions. The goal of this review is to summarize the clinical and histopathological features of DPN and to discuss diagnostic and treatment strategies for dermatologists.

  18. Deep space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Srinivasan, Meera; Shaw, Matthew; Piazzolla, Sabino; Wright, Malcolm W.; Farr, William H.

    2016-03-01

    A number of laser communication link demonstrations from near Earth distances extending out to lunar ranges have been remarkably successful, demonstrating the augmented channel capacity that is accessible with the use of lasers for communications. The next hurdle on the path to extending laser communication and its benefits throughout the solar system and beyond is to demonstrate deep-space laser communication links. In this paper, concepts and technology development being advanced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in order to enable deep-space link demonstrations to ranges of approximately 3 AU in the next decade, will be discussed.

  19. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  20. Systems biology and cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Andrew A; Roden, Dan M

    2013-01-01

    During the past few years, the development of effective, empirical technologies for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias has exceeded the pace at which detailed knowledge of the underlying biology has accumulated. As a result, although some clinical arrhythmias can be cured with techniques such as catheter ablation, drug treatment and prediction of the risk of sudden death remain fairly primitive. The identification of key candidate genes for monogenic arrhythmia syndromes shows that to bring basic biology to the clinic is a powerful approach. Increasingly sophisticated experimental models and methods of measurement, including stem cell-based models of human cardiac arrhythmias, are being deployed to study how perturbations in several biologic pathways can result in an arrhythmia-prone heart. The biology of arrhythmia is largely quantifiable, which allows for systematic analysis that could transform treatment strategies that are often still empirical into management based on molecular evidence. PMID:23101717

  1. [Cardiac support and replacement therapies].

    PubMed

    Lotz, Christopher; Roewer, Norbert; Muellenbach, Ralf M

    2016-09-01

    Circulatory support represents an integral part within the treatment of the critically ill patient. Sophisticated pharmacologic regimens help to maintain systemic perfusion pressure by increasing vascular tone as well as mediating positive inotropic effects. Besides the administration of catecholamines and phosphodiesterase-III-inhibitors, in particular the administration of levosimendan represents a promising alternative during low-cardiac-output. Nevertheless, sufficient evidence demonstrating a survival benefit for any pharmacologic regimen is nonexistent. In case pharmacological measures do not suffice mechanical cardiopulmonary support (MCS) may be used. MCS may be used during cardiopulmonary resuscitation or a "low-cardiac-output-syndrome" as bridging towards decision, recovery or long-term support. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vaECMO) may take over cardiopulmonary function and may improve survival as well as neurological outcome after cardiogenic shock or cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:27631451

  2. Heart fields and cardiac morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Robert G; Buckingham, Margaret E; Moorman, Antoon F

    2014-10-01

    In this review, we focus on two important steps in the formation of the embryonic heart: (i) the progressive addition of late differentiating progenitor cells from the second heart field that drives heart tube extension during looping morphogenesis, and (ii) the emergence of patterned proliferation within the embryonic myocardium that generates distinct cardiac chambers. During the transition between these steps, the major site of proliferation switches from progenitor cells outside the early heart to proliferation within the embryonic myocardium. The second heart field and ballooning morphogenesis concepts have major repercussions on our understanding of human heart development and disease. In particular, they provide a framework to dissect the origin of congenital heart defects and the regulation of myocardial proliferation and differentiation of relevance for cardiac repair.

  3. Cardiac regeneration: epicardial mediated repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hearts of lower vertebrates such as fish and salamanders display scarless regeneration following injury, although this feature is lost in adult mammals. The remarkable capacity of the neonatal mammalian heart to regenerate suggests that the underlying machinery required for the regenerative process is evolutionarily retained. Recent studies highlight the epicardial covering of the heart as an important source of the signalling factors required for the repair process. The developing epicardium is also a major source of cardiac fibroblasts, smooth muscle, endothelial cells and stem cells. Here, we examine animal models that are capable of scarless regeneration, the role of the epicardium as a source of cells, signalling mechanisms implicated in the regenerative process and how these mechanisms influence cardiomyocyte proliferation. We also discuss recent advances in cardiac stem cell research and potential therapeutic targets arising from these studies. PMID:26702046

  4. Nutritional status and cardiac autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jihyun; Kim, Jaetaek

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy is necessary for the degradation of long-lasting proteins and nonfunctional organelles, and is activated to promote cellular survival. However, overactivation of autophagy may deplete essential molecules and organelles responsible for cellular survival. Lifelong calorie restriction by 40% has been shown to increase the cardiac expression of autophagic markers, which suggests that it may have a cardioprotective effect by decreasing oxidative damage brought on by aging and cardiovascular diseases. Although cardiac autophagy is critical to regulating protein quality and maintaining cellular function and survival, increased or excessive autophagy may have deleterious effects on the heart under some circumstances, including pressure overload-induced heart failure. The importance of autophagy has been shown in nutrient supply and preservation of energy in times of limitation, such as ischemia. Some studies have suggested that a transition from obesity to metabolic syndrome may involve progressive changes in myocardial inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, fibrosis, apoptosis, and myocardial autophagy.

  5. Systems biology and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Grace, Andrew A; Roden, Dan M

    2012-10-27

    During the past few years, the development of effective, empirical technologies for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias has exceeded the pace at which detailed knowledge of the underlying biology has accumulated. As a result, although some clinical arrhythmias can be cured with techniques such as catheter ablation, drug treatment and prediction of the risk of sudden death remain fairly primitive. The identification of key candidate genes for monogenic arrhythmia syndromes shows that to bring basic biology to the clinic is a powerful approach. Increasingly sophisticated experimental models and methods of measurement, including stem cell-based models of human cardiac arrhythmias, are being deployed to study how perturbations in several biologic pathways can result in an arrhythmia-prone heart. The biology of arrhythmia is largely quantifiable, which allows for systematic analysis that could transform treatment strategies that are often still empirical into management based on molecular evidence.

  6. Monitoring chaos of cardiac rhythms

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer-Kress, G.

    1989-01-01

    Chaos theory provides a new paradigm in monitoring complexity changes in heart rate variability. Even in cases where the spectral analysis only shows broad band characteristics estimations of dimensional complexity parameters can show quantitative changes in the degree of chaos present in the interbeat interval dynamics. We introduce the concept of dimensional complexity as dynamical monitoring parameter and discuss its properties in connection with control data and data taken during cardiac arrest. Whereas dimensional complexity provides a quantitative indicator of overall chaotic behavior, recurrence plots allow direct visualization of recurrences in arbitrary high dimensional pattern-space. In combination these two methods from non-linear dynamics exemplify a new approach in the problem of heart rate monitoring and identification of precursors of cardiac arrest. Finally we mention a new method of chaotic control, by which selective and highly effective perturbations of nonlinear dynamical systems could be used for improved pacing patterns. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Pathophysiology and clinical management of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Nabeel; Steckman, David A; Sauer, William H; Judson, Marc A

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is a potentially life-threatening condition characterized by formation of granulomas in the heart, resulting in conduction disturbances, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, and ventricular dysfunction. The presentation of cardiac sarcoidosis ranges from asymptomatic with an abnormal imaging scan, to palpitations, syncope, symptoms of congestive heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis has not been standardized, but the presence of cardiac symptoms on medical history and physical examination, and an abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG), Holter monitoring, or echocardiogram has been shown to be highly sensitive for detecting cardiac sarcoidosis. A signal-averaged ECG might also have a role in screening for cardiac sarcoidosis in asymptomatic patients. Although endomyocardial biopsies are highly specific for the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis, procedural yield is very low and appropriate findings on cardiac MRI or PET are, therefore, often used as diagnostic surrogates. Treatment for cardiac sarcoidosis usually involves immunosuppressive therapy, particularly corticosteroids. Additional therapy might be required, depending on the clinical presentation, including implantation of an internal defibrillator, antiarrhythmic agents, and catheter ablation.

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias misdiagnosed as epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, N; Southall, D P

    1985-01-01

    A mother and three children presenting with syncope induced by exercise and emotion were diagnosed as epileptic. They, and three symptom free children, showed frequent ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias on ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. Three died before the correct diagnosis of disordered sympathetic innervation of the heart was made, but episodes of syncope and cardiac arrhythmias in the survivors have been successfully treated by propranolol. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3970569

  9. Intensive Hemodialysis Preserved Cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christopher T; Li, Guo Hua; Valaperti, Alan; Liu, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac injury triggers cellular responses involving both cardiomyocytes and nonmuscle cells to process cardiac structural remodeling. End-stage renal disease (ESRD), despite conventional dialysis, is associated with adverse cardiac remodeling and increased cardiovascular events. Intensification of hemodialysis with nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHD; five sessions per week; 6-8 hours per treatment) was associated with regression of left ventricular hypertrophy and downregulation of genes in apoptosis and fibrosis. In this pilot study, we hypothesize that NHD achieves its cardiac effects in part through attenuation of innate immune activation resulting in amelioration of cardiomyocytes apoptosis and fibrosis. Eight patients (4M:4F; age, 59 ± 9 years) with ESRD were studied. Half of the cohort was converted to NHD, whereas the rest of the patients were maintained on conventional hemodialysis (CHD). At baseline, CHD was associated with an increase in cardiomyocyte apoptosis detected by flow cytometry using Annexin V (mean fluorescence index in CHD and in normal control is 1.00 ± 0.05 vs. 0.66 ± 0.01, p < 0.05). After conversion to NHD, cardiomyocyte apoptosis was reduced compared with baseline CHD situation (p < 0.05) and approached that of normal control (0.59 ± 0.09 vs. 0.66 ± 0.01, p > 0.05). The CHD serum was associated with a coordinated augmentation innate immunity pathway, significantly increasing myeloid differentiation factor-88 and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4; NHD was able to reduce their levels. Heat shock protein 60 was augmented during CHD condition and fell after NHD. In addition, CHD increased fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast transformation. Uremia is associated with activation of common innate immune signaling pathways leading to fibrosis and apoptosis. Amelioration of uremic clearance by NHD may attenuate this pathological signaling cascade. PMID:26164598

  10. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  11. Sudden cardiac death risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Deyell, Marc W; Krahn, Andrew D; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2015-06-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be caused by ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation or pulseless electric activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our healthcare and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD because of pulseless electric activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized.

  12. Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Deyell, Marc W.; Krahn, Andrew D.; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be due to ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (SCD-VT/VF) or pulseless electrical activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our health care and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD due to pulseless electrical activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-VT/VF. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-VT/VF. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction and/or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-VT/VF occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized. PMID:26044247

  13. The history of cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Martial G

    2005-10-01

    The evolution of cardiac catheterization has occurred over at least four centuries. One of the first major steps was the description of the circulation of the blood by William Harvey in 1628. The next milestone was the measurement of arterial pressure by Stephen Hales, one century later. However, the 19th century represented the golden age of cardiovascular physiology, highlighted by the achievements of Carl Ludwig, Etienne-Jules Marey and Claude Bernard, among others. Human cardiac catheterization developed during the 20th century. The first right heart catheterization in a human was performed by Werner Forssmann on himself in 1929. Diagnostic cardiac catheterization was introduced by André Cournand and Dickinson Richards in the early 1940s, and selective coronary angiography was described by Mason Sones in the early 1960s. More recently, with the advent of catheter-based interventions, pioneered by Andreas Gruentzig in the late 1970s, there has been considerable progress in the refinement and expansion of these techniques. Currently, the Sones technique is used only infrequently, and coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention rely mainly on percutaneous femoral and percutaneous radial artery approaches. On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Montreal Heart Institute, it seems appropriate to highlight the contribution of this institution in these two areas. PMID:16234881

  14. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms “Long QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Short QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Brugada Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia” (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  15. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full.

  16. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Work accomplished on the Deep Space Network (DSN) was described, including the following topics: supporting research and technology, advanced development and engineering, system implementation, and DSN operations pertaining to mission-independent or multiple-mission development as well as to support of flight projects.

  17. Deep neck space infections.

    PubMed

    Beasley, D J; Amedee, R G

    1995-05-01

    The incidence of deep neck space infections has dramatically decreased since the advent of antibiotics, but with delayed treatment they carry the potential for significant morbidity and mortality. Odontogenic infections with involvement of the submandibular space are the most common source of deep neck space infections in adults, whereas in the pediatric population the most common cause is acute tonsillitis with involvement of the peritonsillar space. The newest group of patients at risk for deep neck space infections are intravenous drug abusers who inject the major vessels of the neck. Knowledge of neck spaces and fascial relationships is important in understanding the presentation, treatment, and complications of deep neck space infections. The spaces, which are created by various fasciae of the head and neck, are only potential spaces in that under normal conditions they cannot be examined clinically or radiographically. As the spaces are invaded by bacteria, a cellulitis or abscess occurs, and this infection may travel through paths of least resistance from one space to another.

  18. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is the largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation network in the world. Its principal responsibilities are to support unmanned interplanetary spacecraft missions and to support radio and radar astronomy observations in the exploration of the solar system and the universe. The DSN facilities and capabilities as of January 1988 are described.

  19. [Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Chagoya, Gloria Alejandra; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background: despite the proven effectiveness of preventive therapy for deep vein thrombosis, a significant proportion of patients at risk for thromboembolism do not receive prophylaxis during hospitalization. Our objective was to determine the adherence to thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines in a general hospital as a quality control strategy. Methods: a random audit of clinical charts was conducted at the Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico, to determine the degree of adherence to deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines. The instrument used was the Caprini's checklist for thrombosis risk assessment in adult patients. Results: the sample included 300 patient charts; 182 (60.7 %) were surgical patients and 118 were medical patients. Forty six patients (15.3 %) received deep vein thrombosis pharmacologic prophylaxis; 27.1 % of medical patients received deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis versus 8.3 % of surgical patients (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: our results show that adherence to DVT prophylaxis at our hospital is extremely low. Only 15.3 % of our patients at risk received treatment, and even patients with very high risk received treatment in less than 25 % of the cases. We have implemented strategies to increase compliance with clinical guidelines.

  20. Teaching for Deep Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Tracy Wilson; Colby, Susan A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors have been engaged in research focused on students' depth of learning as well as teachers' efforts to foster deep learning. Findings from a study examining the teaching practices and student learning outcomes of sixty-four teachers in seventeen different states (Smith et al. 2005) indicated that most of the learning in these classrooms…

  1. Communicating through deep space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) consists of a worldwide set of communication stations and a central control facility in California, enabling communication with spacecraft thousands of millions of miles from earth. The stations have gone from 26 m diameter antennas operating at 960 MHz to 70 m diameter (by 1988) at 8400 MHz. The DSN provides exceptional performance in high gain steerable antennas, ultra-low noise receivers, high power transmitters, frequency and time standards, and precise radio metric data. Spacecraft missions envisaged in the 1990's for the continuing exploration of the Solar System include an array of increasingly complex visits to the inner planets, asteroids and comets and the outer planets. The Deep Space Network planned for the mid-1980s may not meet all the needs of these missions without substantial change. Deep space stations may require conversion to operation with beam waveguides, higher frequency and relative frequency stability of 10 to the -16th. A deep space relay station in earth orbit could permit operation at higher frequencies, with attendant higher performance. Long range planning to select the appropriate future network configurations and develop the technologies essential to their implementation is underway.

  2. In vivo imaging of cardiac development and function in zebrafish using light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Detailed studies of heart development and function are crucial for our understanding of cardiac failures and pave the way for better diagnostics and treatment. However, the constant motion and close incorporation into the cardiovascular system prevent in vivo studies of the living, unperturbed heart. The complementary strengths of the zebrafish model and light sheet microscopy provide a useful platform to fill this gap. High-resolution images of the embryonic vertebrate heart are now recorded from within the living animal: deep inside the unperturbed heart we can follow cardiac contractions and measure action potentials and calcium transients. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the entire beating heart with cellular resolution give new insights into its ever-changing morphology and facilitate studies into how individual cells form the complex cardiac network. In addition, cardiac dynamics and robustness are now examined with targeted optical manipulation. Overall, the combination of zebrafish and light sheet microscopy represents a promising addition for cardiac research and opens the door to a better understanding of heart function and development.

  3. In vivo imaging of cardiac development and function in zebrafish using light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Detailed studies of heart development and function are crucial for our understanding of cardiac failures and pave the way for better diagnostics and treatment. However, the constant motion and close incorporation into the cardiovascular system prevent in vivo studies of the living, unperturbed heart. The complementary strengths of the zebrafish model and light sheet microscopy provide a useful platform to fill this gap. High-resolution images of the embryonic vertebrate heart are now recorded from within the living animal: deep inside the unperturbed heart we can follow cardiac contractions and measure action potentials and calcium transients. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the entire beating heart with cellular resolution give new insights into its ever-changing morphology and facilitate studies into how individual cells form the complex cardiac network. In addition, cardiac dynamics and robustness are now examined with targeted optical manipulation. Overall, the combination of zebrafish and light sheet microscopy represents a promising addition for cardiac research and opens the door to a better understanding of heart function and development. PMID:26700795

  4. Sudden cardiac death in athletes.

    PubMed

    Schmied, C; Borjesson, M

    2014-02-01

    A 'paradox of sport' is that in addition to the undisputed health benefits of physical activity, vigorous exertion may transiently increase the risk of acute cardiac events. In general, the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) approximately doubles during physical activity and is 2- to 3-fold higher in athletes compared to nonathletes. The incidence of SCD in young athletes is in fact very low, at around 1-3 per 100,000, but attracts much public attention. Variations in incidence figures may be explained by the methodology used for data collection and more importantly by differences between subpopulations of athletes. The incidence of SCD in older (≥ 35 years) athletes is higher and may be expected to rise, as more and older individuals take part in organized sports. SCD is often the first clinical manifestation of a potentially fatal underlying cardiovascular disorder and usually occurs in previously asymptomatic athletes. In the young (<35 years), SCD is mainly due to congenital/inherited cardiac abnormalities, whilst coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause in older athletes. Cardiac screening including family/personal history, physical examination and resting electrocardiogram (ECG) may identify individuals at risk and has the potential to decrease the risk of SCD in young athletes. Screening including the ECG has a high sensitivity for underlying disease in young athletes, but the specificity needs to be improved, whereas the sensitivity of screening without the use of ECG is very low. The screening modality recommended for young athletes is of limited value in older athletes, who should receive individualized screening with cardiac stress testing for patients with high risk of underlying CAD. As cardiovascular screening will never be able to identify all athletes at risk, adequate preparedness is vital in case of a potentially fatal event at the sporting arena/facility. Firstly, we will review the magnitude of the problem of SCD in athletes of

  5. Physical therapy intervention in patients with non-cardiac chest pain following a recent cardiac event: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stafne, Signe N; Hiller, Aud; Slørdahl, Stig A; Aamot, Inger-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of two different physical therapy interventions in patients with stable coronary heart disease and non-cardiac chest pain. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out at a university hospital in Norway. A total of 30 patients with known and stable coronary heart disease and self-reported persistent chest pain reproduced by palpation of intercostal trigger points were participating in the study. The intervention was deep friction massage and heat pack versus heat pack only. The primary outcome was pain intensity after the intervention period and 3 months after the last treatment session, measured by Visual Analogue Scale, 0 to 100. Secondary outcome was health-related quality of life. Results: Treatment with deep friction massage and heat pack gave significant pain reduction compared to heat pack only (–17.6, 95% confidence interval: –30.5, –4.7; p < 0.01), and the reduction was persistent at 3 months’ follow-up (–15.2, 95% confidence interval: –28.5, –1.8; p = 0.03). Health-related quality of life improved in all three domains in patients with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: Deep friction massage combined with heat pack is an efficient treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain in patients with stable coronary heart disease. PMID:26770781

  6. Evaluation of Known or Suspected Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Blankstein, Ron; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown cause, and cardiac sarcoidosis affects at least 25% of patients and accounts for substantial mortality and morbidity from this disease. Cardiac sarcoidosis may present with heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, AV block, atrial or ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Cardiac involvement can be challenging to detect and diagnose because of the focal nature of the disease, as well as the fact that clinical criteria have limited diagnostic accuracy. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be enhanced by integrating both clinical and imaging findings. This article reviews the various roles that different imaging modalities provide in the evaluation and management of patients with known or suspected cardiac sarcoidosis.

  7. Quality Control Systems in Cardiac Aging

    PubMed Central

    Quarles, Ellen K; Dai, Dao-Fu; Tocchi, Autumn; Basisty, Nathan; Gitari, Lemuel; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac aging is an intrinsic process that results in impaired cardiac function, along with cellular and molecular changes. These degenerative changes are intimately associated with quality control mechanisms. This review provides a general overview of the clinical and cellular changes which manifest in cardiac aging, and the quality control mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis and retarding aging. These mechanisms include autophagy, ubiquitin-mediated turnover, apoptosis, mitochondrial quality control and cardiac matrix homeostasis. Finally, we discuss aging interventions that have been observed to impact cardiac health outcomes. These include caloric restriction, rapamycin, resveratrol, GDF11, mitochondrial antioxidants and cardiolipin-targeted therapeutics. A greater understanding of the quality control mechanisms that promote cardiac homeostasis will help to understand the benefits of these interventions, and hopefully lead to further improved therapeutic modalities. PMID:25702865

  8. Evaluation of Known or Suspected Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Blankstein, Ron; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown cause, and cardiac sarcoidosis affects at least 25% of patients and accounts for substantial mortality and morbidity from this disease. Cardiac sarcoidosis may present with heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, AV block, atrial or ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Cardiac involvement can be challenging to detect and diagnose because of the focal nature of the disease, as well as the fact that clinical criteria have limited diagnostic accuracy. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be enhanced by integrating both clinical and imaging findings. This article reviews the various roles that different imaging modalities provide in the evaluation and management of patients with known or suspected cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:26926267

  9. Cardiac mechanics: Physiological, clinical, and mathematical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirsky, I. (Editor); Ghista, D. N.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Recent studies concerning the basic physiological and biochemical principles underlying cardiac muscle contraction, methods for the assessment of cardiac function in the clinical situation, and mathematical approaches to cardiac mechanics are presented. Some of the topics covered include: cardiac ultrastructure and function in the normal and failing heart, myocardial energetics, clinical applications of angiocardiography, use of echocardiography for evaluating cardiac performance, systolic time intervals in the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular performance in man, evaluation of passive elastic stiffness for the left ventricle and isolated heart muscle, a conceptual model of myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock, application of Huxley's sliding-filament theory to the mechanics of normal and hypertrophied cardiac muscle, and a rheological modeling of the intact left ventricle. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  10. A triad: cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma, stroke and tamponade.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Tazeen; Day, Thomas George; Marek, Jan; Hughes, Marina; Giardini, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    The case report describes a 9-year-old boy who presented with an acute cerebrovascular accident and was found to have cardiac tamponade caused by cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma. Symptoms of rhabdomyosarcoma can be indolent and nonspecific, even with metastatic disease. Echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are explored as adjuncts to diagnosis. The radiologic features that helped with the diagnosis of this rare condition are described.

  11. Sudden cardiac death – Historical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, S.P.; Namboodiri, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unexpected death due to cardiac causes that occurs in a short time period (generally within 1 h of symptom onset) in a person with known or unknown cardiac disease. It is believed to be involved in nearly a quarter of human deaths, with ventricular fibrillation being the most common mechanism. It is estimated that more than 7 million lives per year are lost to SCD worldwide. Historical perspectives of SCD are analyzed with a brief description on how the developments in the management of sudden cardiac arrest evolved over time. PMID:24568828

  12. New electrical plethysmograph monitors cardiac output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubicek, W. B.; Patterson, R. P.; Witsoe, D. A.

    1968-01-01

    Four-electrode impedance plethysmograph measures ventricular stroke volume of cardiac output of humans. The instrument is automatic, operates with only one recording channel, and minimizes patient discomfort.

  13. Cardiac Arrhythmias: Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Fu, Du-Guan

    2015-11-01

    The cardiac arrhythmia is characterized by irregular rhythm of heartbeat which could be either too slow (<60 beats/min) or too fast (>100 beats/min) and can happen at any age. The use of pacemaker and defibrillators devices has been suggested for heart arrhythmias patients. The antiarrhythmic medications have been reported for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias or irregular heartbeats. The diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of cardiac arrhythmias as well as the radiofrequency ablation, tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, arterial fibrillation, and recent research on the genetics of cardiac arrhythmias have been described here.

  14. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage. 410.49 Section 410.49 Public Health CENTERS FOR... MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.49 Cardiac rehabilitation...

  15. Horses and Zebras: complex cardiac anatomy in a patient with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Brown, Samuel M; Miller, Dylan V; Vezina, Daniel; Dean, Nathan C; Grissom, Colin K

    2011-04-01

    This case report describes a woman presenting after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with several cardiac anomalies, including a form fruste of Ebstein's anomaly complicated by a large tricuspid valve vegetation. On autopsy, she proved to have unstable plaques in epicardial vessels that likely caused arrhythmic sudden cardiac death, a reminder that even in the presence of rare anomalies, common things are common.

  16. Deep gluteal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Hal David; Reddy, Manoj; Gómez-Hoyos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Deep gluteal syndrome describes the presence of pain in the buttock caused from non-discogenic and extrapelvic entrapment of the sciatic nerve. Several structures can be involved in sciatic nerve entrapment within the gluteal space. A comprehensive history and physical examination can orientate the specific site where the sciatic nerve is entrapped, as well as several radiological signs that support the suspected diagnosis. Failure to identify the cause of pain in a timely manner can increase pain perception, and affect mental control, patient hope and consequently quality of life. This review presents a comprehensive approach to the patient with deep gluteal syndrome in order to improve the understanding of posterior hip anatomy, nerve kinematics, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, differential diagnosis and treatment considerations. PMID:27011826

  17. Deep gluteal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Hal David; Reddy, Manoj; Gómez-Hoyos, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Deep gluteal syndrome describes the presence of pain in the buttock caused from non-discogenic and extrapelvic entrapment of the sciatic nerve. Several structures can be involved in sciatic nerve entrapment within the gluteal space. A comprehensive history and physical examination can orientate the specific site where the sciatic nerve is entrapped, as well as several radiological signs that support the suspected diagnosis. Failure to identify the cause of pain in a timely manner can increase pain perception, and affect mental control, patient hope and consequently quality of life. This review presents a comprehensive approach to the patient with deep gluteal syndrome in order to improve the understanding of posterior hip anatomy, nerve kinematics, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, differential diagnosis and treatment considerations.

  18. Deep-Sarsa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrecut, M.; Ali, M. K.

    In this paper we discuss the application of reinforcement learning algorithms to the problem of autonomous robot navigation. We show that the autonomous navigation using the standard delayed reinforcement learning algorithms is an ill posed problem and we present a more efficient algorithm for which the convergence speed is greatly improved. The proposed algorithm (Deep-Sarsa) is based on a combination between the Depth-First Search (a graph searching algorithm) and Sarsa (a delayed reinforcement learning algorithm).

  19. Understanding deep convolutional networks.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Stéphane

    2016-04-13

    Deep convolutional networks provide state-of-the-art classifications and regressions results over many high-dimensional problems. We review their architecture, which scatters data with a cascade of linear filter weights and nonlinearities. A mathematical framework is introduced to analyse their properties. Computations of invariants involve multiscale contractions with wavelets, the linearization of hierarchical symmetries and sparse separations. Applications are discussed. PMID:26953183

  20. Systematic traction techniques in minimal-access pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Oiwa, Hiroshi; Ishida, Ryoichi; Sudo, Kenichi

    2004-11-01

    Minimal-access pediatric cardiac surgery is now common in the treatment of simple congenital heart defects. However, methods of securing a good, unobstructed view for surgery and the difficulties of working in a deep, narrow field jeopardize safety in surgical procedures, especially for less experienced surgeons have been described. Our systematic, step-by-step traction techniques on the skin, the pericardium, the right atrial appendage, the aortic root, both venae cavae, and the free wall of the right ventricular outflow, using a mechanical retractor and traction sutures, facilitate surgical field exposure and the achievement of safety. As described below, our procedures are simple, allow direct inspection, and assist those working toward technical mastery.

  1. Bilingual deep dysphasia.

    PubMed

    Weekes, Brendan S; Raman, Ilhan

    2008-05-01

    We report B.R.B., a bilingual Turkish-English speaker with deep dysphasia. B.R.B. shows the typical pattern of semantic errors in repetition with effects of lexicality and imageability on performance in both languages. The question we asked is whether language type (Turkish or English) or language status--that is, first acquired (L1) or second acquired (L2)--has a greater impact on performance. Results showed that repetition in L1 (Turkish) was better than that in L2 (English). We also observed effects of language status on oral reading, writing to dictation, and naming (spoken and written) with greater impairment to repetition than other tasks in both languages. An additional finding was that spoken-word translation in both directions was worse than written-word translation, and word class had an effect on translation from L1 to L2. We argue that interactive activation models of deep dysphasia could explain deep dysphasia in bilingual speakers and interactions between task and language, if the weighted connections that support language processing in L2 are assumed to be weaker, thus causing rapid phonological decay to have more impact on task performance in L2. Implications of the results for models of bilingual language processing are also considered.

  2. ECLS in Pediatric Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Nardo, Matteo; MacLaren, Graeme; Marano, Marco; Cecchetti, Corrado; Bernaschi, Paola; Amodeo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an important device in the management of children with severe refractory cardiac and or pulmonary failure. Actually, two forms of ECLS are available for neonates and children: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and use of a ventricular assist device (VAD). Both these techniques have their own advantages and disadvantages. The intra-aortic balloon pump is another ECLS device that has been successfully used in larger children, adolescents, and adults, but has found limited applicability in smaller children. In this review, we will present the “state of art” of ECMO in neonate and children with heart failure. ECMO is commonly used in a variety of settings to provide support to critically ill patients with cardiac disease. However, a strict selection of patients and timing of intervention should be performed to avoid the increase in mortality and morbidity of these patients. Therefore, every attempt should be done to start ECLS “urgently” rather than “emergently,” before the presence of dysfunction of end organs or circulatory collapse. Even though exciting progress is being made in the development of VADs for long-term mechanical support in children, ECMO remains the mainstay of mechanical circulatory support in children with complex anatomy, particularly those needing rapid resuscitation and those with a functionally univentricular circulation. With the increase in familiarity with ECMO, new indications have been added, such as extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). The literature supporting ECPR is increasing in children. Reasonable survival rates have been achieved after initiation of support during active compressions of the chest following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Contraindications to ECLS have reduced in the last 5 years and many centers support patients with functionally univentricular circulations. Improved results have been recently achieved in this complex subset of patients. PMID

  3. Neuroprognostication After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Topjian, Alexis A.; Hammond, Rachel; Illes, Judy; Abend, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Management decisions and parental counseling after pediatric cardiac arrest depend on the ability of physicians to make accurate and timely predictions regarding neurological recovery. We evaluated neurologists and intensivists performing neuroprognostication after cardiac arrest to determine prediction agreement, accuracy, and confidence. METHODS Pediatric neurologists (n = 10) and intensivists (n = 9) reviewed 18 cases of children successfully resuscitated from a cardiac arrest and managed in the pediatric intensive care unit. Cases were sequentially presented (after arrest day 1, days 2–4, and days 5–7), with updated examinations, neurophysiologic data, and neuroimaging data. At each time period, physicians predicted outcome by Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category and specified prediction confidence. RESULTS Predicted discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category versus actual hospital discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category outcomes were compared. Exact (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = 0) and close (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = ±1) outcome prediction accuracies for all physicians improved over successive periods (P < 0.05). Prediction accuracy did not differ significantly between physician groups at any period or overall. Agreement improved over time among neurologists (day 1 Kappa [κ], 0.28; days 2–4 κ, 0.43; days 5–7 κ, 0.68) and among intensivists (day 1 κ, 0.30; days 2–4 κ, 0.44; days 5–7 κ, 0.57). Prediction confidence increased over time (P < 0.001) and did not differ between physician groups. CONCLUSIONS Inter-rater agreement among neurologists and among intensivists improved over time and reached moderate levels. For all physicians, prediction accuracy and confidence improved over time. Further prospective research is needed to better characterize how physicians

  4. Slow Conduction in Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Melvyn; Kootsey, J. Mailen; Johnson, Edward A.; Sawanobori, Tohru

    1973-01-01

    Mechanisms of slow conduction in cardiac muscle are categorized and the most likely identified. Propagating action potentials were obtained experimentally from a synthetically grown strand of cardiac muscle (around 50 μm by 30 mm) and theoretically from a one-dimensional cable model that incorporated varying axial resistance and membrane properties along its length. Action potentials propagated at about 0.3 m/s, but in some synthetic strands there were regions (approximately 100 μm in length) where the velocity decreased to 0.002 m/s. The electrophysiological behavior associated with this slow conduction was similar to that associated with slow conduction in naturally occurring cardiac muscle (notches, Wenckebach phenomena, and block). Theoretically, reasonable changes in specific membrane capacitance, membrane activity, and various changes in geometry were insufficient to account for the observed slow conduction velocities. Conduction velocities as low as 0.009 m/s, however, could be obtained by increasing the resistance (ri) of connections between the cells in the cable; velocities as low as 0.0005 m/s could be obtained by a further increase in ri made possible by a reduction in membrane activity by one-fourth, which in itself decreased conduction velocity by only a factor of 1/1.4. As a result of these findings, several of the mechanisms that have been postulated, previously, are shown to be incapable of accounting for delays such as those which occur in the synthetic strand as well as in the atrioventricular (VA) node. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 2FIGURE 3FIGURE 4 PMID:4709519

  5. Demography of penetrating cardiac trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, M J; Brissie, R M; Bessey, P Q; McEachern, M M; Donald, J M; Laws, H L

    1989-01-01

    All cases of penetrating cardiac trauma in 1985 and 1986 in Jefferson County, Alabama, where patients dying of penetrating trauma received autopsies, were retrospectively reviewed. All hospitals in the county plus the single coroner's office provided the records of the 72 patients comprising this study. Incidents occurred most often in the home or residence (70%) by a known assailant (83%) due to domestic/social disputes (73%). Frequency was greatest in the evening hours (73% between 6:00 PM and 3:00 AM), on weekends in spring and summer. Victims tended to be male (86%), black (72%), married (46%), blue collar workers (62%). There were 41 (57%) gunshot wounds, 3 (4%) shotgun wounds, and 28 (39%) stab wounds with an associated mortality rate of 97%, 100%, and 68%, respectively. Prehospital mortality rate (dead at the scene) was 54.2% (39/72), and death on arrival was 26.4% (19/72), for a combined pretreatment mortality rate of 80.6%. All patients who arrived with no vital signs died. Mortality appeared to be related to mechanism of injury, age, race, sex, vital signs on arrival, number and specific cardiac chambers injured, associated major vascular injury, hematocrit, and mode of transportation. Mortality was not related to caliber of weapon, ethanol level, transport time, time from arrival to operation, or transfusion requirements. There were only ten survivors (1 gunshot wound and 9 stab wounds), all of whom had ventricular injuries and no associated major vascular injuries. The ten survivors represented a 71.4% (10/14) salvage rate for those victims arriving with vital signs. Complications occurred in three patients. Hospitalization averaged 7.3 days in the survivors. Penetrating cardiac trauma remains a serious, socially linked disease with a high rate of mortality. Rapid transport, aggressive resuscitation and cardiorrhaphy remain the best treatment. PMID:2730180

  6. Trigeminal Cardiac Reflex and Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Dominga; Scuri, Rossana; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals). During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart, and brain and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is sequestered within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing. The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min) by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral levels, reducing the arterial blood pressure, and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activate the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension. Opposite effects, such as hypotension, and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone, were observed, when these responses were compared to those elicited by the diving reflex. PMID:27812317

  7. Cellular Encapsulation Enhances Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Levit, Rebecca D.; Landázuri, Natalia; Phelps, Edward A.; Brown, Milton E.; García, Andrés J.; Davis, Michael E.; Joseph, Giji; Long, Robert; Safley, Susan A.; Suever, Jonathan D.; Lyle, Alicia N.; Weber, Collin J.; Taylor, W. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Stem cells for cardiac repair have shown promise in preclinical trials, but lower than expected retention, viability, and efficacy. Encapsulation is one potential strategy to increase viable cell retention while facilitating paracrine effects. Methods and Results Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were encapsulated in alginate and attached to the heart with a hydrogel patch in a rat myocardial infarction (MI) model. Cells were tracked using bioluminescence (BLI) and cardiac function measured by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Microvasculature was quantified using von Willebrand factor staining and scar measured by Masson's Trichrome. Post‐MI ejection fraction by CMR was greatly improved in encapsulated hMSC‐treated animals (MI: 34±3%, MI+Gel: 35±3%, MI+Gel+hMSC: 39±2%, MI+Gel+encapsulated hMSC: 56±1%; n=4 per group; P<0.01). Data represent mean±SEM. By TTE, encapsulated hMSC‐treated animals had improved fractional shortening. Longitudinal BLI showed greatest hMSC retention when the cells were encapsulated (P<0.05). Scar size at 28 days was significantly reduced in encapsulated hMSC‐treated animals (MI: 12±1%, n=8; MI+Gel: 14±2%, n=7; MI+Gel+hMSC: 14±1%, n=7; MI+Gel+encapsulated hMSC: 7±1%, n=6; P<0.05). There was a large increase in microvascular density in the peri‐infarct area (MI: 121±10, n=7; MI+Gel: 153±26, n=5; MI+Gel+hMSC: 198±18, n=7; MI+Gel+encapsulated hMSC: 828±56 vessels/mm2, n=6; P<0.01). Conclusions Alginate encapsulation improved retention of hMSCs and facilitated paracrine effects such as increased peri‐infarct microvasculature and decreased scar. Encapsulation of MSCs improved cardiac function post‐MI and represents a new, translatable strategy for optimization of regenerative therapies for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24113327

  8. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The physical principles and current applications of echocardiography in assessment of heart diseases are reviewed. Technical considerations and unresolved points relative to the use of echocardiography in various disease states are stressed. The discussion covers normal mitral valve motion, mitral stenosis, aortic regurgitation, atrial masses, mitral valve prolapse, and idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. Other topics concern tricuspic valve abnormalities, aortic valve disease, pulmonic valve, pericardial effusion, intraventricular septal motion, and left ventricular function. The application of echocardiography to congenital heart disease diagnosis is discussed along with promising ultrasonic imaging systems. The utility of echocardiography in quantitative evaluation of cardiac disease is demonstrated.

  9. Antithrombotic Therapy in Cardiac Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Álvaro; Chamorro, Ángel

    2010-01-01

    Anticoagulation is indicated in most cardioembolic ischemic strokes for secondary prevention. In many cardiac conditions, anticoagulation is also indication for primary stroke prevention, mainly when associated to vascular risk factors. Anticoagulation should be started as soon as possible, as it is safe even in moderate acute strokes. The efficacy of early anticoagulation after cardioembolic stroke in relation to outcome has not been assessed adequately, but there is evidence from animal models and clinical studies that anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin is associated with a better outcome mediated in part by its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:21804782

  10. CARDIAC OPERATIONS WITH EXTRACORPOREAL CIRCULATION

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Jerome Harold; Anderson, Robert M.; Lewis, Reuben R.; Meihaus, John; Magidson, Oscar; Snyder, Edward N.; Bennett, Louis C.; Bernstein, Sol; Amsden, Neal

    1959-01-01

    In a series of 50 patients for whom a heart-lung machine was used for periods as long as 70 minutes during operations to correct structural defects of the heart, there were no deaths attributable to the machine. Seven patients died. Two of them had high pressure ventricular septal defects with bidirectional shunts; a third patient with the same lesion recovered after repair. One patient died of cardiac tamponade when a large blood clot formed about the entire heart in a loosely closed pericardial sac. Others died of various causes. The development of subacute bacterial endocarditis in one patient led to a change in sterilization of apparatus. PMID:13662856

  11. Cardiac imaging: does radiation matter?

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Knuuti, Juhani

    2012-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation in cardiovascular imaging has generated considerable discussion. Radiation should not be considered in isolation, but rather in the context of a careful examination of the benefits, risks, and costs of cardiovascular imaging. Such consideration requires an understanding of some fundamental aspects of the biology, physics, epidemiology, and terminology germane to radiation, as well as principles of radiological protection. This paper offers a concise, contemporary perspective on these areas by addressing pertinent questions relating to radiation and its application to cardiac imaging. PMID:21828062

  12. Thymosin-β4 prevents cardiac rupture and improves cardiac function in mice with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hongmei; Xu, Jiang; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Dai, Xiangguo; Peterson, Edward L; Carretero, Oscar A; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine

    2014-09-01

    Thymosin-β4 (Tβ4) promotes cell survival, angiogenesis, and tissue regeneration and reduces inflammation. Cardiac rupture after myocardial infarction (MI) is mainly the consequence of excessive regional inflammation, whereas cardiac dysfunction after MI results from a massive cardiomyocyte loss and cardiac fibrosis. It is possible that Tβ4 reduces the incidence of cardiac rupture post-MI via anti-inflammatory actions and that it decreases adverse cardiac remodeling and improves cardiac function by promoting cardiac cell survival and cardiac repair. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to MI and treated with either vehicle or Tβ4 (1.6 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ip via osmotic minipump) for 7 days or 5 wk. Mice were assessed for 1) cardiac remodeling and function by echocardiography; 2) inflammatory cell infiltration, capillary density, myocyte apoptosis, and interstitial collagen fraction histopathologically; 3) gelatinolytic activity by in situ zymography; and 4) expression of ICAM-1 and p53 by immunoblot analysis. Tβ4 reduced cardiac rupture that was associated with a decrease in the numbers of infiltrating inflammatory cells and apoptotic myocytes, a decrease in gelatinolytic activity and ICAM-1 and p53 expression, and an increase in the numbers of CD31-positive cells. Five-week treatment with Tβ4 ameliorated left ventricular dilation, improved cardiac function, markedly reduced interstitial collagen fraction, and increased capillary density. In a murine model of acute MI, Tβ4 not only decreased mortality rate as a result of cardiac rupture but also significantly improved cardiac function after MI. Thus, the use of Tβ4 could be explored as an alternative therapy in preventing cardiac rupture and restoring cardiac function in patients with MI.

  13. Imagining Deep Time (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talasek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Imagining Deep Time '...the mind seemed to grow giddy by looking so far into the abyss of time.' John Playfair (1748 -1819), scientist and mathematician "Man cannot afford to conceive of nature and exclude himself." Emmit Gowin, photographer 'A person would have to take themselves out of the human context to begin to think in terms of geologic time. They would have to think like a rock.' Terry Falke, photographer The term Deep Time refers to the vastness of the geological time scale. First conceived in the 18th century, the development of this perspective on time has been pieced together like a jigsaw puzzle of information and observations drawn from the study of the earth's structure and discovered fossilized flora and fauna. Deep time may possibly be the greatest contribution made by the discipline of geology forever impacting our perception of earth and our relationship to it. How do we grasp such vast concepts as deep time which relates to the origins of the earth or cosmic time which relates to the origins of the universe - concepts that exist far beyond the realm of human experience? Further more how do we communicate this? The ability to visualize is a powerful tool of discovery and communication for the scientist and it is part and parcel of the work of visual artists. The scientific process provides evidence yet it is imagination on the part of the scientists and artists alike that is needed to interpret that information. This exhibition represents an area where both rational and intuitive thinking come together to explore this question of how we relate to the vastness of time. The answer suggested by the combination of art work assembled here suggests that we do so through a combination of visual metaphors (cycles, circles, arrows, trajectories) and visual evidence (rock formations, strata, fossils of fauna and flora) while being mediated through various technologies. One provides factual and empirical evidence while the other provides a way of grasping

  14. The Cardiac Conduction System: Generation and Conduction of the Cardiac Impulse.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan; Finlay, Dewar D; Guldenring, Daniel; Bond, Raymond; Moran, Kieran; McLaughlin, James

    2016-09-01

    In this article, the authors outline the key components behind the automated generation of the cardiac impulses and the effect these impulses have on cardiac myocytes. Also, a description of the key components of the normal cardiac conduction system is provided, including the sinoatrial node, the atrioventricular node, the His bundle, the bundle branches, and the Purkinje network. Finally, an outline of how each stage of the cardiac conduction system is represented on the electrocardiogram is described, allowing the reader of the electrocardiogram to translate background information about the normal cardiac conduction system to everyday clinical practice.

  15. The Cardiac Conduction System: Generation and Conduction of the Cardiac Impulse.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan; Finlay, Dewar D; Guldenring, Daniel; Bond, Raymond; Moran, Kieran; McLaughlin, James

    2016-09-01

    In this article, the authors outline the key components behind the automated generation of the cardiac impulses and the effect these impulses have on cardiac myocytes. Also, a description of the key components of the normal cardiac conduction system is provided, including the sinoatrial node, the atrioventricular node, the His bundle, the bundle branches, and the Purkinje network. Finally, an outline of how each stage of the cardiac conduction system is represented on the electrocardiogram is described, allowing the reader of the electrocardiogram to translate background information about the normal cardiac conduction system to everyday clinical practice. PMID:27484656

  16. Assessment of cardiac function: magnetic resonance and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S B

    2000-10-01

    A complete cardiac study requires both anatomic and physiologic evaluation. Cardiac function can be evaluated noninvasively by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)or ultrafast computed tomography (CT). MRI allows for evaluation of cardiac function by cine gradient echo imaging of the ventricles and flow analysis across cardiac valves and the great vessels. Cine gradient echo imaging is useful for evaluation of cardiac wall motion, ventricular volumes and ventricular mass. Flow analysis allows for measurement of velocity and flow during the cardiac cycle that reflects cardiac function. Ultrafast CT allows for measurement of cardiac indices similar to that provided by gradient echo imaging of the ventricles.

  17. Using the Trajectory Framework: reconceptualizing cardiac illness.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, M H

    1991-01-01

    Cardiac disease is known to be the leading cause of premature morbidity and mortality in the United States. Nursing management of cardiac illnesses, as such, is a primary concern for most practicing nurses. Dramatic changes in cardiac patient populations and associated technology available for treatment indicate a need to reconceptualize the nature of cardiac illness and to consider alternative approaches to guide the care of these patients. Traditional care, to a large degree, has focused upon acute illness, consequently limiting needed attention to the increasing group of patients suffering chronic illness and disability. In the present paper, the major changes in the cardiac patient population and in utilization of available technology are presented. The application of the Corbin and Strauss trajectory framework as an appropriate and useful framework for conceptualizing cardiac illness and care is then discussed. Five characteristics of the framework which render the model particularly well suited to address cardiac care are identified and discussed. These characteristics are: 1) comprehensiveness of care, 2) patient-centered care, 3) gender issues in care, 4) family-focused care, 5) technology and cardiac care. PMID:1763241

  18. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  19. Update in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    García-Bolao, Ignacio; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco; Bazan, Victor; Berruezo, Antonio; Alcalde, Oscar; Leal del Ojo, Juan; Acosta, Juan; Martínez Sellés, Manuel; Mosquera, Ignacio

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the main advances in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published between 2013 and 2014. Special attention is given to the interventional treatment of atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias, and on advances in cardiac pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, with particular reference to the elderly patient.

  20. Mitochondrial Quality Control in Cardiac Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Juliane C.; Bozi, Luiz H. M.; Bechara, Luiz R. G.; Lima, Vanessa M.; Ferreira, Julio C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis is a hallmark of cardiac diseases. Therefore, maintenance of mitochondrial integrity through different surveillance mechanisms is critical for cardiomyocyte survival. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings on the central role of mitochondrial quality control processes including regulation of mitochondrial redox balance, aldehyde metabolism, proteostasis, dynamics, and clearance in cardiac diseases, highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets.

  1. Ultrasound Imaging in Teaching Cardiac Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Quinn, Joe G.; Roe, Sean M.; Stewart, Michael T.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such…

  2. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  3. Cardiac Vagal Regulation and Early Peer Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Keane, Susan P.; Calkins, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 341 5 1/2-year-old children participating in an ongoing longitudinal study was the focus of a study on the relation between cardiac vagal regulation and peer status. To assess cardiac vagal regulation, resting measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA change (suppression) to 3 cognitively and emotionally challenging tasks…

  4. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  5. Fetal cardiac anomalies and genetic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pajkrt, Eva; Weisz, Boaz; Firth, Helen V; Chitty, Lyn S

    2004-12-30

    Cardiac anomalies may occur in isolation or can be part of a genetic syndrome. In this article, we describe some of the genetic syndromes commonly associated with cardiac anomalies where there are other sonographic features that may aid accurate prenatal diagnosis.

  6. MicroRNAs and cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Conrad P.; Kang, Martin H.; Dal-Pra, Sophie; Mirotsou, Maria; Dzau, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    The human heart has a very limited capacity to regenerate lost or damaged cardiomyocytes following cardiac insult. Instead, myocardial injury is characterized by extensive cardiac remodeling by fibroblasts, resulting in the eventual deterioration of cardiac structure and function. Cardiac function would be improved if these fibroblasts could be converted into cardiomyocytes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs that promote mRNA degradation and inhibit mRNA translation, have been shown to be important in cardiac development. Using this information various researchers have utilized miRNAs to promote the formation of cardiomyocytes through a number of approaches. Several miRNAs acting in combination promote the direct conversion of cardiac fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes. Moreover, a number of miRNAs have been identified that aid the formation of iPS cells and miRNAs also induce these cells to adopt a cardiac fate. MiRNAs have also been implicated in resident cardiac progenitor cell differentiation. In this review we will discuss the current literature as it pertains to these processes as well as discussing the therapeutic implications of these findings. PMID:25953925

  7. Cardiac Diseases in People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Akker, M.; Maaskant, M. A.; van der Meijden, R. J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In people with ID there is more morbidity than in the general population, including cardiac diseases. Dutch figures on this subject are scarce. Methods: Descriptive study of the prevalence of cardiac diseases in 436 residential clients in Echt, the Netherlands, and comparisons between men and women, age groups, and level and aetiology…

  8. Influence of cirrhosis in cardiac surgery outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Esteve, Francisco; Javierre, Casimiro; Ventura, Josep L; Mañez, Rafael; Farrero, Elisabet; Torrado, Herminia; Rodríguez-Castro, David; Carrio, Maria L

    2015-04-18

    Liver cirrhosis has evolved an important risk factor for cardiac surgery due to the higher morbidity and mortality that these patients may suffer compared with general cardiac surgery population. The presence of contributing factors for a poor outcome, such as coagulopathy, a poor nutritional status, an adaptive immune dysfunction, a degree of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and a degree of renal and pulmonary dysfunction, have to be taken into account for surgical evaluation when cardiac surgery is needed, together with the degree of liver disease and its primary complications. The associated pathophysiological characteristics that liver cirrhosis represents have a great influence in the development of complications during cardiac surgery and the postoperative course. Despite the population of cirrhotic patients who are referred for cardiac surgery is small and recommendations come from small series, since liver cirrhotic patients have increased their chance of survival in the last 20 years due to the advances in their medical care, which includes liver transplantation, they have been increasingly considered for cardiac surgery. Indeed, there is an expected rise of cirrhotic patients within the cardiac surgical population due to the increasing rates of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, especially in western countries. In consequence, a more specific approach is needed in the assessment of care of these patients if we want to improve their management. In this article, we review the pathophysiology and outcome prediction of cirrhotic patients who underwent cardiac surgery.

  9. Global Availability of Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Turk-Adawi, Karam; Grace, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    The most prevalent non-communicable disease globally, namely cardiovascular disease (CVD), is also the leading cause of mortality, with over 80% of the deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. To lessen the impact of CVDs on individuals and societies, a comprehensive approach is needed. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) involves delivery of structured exercise, education and risk reduction, in a cost-effective manner. Robust evidence demonstrates it reduces mortality up to 25%, improves functional capacity, as well as decreases re-hospitalization. Despite its benefits, and clinical practice guideline recommendations to refer cardiac patients, CR programs are grossly under-used. Worldwide, there is low availability of CR; only 38.8% of countries globally have CR programs. Specifically, 68.0% of high-income and 23% of LMICs (28.2% for middle- and 8.3% for low-income countries) have CR. CR density estimates ranged from 1 program per 0.1–6.4 million inhabitants. CR availability is much lower than that of other evidence-based secondary prevention therapies, such as revascularization and pharmacological therapies. Multi-level strategies to augment CR capacity and availability at national and international levels such as supportive public health policies, systematic referral strategies, and alternative models of delivery are needed. PMID:25027487

  10. Cardiac Rehabilitation in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, David W; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    The biology of aging and the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) overlap, with the effect that CVD is endemic in the growing population of older adults. Moreover, CVD in older adults is usually complicated by age-related complexities, including multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, and other intricacies that add to the risks of ambiguous symptoms, deconditioning, iatrogenesis, falls, disability, and other challenges. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a comprehensive lifestyle program that can have particular benefit for older patients with cardiovascular conditions. Although CR was originally designed primarily as an exercise training program for younger adults after a myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass surgery, it has evolved as a comprehensive lifestyle program (promoting physical activity as well as education, diet, risk reduction, and adherence) for a broader range of CVD (coronary heart disease, heart failure, and valvular heart disease). It provides a valuable opportunity to address and moderate many of the challenges pertinent for the large and growing population of older adults with CVD. Cardiac rehabilitation promotes physical function (cardiorespiratory fitness as well as strength and balance) that helps overcome disease and deconditioning as well as related vulnerabilities such as disability, frailty, and falls. Similarly, CR facilitates education, monitoring, and guidance to reduce iatrogenesis and promote adherence. Furthermore, CR fosters cognition, socialization, and independence in older patients. Yet despite all its conceptual benefits, CR is significantly underused in older populations. This review discusses benefits and the paradoxical underuse of CR, as well as evolving models of care that may achieve greater application and efficacy. PMID:27297002

  11. Predictive Modeling of Cardiac Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Gary T.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the Contextual Alarms Management System (CALMS) project is to develop sophisticated models to predict the onset of clinical cardiac ischemia before it occurs. The system will continuously monitor cardiac patients and set off an alarm when they appear about to suffer an ischemic episode. The models take as inputs information from patient history and combine it with continuously updated information extracted from blood pressure, oxygen saturation and ECG lines. Expert system, statistical, neural network and rough set methodologies are then used to forecast the onset of clinical ischemia before it transpires, thus allowing early intervention aimed at preventing morbid complications from occurring. The models will differ from previous attempts by including combinations of continuous and discrete inputs. A commercial medical instrumentation and software company has invested funds in the project with a goal of commercialization of the technology. The end product will be a system that analyzes physiologic parameters and produces an alarm when myocardial ischemia is present. If proven feasible, a CALMS-based system will be added to existing heart monitoring hardware.

  12. Cardiac cachexia: hic et nunc.

    PubMed

    Loncar, Goran; Springer, Jochen; Anker, Markus; Doehner, Wolfram; Lainscak, Mitja

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac cachexia (CC) is the clinical entity at the end of the chronic natural course of heart failure (HF). Despite the efforts, even the most recent definition of cardiac cachexia has been challenged, more precisely, the addition of new criteria on top of obligatory weight loss. The pathophysiology of CC is complex and multifactorial. A better understanding of pathophysiological pathways in body wasting will contribute to establish potentially novel treatment strategies. The complex biochemical network related with CC and HF pathophysiology underlines that a single biomarker cannot reflect all of the features of the disease. Biomarkers that could pick up the changes in body composition before they convey into clinical manifestations of CC would be of great importance. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against cachexia, sarcopenia, and wasting disorders is perceived as an urgent need by healthcare professionals. The treatment of body wasting remains an unresolved challenge to this day. As CC is a multifactorial disorder, it is unlikely that any single agent will be completely effective in treating this condition. Among all investigated therapeutic strategies, aerobic exercise training in HF patients is the most proved to counteract skeletal muscle wasting and is recommended by treatment guidelines for HF. PMID:27386168

  13. Cardiac cachexia: hic et nunc.

    PubMed

    Loncar, Goran; Springer, Jochen; Anker, Markus; Doehner, Wolfram; Lainscak, Mitja

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac cachexia (CC) is the clinical entity at the end of the chronic natural course of heart failure (HF). Despite the efforts, even the most recent definition of cardiac cachexia has been challenged, more precisely, the addition of new criteria on top of obligatory weight loss. The pathophysiology of CC is complex and multifactorial. A better understanding of pathophysiological pathways in body wasting will contribute to establish potentially novel treatment strategies. The complex biochemical network related with CC and HF pathophysiology underlines that a single biomarker cannot reflect all of the features of the disease. Biomarkers that could pick up the changes in body composition before they convey into clinical manifestations of CC would be of great importance. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against cachexia, sarcopenia, and wasting disorders is perceived as an urgent need by healthcare professionals. The treatment of body wasting remains an unresolved challenge to this day. As CC is a multifactorial disorder, it is unlikely that any single agent will be completely effective in treating this condition. Among all investigated therapeutic strategies, aerobic exercise training in HF patients is the most proved to counteract skeletal muscle wasting and is recommended by treatment guidelines for HF.

  14. Cardiac arrhythmias in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, I; Hardarson, T; Jonsson, S

    1982-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias in a group of relatives of patients who had come to necropsy with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Another aim of the study was to assess the validity of an interventricular septal thickness of 1.3 cm or more, measured by echocardiography, as a diagnostic criterion of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy among relatives of cases proven at necropsy. Fifty close relatives of eight deceased patients were examined. By the above definition 22 relatives had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 28 did not. A comparison of the prevalence and types of cardiac arrhythmias, as shown by 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, was made between the two groups and a third apparently healthy group of 40 people. The patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy showed a significant increase in supraventricular extrasystoles/24 hours, supraventricular arrhythmias, high grade ventricular arrhythmia, and the number of patients with more than 10 ventricular extrasystoles every 24 hours when compared with the other groups. There was no significant difference between normal relatives and controls. The prevalence and types of arrhythmia in these patients were similar to those found by other investigators using different diagnostic criteria. These results support the contention that these patients do indeed have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and suggest that all close relatives of necropsy proven cases should be examined by echocardiography and subsequently by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring if the interventricular septal thickness is 1.3 more. PMID:7201843

  15. Cardiac cachexia: hic et nunc

    PubMed Central

    Loncar, Goran; Springer, Jochen; Anker, Markus; Doehner, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac cachexia (CC) is the clinical entity at the end of the chronic natural course of heart failure (HF). Despite the efforts, even the most recent definition of cardiac cachexia has been challenged, more precisely, the addition of new criteria on top of obligatory weight loss. The pathophysiology of CC is complex and multifactorial. A better understanding of pathophysiological pathways in body wasting will contribute to establish potentially novel treatment strategies. The complex biochemical network related with CC and HF pathophysiology underlines that a single biomarker cannot reflect all of the features of the disease. Biomarkers that could pick up the changes in body composition before they convey into clinical manifestations of CC would be of great importance. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against cachexia, sarcopenia, and wasting disorders is perceived as an urgent need by healthcare professionals. The treatment of body wasting remains an unresolved challenge to this day. As CC is a multifactorial disorder, it is unlikely that any single agent will be completely effective in treating this condition. Among all investigated therapeutic strategies, aerobic exercise training in HF patients is the most proved to counteract skeletal muscle wasting and is recommended by treatment guidelines for HF. PMID:27386168

  16. Hemodynamics driven cardiac valve morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Steed, Emily; Boselli, Francesco; Vermot, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical forces are instrumental to cardiovascular development and physiology. The heart beats approximately 2.6 billion times in a human lifetime and heart valves ensure that these contractions result in an efficient, unidirectional flow of the blood. Composed of endocardial cells (EdCs) and extracellular matrix (ECM), cardiac valves are among the most mechanically challenged structures of the body both during and after their development. Understanding how hemodynamic forces modulate cardiovascular function and morphogenesis is key to unraveling the relationship between normal and pathological cardiovascular development and physiology. Most valve diseases have their origins in embryogenesis, either as signs of abnormal developmental processes or the aberrant re-expression of fetal gene programs normally quiescent in adulthood. Here we review recent discoveries in the mechanobiology of cardiac valve development and introduce the latest technologies being developed in the zebrafish, including live cell imaging and optical technologies, as well as modeling approaches that are currently transforming this field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  17. Modeling the isolated cardiac myocyte.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Jose L; Wang, Fei; Bers, Donald M

    2004-01-01

    Computer modeling of cardiac myocytes has flourished in recent years. Models have evolved from mathematical descriptions of ionic channels alone to more sophisticated formulations that include calcium transport mechanisms, ATP production and metabolic pathways. The increased complexity is fueled by the new data available in the field. The continuous production of experimental data has led to the evolution of increasingly refined descriptions of the phenomena by modelers. Integrating the numerous systems involved in cardiac myocyte homeostasis makes the use of computer models necessary due to the unreliability of intuitive approaches. However the complexity of the model should not imply a cumbersome operation of the program. As with any tool, computer models have to be easy to operate or their strength will be diminished and potential users will not benefit fully from them. The contribution of the computer modeler to their respective biological fields will be more successful and enduring if modelers devote sufficient time to implement their equations into a model with user-friendly characteristics. PMID:15142742

  18. Glucose metabolism and cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Tian, Rong

    2011-01-01

    The most notable change in the metabolic profile of hypertrophied hearts is an increased reliance on glucose with an overall reduced oxidative metabolism, i.e. a reappearance of the foetal metabolic pattern. In animal models, this change is attributed to the down-regulation of the transcriptional cascades promoting gene expression for fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in adult hearts. Impaired myocardial energetics in cardiac hypertrophy also triggers AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased glucose uptake and glycolysis. Aside from increased reliance on glucose as an energy source, changes in other glucose metabolism pathways, e.g. the pentose phosphate pathway, the glucosamine biosynthesis pathway, and anaplerosis, are also noted in the hypertrophied hearts. Studies using transgenic mouse models and pharmacological compounds to mimic or counter the switch of substrate preference in cardiac hypertrophy have demonstrated that increased glucose metabolism in adult heart is not harmful and can be beneficial when it provides sufficient fuel for oxidative metabolism. However, improvement in the oxidative capacity and efficiency rather than the selection of the substrate is likely the ultimate goal for metabolic therapies. PMID:21502371

  19. Applications of Computational Modeling in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Genet, Martin; Dang, Alan B.; Ge, Liang; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Although computational modeling is common in many areas of science and engineering, only recently have advances in experimental techniques and medical imaging allowed this tool to be applied in cardiac surgery. Despite its infancy in cardiac surgery, computational modeling has been useful in calculating the effects of clinical devices and surgical procedures. In this review, we present several examples that demonstrate the capabilities of computational cardiac modeling in cardiac surgery. Specifically, we demonstrate its ability to simulate surgery, predict myofiber stress and pump function, and quantify changes to regional myocardial material properties. In addition, issues that would need to be resolved in order for computational modeling to play a greater role in cardiac surgery are discussed. PMID:24708036

  20. Gender differences in cardiac hypertrophic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Patrizio, Mario; Marano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is a complex process that occurs in response to different types of cardiac injury such as ischemia and hypertension, and that involves cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle cells, vascular endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells. The end result is cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, inflammation, vascular, and electrophysiological remodeling. This paper reviews a large number of studies on the influence of gender on pathological cardiac remodeling and shows how sex differences result in different clinical outcomes and therapeutic responses, with males which generally develop greater cardiac remodeling responses than females. Although estrogens appear to have an important role in attenuating adverse cardiac remodeling, the mechanisms through which gender modulates myocardial remodeling remain to be identified. PMID:27364397

  1. [A new incentive for cardiac rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Brügemann, Johan; Gerds-Ploeger, Hendyke Z R

    2015-01-01

    Only a minority of patients receive cardiac rehabilitation after acute coronary syndrome, coronary bypass grafting or heart valve operation. A recent study published in the European Heart Journal, presents the results from approximately 36,000 patients who participated in a rehabilitation program. It showed a 35% reduction in mortality during 4-year follow-up. Modern cardiac rehabilitation does not only focus on physical training but also includes interactive education, relaxation therapy, coping and self-management. Patients are also encouraged to participate in structural physical activity, which is incorporated into their daily life after the rehabilitation program. From other studies we know that not only is mortality reduced but also quality of life is improved as a result of cardiac rehabilitation. We both strongly recommend and encourage our colleagues to refer their cardiac patients to a multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation program. PMID:26288140

  2. Integrative modeling of the cardiac ventricular myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Raimond L.; Cortassa, Sonia; O'Rourke, Brian; Hashambhoy, Yasmin L.; Rice, John Jeremy; Greenstein, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology is a discipline with a rich 50-year history of experimental research coupled with integrative modeling which has enabled us to achieve a quantitative understanding of the relationships between molecular function and the integrated behavior of the cardiac myocyte in health and disease. In this paper, we review the development of integrative computational models of the cardiac myocyte. We begin with a historical overview of key cardiac cell models that helped shape the field. We then narrow our focus to models of the cardiac ventricular myocyte and describe these models in the context of their subcellular functional systems including dynamic models of voltage-gated ion channels, mitochondrial energy production, ATP-dependent and electrogenic membrane transporters, intracellular Ca dynamics, mechanical contraction, and regulatory signal transduction pathways. We describe key advances and limitations of the models as well as point to new directions for future modeling research. PMID:20865780

  3. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27591449

  4. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27590654

  5. Effects of hot-water extract of banana (Musa acuminata) fruit's peel on the antibacterial activity, and anti-hypothermal stress, immune responses and disease resistance of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbegii.

    PubMed

    Rattanavichai, Wutti; Cheng, Winton

    2014-08-01

    The hot-extracts isolated from fruit's peel of banana, Musa acuminata, was evaluated on the antibacterial activity to pathogens from aquatic animals, and immunostimulating potential, disease resistance and anti-hypothermal stress in giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii through injection administration. The banana peel extract (BPE) showed good activity against 1 Gram-positive and 3 Gram-negative pathogens, including Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacteria damsella, Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahemolyticus especially in prawn pathogen of L. garvieae strain, which were carried out by a disk diffusion method. Prawn received BPE via injection administration at 1-6 μg (g prawn)(-1) significantly increased total haemocyte count (THC), hyaline cell (HC), granular cell (GC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity and phagocytic activity against L. garvieae from 3 to 6 days, and significantly increased clearance efficiency against L. garvieae and a significantly decreased coagulation time of prawn from 1 to 6 days. Prawn injected with BPE at 6.0 μg (g prawn)(-1) for 6 days showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but significantly decreased respiratory bursts (RBs) of per haemocyte. Survival rates of M. rosenbergii injected with BPE at concentrations of 1, 3 and 6 μg (g prawn)(-1) were significantly higher than those injected with saline control after challenge with L. garvieae for 4-6 days, and the respective relative survival percentages of prawn were 28.6%, 38.1%, and 47.8%, respectively at 6 days. The sublethal time of prawns that had received saline and BPE at 1, 3 and 6 μg (g prawn)(-1) for 6 days and then were transferred from 28 °C to 14 °C were 69.4, 79.8, 83.6, and 90.2 h, respectively. It was concluded that the BPE can be used as the bacteriostat, and immunostimulant and physiological regulator for prawn through injection administration to enhance immunity, physiological responses, and resistance against L. garvieae.

  6. Cardiac matrix: a clue for future therapy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Paras Kumar; Givvimani, Srikanth; Chavali, Vishalakshi; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac muscle is unique because it contracts ceaselessly throughout the life and is highly resistant to fatigue. The marvelous nature of the cardiac muscle is attributed to its matrix that maintains structural and functional integrity and provides ambient micro-environment required for mechanical, cellular and molecular activities in the heart. Cardiac matrix dictates the endothelium myocyte (EM) coupling and contractility of cardiomyocytes. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) regulate matrix degradation that determines cardiac fibrosis and myocardial performance. We have shown that MMP-9 regulates differential expression of micro RNAs (miRNAs), calcium cycling and contractility of cardiomyocytes. The differential expression of miRNAs is associated with angiogenesis, hypertrophy and fibrosis in the heart. MMP-9, which is involved in the degradation of cardiac matrix and induction of fibrosis, is also implicated in inhibition of survival and differentiation of cardiac stem cells (CSC). Cardiac matrix is distinct because it renders mechanical properties and provides a framework essential for differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPC) into specific lineage. Cardiac matrix regulates myocyte contractility by EM coupling and calcium transients and also directs miRNAs required for precise regulation of continuous and synchronized beating of cardiomyocytes that is indispensible for survival. Alteration in the matrix homeostasis due to induction of MMPs, altered expression of specific miRNAs or impaired signaling for contractility of cardiomyocytes leads to catastrophic effects. This review describes the mechanisms by which cardiac matrix regulates myocardial performance and suggests future directions for the development of treatment strategies in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24055000

  7. Non-coding RNAs in cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanli; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Developing new therapeutic strategies which could enhance cardiomyocyte regenerative capacity is of significant clinical importance. Though promising, methods to promote cardiac regeneration have had limited success due to the weak regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian heart. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), are functional RNA molecules without a protein coding function that have been reported to engage in cardiac regeneration and repair. In light of current regenerative strategies, the regulatory effects of ncRNAs can be categorized as follows: cardiac proliferation, cardiac differentiation, cardiac survival and cardiac reprogramming. miR-590, miR-199a, miR-17-92 cluster, miR302-367 cluster and miR-222 have been reported to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation while miR-1 and miR-133 suppress that. miR-499 and miR-1 promote the differentiation of cardiac progenitors into cardiomyocyte while miR-133 and H19 inhibit that. miR-21, miR-24, miR-221, miR-199a and miR-155 improve cardiac survival while miR-34a, miR-1 and miR-320 exhibit opposite effects. miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499 are capable of reprogramming fibroblasts to cardiomyocyte-like cells and miR-284, miR-302, miR-93, miR-106b and lncRNA-ST8SIA3 are able to enhace cardiac reprogramming. Exploring non-coding RNA-based methods to enhance cardiac regeneration would be instrumental for devising new effective therapies against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26462179

  8. Deep shadow occulter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for occulting light. The occulter shape suppresses diffraction at any given size or angle and is practical to build because it can be made binary to avoid scatter. Binary structures may be fully opaque or fully transmitting at specific points. The diffraction suppression is spectrally broad so that it may be used with incoherent white light. An occulter may also include substantially opaque inner portion and an at least partially transparent outer portion. Such occulters may be used on the ground to create a deep shadow in a short distance, or may be used in space to suppress starlight and reveal exoplanets.

  9. Deep Space Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Andrew T. (Inventor); Riedel, Joseph E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single, compact, lower power deep space positioning system (DPS) configured to determine a location of a spacecraft anywhere in the solar system, and provide state information relative to Earth, Sun, or any remote object. For example, the DPS includes a first camera and, possibly, a second camera configured to capture a plurality of navigation images to determine a state of a spacecraft in a solar system. The second camera is located behind, or adjacent to, a secondary reflector of a first camera in a body of a telescope.

  10. Deep mantle subduction flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Katherine A.; White, William M.

    2009-12-01

    We assess the flux of incompatible trace elements into the deep mantle in the Aleutian, Central America, Izu-Bonin, Kurile, Lesser Antilles, Mariana, Sunda, and Tonga subduction zones. We use a simple mass balance approach in which we assume that all of the material lost from the subducting crust and sediment (the "slab") is incorporated into the magmas erupted above the subduction zone, and we use these assumptions to calculate a residual slab composition. The calculated residual slabs are enriched in incompatible elements compared to mid-ocean ridge basalts and highly enriched compared to primitive or depleted mantle. Almost all of the subducted Nb, Ta, and intermediate and heavy rare earths survive into the deep mantle, as do most of the light rare earths. On average, 73% of Th and Pb, 74% of K, 79% of U, 80% of Rb, 80% of Sr, and 82% of Ba survive into the deep mantle. Pb/Ce ratios are systematically lower, and Nb/U ratios are systematically higher, in the deep mantle flux than they are in the flux of material into the trench. Nevertheless, most residual slabs have Pb/Ce and Nb/U ratios outside the typical mantle range. Changes to U/Pb and Th/U ratios tend to be small and are not systematic. Rb/Sr ratios significantly decrease in some subduction zones but increase in others. In contrast, Sm/Nd ratios increase by small but significant amounts in most arcs. Based on these results, we attempt to predict the Sr, Nd, and Pb composition of anciently recycled material now in the mantle. We find that such material would most resemble enriched mantle II-type oceanic island basalts (OIB). None of our calculated residual slabs would evolve to Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions similar to either high 238U/204Pb or enriched mantle I. The range of Sr and Pb isotope ratios in anciently recycled material is similar to that seen in modern OIB, but Nd isotopic compositions do not range to ɛNd values as low as those in some modern OIB. Neither radiogenic nor unradiogenic Pb isotope

  11. Mesenchymal-endothelial-transition contributes to cardiac neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Ubil, Eric; Duan, Jinzhu; Pillai, Indulekha C.L.; Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; Wu, Yong; Bargiacchi, Francesca; Lu, Yan; Stanbouly, Seta; Huang, Jie; Rojas, Mauricio; Vondriska, Thomas M.; Stefani, Enrico; Deb, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells contribute to a subset of cardiac fibroblasts by undergoing endothelial-to-mesenchymal-transition, but whether cardiac fibroblasts can adopt an endothelial cell fate and directly contribute to neovascularization after cardiac injury is not known. Here, using genetic fate map techniques, we demonstrate that cardiac fibroblasts rapidly adopt an endothelial cell like phenotype after acute ischemic cardiac injury. Fibroblast derived endothelial cells exhibit anatomical and functional characteristics of native endothelial cells. We show that the transcription factor p53 regulates such a switch in cardiac fibroblast fate. Loss of p53 in cardiac fibroblasts severely decreases the formation of fibroblast derived endothelial cells, reduces post infarct vascular density and worsens cardiac function. Conversely, stimulation of the p53 pathway in cardiac fibroblasts augments mesenchymal to endothelial transition, enhances vascularity and improves cardiac function. These observations demonstrate that mesenchymal-to-endothelial-transition contributes to neovascularization of the injured heart and represents a potential therapeutic target for enhancing cardiac repair. PMID:25317562

  12. Exercises in anatomy: cardiac isomerism.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert H; Sarwark, Anne E; Spicer, Diane E; Backer, Carl L

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that the patients with the most complex cardiac malformations are those with so-called visceral heterotaxy. At present, it remains a fact that most investigators segregate these patients on the basis of their splenic anatomy, describing syndromes of so-called asplenia and polysplenia. It has also been known for quite some time, nonetheless, that the morphology of the tracheobronchial tree is usually isomeric in the setting of heterotaxy. And it has been shown that the isomerism found in terms of bronchial arrangement correlates in a better fashion with the cardiac anatomy than does the presence of multiple spleens, or the absence of any splenic tissue. In this exercise in anatomy, we use hearts from the Idriss archive of Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago to demonstrate the isomeric features found in the hearts obtained from patients known to have had heterotaxy. We first demonstrate the normal arrangements, showing how it is the extent of the pectinate muscles in the atrial appendages relative to the atrioventricular junctions that distinguishes between morphologically right and left atrial chambers. We also show the asymmetry of the normal bronchial tree, and the relationships of the first bronchial branches to the pulmonary arteries supplying the lower lobes of the lungs. We then demonstrate that diagnosis of multiple spleens requires the finding of splenic tissue on either side of the dorsal mesogastrium. Turning to hearts obtained from patients with heterotaxy, we illustrate isomeric right and left atrial appendages. We emphasize that it is only the appendages that are universally isomeric, but point out that other features support the notion of cardiac isomerism. We then show that description also requires a full account of veno-atrial connections, since these can seemingly be mirror-imaged when the arrangement within the heart is one of isomerism of the atrial appendages. We show how failure to recognize the presence of such isomeric

  13. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    heart function. Presented is the first use of transthoracic ARFI imaging in a serial study of heart failure in a porcine model. Results demonstrate the ability of transthoracic ARFI to image cyclically-varying stiffness changes in healthy and infarcted myocardium under good B-mode imaging conditions at depths in the range of 3-5 cm. Challenging imaging scenarios such as deep regions of interest, vigorous lateral motion and stable, reverberant clutter are analyzed and discussed. Results are then presented from the first study of clinical feasibility of transthoracic cardiac ARFI imaging. At the Duke University Medical Center, healthy volunteers and patients having magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed apical infarcts were enrolled for the study. The number of patients who met the inclusion criteria in this preliminary clinical trial was low, but results showed that the limitations seen in animal studies were not overcome by allowing transmit power levels to exceed the FDA mechanical index (MI) limit. The results suggested the primary source of image degradation was clutter rather than lack of radiation force. Additionally, the transthoracic method applied in its present form was not shown capable of tracking propagating ARFI-induced shear waves in the myocardium. Under current instrumentation and processing methods, results of these studies support feasibility for transthoracic ARFI in high-quality B-Mode imaging conditions. Transthoracic ARFI was not shown sensitive to infarct or to tracking heart failure in the presence of clutter and signal decorrelation. This work does provide evidence that transthoracic ARFI imaging is a safe non-invasive tool, but clinical efficacy as a diagnostic tool will need to be addressed by further development to overcome current challenges and increase robustness to sources of image degradation.

  14. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na+/K+-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1–3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na+/K+-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na+/K+-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling. PMID:27667975

  15. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na+/K+-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1–3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na+/K+-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na+/K+-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling.

  16. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1-3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling. PMID:27667975

  17. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1-3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling.

  18. Rerouting surgery of cardiac type total anomalous pulmonary venous return in a premature newborn with very low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Wu, En-Ting; Huang, Shu-Chien; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Chang, Chung-I

    2007-02-01

    Intracardiac repair for complex congenital heart defects in premature neonates with very low birth weight (VLBW) is still a challenge to pediatric cardiac surgeons. We report the successful rerouting of cardiac type total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) in a premature newborn (36th gestational week) with VLBW (1250 g). She had severe hypoxemia and low cardiac output despite medical treatment. Rerouting surgery of TAPVR was performed under deep hypothermia circulatory arrest at the age of 20 days. The sternum was left open and approximated 2 days later. Follow-up echocardiography showed good ventricular function without pulmonary venous obstruction. The endotracheal tube was removed 7 days postoperatively. She was then discharged without complication. In conclusion, with improved cardiopulmonary bypass technique and perioperative care, open heart surgery can be performed in premature newborns with VLBW.

  19. Multimedia instruction of cardiac auscultation.

    PubMed Central

    Criley, J. M.; Criley, D.; Zalace, C.

    1997-01-01

    The cardiac physical examination is in itself a multimedia experience. It is an amalgamation of visible, palpable, and audible sensations, preceded by the collection of an appropriate historical context in which to place these multiple sensations. It is unlikely that any electronic media could ever replace the real life experience of admitting, examining, diagnosing, and effectively treating a patient with mitral stenosis who has decompensated because of the onset of atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response, or a patient with sudden, severe aortic regurgitation due to endocarditis. These potentially fatal conditions can be effectively treated only if the suspicion of their presence is seriously raised. Although there is no substitute for first-hand experience, attempts to provide an effective surrogate experience are worth pursuing. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:9108683

  20. Fractals analysis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohammed

    2005-09-01

    Heart rhythms are generated by complex self-regulating systems governed by the laws of chaos. Consequently, heart rhythms have fractal organization, characterized by self-similar dynamics with long-range order operating over multiple time scales. This allows for the self-organization and adaptability of heart rhythms under stress. Breakdown of this fractal organization into excessive order or uncorrelated randomness leads to a less-adaptable system, characteristic of aging and disease. With the tools of nonlinear dynamics, this fractal breakdown can be quantified with potential applications to diagnostic and prognostic clinical assessment. In this paper, I review the methodologies for fractal analysis of cardiac rhythms and the current literature on their applications in the clinical context. A brief overview of the basic mathematics of fractals is also included. Furthermore, I illustrate the usefulness of these powerful tools to clinical medicine by describing a novel noninvasive technique to monitor drug therapy in atrial fibrillation.

  1. [Interventional cardiac catheterization in children].

    PubMed

    Van Aerschot, I; Boudjemline, Y

    2012-01-01

    With the technological progress, the role of the cardiac catheterization has dramatically changed, moving from diagnostic to therapeutic and becoming adjuvant to surgical procedures. In various congenital heart defects, it allows to postpone the need for surgery or even cancel the surgical indication being less invasive and as powerful as surgery. It is thanks to many technological advances, in particular with the development of devices with memory alloy, that the catheterization makes such great strides today, and the miniaturization of the prosthetic material makes it possible to push back more and more the limits of feasibility which remain related to the smallness of the vascular accesses at the newborn age. The future of this discipline lies in the hybrid procedures, where a true teamwork between the surgeons and the pediatric cardiologists makes it possible to bring the best therapeutic strategy for patients with congenital heart defects. PMID:22041595

  2. Diagnosis of traumatic cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, K.; Soliman, M.H.; Braunstein, P.; Formosa, P.; Cohen, A.J.; Matsuura, P.; Mason, G.R.

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma remains a diagnostic problem because of a lack of sensitive diagnostic tests. This study evaluated thallous chloride Tl 201 single-photon-emission computed tomography in a series of 48 patients following blunt chest trauma. Of the 48 patients, 23 had normal scans. None of these patients proved to have serious arrhythmias during three days of continuous monitoring. Of 25 patients with abnormal or ambiguous studies, five (20%) developed serious arrhythmias requiring therapy. Single-photon-emission computed tomography scanning thus was sensitive in indicating that group of patients at risk of serious arrhythmias, and may therefore prove to be a useful screening test to determine the need for hospitalization and arrhythmia monitoring following blunt chest trauma.

  3. Redox signaling in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Celio X.C.; Anilkumar, Narayana; Zhang, Min; Brewer, Alison C.; Shah, Ajay M.

    2011-01-01

    The heart has complex mechanisms that facilitate the maintenance of an oxygen supply–demand balance necessary for its contractile function in response to physiological fluctuations in workload as well as in response to chronic stresses such as hypoxia, ischemia, and overload. Redox-sensitive signaling pathways are centrally involved in many of these homeostatic and stress-response mechanisms. Here, we review the main redox-regulated pathways that are involved in cardiac myocyte excitation–contraction coupling, differentiation, hypertrophy, and stress responses. We discuss specific sources of endogenously generated reactive oxygen species (e.g., mitochondria and NADPH oxidases of the Nox family), the particular pathways and processes that they affect, the role of modulators such as thioredoxin, and the specific molecular mechanisms that are involved—where this knowledge is available. A better understanding of this complex regulatory system may allow the development of more specific therapeutic strategies for heart diseases. PMID:21236334

  4. The role of autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanfang; Xu, Jin; He, Lu; Peng, Lijun; Zhong, Qiaoqing; Chen, Linxi; Jiang, Zhisheng

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is conserved in nature from lower eukaryotes to mammals and is an important self-cannibalizing, degradative process that contributes to the elimination of superfluous materials. Cardiac hypertrophy is primarily characterized by excess protein synthesis, increased cardiomyocyte size, and thickened ventricular walls and is a major risk factor that promotes arrhythmia and heart failure. In recent years, cardiomyocyte autophagy has been considered to play a role in controlling the hypertrophic response. However, the beneficial or aggravating role of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy remains controversial. The exact mechanism of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy requires further study. In this review, we summarize the controversies associated with autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy and provide insights into the role of autophagy in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. We conclude that future studies should emphasize the relationship between autophagy and the different stages of cardiac hypertrophy, as well as the autophagic flux and selective autophagy. Autophagy will be a potential therapeutic target for cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27084518

  5. microRNA and Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gnecchi, Massimiliano; Pisano, Federica; Bariani, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Heart diseases are a very common health problem in developed as well as developing countries. In particular, ischemic heart disease and heart failure represent a plague for the patients and for the society. Loss of cardiac tissue after myocardial infarction or dysfunctioning tissue in nonischemic cardiomyopathies may result in cardiac failure. Despite great advancements in the treatment of these diseases, there is a substantial unmet need for novel therapies, ideally addressing repair and regeneration of the damaged or lost myocardium. Along this line, cardiac cell based therapies have gained substantial attention. Three main approaches are currently under investigation: stem cell therapy with either embryonic or adult stem cells; generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells; stimulation of endogenous regeneration trough direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes, activation of resident cardiac stem cells or induction of native resident cardiomyocytes to reenter the cell cycle. All these strategies need to be optimized since their efficiency is low.It has recently become clear that cardiac signaling and transcriptional pathways are intimately intertwined with microRNA molecules which act as modulators of cardiac development, function, and disease. Moreover, miRNA also regulates stem cell differentiation. Here we describe how miRNA may circumvent hurdles that hamper the field of cardiac regeneration and stem cell therapy, and how miRNA may result as the most suitable solution for the damaged heart.

  6. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Improving Function and Reducing Risk.

    PubMed

    Servey, Jessica T; Stephens, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation is a comprehensive multidisciplinary program individually tailored to the needs of patients with cardiovascular disease. The overall goals focus on improving daily function and reducing cardiovascular risk factors. Cardiac rehabilitation includes interventions aimed at lowering blood pressure and improving lipid and diabetes mellitus control, with tobacco cessation, behavioral counseling, and graded physical activity. The physical activity component typically involves 36 sessions over 12 weeks, during which patients participate in supervised exercise under cardiac monitoring. There are also intensive programs that include up to 72 sessions lasting up to 18 weeks, although these programs are not widely available. Additional components of cardiac rehabilitation include counseling on nutrition, screening for and managing depression, and assuring up-to-date immunizations. Cardiac rehabilitation is covered by Medicare and recommended for patients following myocardial infarction, bypass surgery, and stent placement, and for patients with heart failure, stable angina, and several other conditions. Despite proven benefits in mortality rates, depression, functional capacity, and medication adherence, rates of referral for cardiac rehabilitation are suboptimal. Groups less likely to be referred are older adults, women, patients who do not speak English, and persons living in areas where cardiac rehabilitation is not locally available. Additionally, primary care physicians refer patients less often than cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:27386722

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Kahlfuß, Sascha; Flieger, Robert Rainer; Roepke, Torsten Kai; Yilmaz, Kadir

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac echinococcosis is a rare manifestation of cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus Among all patients suffering from CE, only 0.5%-2% exhibit a cardiac involvement. In addition, during the past years the number of CE cases reported in Western Europe remained roughly unchanged. However, we postulate that cases of CE in Western Europe will increase due to a growing number of refugees coming from endemic areas such as Southern Europe, Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Importantly, although cardiac echinococcosis is rare the disease can lead to many clinical complications, for instance acute heart failure and life-threatening arrhythmias. With respect to the increasing relevance of cardiac echinococcosis in Western Europe and the danger of fulminant disease courses, here we review diagnosis strategies and treatment options of the disease. Diagnosis of cardiac echinococcosis requires a detailed evaluation of the patients' case history, specific laboratory analyses and radiological imaging methods. Ultrasound, MRI and CT are key imaging tools for diagnosis, therapy control, prognosis estimation and disease course control. For the therapy of cardiac echinococcosis, a combination of surgical removal and drug treatment should be applied to symptomatic as well as asymptomatic patients. The complete surgical removal of the cyst(s) is the major prognosis factor of the cardiac manifestation of CE. PMID:27199228

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms in cardiac development and disease.

    PubMed

    Vallaster, Marcus; Vallaster, Caroline Dacwag; Wu, Sean M

    2012-01-01

    During mammalian development, cardiac specification and ultimately lineage commitment to a specific cardiac cell type is accomplished by the action of specific transcription factors (TFs) and their meticulous control on an epigenetic level. In this review, we detail how cardiac-specific TFs function in concert with nucleosome remodeling and histone-modifying enzymes to regulate a diverse network of genes required for processes such as cell growth and proliferation, or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), for instance. We provide examples of how several cardiac TFs, such as Nkx2.5, WHSC1, Tbx5, and Tbx1, which are associated with developmental and congenital heart defects, are required for the recruitment of histone modifiers, such as Jarid2, p300, and Ash2l, and components of ATP-dependent remodeling enzymes like Brg1, Baf60c, and Baf180. Binding of these TFs to their respective sites at cardiac genes coincides with a distinct pattern of histone marks, indicating that the precise regulation of cardiac gene networks is orchestrated by interactions between TFs and epigenetic modifiers. Furthermore, we speculate that an epigenetic signature, comprised of TF occupancy, histone modifications, and overall chromatin organization, is an underlying mechanism that governs cardiac morphogenesis and disease.

  9. Deep drawing of uranium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R J; Lundberg, M R

    1987-01-19

    A procedure was developed to fabricate uranium forming blanks with high ''draw-ability'' so that cup shapes could be easily and uniformly deep drawn. The overall procedure involved a posttreatment to develop optimum mechanical and structural properties in the deep-drawn cups. The fabrication sequence is casting high-purity logs, pucking cast logs, cross-rolling pucks to forming blanks, annealing and outgassing forming blanks, cold deep drawing to hemispherical shapes, and stress relieving, outgassing, and annealing deep-drawn parts to restore ductility and impart dimensional stability. The fabrication development and the resulting fabrication procedure are discussed in detail. The mechanical properties and microstructural properties are discussed.

  10. Deep learning for image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoppin, Ryan; Rizki, Mateen

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of deep learning and introduces the several subfields of deep learning including a specific tutorial of convolutional neural networks. Traditional methods for learning image features are compared to deep learning techniques. In addition, we present our preliminary classification results, our basic implementation of a convolutional restricted Boltzmann machine on the Mixed National Institute of Standards and Technology database (MNIST), and we explain how to use deep learning networks to assist in our development of a robust gender classification system.

  11. Neurological effects of deep diving.

    PubMed

    Grønning, Marit; Aarli, Johan A

    2011-05-15

    Deep diving is defined as diving to depths more than 50 m of seawater (msw), and is mainly used for occupational and military purposes. A deep dive is characterized by the compression phase, the bottom time and the decompression phase. Neurological and neurophysiologic effects are demonstrated in divers during the compression phase and the bottom time. Immediate and transient neurological effects after deep dives have been shown in some divers. However, the results from the epidemiological studies regarding long term neurological effects from deep diving are conflicting and still not conclusive. Prospective clinical studies with sufficient power and sensitivity are needed to solve this very important issue.

  12. Space Derived Health Aids (Cardiac Pacemaker)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division's (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) pacer is a rechargeable cardiac pacemaker that eliminates the recurring need for surgery to implant a new battery. The Programalith is an advanced cardiac pacing system which permits a physician to reprogram a patient's implanted pacemaker without surgery. System consists of a pacemaker, together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Signals are transmitted by wireless telemetry. Two-way communications, originating from spacecraft electrical power systems technology, allows physician to interrogate the pacemaker as to the status of the heart, then to fine tune the device to best suit the patient's needs.

  13. Racial differences in sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Fender, Erin A; Henrikson, Charles A; Tereshchenko, Larisa

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), in African Americans, the basis of which is likely multifactorial. African Americans have higher rates of traditional cardiac risk factors including hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and heart failure. There are also significant disparities in health care delivery. While these factors undoubtedly affect health outcomes, there is also growing evidence that genetics may have a significant impact as well. In this paper, we discuss data and hypotheses in support of both sides of the controversy around racial differences in SCD/SCA.

  14. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  15. Benign cardiac tumors and tumorlike conditions.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepali; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Halushka, Marc K

    2010-06-01

    Benign primary cardiac tumors and tumorlike conditions are rare, yet important surgical and autopsy pathology specimens. Although many of these entities are clinically silent, a few can cause significant morbidity or even sudden death. Some cardiac tumors arise in the setting of genetic disorders. Providing the correct diagnosis for a cardiac mass lesion will aid in patient care and genetic counseling. Therefore, a familiarity of these tumors is essential for both surgical and forensic pathologists. This comprehensive and up-to-date review describes the key clinical, gross, and histologic findings for 16 distinct entities. It also provides differential diagnoses and key facts to differentiate between similar appearing tumors. PMID:20471569

  16. Cardiac and Respiratory Disease in Aged Horses.

    PubMed

    Marr, Celia M

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory and cardiac diseases are common in older horses. Advancing age is a specific risk factor for cardiac murmurs and these are more likely in males and small horses. Airway inflammation is the most common respiratory diagnosis. Recurrent airway obstruction can lead to irreversible structural change and bronchiectasis; with chronic hypoxia, right heart dysfunction and failure can develop. Valvular heart disease most often affects the aortic and/or the mitral valve. Management of comorbidity is an essential element of the therapeutic approach to cardiac and respiratory disease in older equids.

  17. Cardiac Monitoring in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Zègre-Hemsey, Jessica K; Garvey, J Lee; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Patients present to the emergency department (ED) with a wide range of complaints and ED clinicians are responsible for identifying which conditions are life threatening. Cardiac monitoring strategies in the ED include, but are not limited to, 12-lead electrocardiography and bedside cardiac monitoring for arrhythmia and ischemia detection as well as QT-interval monitoring. ED nurses are in a unique position to incorporate cardiac monitoring into the early triage and risk stratification of patients with cardiovascular emergencies to optimize patient management and outcomes. PMID:27484661

  18. A rare case of primary cardiac lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Khan-Kheil, Ayisha Mehtab; Mustafa, Hanif Muhammad; Anand, Dhakshinamurthy Vijay; Banerjee, Prithwish

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with shortness of breath and tachycardia along with systemic symptoms of weight loss and lethargy. A pulmonary embolus was the initial suspected diagnosis but through extensive investigations a rarer cause of his symptoms was identified. This case demonstrates the importance of cardiac imaging in the assessment and non-invasive tissue characterisation of a suspected cardiac tumour; in our case, this was subsequently confirmed by careful histological/immunocytochemical evaluation of the pericardial effusion as a primary cardiac B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, thus enabling appropriate management leading to an excellent clinical outcome. PMID:26538249

  19. Pneumopericardium: an unusual cause for cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Djaiani, G; Major, E

    1998-06-01

    A 1-year-old boy breathing via a T-piece system and recovering from meningococcal septicaemia in the intensive care unit suffered a severe bout of coughing and developed bilateral pneumothoraces and tension pneumopericardium resulting in electromechanical dissociation and asystole. Conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation and adrenaline boluses were unsuccessful. Administration of 20 ml.kg-1 of colloid and 3 mmol.kg-1 of sodium bicarbonate solutions produced instantaneous return of cardiac, output. The deleterious effects of cardiac tamponade appeared to decrease with increasing cardiac filling pressures. The patient was managed conservatively and he made a full recovery with no signs of residual neurological deficit. PMID:9709145

  20. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834