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Sample records for deep phase profile

  1. Deep space LADAR, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Randy W.; Rawlins, Greg; Zepkin, Neil; Bohlin, John

    1989-03-01

    A pseudo-ranging laser radar (PRLADAR) concept is proposed to provide extended range capability to tracking LADAR systems meeting the long-range requirements of SDI mission scenarios such as the SIE midcourse program. The project will investigate the payoff of several transmitter modulation techniques and a feasibility demonstration using a breadboard implementation of a new receiver concept called the Phase Multiplexed Correlator (PMC) will be accomplished. The PRLADAR concept has specific application to spaceborne LADAR tracking missions where increased CNR/SNR performance gained by the proposed technique may reduce the laser power and/or optical aperture requirement for a given mission. The reduction in power/aperture has similar cost reduction advantages in commercial ranging applications. A successful Phase 1 program will lay the groundwork for a quick reaction upgrade to the AMOS/LASE system in support of near term SIE measurement objectives.

  2. Natural deep eutectic solvents: cytotoxic profile.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Mbous, Yves Paul; Looi, Chung Yeng; Wong, Won Fen; Hayyan, Adeeb; Salleh, Zulhaziman; Mohd-Ali, Ozair

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic profiles of different ternary natural deep eutectic solvents (NADESs) containing water. For this purpose, five different NADESs were prepared using choline chloride as a salt, alongside five hydrogen bond donors (HBD) namely glucose, fructose, sucrose, glycerol, and malonic acid. Water was added as a tertiary component during the eutectics preparation, except for the malonic acid-based mixture. Coincidentally, the latter was found to be more toxic than any of the water-based NADESs. A trend was observed between the cellular requirements of cancer cells, the viscosity of the NADESs, and their cytotoxicity. This study also highlights the first time application of the conductor-like screening model for real solvent (COSMO-RS) software for the analysis of the cytotoxic mechanism of NADESs. COSMO-RS simulation of the interactions between NADESs and cellular membranes' phospholipids suggested that NADESs strongly interacted with cell surfaces and that their accumulation and aggregation possibly defined their cytotoxicity. This reinforced the idea that careful selection of NADESs components is necessary, as it becomes evident that organic acids as HBD highly contribute to the increasing toxicity of these neoteric mixtures. Nevertheless, NADESs in general seem to possess relatively less acute toxicity profiles than their DESs parents. This opens the door for future large scale utilization of these mixtures. PMID:27386357

  3. Deep seismic reflection profiling and continental growth curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemperer, Simon L.

    1988-01-01

    The results of deep seismic reflection profiling is discussed which shows that the lower crust is prominently layered, in many continental areas, regardless of the age of the surface rocks. The seismic Moho is commonly shallower than the petrological Moho, leading to the question of the nature and origin of this prominent reflector in the deep crust. The lower crust is much less well defined in Phanerozoic and Proterozoic accreted terranes, suggesting possible differences in types of lower crusts.

  4. Continuous contour phase plates for tailoring the focal plane irradiance profile

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S.N.; Rushford, M.C.; Thomas, I.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-08-09

    We present fully continuous phase screens for producing super-Gaussian focal-plane irradiance profiles. Such phase screens are constructed with the assumption of either circular symmetric near-field and far-field profiles or a separable phase screen in Cartesian co-ordinates. In each case, the phase screen is only a few waves deep. Under illumination by coherent light, such phase screens produce high order super-Gaussian profiles in the focal plane with high energy content effects of beam aberrations on the focal profiles and their energy content are also discussed.

  5. Duricrusts and deep-weathering profiles in southwestern wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Dury, G H; Knox, J C

    1971-10-15

    Numerous exposures in southwestern Wisconsin display the profiles of relict deep weathering. Crusts are mainly siliceous, but many are ferruginized to some extent. The occurrence of blocky silcrete, thought to be reported for the first time, recalls the profiles in the Australian belt of transition from silcrust to ferricrust. The humid-tropical kind of pedogenesis necessary to effect this transition may have operated as late as the mid-Miocene. In some localities, the action of grotndwater has caused crusting, mottling, and reduction beneath the dolomite low surface moisture.

  6. Fabrication of large aperture kinoform phase plates in fused silica for smoothing focal plane intensity profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rushford, M.; Dixit, S.; Thomas, I.; Perry, M.

    1996-04-26

    We have fabricated large aperture (40-cm) kinoform phase plates for producing super-Gaussian focal plane intensity profiles. The continuous phase screen, designed using a new iterative procedure, was fabricated in fused silica as a 16-level, one-wave deep rewrapped phase profile using a lithographic process and wet etching in buffered hydrofluoric acid. The observed far-field contains 94% of the incident energy inside the desired spot.

  7. Giddings Austin chalk enters deep lean-gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Moritis, G.

    1995-12-25

    Deep lean gas is the latest phase in the growth of the Giddings field Austin chalk play. The first phase involved drilling vertical oil and gas wells. Next came the horizontal well boom in the shallower Austin chalk area, which is still continuing. And now this third phase places horizontal laterals in the Austen chalk at about 14,000--15,000 ft to produce lean gas. The article describes the producing wells and gas gathering.

  8. Crustal structure of China from deep seismic sounding profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, S.; Mooney, W.D.

    1998-01-01

    More than 36,000 km of Deep Seismic Sounding (DSS) profiles have been collected in China since 1958. However, the results of these profiles are not well known in the West due to the language barrier. In this paper, we summarize the crustal structure of China with a new contour map of crustal thickness, nine representative crustal columns, and maps showing profile locations, average crustal velocity, and Pn velocity. The most remarkable aspect of the crustal structure of China is the well known 70+ km thickness of the crust of the Tibetan Plateau. The thick (45-70 km) crust of western China is separated from the thinner (30-45 km) crust of eastern China by the north-south trending seismic belt (105??E). The average crustal velocity of China ranges from 6.15 to 6.45 km/s, indicating a felsic-to-intermediate bulk crustal composition. Upper mantle (Pn) velocities are 8.0 ?? 0.2 km/s, equal to the global continental average. We interpret these results in terms of the most recent thermo-tectonic events that have modified the crust. In much of eastern China, Cenoxoic crustal extension has produced a thin crust with a low average crustal velocity, similar to western Europe and the Basin and Range Province, western USA. In western China, Mesozoic and Cenoxoic arc-continent and continent-continent collisions have led to crustal growth and thickening. Inferences on the process of crustal thickening are provided by the deep crustal velocity structure as determined by DSS profiles and other seismological studies. A high velocity (7.0-7.4 km/s) lower-crustal layer has been reported in western China only beneath the southernmost Tibetan Plateau. We identity this high-velocity layer as the cold lower crust of the subducting Indian plate. As the Indian crust is injected northward into the Tibetan lower crust, it heats and assimilates by partial melting, a process that results in a reduction in the seismic velocity of the lower crust in the central and northern Tibetan Plateau

  9. Mother and child T cell receptor repertoires: deep profiling study.

    PubMed

    Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Britanova, Olga V; Staroverov, Dmitriy B; Merzlyak, Ekaterina M; Turchaninova, Maria A; Shugay, Mikhail; Bolotin, Dmitriy A; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Bobrynina, Vlasta; Maschan, Mikhail; Lebedev, Yuri B; Chudakov, Dmitriy M

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between maternal and child immunity has been actively studied in the context of complications during pregnancy, autoimmune diseases, and haploidentical transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and solid organs. Here, we have for the first time used high-throughput Illumina HiSeq sequencing to perform deep quantitative profiling of T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires for peripheral blood samples of three mothers and their six children. Advanced technology allowed accurate identification of 5 × 10(5) to 2 × 10(6) TCR beta clonotypes per individual. We performed comparative analysis of these TCR repertoires with the aim of revealing characteristic features that distinguish related mother-child pairs, such as relative TCR beta variable segment usage frequency and relative overlap of TCR beta complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) repertoires. We show that thymic selection essentially and similarly shapes the initial output of the TCR recombination machinery in both related and unrelated pairs, with minor effect from inherited differences. The achieved depth of TCR profiling also allowed us to test the hypothesis that mature T cells transferred across the placenta during pregnancy can expand and persist as functional microchimeric clones in their new host, using characteristic TCR beta CDR3 variants as clonal identifiers.

  10. Skeleton-migration: Applications in deep crustal reflection seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W.; Vasudevan, K.

    2009-12-01

    The reflection geometry of the sub-surface is three-dimensional in character. A 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing would be the ideal modus operandi for true seismic interpretation. However, almost all deep-crustal reflection profiles recorded on land follow quasi-linear geometry, for economic reasons. Although conventional processing of the lines accommodates crooked-line geometry, the migration algorithms used to produce seismic images for interpretation are generally 2-D in nature. Consequently, the effects of 3-D geometry are not usually well-accounted for. For example, the out-of-plane reflections lead to mislocation errors that increase with recording time. The events may be mislocated by 10’s of km and show spurious apparent dip after migration. In order to circumvent these problems and to gain insight into 3-D structures, we present an easy-to-implement “Skeleton-migration” algorithm. The skeleton-migration method follows a two-step procedure. In the first step, we introduce a fast skeletonization of the final pre-processed stack to generate a digital catalogue containing a variety of event attributes including two-way travel times and location information in UTM co-ordinates. In the second step, we apply ray-based migration to the catalogue of events or two-way travel times of the 2-D stack using an appropriate velocity model for the crust and upper mantle. Since often we do not know a priori the strike direction of the reflectors, we have implemented a fast visualization-based optimization procedure to determine the strike. In subsequent steps, we use visualization methods to view and interpret the skeleton-migration results. We illustrate the usefulness of the method with examples from both the synthetic and deep crustal seismic reflection data. For the synthetic examples, we consider physical models corresponding to a point-scatterer, a synform, a fault and a subducting slab. In all these instances, we use an elastic Kirchhoff algorithm

  11. 30 CFR 203.42 - What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells? 203.42 Section 203.42 Mineral Resources BUREAU... Deep Gas Wells on Leases Not Subject to Deep Water Royalty Relief § 203.42 What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells? The conditions...

  12. Strike fault links mountain building from top to deep: evidence from the deep seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Wang, H.; Lu, Z.; Wang, C.; Klemperer, S. L.; Yin, A.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of mountains was influenced by large-scale strike-slip faults in Tibet. At the south and north borders of the Tibetan Plateau, the Karakorum and Kunlun strike-slip faults cut the Himalayas and the Kunlun Mountains crust respectively. Based on the detection results of deep seismic reflection profiles, we report the structures of these strike-slip faults and shear deformation depth. The Karakoram fault and Indus-Yarlung suture (IYS) zone are two important structures in southwest and south Tibet, associated with the collision between India and Eurasia. SinoProbe has acquired two deep seismic reflection profiles with 210 km length. The northwestern profile spans 120 km and crosses the southeast part of the Karakoram fault where dextrally sheared mylonite and mylonitized gneiss-granite are exposed along the fault. The southeastern profile spans 90km and crosses the ophiolite belt of the western IYS. Our preliminary images show: Moho reflections appear at ~ 24 s (TWT) beneath both lines. Flower-structures imaged at the Karakoram fault zone are suggestive of strike-slip structure. There are significant differences in lower-crustal structure between the two lines. Many north and south dipping reflections in the lower crust form v-shaped structures along the northwest line. On the southeastern line, there are many north-dipping but few south-dipping reflections in the lower crust. Kunlun seismic profile crosses the active left-slip Kunlun fault, which is ~1000-km long and was inferred to merge downward with a continental subduction zone. The fault was initiated at 15-8 Ma, moved at a rate of 5-16 mm/year, and has a total slip of 65-120 km. The results of our seismic-reflection study across northeastern Tibet show that the actively deforming middle Tibetan crust is dominated by discrete sub-horizontal simple-shear zones that terminate the subvertical, left-slip Kunlun fault above. The flat shear zones appear to act as roof and floor thrusts of large duplex

  13. Saudi Arabian seismic deep-refraction profiles; final project report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, J.H.; Mooney, W.D.; Blank, H.R.; Gettings, M.E.; Kohler, W.M.; Lamson, R.J.; Leone, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    In February 1978 a seismic deep-refraction profile was recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey along a 1000-km line across the Arabian Shield in western Saudi Arabia. The line begins in Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, leads southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan (Tihamat-Asir), and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, including 19 in the Farasan Islands. Six shot points were used: five on land, with most charges placed below the water table in drill holes, and one at sea, with charges placed on the sea floor and detonated from a ship. Slightly more than 61 metric tons of explosives were used in 19 discrete firings. Seismic energy was recorded by 100 newly-developed portable seismic stations deployed in approximately 200 km-long arrays for each firing. Each station consisted of a standard 2-Hz vertical component geophone coupled to a self-contained analog recording instrument equipped with a magnetic-tape cassette. In this final report, we fully document the field and data-processing procedures and present the final seismogram data set as both a digital magnetic tape and as record sections for each shot point. Record sections include a normalized set of seismograms, reduced at 6 km/s, and a true-amplitude set, reduced at 8 km/s, which have been adjusted for amplifier gain, individual shot size, and distance from the shot point. Appendices give recorder station and shot information, digital data set descriptions, computer program listings, arrival times used in the interpretation, and a bibliography of reports published as a result of this project. We used two-dimensional ray-tracing techniques in the data analysis, and our interpretation is based primarily on horizontally layered models. The Arabian Shield is composed, to first-order, of two layers, each about 20 km

  14. Comparative deep transcriptional profiling of four developing oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Troncoso-Ponce, Manuel A; Kilaru, Aruna; Cao, Xia; Durrett, Timothy P; Fan, Jilian; Jensen, Jacob K; Thrower, Nick A; Pauly, Markus; Wilkerson, Curtis; Ohlrogge, John B

    2011-12-01

    Transcriptome analysis based on deep expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing allows quantitative comparisons of gene expression across multiple species. Using pyrosequencing, we generated over 7 million ESTs from four stages of developing seeds of Ricinus communis, Brassica napus, Euonymus alatus and Tropaeolum majus, which differ in their storage tissue for oil, their ability to photosynthesize and in the structure and content of their triacylglycerols (TAG). The larger number of ESTs in these 16 datasets provided reliable estimates of the expression of acyltransferases and other enzymes expressed at low levels. Analysis of EST levels from these oilseeds revealed both conserved and distinct species-specific expression patterns for genes involved in the synthesis of glycerolipids and their precursors. Independent of the species and tissue type, ESTs for core fatty acid synthesis enzymes maintained a conserved stoichiometry and a strong correlation in temporal profiles throughout seed development. However, ESTs associated with non-plastid enzymes of oil biosynthesis displayed dissimilar temporal patterns indicative of different regulation. The EST levels for several genes potentially involved in accumulation of unusual TAG structures were distinct. Comparison of expression of members from multi-gene families allowed the identification of specific isoforms with conserved function in oil biosynthesis. In all four oilseeds, ESTs for Rubisco were present, suggesting its possible role in carbon metabolism, irrespective of light availability. Together, these data provide a resource for use in comparative and functional genomics of diverse oilseeds. Expression data for more than 350 genes encoding enzymes and proteins involved in lipid metabolism are available at the 'ARALIP' website (http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

  15. Comparative deep transcriptional profiling of four developing oilseeds

    PubMed Central

    Troncoso-Ponce, Manuel A; Kilaru, Aruna; Cao, Xia; Durrett, Timothy P; Fan, Jilian; Jensen, Jacob K; Thrower, Nick A; Pauly, Markus; Wilkerson, Curtis; Ohlrogge, John B

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis based on deep expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing allows quantitative comparisons of gene expression across multiple species. Using pyrosequencing, we generated over 7 million ESTs from four stages of developing seeds of Ricinus communis, Brassica napus, Euonymus alatus and Tropaeolum majus, which differ in their storage tissue for oil, their ability to photosynthesize and in the structure and content of their triacylglycerols (TAG). The larger number of ESTs in these 16 datasets provided reliable estimates of the expression of acyltransferases and other enzymes expressed at low levels. Analysis of EST levels from these oilseeds revealed both conserved and distinct species-specific expression patterns for genes involved in the synthesis of glycerolipids and their precursors. Independent of the species and tissue type, ESTs for core fatty acid synthesis enzymes maintained a conserved stoichiometry and a strong correlation in temporal profiles throughout seed development. However, ESTs associated with non-plastid enzymes of oil biosynthesis displayed dissimilar temporal patterns indicative of different regulation. The EST levels for several genes potentially involved in accumulation of unusual TAG structures were distinct. Comparison of expression of members from multi-gene families allowed the identification of specific isoforms with conserved function in oil biosynthesis. In all four oilseeds, ESTs for Rubisco were present, suggesting its possible role in carbon metabolism, irrespective of light availability. Together, these data provide a resource for use in comparative and functional genomics of diverse oilseeds. Expression data for more than 350 genes encoding enzymes and proteins involved in lipid metabolism are available at the ‘ARALIP’ website (http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). PMID:21851431

  16. Deep Space Habitat Team: HEFT Phase 2 Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toups, Larry D.; Smitherman, David; Shyface, Hilary; Simon, Matt; Bobkill, Marianne; Komar, D. R.; Guirgis, Peggy; Bagdigian, Bob; Spexarth, Gary

    2011-01-01

    HEFT was a NASA-wide team that performed analyses of architectures for human exploration beyond LEO, evaluating technical, programmatic, and budgetary issues to support decisions at the highest level of the agency in HSF planning. HEFT Phase I (April - September, 2010) and Phase II (September - December, 2010) examined a broad set of Human Exploration of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) Design Reference Missions (DRMs), evaluating such factors as elements, performance, technologies, schedule, and cost. At end of HEFT Phase 1, an architecture concept known as DRM 4a represented the best available option for a full capability NEO mission. Within DRM4a, the habitation system was provided by Deep Space Habitat (DSH), Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV), and Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV) pressurized elements. HEFT Phase 2 extended DRM4a, resulting in DRM4b. Scrubbed element-level functionality assumptions and mission Concepts of Operations. Habitation Team developed more detailed concepts of the DSH and the DSH/MMSEV/CTV Conops, including functionality and accommodations, mass & volume estimates, technology requirements, and DDT&E costs. DRM 5 represented an effort to reduce cost by scaling back on technologies and eliminating the need for the development of an MMSEV.

  17. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  18. Simple and Integrated Spintip-Based Technology Applied for Deep Proteome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendong; Wang, Shuai; Adhikari, Subash; Deng, Zuhui; Wang, Lingjue; Chen, Lan; Ke, Mi; Yang, Pengyuan; Tian, Ruijun

    2016-05-01

    Great efforts have been taken for developing high-sensitive mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic technologies, among which sample preparation is one of the major focus. Here, a simple and integrated spintip-based proteomics technology (SISPROT) consisting of strong cation exchange beads and C18 disk in one pipet tip was developed. Both proteomics sample preparation steps, including protein preconcentration, reduction, alkylation, and digestion, and reversed phase (RP)-based desalting and high-pH RP-based peptide fractionation can be achieved in a fully integrated manner for the first time. This easy-to-use technology achieved high sensitivity with negligible sample loss. Proteomic analysis of 2000 HEK 293 cells readily identified 1270 proteins within 1.4 h of MS time, while 7826 proteins were identified when 100000 cells were processed and analyzed within only 22 h of MS time. More importantly, the SISPROT can be easily multiplexed on a standard centrifuge with good reproducibility (Pearson correlation coefficient > 0.98) for both single-shot analysis and deep proteome profiling with five-step high-pH RP fractionation. The SISPROT was exemplified by the triplicate analysis of 100000 stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). This led to the identification of 9078 proteins containing 3771 annotated membrane proteins, which was the largest proteome data set for dental stem cells reported to date. We expect that the SISPROT will be well suited for deep proteome profiling for fewer than 100000 cells and applied for translational studies where multiplexed technology with good label-free quantification precision is required. PMID:27062885

  19. 30 CFR 203.42 - What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells? 203.42 Section 203.42 Mineral Resources BUREAU... limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells? The conditions and... or deeper, your lease cannot earn an RSV under § 203.41 as a result of drilling any subsequent...

  20. 30 CFR 203.41 - If I have a qualified deep well or a qualified phase 1 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false If I have a qualified deep well or a qualified phase 1 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would my lease earn? 203.41 Section 203.41 Mineral... qualified deep well or a qualified phase 1 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would my lease earn? (a)...

  1. 30 CFR 203.34 - To which production may an RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells on my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... production may an RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells on my lease not be applied... perforated deeper than 15,000 feet TVD SS; (b) To production from a deep well or ultra-deep well on any other... condensate) volumes; or (d) To production from a deep well or ultra-deep well that commenced drilling...

  2. The deep lunar electrical conductivity profile - Structural and thermal inferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Herbert, F.; Sonett, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    Simultaneous lunar surface and orbital magnetometer records are reexamined, to ascertain intervals which may be suitable for measuring lunar inductive response in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath. Power spectral estimates of the response tangent to the lunar surface, defined in terms of transfer and gain functions, are obtained for the 0.0001-0.01 Hz frequency range. The maximum consistency of estimates from different time intervals is found when the initial analysis is limited to the tangential direction of maximum incident power, or that direction in which the ratio of signal to background noise is greatest. Spherically symmetric plasma confinement theory is used in the interpretation of transfer function data, by way of forward model calculations, under the assumption of continuous electrical conductivity increase with depth. Results are presented for internal electrical conductivity profile, metallic core radius, and selenotherm limits.

  3. The Effect of Borehole Flow on Salinity Profiles From Deep Monitor Wells in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotzoll, K.; Hunt, C. D.; El-Kadi, A. I.

    2008-12-01

    Ground-water resource management in Hawaii is based partly on salinity profiles from deep wells that are used to monitor the thickness of freshwater lenses and the transition zone between freshwater and saltwater. Vertical borehole flow in these wells may confound understanding of the actual salinity-depth profiles in the basaltic aquifers and lead to misinterpretations that hamper effective water-resource management. Causes and effects of borehole flow on salinity profiles are being evaluated at 40 deep monitor wells in Hawaii. Step- like changes in fluid electrical conductivity with respect to depth are indicative of borehole flow and are evident in almost all available salinity profiles. A regional trend in borehole flow direction, expected from basin-wide ground-water flow dynamics, is evident as major downward flow components in inland recharge areas and major upward flow components in discharge areas near the coast. The midpoint of the transition zone in one deep monitor well showed inconsequential depth displacements in response to barometric pressure and tidal fluctuations and to pumping from nearby wellfields. Commonly, the 1 mS/cm conductivity value is used to indicate the top of the transition zone. Contrary to the more stable midpoint, the depth of the 1 mS/cm conductivity value may be displaced by as much as 200 m in deep monitor wells near pumping wellfields. The displacement is complemented with an increase in conductivity at a particular depth in the upper part of the profile. The observed increase in conductivity is linear with increase in nearby pumpage. The largest deviations from expected aquifer-salinity profiles occur in deep monitor wells located in the area extending from east Pearl Harbor to Kalihi on Oahu, which coincides with the most heavily pumped part of the aquifer.

  4. Influence of Die and Punch Profile Radii on Deep Drawing Force and Punch Load- Displacement Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansourinejad, M.; Mirzakhani, B.; Pishbin, H.; Amadeh, A.; Farshchian, B.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, circumstances of formation and development of different zones of cup during the deep drawing process is predicted using geometrical relationships between punch and some process variables. Also, relationships between bending angle, die and punch profile radii, strain in flange and die profile regions are obtained at a given punch travel. In addition, deformation force components are calculated and based on the obtained relationships punch force-displacement diagrams for various punch and die profile radii are plotted. The effects of punch and die profile radii on these diagrams are then discussed. According to the proposed analysis, the effects of die and punch profile radii on deep drawing force are compared with each other. It is concluded that the die profile radius affects not only bending and unbending forces but also the actual drawing ratio while the punch profile radius has only an insignificant effect on actual drawing ratio. Also, effects of die and punch profile radii on punch stroke at maximum load are the same.

  5. Reverse Phase Protein Arrays for Compound Profiling.

    PubMed

    Moerke, Nathan; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPAs), also called reverse phase lysate arrays (RPLAs), involve immobilizing cell or tissue lysates, in small spots, onto solid supports which are then probed with primary antibodies specific for proteins or post-translational modifications of interest. RPPA assays are well suited for large-scale, high-throughput measurement of protein and PTM levels in cells and tissues. RPPAs are affordable and highly multiplexable, as a large number of arrays can readily be produced in parallel and then probed separately with distinct primary antibodies. This article describes a procedure for treating cells and preparing cell lysates, as well as a procedure for generating RPPAs using these lysates. A method for probing, imaging, and analyzing RPPAs is also described. These procedures are readily adaptable to a wide range of studies of cell signaling in response to drugs and other perturbations. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27622568

  6. Afghanistan environmental profile. Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Afghanistan's environment, already scarred by 12 years of conflict, is likely to undergo severe stress as external and internal refugees are resettled, according to this preliminary environmental profile. Following an introduction, Chapter 2 discusses the state of Afghanistan's environment in 1978 prior to the Soviet invasion, while Chapter 3 documents the environmental impacts of events since that time, including population relocation, deforestation, and locust and sunn-pest infestations. Chapter 4 examines major environmental areas (vegetation, wildlife, soil erosion, pesticides, public health, environmental infrastructure, energy, and air quality) with respect to both existing conditions and what is likely to occur when resettlement begins in earnest. Chapter 5 presents potential mitigation measures, including a set of environmental guidelines for the Government of Afghanistan. Chapter 6 discusses the Geographic Information System being developed under USAID's Agricultural Services Support Program; it discusses the extent to which GIS data can contribute to environmental studies, and vice versa.

  7. Phase 1 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent [Jubin 2012b]. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the first phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 and early FY-2014. Testing has been performed to address questions posed in the test plan, and followed the testing outline in the test plan. Tests established detection limits, developed procedures for sample analysis with minimal analytical interferences, and confirmed earlier results that show that the methyl iodide reacts when in contact with the AgZ sorbent, and not significantly in the gas flow upstream of the sorbent. The reaction(s) enable separation of the iodine from the organic moiety, so that the iodine can chemisorb onto the sorbent. The organic moiety can form other compounds, some of which are organic compounds that are detected and can be tentatively identified using GC-FID and GCMS. Test results also show that other gas constituents (NOx and/or H2O) can affect the methyl iodide reactions. With NOx and H2O present in the gas stream, the majority of uncaptured iodine exiting iodine-laden sorbent beds is in the form of I2 or HI, species that

  8. Structure of the Upper Mantle Beneath Northern Eurasia Derived from Russian Deep-Seismic PNE Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryberg, Trond; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Wenzel, Friedemann

    From 1968 until 1990, Russian scientists carried out an intensive program of deep seismic sounding across the territory of the former Soviet Union, using Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNEs) as powerful sources for elastic waves. The explosions, both chemical and nuclear, were recorded by up to 400 shot-period (1-2 Hz) three-component, analog recording systems. The average station spacing of about 10 km along the profiles provided a data density not previously available for studies of the upper mantle and the transition zone. Observation distances of more than 3000 km allow the investigation of the velocity structure of the Earths crust and upper mantle to a depth of 700 km. The analog data have been digitized and used to constrain the fine structure of the upper mantle below Northern Eurasia. They reveal reflections and refractions from upper mantle discontinuities at 410, 520 and 660 km depth. Several properties of the recorded phases have been used to derive a regional P wave velocity model. Synthetic seismograms were calculated and compared with the observations to test these models. Characteristic for all the data in northern Eurasia is the absence of strong pre-critical reflections predicted by the global IASP91 model for the 660 km discontinuity. The appearance of two additional characteristic travel-time branches in the distance range of 2200 km was interpreted as being caused by the proposed and disputed upper mantle discontinuity at 520 km depth. Synthetic seismograms were calculated to constrain its properties. The recordings on the Quartz profile in Northern Eurasia have been used to constrain the nature of the globally observed high-frequency teleseismic P phase, which can be observed for shot-receiver distances of more than 3000 km. We suggest that this phase is caused by velocity fluctuations in the upper mantle acting as scatterers. This hypothesis was tested by extensive numerical simulations of the wave propagation using finite difference methods

  9. A simple method for migrating narrow aperture, noisy seismic reflection data and application to Project INDEPTH (International Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalaya) deep seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, Doug

    1997-08-01

    Migration of deep seismic data is often hindered by a narrow recording aperture (line length by record length) and a low signal-to-noise ratio. The severity of typical migration artifacts (e.g., lateral smearing of discontinuous reflections into synforms, "smiles") increases with travel time such that interpreters of deep seismic data have often substituted migrated line drawings for the actual sections. As part of Project INDEPTH (International Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalaya), a new migration method was developed to address both the noise and migration issues. The method works in the time-space domain and uses the simple, constant velocity, straight ray path to perform the migration. First, only amplitudes within a given range are retained for migration, thus avoiding high-amplitude noise bursts and low-amplitude background noise. Then, the local dip of a reflection is found by automatically fitting a straight line to the highest amplitudes within a small window (several time samples by several traces) and calculating the dip of the line using a constant velocity. Finally, using this dip, the method migrates a selected amplitude value. The dips, lateral positions, and depths of the migrated events compare very well with output from more conventional algorithms (e.g.,fk-Stolt, finite difference, etc.). The advantages of the new method include fewer artifacts, fast computer run times, low memory use and the ability to migrate long profiles and travel times (e.g., 50 s). The output of the method is a grid of migrated amplitudes (not wavelets) or dip values which is particularly effective for making small figures, such as those needed for publication. The principal disadvantage is the use of a constant migration velocity.

  10. Mantle phase changes and deep-earthquake faulting in subducting lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Kirby, S H; Durham, W B; Stern, L A

    1991-04-12

    Inclined zones of earthquakes are the primary expression of lithosphere subduction. A distinct deep population of subduction-zone earthquakes occurs at depths of 350 to 690 kilometers. At those depths ordinary brittle fracture and frictional sliding, the faulting processes of shallow earthquakes, are not expected. A fresh understanding of these deep earthquakes comes from developments in several areas of experimental and theoretical geophysics, including the discovery and characterization of transformational faulting, a shear instability connected with localized phase transformations under nonhydrostatic stress. These developments support the hypothesis that deep earthquakes represent transformational faulting in a wedge of olivine-rich peridotite that is likely to persist metastably in coldest plate interiors to depths as great as 690 km. Predictions based on this deep structure of mantle phase changes are consistent with the global depth distribution of deep earthquakes, the maximum depths of earthquakes in individual subductions zones, and key source characteristics of deep events. PMID:17769266

  11. Mantle phase changes and deep-earthquake faulting in subducting lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Inclined zones of earthquakes are the primary expression of lithosphere subduction. A distinct deep population of subduction-zone earthquakes occurs at depths of 350 to 690 kilometers. At those depths ordinary brittle fracture and frictional sliding, the faulting processes of shallow earthquakes, are not expected. A fresh understanding of these deep earthquakes comes from developments in several areas of experimental and theoretical geophysics, including the discovery and characterization of transformational faulting, a shear instability connected with localized phase transformations under nonhydrostatic stress. These developments support the hypothesis that deep earthquakes represent transformational faulting in a wedge of olivine-rich peridotite that is likely to persist metastably in coldest plate interiors to depths as great as 690 km. Predictions based on this deep structure of mantle phase changes are consistent with the global depth distribution of deep earthquakes, the maximum depths of earthquakes in individual subductions zones, and key source characteristics of deep events.

  12. Mantle phase changes and deep-earthquake faulting in subducting lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Kirby, S H; Durham, W B; Stern, L A

    1991-04-12

    Inclined zones of earthquakes are the primary expression of lithosphere subduction. A distinct deep population of subduction-zone earthquakes occurs at depths of 350 to 690 kilometers. At those depths ordinary brittle fracture and frictional sliding, the faulting processes of shallow earthquakes, are not expected. A fresh understanding of these deep earthquakes comes from developments in several areas of experimental and theoretical geophysics, including the discovery and characterization of transformational faulting, a shear instability connected with localized phase transformations under nonhydrostatic stress. These developments support the hypothesis that deep earthquakes represent transformational faulting in a wedge of olivine-rich peridotite that is likely to persist metastably in coldest plate interiors to depths as great as 690 km. Predictions based on this deep structure of mantle phase changes are consistent with the global depth distribution of deep earthquakes, the maximum depths of earthquakes in individual subductions zones, and key source characteristics of deep events.

  13. Structure of Precambrian crust in the U. S. from COCORP deep seismic profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.D. )

    1992-01-01

    COCORP and industry seismic reflection profiles probing beneath the thin veneer of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of the US mid-continent are mapping a complex, largely unknown three dimensional mosaic of major fault zones and sutures, a highly variable Moho, and extensive sequences of unexplored volcanic and/or sedimentary strata. Key features of the Precambrian suggested by COCORP and other deep profiling include: Pervasive, distributed reflectivity, often diffractive, dominating the middle and lower crust. Moho that is rarely reflective, usually evident as a downward transition of distributed crustal reflectivity into mantle transparency. Volcano-clastic filled graben of the late Proterozoic Keweenawan rift buried beneath Paleozoic strata in Kansas and Michigan. Extensive, subhorizontal Precambrian stratification in the upper crust beneath the east- central US and the Texas-Oklahoma border region, argued to be either an extensive volcano-clastic basin, a voluminous felsic volcanic outpouring or a major intrusive sill complex. Crustal penetrating, dipping reflection zones that mark known (Grenville front) or inferred (Cashocton zone, Trans-Hudson orogen) shear zones. Non-reflective ( ) basement beneath the Appalachian foreland suggesting transparent massifs'' that serve as collisional buttresses during terrane accretion. Deep structure is sometimes at odds with simple extrapolations of surface geology. Clearly deep seismic profiling has only begun to reveal the buried craton in the US. It is time for an integrated program for the systematic exploration of this special scientific frontier.

  14. Gas-phase exposure history derived from material-phase concentration profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, G. C.; Little, J. C.; Xu, Y.; Rao, M.; Enke, D.

    Non-reactive gas-phase pollutants such as benzene diffuse into indoor furnishings and leave behind a unique material-phase concentration profile that serves as a record of the past gas-phase indoor concentrations. The inverse problem to be solved is the diffusion equation in a slab such as vinyl flooring. Using knowledge of the present material-phase concentration profile in the slab, we seek to determine the historical material-phase concentration at the surface exposed to indoor air, and hence the historical gas-phase concentration, which can be used directly to determine exposure. The problem as posed has a unique solution that may be solved using a variety of approaches. We use a trained artificial neural network (ANN) to derive solutions for hypothetical exposure scenarios. The ANN results show that it is possible to estimate the intensity and timing of past exposures from the material-phase concentration profile in a building material. The overall method is limited by (1) the resolution of techniques for measuring spatial material-phase concentration profiles, (2) how far back in time we seek to determine exposure and (3) the representational power of the ANN solution. For example, we estimate that this technique can estimate exposure to phenol up to 0.5 y in the past from analyses of vinyl flooring.

  15. Deep drilling phase of the Pen Brand Fault Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    This deep drilling activity is one element of the Pen Branch Fault Program at Savannah River Site (SRS). The effort will consist of three tasks: the extension of wells PBF-7 and PBF-8 into crystalline basement, geologic and drilling oversight during drilling operations, and the lithologic description and analysis of the recovered core. The drilling program addresses the association of the Pen Branch fault with order fault systems such as the fault that formed the Bunbarton basin in the Triassic.

  16. Deep Space Habitat Concept of Operations for Transit Mission Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has begun evaluating various mission and system components of possible implementations of what the U.S. Human Spaceflight Plans Committee (also known as the Augustine Committee) has named the flexible path (Anon., 2009). As human spaceflight missions expand further into deep space, the duration of these missions increases to the point where a dedicated crew habitat element appears necessary. There are several destinations included in this flexible path a near Earth asteroid (NEA) mission, a Phobos/Deimos (Ph/D) mission, and a Mars surface exploration mission that all include at least a portion of the total mission in which the crew spends significant periods of time (measured in months) in the deep space environment and are thus candidates for a dedicated habitat element. As one facet of a number of studies being conducted by the Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT) a workshop was conducted to consider how best to define and quantify habitable volume for these future deep space missions. One conclusion reached during this workshop was the need for a description of the scope and scale of these missions and the intended uses of a habitat element. A group was set up to prepare a concept of operations document to address this need. This document describes a concept of operations for a habitat element used for these deep space missions. Although it may eventually be determined that there is significant overlap with this concept of operations and that of a habitat destined for use on planetary surfaces, such as the Moon and Mars, no such presumption is made in this document.

  17. 30 CFR 203.41 - If I have a qualified deep well or a qualified phase 1 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If I have a qualified deep well or a qualified phase 1 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would my lease earn? 203.41 Section 203.41 Mineral... Relief for Drilling Deep Gas Wells on Leases Not Subject to Deep Water Royalty Relief § 203.41 If I...

  18. Laser nitriding of iron: Nitrogen profiles and phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illgner, C.; Schaaf, P.; Lieb, K. P.; Schubert, E.; Queitsch, R.; Bergmann, H.-W.

    1995-07-01

    Armco iron samples were surface nitrided by irradiating them with pulses of an excimer laser in a nitrogen atmosphere. The resulting nitrogen depth profiles measured by Resonant Nuclear Reaction Analysis (RNRA) and the phase formation determined by Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (CEMS) were investigated as functions of energy density and the number of pulses. The nitrogen content of the samples was found to be independent of the number of pulses in a layer of 50 nm from the surface and to increase in depths exceeding 150 nm. The phase composition did not change with the number of pulses. The nitrogen content can be related to an enhanced nitrogen solubility based on high temperatures and high pressures due to the laser-induced plasma above the sample. With increasing pulse energy density, the phase composition changes towards phases with higher nitrogen contents. Nitrogen diffusion seems to be the limiting factor for the nitriding process.

  19. Large-Scale and Deep Quantitative Proteome Profiling Using Isobaric Labeling Coupled with Two-Dimensional LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, Marina A; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive, quantitative information on abundances of proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs) can potentially provide novel biological insights into diseases pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Herein, we introduce a quantitative strategy utilizing isobaric stable isotope-labeling techniques combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) for large-scale, deep quantitative proteome profiling of biological samples or clinical specimens such as tumor tissues. The workflow includes isobaric labeling of tryptic peptides for multiplexed and accurate quantitative analysis, basic reversed-phase LC fractionation and concatenation for reduced sample complexity, and nano-LC coupled to high resolution and high mass accuracy MS analysis for high confidence identification and quantification of proteins. This proteomic analysis strategy has been successfully applied for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of tumor samples and can also be used for integrated proteome and PTM characterization, as well as comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis across samples from large clinical cohorts.

  20. The ESCIN-3-1 deep seismic profile in the northwestern Galicia margin revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, R.; Alvarez-Marron, J.; Ayarza, P.; Torne, M.

    2015-12-01

    The ESCIN-3.1 profile was acquired in 1993 offshore northwest Galicia (Spain), and recorded 20 s of near vertical reflection seismic data. This 140 km long profile was intended to provide an image of the crustal structure of this sector of the continental margin from near the coastline to the deep-sea area. The tectonic evolution of the northwest Galicia margin initiated by rifting during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous times and progressed to sea floor spreading during Albian- Late Cretaceous times when the Bay of Biscay opened. Subsequently, the margin was active during the convergence of Eurasia and Iberia in the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene. Here we present a new interpretation of the mentioned profile based on a newly reprocessed depth migrated image and corresponding gravity model. In the deep-sea areas, a free-air gravity low reach up to - 120 mGal and the sea bottom is at more than 5000 m deep. The 7 km thick flat lying undisturbed sedimentary cover appears above a 10 km thick, ~120 Ma old oceanic basement. This flat sediments onlap toward the ocean-continent transition on a folded and disturbed 20 km long wedge shaped sedimentary body. A major landward dipping structure reaches from the foot of the slope to beneath the sub horizontal Moho of the continental slope. The slope has a gentle dip of about 2° in this section, and include large mass flow deposits. Fault bound sediments are imaged in the upper continental margin that could correspond to preserved syn-rift Mesozoic structures. The structure of what correspond to the continental basement in the thicker part of the margin is not well resolved. Only in the landward side of the profile a layered lower crust is seen where the Moho reaches depths of 29 km. The ocean-continent transition in this profile may be interpreted as that of an active compressional boundary with some accretion of deep-sea sediments that are underthrust by a thinned continental margin with large submarine landslides and mass flow

  1. 30 CFR 203.33 - To which production do I apply the RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lease under 30 CFR 1210.102. All gas production from qualified wells reported on the OGOR-A, including production not subject to royalty, counts toward the total lease RSV earned by both deep or ultra-deep wells... production do I apply the RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells on my lease or in...

  2. 30 CFR 203.33 - To which production do I apply the RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... lease under 30 CFR 1210.102. All gas production from qualified wells reported on the OGOR-A, including production not subject to royalty, counts toward the total lease RSV earned by both deep or ultra-deep wells... production do I apply the RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells on my lease or in...

  3. 30 CFR 203.33 - To which production do I apply the RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lease under 30 CFR 1210.102. All gas production from qualified wells reported on the OGOR-A, including production not subject to royalty, counts toward the total lease RSV earned by both deep or ultra-deep wells... production do I apply the RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells on my lease or in...

  4. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral... Relief for Drilling Deep Gas Wells on Leases Not Subject to Deep Water Royalty Relief § 203.40 Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep...

  5. Deep seismic soundings on the 1-AP profile in the Barents Sea: Methods and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakoulina, T. S.; Kashubin, S. N.; Pavlenkova, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    Profile 1-AP with a length of 1300 km intersects the Barents Sea from The Kola Peninsula to Franz Josef Land. The combined Common Depth Point (CDP) and Deep Seismic Sounding (DSS) seismic studies were carried out on this profile. The DSS measurements were conducted with the standalone bottom seismic stations with an interval of 5-20 km between them. The stations recorded the signals generated by the large air guns with a step of 250 m. Based on these data, the detailed P-velocity section of the Earth's crust and uppermost mantle have been constructed for the entire profile and the S-velocity section for its southern part. The use of a variety of methods for constructing the velocity sections enabled us to assess the capabilities of each method from the standpoint of the highest reliability and informativity of the models. The ray tracing method yielded the best results. The 1-PR profile crosses two large basins—the South Barents and North Barents ones, with the thickness of the sediments increasing from 8 to 10 km in the south to 12-15 km in the north. The Earth's crust pertains to the continental type along the entire profile. Its thickness averages 32 to 36 km and only increases to 43 km at the boundary between the two basins. The distinct change in the wave field at this boundary suggests the presence of a large deep fault in this zone. The high-velocity blocks are revealed in the crust of the South Barents basin, whereas the North Barents crust is characterized by relatively low velocities.

  6. Study of deep profile control and oil displacement technologies with nanoscale polymer microspheres.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhao; Lin, Meiqin; Dong, Zhaoxia; Li, Mingyuan; Zhang, Guiqing; Yang, Jie

    2014-06-15

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic lighting scattering (DLS) and HAAKE rheometer experiments were adopted to investigate the shape, size and rheological properties of nanoscale polymer microspheres. Moreover, nuclear-pore film filtration, sand packed tube displacement, core displacement, micro-visual model and capillary flow experiments were used to study the mechanisms of deep profile control and oil displacement of nanoscale polymer microspheres. The results demonstrated that the original shape of the nanoscale polymer microspheres were typically spherical, ranging in size from 30 to 60 nm. When the microspheres were dispersed in water, their size increased by 3-6 times due to swelling and a poly-dispersed system appeared; however, the spherical conformation remained. Within a certain range of shear rates, a 100-900 mg/L microsphere dispersed system exhibited shear thickening behaviour, making it favourable for increasing the flow resistance of a displacement fluid. These polymer microspheres dispersed systems exhibited effective plugging on a nuclear pore film with 0.4-μm pores with deep plugging in the core; these systems also tended to plug the high permeability layer and drive crude oil from the low permeability layer in parallel sand packed tubes. Cross-linked polymer microspheres could reduce water permeability because the microspheres adsorbed, accumulated and bridged in the pore-throat, and the adsorbed layers would be collapsed under the pressure, entering deep into the reservoir due to the good deformation properties of the microspheres. Meanwhile these microspheres would drive crude oil on and in the pores/throats while they are transported in porous media, achieving deep profile control and oil displacement with the ultimate purpose of improving oil recovery. PMID:24767500

  7. Study of deep profile control and oil displacement technologies with nanoscale polymer microspheres.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhao; Lin, Meiqin; Dong, Zhaoxia; Li, Mingyuan; Zhang, Guiqing; Yang, Jie

    2014-06-15

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic lighting scattering (DLS) and HAAKE rheometer experiments were adopted to investigate the shape, size and rheological properties of nanoscale polymer microspheres. Moreover, nuclear-pore film filtration, sand packed tube displacement, core displacement, micro-visual model and capillary flow experiments were used to study the mechanisms of deep profile control and oil displacement of nanoscale polymer microspheres. The results demonstrated that the original shape of the nanoscale polymer microspheres were typically spherical, ranging in size from 30 to 60 nm. When the microspheres were dispersed in water, their size increased by 3-6 times due to swelling and a poly-dispersed system appeared; however, the spherical conformation remained. Within a certain range of shear rates, a 100-900 mg/L microsphere dispersed system exhibited shear thickening behaviour, making it favourable for increasing the flow resistance of a displacement fluid. These polymer microspheres dispersed systems exhibited effective plugging on a nuclear pore film with 0.4-μm pores with deep plugging in the core; these systems also tended to plug the high permeability layer and drive crude oil from the low permeability layer in parallel sand packed tubes. Cross-linked polymer microspheres could reduce water permeability because the microspheres adsorbed, accumulated and bridged in the pore-throat, and the adsorbed layers would be collapsed under the pressure, entering deep into the reservoir due to the good deformation properties of the microspheres. Meanwhile these microspheres would drive crude oil on and in the pores/throats while they are transported in porous media, achieving deep profile control and oil displacement with the ultimate purpose of improving oil recovery.

  8. Simple parameterized coordinate transformation method for deep- and smooth-profile gratings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xihong; Li, Lifeng

    2014-12-01

    A simple variable transformation that consists of two joined straight-line segments per grating period is proposed for the parameterized coordinate transformation method (the C method). With this bilinear parameterization, the C method can produce convergent numerical results for gratings of deep and smooth profiles with a groove depth-to-period ratio as high as 10, which to date has been far out of reach of the C method. The danger of getting divergent results due to inadvertently using an overly large truncation number is also practically eliminated.

  9. Influence of phase delay profile on diffraction efficiency of liquid crystal optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lin; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Li Ying

    2009-06-01

    The hardware structure and driving voltage of liquid crystal optical phased array (LCOPA) devices determine the produced phase delay characteristics. The phase delay profile influences directly the device's diffraction efficiency. In this paper, a sawtooth-shaped phase delay model of LCOPA was proposed to analyze quantitatively the influence factors of diffraction efficiency employing Fourier optics theory. Analysis results show that flyback region size is the main factor that affects diffraction efficiency. The influence extent varies with different maximum-phase-delays and grating periods. There exists an optimized curve between maximum-phase-delay and flyback region, and between maximum-phase-delay and grating period, individually. The smaller the grating period is or the larger the flyback region is, the more evident the optimization effect becomes, and the maximum increase ratio is up to 16%. Some feasible experiments were done to test theoretical analysis, and the experimental results agreed with the analysis results.

  10. Sodium storage in deep paleoweathering profiles beneath the Paleozoic-Triassic unconformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, M.; Parcerisa, D.; Ricordel-Prognon, C.; Schmitt, J.-M.

    2009-04-01

    A major sodium accumulation has been recognized for long and by numerous authors in the Permo-Triassic salt deposits (Hay et al., 2006). Beside these basinal deposits, important masses of sodium were stored on the continents within deep palaeoweathering profiles in form of albite. Indeed, wide surfaces and huge volumes of granito-gneissic basements of the Hercynian massifs are albitized from North-Africa up to Scandinavia. These albitized rocks have usually been considered as related to tardi-magmatic metasomatic processes (Cathelineau 1986; Petersson and Eliasson 1997). Geometrical arrangement and dating of these alterations point out that these albitizations, or at least a part of them, developed under low temperature subsurface conditions in relation with the Triassic palaeosurface (Ricordel et al., 2007; Parcerisa et al., 2009). Petrology The albitized igneous rocks show a strong alteration with pseudomorphic replacement of the primary plagioclases into albite, replacement of primary biotite by chlorite and minor precipitation of neogenic minerals like albite, chlorite, apatite, haematite, calcite and titanite. Albitized rocks are characterized by their pink coloration due to the presence of minute haematite inclusions in the albite. The development and distribution of the albitization and related alterations above the unaltered basement occurs in three steps that define a vertical profile, up to 100-150 m depth. 1) In the lower part of the profile, albitization occurs within pink-colored patches in the unaltered rock, giving a pink-spotted aspect to the rock. 2) In the middle part of the profile, rocks have an overall pink coloration due to the albitization of the primary Ca-bearing igneous plagioclases. Usually, this facies develops in a pervasive manner, affecting the whole rock, but it may also be restricted to joints, giving a sharp-pink coloration to the fracture wall. 3) Finally, the top of the profile is defined by the same mineral paragenesis as in the

  11. SINOPROBE deep reflection profile reveals a Neo-Proterozoic subduction zone beneath Sichuan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Rui; Chen, Chen; Wang, Haiyan; Lu, Zhanwu; Brown, Larry; Dong, Shuwen; Feng, Shaoying; Li, Qiusheng; Li, Wenhui; Wen, Zhongping; Li, Feng

    2016-11-01

    A new multichannel seismic reflection profile collected across the Sichuan Basin in southern China by SINOPROBE images prominent reflectors that originate within the lower crust and penetrate well into the underlying mantle. The geometry of these mantle reflectors is very similar to those observed on other deep reflection profiles that have been interpreted as relicts of ancient subduction. Considering the geological history of the basement beneath and surrounding Sichuan Basin and ages of granites encountered in nearby wells, we propose that these newly revealed reflectors are the remnants of Neo-Proterozoic subduction that occurred along the NW margin of the Yangtze Craton. This interpretation is consistent with geochemical studies from a gneissic complex at the west margin of the Sichuan Basin. Moreover, preservation of these reflectors supports the idea that the Sichuan lithosphere served as a consolidated tectonic buttress against which the Tibetan Plateau has impinged to produce the Longmenshan orogenic belt.

  12. Outer density profiles of 19 Galactic globular clusters from deep and wide-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Gieles, Mark; Sollima, Antonio; Koposov, Sergey; Martínez-Delgado, David; Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Using deep photometric data from Wide Field Camera at the Isaac Newton Telescope and Wide Field Imager at the ESO 2.2-m telescope we measure the outer number density profiles of 19 stellar clusters located in the inner region of the Milky Way halo (within a Galactocentric distance range of 10-30 kpc) in order to assess the impact of internal and external dynamical processes on the spatial distribution of stars. Adopting power-law fitting templates, with index -γ in the outer region, we find that the clusters in our sample can be divided in two groups: a group of massive clusters (≥105 M⊙) that has relatively flat profiles with 2.5 < γ < 4, and a group of low-mass clusters (≤105 M⊙), with steep profiles (γ > 4) and clear signatures of interaction with the Galactic tidal field. We refer to these two groups as 'tidally unaffected' and 'tidally affected', respectively. Our results also show a clear trend between the slope of the outer parts and the half-mass density of these systems, which suggests that the outer density profiles may retain key information on the dominant processes driving the dynamical evolution of globular clusters.

  13. Performance evaluation of digital phase-locked loops for advanced deep space transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, T. M.; Hinedi, S. M.; Yeh, H.-G.; Kyriacou, C.

    1994-01-01

    The performances of the digital phase-locked loops (DPLL's) for the advanced deep-space transponders (ADT's) are investigated. DPLL's considered in this article are derived from the analog phase-locked loop, which is currently employed by the NASA standard deep space transponder, using S-domain to Z-domain mapping techniques. Three mappings are used to develop digital approximations of the standard deep space analog phase-locked loop, namely the bilinear transformation (BT), impulse invariant transformation (IIT), and step invariant transformation (SIT) techniques. The performance in terms of the closed loop phase and magnitude responses, carrier tracking jitter, and response of the loop to the phase offset (the difference between in incoming phase and reference phase) is evaluated for each digital approximation. Theoretical results of the carrier tracking jitter for command-on and command-off cases are then validated by computer simulation. Both theoretical and computer simulation results show that at high sampling frequency, the DPLL's approximated by all three transformations have the same tracking jitter. However, at low sampling frequency, the digital approximation using BT outperforms the others. The minimum sampling frequency for adequate tracking performance is determined for each digital approximation of the analog loop. In addition, computer simulation shows that the DPLL developed by BT provides faster response to the phase offset than IIT and SIT.

  14. Past Radiocarbon Profiles from Deep-Sea Corals in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, L. F.; Adkins, J. F.; Fernandez, D. P.; Wang, S. L.

    2004-12-01

    Deep-sea corals are an excellent archive of ocean history since their aragonitic, uranium-rich skeletons are well suited to U-Th dating. This independent dating technique means that 14C is no longer needed for chronometry and can be used to reconstruct radiocarbon profiles of the water column. We have many thousands of coral individuals ranging in depth from 1000 - 2500 m and the first 100 U-Th dates show a bias towards ages of the last glacial and deglaciation. These samples are ideally suited to monitoring the variable depth of the contact between Northern and Southern sourced waters. Initial radiocarbon data exhibit D14C gradients with depth that are large compared to the smooth profile observed in the modern ocean. Samples from one depth (~1750m) but with ages spanning Heinrich 1 through to the Younger Dryas not only reflect the events seen in global records, but also demonstrate transient deep-sea circulation changes. These transient D14C excursions are observed to occur abruptly, even within the lifetime of one coral (~100 years). In addition, these samples allow us to investigate the controls on the atmospheric 14C/12C record, namely the interplay between the production rate of 14C and its removal by ocean circulation. Combining this radiocarbon data with passive tracers of the mixing ratio of Northern to Southern sourced water would allow us to calculate ventilation rates for the deep ocean. Ultimately, we aim to reconstruct ventilation rates for the NW Atlantic through the last glacial and deglaciation.

  15. Can ice sheet models contribute to the understanding of deep borehole temperature profiles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Volker; Tarasov, Lev; Mottaghy, Darius; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Majorowicz, Jacek; Safanda, Jan; Demezhko, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    It has been argued many times that deep boreholes in Northern America and Europe have recorded basal ice sheet conditions during the last glacial cycle. However, though most of the very deep and well documented boreholes available today belong into this group, systematic investigations of this effects have been rare, and are only now emerging (Matharoo et al., Rath et al., in prep.). Here we present some early results from a case study in Northern Europe,analyzing several well-known deep boreholes in the light of the recent ice sheet model of Tarasov et al.(2008). These boreholes include temperature profiles from the Kola SG3 (Russia, >4000 m) Outokumpu (Finland, 2500 m), Udryn (Poland, 2250 m), Torun (Poland, 2920 m), and Czeszowo (Poland, 3450 m). All of these data have been independently investigated before with forward and inverse methods. For this study, we have chosen a very simple approach. Starting from a small ensemble of ground surface temperatures derived from the data-calibrated glacial Systems Model, we employed an 1D subsurface model based on the best available knowledge on local geology and climatic conditions. The synthetic borehole temperature profiles derived are then compared to the observations, and discussed with respect to earlier interpretations. Several problems related to this approach are discussed: (1) the imperfect representation of local subsurface conditions, e.g., the assumption of 1D structure; (2) the role of the driving climate, which will determine the conditions under ice-free conditions; (3) the well-known imperfect coupling of surface air and ground temperatures. We believe that this contribution will be the base for in-depth discussions, and could be seminal for further investigations.

  16. Sodium storage in deep paleoweathering profiles beneath the Paleozoic-Triassic unconformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, M.; Parcerisa, D.; Ricordel-Prognon, C.; Schmitt, J.-M.

    2009-04-01

    A major sodium accumulation has been recognized for long and by numerous authors in the Permo-Triassic salt deposits (Hay et al., 2006). Beside these basinal deposits, important masses of sodium were stored on the continents within deep palaeoweathering profiles in form of albite. Indeed, wide surfaces and huge volumes of granito-gneissic basements of the Hercynian massifs are albitized from North-Africa up to Scandinavia. These albitized rocks have usually been considered as related to tardi-magmatic metasomatic processes (Cathelineau 1986; Petersson and Eliasson 1997). Geometrical arrangement and dating of these alterations point out that these albitizations, or at least a part of them, developed under low temperature subsurface conditions in relation with the Triassic palaeosurface (Ricordel et al., 2007; Parcerisa et al., 2009). Petrology The albitized igneous rocks show a strong alteration with pseudomorphic replacement of the primary plagioclases into albite, replacement of primary biotite by chlorite and minor precipitation of neogenic minerals like albite, chlorite, apatite, haematite, calcite and titanite. Albitized rocks are characterized by their pink coloration due to the presence of minute haematite inclusions in the albite. The development and distribution of the albitization and related alterations above the unaltered basement occurs in three steps that define a vertical profile, up to 100-150 m depth. 1) In the lower part of the profile, albitization occurs within pink-colored patches in the unaltered rock, giving a pink-spotted aspect to the rock. 2) In the middle part of the profile, rocks have an overall pink coloration due to the albitization of the primary Ca-bearing igneous plagioclases. Usually, this facies develops in a pervasive manner, affecting the whole rock, but it may also be restricted to joints, giving a sharp-pink coloration to the fracture wall. 3) Finally, the top of the profile is defined by the same mineral paragenesis as in the

  17. 30 CFR 203.42 - What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... by that well under § 203.41 applies only to production from qualified wells on or allocated to your... the RSV under § 203.41 to production from the non-qualified well. (g) You qualify for an RSV under... royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells? 203.42 Section 203.42 Mineral Resources...

  18. 30 CFR 203.42 - What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... by that well under § 203.41 applies only to production from qualified wells on or allocated to your... the RSV under § 203.41 to production from the non-qualified well. (g) You qualify for an RSV under... royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells? 203.42 Section 203.42 Mineral Resources...

  19. Generation of Data-Rate Profiles of Ka-Band Deep-Space Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2006-01-01

    A short report discusses a methodology for designing Ka-band Deep-Space-to- Earth radio-communication links. This methodology is oriented toward minimizing the effects of weather on the Ka-band telecommunication link by maximizing the expected data return subject to minimum link availability and a limited number of data rates. This methodology differs from the current standard practices in which a link is designed according to a margin policy for a given link availability at 10 elevation. In this methodology, one chooses a data-rate profile that will maximize the average data return over a pass while satisfying a minimum-availability requirement for the pass, subject to mission operational limitations expressed in terms of the number of data rates used during the pass. The methodology is implemented in an intelligent search algorithm that first finds the allowable data-rate profiles from the mission constraints, spacecraft-to-Earth distance, spacecraft EIRP (effective isotropic radiated power), and the applicable zenith atmospheric noise temperature distribution, and then selects the best data rate in terms of maximum average data return from the set of allowable data-rate profiles.

  20. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REDUCTION IN ROYALTY RATES OCS Oil, Gas, and Sulfur General Royalty Relief for Drilling Deep Gas Wells on... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? Your lease may receive an RSV...

  1. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral... eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? Your lease... of 87 degrees, 30 minutes West longitude in water depths entirely less than 400 meters deep. (b)...

  2. Acousto-thermometric recovery of the deep temperature profile using heat conduction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Vilkov, V. A.; Dvornikova, M. V.; Dvornikova, V. V.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Kuryatnikova, N. A.; Mansfel'd, A. D.

    2012-09-01

    In a model experiment using the acousto-thermographic method, deep temperature profiles varying in time are recovered. In the recovery algorithm, we used a priori information in the form of a requirement that the calculated temperature must satisfy the heat conduction equation. The problem is reduced to determining two parameters: the initial temperature and the temperature conductivity coefficient of the object under consideration (the plasticine band). During the experiment, there was independent inspection using electronic thermometers mounted inside the plasticine. The error in the temperature conductivity coefficient was about 17% and the error in initial temperature determination was less than one degree. Such recovery results allow application of this approach to solving a number of medical problems. It is experimentally proved that acoustic irregularities influence the acousto-thermometric results as well. It is shown that in the chosen scheme of experiment (which corresponds to measurements of human muscle tissue), this influence can be neglected.

  3. A simple deep-towed vertical array for high-resolution reflection seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herber, R.; Nuppenau, V.; Weigel, W.; Wong, H. K.

    1986-06-01

    A simple, low cost, deep-towed system for high-resolution reflection seismic profiling is described. It consists of a vertical array with two hydrophones having a separation of 2.2 m and rigidly mounted onto streamlined tow bodies. Improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio is attained by simple stacking of the hydrophone outputs after signal conditioning and travel time corrections. The suppression of side echoes and surface reflections is achieved by an analog procedure which in effect improves the directional characteristics of the array. A circuit for automatic gain control is included to enhance weak signals as well as to suppress ringing. Results in Kiel Bay and over the crest of the Jan Mayen Ridge (northern Atlantic) suggest that this simple vertical array may supplement air gun systems better than conventional, surface pinger-type equipment.

  4. Locomotor muscle profile of a deep (Kogia breviceps) versus shallow (Tursiops truncatus) diving cetacean.

    PubMed

    Kielhorn, Caitlin E; Dillaman, Richard M; Kinsey, Stephen T; McLellan, William A; Gay, D Mark; Dearolf, Jennifer L; Pabst, D Ann

    2013-06-01

    When a marine mammal dives, breathing and locomotion are mechanically uncoupled, and its locomotor muscle must power swimming when oxygen is limited. The morphology of that muscle provides insight into both its oxygen storage capacity and its rate of oxygen consumption. This study investigated the m. longissimus dorsi, an epaxial swimming muscle, in the long duration, deep-diving pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) and the short duration, shallow-diving Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Muscle myoglobin content, fiber type profile (based upon myosin ATPase and succinate dehydrogenase assays), and fiber size were measured for five adult specimens of each species. In addition, a photometric analysis of sections stained for succinate dehydrogenase was used to create an index of mitochondrial density. The m. longissimus dorsi of K. breviceps displayed significantly a) higher myoglobin content, b) larger proportion of Type I (slow oxidative) fibers by area, c) larger mean fiber diameters, and d) lower indices of mitochondrial density than that of T. truncatus. Thus, this primary swimming muscle of K. breviceps has greater oxygen storage capacity, reduced ATP demand, and likely a reduced rate of oxygen consumption relative to that of T. truncatus. The locomotor muscle of K. breviceps appears able to ration its high onboard oxygen stores, a feature that may allow this species to conduct relatively long duration, deep dives aerobically.

  5. 30 CFR 203.31 - If I have a qualified phase 2 or qualified phase 3 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of gas production: (1) An original well, 35 BCF. (2) A sidetrack with a sidetrack measured depth of... ultra-deep well that is . . Then your lease earns an RSV on this volume of gas production: (i) An... production from qualified phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep wells that: (1) Occurs before December 18, 2008...

  6. Deep-cryogenic-treatment-induced phase transformation in the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-mei; Cheng, Nan-pu; Chen, Zhi-qian; Guo, Ning; Zeng, Su-min

    2015-01-01

    An aluminum alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) subjected to deep cryogenic treatment (DCT) was systematically investigated. The results show that a DCT-induced phase transformation varies the microstructures and affects the mechanical properties of the Al alloy. Both Guinier-Preston (GP) zones and a metastable η' phase were observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The phenomenon of the second precipitation of the GP zones in samples subjected to DCT after being aged was observed. The viability of this phase transformation was also demonstrated by first-principles calculations.

  7. Deep seismic reflection profiling of the subduction megathrust across the Sagimi trough and Tokyo bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Takaya; Abe, Susumu; Saito, Hideo; Kawanaka, Taku; Hirata, Naoshi

    2010-05-01

    Beneath the metropolitan Tokyo, the Philippine Sea plate, in particular the fore arc portion of the Izu-Bonin island arc, has been subducted. Subduction megathrust beneath Tokyo generated M-8 class earthquakes, such as the 1923 Kanto (M7.9) and 1703 Genroku (M8.0) earthquakes. Due to the buyant subduction of the Izu-Bonin arc, the megathrust lies very shallow part of the crust. The Kozu-Matsuda fault, probable spray fault from the megathrust, emerged at the surface. In 2009, we acquired the deep seismic reflection data across the toe of the thrust system to reveal the connectivity of the probable spray fault to the megathrust. Together with the deep seismic section acquired in 2003, we show a 120-km-long deep seismic reflection profile from the front to 30 km in depth and discuss the geometry and characteristics of the thrust system. We performed deep seismic profiling across the Sagami trough for a 70-km-long seismic line in September 2009, using two ships for offshore seismic data acquisition: a gun-ship with a 3020 cu. inch air-gun and a cable-ship with a 2-km-long, streamer cable and a 480 cu. inch air-gun. The seismic signals were recorded at Miura and Izu peninsulas located both ends of the seismic line. At both sides of the onshore line, off-line recorders were deployed along total 20-km-long seismic lines at a 50m interval. Seismic reflection data were acquired by different offset of ships making large-offset gathers. The northeast end of the seismic line connected with the 2003 Tokyo bay seismic line (Sato et al., 2005: Science). The obtained seismic sections portray the detailed geometry of the spray faults, suggesting an emergent thrust with 4 km thick landward dipping strata. It merges to the megathrust at 6-7 sec (TWT). Judging from the geometry of fault-related fold in the trough fill sediments, the tip of the megathrust is located at 3 sec (TWT) beneath the trough axis. According to the co-seismic crustal deformation, the slip of the 1923 Kanto

  8. Deep transcriptome profiling of clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates reveals strain and sequence type-specific adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bruchmann, Sebastian; Muthukumarasamy, Uthayakumar; Pohl, Sarah; Preusse, Matthias; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Hamann, Isabell; Hillert, Roger; Kola, Axel; Gastmeier, Petra; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Health-care-associated infections by multi-drug-resistant bacteria constitute one of the greatest challenges to modern medicine. Bacterial pathogens devise various mechanisms to withstand the activity of a wide range of antimicrobial compounds, among which the acquisition of carbapenemases is one of the most concerning. In Klebsiella pneumoniae, the dissemination of the K. pneumoniae carbapenemase is tightly connected to the global spread of certain clonal lineages. Although antibiotic resistance is a key driver for the global distribution of epidemic high-risk clones, there seem to be other adaptive traits that may explain their success. Here, we exploited the power of deep transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) to shed light on the transcriptomic landscape of 37 clinical K. pneumoniae isolates of diverse phylogenetic origins. We identified a large set of 3346 genes which was expressed in all isolates. While the core-transcriptome profiles varied substantially between groups of different sequence types, they were more homogenous among isolates of the same sequence type. We furthermore linked the detailed information on differentially expressed genes with the clinically relevant phenotypes of biofilm formation and bacterial virulence. This allowed for the identification of a diminished expression of biofilm-specific genes within the low biofilm producing ST258 isolates as a sequence type-specific trait. PMID:26261087

  9. Deep RNA profiling identified CLOCK and molecular clock genes as pathophysiological signatures in collagen VI myopathy.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Schwartz, Elena; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Martoni, Elena; Passarelli, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Osman, Hana; Rodolico, Carmelo; Messina, Sonia; Pegoraro, Elena; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Boffi, Patrizia; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katherine; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Merlini, Luciano; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo; Foley, Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Zaharieva, Irina; Muntoni, Francesco; Capitanio, Daniele; Gelfi, Cecilia; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Yuryev, Anton; Lebowitz, Michael; Zhang, Xiping; Hodge, Brian A; Esser, Karyn A; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Collagen VI myopathies are genetic disorders caused by mutations in collagen 6 A1, A2 and A3 genes, ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the milder Bethlem myopathy, which is recapitulated by collagen-VI-null (Col6a1(-/-)) mice. Abnormalities in mitochondria and autophagic pathway have been proposed as pathogenic causes of collagen VI myopathies, but the link between collagen VI defects and these metabolic circuits remains unknown. To unravel the expression profiling perturbation in muscles with collagen VI myopathies, we performed a deep RNA profiling in both Col6a1(-/-)mice and patients with collagen VI pathology. The interactome map identified common pathways suggesting a previously undetected connection between circadian genes and collagen VI pathology. Intriguingly, Bmal1(-/-)(also known as Arntl) mice, a well-characterized model displaying arrhythmic circadian rhythms, showed profound deregulation of the collagen VI pathway and of autophagy-related genes. The involvement of circadian rhythms in collagen VI myopathies is new and links autophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities. It also opens new avenues for therapies of hereditary myopathies to modulate the molecular clock or potential gene-environment interactions that might modify muscle damage pathogenesis.

  10. Large-Scale and Deep Quantitative Proteome Profiling Using Isobaric Labeling Coupled with Two-Dimensional LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, Marina A; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive, quantitative information on abundances of proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs) can potentially provide novel biological insights into diseases pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Herein, we introduce a quantitative strategy utilizing isobaric stable isotope-labeling techniques combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) for large-scale, deep quantitative proteome profiling of biological samples or clinical specimens such as tumor tissues. The workflow includes isobaric labeling of tryptic peptides for multiplexed and accurate quantitative analysis, basic reversed-phase LC fractionation and concatenation for reduced sample complexity, and nano-LC coupled to high resolution and high mass accuracy MS analysis for high confidence identification and quantification of proteins. This proteomic analysis strategy has been successfully applied for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of tumor samples and can also be used for integrated proteome and PTM characterization, as well as comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis across samples from large clinical cohorts. PMID:26867748

  11. Refractive-index profiling of optical fibers with axial symmetry by use of quantitative phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A; Ampem-Lassen, E; Barty, A; Nugent, K A; Baxter, G W; Dragomir, N M; Huntington, S T

    2002-12-01

    The application of quantitative phase microscopy to refractive-index profiling of optical fibers is demonstrated. Phase images of axially symmetric optical fibers immersed in index-matching fluid are obtained, and the inverse Abel transform is used to obtain the radial refractive-index profile. This technique is straightforward, nondestructive, repeatable, and accurate. Excellent agreement, to within approximately 0.0005, between this method and the index profile obtained with a commercial profiler is obtained.

  12. Metastable mantle phase transformations and deep earthquakes in subducting oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Stephen H.; Stein, Seth; Okal, Emile A.; Rubie, David C.

    1996-05-01

    Earth's deepest earthquakes occur as a population in subducting or previously subducted lithosphere at depths ranging from about 325 to 690 km. This depth interval closely brackets the mantle transition zone, characterized by rapid seismic velocity increases resulting from the transformation of upper mantle minerals to higher-pressure phases. Deep earthquakes thus provide the primary direct evidence for subduction of the lithosphere to these depths and allow us to investigate the deep thermal, thermodynamic, and mechanical ferment inside slabs. Numerical simulations of reaction rates show that the olivine → spinel transformation should be kinetically hindered in old, cold slabs descending into the transition zone. Thus wedge-shaped zones of metastable peridotite probably persist to depths of more than 600 km. Laboratory deformation experiments on some metastable minerals display a shear instability called transformational faulting. This instability involves sudden failure by localized superplasticity in thin shear zones where the metastable host mineral transforms to a denser, finer-grained phase. Hence in cold slabs, such faulting is expected for the polymorphic reactions in which olivine transforms to the spinel structure and clinoenstatite transforms to ilmenite. It is thus natural to hypothesize that deep earthquakes result from transformational faulting in metastable peridotite wedges within cold slabs. This consideration of the mineralogical states of slabs augments the traditional largely thermal view of slab processes and explains some previously enigmatic slab features. It explains why deep seismicity occurs only in the approximate depth range of the mantle transition zone, where minerals in downgoing slabs should transform to spinel and ilmenite structures. The onset of deep shocks at about 325 km is consistent with the onset of metastability near the equilibrium phase boundary in the slab. Even if a slab penetrates into the lower mantle, earthquakes

  13. Metastable mantle phase transformations and deep earthquakes in subducting oceanic lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Stein, S.; Okal, E.A.; Rubie, David C.

    1996-01-01

    Earth's deepest earthquakes occur as a population in subducting or previously subducted lithosphere at depths ranging from about 325 to 690 km. This depth interval closely brackets the mantle transition zone, characterized by rapid seismic velocity increases resulting from the transformation of upper mantle minerals to higher-pressure phases. Deep earthquakes thus provide the primary direct evidence for subduction of the lithosphere to these depths and allow us to investigate the deep thermal, thermodynamic, and mechanical ferment inside slabs. Numerical simulations of reaction rates show that the olivine ??? spinel transformation should be kinetically hindered in old, cold slabs descending into the transition zone. Thus wedge-shaped zones of metastable peridotite probably persist to depths of more than 600 km. Laboratory deformation experiments on some metastable minerals display a shear instability called transformational faulting. This instability involves sudden failure by localized superplasticity in thin shear zones where the metastable host mineral transforms to a denser, finer-grained phase. Hence in cold slabs, such faulting is expected for the polymorphic reactions in which olivine transforms to the spinel structure and clinoenstatite transforms to ilmenite. It is thus natural to hypothesize that deep earthquakes result from transformational faulting in metastable peridotite wedges within cold slabs. This consideration of the mineralogical states of slabs augments the traditional largely thermal view of slab processes and explains some previously enigmatic slab features. It explains why deep seismicity occurs only in the approximate depth range of the mantle transition zone, where minerals in downgoing slabs should transform to spinel and ilmenite structures. The onset of deep shocks at about 325 km is consistent with the onset of metastability near the equilibrium phase boundary in the slab. Even if a slab penetrates into the lower mantle, earthquakes

  14. Deep Seismic Reflection Profiling in the Source Region of the 1923 Kanto Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Hirata, N.; Iwasaki, T.; Koketsu, K.; Ito, T.; Kasahara, K.; Ito, K.; Kawamura, T.; Ikawa, T.; Onishi, M.; Kawanaka, T.; Abe, S.

    2003-12-01

    The location and geometry of the source fault, and crustal velocity structure, provide the basic information for more precise estimation of strong ground motions with devastative earthquakes. The deep seismic profiling around Metropolitan Tokyo (Kanto area) began from 2002 under the project named `Regional Characterization of the Crust in Metropolitan Areas for Prediction of Strong Ground Motion' as five year's project. Deep seismic profiling was performed along the Sagami (Sagami 2003) and Tokyo Bay (Tokyo Bay 2003), to obtain an image of the source fault of the Kanto earthquake of 1923 (M7.9), upper surface of the Philippine Sea plate, and deeper extension of inland active faults. In Sagami 2003, seismic reflection data were acquired along a 75-km-long seismic line from the flank of the Hakone volcano to Tokyo Bay through the coast of Sagami Bay. The seismic source was four vibroseis trucks and air guns (1500 cu. inch). The seismic signals were recorded by geophones (10 Hz) on land along the coast with 20 33-km-long spread. The seismic data was processed by standard CMP-reflection method. The obtained seismic section portrays the east dipping reflectors beneath Odawara at depth ca. 4 km to Kamakura at depth ca. 13 km for 40-km-distance forming a narrow (< 1 km) concentrated zone of reflectors. The location and geometry of reflectors are almost coincidence with the source fault model (model II) proposed by MatsuOura et al. (1980) for the Kanto earthquake using a inverse method from geodetic data. Thus, it is interpreted that the source fault of the earthquake is in the narrow zone of the concentrated reflectors. The deeper extension of the Kozu-Matsuda Fault, showing the one of the highest slip rates (3 mm/y: vertical component) among active faults in Japan and was assessed high seismic risk, merges to the east dipping reflectors at ca. 6.5 km in depth beneath the Oiso hills. In the Tokyo Bay 2003, seismic reflection data were acquired along a 71-km

  15. The Mechanics of Deep Earthquakes: An Experimental Investigation of Slab Phase Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santangeli, J. R.; Dobson, D. P.; Hunt, S. A.; Meredith, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of deep earthquakes have remained a puzzle for researchers since 1928 when they were first accurately identified by Kiyoo Wadati1 in Japan. Deep earthquakes show a split distribution, with peaks centered around ~370-420km and ~520-550km. As these events are limited to subducting slabs, it is accepted that they may be due to phase changes in metastable slab material. Indeed, conditions at ~350km depth are nominally appropriate for the olivine - wadsleyite transition, consistent with the anticrack mechanism previously observed in (Mg,Fe)2SiO42. The additional peak around 520km suggests that there is another siesmogenic phase change; candidates include Ca-garnet -> Ca-perovskite, wadsleyite -> ringwoodite and enstatite -> majorite or ilmenite. Importantly, for large scale seismogenesis to occur candidate phase changes must be susceptible to a runaway mechanism. Typically this involves the release of heat during exothermic reactions, which acts to increase reaction and nucleation rates. It is worth noting that the post-spinel reaction (sp -> pv + fp) marks the cessation of deep earthquakes; possibly as a result of being endothermic. This research aims to identify which of these candidates could be responsible for seismogenesis. We use high-pressure split cylinder multi-anvil experiments with acoustic emission detection. Low-pressure analogue materials have been used to allow greater cell sizes and thus sample volumes to enable accurate location of AE to within the sample. The candidate phase is annealed below its phase boundary, and then taken through the boundary by further compression. Acoustic emissions, if generated, are observed in real time and later processed to ensure they emanate from within the sample volume. Initial results indicate that the pryroxene -> ilmenite transition in MgGeO3 is seismogenic, with several orders of magnitude increase in the energy of AE concurrent with the phase boundary. References:1) Wadati, K. (1928) Shallow and deep

  16. 30 CFR 203.41 - If I have a qualified deep well or a qualified phase 1 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... well with a perforated interval whose top is 18,000 feet TVD SS or deeper, has a qualified deep well with a perforated interval whose top is 18,000 feet TVD SS or deeper or a qualified phase 1 ultra-deep... from 15,000 to less than 18,000 feet TVD SS, 15 BCF. (2) A sidetrack with a perforated interval the...

  17. Metagenomic profiles of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) between human impacted estuary and deep ocean sediments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baowei; Yang, Ying; Liang, Ximei; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong; Li, Xiangdong

    2013-11-19

    Knowledge of the origins and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is essential for understanding modern resistomes in the environment. The mechanisms of the dissemination of ARGs can be revealed through comparative studies on the metagenomic profiling of ARGs between relatively pristine and human-impacted environments. The deep ocean bed of the South China Sea (SCS) is considered to be largely devoid of anthropogenic impacts, while the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) in south China has been highly impacted by intensive human activities. Commonly used antibiotics (sulfamethazine, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, tetracycline, and erythromycin) have been detected through chemical analysis in the PRE sediments, but not in the SCS sediments. In the relatively pristine SCS sediments, the most prevalent and abundant ARGs are those related to resistance to macrolides and polypeptides, with efflux pumps as the predominant mechanism. In the contaminated PRE sediments, the typical ARG profiles suggest a prevailing resistance to antibiotics commonly used in human health and animal farming (including sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides), and higher diversity in both genotype and resistance mechanism than those in the SCS. In particular, antibiotic inactivation significantly contributed to the resistance to aminoglycosides, β-lactams, and macrolides observed in the PRE sediments. There was a significant correlation in the levels of abundance of ARGs and those of mobile genetic elements (including integrons and plasmids), which serve as carriers in the dissemination of ARGs in the aquatic environment. The metagenomic results from the current study support the view that ARGs naturally originate in pristine environments, while human activities accelerate the dissemination of ARGs so that microbes would be able to tolerate selective environmental stress in response to anthropogenic impacts.

  18. Orogenic structure of the Eastern Alps, Europe, from TRANSALP deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüschen, Ewald; Lammerer, Bernd; Gebrande, Helmut; Millahn, Karl; Nicolich, Rinaldo; Transalp Working Group

    2004-09-01

    The TRANSALP Group, comprising of partner institutions from Italy, Austria and Germany, acquired data on a 340 km long deep seismic reflection line crossing the Eastern Alps between Munich and Venice. Although the field work was split into four campaigns, between fall 1998 and summer 2001, the project gathered for the first time a continuous profile across the Alps using consistent field acquisition and data processing parameters. These sections span the orogen itself, at its broadest width, as well as the editor Fred Davey and the two adjacent basins. Vibroseis and explosion data, complementary in their depth penetration and resolution characteristics, were obtained along with wide-angle and teleseismic data. The profile shows a bi-vergent asymmetric structure of the crust beneath the Alpine axis which reaches a maximum thickness of 55 km, and 80-100 km long transcrustal ramps, the southward dipping 'Sub-Tauern-Ramp' and the northward-dipping 'Sub-Dolomites-Ramp'. Strongly reflective patterns of these ramps can be traced towards the north to the Inn Valley and towards the south to the Valsugana thrust belt, both of which show enhanced seismicity in the brittle upper crust. The seismic sections do not reveal any direct evidence for the presence of the Periadriatic Fault system, the presumed equivalent to the Insubric Line in the Western Alps. According to our new evolutionary model, the Sub-Tauern-Ramp is linked at depth with remnants of the subducted Penninic Ocean. The 'crocodile'-type model describes an upper/lower crustal decoupling and wedging of both the European and the Adriatic-African continents.

  19. Toxicity profile of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents for fungi and Cyprinus carpio fish.

    PubMed

    Juneidi, Ibrahim; Hayyan, Maan; Mohd Ali, Ozair

    2016-04-01

    An investigation on the toxicological assessment of 10 choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) towards four fungi strains and Cyprinus carpio fish was conducted. ChCl was combined with materials from different chemical groups such as alcohols, sugars, acids and others to form DESs. The study was carried out on the individual DES components, their aqueous mixture before DES formation and their formed DESs. The agar disc diffusion method was followed to investigate their toxicity on four fungi strains selected as a model of eukaryotic microorganisms (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Aspergillus niger, Lentinus tigrinus and Candida cylindracea). Among these DESs, ChCl:ZnCl2 exhibited the highest inhibition zone diameter towards the tested fungi growth in vitro, followed by the acidic group (malonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid). Another study was conducted to test the acute toxicity and determine the lethal concentration at 50 % (LC50) of the same DESs on C. carpio fish. The inhibition range and LC50 of DESs were found to be different from their individual components. DESs were found to be less toxic than their mixture or individual components. The LC50 of ChCl:MADES is much higher than that of ChCl:MAMix. Moreover, the DESs acidic group showed a lower inhibition zone on fungi growth. Thus, DESs should be considered as new components with different physicochemical properties and toxicological profiles, and not merely compositions of compounds.

  20. Integration of deep transcript and targeted metabolite profiles for eight cultivars of opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Desgagné-Penix, Isabel; Farrow, Scott C; Cram, Dustin; Nowak, Jacek; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-06-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology and analytical mass spectrometry are providing unprecedented opportunities to develop the functional genomics resources required to investigate complex biological processes in non-model plants. Opium poppy produces a wide variety of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs), including the pharmaceutical compounds codeine, morphine, noscapine and papaverine. A functional genomics platform to identify novel BIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes in opium poppy has been established based on the differential metabolite profile of eight selected cultivars. Stem cDNA libraries from each of the eight opium poppy cultivars were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing and searchable expressed sequence tag databases were created from the assembled reads. These deep and integrated metabolite and transcript databases provide a nearly complete representation of the genetic and metabolic variances responsible for the differential occurrence of specific BIAs in each cultivar as demonstrated using the biochemically well characterized pathway from tyrosine to morphine. Similar correlations between the occurrence of specific transcripts and alkaloids effectively reveals candidate genes encoding uncharacterized biosynthetic enzymes as shown using cytochromes P450 potentially involved in the formation of papaverine and noscapine.

  1. Transcriptional profiling of CRP-regulated genes in deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Hu, Jing; Xiao, Xiang

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a conserved regulator in bacteria and involved in regulation of energy metabolism, such as glucose, galactose, and citrate (Green et al., 2014 [1]). As an important catabolite activator protein, it has been well characterized in model microorganism such as Escherichia coli. However, our understanding of the roles of CRP in deep-sea bacteria is rather limited. To indentify the function of CRP, we performed whole genome transcriptional profiling using a custom designed microarray which contains 95% open reading frames of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, which was isolated from West Pacific sediment at a depth of 1914 m (Xiao et al., 2007 [2]; Wang et al., 2008 [3]). Here we describe the experimental procedures and methods in detail to reproduce the results (available at Gene Expression Omnibus database under GSE67731 and GSE67732) and provide resource to be employed for comparative analyses of CRP regulon and the regulatory network of anaerobic respiration in microorganisms which inhabited in different environments, and thus broaden our understanding of mechanism of bacteria against various environment stresses.

  2. Toxicity profile of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents for fungi and Cyprinus carpio fish.

    PubMed

    Juneidi, Ibrahim; Hayyan, Maan; Mohd Ali, Ozair

    2016-04-01

    An investigation on the toxicological assessment of 10 choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) towards four fungi strains and Cyprinus carpio fish was conducted. ChCl was combined with materials from different chemical groups such as alcohols, sugars, acids and others to form DESs. The study was carried out on the individual DES components, their aqueous mixture before DES formation and their formed DESs. The agar disc diffusion method was followed to investigate their toxicity on four fungi strains selected as a model of eukaryotic microorganisms (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Aspergillus niger, Lentinus tigrinus and Candida cylindracea). Among these DESs, ChCl:ZnCl2 exhibited the highest inhibition zone diameter towards the tested fungi growth in vitro, followed by the acidic group (malonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid). Another study was conducted to test the acute toxicity and determine the lethal concentration at 50 % (LC50) of the same DESs on C. carpio fish. The inhibition range and LC50 of DESs were found to be different from their individual components. DESs were found to be less toxic than their mixture or individual components. The LC50 of ChCl:MADES is much higher than that of ChCl:MAMix. Moreover, the DESs acidic group showed a lower inhibition zone on fungi growth. Thus, DESs should be considered as new components with different physicochemical properties and toxicological profiles, and not merely compositions of compounds. PMID:26743645

  3. Optimized Structures for Low-Profile Phase Change Thermal Spreaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharratt, Stephen Andrew

    Thin, low-profile phase change thermal spreaders can provide cooling solutions for some of today's most pressing heat flux dissipation issues. These thermal issues are only expected to increase as future electronic circuitry requirements lead to denser and potentially 3D chip packaging. Phase change based heat spreaders, such as heat pipes or vapor chambers, can provide a practical solution for effectively dissipating large heat fluxes. This thesis reports a comprehensive study of state-of-the-art capillary pumped wick structures using computational modeling, micro wick fabrication, and experimental analysis. Modeling efforts focus on predicting the shape of the liquid meniscus inside a complicated 3D wick structure. It is shown that this liquid shape can drastically affect the wick's thermal resistance. In addition, knowledge of the liquid meniscus shape allows for the computation of key parameters such as permeability and capillary pressure which are necessary for predicting the maximum heat flux. After the model is validated by comparison to experimental results, the wick structure is optimized so as to decrease overall wick thermal resistance and increase the maximum capillary limited heat flux before dryout. The optimized structures are then fabricated out of both silicon and copper using both traditional and novel micro-fabrication techniques. The wicks are made super-hydrophilic using chemical and thermal oxidation schemes. A sintered monolayer of Cu particles is fabricated and analyzed as well. The fabricated wick structures are experimentally tested for their heat transfer performance inside a well controlled copper vacuum chamber. Heat fluxes as high as 170 W/cm2 are realized for Cu wicks with structure heights of 100 μm. The structures optimized for both minimized thermal resistance and high liquid supply ability perform much better than their non-optimized counterparts. The super-hydrophilic oxidation scheme is found to drastically increase the maximum

  4. Hydride vapor phase GaN films with reduced density of residual electrons and deep traps

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Yugova, T. G.; Cox, H.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.; Usikov, A. S.

    2014-05-14

    Electrical properties and deep electron and hole traps spectra are compared for undoped n-GaN films grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) in the regular process (standard HVPE samples) and in HVPE process optimized for decreasing the concentration of residual donor impurities (improved HVPE samples). It is shown that the residual donor density can be reduced by optimization from ∼10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} to (2–5) × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}. The density of deep hole traps and deep electron traps decreases with decreased donor density, so that the concentration of deep hole traps in the improved samples is reduced to ∼5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} versus 2.9 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} in the standard samples, with a similar decrease in the electron traps concentration.

  5. Multiscale deep drawing analysis of dual-phase steels using grain cluster-based RGC scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjahjanto, D. D.; Eisenlohr, P.; Roters, F.

    2015-06-01

    Multiscale modelling and simulation play an important role in sheet metal forming analysis, since the overall material responses at macroscopic engineering scales, e.g. formability and anisotropy, are strongly influenced by microstructural properties, such as grain size and crystal orientations (texture). In the present report, multiscale analysis on deep drawing of dual-phase steels is performed using an efficient grain cluster-based homogenization scheme. The homogenization scheme, called relaxed grain cluster (RGC), is based on a generalization of the grain cluster concept, where a (representative) volume element consists of p  ×  q  ×  r (hexahedral) grains. In this scheme, variation of the strain or deformation of individual grains is taken into account through the, so-called, interface relaxation, which is formulated within an energy minimization framework. An interfacial penalty term is introduced into the energy minimization framework in order to account for the effects of grain boundaries. The grain cluster-based homogenization scheme has been implemented and incorporated into the advanced material simulation platform DAMASK, which purposes to bridge the macroscale boundary value problems associated with deep drawing analysis to the micromechanical constitutive law, e.g. crystal plasticity model. Standard Lankford anisotropy tests are performed to validate the model parameters prior to the deep drawing analysis. Model predictions for the deep drawing simulations are analyzed and compared to the corresponding experimental data. The result shows that the predictions of the model are in a very good agreement with the experimental measurement.

  6. Constraints on dissipation in the deep interiors of Ganymede and Europa from tidal phase-lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussmann, Hauke; Shoji, Daigo; Steinbrügge, Gregor; Stark, Alexander; Sohl, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Jupiter's satellites are subject to strong tidal forces which result in variations of the gravitational potential and deformations of the satellites' surfaces on the diurnal tidal cycle. Such variations are described by the Love numbers k_2 and h_2 for the tide-induced potential variation due to internal mass redistribution and the radial surface displacement, respectively. The phase-lags φ _{k_2} and φ _{h_2} of these complex numbers contain information about the rheological and dissipative states of the satellites. Starting from interior structure models and assuming a Maxwell rheology to compute the tidal deformation, we calculate the phase-lags in application to Ganymede and Europa. For both satellites we assume a decoupling of the outer ice-shell from the deep interior by a liquid subsurface water ocean. We show that, in this case, the phase-lag difference Δ φ = φ _{k_2}- φ _{h_2} can provide information on the rheological and thermal state of the deep interiors if the viscosities of the deeper layers are small. In case of Ganymede, phase-lag differences can reach values of a few degrees for high-pressure ice viscosities {<}10^{14} Pa s and would indicate a highly dissipative state of the deep interior. In this case Δ φ is dominated by dissipation in the high-pressure ice layer rather than dissipation within the ice-I shell. These phase lags would be detectable from spacecraft in orbit around the satellite. For Europa Δ φ could reach values exceeding 20° and phase-lag measurements could help distinguish between (1) a hot dissipative silicate mantle which would in thermal equilibrium correspond to a very thin outer ice-I shell and (2) a cold deep interior implying that dissipation would mainly occur in a thick (several tens of km) outer ice-I shell. These measurements are highly relevant for ESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) and NASA's Europa Multiple Flyby Mission, both targeted for the Jupiter system.

  7. Constraints on dissipation in the deep interiors of Ganymede and Europa from tidal phase-lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussmann, Hauke; Shoji, Daigo; Steinbrügge, Gregor; Stark, Alexander; Sohl, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Jupiter's satellites are subject to strong tidal forces which result in variations of the gravitational potential and deformations of the satellites' surfaces on the diurnal tidal cycle. Such variations are described by the Love numbers k_2 and h_2 for the tide-induced potential variation due to internal mass redistribution and the radial surface displacement, respectively. The phase-lags φ _{k_2} and φ _{h_2} of these complex numbers contain information about the rheological and dissipative states of the satellites. Starting from interior structure models and assuming a Maxwell rheology to compute the tidal deformation, we calculate the phase-lags in application to Ganymede and Europa. For both satellites we assume a decoupling of the outer ice-shell from the deep interior by a liquid subsurface water ocean. We show that, in this case, the phase-lag difference Δ φ = φ _{k_2}- φ _{h_2} can provide information on the rheological and thermal state of the deep interiors if the viscosities of the deeper layers are small. In case of Ganymede, phase-lag differences can reach values of a few degrees for high-pressure ice viscosities {<}10^{14} Pa s and would indicate a highly dissipative state of the deep interior. In this case Δ φ is dominated by dissipation in the high-pressure ice layer rather than dissipation within the ice-I shell. These phase lags would be detectable from spacecraft in orbit around the satellite. For Europa Δ φ could reach values exceeding 20° and phase-lag measurements could help distinguish between (1) a hot dissipative silicate mantle which would in thermal equilibrium correspond to a very thin outer ice-I shell and (2) a cold deep interior implying that dissipation would mainly occur in a thick (several tens of km) outer ice-I shell. These measurements are highly relevant for ESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) and NASA's Europa Multiple Flyby Mission, both targeted for the Jupiter system.

  8. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  9. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth.

  10. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth’s interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ13C ≈ −5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼−40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ13C distributions to the observed low δ13C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe−C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe−Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in 13C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe−C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ13C values. The sharp contrast in the δ13C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5–3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ13C values and that an average δ13C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼−5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ13C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion−differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Toxicity Profiling of Ammonium-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Hayyan, Maan; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hayyan, Adeeb; Wong, Won Fen; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic potential of ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) with four hydrogen bond donors, namely glycerine (Gl), ethylene glycol (EG), triethylene glycol (TEG) and urea (U) were investigated. The toxicity of DESs was examined using In Vitro cell lines and In Vivo animal model. IC50 and selectivity index were determined for the DESs, their individual components and their combinations as aqueous solutions for comparison purposes. The cytotoxicity effect of DESs varied depending on cell lines. The IC50 for the GlDES, EGDES, UDES and TEGDES followed the sequence of TEGDES< GlDES< EGDES< UDES for OKF6, MCF-7, A375, HT29 and H413, respectively. GlDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375, EGDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, UDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, and TEGDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375. However, acute toxicity studies using ICR mice showed that these DESs were relatively toxic in comparison to their individual components. DES did not cause DNA damage, but it could enhance ROS production and induce apoptosis in treated cancer cells as evidenced by marked LDH release. Furthermore, the examined DESs showed less cytotoxicity compared with ionic liquids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that combined In Vitro and In Vivo toxicity profiles of DESs were being demonstrated, raising the toxicity issue of these neoteric mixtures and their potential applicability to be used for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25679975

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo toxicity profiling of ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hayyan, Adeeb; Wong, Won Fen; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic potential of ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) with four hydrogen bond donors, namely glycerine (Gl), ethylene glycol (EG), triethylene glycol (TEG) and urea (U) were investigated. The toxicity of DESs was examined using In Vitro cell lines and In Vivo animal model. IC50 and selectivity index were determined for the DESs, their individual components and their combinations as aqueous solutions for comparison purposes. The cytotoxicity effect of DESs varied depending on cell lines. The IC50 for the GlDES, EGDES, UDES and TEGDES followed the sequence of TEGDES< GlDES< EGDES< UDES for OKF6, MCF-7, A375, HT29 and H413, respectively. GlDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375, EGDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, UDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, and TEGDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375. However, acute toxicity studies using ICR mice showed that these DESs were relatively toxic in comparison to their individual components. DES did not cause DNA damage, but it could enhance ROS production and induce apoptosis in treated cancer cells as evidenced by marked LDH release. Furthermore, the examined DESs showed less cytotoxicity compared with ionic liquids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that combined In Vitro and In Vivo toxicity profiles of DESs were being demonstrated, raising the toxicity issue of these neoteric mixtures and their potential applicability to be used for therapeutic purposes.

  13. In Vitro and In Vivo toxicity profiling of ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hayyan, Adeeb; Wong, Won Fen; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic potential of ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) with four hydrogen bond donors, namely glycerine (Gl), ethylene glycol (EG), triethylene glycol (TEG) and urea (U) were investigated. The toxicity of DESs was examined using In Vitro cell lines and In Vivo animal model. IC50 and selectivity index were determined for the DESs, their individual components and their combinations as aqueous solutions for comparison purposes. The cytotoxicity effect of DESs varied depending on cell lines. The IC50 for the GlDES, EGDES, UDES and TEGDES followed the sequence of TEGDES< GlDES< EGDES< UDES for OKF6, MCF-7, A375, HT29 and H413, respectively. GlDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375, EGDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, UDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, and TEGDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375. However, acute toxicity studies using ICR mice showed that these DESs were relatively toxic in comparison to their individual components. DES did not cause DNA damage, but it could enhance ROS production and induce apoptosis in treated cancer cells as evidenced by marked LDH release. Furthermore, the examined DESs showed less cytotoxicity compared with ionic liquids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that combined In Vitro and In Vivo toxicity profiles of DESs were being demonstrated, raising the toxicity issue of these neoteric mixtures and their potential applicability to be used for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25679975

  14. Seven hundred years of peat formation recorded throughout a deep floating mire profile from Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobianco, Daniela; D'Orazio, Valeria; Miano, Teodoro; Zaccone, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    3), an ash content ranging from 0.8 and 7.4%, an average gravimetric water content of 26.6±7.7 gwater gdrypeat‑1, and a pH generally increasing with depth (from 4.1 to 7.2). The C content along the profile ranged between 35 and 47% (avg., 41±4%), whereas the N between 0.3 and 1.1% (avg., 0.5±0.1%). Main atomic ratios (C/N, H/C and O/C) and FT-IR spectra seem to confirm what found during the visual inspection of the core, i.e., Sphagnum material so well preserved that it is hard to classify it as "peat". In fact, the 14C age dating suggests that the first 110 cm of Sphagnum material accumulated in ca. 55 yrs, thus resulting in an average growing rate of 2 cm yr‑1. The remaining 300 cm (from 100 to 400 cm of depth), i.e., the submerged part of the island, consist of peat showing completely different botanical composition (reed-fen peat and silty peat rich in reeds) and physical and chemical properties. In particular, both bulk density (avg., 0.09±0.05 g cm‑3) and ash content increase, reaching their maximum at 300-325 cm of depth (0.27 g cm‑3 and 17%, respectively), whereas the average gravimetric water content significantly decreases (17.4±9.0 gwater gdrypeat‑1). The pH ranges from 6.6 and 7.4. Both C and N along this section of the profile show higher average contents (44±3 and 1.3±0.6%, respectively) compared to those recorded in the upper 100 cm layer; furthermore, the decrease with depth of C/N, H/C and O/C atomic ratios, as well as main absorption bands of FT-IR spectra, clearly indicate the occurrence of an organic matter highly humified. The estimated accumulation rate for the bottom 300 cm of the island is 0.5 cm yr‑1. At the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first characterization of a (4 m) deep floating mire profile. At Posta Fibreno, the deep water layer below the base of the island (7 m) and the movement on the water surface probably avoided the transition from floating island to firm land, thus allowing this island to

  15. Seven hundred years of peat formation recorded throughout a deep floating mire profile from Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobianco, Daniela; D'Orazio, Valeria; Miano, Teodoro; Zaccone, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    ), an ash content ranging from 0.8 and 7.4%, an average gravimetric water content of 26.6±7.7 gwater gdrypeat-1, and a pH generally increasing with depth (from 4.1 to 7.2). The C content along the profile ranged between 35 and 47% (avg., 41±4%), whereas the N between 0.3 and 1.1% (avg., 0.5±0.1%). Main atomic ratios (C/N, H/C and O/C) and FT-IR spectra seem to confirm what found during the visual inspection of the core, i.e., Sphagnum material so well preserved that it is hard to classify it as "peat". In fact, the 14C age dating suggests that the first 110 cm of Sphagnum material accumulated in ca. 55 yrs, thus resulting in an average growing rate of 2 cm yr-1. The remaining 300 cm (from 100 to 400 cm of depth), i.e., the submerged part of the island, consist of peat showing completely different botanical composition (reed-fen peat and silty peat rich in reeds) and physical and chemical properties. In particular, both bulk density (avg., 0.09±0.05 g cm-3) and ash content increase, reaching their maximum at 300-325 cm of depth (0.27 g cm-3 and 17%, respectively), whereas the average gravimetric water content significantly decreases (17.4±9.0 gwater gdrypeat-1). The pH ranges from 6.6 and 7.4. Both C and N along this section of the profile show higher average contents (44±3 and 1.3±0.6%, respectively) compared to those recorded in the upper 100 cm layer; furthermore, the decrease with depth of C/N, H/C and O/C atomic ratios, as well as main absorption bands of FT-IR spectra, clearly indicate the occurrence of an organic matter highly humified. The estimated accumulation rate for the bottom 300 cm of the island is 0.5 cm yr-1. At the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first characterization of a (4 m) deep floating mire profile. At Posta Fibreno, the deep water layer below the base of the island (7 m) and the movement on the water surface probably avoided the transition from floating island to firm land, thus allowing this island to float during the

  16. First Autonomous Bio-Optical Profiling Float in the Gulf of Mexico Reveals Dynamic Biogeochemistry in Deep Waters

    PubMed Central

    Green, Rebecca E.; Bower, Amy S.; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Profiling floats equipped with bio-optical sensors well complement ship-based and satellite ocean color measurements by providing highly-resolved time-series data on the vertical structure of biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters. This is the first study to employ an autonomous profiling (APEX) float in the Gulf of Mexico for measuring spatiotemporal variability in bio-optics and hydrography. During the 17-month deployment (July 2011 to December 2012), the float mission collected profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, particulate backscattering (bbp), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence from the ocean surface to a depth of 1,500 m. Biogeochemical variability was characterized by distinct depth trends and local “hot spots”, including impacts from mesoscale processes associated with each of the water masses sampled, from ambient deep waters over the Florida Plain, into the Loop Current, up the Florida Canyon, and eventually into the Florida Straits. A deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) occurred between 30 and 120 m, with the DCM depth significantly related to the unique density layer ρ = 1023.6 (R2 = 0.62). Particulate backscattering, bbp, demonstrated multiple peaks throughout the water column, including from phytoplankton, deep scattering layers, and resuspension. The bio-optical relationship developed between bbp and chlorophyll (R2 = 0.49) was compared to a global relationship and could significantly improve regional ocean-color algorithms. Photooxidation and autochthonous production contributed to CDOM distributions in the upper water column, whereas in deep water, CDOM behaved as a semi-conservative tracer of water masses, demonstrating a tight relationship with density (R2 = 0.87). In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, this research lends support to the use of autonomous drifting profilers as a powerful tool for consideration in the design of an expanded and integrated observing network

  17. Trace elements profiles, notably Hg, from a preliminary study of the Apollo 15 deep-drill core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The possible thermal gradient near the surface during a lunation is considered together with the heat flow from the interior, the physical process of Hg migration, the results from core and trench samples from previous missions, and other temperature sensitive phenomena that may help understand the processes. U, Os, and Ru concentrations in the deep drill core samples are of potential interest and are summarized in a table. The Os tends to parallel the Hg profile with depth.

  18. First autonomous bio-optical profiling float in the Gulf of Mexico reveals dynamic biogeochemistry in deep waters.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebecca E; Bower, Amy S; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Profiling floats equipped with bio-optical sensors well complement ship-based and satellite ocean color measurements by providing highly-resolved time-series data on the vertical structure of biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters. This is the first study to employ an autonomous profiling (APEX) float in the Gulf of Mexico for measuring spatiotemporal variability in bio-optics and hydrography. During the 17-month deployment (July 2011 to December 2012), the float mission collected profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, particulate backscattering (bbp), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence from the ocean surface to a depth of 1,500 m. Biogeochemical variability was characterized by distinct depth trends and local "hot spots", including impacts from mesoscale processes associated with each of the water masses sampled, from ambient deep waters over the Florida Plain, into the Loop Current, up the Florida Canyon, and eventually into the Florida Straits. A deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) occurred between 30 and 120 m, with the DCM depth significantly related to the unique density layer ρ = 1023.6 (R2 = 0.62). Particulate backscattering, bbp, demonstrated multiple peaks throughout the water column, including from phytoplankton, deep scattering layers, and resuspension. The bio-optical relationship developed between bbp and chlorophyll (R2 = 0.49) was compared to a global relationship and could significantly improve regional ocean-color algorithms. Photooxidation and autochthonous production contributed to CDOM distributions in the upper water column, whereas in deep water, CDOM behaved as a semi-conservative tracer of water masses, demonstrating a tight relationship with density (R2 = 0.87). In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, this research lends support to the use of autonomous drifting profilers as a powerful tool for consideration in the design of an expanded and integrated observing network for

  19. MMIC linear-phase and digital modulators for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Ali, Fazal

    1991-01-01

    The design concepts, analyses, and development of GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) linear-phase and digital modulators for the next generation of space-borne communications systems are summarized. The design approach uses a compact lumped element quadrature hybrid and Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFET)-varactors to provide low loss and well-controlled phase performance for deep space transponder (DST) applications. The measured results of the MESFET-diode show a capacitance range of 2:1 under reverse bias, and a Q of 38 at 10 GHz. Three cascaded sections of hybrid-coupled reflection phase shifters were modeled and simulations performed to provide an X-band (8415 +/- 50 MHz) DST phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians of peak phase deviation. The modulator will accommodate downlink signal modulation with composite telemetry and ranging data, with a deviation linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 8 +/- 0.5 dB. The MMIC digital modulator is designed to provide greater than 10 Mb/s of bi-phase modulation at X-band.

  20. High-resolution crustal structure of the Yinchuan basin revealed by deep seismic reflection profiling: implications for deep processes of basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingfu; Feng, Shaoying; Gao, Rui; Li, Wenhui

    2016-04-01

    The Yinchuan basin, located on the western margin of the Ordos block, has the characteristics of an active continental rift. A NW-striking deep seismic reflection profile across the center of Yinchuan basin precisely revealed the fine structure of the crust. The images showed that the crust in the Yinchuan basin was characterized by vertical stratifications along a detachment located at a two-way travel time (TWT) of 8.0 s. The most outstanding feature of this seismic profile was the almost flat Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho) and a high-reflection zone in the lower crust. This sub-horizontal Moho conflicts with the general assumption of an uplifted Moho under sedimentary basins and continental rifts, and may indicate the action of different processes at depth during the evolution of sedimentary basins or rifts. We present a possible interpretation of these deep processes and the sub-horizontal Moho. The high-reflection zone, which consists of sheets of high-density, mantle-derived materials, may have compensated for crustal thinning in the Yinchuan basin, leading to the formation of a sub-horizontal Moho. These high-density materials may have been emplaced by underplating with mantle-sourced magma.

  1. A novel explanation of a low-profile mechanism for unsaturated polyester resins using phase diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Suspene, L.; Fourquier, D.; Yang, Y.S. )

    1990-04-01

    A novel explanation for the mechanism of low profile additives in unsaturated polyester resins by using a concept of a phase diagram was proposed. According to the ternary phase diagrams for the systems of styrene-unsaturated polyester prepolymer-additives (e.g., polyvinyl acetate, polyurethane), the phenomenon of phase separation was explained. Furthermore, the final morphology of cured resins was correlated to the phase diagram. Microscopic observations showed the morphology was controlled by the phase separation. TEM results also clearly showed that the microvoids were formed in the low profile phase, separated from the resin phase, instead of being in the interfacial region as previously reported. It was concluded that a well controlled phase diagram can lead to a shrinkage-controlled low profile system.

  2. Is collisional breakup an important process within mixed-phase deep convective clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, A.; Khain, A.; Mayer, F.

    2003-04-01

    The microphysics of deep convective clouds determines their precipitation efficiency as well as the dynamical evolution of cloud systems and is therefore of great importance for numerical weather prediction, flood forecasting and regional climate modeling. Of all cloud systems mixed-phase deep convection is maybe the most complex and least understood. One reason is that the numerous microphysical processes taking place are highly nonlinear and strongly coupled with each other as well as with the hydrodynamics of the cloud. Collisional breakup of raindrops is one of these cloud microphysical processes, but is often neglected or not well represented in state-of-the-art cloud resolving models. The importance of collisional breakup is well known for tropical cloud systems, which are dominated by warm phase processes. In addition various studies using so-called rainshaft models showed that collisional breakup can alter the raindrop size distribution below cloud base. But what happens within the clouds and especially within strong convective updrafts? Can collisional breakup lead to a different cloud evolution by changing the drop size distribution? Using the Hebrew University Cloud Model (HUCM), which includes the most detailed spectral microphysics model available today, we performed a sensitivity study to answer these questions. Collisional breakup was therefore recently included in HUCM using Bleck's numerical method, which is standard for simulation of the breakup process. Our breakup scheme itself is mainly based on the parameterization of Low and List (1982, JAS), but includes also additional data for small raindrops by Beard and Ochs (1995, JAS). As a test case a deep convective mixed-phase cloud is simulated with initial conditions based on a sounding from 13 August 1999, Midland/Texas. We present a detailed analysis of the simulated cloud evolution with and without collisional breakup taken into account. The conclusion from our sensitivity study is that

  3. Local coexistence of VO2 phases revealed by deep data analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Anton; Tselev, Alexander; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-07

    We report a synergistic approach of micro-Raman spectroscopic mapping and deep data analysis to study the distribution of crystallographic phases and ferroelastic domains in a defected Al-doped VO2 microcrystal. Bayesian linear unmixing revealed an uneven distribution of the T phase, which is stabilized by the surface defects and uneven local doping that went undetectable by other classical analysis techniques such as PCA and SIMPLISMA. This work demonstrates the impact of information recovery via statistical analysis and full mapping in spectroscopic studies of vanadium dioxide systems, which is commonly substituted by averaging or single point-probing approaches, both of which suffer frommore » information misinterpretation due to low resolving power.« less

  4. Local coexistence of VO2 phases revealed by deep data analysis.

    PubMed

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Anton; Belianinov, Alex; Tselev, Alexander; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-01-01

    We report a synergistic approach of micro-Raman spectroscopic mapping and deep data analysis to study the distribution of crystallographic phases and ferroelastic domains in a defected Al-doped VO2 microcrystal. Bayesian linear unmixing revealed an uneven distribution of the T phase, which is stabilized by the surface defects and uneven local doping that went undetectable by other classical analysis techniques such as PCA and SIMPLISMA. This work demonstrates the impact of information recovery via statistical analysis and full mapping in spectroscopic studies of vanadium dioxide systems, which is commonly substituted by averaging or single point-probing approaches, both of which suffer from information misinterpretation due to low resolving power. PMID:27384473

  5. Local coexistence of VO2 phases revealed by deep data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Anton; Belianinov, Alex; Tselev, Alexander; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-01-01

    We report a synergistic approach of micro-Raman spectroscopic mapping and deep data analysis to study the distribution of crystallographic phases and ferroelastic domains in a defected Al-doped VO2 microcrystal. Bayesian linear unmixing revealed an uneven distribution of the T phase, which is stabilized by the surface defects and uneven local doping that went undetectable by other classical analysis techniques such as PCA and SIMPLISMA. This work demonstrates the impact of information recovery via statistical analysis and full mapping in spectroscopic studies of vanadium dioxide systems, which is commonly substituted by averaging or single point-probing approaches, both of which suffer from information misinterpretation due to low resolving power. PMID:27384473

  6. Local coexistence of VO2 phases revealed by deep data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Anton; Belianinov, Alex; Tselev, Alexander; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-01

    We report a synergistic approach of micro-Raman spectroscopic mapping and deep data analysis to study the distribution of crystallographic phases and ferroelastic domains in a defected Al-doped VO2 microcrystal. Bayesian linear unmixing revealed an uneven distribution of the T phase, which is stabilized by the surface defects and uneven local doping that went undetectable by other classical analysis techniques such as PCA and SIMPLISMA. This work demonstrates the impact of information recovery via statistical analysis and full mapping in spectroscopic studies of vanadium dioxide systems, which is commonly substituted by averaging or single point-probing approaches, both of which suffer from information misinterpretation due to low resolving power.

  7. Highly multiplexed profiling of single-cell effector functions reveals deep functional heterogeneity in response to pathogenic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao; Xue, Qiong; Eisele, Markus R.; Sulistijo, Endah S.; Brower, Kara; Han, Lin; Amir, El-ad David; Pe’er, Dana; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn; Fan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in single-cell genomic, transcriptional, and mass-cytometric profiling, it remains a challenge to collect highly multiplexed measurements of secreted proteins from single cells for comprehensive analysis of functional states. Herein, we combine spatial and spectral encoding with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchambers for codetection of 42 immune effector proteins secreted from single cells, representing the highest multiplexing recorded to date for a single-cell secretion assay. Using this platform to profile differentiated macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the ligand of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), reveals previously unobserved deep functional heterogeneity and varying levels of pathogenic activation. Uniquely protein profiling on the same single cells before and after LPS stimulation identified a role for macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) to potentiate the activation of LPS-induced cytokine production. Advanced clustering analysis identified functional subsets including quiescent, polyfunctional fully activated, partially activated populations with different cytokine profiles. This population architecture is conserved throughout the cell activation process and prevails as it is extended to other TLR ligands and to primary macrophages derived from a healthy donor. This work demonstrates that the phenotypically similar cell population still exhibits a large degree of intrinsic heterogeneity at the functional and cell behavior level. This technology enables full-spectrum dissection of immune functional states in response to pathogenic or environmental stimulation, and opens opportunities to quantify deep functional heterogeneity for more comprehensive and accurate immune monitoring. PMID:25646488

  8. Digital image profilers for detecting faint sources which have bright companions, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Elena; Flint, Graham

    1991-01-01

    A breadboard image profiling system developed for the first phase of this project demonstrated the potential for detecting extremely faint optical sources in the presence of light companions. Experimental data derived from laboratory testing of the device supports the theory that image profilers of this type may approach the theoretical limit imposed by photon statistics. The objective of Phase 2 of this program is the development of a ground-based multichannel image profiling system capable of detecting faint stellar objects slightly displaced from brighter stars. We have finalized the multichannel image profiling system and attempted three field tests.

  9. 30 CFR 203.33 - To which production do I apply the RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... To which production do I apply the RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells on my... (OGOR-A) for your lease under § 216.53. All gas production from qualified wells reported on the OGOR-A... only gas production from qualified wells on your lease, regardless of their depth, for which you...

  10. Spectral phase transfer from near IR to deep UV by broadband phase-matched four-wave mixing in an argon-filled hollow core waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, J. P.; Mendonça, C. R.; Zilio, S. C.; Misoguti, L.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the implementation of a spectral phase transfer scheme from near IR to deep UV, in which the frequency conversion step is based on the broadband phase-matched four-wave mixing in a gas-filled hollow core waveguide. Micro joule level femtosecond pulses at 260 nm were generated by nonlinear mixing of a Ti:sapphire laser and its second-harmonic. The transfer of a π-step phase in a controllable manner was proposed and confirmed by a modulation observed in the generated deep UV femtosecond pulse spectrum due to an interference process. Numerical simulations confirmed our results.

  11. Deep arid system hydrodynamics 2. Application to paleohydrologic reconstruction using vadose zone profiles from the northern Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, M.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Tyler, S.W.; Hartsough, P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Site-specific numerical modeling of four sites in two arid alluvial basins within the Nevada Test Site employs a conceptual model of deep arid system hydrodynamics that includes vapor transport, the role of xeric vegetation, and long-term surface boundary transients. Surface boundary sequences, spanning 110 kyr, that best reproduce measured chloride concentration and matric potential profiles from four deep (230-460 m) boreholes concur with independent paleohydrologic and paleoecological records from the region. Simulations constrain a pluvial period associated with infiltration of 2-5 mm yr-1 at 14-13 ka and denote a shift linked to the establishment of desert vegetation at 13-9.5 ka. Retrodicted moisture flux histories inferred from modeling results differ significantly from those determined using the conventional chloride mass balance approach that assumes only downward advection. The modeling approach developed here represents a significant advance in the use of deep vadose zone profile data from arid regions to recover detailed paleohydrologic and current hydrologic information.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN DEEP AQUIFER MEDIA - PHASE II

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj Gupta; Bruce Sass; Jennifer Ickes

    2000-11-28

    In 1998 Battelle was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under a Novel Concepts project grant to continue Phase II research on the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in deep saline formations. The focus of this investigation is to conduct detailed laboratory experiments to examine factors that may affect chemical sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations. Reactions between sandstone and other geologic media from potential host reservoirs, brine solutions, and CO{sub 2} are being investigated under high-pressure conditions. Some experiments also include sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) gases to evaluate the potential for co-injection of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} related gases in the deep formations. In addition, an assessment of engineering and economic aspects is being conducted. This current Technical Progress Report describes the status of the project as of September 2000. The major activities undertaken during the quarter included several experiments conducted to investigate the effects of pressure, temperature, time, and brine composition on rock samples from potential host reservoirs. Samples (both powder and slab) were taken from the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a potential CO{sub 2} host formation in the Ohio, the Eau Claire Shale, and Rome Dolomite samples that form the caprock for Mt. Simon Sandstone. Also, a sample with high calcium plagioclase content from Frio Formation in Texas was used. In addition, mineral samples for relatively pure Anorthite and glauconite were experimented on with and without the presence of additional clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. The experiments were run for one to two months at pressures similar to deep reservoirs and temperatures set at 50 C or 150 C. Several enhancements were made to the experimental equipment to allow for mixing of reactants and to improve sample collection methods. The resulting fluids (gases and liquids) as

  13. An adaptive microwave phased array for targeted heating of deep tumours in intact breast: animal study results.

    PubMed

    Fenn, A J; Wolf, G L; Fogle, R M

    1999-01-01

    It has previously been reported in phantoms, that an adaptive radiofrequency phased array can generate deep focused heating distributions without overheating the skin and superficial healthy tissues. The present study involves adaptive microwave phased array hyperthermia tests in animals (rabbits) with and without tumours. The design of the adaptive phased array as applied to the treatment of tumours in intact breast, is described. The adaptive phased array concept uses breast compression and dual-opposing 915 MHz air-cooled waveguide applicators with electronic phase shifters and electric-field feedback, to focus automatically by computer control the microwave radiation in deep tissue. Temperature measurements for a clinical adaptive phased array hyperthermia system demonstrate tissue heating at depth with reduced skin heating.

  14. The Pyrolytic Profile of Lyophilized and Deep-Frozen Compact Part of the Human Bone

    PubMed Central

    Lodowska, Jolanta; Wolny, Daniel; Kurkiewicz, Sławomir; Węglarz, Ludmiła

    2012-01-01

    Background. Bone grafts are used in the treatment of nonunion of fractures, bone tumors and in arthroplasty. Tissues preserved by lyophilization or deep freezing are used as implants nowadays. Lyophilized grafts are utilized in the therapy of birth defects and bone benign tumors, while deep-frozen ones are applied in orthopedics. The aim of the study was to compare the pyrolytic pattern, as an indirect means of the analysis of organic composition of deep-frozen and lyophilized compact part of the human bone. Methods. Samples of preserved bone tissue were subjected to thermolysis and tetrahydroammonium-hydroxide- (TMAH-) associated thermochemolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Results. Derivatives of benzene, pyridine, pyrrole, phenol, sulfur compounds, nitriles, saturated and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, and fatty acids (C12–C20) were identified in the pyrolytic pattern. The pyrolyzates were the most abundant in derivatives of pyrrole and nitriles originated from proteins. The predominant product in pyrolytic pattern of the investigated bone was pyrrolo[1,2-α]piperazine-3,6-dione derived from collagen. The content of this compound significantly differentiated the lyophilized graft from the deep-frozen one. Oleic and palmitic acid were predominant among fatty acids of the investigated samples. The deep-frozen implants were characterized by higher percentage of long-chain fatty acids than lyophilized grafts. PMID:22619606

  15. Low-flow characteristics and profiles for the Deep River in the Cape Fear River basin, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    An understanding of the magnitude and frequency of low-flow discharges is an important part of protecting surface-water resources and planning for municipal and industrial economic expansion. Low-flow characteristics are summarized for 7 continuous-record gaging stations and 23 partial-record measuring sites in the Deep River Basin in North Carolina. Records of discharge collected through the 1995 water year are used. Flow characteristics included in the summary are (1) average annual unit flow; (2) 7Q10 low-flow discharge, the minimum average discharge for a 7-consecutive-day period occurring, on average, once in 10 years; (3) 30Q2 low-flow discharge; (4) W7Q10 low-flow discharge, similar to 7Q10 discharge except only flow during the months of November through March is considered; and (5) 7Q2 low-flow discharge. The potential for sustained base flows in the upper half of the basin is higher than that for streams in the lower half of the basin. Much of the decrease in base-flow potential in the lower part of the basin is attributed to the underlying rock types of the Triassic basin. Soils in the lower part of the basin consist of clays which limit the infiltration of water into surficial aquifers for later release to streams during drought conditions. Correspondingly, many streams in the lower part of the basin have minimal (defined as less than 0.1 cubic foot per second) or zero 7Q10 discharges. Drainage area and low-flow discharge profiles are presented for the Deep River. The drainage-area profile shows downstream increases in basin size. At the mouth, the drainage area for the Deep River is 1,441 square miles. Low-flow discharge profiles for the Deep River include 7Q10, 30Q2, W7Q10, and 7Q2 discharges in a continuous profile with contributions from major tributaries included.

  16. Potential for Microbial Stimulation in Deep Vadose Zone Sediments by Gas-Phase Nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.W.; Plymale, A. E.; Brockman, F.J.

    2006-04-05

    Viable microbial populations are low, typically 10{sup 4} cells per gram, in deep vadose zones in arid climates. There is evidence that microbial distribution in these environments is patchy. In addition, infiltration or injection of nutrient-laden water has the potential to spread and drive contaminants downward to the saturated zone. For these reasons, there are uncertainties regarding the feasibility of bioremediation of recalcitrant contaminants in deep vadose zones. The objectives of this study were to investigate the occurrence of denitrifying activity and gaseous carbon-utilizing activity in arid-climate deep vadose zone sediments contaminated with, and/or affected by past exposure to, carbon tetrachloride (CT). These metabolisms are known to degrade CT and/or its breakdown product chloroform under anoxic conditions. A second objective was to determine if CT would be degraded in these sediments under unsaturated, bulk-phase aerobic incubation conditions. Both denitrifier population (determined by MPN) and microbial heterotrophic activity (measured by mineralization of 14-C labeled glucose and acetate) were relatively low and the sediments with greater in situ moisture (10-21% versus 2-7%) tended to have higher activities. When sediments were amended with gaseous nutrients (nitrous oxide and triethyl/tributyl phosphate) and gaseous C sources (a mixture of methane, ethane, propylene, propane, and butane) and incubated for 6 months, approximately 50% of the samples showed removal of one or more gaseous C sources, with butane most commonly used (44% of samples), followed by propylene (42%), propane (31%), ethane (22%), and methane (4%). Gaseous N and gaseous P did not stimulate removal of gaseous C substrates compared to no addition of N and P. CT and gaseous C sources were spiked into the sediments that removed gaseous C sources to determine if hydrocarbon-degraders have the potential to degrade CT under unsaturated conditions. In summary, gaseous C sources

  17. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Part 1. Evaluation of Phase 2 CO2 Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2. Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bowersox, Richard; Hickman, John; Leetaru, Hannes

    2012-12-20

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO2 in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO2 storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO2 were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO2 was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole – including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite – at 1152–2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO2 was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter.

  18. Sulfur isotope profiles in the pelagic Panthalassic deep sea during the Permian-Triassic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Kaiho, Kunio; Hori, Rie S.; Gorjan, Paul; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yamakita, Satoshi; Aita, Yoshiaki; Takemura, Atsushi; Spörli, K. Bernhard; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Oba, Masahiro

    2013-06-01

    Mesozoic accretionary complexes in Japan and New Zealand contain Panthalassic low latitude and southern mid-latitude deep-water sedimentary rock respectively. These sedimentary rocks record environmental changes in the pelagic Panthalassic Ocean during the transition associated with the severe Permian-Triassic mass extinction. This study presents sulfur isotope records of sulfide from continuous deep-sea Permian-Triassic boundary sections located in northeast Japan (the Akkamori section-2, the most continuous section among other previously reported deep-sea sections) and North Island of New Zealand (the Waiheke-1 section, providing the first sulfur isotopic record from a southern hemisphere deep-sea section). Both sections show sharp ~ 15‰ drops of the sulfur isotope ratio coupled with a negative shift of organic carbon isotope ratio. Similar decreases in sulfur isotope ratio of carbonate-associated sulfates by ~ 10‰ accompanied with a negative shift of inorganic carbon isotope ratio at the end-Permian mass extinction horizon have been reported in some shallow water Paleotethyan sections. These sulfur isotope changes suggest that a massive release of 32S-enriched sulfur from the H2S-rich water to the oxic surface-waters coincided with the end-Permian mass extinction.

  19. Electron bunch profile reconstruction based on phase-constrained iterative algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkali Taheri, F.; Konoplev, I. V.; Doucas, G.; Baddoo, P.; Bartolini, R.; Cowley, J.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    The phase retrieval problem occurs in a number of areas in physics and is the subject of continuing investigation. The one-dimensional case, e.g., the reconstruction of the temporal profile of a charged particle bunch, is particularly challenging and important for particle accelerators. Accurate knowledge of the longitudinal (time) profile of the bunch is important in the context of linear colliders, wakefield accelerators and for the next generation of light sources, including x-ray SASE FELs. Frequently applied methods, e.g., minimal phase retrieval or other iterative algorithms, are reliable if the Blaschke phase contribution is negligible. This, however, is neither known a priori nor can it be assumed to apply to an arbitrary bunch profile. We present a novel approach which gives reproducible, most-probable and stable reconstructions for bunch profiles (both artificial and experimental) that would otherwise remain unresolved by the existing techniques.

  20. Surface profiling of turbine blade using phase-shifting Talbot interferometric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Saba; Shakher, Chandra

    2004-08-01

    In this paper we present phase shifting Talbot interferometric technique to draw the profile of the gas turbine blade. In Talbot interferometry phase shifting is implemented by giving in-plane translation to first grating by using precision translation stage. To obtain the phase connected with the object, the additional phase change stepwise, with a step of π/2 at least three times is introduced and the intensity patterns corresponding to these steps are recorded as Talbot interferometric fringes pattern. Experimentally recorded interferograms have noise due to grating lines and speckles. These noises are filtered by using Fourier filtering technique. The phase map made by using Fourier filtered data. Height variations/profile of the gas turbine blades made by using phase shifting Talbot Interferometry are compared with the results obtained from Co-ordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) having coordinate measurement facility with the resolution of 1μm. The results are in good agreement.

  1. Origin of deep crystal reflections: seismic profiling across high-grade metamorphic terranes in Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, A.; Milkereit, B.; Percival, J.; Davidson, A.; Parrish, R.; Cook, F.; Geis, W.; Cannon, W.; Hutchinson, D.; West, G.; Clowes, R.

    1990-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand the origin of deep crustal reflections LITHOPROBE has sponsored or co-sponsored Seismic reflection surveys across tracts of high-grade metamorphic rock in the Archean Superior craton, the Proterozoic Grenville orogen and the Phanerozoic Cordilleran orogen. Common to these three diverse terranes are near-surface zones of prominent Seismic reflectivity that are typically associated with velocity discontinuities at highly strained contacts between gneissic rocks of varying lithology. At some locations the reflective layering resulted from transposition and rearrangement of previously layered rocks (stratified assemblages, sills, etc.), whereas in other regions it was generated by extreme attenuation, stretching and ductile flow of weakly layered or irregularly organized rocks. It seems likely that compositionally layered gneissic rock is a common source of reflections in the deep crust, with reflections originating at lithological boundaries and zones of mylonite. ?? 1990.

  2. Elasticity of superhydrous phase B, seismic anomalies in cold slabs and implications for deep water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Angelika D.; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Wang, Jingyun; Saikia, Ashima

    2015-06-01

    Seismic anomalies in the vicinity of cold slabs, including low velocity zones and enhanced seismic shear wave splitting have been commonly attributed to the presence of hydrated slab material. The dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) superhydrous phase B (ShyB, Mg10Si3H4O18) is considered an important water carrier to transition zone depth due to its large pressure stability and abundance (up to 20 vol.%) in hydrous peridotites. To interpret the observed seismic anomalies in terms of hydration and to assess the role of ShyB in deep water recycling, we have investigated the sound velocities and single-crystal elasticity of ShyB to pressures of 17.5 GPa at ambient temperature by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy in diamond anvil cells. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill averages for the adiabatic bulk moduli KS, shear moduli μ and their pressure derivatives yield KS = 150(2) GPa, μ = 99(1) GPa, (∂KS/∂P) = 4.7(2) and (∂μ/∂P) = 1.44(5). The aggregate compressional and shear wave velocities of ShyB at transition zone pressures are comparable to those of hydrous iron-bearing ringwoodite but are significantly lower than anhydrous phases in peridotites. The calculated velocity contrast between dry and ShyB-bearing hydrous peridotite (containing 1.2 wt.% of water) indicate that 17 vol.% of ShyB decreases both compressional VP and shear VS wave velocities by at most 2.5% at transition zone depths. Our results, combined with data for the deformation mechanisms of ShyB, indicate that ShyB aggregates develop strong textures under down-dip compression regime and yield a maximum shear wave splitting of 1.1% in the plane perpendicular to the compression axis at 17.5 GPa. Although ShyB in hydrous subducted peridotite would reduce its seismic velocities, the splitting geometry VSV > VSH generated by ShyB fabrics in peridotite is incompatible with the pattern observed in Tonga and Sangihe, and would require the contribution of other phases to be explained. Textured phase D is a

  3. T₂ distribution mapping profiles with phase-encode MRI.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Oleg V; Ersland, Geir; Balcom, Bruce J

    2011-03-01

    Two 1-D phase-encode sequences for T₂ mapping, namely CPMG-prepared SPRITE and spin-echo SPI, are presented and compared in terms of image quality, accuracy of T₂ measurements and the measurement time. The sequences implement two different approaches to acquiring T₂-weighted images: in the CPMG-prepared SPRITE, the T₂-weighting of magnetization precedes the spatial encoding, while in the spin-echo SPI, the T₂-weighting follows the spatial encoding. The sequences are intended primarily for T₂ mapping of fluids in porous solids, where using frequency encode techniques may be problematic either due to local gradient distortions or too short T₂. Their possible applications include monitoring fluid-flow processes in rocks, cement paste hydration, curing of rubber, filtering paramagnetic impurities and other processes accomplished by changing site-specific T₂. PMID:21239194

  4. Doppler Radar Profiler for Launch Winds at the Kennedy Space Center (Phase 1a)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request from the, NASA Technical Fellow for Flight Mechanics at Langley Research Center (LaRC), to develop a database from multiple Doppler radar wind profiler (DRWP) sources and develop data processing algorithms to construct high temporal resolution DRWP wind profiles for day-of-launch (DOL) vehicle assessment. This document contains the outcome of Phase 1a of the assessment including Findings, Observations, NESC Recommendations, and Lessons Learned.

  5. Crustal profile of mountain belt: COCORP deep seismic reflection profiling in New England Appalachians and implications for architecture of convergent mountain chains

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, C.J.; Brown, L.D.; Cheadle, M.J.; Cook, F.A.; Czuchra, B.L.; Kaufman, S.; Klemperer, S.L.; Oliver, J.E.; Rosenfeld, J.L.; Thompson, J.B.

    1984-07-01

    COCORP deep seismic reflection profiles from the New England Appalachians display some fundamental changes in crustal geometry from exterior to more interior parts of the mountain belt. Relatively shallow reflections from beneath the Taconic allochthon and Green Mountain anticlinorium are suggested to mark a zone of detachment that carries Precambrian Grenville basement of the Green Mountains in its upper plate. The data strongly suggest that tectonic thickening of the shelf sedimentary and synorogenic flysch sequence beneath the Taconic allochthon has occurred, and that major thrust-fault systems (Champlain thrust of western Vermont), which imbricate shelf lithologies, project downplunge into the seismic profile. Eastward-dipping reflections beneath the east flank of the Green Mountains appear to project in the subsurface across the Connecticut River valley into New Hampshire. Because some of these reflections can be projected into an exposed zone of probable thrust-imbricated Precambrian Grenville basement and younger metasediments, there is a strong implication that similar rock types exist in the deeper crust beneath New Hampshire.

  6. Phases and Interfaces from Real Space Atomically Resolved Data: Physics-Based Deep Data Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-09-14

    Advances in electron and scanning probe microscopies have led to a wealth of atomically resolved structural and electronic data, often with ∼1-10 pm precision. However, knowledge generation from such data requires the development of a physics-based robust framework to link the observed structures to macroscopic chemical and physical descriptors, including single phase regions, order parameter fields, interfaces, and structural and topological defects. Here, we develop an approach based on a synergy of sliding window Fourier transform to capture the local analog of traditional structure factors combined with blind linear unmixing of the resultant 4D data set. This deep data analysis is ideally matched to the underlying physics of the problem and allows reconstruction of the a priori unknown structure factors of individual components and their spatial localization. We demonstrate the principles of this approach using a synthetic data set and further apply it for extracting chemical and physically relevant information from electron and scanning tunneling microscopy data. This method promises to dramatically speed up crystallographic analysis in atomically resolved data, paving the road toward automatic local structure-property determinations in crystalline and quasi-ordered systems, as well as systems with competing structural and electronic order parameters. PMID:27517608

  7. Phases and Interfaces from Real Space Atomically Resolved Data: Physics-Based Deep Data Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-09-14

    Advances in electron and scanning probe microscopies have led to a wealth of atomically resolved structural and electronic data, often with ∼1-10 pm precision. However, knowledge generation from such data requires the development of a physics-based robust framework to link the observed structures to macroscopic chemical and physical descriptors, including single phase regions, order parameter fields, interfaces, and structural and topological defects. Here, we develop an approach based on a synergy of sliding window Fourier transform to capture the local analog of traditional structure factors combined with blind linear unmixing of the resultant 4D data set. This deep data analysis is ideally matched to the underlying physics of the problem and allows reconstruction of the a priori unknown structure factors of individual components and their spatial localization. We demonstrate the principles of this approach using a synthetic data set and further apply it for extracting chemical and physically relevant information from electron and scanning tunneling microscopy data. This method promises to dramatically speed up crystallographic analysis in atomically resolved data, paving the road toward automatic local structure-property determinations in crystalline and quasi-ordered systems, as well as systems with competing structural and electronic order parameters.

  8. Phases and interfaces from real space atomically resolved data: Physics-based deep data image analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vasudevan, Rama K.; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-08-12

    Advances in electron and scanning probe microscopies have led to a wealth of atomically resolved structural and electronic data, often with ~1–10 pm precision. However, knowledge generation from such data requires the development of a physics-based robust framework to link the observed structures to macroscopic chemical and physical descriptors, including single phase regions, order parameter fields, interfaces, and structural and topological defects. Here, we develop an approach based on a synergy of sliding window Fourier transform to capture the local analog of traditional structure factors combined with blind linear unmixing of the resultant 4D data set. This deep data analysismore » is ideally matched to the underlying physics of the problem and allows reconstruction of the a priori unknown structure factors of individual components and their spatial localization. We demonstrate the principles of this approach using a synthetic data set and further apply it for extracting chemical and physically relevant information from electron and scanning tunneling microscopy data. Furthermore, this method promises to dramatically speed up crystallographic analysis in atomically resolved data, paving the road toward automatic local structure–property determinations in crystalline and quasi-ordered systems, as well as systems with competing structural and electronic order parameters.« less

  9. Speedup properties of phases in the execution profile of distributed parallel programs

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.M.; Wagner, T.D.; Dowdy, L.W.; Worley, P.H.

    1992-08-01

    The execution profile of a distributed-memory parallel program specifies the number of busy processors as a function of time. Periods of homogeneous processor utilization are manifested in many execution profiles. These periods can usually be correlated with the algorithms implemented in the underlying parallel code. Three families of methods for smoothing execution profile data are presented. These approaches simplify the problem of detecting end points of periods of homogeneous utilization. These periods, called phases, are then examined in isolation, and their speedup characteristics are explored. A specific workload executed on an Intel iPSC/860 is used for validation of the techniques described.

  10. MiRNA Expression Profile for the Human Gastric Antrum Region Using Ultra-Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hamoy, Igor G.; Darnet, Sylvain; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Gonçalves, André Nicolau; Alencar, Dayse O.; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Araújo Jr., Wilson; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small non-coding nucleotide sequences that regulate gene expression. These structures are fundamental to several biological processes, including cell proliferation, development, differentiation and apoptosis. Identifying the expression profile of microRNAs in healthy human gastric antrum mucosa may help elucidate the miRNA regulatory mechanisms of the human stomach. Methodology/Principal Findings A small RNA library of stomach antrum tissue was sequenced using high-throughput SOLiD sequencing technology. The total read count for the gastric mucosa antrum region was greater than 618,000. After filtering and aligning using with MirBase, 148 mature miRNAs were identified in the gastric antrum tissue, totaling 3,181 quality reads; 63.5% (2,021) of the reads were concentrated in the eight most highly expressed miRNAs (hsa-mir-145, hsa-mir-29a, hsa-mir-29c, hsa-mir-21, hsa-mir-451a, hsa-mir-192, hsa-mir-191 and hsa-mir-148a). RT-PCR validated the expression profiles of seven of these highly expressed miRNAs and confirmed the sequencing results obtained using the SOLiD platform. Conclusions/Significance In comparison with other tissues, the antrum’s expression profile was unique with respect to the most highly expressed miRNAs, suggesting that this expression profile is specific to stomach antrum tissue. The current study provides a starting point for a more comprehensive understanding of the role of miRNAs in the regulation of the molecular processes of the human stomach. PMID:24647245

  11. Cell and Microvesicle Urine microRNA Deep Sequencing Profiles from Healthy Individuals: Observations with Potential Impact on Biomarker Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Dov, Iddo Z.; Whalen, Veronica M.; Goilav, Beatrice; Max, Klaas E. A.; Tuschl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Urine is a potential source of biomarkers for diseases of the kidneys and urinary tract. RNA, including microRNA, is present in the urine enclosed in detached cells or in extracellular vesicles (EVs) or bound and protected by extracellular proteins. Detection of cell- and disease-specific microRNA in urine may aid early diagnosis of organ-specific pathology. In this study, we applied barcoded deep sequencing to profile microRNAs in urine of healthy volunteers, and characterized the effects of sex, urine fraction (cells vs. EVs) and repeated voids by the same individuals. Results Compared to urine-cell-derived small RNA libraries, urine-EV-derived libraries were relatively enriched with miRNA, and accordingly had lesser content of other small RNA such as rRNA, tRNA and sn/snoRNA. Unsupervised clustering of specimens in relation to miRNA expression levels showed prominent bundling by specimen type (urine cells or EVs) and by sex, as well as a tendency of repeated (first and second void) samples to neighbor closely. Likewise, miRNA profile correlations between void repeats, as well as fraction counterparts (cells and EVs from the same specimen) were distinctly higher than correlations between miRNA profiles overall. Differential miRNA expression by sex was similar in cells and EVs. Conclusions miRNA profiling of both urine EVs and sediment cells can convey biologically important differences between individuals. However, to be useful as urine biomarkers, careful consideration is needed for biofluid fractionation and sex-specific analysis, while the time of voiding appears to be less important. PMID:26785265

  12. Identification of an inflammatory bowel disease patient with a deep vein thrombosis and an altered clot lysis profile.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Lize; Wuyts, Joke; Vermeire, Séverine; Gils, Ann

    2016-03-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by flares and remission, are prone to develop thrombosis. The mechanism behind this prothrombotic state is not completely understood but is definitely multifactorial and linked with excessive inflammation observed in these patients. So far, no biomarker exists to select among IBD patients those with and increased risk for thrombosis. Corticosteroid therapy, given as rescue IBD treatment, is known to increase the thrombotic risk, whereas for antitumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha therapy such as infliximab, given to induce and maintain remission in IBD, the results are inconclusive. Here, we describe a 31-year-old IBD patient who developed a deep vein thrombosis. We determined the clot lysis profiles before and after developing thrombosis. We showed that a global functional clot lysis assay can be used as a tool to identify IBD patients who may benefit from thromboprophylactic therapy. PMID:26378816

  13. SinoProbe-02: Deep Seismic Reflection Profiling of the Bangong Suture and Qiangtang terrane in central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Chen, C.; Gao, R.; Brown, L.; Xiong, X.; Li, W.; Deng, G.

    2010-12-01

    The Bangong Suture represents the tectonic junction between the two primary terranes of the Tibetan Plateau- the Lhasa block and the Qiangtang terrane.This suture was originally formed during a Jurassic collision of these two terranes,but has retained considerably significance as the suspect surface position of the buried mantle suture between Indian and Asian lithosphere that formed during Himalayan collision.As a corollary,these terranes have been associated with very different styles of mantle tectonics,perhaps as a result of mantle delamination beneath the Qiangtang.There have been a number of attempts to probe the deep structure of both the suture and its flanking terranes with refraction and teleseismic methods.Here we report the results of the first multichannel seismic reflection profile across this critical region.Deep seismic reflection method is internationally recognized as a pioneering technology for imaging crustal details,and it has been successfully applied in Southern Tibetan plateau in early 1990s.From October 2009 to May 2010,SinoProbe collected 310 km of a deep seismic reflection profile crossing BNS,successfully revealing structural details down to the Moho and possible deeper.The profile starts west of Silin Co in the northern Lhasa block,crosses the Bangong-Nujiang suture west of Lunpola,skirts the eastern extension of the central Qiantang anticline and ends at Dogai Coring just of south of Jinsha suture.The survey used explosive sources with variable shot size to insure adequate imaging of both the upper and lower crust.In the southern part of the profile,small shots of 50kg explosive were placed at 30m depth at 250m spacing,augmented by larger shots of 200kg t 50m depth spaced every 1km.In addition,large shots of 1000kg were placed every 50km.In the middle and north part,only 200 kg shots at 500m spacing along with the big shots.A linear array of receivers was used with a group interval of 50 m.The data was acquired by Sercel 408 XL using

  14. Gene expression profiling of Sinapis alba leaves under drought stress and rewatering growth conditions with Illumina deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cai-Hua; Li, Chen; Yan, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Shun-Mou; Huang, Jin-Yong; Wang, Li-Jun; Guo, Rui-Xing; Lu, Guang-Yuan; Zhang, Xue-Kun; Fang, Xiao-Ping; Wei, Wen-Hui

    2012-05-01

    Sinapis alba has many desirable agronomic traits including tolerance to drought. In this investigation, we performed the genome-wide transcriptional profiling of S. alba leaves under drought stress and rewatering growth conditions in an attempt to identify candidate genes involved in drought tolerance, using the Illumina deep sequencing technology. The comparative analysis revealed numerous changes in gene expression level attributable to the drought stress, which resulted in the down-regulation of 309 genes and the up-regulation of 248 genes. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in cell division and catalytic and metabolic processes. Our results provide useful information for further analyses of the drought stress tolerance in Sinapis, and will facilitate molecular breeding for Brassica crop plants. PMID:22207172

  15. Deep structure and structural inversion along the central California continental margin from EDGE seismic profile RU-3

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, K.D.; Reed, D.L.; Silver, E.A. ); Meltzer, A.S. )

    1991-04-10

    Deep-penetration seismic reflection profile RU-3 reveals a subducted oceanic plate, a modified accretionary prism, and complex structures of the overlying sedimentary basins. This structural framework was established by subduction processes during Paleogene and earlier time and subsequently was modified by Neogene transform motion combined with apparent components of extension and compression. Subducted rocks are indicated by deep, gently dipping reflectors that extend beneath the continental margin for at least 38 km at a depth of about 15 km. The authors interpret the subducted crust as either a part of the Pacific plate or, more likely, a subducted fragment derived from the Farallon plate. A set of more steeply dipping, deep events may indicate faulting within the subducted plate or its boundary with a no-slab zone. The overlying, largely nonreflective layer of accreted material rapidly reaches 10 km in thickness landward of the paleotrench and increases to 15 km in thickness near the coast. The Santa Lucia Basin, landward of the steep continental slope, originated as a slope basin during Paleogene subduction. The lower strata of this basin were deposited onto and partially incorporated into the accretionary complex. The offshore Santa Maria Basin exhibits a variety of compressional structures that formed in the last 3.5 m.y. and whose locations correspond to an earlier framework of extensional faults. Structural inversion has occurred in Miocene depocenters adjacent to the Santa Lucia Bank fault and at the Queenie structure. Miocene and lower Pliocene strata also thicken toward the Hosgri fault zone where subsequent compression is characterized by low-angle thrusts and folding.

  16. Early origins of the Caribbean plate from deep seismic profiles across the Nicaraguan Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    The offshore Nicaraguan Rise in the maritime zones of Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua and Colombia covers a combined area of 500,000 km2, and is one of the least known equatorial Cretaceous-Cenozoic carbonate regions remaining on Earth. The purpose of this study is to describe the Cretaceous to Recent tectonic and stratigraphic history of the deep water Nicaraguan Rise, and to better understand how various types of crustal blocks underlying the Eocene to Recent carbonate cover fused into a single, larger Caribbean plate known today from GPS studies. We interpreted 8700 km of modern, deep-penetration 2D seismic data kindly provided by the oil industry, tied to five wells that penetrated Cretaceous igneous basement. Based on these data, and integration with gravity, magnetic and existing crustal refraction data, we define four crustal provinces for the offshore Nicaraguan Rise: 1) Thicker (15-18 km) Late Cretaceous Caribbean ocean plateau (COP) with rough, top basement surface; 2) normal (6-8 km) Late Cretaceous COP with smooth top basement surface (B") and correlative outcrops in southern Haiti and Jamaica; 3) Precambrian-Paleozoic continental crust (20-22 km thick) with correlative outcrops in northern Central America; and 4) Cretaceous arc crust (>18 km thick) with correlative outcrops in Jamaica. These strongly contrasting basement belts strike northeastward to eastward, and were juxtaposed by latest Cretaceous-Paleogene northward and northwestward thrusting of Caribbean arc over continental crust in Central America, and the western Nicaraguan Rise (84 to 85 degrees west). A large Paleogene to recent, CCW rotation of the Caribbean plate along the Cayman trough faults and into its present day location explains why terranes in Central America and beneath the Nicaraguan Rise have their present, anomalous north-east strike. Continuing, present-day activity on some of these crustal block boundaries is a likely result of intraplate stresses imposed by the surrounding

  17. Resistivity profile of mountain slopes after deep catastrophic landslides caused by earthquake in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isshiki, Hiromitsu; Takahara, Teruyoshi; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Ishiduka, Tadanori

    2014-05-01

    An airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey can be used to estimate the resistivity structure underground by measuring the electromagnetic induction. An AEM survey can quickly obtain the resistivity in the depth direction for a wide area. The resistivity varies with the type of rock, water saturation, porosity, and clay mineral content. This study targeted the deep catastrophic landslide (DCL) triggered by the Iwate-Miyagi Inland Earthquake in 2008 on the slopes of Mt. Kurikoma, which is an active volcano in northeastern Japan. Fluidized material slid down the slope and struck a small spa, resulting in the loss of human life. When considering mitigation measures, it is important to predict those slopes where DCLs might occur. This study estimated the scale of the slopes at risk of DCLs. First, we conducted a field survey and confirmed the distribution of geological conditions and collapse. Soft altered tuff breccia was spread over the entire slope, while andesite covered a head cliff on the upper slope. It was thought that the DCL occurred at the andesite cap rock, at the slip plane boundary of the andesite and altered tuff breccia. Next, we conducted an AEM survey over a wide area, including the landslide. While the specific resistance of the uncollapsed zone was ≥ 400 Ω-m, that of the collapsed zone was ≤ 100-200 Ω-m. Finally, comparing the results of the field and AEM surveys, the spatial distribution of the specific resistivity roughly corresponded to the underground geological setting, such as andesite cap rock. Based on the distribution of the high-resistivity zone, the slopes at risk of deep-seated landslides and the collapsed soil layer thickness could be estimated. In conclusion, in order to evaluate the risk of a DCL, it is necessary consider underground information. An AEM survey is a practical method for evaluating the risk of a DCL.

  18. Phase diagram of deep rough mutant lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota R595.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, K; Koch, M H; Seydel, U

    1992-01-01

    The structural polymorphism of deep rough mutant lipopolysaccharide--in many biological systems the most active endotoxin--from Salmonella minnesota strain R595 was investigated as function of temperature, water content, and Mg2+ concentration. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to determine the amount of bound water and the enthalpy change at the beta<==>alpha gel to liquid crystalline acyl chain melting. The onset, midtemperature Tc, and completion of the beta<==>alpha phase transition were studied with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction was used to characterize the supramolecular three-dimensional structures in each phase state. The results indicate an extremely complex dependence of the structural behavior of LPS on ambient conditions. The beta<==>alpha acyl chain melting temperature Tc lying at 30 degrees C at high water content (95%) increases with decreasing water content reaching a value of 50 degrees C at 30% water content. Concomitantly, a broadening of the transition range takes place. At still lower water content, no distinct phase transition can be observed. This behavior is even more clearly expressed in the presence of Mg2+. In the lower water concentration range (< 50%) at temperatures below 70 degrees C, only lamellar structures can be observed independent of the Mg2+ concentration. This correlates with the absence of free water. Above 50% water concentration, the supramolecular structure below 70 degrees C strongly depends on the [LPS]:[Mg2+] ratio. For large [LPS]:[Mg2+] ratios, the predominant structure is nonlamellar, for smaller [LPS]:[Mg2+] ratios there is a superposition of lamellar and nonlamellar structures. At an equimolar ratio of LPS and Mg2+ a multibilayered organization is observed. The nonlamellar structures can be assigned in various cases to structures with cubic symmetry with periodicities between 12 and 16 nm. Under all investigated conditions, a transition into the hexagonal

  19. Deep-blue supercontinnum sources with optimum taper profiles--verification of GAM.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, S T; Møller, U; Larsen, C; Moselund, P M; Jakobsen, C; Johansen, J; Andersen, T V; Thomsen, C L; Bang, O

    2012-05-01

    We use an asymmetric 2 m draw-tower photonic crystal fiber taper to demonstrate that the taper profile needs careful optimisation if you want to develop a supercontinuum light source with as much power as possible in the blue edge of the spectrum. In particular we show, that for a given taper length, the downtapering should be as long as possible. We argue how this may be explained by the concept of group-acceleration mismatch (GAM) and we confirm the results using conventional symmetrical short tapers made on a taper station, which have varying downtapering lengths. PMID:22565689

  20. Transcurrent nature of the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone in Central Europe: results of the POLCRUST-01 deep reflection seismic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narkiewicz, M.; Maksym, A.; Malinowski, M.; Grad, M.; Guterch, A.; Petecki, Z.; Probulski, J.; Janik, T.; Majdański, M.; Środa, P.; Czuba, W.; Gaczyński, E.; Jankowski, L.

    2015-04-01

    Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) corresponds to a crustal boundary between the Precambrian East European Platform (EEP) and the Palaeozoic West European Platform. Although the zone has been controlling Phanerozoic evolution of large parts of Central Europe, its course, geometry and origin are still poorly constrained. Deep reflection seismic profile POLCRUST-01, recently acquired in SE Poland, for the first time allowed a precise comparison of the Ediacaran and later tectonic patterns to the deep crustal features of the TTZ and adjacent areas. The TTZ corresponds to the subvertical Tomaszów Fault separating the Radom-Kraśnik Elevation, composed of the typical EEP crust, from the Biłgoraj-Narol Block (BNB) in the SW, with a thinned crystalline basement showing affinities to the EEP crust. The BNB is a part of the larger Caledonian Łysogóry Terrane as evidenced by its Lower Palaeozoic stratigraphy and gravity data. Thus, for the first time, the proximal Baltican affinity of this unit has been documented unambiguously. The Łysogóry Terrane is delimited from the SW by the subvertical Cieszanów Fault Zone, corresponding to the Holy Cross Suture. The adjacent Małopolska Terrane is characterized by a distinct Early Palaeozoic stratigraphy, and lower-middle crust exhibiting SW-dipping reflective packages interpreted as NE-verging thrust and shear zones of a Neoproterozoic orogen. The observations from the POLCRUST-01 profile and regional comparisons indicate that the TTZ is a major Caledonian transcurrent zone between Poland and East Romania. In central Poland, the TTZ likely forms a narrow subvertical contact between the EEP and a proximal Kuiavia Terrane, as constrained by the deep refraction seismic data. To the NW, the zone extends towards the Pomeranian part of the Caledonide fold-and-thrust belt related to the Avalonia-Baltica collision zone (Thor Suture). South-east of Poland the TTZ corresponds to the Rava Ruska Fault Zone established as a Caledonian suture

  1. Metabolomic profiling reveals deep chemical divergence between two morphotypes of the zoanthid Parazoanthus axinellae

    PubMed Central

    Cachet, Nadja; Genta-Jouve, Grégory; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Chevaldonné, Pierre; Sinniger, Frédéric; Culioli, Gérald; Pérez, Thierry; Thomas, Olivier P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics has recently proven its usefulness as complementary tool to traditional morphological and genetic analyses for the classification of marine invertebrates. Among the metabolite-rich cnidarian order Zoantharia, Parazoanthus is a polyphyletic genus whose systematics and phylogeny remain controversial. Within this genus, one of the most studied species, Parazoanthus axinellae is prominent in rocky shallow waters of the Mediterranean Sea and the NE Atlantic Ocean. Although different morphotypes can easily be distinguished, only one species is recognized to date. Here, a metabolomic profiling approach has been used to assess the chemical diversity of two main Mediterranean morphotypes, the “slender” and “stocky” forms of P. axinellae. Targeted profiling of their major secondary metabolites revealed a significant chemical divergence between the morphotypes. While zoanthoxanthin alkaloids and ecdysteroids are abundant in both morphs, the “slender” morphotype is characterized by the presence of additional and bioactive 3,5-disubstituted hydantoin derivatives named parazoanthines. The absence of these specific compounds in the “stocky” morphotype was confirmed by spatial and temporal monitoring over an annual cycle. Moreover, specimens of the “slender” morphotype are also the only ones found as epibionts of several sponge species, particularly Cymbaxinella damicornis thus suggesting a putative ecological link. PMID:25655432

  2. Metabolomic profiling reveals deep chemical divergence between two morphotypes of the zoanthid Parazoanthus axinellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachet, Nadja; Genta-Jouve, Grégory; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Chevaldonné, Pierre; Sinniger, Frédéric; Culioli, Gérald; Pérez, Thierry; Thomas, Olivier P.

    2015-02-01

    Metabolomics has recently proven its usefulness as complementary tool to traditional morphological and genetic analyses for the classification of marine invertebrates. Among the metabolite-rich cnidarian order Zoantharia, Parazoanthus is a polyphyletic genus whose systematics and phylogeny remain controversial. Within this genus, one of the most studied species, Parazoanthus axinellae is prominent in rocky shallow waters of the Mediterranean Sea and the NE Atlantic Ocean. Although different morphotypes can easily be distinguished, only one species is recognized to date. Here, a metabolomic profiling approach has been used to assess the chemical diversity of two main Mediterranean morphotypes, the ``slender'' and ``stocky'' forms of P. axinellae. Targeted profiling of their major secondary metabolites revealed a significant chemical divergence between the morphotypes. While zoanthoxanthin alkaloids and ecdysteroids are abundant in both morphs, the ``slender'' morphotype is characterized by the presence of additional and bioactive 3,5-disubstituted hydantoin derivatives named parazoanthines. The absence of these specific compounds in the ``stocky'' morphotype was confirmed by spatial and temporal monitoring over an annual cycle. Moreover, specimens of the ``slender'' morphotype are also the only ones found as epibionts of several sponge species, particularly Cymbaxinella damicornis thus suggesting a putative ecological link.

  3. Dose-dependent targeted knockout methodology combined with deep structure elucidation strategies for Chinese licorice chemical profiling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Chai, Xin; Jiang, Miaomiao; Shan, Lihua

    2015-11-10

    One of the limitations with regards to the chemical profiling of Chinese herbs is that low-level compounds are masked by high-level structures. Here, we established a novel methodology based on a dose-dependent targeted knockout (DDTK) technique combined with deep structure elucidation strategies to allow the chemical profiling of Chinese licorice. We employed ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q/TOF MS) incorporated with the DDTK technique to identify the compounds in different concentration samples and found that the compounds at the high- or medium-level were detected readily in the sample at a low concentration; subsequently, minor or trace-level constituents were identified in the sample at a high concentration by rejecting high-level constituents detected in the sample at a low concentration based on a heart-cutting technique during analysis. In this study, among the 232 compounds detected, 27 compounds were unequivocally identified and 165 compounds, including 29 new compounds and two new natural products, were tentatively characterized. The novel methodology established in this work paves the way the further identification of compounds from complicated mixtures, especially traditional Chinese medicines.

  4. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, Phase II, Post-Secondary Education Profile: Abstract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    The material presented in this booklet represents a condensation of materials developed under the Post-Secondary Education Profile phase of the National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment. The final report of the study consisted of 16 volumes which are summarized. The following topics are covered: air, energy, noise, pesticides, potable…

  5. Surface energy from order parameter profile: At the QCD phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frei, Z.; Patkos, A.

    1989-01-01

    The order parameter profile between coexisting confined and plasma regions at the quantum chromodynamic (QCD) phase transition is constructed. The dimensionless combination of the surface energy (Sigma) and the correlation length (Zeta) is estimated to be Sigma Zeta 3 approximately equals 0.8.

  6. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals. Job Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Conway, T. J.; Tobey, D. H.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Dalton, Angela C.; Pusey, Portia K.

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Job Profiles. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  7. Detection of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-beta plaque deposition by deep brain impedance profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Fraering, Patrick C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. Toxic brain amyloid-beta (Aß) aggregates and ensuing cell death are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we investigated if we could monitor the presence of these aggregates by performing in situ electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in AD model mice brains. Approach. In this study, electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed post-mortem in APPPS1 transgenic mice brains. This transgenic model is commonly used to study amyloidogenesis, a pathological hallmark of AD. We used flexible probes with embedded micrometric electrodes array to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting senile plaques composed of Aß peptides by localized impedance measurements. Main results. We particularly focused on deep brain structures, such as the hippocampus. Ex vivo experiments using brains from young and old APPPS1 mice lead us to show that impedance measurements clearly correlate with the percentage of Aβ plaque load in the brain tissues. We could monitor the effects of aging in the AD APPPS1 mice model. Significance. We demonstrated that a localized electrical impedance measurement constitutes a valuable technique to monitor the presence of Aβ-plaques, which is complementary with existing imaging techniques. This method does not require prior Aβ staining, precluding the risk of variations in tissue uptake of dyes or tracers, and consequently ensuring reproducible data collection.

  8. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein with deep eutectic solvent immobilized magnetic graphene oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi; Ding, Xueqin; Huang, Yanhua; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    As a new type of green solvent, four kinds of choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized, and then a core-shell structure magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4-NH2@GO) nanoparticles have been prepared and coated with the ChCl-based DESs. Magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) based Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES was studied for the first time for the extraction of proteins. The characteristic results of vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES. The concentrations of proteins in studies were determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The advantages of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES in protein extraction were compared with Fe3O4-NH2@GO and Fe3O4-NH2, and Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol was selected as the suitable extraction solvent. The influence factors of the extraction process such as the pH value, the temperature, the extraction time, the concentration of protein and the amount of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol were evaluated. Desorption experimental result showed 98.73% of BSA could be eluted from the solid extractant with 0.1 mol/L Na2HPO4 solution contained 1 mol/L NaCl. Besides, the conformation of BSA was not changed during the elution by the investigation of circular dichromism (CD) spectra. Furthermore, the analysis of real sample demonstrated that the prepared magnetic nanoparticles did have extraction ability on proteins in bovine whole blood.

  9. Deep seismic studies of conjugate profiles from the Nova Scotia - Moroccan and the Liguro-Provencal margin pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Biari, Y.; Sahabi, M.; Aslanian, D.; Philippe, S.; Schnabel, M.; Moulin, M.; Louden, K. E.; Funck, T.; Reichert, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The structure of conjugate passive margins provides information about rifting styles, opening of an ocean and formation of it's associated sedimentary basins. In order to distinguish between tectonic inheritance and structures directly related to rifting of passive margins conjugate profiles have to be acquired on margins on diverse locations and different ages. In this study we use new and existing reflection and wide-angle seismic data from two margin pairs, the 200 Ma year old Nova-Scotia - Morocco margin pair and the only 20 Ma Gulf of Lions - Sardinia margin pair. On both margin pairs wide-angle seismic data combined with reflection seismic data were acquired on conjugate profiles on sea and extended on land. Forward modelling of the deep crustal structure along the four transects indicates that a high velocity zone (HVZ) (> 7.2 km/s) is present at the base of the lower crust on all four margins along the ocean-continental transition zone (OCT). This may represent either exhumed upper mantle material or injection of upper mantle material into proto-oceanic crust at the onset of sea-floor spreading. However the width of the HVZ might strongly differ between conjugates, which may be the result of tectonic inheritance, for example the presence of ancient subduction zones or orogens. Both margin pairs show a similar unthinned continental crustal thickness. Crustal thinning and upper-to-lower crustal thickness vary between margin pairs, but remain nearly symmetric on conjugate profiles and might therefore depend on the structure and mechanical properties of the original continental crust. For the Mediterranean margin pair, the oceanic crust is similar on both sides, with a thickness of only 4-5 km. For the Atlantic margin pair, oceanic crustal thickness is higher on the Moroccan Margin, a fact that can be explained by either asymmetric spreading or by the volcanic underplating, possibly originating from the Canary Hot Spot.

  10. Reproducible vapor-time profiles using solid-phase microextraction with an externally sampled internal standard.

    PubMed

    MacCrehan, William; Moore, Stephanie; Schantz, Michele

    2012-06-29

    Determination of the dynamic nature of vapor/odor release has application in a wide variety of systems. This study applies automated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) utilizing an externally sampled internal standard (ESIS) to determine the vapor-time profile of odor delivery devices for three classes of explosive compounds. The profiles of delivery systems for target odorants 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2-EH), and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) as canine training aids were compared over a period of 70 h. Strategies for evaluating the vapor-time profile of components with widely differing volatility are considered. An approach to quantifying the vapor concentration is described. The differences in the vapor-time profiles are examined and suggestions for selecting the best representative odor delivery technique are outlined. PMID:22633864

  11. Method development for impurity profiling in SFC: The selection of a dissimilar set of stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Galea, Charlene; Mangelings, Debby; Heyden, Yvan Vander

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is drawing considerable interest as separation technique in the pharmaceutical industry. The technique is already well established in chiral separations both analytically and on a preparative scale. The use of SFC as a technique for drug impurity profiling is examined here. To define starting conditions in method development for drug impurity profiling, a set of dissimilar stationary phases is screened in parallel. The possibility to select a set of dissimilar columns using the retention factors (k-values) for a set of 64 drugs measured on 27 columns in SFC was examined. Experiments were carried out at a back-pressure of 150 bar and 25 °C with a mobile phase consisting of CO2 and methanol with 0.1% isopropylamine (5-40% over 10 min) at a flow rate of 3 mL/min. These k-values were then used to calculate correlation coefficients on the one hand and to perform a principal component analysis on the other. The Kennard and Stone algorithm, besides dendrograms and correlation-coefficient colour maps were used to select a set of 6 dissimilar stationary phases. The stationary phase characterization results from this study were compared to those from previous studies found in the literature. Retention mechanisms for compounds possessing different properties were also evaluated. The dissimilarity of the selected subset of 6 stationary phases was validated using mixtures of compounds with similar properties and structures, as one can expect in a drug impurity profile. PMID:25630237

  12. Method development for impurity profiling in SFC: The selection of a dissimilar set of stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Galea, Charlene; Mangelings, Debby; Heyden, Yvan Vander

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is drawing considerable interest as separation technique in the pharmaceutical industry. The technique is already well established in chiral separations both analytically and on a preparative scale. The use of SFC as a technique for drug impurity profiling is examined here. To define starting conditions in method development for drug impurity profiling, a set of dissimilar stationary phases is screened in parallel. The possibility to select a set of dissimilar columns using the retention factors (k-values) for a set of 64 drugs measured on 27 columns in SFC was examined. Experiments were carried out at a back-pressure of 150 bar and 25 °C with a mobile phase consisting of CO2 and methanol with 0.1% isopropylamine (5-40% over 10 min) at a flow rate of 3 mL/min. These k-values were then used to calculate correlation coefficients on the one hand and to perform a principal component analysis on the other. The Kennard and Stone algorithm, besides dendrograms and correlation-coefficient colour maps were used to select a set of 6 dissimilar stationary phases. The stationary phase characterization results from this study were compared to those from previous studies found in the literature. Retention mechanisms for compounds possessing different properties were also evaluated. The dissimilarity of the selected subset of 6 stationary phases was validated using mixtures of compounds with similar properties and structures, as one can expect in a drug impurity profile.

  13. Creating diversified response profiles from a single quenchometric sensor element by using phase-resolved luminescence.

    PubMed

    Tehan, Elizabeth C; Bukowski, Rachel M; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Titus, Albert H; Cartwright, Alexander N; Bright, Frank V

    2015-01-05

    We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier) phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i) can become highly non-linear; (ii) yield negative going responses; (iii) can be biphasic; and (iv) can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions).

  14. Creating Diversified Response Profiles from a Single Quenchometric Sensor Element by Using Phase-Resolved Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Tehan, Elizabeth C.; Bukowski, Rachel M.; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Titus, Albert H.; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Bright, Frank V.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier) phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i) can become highly non-linear; (ii) yield negative going responses; (iii) can be biphasic; and (iv) can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions). PMID:25569752

  15. Experimental phase determination of the structure factor from Kossel line profile

    PubMed Central

    Faigel, G.; Bortel, G.; Tegze, M.

    2016-01-01

    Kossel lines are formed when radiation from point x-ray sources inside a single crystal are diffracted by the crystal itself. In principle, Kossel line patterns contain full information on the crystalline structure: phase and magnitude of the structure factors. The phase is coded into the profile of the lines. Although this was known for a long time, experimental realization has not been presented. In this work we demonstrate experimentally that phases can be directly determined from the profile of the Kossel lines. These measurements are interesting not only theoretically, but they would facilitate structure solution of samples within extreme conditions, such as high pressure, high and low temperatures, high magnetic fields and extremely short times. The parallel measurement of many diffraction lines on a stationary sample will allow a more efficient use of the new generation of x-ray sources the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). PMID:26965321

  16. Deep-sequence profiling of miRNAs and their target prediction in Monotropa hypopitys.

    PubMed

    Shchennikova, Anna V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Shulga, Olga A; Mazur, Alexander M; Prokhortchouk, Egor B; Kochieva, Elena Z; Ravin, Nikolay V; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2016-07-01

    Myco-heterotroph Monotropa hypopitys is a widely spread perennial herb used to study symbiotic interactions and physiological mechanisms underlying the development of non-photosynthetic plant. Here, we performed, for the first time, transcriptome-wide characterization of M. hypopitys miRNA profile using high throughput Illumina sequencing. As a result of small RNA library sequencing and bioinformatic analysis, we identified 55 members belonging to 40 families of known miRNAs and 17 putative novel miRNAs unique for M. hypopitys. Computational screening revealed 206 potential mRNA targets for known miRNAs and 31 potential mRNA targets for novel miRNAs. The predicted target genes were described in Gene Ontology terms and were found to be involved in a broad range of metabolic and regulatory pathways. The identification of novel M. hypopitys-specific miRNAs, some with few target genes and low abundances, suggests their recent evolutionary origin and participation in highly specialized regulatory mechanisms fundamental for non-photosynthetic biology of M. hypopitys. This global analysis of miRNAs and their potential targets in M. hypopitys provides a framework for further investigation of miRNA role in the evolution and establishment of non-photosynthetic myco-heterotrophs. PMID:27097902

  17. Kinetics of AlGaN metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy for deep-UV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanova, Anna; Yakovlev, Eugene; Jeschke, Joerg; Knauer, Arne; Weyers, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Al x Ga1- x N layers with high aluminum content of x ˜ 0.68-0.73 were grown in an 11 × 2-in. AIX 2400 G3 HT planetary reactor by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. Growth trends are analyzed by reaction-transport modeling in a wide range of growth conditions. Gas-phase nucleation resulting in both Al and Ga consumption into nanoparticles is a major mechanism affecting the growth efficiencies of AlN and GaN. Process windows suitable to grow multiple quantum wells (MQWs) for deep UV applications are found for a range of pressures, temperatures, and V/III ratios.

  18. Uncovering a Salt Giant. Deep-Sea Record of Mediterranean Messinian Events (DREAM) multi-phase drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlenghi, Angelo; Aoisi, Vanni; Lofi, Johanna; Hübscher, Christian; deLange, Gert; Flecker, Rachel; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Gorini, Christian; Gvirtzman, Zohar; Krijgsman, Wout; Lugli, Stefano; Makowsky, Yizhaq; Manzi, Vinicio; McGenity, Terry; Panieri, Giuliana; Rabineau, Marina; Roveri, Marco; Sierro, Francisco Javier; Waldmann, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    In May 2013, the DREAM MagellanPlus Workshop was held in Brisighella (Italy). The initiative builds from recent activities by various research groups to identify potential sites to perform deep-sea scientific drilling in the Mediterranean Sea across the deep Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) sedimentary record. In this workshop three generations of scientists were gathered: those who participated in formulation of the deep desiccated model, through DSDP Leg 13 drilling in 1973; those who are actively involved in present-day MSC research; and the next generation (PhD students and young post-docs). The purpose of the workshop was to identify locations for multiple-site drilling (including riser-drilling) in the Mediterranean Sea that would contribute to solve the several open questions still existing about the causes, processes, timing and consequences at local and planetary scale of an outstanding case of natural environmental change in the recent Earth history: the Messinian Salinity Crisis in the Mediterranean Sea. The product of the workshop is the identification of the structure of an experimental design of site characterization, riser-less and riser drilling, sampling, measurements, and down-hole analyses that will be the core for at least one compelling and feasible multiple phase drilling proposal. Particular focus has been given to reviewing seismic site survey data available from different research groups at pan-Mediterranean basin scale, to the assessment of additional site survey activity including 3D seismics, and to ways of establishing firm links with oil and gas industry. The scientific community behind the DREAM initiative is willing to proceed with the submission to IODP of a Multi-phase Drilling Project including several drilling proposals addressing specific drilling objectives, all linked to the driving objectives of the MSC drilling and understanding . A series of critical drilling targets were identified to address the still open questions

  19. Mass, velocity anisotropy, and pseudo phase-space density profiles of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, E.; Biviano, A.; Mamon, G. A.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: We aim to compute the mass and velocity anisotropy profiles of Abell 2142 and, from there, the pseudo phase-space density profile Q(r) and the density slope - velocity anisotropy β - γ relation, and then to compare them with theoretical expectations. Methods: The mass profiles were obtained by using three techniques based on member galaxy kinematics, namely the caustic method, the method of dispersion-kurtosis, and MAMPOSSt. Through the inversion of the Jeans equation, it was possible to compute the velocity anisotropy profiles. Results: The mass profiles, as well as the virial values of mass and radius, computed with the different techniques agree with one another and with the estimates coming from X-ray and weak lensing studies. A combined mass profile is obtained by averaging the lensing, X-ray, and kinematics determinations. The cluster mass profile is well fitted by an NFW profile with c = 4.0 ± 0.5. The population of red and blue galaxies appear to have a different velocity anisotropy configuration, since red galaxies are almost isotropic, while blue galaxies are radially anisotropic, with a weak dependence on radius. The Q(r) profile for the red galaxy population agrees with the theoretical results found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that any bias, relative to the dark matter particles, in velocity dispersion of the red component is independent of radius. The β - γ relation for red galaxies matches the theoretical relation only in the inner region. The deviations might be due to the use of galaxies as tracers of the gravitational potential, unlike the non-collisional tracer used in the theoretical relation.

  20. Profile analysis of ventricle specimen based on a new phase measuring method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiping; Su, Xianyu; Chen, Wenjing; Xiang, Liqun; Zhang, Qichan; Liu, Yuankun

    2009-08-01

    The size and shape of ventricle are very important to analyze and diagnose pathology of human heart. So it is very necessary to measure the profile of ventricle. It is very difficult to measure the ventricle by vivisectional method for its unique function of heart, so the ventricle specimen is adopted to be measured. Three-dimensional (3D) automatic measurement methods are widely used in many fields. In Biology and Medicine society, it can be applicable for surgery, orthopedics, viscera disease analysis and diagnosis etc. Here a new method to measure the 3D surface of ventricle specimen is proposed. Although the traditional 3D measuing method with equal or stated phase-shifting step length possess excellent accuracy, they are much dependent on the consistency of these phase-shifting step lengths. In fact, this condition is very difficult to guarantee. which may lead to the incorrect wrapped phase and incorrect phase unwrapping in some regions, even the reconstructed object may be misshapen or anamorphic. In the proposed method, a novel improved three undecided step lengths phase-shifting algorithm with three unequal phase-shifting steps has been presented detailed and is applied to measure the profile of ventricle sucssesfully. Experiments show that the improved algorithm can not only effectively improve the measuring accuracy, but also branch out its application.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR GENTLY SLOPING PLASMA DENSITY PROFILES IN THE DEEP CORONA: TYPE III OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lobzin, V. V.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A.; Warmuth, A.; Mann, G.; Gorgutsa, R. V.; Fomichev, V. V.

    2010-12-01

    Type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency f{sub p} and near its harmonic 2f{sub p} by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. The coronal bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration being about 1-3 s. In the present paper, 37 well-defined coronal type III radio bursts (25-450 MHz) are analyzed. The results obtained substantiate an earlier statement that the dependence of the central frequency of the emission on time can be fitted to a power-law model, f(t) {proportional_to} (t - t{sub 0}){sup -{alpha}}, where {alpha} can be as low as 1. In the case of negligible plasma acceleration and conical flow, it means that the electron number density within about 1 solar radius above the photosphere will decrease as r {sup -2}, like in the solar wind. For the data set chosen, the index {alpha} varies in the range from 0.2 to 7 or bigger, with mean and median values of 1.2 and 0.5, respectively. A surprisingly large fraction of events, 84%, have {alpha} {<=} 1.2. These results provide strong evidence that in the type III source regions the electron number density scales as n(r) {proportional_to} (r - r{sub 0}){sup -{beta}}, with minimum, mean, and median {beta} = 2{alpha} of 0.4, 2.4, and 1.0, respectively. Hence, the typical density profiles are more gently sloping than those given by existing empirical coronal models. Several events are found with a wind-like dependence of burst frequency on time. Smaller power-law indices could result from the effects of non-conical geometry of the plasma flow tubes, deceleration of coronal plasma, and/or the curvature of the magnetic field lines. The last effect is shown to be too weak to explain such low power-law indices. A strong tendency is found for bursts from the same group to have similar power-law indices, thereby favoring the hypothesis that they are usually produced by the same source

  2. MicroRNA Profiling of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated NK/T-Cell Lymphomas by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Motsch, Natalie; Alles, Julia; Imig, Jochen; Zhu, Jiayun; Barth, Stephanie; Reineke, Tanja; Tinguely, Marianne; Cogliatti, Sergio; Dueck, Anne; Meister, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic human Herpes virus involved in the pathogenesis of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma. EBV encodes microRNAs (miRNAs) and induces changes in the host cellular miRNA profile. MiRNAs are short non-coding RNAs of about 19–25 nt length that regulate gene expression by post-transcriptional mechanisms and are frequently deregulated in human malignancies including cancer. The microRNA profiles of EBV-positive NK/T-cell lymphoma, non-infected T-cell lymphoma and normal thymus were established by deep sequencing of small RNA libraries. The comparison of the EBV-positive NK/T-cell vs. EBV-negative T-cell lymphoma revealed 15 up- und 16 down-regulated miRNAs. In contrast, the majority of miRNAs was repressed in the lymphomas compared to normal tissue. We also identified 10 novel miRNAs from known precursors and two so far unknown miRNAs. The sequencing results were confirmed for selected miRNAs by quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR). We show that the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 alpha (IL1A) is a target for miR-142-3p and the oncogenic BCL6 for miR-205. MiR-142-3p is down-regulated in the EBV-positive vs. EBV-negative lymphomas. MiR-205 was undetectable in EBV-negative lymphoma and strongly down-regulated in EBV-positive NK/T-cell lymphoma as compared to thymus. The targets were confirmed by reporter assays and by down-regulation of the proteins by ectopic expression of the cognate miRNAs. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the relevance of deregulated miRNAs for the post-transcriptional gene regulation in nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas. PMID:22870299

  3. Refining transcriptional programs in kidney development by integration of deep RNA-sequencing and array-based spatial profiling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The developing mouse kidney is currently the best-characterized model of organogenesis at a transcriptional level. Detailed spatial maps have been generated for gene expression profiling combined with systematic in situ screening. These studies, however, fall short of capturing the transcriptional complexity arising from each locus due to the limited scope of microarray-based technology, which is largely based on "gene-centric" models. Results To address this, the polyadenylated RNA and microRNA transcriptomes of the 15.5 dpc mouse kidney were profiled using strand-specific RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) to a depth sufficient to complement spatial maps from pre-existing microarray datasets. The transcriptional complexity of RNAs arising from mouse RefSeq loci was catalogued; including 3568 alternatively spliced transcripts and 532 uncharacterized alternate 3' UTRs. Antisense expressions for 60% of RefSeq genes was also detected including uncharacterized non-coding transcripts overlapping kidney progenitor markers, Six2 and Sall1, and were validated by section in situ hybridization. Analysis of genes known to be involved in kidney development, particularly during mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, showed an enrichment of non-coding antisense transcripts extended along protein-coding RNAs. Conclusion The resulting resource further refines the transcriptomic cartography of kidney organogenesis by integrating deep RNA sequencing data with locus-based information from previously published expression atlases. The added resolution of RNA-Seq has provided the basis for a transition from classical gene-centric models of kidney development towards more accurate and detailed "transcript-centric" representations, which highlights the extent of transcriptional complexity of genes that direct complex development events. PMID:21888672

  4. Phase behavior of elastin-like synthetic recombinamers in deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Nardecchia, Stefania; Gutiérrez, María C; Ferrer, M Luisa; Alonso, Matilde; López, Isabel M; Rodríguez-Cabello, J Carlos; del Monte, Francisco

    2012-07-01

    Deep eutectic solvents promoted the stabilization of the collapsed state of elastin-like recombinamers - and the subsequent formation of aggregates - upon the loss of the structural water molecules involved in hydrophobic hydration. Cryo-etch scanning electron microscopy allowed the observation of these aggregates in neat deep eutectic solvents. The suppression of the lower critical solution temperature transition, observed by differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic light scattering, confirmed the presence of the elastin-like recombinamers in their collapsed state. Actually, the transition from the collapsed to the expanded state was suppressed even after moderate aqueous dilution - for water contents ranging from nil to ca. 45 wt % - and it was only recovered upon further addition of water - above 50 wt %. These features revealed the preferred stabilization of the collapsed state in not only neat deep eutectic solvents but also partially hydrated deep eutectic solvents. We consider that the capability to trigger the lower critical solution temperature transition by partial hydration of deep eutectic solvent may open interesting perspectives for nano(bio)technological applications of elastin-like recombinamers. PMID:22632070

  5. Directivity of a Sparse Array in the Presence of Atmospheric-Induced Phase Fluctuations for Deep Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Acosta, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Widely distributed (sparse) ground-based arrays have been utilized for decades in the radio science community for imaging celestial objects, but have only recently become an option for deep space communications applications with the advent of the proposed Next Generation Deep Space Network (DSN) array. But whereas in astronomical imaging, observations (receive-mode only) are made on the order of minutes to hours and atmospheric-induced aberrations can be mostly corrected for in post-processing, communications applications require transmit capabilities and real-time corrections over time scales as short as fractions of a second. This presents an unavoidable problem with the use of sparse arrays for deep space communications at Ka-band which has yet to be successfully resolved, particularly for uplink arraying. In this paper, an analysis of the performance of a sparse antenna array, in terms of its directivity, is performed to derive a closed form solution to the expected array loss in the presence of atmospheric-induced phase fluctuations. The theoretical derivation for array directivity degradation is validated with interferometric measurements for a two-element array taken at Goldstone, California. With the validity of the model established, an arbitrary 27-element array geometry is defined at Goldstone, California, to ascertain its performance in the presence of phase fluctuations. It is concluded that a combination of compact array geometry and atmospheric compensation is necessary to ensure high levels of availability.

  6. Frozen subduction in the Yangtze block: insights from the deep seismic profiling and gravity anomaly in east Sichuan fold belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaosong; Gao, Rui; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jisheng; Guo, Lianghui

    2016-04-01

    The Sichuan basin is the main part of the middle-upper Yangtze block, which has been experienced a long-term tectonic evolution since Archean. The Yangtze block was regarded as a stable block until the collision with the Cathaysia block in late Neoproterozoic. A new deep seismic reflection profile conducted in the eastern Sichuan fold belt (ESFB) discovered a serials of south-dipping reflectors shown from lower crust to the mantle imply a frozen subduction zone within the Yangtze block. In order to prove the speculation, we also obtain the middle-lower crustal gravity anomalies by removing the gravity anomalies induced by the sedimentary rocks and the mantle beneath the Moho, which shows the mid-lower crustal structure of the Sichuan basin can be divided into eastern and western parts. Combined with the geochronology and Aeromagnetic anomalies, we speculated the Yangtze block was amalgamated by the West Sichuan and East Sichuan blocks separated by the Huayin-Chongqing line. The frozen subduction zone subsequently shifted to a shear zone accommodated the lower crustal shortening when the decollement at the base of the Nanhua system functioned in the upper plate.

  7. 30 CFR 203.43 - To which production do I apply the RSV earned from qualified deep wells or qualified phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... production do I apply the RSV earned from qualified deep wells or qualified phase 1 ultra-deep wells on my... qualified wells on or after May 3, 2004, reported on the OGOR-A for your lease under 30 CFR 1210.102, as and... section, all gas production from qualified wells reported on the OGOR-A, including production that is...

  8. 30 CFR 203.43 - To which production do I apply the RSV earned from qualified deep wells or qualified phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... production do I apply the RSV earned from qualified deep wells or qualified phase 1 ultra-deep wells on my... qualified wells on or after May 3, 2004, reported on the OGOR-A for your lease under 30 CFR 1210.102, as and... section, all gas production from qualified wells reported on the OGOR-A, including production that is...

  9. 30 CFR 203.43 - To which production do I apply the RSV earned from qualified deep wells or qualified phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... production do I apply the RSV earned from qualified deep wells or qualified phase 1 ultra-deep wells on my... qualified wells on or after May 3, 2004, reported on the OGOR-A for your lease under 30 CFR 1210.102, as and... section, all gas production from qualified wells reported on the OGOR-A, including production that is...

  10. 30 CFR 203.43 - To which production do I apply the RSV earned from qualified deep wells or qualified phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... which production do I apply the RSV earned from qualified deep wells or qualified phase 1 ultra-deep... this section, all gas production from qualified wells reported on the OGOR-A, including production that... first qualified well that earns your lease the RSV begins production (other than test production)....

  11. Phase-referenced probe interferometer for biological surface profiling and displacement measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Chu, Mark C.; Seung, H. Sebastian; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2007-12-01

    We present a probe-based, phase-referenced low coherence interferometer in which the reference field is provided by a fiber end reflection. A gradient-index microlens focuses light onto a sample and collects reflected light. We use the probe interferometer to measure surface profiles of the compound eye of a housefly (Musca domestica) and measure nanometer-scale vibrations in a test sample.

  12. Pulse-combustion deep fat fryer, Phase 2. Final report, December 1983-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A pulse-combustion burner system was developed that met both efficiency and cooking-performance goals. Work involved modifications to the pulse-combustion deep fat fryer to reduce the sound level, eliminate vibrations, and ensure reliable ignition. Field testing in a major fast-food restaurant chain was initiated, demonstrating that the pulse fryer is reliable and acceptable.

  13. Saturation Profiles from Lab-scale Permittivity Measurements and 2-Phase Flow Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorriti, A. G.

    2005-05-01

    sample, we obtain the permittivity profile. The permittivity is mainly determined by the saturation, then, the permittivity profile within the sample is equivalent to the saturation profile. One can be obtained from the other using the Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM). The saturation profile can also be obtained with traditional 2-phase flow modelling. Preliminary results show that the saturation profile obtained from the permittivity is more close to reality than the one inferred from 2-phase flow modelling.

  14. Altered circadian rhythm and metabolic gene profile in rats subjected to advanced light phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Laura; Valcarcel, Lorea; da Silva, Crhistiane Andressa; Albert, Nerea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Cambras, Trinitat; Serra, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates metabolic homeostasis and its disruption predisposes to obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the effect of phase shifts on metabolism is not completely understood. We examined whether alterations in the circadian rhythm caused by phase shifts induce metabolic changes in crucial genes that would predispose to obesity. Three-month-old rats were maintained on a standard diet under lighting conditions with chronic phase shifts consisting of advances, delays or advances plus delays. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose levels decreased only in rats subjected to advances. The expression of the clock gene Bmal 1 increased in the hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and liver of the advanced group compared to control rats. The advanced group showed an increase in hypothalamic AgRP and NPY mRNA, and their lipid metabolism gene profile was altered in liver, WAT and BAT. WAT showed an increase in inflammation and ER stress and brown adipocytes suffered a brown-to-white transformation and decreased UCP-1 expression. Our results indicate that chronic phase advances lead to significant changes in neuropeptides, lipid metabolism, inflammation and ER stress gene profile in metabolically relevant tissues such as the hypothalamus, liver, WAT and BAT. This highlights a link between alteration of the circadian rhythm and metabolism at the transcriptional level.

  15. Altered Circadian Rhythm and Metabolic Gene Profile in Rats Subjected to Advanced Light Phase Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Laura; Valcarcel, Lorea; da Silva, Crhistiane Andressa; Albert, Nerea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Cambras, Trinitat; Serra, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates metabolic homeostasis and its disruption predisposes to obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the effect of phase shifts on metabolism is not completely understood. We examined whether alterations in the circadian rhythm caused by phase shifts induce metabolic changes in crucial genes that would predispose to obesity. Three-month-old rats were maintained on a standard diet under lighting conditions with chronic phase shifts consisting of advances, delays or advances plus delays. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose levels decreased only in rats subjected to advances. The expression of the clock gene Bmal 1 increased in the hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and liver of the advanced group compared to control rats. The advanced group showed an increase in hypothalamic AgRP and NPY mRNA, and their lipid metabolism gene profile was altered in liver, WAT and BAT. WAT showed an increase in inflammation and ER stress and brown adipocytes suffered a brown-to-white transformation and decreased UCP-1 expression. Our results indicate that chronic phase advances lead to significant changes in neuropeptides, lipid metabolism, inflammation and ER stress gene profile in metabolically relevant tissues such as the hypothalamus, liver, WAT and BAT. This highlights a link between alteration of the circadian rhythm and metabolism at the transcriptional level. PMID:25837425

  16. DX Deep Centers in AlxGa1-xAs Grown by Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Masami; Mizuta, Masashi; Kukimoto, Hiroshi

    1984-12-01

    Deep levels, the so-called DX centers, in the AlxGa1-xAs alloy system grown by liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) were investigated by junction-capacitance spectroscopy. The dependence of the activation energy of the DX center in Sn-doped AlxGa1-xAs on the alloy composition was determined by DLTS. This dependence seems to reflect the change in the nature of the conduction bands in this alloy system. The other donor species studied: Si, Te and Se, were also found to form DX centers. An anomalously high concentration of DX centers was determined using low-temperature C-V techniques.

  17. Deep level transient spectroscopy assessment of silicon contamination in AlGaAs layers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, E.; Sanchez, F.; Muñoz, E.; Gibart, P.; Powell, A.; Roberts, J. S.

    1995-08-01

    A systematic silicon contamination has been detected by deep level transient spectroscopy in undoped and n-type doped (Te, Se, Sn) AlGaAs layers, grown in two different metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy reactors. DX center generation by substitutional donors, with very specific capture and emission thermal barriers (fingerprints), is the key to unambiguously identifying their presence, with detection limits well below the standard secondary ion mass spectroscopy capability. We comment on the potential sources of Si contamination (most common in this epitaxial technique), and on the relevance of such contamination to interpreting correctly experimental data related to the microscopic structure of DX centers.

  18. Utilization of deep eutectic solvents as novel mobile phase additives for improving the separation of bioactive quaternary alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Zhang, Mingliang; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as novel mobile phase additives to improve chromatographic separation of four quaternary alkaloids including coptisine chloride, sanguinarine, berberine chloride and chelerythrine on a C18 column. DESs as a new class of ionic liquids are renewably sourced, environmentally benign, low cost and easy to prepare. Seven DESs were obtained by mixing different hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. The effects of organic solvents, the concentration of DESs, the types of DESs and the pH values of the buffer solution on the separation of the analytes were investigated. The composition of acetonitrile and 1.0% deep eutectic solvents aqueous solution (pH 3.3, adjusted with hydrochloric acid) in a 32:68 (v/v) ratio was used as optimized mobile phase, with which four quaternary alkaloids were well separated. When a small amount of DESs was added in the mobile phase for the separation of alkaloids on the C18 column, noticeable improvements were distinctly observed such as decreasing peak tailing and improving resolution. The separation mechanism mediated by DESs as mobile phase additives can be attributed to combined effect of both hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. For example, choline chloride can effectively cover the residual silanols on silica surface and ethylene glycol can reduce the retention time of analytes. The proposed method has been applied to determine BerbC in Lanqin Chinese herbal oral solution and BerbC tablet. Utilization of DESs in mobile phase can efficiently improve separation and selectivity of analytes from complex samples.

  19. Utilization of deep eutectic solvents as novel mobile phase additives for improving the separation of bioactive quaternary alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Zhang, Mingliang; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-03-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as novel mobile phase additives to improve chromatographic separation of four quaternary alkaloids including coptisine chloride, sanguinarine, berberine chloride and chelerythrine on a C18 column. DESs as a new class of ionic liquids are renewably sourced, environmentally benign, low cost and easy to prepare. Seven DESs were obtained by mixing different hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. The effects of organic solvents, the concentration of DESs, the types of DESs and the pH values of the buffer solution on the separation of the analytes were investigated. The composition of acetonitrile and 1.0% deep eutectic solvents aqueous solution (pH 3.3, adjusted with hydrochloric acid) in a 32:68 (v/v) ratio was used as optimized mobile phase, with which four quaternary alkaloids were well separated. When a small amount of DESs was added in the mobile phase for the separation of alkaloids on the C18 column, noticeable improvements were distinctly observed such as decreasing peak tailing and improving resolution. The separation mechanism mediated by DESs as mobile phase additives can be attributed to combined effect of both hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. For example, choline chloride can effectively cover the residual silanols on silica surface and ethylene glycol can reduce the retention time of analytes. The proposed method has been applied to determine BerbC in Lanqin Chinese herbal oral solution and BerbC tablet. Utilization of DESs in mobile phase can efficiently improve separation and selectivity of analytes from complex samples. PMID:26717817

  20. Sensory, psychological, and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy: A cross-sectional deep profiling study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tudor J.C.; Brown, Matthew; Ramirez, Juan D.; Perkins, James; Woldeamanuel, Yohannes W.; Williams, Amanda C. de C.; Orengo, Christine; Bennett, David L.H.; Bodi, Istvan; Cox, Sarah; Maier, Christoph; Krumova, Elena K.; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a frequent complication of HIV infection and a major source of morbidity. A cross-sectional deep profiling study examining HIV-SN was conducted in people living with HIV in a high resource setting using a battery of measures which included the following: parameters of pain and sensory symptoms (7 day pain diary, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI] and Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sensory innervation (structured neurological examination, quantitative sensory testing [QST] and intraepidermal nerve fibre density [IENFD]), psychological state (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 [PASS-20], Depression Anxiety and Positive Outlook Scale [DAPOS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS], insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), and quality of life (Short Form (36) Health Survey [SF-36]). The diagnostic utility of the Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (BPNS), Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), and Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) were evaluated. Thirty-six healthy volunteers and 66 HIV infected participants were recruited. A novel triumvirate case definition for HIV-SN was used that required 2 out of 3 of the following: 2 or more abnormal QST findings, reduced IENFD, and signs of a peripheral neuropathy on a structured neurological examination. Of those with HIV, 42% fulfilled the case definition for HIV-SN (n = 28), of whom 75% (n = 21) reported pain. The most frequent QST abnormalities in HIV-SN were loss of function in mechanical and vibration detection. Structured clinical examination was superior to QST or IENFD in HIV-SN diagnosis. HIV-SN participants had higher plasma triglyceride, concentrations depression, anxiety and catastrophizing scores, and prevalence of insomnia than HIV participants without HIV-SN. PMID:24973717

  1. Development of a High Performance, Low Profile Translation Table with Wire Feedthrough for a Deep Space CubeSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Few, Alex

    2016-01-01

    NEAScout, a 6U cubesat and secondary payload on NASA's EM-1, will use an 85 sq m solar sail to travel to a near-earth asteroid at about 1 Astronomical Unit (about 1.5 x 10(exp 8) km) for observation and reconnaissance1. A combination of reaction wheels, reaction control system, and a slow rotisserie roll about the solar sail's normal axis were expected to handle attitude control and adjust for imperfections in the deployed sail during the 2.5-year mission. As the design for NEAScout matured, one of the critical design parameters, the offset in the center of mass and center of pressure (CP/CM offset), proved to be sub-optimal. After significant mission and control analysis, the CP/CM offset was accommodated by the addition of a new subsystem to NEAScout. This system, called the Active Mass Translator (AMT), would reside near the geometric center of NEAScout and adjust the CM by moving one portion of the flight system relative to the other. The AMT was given limited design space - 17 mm of the vehicle's assembly height-and was required to generate +/-8 cm by +/-2 cm translation to sub-millimeter accuracy. Furthermore, the design must accommodate a large wire bundle of small gage, single strand wire and coax cables fed through the center of the mechanism. The bend radius, bend resistance, and the exposure to deep space environment complicates the AMT design and operation and necessitated a unique design to mitigate risks of wire bundle damage, binding, and cold-welding during operation. This paper will outline the design constraints for the AMT, discuss the methods and reasoning for design, and identify the lessons learned through the designing, breadboarding and testing for the low-profile translation stages with wire feedthrough capability.

  2. Sensory, psychological, and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy: A cross-sectional deep profiling study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tudor J C; Brown, Matthew; Ramirez, Juan D; Perkins, James; Woldeamanuel, Yohannes W; Williams, Amanda C de C; Orengo, Christine; Bennett, David L H; Bodi, Istvan; Cox, Sarah; Maier, Christoph; Krumova, Elena K; Rice, Andrew S C

    2014-09-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a frequent complication of HIV infection and a major source of morbidity. A cross-sectional deep profiling study examining HIV-SN was conducted in people living with HIV in a high resource setting using a battery of measures which included the following: parameters of pain and sensory symptoms (7day pain diary, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI] and Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sensory innervation (structured neurological examination, quantitative sensory testing [QST] and intraepidermal nerve fibre density [IENFD]), psychological state (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 [PASS-20], Depression Anxiety and Positive Outlook Scale [DAPOS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS], insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), and quality of life (Short Form (36) Health Survey [SF-36]). The diagnostic utility of the Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (BPNS), Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), and Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) were evaluated. Thirty-six healthy volunteers and 66 HIV infected participants were recruited. A novel triumvirate case definition for HIV-SN was used that required 2 out of 3 of the following: 2 or more abnormal QST findings, reduced IENFD, and signs of a peripheral neuropathy on a structured neurological examination. Of those with HIV, 42% fulfilled the case definition for HIV-SN (n=28), of whom 75% (n=21) reported pain. The most frequent QST abnormalities in HIV-SN were loss of function in mechanical and vibration detection. Structured clinical examination was superior to QST or IENFD in HIV-SN diagnosis. HIV-SN participants had higher plasma triglyceride, concentrations depression, anxiety and catastrophizing scores, and prevalence of insomnia than HIV participants without HIV-SN. PMID:24973717

  3. Deep proteomic profiling of vasopressin-sensitive collecting duct cells. I. Virtual Western blots and molecular weight distributions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chin-Rang; Tongyoo, Pumipat; Emamian, Milad; Sandoval, Pablo C; Raghuram, Viswanathan; Knepper, Mark A

    2015-12-15

    The mouse mpkCCD cell line is a continuous cultured epithelial cell line with characteristics of renal collecting duct principal cells. This line is widely used to study epithelial transport and its regulation. To provide a data resource useful for experimental design and interpretation in studies using mpkCCD cells, we have carried out "deep" proteomic profiling of these cells using three levels of fractionation (differential centrifugation, SDS-PAGE, and HPLC) followed by tandem mass spectrometry to identify and quantify proteins. The analysis of all resulting samples generated 34.6 gigabytes of spectral data. As a result, we identified 6,766 proteins in mpkCCD cells at a high level of stringency. These proteins are expressed over eight orders of magnitude of protein abundance. The data are provided to users as a public data base (https://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/mpkFractions/). The mass spectrometry data were mapped back to their gel slices to generate "virtual Western blots" for each protein. For most of the 6,766 proteins, the apparent molecular weight from SDS-PAGE agreed closely with the calculated molecular weight. However, a substantial fraction (>15%) of proteins was found to run aberrantly, with much higher or much lower mobilities than predicted. These proteins were analyzed to identify mechanisms responsible for altered mobility on SDS-PAGE, including high or low isoelectric point, high or low hydrophobicity, physiological cleavage, residence in the lysosome, posttranslational modifications, and expression of alternative isoforms due to alternative exon usage. Additionally, this analysis identified a previously unrecognized isoform of aquaporin-2 with apparent molecular mass <20 kDa.

  4. Advances in Scanning Reflectarray Antennas Based on Ferroelectric Thin Film Phase Shifters for Deep Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    Though there are a few examples of scanning phased array antennas that have flown successfully in space, the quest for low-cost, high-efficiency, large aperture microwave phased arrays continues. Fixed and mobile applications that may be part of a heterogeneous exploration communication architecture will benefit from the agile (rapid) beam steering and graceful degradation afforded by phased array antennas. The reflectarray promises greater efficiency and economy compared to directly-radiating varieties. Implementing a practical scanning version has proven elusive. The ferroelectric reflectarray, under development and described herein, involves phase shifters based on coupled microstrip patterned on Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3 films, that were laser ablated onto LaAlO3 substrates. These devices outperform their semiconductor counterparts from X- through and K-band frequencies. There are special issues associated with the implementation of a scanning reflectarray antenna, especially one realized with thin film ferroelectric phase shifters. This paper will discuss these issues which include: relevance of phase shifter loss; modulo 2(pi) effects and phase shifter transient effects on bit error rate; scattering from the ground plane; presentation of a novel hybrid ferroelectric-semiconductor phase shifter; and the effect of mild radiation exposure on phase shifter performance.

  5. Online, efficient and precision laser profiling of bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheels based on a single-layer deep-cutting intermittent feeding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hui; Chen, Genyu; He, Jie; Zhou, Cong; Du, Han; Wang, Yanyi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an online, efficient and precision laser profiling approach that is based on a single-layer deep-cutting intermittent feeding method is described. The effects of the laser cutting depth and the track-overlap ratio of the laser cutting on the efficiency, precision and quality of laser profiling were investigated. Experiments on the online profiling of bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheels were performed using a pulsed fiber laser. The results demonstrate that an increase in the laser cutting depth caused an increase in the material removal efficiency during the laser profiling process. However, the maximum laser profiling efficiency was only achieved when the laser cutting depth was equivalent to the initial surface contour error of the grinding wheel. In addition, the selection of relatively high track-overlap ratios of laser cutting for the profiling of grinding wheels was beneficial with respect to the increase in the precision of laser profiling, whereas the efficiency and quality of the laser profiling were not affected by the change in the track-overlap ratio. After optimized process parameters were employed for online laser profiling, the circular run-out error and the parallelism error of the grinding wheel surface decreased from 83.1 μm and 324.6 μm to 11.3 μm and 3.5 μm, respectively. The surface contour precision of the grinding wheel significantly improved. The highest surface contour precision for grinding wheels of the same type that can be theoretically achieved after laser profiling is completely dependent on the peak power density of the laser. The higher the laser peak power density is, the higher the surface contour precision of the grinding wheel after profiling.

  6. Common complications of deep lamellar keratoplasty in the early phase of the learning curve

    PubMed Central

    Hosny, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and record the common complications that face surgeons when they perform their first few series of deep lamellar keratoplasty and measures to avoid these. Setting: Dar El Oyoun Hospital, Cairo, Egypt. Methods: Retrospective study of the first 40 eyes of 40 patients carried out by two corneal surgeons working in the same center. All patients were planned to undergo a deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty using the big bubble technique. Twelve patients suffered from keratoconus while 28 patients had anterior corneal pathologies. Recorded complications were classified as either intraoperative or postoperative. Results: Perforation of Descemet’s membrane was the most common intraoperative complication. It occurred in nine eyes (22.5%): five eyes (12.5%) had microperforations while four eyes (10%) had macroperforations, three eyes (7.5%) had central perforations, and six eyes (15%) had peripheral perforations. Other complications included incomplete separation of Descemet’s membrane and remnants of peripheral stromal tissue. Postoperative complications included double anterior chamber which occurred in four eyes (10%) and Descemet’s membrane corrugations. Postoperative astigmatism ranged from 1.25 to 4.5 diopters with a mean of 2.86 diopters in the whole series, but in the six cases with identified residual stroma in the periphery of the host bed, the astigmatism ranged from 2.75 to 4.5 diopters with a mean of 3.62 diopters. Conclusion: Deep lamellar keratoplasty is sensitive to procedural details. Learning the common complications and how to avoid them helps novice surgeons to learn the procedure faster. PMID:21750612

  7. Viscous singular shock profiles for a system of conservation laws modeling two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ting-Hao

    2016-08-01

    This paper is concerned with singular shocks for a system of conservation laws via the Dafermos regularization ut + f(u)x = ɛtuxx. For a system modeling incompressible two-phase fluid flow, the existence of viscous profiles is proved using Geometric Singular Perturbation Theory. The weak convergence and the growth rate of the viscous solution are also derived; the weak limit is the sum of a piecewise constant function and a δ-measure supported on a shock line, and the maximum value of the viscous solution is of order exp ⁡ (1 / ɛ).

  8. Theoretical analysis of H-Horn annular phased array system for heating deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Tianquan, D; Zheng, L; Wei, R

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a type of annular phased array system--H-Horn APA. The phase and amplitude control of power deposition patterns for this system are theoretically analyzed at a frequency of 200 MHz. The formulas for calculating E-field and SAR for this APA system are derived, and can be applied to other type APA systems. Models of computerized tomography (CT) scans from liver and lung regions have been used, respectively, for predicting optimization of E-field and SAR patterns in the case of the relative phase and amplitude changes. It is shown that the techniques of the phase and amplitude control of SAR patterns result in more selectively and effectively heating of tumors situated eccentrically and deeply within bodies of patients. The APA hyperthermia described in this paper shows great promise, and it looks very useful for developing clinical applications.

  9. A Study of Phased Array Antennas for NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Huang, John; Cesarone, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we briefly discuss various options but focus on the feasibility of the phased arrays as a viable option for this application. Of particular concern and consideration will be the cost, reliability, and performance compared to the present 70-meter antenna system, particularly the gain/noise temperature levels in the receive mode. Many alternative phased arrays including planar horizontal arrays, hybrid mechanically/electronically steered arrays, phased array of mechanically steered reflectors, multi-faceted planar arrays, phased array-fed lens antennas, and planar reflect-arrays are compared and their viability is assessed. Although they have many advantages including higher reliability, near-instantaneous beam switching or steering capability, the cost of such arrays is presently prohibitive and it is concluded that the only viable array options at the present are the arrays of a few or many small reflectors. The active planar phased arrays, however, may become feasible options in the next decade and can be considered for deployment in smaller configurations as supplementary options.

  10. Berry phases and profiles of line wings and rainbow satellites induced by optical collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuryło, R.; Szudy, J.; Baylis, W. E.

    2015-09-01

    The concept of Berry phase is included in an analysis of the intensity distribution in far wings of pressure-broadened spectral lines emitted or absorbed by atoms placed in an external cone-rotating electric field. Particular attention is focused on frequency regions where rainbow satellite bands appear. A classical-path treatment that employs the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is used to derive an expression for the line shape, and it uses a dipole transition moment calculated with quasimolecular wave functions given by the Berry version of the adiabatic approximation. It is found that in the presence of an external rotating electric field, the intensity distribution in far wings can be expressed in terms of the universal line shape function of the unified Franck-Condon theory once energy shifts due to Stark and Berry effects are taken into account. We show that the influence of Berry phase in the profiles of the far wings can be manifested either in the form of deviations of observed profiles from the quasistatic distribution or the appearance of additional features in the vicinity of the maximum of the rainbow satellite band. As an example, the modification of the rainbow satellite at 162.3 nm in the red wing of the self-broadened Lyman-α line of hydrogen, caused by an external rotating electric field, is considered.

  11. Shear wave anisotropy in textured phase D and constraints on deep water recycling in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Angelika D.; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Nisr, Carole; Evans, Shaun R.; Debord, Regis; Merkel, Sébastien

    2013-09-01

    Regions of low seismic velocity and high shear anisotropies in cold subducted slabs have often been related to anisotropic fabrics in hydrous phases mainly induced by slab deformation. The interpretation of these seismic anomalies in terms of hydration thus relies on a better knowledge of the elasticity and plastic deformation mechanisms of candidate hydrous phases. Here we investigate the development of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) in phase D [MgSi2H2O6, 10-18 wt% H2O], the ultimate water carrier in hydrous subducted peridotite. The samples were deformed non-hydrostatically up to 48 GPa in a diamond anvil cell and the texture and strength were obtained from analysis of the X-ray diffraction patterns collected in radial diffraction geometry. We find that at low strains the layered structure of phase D displays strong 0001 texture, where the stacking fault axis (c-axis) preferentially align parallel to the compression axis. A subsidiary 101¯0 texture develops at higher strains. Plasticity simulations in polycrystalline aggregates using a viscoplastic self-consistent model suggest that these LPO patterns are consistent with shape preferred orientation mechanism during the first compaction steps and, with dominant easy glide on basal planes and harder first order pyramidal slip, respectively, upon further compression. We find that phase D displays the lowest strength and the highest anisotropy among phases in hydrous peridotite in the uppermost lower mantle and might thus control the shear wave anisotropy generated in subducted slabs below the transition zone. We further evaluate the effect of textured phase D on the seismic velocity structure and shear wave anisotropy of deformed hydrous peridotite and compare the results to seismic observations in Tonga subduction. We show that 16 vol% of phase D in hydrous subducted peridotite is required to explain the negative velocity anomalies of 3%, the extent of shear wave splitting (0.9±0.3%) and the shear wave ray

  12. Periparturient cortisol, acute phase cytokine, and acute phase protein profiles of gilts housed in groups or stalls during gestation.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, A D; Eicher, S D; Harris, M J; Pajor, E A; Richert, B T

    2007-07-01

    Use of gestation stalls in pork production remains a controversial topic in animal welfare. Immune status and measures are frequently used to assess stress levels and thus well-being of confined animals. The important welfare issue of close confinement among gestating gilts was tested by quantifying cortisol, acute phase cytokine, and acute phase protein pro-files before and after farrowing of gilts housed in 2 systems. Landrace x Yorkshire crossbred gilts housed in groups of 4 (group, n = 8) in pens (3.9 x 2.4 m with 4 individual feeding spaces, 9.36 m(2) total or 2.34 m(2)/gilt) were compared with gilts housed in standard industry stalls (stall, n = 16; 2.2 x 0.6 m, 1.32 m(2)/gilt). Floors were fully slatted, and a substrate was not provided for either system. Cortisol was determined from saliva on d 105 of gestation, 1 h after moving the gilts into farrowing stalls (d 111), and 24 h and 7 d after farrowing. Cortisol was greater (P = 0.04) for group gilts compared with stall gilts 1 h after moving them into farrowing stalls and 24 h after farrowing. Cortisol concentrations decreased (P = 0.001) over time. Leukocyte mRNA expression of IL-1, IL-1 receptor antagonist, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was determined by quantitative, reverse transcription PCR on d 35, 63, and 91 of gestation and 72 h after farrowing. Cytokine mRNA expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells did not differ between housing systems for IL-1, its receptor antagonist, or for tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Acute phase proteins, including fibrinogen, haptoglobin, and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein were determined for plasma samples taken at d 35, 63, and 91 of gestation and 72 h and 14 d after farrowing. In contrast to cortisol, plasma fibrinogen concentrations increased (P < 0.005) over time. Haptoglobin did not differ between treatments (P > 0.10). Stall gilts tended to have greater (P = 0.07) plasma alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein concentrations than group animals at d 35 of gestation and d 14

  13. 30 CFR 203.34 - To which production may an RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells on my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... perforated deeper than 15,000 feet TVD SS; (b) To production from a deep well or ultra-deep well on any other... condensate) volumes; or (d) To production from a deep well or ultra-deep well that commenced drilling before... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false To which production may an RSV earned...

  14. 30 CFR 203.34 - To which production may an RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells on my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... perforated deeper than 15,000 feet TVD SS; (b) To production from a deep well or ultra-deep well on any other... condensate) volumes; or (d) To production from a deep well or ultra-deep well that commenced drilling before... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false To which production may an RSV earned...

  15. 30 CFR 203.34 - To which production may an RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells on my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... feet TVD SS; (b) To production from a deep well or ultra-deep well on any other lease, except as...) To production from a deep well or ultra-deep well that commenced drilling before: (1) March 26, 2003... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false To which production may an RSV earned...

  16. 30 CFR 203.34 - To which production may an RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells on my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... perforated deeper than 15,000 feet TVD SS; (b) To production from a deep well or ultra-deep well on any other... condensate) volumes; or (d) To production from a deep well or ultra-deep well that commenced drilling before... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false To which production may an RSV earned...

  17. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral... MANAGEMENT RELIEF OR REDUCTION IN ROYALTY RATES OCS Oil, Gas, and Sulfur General § 203.40 Which leases are... may receive an RSV under §§ 203.41 through 203.44, and may receive an RSS under §§ 203.45 through...

  18. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral... MANAGEMENT RELIEF OR REDUCTION IN ROYALTY RATES OCS Oil, Gas, and Sulfur General § 203.40 Which leases are... may receive an RSV under §§ 203.41 through 203.44, and may receive an RSS under §§ 203.45 through...

  19. Metabolic profiles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities in deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi [corrected]. indicated by metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Yue-Zhu; He, Li-Ming; Zheng, Hua-Jun

    2014-01-27

    The whole metabolism of a sponge holobiont and the respective contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with the sponge host remain largely unclear. Meanwhile, compared with shallow water sponges, deep-sea sponges are rarely understood. Here we report the metagenomic exploration of deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi [corrected] . at the whole community level. Metagenomic data showed phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes and eukaryotes in Neamphius huxleyi [corrected]. MEGAN and gene enrichment analyses indicated different metabolic potentials of prokaryotic symbionts from eukaryotic symbionts, especially in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, and their molecular interactions with the sponge host. These results supported the hypothesis that prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts have different ecological roles and relationships with sponge host. Moreover, vigorous denitrification, and CO2 fixation by chemoautotrophic prokaryotes were suggested for this deep-sea sponge. The study provided novel insights into the respective potentials of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi [corrected].

  20. Metabolic profiles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities in deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp. indicated by metagenomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Yue-Zhu; He, Li-Ming; Zheng, Hua-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The whole metabolism of a sponge holobiont and the respective contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with the sponge host remain largely unclear. Meanwhile, compared with shallow water sponges, deep-sea sponges are rarely understood. Here we report the metagenomic exploration of deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp. at the whole community level. Metagenomic data showed phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes and eukaryotes in Lamellomorpha sp.. MEGAN and gene enrichment analyses indicated different metabolic potentials of prokaryotic symbionts from eukaryotic symbionts, especially in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, and their molecular interactions with the sponge host. These results supported the hypothesis that prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts have different ecological roles and relationships with sponge host. Moreover, vigorous denitrification, and CO2 fixation by chemoautotrophic prokaryotes were suggested for this deep-sea sponge. The study provided novel insights into the respective potentials of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp..

  1. Deep soil carbon dynamics are driven more by soil type than by climate: a worldwide meta-analysis of radiocarbon profiles.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Jordane A; Hatté, Christine; Balesdent, Jérôme; Parent, Éric

    2015-11-01

    The response of soil carbon dynamics to climate and land-use change will affect both the future climate and the quality of ecosystems. Deep soil carbon (>20 cm) is the primary component of the soil carbon pool, but the dynamics of deep soil carbon remain poorly understood. Therefore, radiocarbon activity (Δ14C), which is a function of the age of carbon, may help to understand the rates of soil carbon biodegradation and stabilization. We analyzed the published 14C contents in 122 profiles of mineral soil that were well distributed in most of the large world biomes, except for the boreal zone. With a multivariate extension of a linear mixed-effects model whose inference was based on the parallel combination of two algorithms, the expectation-maximization (EM) and the Metropolis-Hasting algorithms, we expressed soil Δ14C profiles as a four-parameter function of depth. The four-parameter model produced insightful predictions of soil Δ14C as dependent on depth, soil type, climate, vegetation, land-use and date of sampling (R2=0.68). Further analysis with the model showed that the age of topsoil carbon was primarily affected by climate and cultivation. By contrast, the age of deep soil carbon was affected more by soil taxa than by climate and thus illustrated the strong dependence of soil carbon dynamics on other pedologic traits such as clay content and mineralogy.

  2. Development of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase system for the extraction of protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wang, Yuzhi; Xu, Kaijia; Huang, Yanhua; Wen, Qian; Ding, Xueqin

    2016-05-15

    Six kinds of new type of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized. Deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase systems (DES-ATPS) were established and successfully applied in the extraction of protein. Betaine-urea (Be-U) was selected as the suitable extractant. Single factor experiments were carried out to determine the optimum conditions of the extraction process, such as the salt concentration, the mass of DES, the separation time, the amount of protein, the temperature and the pH value. The extraction efficiency could achieve to 99.82% under the optimum conditions. Mixed sample and practical sample analysis were discussed. The back extraction experiment was implemented and the back extraction efficiency could reach to 32.66%. The precision experiment, repeatability experiment and stability experiment were investigated. UV-vis, FT-IR and circular dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed that the conformation of protein was not changed during the process of extraction. The mechanisms of extraction were researched by dynamic light scattering (DLS), the measurement of the conductivity and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). DES-protein aggregates and embraces phenomenon play considerable roles in the separation process. All of these results indicated that betaine-based DES-ATPS may provide a potential substitute new method for the separation of proteins. PMID:26992491

  3. GANSEKI: JAMSTEC Deep Seafloor Rock Sample Database Emerging to the New Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyama, T.; Ichiyama, Y.; Horikawa, H.; Sato, Y.; Soma, S.; Hanafusa, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) collects a lot of substantial samples as well as various geophysical data using its research vessels and submersibles. These samples and data, which are obtained by spending large amounts of human and physical resources, are precious wealth of the world scientific community. For the better use of these samples and data, it is important that they are utilized not only for initial purpose of each cruse but also for other general scientific and educational purposes of second-hand users. Based on the JAMSTEC data and sample handling policies [1], JAMSTEC has systematically stored samples and data obtained during research cruises, and provided them to domestic/foreign activities on research, education, and public relation. Being highly valued for second-hand usability, deep seafloor rock samples are one of the most important types of samples obtained by JAMSTEC, as oceanic biological samples and sediment core samples are. Rock samples can be utilized for natural history sciences and other various purposes; some of these purposes are connected to socially important issues such as earthquake mechanisms and mineral resource developments. Researchers and educators can access to JAMSTEC rock samples and associated data through 'GANSEKI [2]', the JAMSTEC Deep Seafloor Rock Sample Database. GANSEKI was established on the Internet in 2006 and its contents and functions have been continuously enriched and upgraded since then. GANSEKI currently provides 19 thousands of sample metadata, 9 thousands of collection inventory data and 18 thousands of geochemical data. Most of these samples are recovered from the North-western Pacific Ocean, although samples from other area are also included. The major update of GANSEKI held in May 2013 involved a replacement of database core system and a redesign of user interface. In the new GANSEKI, users can select samples easily and precisely using multi-index search, numerical

  4. Negative refraction of elastic waves at the deep-subwavelength scale in a single-phase metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, R; Liu, X N; Hu, G K; Sun, C T; Huang, G L

    2014-11-24

    Negative refraction of elastic waves has been studied and experimentally demonstrated in three- and two-dimensional phononic crystals, but Bragg scattering is impractical for low-frequency wave control because of the need to scale the structures to manageable sizes. Here we present an elastic metamaterial with chiral microstructure made of a single-phase solid material that aims to achieve subwavelength negative refraction of elastic waves. Both negative effective mass density and modulus are observed owing to simultaneous translational and rotational resonances. We experimentally demonstrate negative refraction of the longitudinal elastic wave at the deep-subwavelength scale in the metamaterial fabricated in a stainless steel plate. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Moreover, wave mode conversion related with negative refraction is revealed and discussed. The proposed elastic metamaterial may thus be used as a flat lens for elastic wave focusing.

  5. Persistent Paramagnons Deep in the Metallic Phase of Sr2 -xLaxIrO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gretarsson, H.; Sung, N. H.; Porras, J.; Bertinshaw, J.; Dietl, C.; Bruin, Jan A. N.; Bangura, A. F.; Kim, Y. K.; Dinnebier, R.; Kim, Jungho; Al-Zein, A.; Moretti Sala, M.; Krisch, M.; Le Tacon, M.; Keimer, B.; Kim, B. J.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the magnetic excitations of electron-doped Sr2 -xLax IrO4 (0 ≤x ≤0.10 ) using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the Ir L3 edge. The long-range magnetic order is rapidly lost with increasing x , but two-dimensional short-range order (SRO) and dispersive magnon excitations with nearly undiminished spectral weight persist well into the metallic part of the phase diagram. The magnons in the SRO phase are heavily damped and exhibit anisotropic softening. Their dispersions are well described by a pseudospin-1 /2 Heisenberg model with exchange interactions whose spatial range increases with doping. We also find a doping-independent high-energy magnetic continuum, which is not described by this model. The spin-orbit excitons arising from the pseudospin-3 /2 manifold of the Ir ions broaden substantially in the SRO phase, but remain largely separated from the low-energy magnons. Pseudospin-1 /2 models are therefore a good starting point for the theoretical description of the low-energy magnetic dynamics of doped iridates.

  6. Odor Profile of Different Varieties of Extra-Virgin Olive Oil During Deep Frying Using an Electronic Nose and SPME-GC-FID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Valeria; Biolatto, Andrea; Sancho, Ana; Descalzo, Adriana; Grigioni, Gabriela; de Reca, Noemí Walsöe

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the performed work was to evaluate with an electronic nose changes in odor profile of Arauco and Arbequina varieties of extra-virgin olive oil during deep-frying. Changes in odor were analyzed using an electronic nose composed of 16 sensors. Volatile compounds were analyzed by SPME-GC-FID. Principal Component Analysis was applied for electronic results. Arauco variety showed the highest response for sensors. Statistical analysis for volatile compounds indicated a significant (P<0.001) interaction between variety and time of frying processes. Arauco variety showed the highest production of volatile compounds at 60 min of deep frying. The two varieties presented distinct patterns of volatile products, being clearly identified with the electronic nose.

  7. Investigations of amplitude and phase excitation profiles in femtosecond coherence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anand T. N.; Rosca, Florin; Widom, Allan; Champion, Paul M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an effective linear response approach to pump-probe femtosecond coherence spectroscopy in the well-separated pulse limit. The treatment presented here is based on a displaced and squeezed state representation for the nonstationary states induced by an ultrashort pump laser pulse or a chemical reaction. The subsequent response of the system to a delayed probe pulse is modeled using closed form nonstationary linear response functions, valid for a multimode vibronically coupled system at arbitrary temperature. When pump-probe signals are simulated using the linear response functions, with the mean nuclear positions and momenta obtained from a rigorous moment analysis of the pump induced (doorway) state, the signals are found to be in excellent agreement with the conventional third-order response approach. The key advantages offered by the moment analysis-based linear response approach include a clear physical interpretation of the amplitude and phase of oscillatory pump-probe signals, a dramatic improvement in computation times, a direct connection between pump-probe signals and equilibrium absorption and dispersion lineshapes, and the ability to incorporate coherence associated with rapid nonradiative surface crossing. We demonstrate these aspects using numerical simulations, and also apply the present approach to the interpretation of experimental amplitude and phase measurements on reactive and nonreactive samples of the heme protein myoglobin. The role played by inhomogeneous broadening in the observed amplitude and phase profiles is discussed in detail. We also investigate overtone signals in the context of reaction driven coherent motion.

  8. Variation of clonal, mesquite-associated rhizobial and bradyrhizobial populations from surface and deep soils by symbiotic gene region restriction fragment length polymorphism and plasmid profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P M; Golly, K F; Zyskind, J W; Virginia, R A

    1994-04-01

    Genetic characteristics of 14 Rhizobium and 9 Bradyrhizobium mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa)-nodulating strains isolated from surface (0- to 0.5-m) and deep (4- to 6-m) rooting zones were determined in order to examine the hypothesis that surface- and deep-soil symbiont populations were related but had become genetically distinct during adaptation to contrasting soil conditions. To examine genetic diversity, Southern blots of PstI-digested genomic DNA were sequentially hybridized with the nodDABC region of Rhizobium meliloti, the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifHDK region encoding nitrogenase structural genes, and the chromosome-localized ndvB region of R. meliloti. Plasmid profile and host plant nodulation assays were also made. Isolates from mesquite nodulated beans and cowpeas but not alfalfa, clover, or soybeans. Mesquite was nodulated by diverse species of symbionts (R. meliloti, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, and Parasponia bradyrhizobia). There were no differences within the groups of mesquite-associated rhizobia or bradyrhizobia in cross-inoculation response. The ndvB hybridization results showed the greatest genetic diversity among rhizobial strains. The pattern of ndvB-hybridizing fragments suggested that surface and deep strains were clonally related, but groups of related strains from each soil depth could be distinguished. Less variation was found with nifHDK and nodDABC probes. Large plasmids (>1,500 kb) were observed in all rhizobia and some bradyrhizobia. Profiles of plasmids of less than 1,000 kb were related to the soil depth and the genus of the symbiont. We suggest that interacting selection pressures for symbiotic competence and free-living survival, coupled with soil conditions that restrict genetic exchange between surface and deep-soil populations, led to the observed patterns of genetic diversity.

  9. Variation of Clonal, Mesquite-Associated Rhizobial and Bradyrhizobial Populations from Surface and Deep Soils by Symbiotic Gene Region Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Plasmid Profile Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P. M.; Golly, K. F.; Zyskind, J. W.; Virginia, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Genetic characteristics of 14 Rhizobium and 9 Bradyrhizobium mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa)-nodulating strains isolated from surface (0- to 0.5-m) and deep (4- to 6-m) rooting zones were determined in order to examine the hypothesis that surface- and deep-soil symbiont populations were related but had become genetically distinct during adaptation to contrasting soil conditions. To examine genetic diversity, Southern blots of PstI-digested genomic DNA were sequentially hybridized with the nodDABC region of Rhizobium meliloti, the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifHDK region encoding nitrogenase structural genes, and the chromosome-localized ndvB region of R. meliloti. Plasmid profile and host plant nodulation assays were also made. Isolates from mesquite nodulated beans and cowpeas but not alfalfa, clover, or soybeans. Mesquite was nodulated by diverse species of symbionts (R. meliloti, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, and Parasponia bradyrhizobia). There were no differences within the groups of mesquite-associated rhizobia or bradyrhizobia in cross-inoculation response. The ndvB hybridization results showed the greatest genetic diversity among rhizobial strains. The pattern of ndvB-hybridizing fragments suggested that surface and deep strains were clonally related, but groups of related strains from each soil depth could be distinguished. Less variation was found with nifHDK and nodDABC probes. Large plasmids (>1,500 kb) were observed in all rhizobia and some bradyrhizobia. Profiles of plasmids of less than 1,000 kb were related to the soil depth and the genus of the symbiont. We suggest that interacting selection pressures for symbiotic competence and free-living survival, coupled with soil conditions that restrict genetic exchange between surface and deep-soil populations, led to the observed patterns of genetic diversity. Images PMID:16349226

  10. A Phase II Study of Fornix Deep Brain Stimulation in Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Andres M.; Fosdick, Lisa; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie; Munro, Cynthia; Oh, Esther; Drake, Kristen E.; Lyman, Christopher H.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Anderson, William S.; Tang-Wai, David F.; Pendergrass, Jo Cara; Salloway, Stephen; Asaad, Wael F.; Ponce, Francisco A.; Burke, Anna; Sabbagh, Marwan; Wolk, David A.; Baltuch, Gordon; Okun, Michael S.; Foote, Kelly D.; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Giacobbe, Peter; Targum, Steven D.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to modulate the activity of dysfunctional brain circuits. The safety and efficacy of DBS in dementia is unknown. Objective: To assess DBS of memory circuits as a treatment for patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods: We evaluated active “on” versus sham “off” bilateral DBS directed at the fornix-a major fiber bundle in the brain’s memory circuit-in a randomized, double-blind trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01608061) in 42 patients with mild AD. We measured cognitive function and cerebral glucose metabolism up to 12 months post-implantation. Results: Surgery and electrical stimulation were safe and well tolerated. There were no significant differences in the primary cognitive outcomes (ADAS-Cog 13, CDR-SB) in the “on” versus “off” stimulation group at 12 months for the whole cohort. Patients receiving stimulation showed increased metabolism at 6 months but this was not significant at 12 months. On post-hoc analysis, there was a significant interaction between age and treatment outcome: in contrast to patients <65 years old (n = 12) whose results trended toward being worse with DBS ON versus OFF, in patients≥65 (n = 30) DBS-f ON treatment was associated with a trend toward both benefit on clinical outcomes and a greater increase in cerebral glucose metabolism. Conclusion: DBS for AD was safe and associated with increased cerebral glucose metabolism. There were no differences in cognitive outcomes for participants as a whole, but participants aged≥65 years may have derived benefit while there was possible worsening in patients below age 65 years with stimulation. PMID:27567810

  11. Crustal structure and geodynamic of the Middle and Lower reaches of Yangtze metallogenic belt and neighboring areas: insights from deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Q.; Shi, D.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.

    2014-12-01

    A 300 km deep seismic reflection profile across the middle and lower Yangtze River metallogenic belt (YRMB) and its adjacent areas established the architecture and geodynamic framework of the region. Results based on the interpretation of the deep seismic data include the deep complicated geometry of the Tan-Lu fault and Zhangbaling uplift, appears as a subvertical thrust fault with its deep portion dip toward the southeast, and along which the Zhangbaling uplift is squeezed out; complex upper crust deformation structure beneath Chuquan depression, within which there are both kink bands, thrusts, imbrication and fold structures reflecting contraction deformation, and detachment fault and normal-fault structures reflecting extensional deformation; the "crocodile" reflection structure emerging beneath the Tan-Lu fault and Ningwu-Lishui volcanic basin, i.e., the upper crust reflection thrust upward, and the lower crust reflection thrust downward and offsetting the Moho discontinuity, which reflects the decoupled deformation process of the upper and lower crust, and is interpreted as an intracontinental subduction. Further to the southeast, the upper crust deformation shows a large-scale "wave-form" pattern, making crustal scale syncline and anticline. The entire section of the reflection Moho is clearly discernible at depth of 30.0-34.5 km, and the Moho beneath the YRMB is shallowest, while the Moho beneath the North China block is deeper than that beneath the Yangtze block. Moho offsets could be seen beneath the Ningwu volcanic basin. Overall, the seismic data show evidence for an intracontinental orogeny and imposes constraints on the deep geodynamic model applied to study region. Our interpretation of seismic profile supports the view that the Yanshanian orogeny, due to the northwest subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate during the Middle-Late Jurassic, is the major event that shaped the tectonic framework of the region. A geodynamic model is proposed for the

  12. Shear banding in a lyotropic lamellar phase. I. Time-averaged velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Jean-Baptiste; Manneville, Sébastien; Colin, Annie

    2003-11-01

    Using velocity profile measurements based on dynamic light scattering and coupled to structural and rheological measurements in a Couette cell, we present evidences for a shear banding scenario in the shear flow of the onion texture of a lyotropic lamellar phase. Time-averaged measurements clearly show the presence of structural shear banding in the vicinity of a shear-induced transition, associated with the nucleation and growth of a highly sheared band in the flow. Our experiments also reveal the presence of slip at the walls of the Couette cell. Using a simple mechanical approach, we demonstrate that our data confirm the classical assumption of the shear banding picture, in which the interface between bands lies at a given stress σ*. We also outline the presence of large temporal fluctuations of the flow field, which are the subject of the second part of this paper [Salmon et al., Phys. Rev. E 68, 051504 (2003)].

  13. Surface profiling of a transparent object by use of phase-shifting Talbot interferometry.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Madhuri; Tay, Cho Jui; Quan, Chenggen

    2005-05-01

    Talbot interferometry is used to study the surface profile of a transparent object. Periodic patterns are produced by illuminating a grating with a collimated laser beam. The object is placed on the self-image plane of the grating. The deformed grating image, which interferes with another grating, results in the Talbot interferometric fringes. The fringe pattern is recorded on a CCD camera for subsequent analysis, and the phase variation is achieved by a linear translation stage. In this application two specimens are tested to demonstrate the validity of the method; one is a transparent object with a spherical shape with a height of less than 350 microm, and the other is a transparent object with an uneven surface of 50-microm average height. The experimental results are compared with the test results obtained with the mechanical stylus method. PMID:15881061

  14. Improvements in the vapor-time profile analysis of explosive odorants using solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Young, Mimy; Schantz, Michele; MacCrehan, William

    2016-07-15

    A modified approach for characterization of the vapor-time profile of the headspace odors of explosives was developed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) incorporating introduction of an externally-sampled internal standard (ESIS) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. With this new method, reproducibility of the measurements of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and cyclohexanone were improved compared to previous work (Hoffman et al., 2009; Arthur and Pawliszyn, 1990) through the use of stable-isotope-labeled internal standards. Exposing the SPME fiber to the ESIS after sampling the target analyte proved to be advantageous, while still correcting for fiber variability and detector drift. For the analysis of high volatility compounds, incorporation of the ESIS using the SPME fiber in the retracted position minimized the subsequent competitive loss of the target analyte, allowing for much longer sampling times.

  15. Nocturnal Melatonin Profiles in Patients with Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder and Control Sleepers.

    PubMed

    Micic, Gorica; Lovato, Nicole; Gradisar, Michael; Burgess, Helen J; Ferguson, Sally A; Kennaway, David J; Lack, Leon

    2015-10-01

    A significant delay in the timing of endogenous circadian rhythms has been associated with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). More recently, other mechanisms have also been proposed to account for this disorder. To further explore the etiology of DSPD, the present study compared nocturnal melatonin profiles of 26 DSPD patients (18 males, 8 females; age, 21.73 ± 4.98 years) and 17 normally timed good sleepers (10 males, 7 females; age, 23.82 ± 5.23 years) in a time-free, dim-light (<10 lux) laboratory environment. A 30-h modified constant routine with alternating 20-min sleep opportunities and 40 min of enforced wakefulness was used to measure the endogenous melatonin circadian rhythm. Salivary melatonin was sampled half-hourly from 1820 h to 0020 h and then hourly from 0120 h to 1620 h. DSPD patients had significantly later timed melatonin profiles that were delayed by approximately 3 h compared to normal sleepers, and there were no notable differences in the relative duration of secretion between groups. However, melatonin secretion between dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) and acrophase was less prominent in DSPD patients compared to good sleepers, who showed a more acute initial surge of melatonin following the DLMO. Although the regulatory role of melatonin is unknown, abnormal melatonin profiles have been linked to psychiatric and neurological disorders (e.g., major depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, Parkinson disease). These results therefore suggest that in addition to a delayed endogenous circadian rhythm, a diminished initial surge of melatonin secretion following DLMO may contribute to the etiology of DSPD.

  16. The direct determination of magnetic domain wall profiles by differential phase contrast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J N; Batson, P E; Waddell, E M; Ferrier, R P

    1978-01-01

    A new technique for the quantitative investigation of magnetic structures in ferromagnetic thin films is proposed. Unlike previous techniques the detected signal is simply related to the magnetic induction in the film, and as such the direct determination of domain wall profiles is possible. The technique utilizes a differential phase contrast mode of scanning transmission electron microscopy in which the normal bright field detector is replaced by a split-detector lying symmetrically about the optic axis of the system. The difference signal from the two halves of the detector provides the required magnetic information. Analysis of the image formation mechanism shows that, using a commercially available scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a field emission gun, wall profiles should be obtainable directly from most structures of interest in Lorentz microscopy. Furthermore, signal-to-noise considerations indicate that these results can be obtained in acceptably short recording times. Finally, experimental results using both polycrystalline and single crystal specimens are presented, which confirm the theoretical predictions. PMID:358526

  17. Phase and Size Control of Core-Shell Upconversion Nanocrystals Light up Deep Dual Luminescence Imaging and CT In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ning; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Yaming; Wang, Dong; Chen, Chuan; Ye, Shefang; Nie, Liming; Ren, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Upconversion nanocrystals (UCNCs) have recently been explored as optical imaging nanoprobes. However, conventional β-NaLuF4 (-) based UCNCs often suffer from large particle size and weak upconversion luminescence (UCL) intensity, leading to poor biocompatibility and low detection sensitivity. Here, a novel strategy for controlling the crystalline phase and size of UCNCs has been developed by doping of yttrium ions, resulting in particle size reduction and phase transition. The total UCL intensity of prepared core-shell UCNCs is significantly enhanced up to ≈4.9 and ≈17.4 times after Tm(3+) and Er(3+) doping than that of core UCNCs, offering deeper tissue UCL imaging with a depth of 8 mm in vivo. Moreover, the CT signal of core-shell UCNCs is ≈1.5 and ≈3.5 times brighter than that of core UCNCs and commercial ioversol agent because of increasing contents of Lu(3+) doped in UCNCs. The synthesized core-shell UCNCs hold a great promise in deep UCL and CT dual-modality imaging in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26990395

  18. Dynamical Consequences of the Post-Perovksite Phase Transition and Implications for Radiative Heat Transfer in Deep Mantle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, D. A.; Matyska, C.

    2004-12-01

    The recent discovery of a phase transition from the perovskite ( PV) to post-perovskite ( PPV ) in the deep lower mantle has important implications for plume dynamics and physical properties in the lower mantle. The proximity of this exothermic phase transition to the core-mantle boundary would exert a profound influence on the generation of lower mantle plumes. We have employed a two-dimensional Cartesian model within the framework of the extended Boussinesq approximation for handling phase transitions for both the spinel to perovskite and the PV to PPV transition. An aspect-ratio 10 box is employed for variable viscosity. For the backgorund state we have used a depth-dependent thermal expansivity and a depth-dependent viscosity with a high viscosity peak in the lower mantle . Both constant and temperature-dependent viscosity models have been considered. The important distinction we found here is the thermal conductivity model. For a constant thermal conductivity model we obtained many small-scale instabilities and the lack of mega plume-like structures. This result does not depend on the type of viscosity employed. However, coherent large upwellings are obtained with the introduction of a temperature-dependent power-law radiative thermal conductivity ( Matyska et al., 1994). Cold downwellings have great difficulties reaching the base of the mantle because of efficient thermal assimilation by radiative transfer. Our findings point to the potential importance of radiative transfer in the deep mantle suggested recently ( Badro et al., 2004 ) , if one were to reconcile with both the existence of the PPV transition and the presence of the two mega slow velocity structures in the lower mantle, inferred from seismic tomography. Matyska, C., Moser, J. and D.A. Yuen, The potential influence of radiative heat transfer on the formation of megaplumes in the lower mantle, Earth Planetary Sci Lett., 125, 255-266, 1994. Badro, J., Rueff, J-P., Vanko, G., Monaco, G., Fiquet, G

  19. Deep RNA-Seq profile reveals biodiversity, plant-microbe interactions and a large family of NBS-LRR resistance genes in walnut (Juglans regia) tissues.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Britton, Monica; Martínez-García, P J; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2016-03-01

    Deep RNA-Seq profiling, a revolutionary method used for quantifying transcriptional levels, often includes non-specific transcripts from other co-existing organisms in spite of stringent protocols. Using the recently published walnut genome sequence as a filter, we present a broad analysis of the RNA-Seq derived transcriptome profiles obtained from twenty different tissues to extract the biodiversity and possible plant-microbe interactions in the walnut ecosystem in California. Since the residual nature of the transcripts being analyzed does not provide sufficient information to identify the exact strain, inferences made are constrained to the genus level. The presence of the pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora was detected in the root through the presence of a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Cryptococcus, the causal agent of cryptococcosis, was found in the catkins and vegetative buds, corroborating previous work indicating that the plant surface supported the sexual cycle of this human pathogen. The RNA-Seq profile revealed several species of the endophytic nitrogen fixing Actinobacteria. Another bacterial species implicated in aerobic biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (Methylibium petroleiphilum) is also found in the root. RNA encoding proteins from the pea aphid were found in the leaves and vegetative buds, while a serine protease from mosquito with significant homology to a female reproductive tract protease from Drosophila mojavensis in the vegetative bud suggests egg-laying activities. The comprehensive analysis of RNA-seq data present also unraveled detailed, tissue-specific information of ~400 transcripts encoded by the largest family of resistance (R) genes (NBS-LRR), which possibly rationalizes the resistance of the specific walnut plant to the pathogens detected. Thus, we elucidate the biodiversity and possible plant-microbe interactions in several walnut (Juglans regia) tissues in California using deep RNA-Seq profiling.

  20. Comparison of Vibroseis and explosive source methods for deep crustal seismic reflection profiling in the Basin and Range province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.

    1991-01-01

    Direct comparison of low-fold, high-energy explosive and high-fold, lower-energy Vibroseis methods for acquiring deep crustal seismic reflection data in the Basin and Range Province suggests that the high-fold common midpoint (CMP) method there does not provide the best possible image of lower crustal structure. -from Authors

  1. Phase retrieval from a single interferometric pattern to determine the profile caused by laser ablation on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, M. I.; López-Olazagasti, E.; Rosales, M. A.; Ibarra, Jorge; Tepichín, E.

    2009-08-01

    We have been working in the interferometric analysis of the ablation profile obtained with different techniques of refractive surgery, applied directly on hard contact lenses. We have demonstrated qualitatively that different ablations produce different fringe patterns; implying different focal shifts1. These results were obtained by means of a Mach- Zehnder type interferometer, where we used a similar unablated contact lens as a reference. Due to the size of each sample, it is difficult to get different fringe patterns with different phase factors. Therefore, the typical phase shifting methods are not suitable in our case. To determine the corresponding profile caused by the different ablation techniques we applied in this work the interpolation method that provide an analysis of static fringe patterns. This method of phase retrieval allows us to obtain the PSF and MTF related to each profile. The advantage of this procedure is that we can obtain a time invariant performance of the resulting ablated surface.

  2. New long trace profiler based on phase plate diffraction for optical metrology of SSRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Danhua; Xiao, Tiqiao; Du, Guohao; Wen, Li; Luo, Hongxin; Xia, Shaojian; Xu, Hongjie

    2006-09-01

    A long trace profiler LTP-1200, with a novel f-θ system based on phase plate diffraction and a scanning range up to 1200mm, has been developed at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The central dark line in the diffraction pattern generated by a π phase plate is taken as the positioning benchmark. A magnet levitated linear rail with very high accuracy is used. A granite bench is employed to reduce deformation due to self-gravity of the rail. The focused diffraction pattern is recorded with an area charge-coupled device. The generalized regression neural network algorithm is adopted to improve the beam positioning precision. The static stability of LTP-1200 in 5h is 0.14μrad, and the repeatability reaches 0.05μrad in a common laboratory without any special control of temperature, air turbulence, etc. Calibration tests were carried out with a high precision autocollimator and a standard spherical mirror, respectively. Results show the high performance and reliability of the LTP-1200.

  3. New long trace profiler based on phase plate diffraction for optical metrology of SSRF

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Danhua; Xiao Tiqiao; Du Guohao; Wen Li; Luo Hongxin; Xia Shaojian; Xu Hongjie

    2006-09-15

    A long trace profiler LTP-1200, with a novel f-{theta} system based on phase plate diffraction and a scanning range up to 1200 mm, has been developed at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The central dark line in the diffraction pattern generated by a {pi} phase plate is taken as the positioning benchmark. A magnet levitated linear rail with very high accuracy is used. A granite bench is employed to reduce deformation due to self-gravity of the rail. The focused diffraction pattern is recorded with an area charge-coupled device. The generalized regression neural network algorithm is adopted to improve the beam positioning precision. The static stability of LTP-1200 in 5 h is 0.14 {mu}rad, and the repeatability reaches 0.05 {mu}rad in a common laboratory without any special control of temperature, air turbulence, etc. Calibration tests were carried out with a high precision autocollimator and a standard spherical mirror, respectively. Results show the high performance and reliability of the LTP-1200.

  4. Solid phase extraction and metabolic profiling of exudates from living copepods

    PubMed Central

    Heuschele, Jan; Nylund, Göran M.; Pohnert, Georg; Pavia, Henrik; Bjærke, Oda; Pender-Healy, Larisa A.; Tiselius, Peter; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Copepods are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats. They exude bioactive compounds that mediate mate finding or induce defensive traits in prey organisms. However, little is known about the chemical nature of the copepod exometabolome that contributes to the chemical landscape in pelagic habitats. Here we describe the development of a closed loop solid phase extraction setup that allows for extraction of exuded metabolites from live copepods. We captured exudates from male and female Temora longicornis and analyzed the content with high resolution LC-MS. Chemometric methods revealed 87 compounds that constitute a specific chemical pattern either qualitatively or quantitatively indicating copepod presence. The majority of the compounds were present in both female and male exudates, but nine compounds were mainly or exclusively present in female exudates and hence potential pheromone candidates. Copepodamide G, known to induce defensive responses in phytoplankton, was among the ten compounds of highest relative abundance in both male and female extracts. The presence of copepodamide G shows that the method can be used to capture and analyze chemical signals from living source organisms. We conclude that solid phase extraction in combination with metabolic profiling of exudates is a useful tool to develop our understanding of the chemical interplay between pelagic organisms. PMID:26788422

  5. Predictive model for toluene degradation and microbial phenotypic profiles in flat plate vapor phase bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mirpuri, R.; Sharp, W.; Villaverde, S.; Jones, W.; Lewandowski, Z.; Cunningham, A.

    1997-06-01

    A predictive model has been developed to describe degradation of toluene in a flat-plate vapor phase bioreactor (VPBR). The VPBR model incorporates kinetic, stoichiometric, injury, and irreversible loss coefficients from suspended culture studies for toluene degradation by P. putida 54G and measured values of Henry`s law constant and boundary layer thickness at the gas-liquid and liquid-biofilm interface. The model is used to estimate the performance of the reactor with respect to toluene degradation and to predict profiles of toluene concentration and bacterial physiological state within the biofilm. These results have been compared with experimentally determined values from a flat plate VPBR under electron acceptor and electron donor limiting conditions. The model accurately predicts toluene concentrations in the vapor phase and toluene degradation rate by adjusting only three parameters: biomass density and rates of death and endogenous decay. Qualitatively, the model also predicts gradients in the physiological state cells in the biofilm. This model provides a rational design for predicting an upper limit of toluene degradation capability in a VPBR and is currently being tested to assess applications for predicting performance of bench and pilot-scale column reactors.

  6. Evaluation of an Extended Autocorrelation Phase Estimator for Ultrasonic Velocity Profiles Using Nondestructive Testing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ofuchi, César Yutaka; Coutinho, Fabio Rizental; Neves, Flávio; de Arruda, Lucia Valéria Ramos; Morales, Rigoberto Eleazar Melgarejo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the extended autocorrelation velocity estimator is evaluated and compared using a nondestructive ultrasonic device. For this purpose, three velocity estimators are evaluated and compared. The autocorrelation method (ACM) is the most used and well established in current ultrasonic velocity profiler technology, however, the technique suffers with phase aliasing (also known as the Nyquist limit) at higher velocities. The cross-correlation method (CCM) is also well known and does not suffer with phase aliasing as it relies on time shift measurements between emissions. The problem of this method is the large computational burden due to several required mathematical operations. Recently, an extended autocorrelation method (EAM) which combines both ACM and CCM was developed. The technique is not well known within the fluid engineering community, but it can measure velocities beyond the Nyquist limit without the ACM phase aliasing issues and with a lower computational cost than CCM. In this work, all three velocity estimation methods are used to measure a uniform flow of the liquid inside a controlled rotating cylinder. The root-mean-square deviation variation coefficient (CVRMSD) of the velocity estimate and the reference cylinder velocity was used to evaluate the three different methods. Results show that EAM correctly measures velocities below the Nyquist limit with less than 2% CVRMSD. Velocities beyond the Nyquist limit are only measured well by EAM and CCM, with the advantage of the former of being computationally 15 times faster. Furthermore, the maximum value of measurable velocity is also investigated considering the number of times the velocity surpasses the Nyquist limit. The combination of number of pulses and number of samples, which highly affects the results, are also studied in this work. Velocities up to six times the Nyquist limit could be measurable with CCM and EAM using a set of parameters as suggested in this work. The results validate

  7. Evaluation of an Extended Autocorrelation Phase Estimator for Ultrasonic Velocity Profiles Using Nondestructive Testing Systems.

    PubMed

    Ofuchi, César Yutaka; Coutinho, Fabio Rizental; Neves, Flávio; de Arruda, Lucia Valéria Ramos; Morales, Rigoberto Eleazar Melgarejo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the extended autocorrelation velocity estimator is evaluated and compared using a nondestructive ultrasonic device. For this purpose, three velocity estimators are evaluated and compared. The autocorrelation method (ACM) is the most used and well established in current ultrasonic velocity profiler technology, however, the technique suffers with phase aliasing (also known as the Nyquist limit) at higher velocities. The cross-correlation method (CCM) is also well known and does not suffer with phase aliasing as it relies on time shift measurements between emissions. The problem of this method is the large computational burden due to several required mathematical operations. Recently, an extended autocorrelation method (EAM) which combines both ACM and CCM was developed. The technique is not well known within the fluid engineering community, but it can measure velocities beyond the Nyquist limit without the ACM phase aliasing issues and with a lower computational cost than CCM. In this work, all three velocity estimation methods are used to measure a uniform flow of the liquid inside a controlled rotating cylinder. The root-mean-square deviation variation coefficient (CVRMSD) of the velocity estimate and the reference cylinder velocity was used to evaluate the three different methods. Results show that EAM correctly measures velocities below the Nyquist limit with less than 2% CVRMSD. Velocities beyond the Nyquist limit are only measured well by EAM and CCM, with the advantage of the former of being computationally 15 times faster. Furthermore, the maximum value of measurable velocity is also investigated considering the number of times the velocity surpasses the Nyquist limit. The combination of number of pulses and number of samples, which highly affects the results, are also studied in this work. Velocities up to six times the Nyquist limit could be measurable with CCM and EAM using a set of parameters as suggested in this work. The results validate

  8. Evaluation of an Extended Autocorrelation Phase Estimator for Ultrasonic Velocity Profiles Using Nondestructive Testing Systems.

    PubMed

    Ofuchi, César Yutaka; Coutinho, Fabio Rizental; Neves, Flávio; de Arruda, Lucia Valéria Ramos; Morales, Rigoberto Eleazar Melgarejo

    2016-08-09

    In this paper the extended autocorrelation velocity estimator is evaluated and compared using a nondestructive ultrasonic device. For this purpose, three velocity estimators are evaluated and compared. The autocorrelation method (ACM) is the most used and well established in current ultrasonic velocity profiler technology, however, the technique suffers with phase aliasing (also known as the Nyquist limit) at higher velocities. The cross-correlation method (CCM) is also well known and does not suffer with phase aliasing as it relies on time shift measurements between emissions. The problem of this method is the large computational burden due to several required mathematical operations. Recently, an extended autocorrelation method (EAM) which combines both ACM and CCM was developed. The technique is not well known within the fluid engineering community, but it can measure velocities beyond the Nyquist limit without the ACM phase aliasing issues and with a lower computational cost than CCM. In this work, all three velocity estimation methods are used to measure a uniform flow of the liquid inside a controlled rotating cylinder. The root-mean-square deviation variation coefficient (CVRMSD) of the velocity estimate and the reference cylinder velocity was used to evaluate the three different methods. Results show that EAM correctly measures velocities below the Nyquist limit with less than 2% CVRMSD. Velocities beyond the Nyquist limit are only measured well by EAM and CCM, with the advantage of the former of being computationally 15 times faster. Furthermore, the maximum value of measurable velocity is also investigated considering the number of times the velocity surpasses the Nyquist limit. The combination of number of pulses and number of samples, which highly affects the results, are also studied in this work. Velocities up to six times the Nyquist limit could be measurable with CCM and EAM using a set of parameters as suggested in this work. The results validate

  9. Dasatinib induces fast and deep responses in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukaemia patients in chronic phase: clinical results from a randomised phase-2 study (NordCML006)

    PubMed Central

    Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Stenke, Leif; Söderlund, Stina; Dreimane, Arta; Ehrencrona, Hans; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Höglund, Martin; Koskenvesa, Perttu; Lotfi, Kourosh; Majeed, Waleed; Markevärn, Berit; Ohm, Lotta; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Remes, Kari; Suominen, Merja; Simonsson, Bengt; Porkka, Kimmo; Mustjoki, Satu; Richter, Johan

    2015-01-01

    We randomised 46 newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (median age 56) to receive dasatinib 100 mg QD or imatinib 400 mg QD and report outcome as an intention-to-treat analysis with 36 months follow-up. Early cytogenetic and molecular responses were superior in the dasatinib group, with a tendency that imatinib patients caught up with time. For instance, MR3.0 was reached at 3 months in 36% vs. 8% (P = 0.02), at 12 months in 81% vs. 46% (P = 0.02) and at 18 months in 73% vs. 65% (n.s.) of the patients in the two groups. In contrast, MR4.5 was consistently superior in the dasatinib group at all time points from 6 months onwards, reaching 61% vs. 21% (P < 0.05) at 36 months. Sixty-four vs. 71% of the patients in the dasatinib and imatinib arms, respectively, remained on assigned drug. Dasatinib dose was frequently reduced, but with maintained excellent effect. One imatinib patient progressed to blastic phase, but no CML-related deaths occurred. In conclusion, our data compare favourably with those of the dasatinib registration study, DASISION. The fast and deep molecular responses induced by dasatinib compared with imatinib may be exploited to increase the proportion of patients who can achieve a treatment-free remission after treatment discontinuation. PMID:25082346

  10. Molecularly imprinted polymers combination with deep eutectic solvents for solid-phase extraction of caffeic acid from hawthorn.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Tang, Weiyang; Cao, Weimin; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with caffeic acid as template and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) materials were prepared in the same procedure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and adsorption capacity test were used to evaluate characteristic of the new materials. MIPs, NIPs and C18 were used for rapid purification of caffeic acid from hawthorn with solid-phase extraction ( SPE) , and extract yields of caffeic acid with the proposed materials were 3.46 µg/g, 1.01 µg/g and 1.17 µg/g, respectively. To optimize the MIPs-SPE procedures, different kinds of elution solutions were studied. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were prepared by choline chloride (ChCl)-glycerol (1/2, n/n) and choline chloride-urea (1/ 2, n/n). Methanol was mixed with the two kinds of DESs (glycerol-based DESs, urea-based DESs) in different ratios (0.5:1, 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1, 5:1, v/v), and they were used to investigated as elution solutions in the above MIPs-SPE procedures. The results showed that MIPs were potential SPE materials, and methanol/ glycerol-based DESs (3 :1, v/v) had the best elution capability with the recovery of 82.32%.

  11. Molecularly imprinted polymers combination with deep eutectic solvents for solid-phase extraction of caffeic acid from hawthorn.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Tang, Weiyang; Cao, Weimin; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with caffeic acid as template and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) materials were prepared in the same procedure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and adsorption capacity test were used to evaluate characteristic of the new materials. MIPs, NIPs and C18 were used for rapid purification of caffeic acid from hawthorn with solid-phase extraction ( SPE) , and extract yields of caffeic acid with the proposed materials were 3.46 µg/g, 1.01 µg/g and 1.17 µg/g, respectively. To optimize the MIPs-SPE procedures, different kinds of elution solutions were studied. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were prepared by choline chloride (ChCl)-glycerol (1/2, n/n) and choline chloride-urea (1/ 2, n/n). Methanol was mixed with the two kinds of DESs (glycerol-based DESs, urea-based DESs) in different ratios (0.5:1, 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1, 5:1, v/v), and they were used to investigated as elution solutions in the above MIPs-SPE procedures. The results showed that MIPs were potential SPE materials, and methanol/ glycerol-based DESs (3 :1, v/v) had the best elution capability with the recovery of 82.32%. PMID:26749853

  12. Cytokine Profile of Children Hospitalized with Virologically-Confirmed Dengue during Two Phase III Vaccine Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Harenberg, Anke; de Montfort, Aymeric; Jantet-Blaudez, Frédérique; Bonaparte, Matthew; Boudet, Florence; Saville, Melanie; Jackson, Nicholas; Guy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background Two large-scale efficacy studies with the recombinant yellow fever-17D–dengue virus, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) candidate undertaken in Asia (NCT01373281) and Latin America (NCT01374516) demonstrated significant protection against dengue disease during two years’ active surveillance (active phase). Long-term follow up of participants for breakthrough disease leading to hospitalization is currently ongoing (hospital phase). Methodology/Principal findings We assessed the cytokine profile in acute sera from selected participants hospitalized (including during the active phase) up to the beginning of the second year of long-term follow up for both studies. The serum concentrations of 38 cytokines were measured in duplicate using the Milliplex Human Cytokine MAGNETIC BEAD Premixed 38 Plex commercial kit (Millipore, Billerica, MA, USA). Partial least squares discriminant analyses did not reveal any difference in the overall cytokine profile of CYD-TDV and placebo recipients hospitalized for breakthrough dengue regardless of stratification used. In addition, there was no difference in the cytokine profile for breakthrough dengue among those aged <9 years versus those aged ≥ 9 years. Conclusions/Significance These exploratory findings show that CYD-TDV does not induce a particular immune profile versus placebo, corroborating the clinical profile observed. PMID:27459266

  13. 30 CFR 203.42 - What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a perforated interval the top of which is 18,000 feet TVD SS or deeper, your lease cannot earn an... feet TVD SS, or 18,000 feet TVD SS and deeper), regardless of the number of subsequent qualified wells... TVD SS and earns an RSV of 12.5 BCF, and you later drill a qualified original deep well to 17,000...

  14. Study of cosmic-ray modulation during the recent deep solar minimum, mini maximum and intervening ascending phase of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin, B.; Aslam, O. P. M.

    After a prolonged and deep solar minimum at the end of cycle 23, current solar cycle 24 is one of the very low active cycles, weakest cycle in more than 50 years. These two periods of deep minima and mini maxima are separated by a period of increasing solar activity as measured by sunspot numbers. We study the cosmic ray relationship with the solar activity, heliospheric plasma and field parameters including the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), during these three periods (phases) of different level and nature of solar activity; (a) a deep minimum, (b) an increasing period and (c) a ‘mini’ maximum. We utilize the neutron monitor data from stations located around the globe to study the rigidity dependence of modulation during the two extremes, i.e., minima and maxima. We also study the time lag between the GCR intensity and various solar/interplanetary parameters separately during the three activity phases. Using the cosmic ray data of neutron monitors with different cutoff rigidities, we study the rigidity dependence of time lag during individual phases. The role/effectiveness of various parameters, including the HCS tilt, in modulating the GCR intensity during the three different phases has also been studied by correlation analysis. The relative importance of various physical processes during different phases and the implication of these results for modulation models are also discussed.

  15. Remote Sensing the Vertical Profile of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius, Thermodynamic Phase, and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martins, J. V.; Marshak, A.; Remer, L. A.; Rosenfeld, D.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Fernandez-Borda, R.; Koren, I.; Correia, A. L.; Zubko, V.; Artaxo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud-aerosol interaction is a key issue in the climate system, affecting the water cycle, the weather, and the total energy balance including the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heat release. Information on the vertical distribution of cloud droplet microphysics and thermodynamic phase as a function of temperature or height, can be correlated with details of the aerosol field to provide insight on how these particles are affecting cloud properties and their consequences to cloud lifetime, precipitation, water cycle, and general energy balance. Unfortunately, today's experimental methods still lack the observational tools that can characterize the true evolution of the cloud microphysical, spatial and temporal structure in the cloud droplet scale, and then link these characteristics to environmental factors and properties of the cloud condensation nuclei. Here we propose and demonstrate a new experimental approach (the cloud scanner instrument) that provides the microphysical information missed in current experiments and remote sensing options. Cloud scanner measurements can be performed from aircraft, ground, or satellite by scanning the side of the clouds from the base to the top, providing us with the unique opportunity of obtaining snapshots of the cloud droplet microphysical and thermodynamic states as a function of height and brightness temperature in clouds at several development stages. The brightness temperature profile of the cloud side can be directly associated with the thermodynamic phase of the droplets to provide information on the glaciation temperature as a function of different ambient conditions, aerosol concentration, and type. An aircraft prototype of the cloud scanner was built and flew in a field campaign in Brazil.

  16. Design and analysis of low-loss linear analog phase modulator for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder (DST) application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Mueller, Robert O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design concepts, analyses, and the development of an X-band transponder low-loss linear phase modulator for deep space spacecraft applications. A single section breadboard circulator-coupled reflection phase modulator has been analyzed, fabricated, and evaluated. Two- and three-cascaded sections have been modeled and simulations performed to provide an X-band DST phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians of peak phase deviation to accommodate down-link signal modulation with composite telemetry data and ranging with a deviation linearity tolerance +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 10 +/- 0.5 dB. A two-section phase modulator using constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit was breadboarded. The measured results satisfy the DST phase modulator requirements, and excellent agreement with the predicted results.

  17. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. L.; Hua, J. F.; Wu, Y. P.; Zhang, C. J.; Li, F.; Wan, Y.; Pai, C.-H.; Lu, W.; An, W.; Yu, P.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2016-03-01

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles.

  18. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles.

    PubMed

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Wu, Y P; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-03-25

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles.

  19. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles.

    PubMed

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Wu, Y P; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-03-25

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles. PMID:27058082

  20. Molecular profiling of patients with colorectal cancer and matched targeted therapy in phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Serpico, Danila; Rodon, Jordi; Saura, Cristina; Macarulla, Teresa; Elez, Elena; Alsina, Maria; Capdevila, Jaume; Perez-Garcia, Jose; Sánchez-Ollé, Gessamí; Aura, Claudia; Prudkin, Ludmila; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Vivancos, Ana; Tabernero, Josep

    2012-09-01

    Clinical experience increasingly suggests that molecular prescreening and biomarker enrichment strategies in phase I trials with targeted therapies will improve the outcomes of patients with cancer. In keeping with the exigencies of a personalized oncology program, tumors from patients with advanced chemorefractory colorectal cancer were analyzed for specific aberrations (KRAS/BRAF/PIK3CA mutations, PTEN and pMET expression). Patients were subsequently offered phase I trials with matched targeted agents (MTA) directed at the identified anomalies. During 2010 and 2011, tumor molecular analysis was conducted in 254 patients: KRAS mutations (80 of 254, 31.5%), BRAF mutations (24 of 196, 12.2%), PIK3CA mutations (15 of 114, 13.2%), KRAS and PIK3CA mutations (9 of 114, 7.9%), low PTEN expression (97 of 183, 53.0%), and high pMET expression (38 of 64, 59.4%). In total, 68 patients received 82 different MTAs: phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway inhibitor (if PIK3CA mutation, n = 10; or low PTEN, n = 32), PI3K pathway inhibitor plus MEK inhibitor (if KRAS mutation, n = 10; or BRAF mutation, n = 1), second-generation anti-EGF receptor monoclonal antibodies (if wild-type KRAS, n = 11), anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal antibody (if high pMET, n = 10), mTOR inhibitor plus anti-insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor monoclonal antibody (if low PTEN, n = 5), and BRAF inhibitor (if BRAF mutation, n = 3). Median time-to-treatment failure on MTA was 7.9 versus 16.3 weeks for their prior systemic antitumor therapy (P < 0.001). Partial response was seen in 1 patient [1.2%, PI3K inhibitor with PIK3CA mutation] and stable disease >16 weeks in 10 cases (12.2%). These results suggest that matching chemorefractory patients with colorectal cancer with targeted agents in phase I trials based on the current molecular profile does not confer a significant clinical benefit.

  1. HPV Population Profiling in Healthy Men by Next-Generation Deep Sequencing Coupled with HPV-QUEST

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Yao, Jin; Chang, Kaifen; Gardner, Brent P.; Yu, Fahong; Giuliano, Anna R.; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple-type human papillomaviruses (HPV) infection presents a greater risk for persistence in asymptomatic individuals and may accelerate cancer development. To extend the scope of HPV types defined by probe-based assays, multiplexing deep sequencing of HPV L1, coupled with an HPV-QUEST genotyping server and a bioinformatic pipeline, was established and applied to survey the diversity of HPV genotypes among a subset of healthy men from the HPV in Men (HIM) Multinational Study. Twenty-one HPV genotypes (12 high-risk and 9 low-risk) were detected in the genital area from 18 asymptomatic individuals. A single HPV type, either HPV16, HPV6b or HPV83, was detected in 7 individuals, while coinfection by 2 to 5 high-risk and/or low-risk genotypes was identified in the other 11 participants. In two individuals studied for over one year, HPV16 persisted, while fluctuations of coinfecting genotypes occurred. HPV L1 regions were generally identical between query and reference sequences, although nonsynonymous and synonymous nucleotide polymorphisms of HPV16, 18, 31, 35h, 59, 70, 73, cand85, 6b, 62, 81, 83, cand89 or JEB2 L1 genotypes, mostly unidentified by linear array, were evident. Deep sequencing coupled with HPV-QUEST provides efficient and unambiguous classification of HPV genotypes in multiple-type HPV infection in host ecosystems. PMID:26821041

  2. HPV Population Profiling in Healthy Men by Next-Generation Deep Sequencing Coupled with HPV-QUEST.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Yao, Jin; Chang, Kaifen; Gardner, Brent P; Yu, Fahong; Giuliano, Anna R; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2016-01-25

    Multiple-type human papillomaviruses (HPV) infection presents a greater risk for persistence in asymptomatic individuals and may accelerate cancer development. To extend the scope of HPV types defined by probe-based assays, multiplexing deep sequencing of HPV L1, coupled with an HPV-QUEST genotyping server and a bioinformatic pipeline, was established and applied to survey the diversity of HPV genotypes among a subset of healthy men from the HPV in Men (HIM) Multinational Study. Twenty-one HPV genotypes (12 high-risk and 9 low-risk) were detected in the genital area from 18 asymptomatic individuals. A single HPV type, either HPV16, HPV6b or HPV83, was detected in 7 individuals, while coinfection by 2 to 5 high-risk and/or low-risk genotypes was identified in the other 11 participants. In two individuals studied for over one year, HPV16 persisted, while fluctuations of coinfecting genotypes occurred. HPV L1 regions were generally identical between query and reference sequences, although nonsynonymous and synonymous nucleotide polymorphisms of HPV16, 18, 31, 35h, 59, 70, 73, cand85, 6b, 62, 81, 83, cand89 or JEB2 L1 genotypes, mostly unidentified by linear array, were evident. Deep sequencing coupled with HPV-QUEST provides efficient and unambiguous classification of HPV genotypes in multiple-type HPV infection in host ecosystems.

  3. Design and analysis of a low-loss linear analog phase modulator for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Mueller, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the design concepts, analyses, and development of an X-band (8145 MHz) transponder low-loss linear phase modulator for deep space spacecraft applications. A single-section breadboard circulator-coupled reflection phase modulator has been analyzed, fabricated, and evaluated. A linear phase deviation of 92 deg with a linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent was measured for this modulator from 8257 MHz to 8634 MHz over the temperature range -20 to 75 C. The measured insertion loss and the static delay variation with temperature were 2 +/- 0.3 dB and 0.16 psec/ C, respectively. Based on this design, cascaded sections have been modeled, and simulations were performed to provide an X-band deep space transponder (DST) phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians (+/- 143 deg) of peak phase deviation to accommodate downlink signal modulation with composite telemetry data and ranging, with a deviation linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 10 +/- 0.5 dB. A two-section phase modulator using constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit was breadboarded. The measured results satisfy the DST phase-modulator requirements and show excellent agreement with the predicted results.

  4. 30 CFR 203.31 - If I have a qualified phase 2 or qualified phase 3 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... production: (1) An original well, 35 BCF. (2) A sidetrack with a sidetrack measured depth of at least 20,000... . . . Then your lease earns an RSV on this volume of gas production: (i) An original well or a sidetrack with... which is 25,000 feet TVD SS, and your lease has had no prior production from a deep or ultra-deep...

  5. 30 CFR 203.31 - If I have a qualified phase 2 or qualified phase 3 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that is: Then your lease earns an RSV on this volume of gas production: (1) An original well, 35 BCF... RSV on this volume of gas production: (i) An original well or a sidetrack with a sidetrack measured... your lease has had no prior production from a deep or ultra-deep well. Assuming your lease has...

  6. 30 CFR 203.31 - If I have a qualified phase 2 or qualified phase 3 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... production: (1) An original well, 35 BCF. (2) A sidetrack with a sidetrack measured depth of at least 20,000... . . . Then your lease earns an RSV on this volume of gas production: (i) An original well or a sidetrack with... which is 25,000 feet TVD SS, and your lease has had no prior production from a deep or ultra-deep...

  7. 30 CFR 203.31 - If I have a qualified phase 2 or qualified phase 3 ultra-deep well, what royalty relief would...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... production: (1) An original well, 35 BCF. (2) A sidetrack with a sidetrack measured depth of at least 20,000... . . . Then your lease earns an RSV on this volume of gas production: (i) An original well or a sidetrack with... which is 25,000 feet TVD SS, and your lease has had no prior production from a deep or ultra-deep...

  8. 30 CFR 203.33 - To which production do I apply the RSV earned by qualified phase 2 and phase 3 ultra-deep wells...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Deep Wells on Leases Not Subject to Deep Water Royalty Relief § 203.33 To which production do I apply... § 216.53. All gas production from qualified wells reported on the OGOR-A, including production not... production from all the qualified wells in the unit participating area would be allocated to your lease...

  9. Into the Deep: Variability in Soil Microbial Communities and Carbon Turnover Along a Tropical Forest Soil Depth Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; McFarlane, K. J.; Heckman, K. A.; Reed, S.; Wood, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store more carbon (C) than any other terrestrial ecosystem and exchange vast amounts of CO2, water, and energy with the atmosphere. Much of this C is leached and stored within deeper soil layers, but we know exceedingly little about the fate of this C or the microbial communities that drive deep soil biogeochemistry. From the data that do exist, most organic matter (OM) in tropical soils appears associated with mineral particles, suggesting deep soils may provide greater C stabilization due to organo-metal co-precipitation and mineral-surface interactions. However, few studies have evaluated sub-surface soils in tropical ecosystems, the turnover times of deep soil C, and sensitivity of this C to global environmental change. To address this critical research need, we quantified C pools, microbial communities and soil radiocarbon turnover times in bulk soils and soil fractions [free light (unprotected), dense (mineral-associated)] from 0-140 cm in replicate soil pits in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Unsurprisingly, we found soil C, nitrogen, and root and microbial biomass all declined exponentially with depth; total C stocks dropped from 5.5 % at the surface to <0.5% at 140cm depth. Soil OM 14C and mean turnover times were variable across replicate horizons, ranging from 3-1500 years at the surface (0-20 cm), to 5000-40,000 years at 140 cm depth. Soil C in the mineral associated fraction was much older than the free light fraction C, which reflected modern 14C at all depths. In comparison to temperate deciduous forests, these 14C values reflect far older soil C, and OM decomposition that highly favors free light C pools, even at depth. While previous work suggests these low C tropical subsoils contain small but metabolically active microbial communities at depths of ~100cm, these organisms appear highly OM limited, and preferentially degrade recent inputs. In the coming half century, tropical forests are predicted to see a 2 - 5

  10. Chemical profile of the secondary metabolites produced by a deep-sea sediment-derived fungus Penicillium commune SD-118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhuo; Li, Xiaoming; Meng, Li; Li, Chunshun; Gao, Shushan; Huang, Caiguo; Wang, Bingui

    2012-03-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the crude extract from Penicillium commune SD-118, a fungus obtained from a deep-sea sediment sample, resulted in the isolation of a known antibacterial compound, xanthocillin X ( 1), and 14 other known compounds comprising three steroids ( 2-4), two ceramides ( 5 and 6), six aromatic compounds ( 7-12), and three alkaloids ( 13-15). Xanthocillin X ( 1) was isolated for the first time from a marine fungus. In the bioassay, xanthocillin X ( 1) displayed remarkable antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and significant cytotoxicity against MCF-7, HepG2, H460, Hela, Du145, and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Meleagrin ( 15) exhibited cytotoxicity against HepG2, Hela, Du145, and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. This is the first report of the cytotoxicity of xanthocillin X ( 1).

  11. Crustal structure and geodynamics of the Middle and Lower reaches of Yangtze metallogenic belt and neighboring areas: Insights from deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Qingtian; Shi, Danian; Liu, Zhendong; Zhang, Yongqian; Dong, Shuwen; Zhao, Jinhua

    2015-12-01

    A 300 km long seismic reflection profile was acquired across the Middle and Lower Reaches of the Yangtze River (MLY) metallogenic belt and its adjacent areas. The objective of the survey was to establish the deep architecture and geodynamic framework of the region. Results based on the interpretation of the deep seismic data include (1) Tan-Lu fault appears as a subvertical thrust fault or transpression fault with its deep portion dipping toward the southeast; (2) the Zhangbaling uplift is squeezed out along this fault; (3) complex upper crustal deformation structures beneath the Chuquan depression include both kink bands, thrusts, imbrication and fold structures reflecting contraction deformation, and detachment fault and normal-fault structures reflecting extensional deformation; (4) the "crocodile" reflection structure emerging beneath the Tan-Lu fault and Ningwu-Lishui volcanic basin, which represents the decoupled deformation process of the upper and lower crust associated with intra-continental subduction; (5) further to the southeast, the upper crust deformation shows a large-scale "wave-form" pattern, making crustal scale syncline and anticline; (6) the entire section of the reflection Moho is clearly discernible at depth of 30.0-34.5 km, and the Moho beneath the Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtze River metallogenic belt is shallowest, while the Moho beneath the North China block is deeper than that beneath the Yangtze block. The Moho offsets could be seen beneath the Ningwu volcanic basin. The seismic reflection data suggest that lithosphere delamination and asthenosphere upwelling that may result from the Mesozoic intra-continental orogenesis is responsible for the formation of large scale magmatism and mineralization in the MLY metallogenic belt.

  12. Genome-Wide Mutant Fitness Profiling Identifies Nutritional Requirements for Optimal Growth of Yersinia pestis in Deep Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Palace, Samantha G.; Proulx, Megan K.; Lu, Shan; Baker, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rapid growth in deep tissue is essential to the high virulence of Yersinia pestis, causative agent of plague. To better understand the mechanisms underlying this unusual ability, we used transposon mutagenesis and high-throughput sequencing (Tn-seq) to systematically probe the Y. pestis genome for elements contributing to fitness during infection. More than a million independent insertion mutants representing nearly 200,000 unique genotypes were generated in fully virulent Y. pestis. Each mutant in the library was assayed for its ability to proliferate in vitro on rich medium and in mice following intravenous injection. Virtually all genes previously established to contribute to virulence following intravenous infection showed significant fitness defects, with the exception of genes for yersiniabactin biosynthesis, which were masked by strong intercellular complementation effects. We also identified more than 30 genes with roles in nutrient acquisition and metabolism as experiencing strong selection during infection. Many of these genes had not previously been implicated in Y. pestis virulence. We further examined the fitness defects of strains carrying mutations in two such genes—encoding a branched-chain amino acid importer (brnQ) and a glucose importer (ptsG)—both in vivo and in a novel defined synthetic growth medium with nutrient concentrations matching those in serum. Our findings suggest that diverse nutrient limitations in deep tissue play a more important role in controlling bacterial infection than has heretofore been appreciated. Because much is known about Y. pestis pathogenesis, this study also serves as a test case that assesses the ability of Tn-seq to detect virulence genes. PMID:25139902

  13. Theoretical Analysis of Effects of Deep Level, Back Contact, and Absorber Thickness on Capacitance-Voltage Profiling of CdTe Thin-Film Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. V.; Halverson, A. F.; Sulima, O. V.; Bansal, S.; Burst, J. M.; Barnes, T. M.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.

    2012-05-01

    The apparent carrier density profile measured by the capacitance-voltage technique in CdTe thin-film solar cells frequently displays a distinctive U-shape. We show that, even assuming a uniform carrier density, such a U-shape may arise from deep levels, a non-ohmic back-contact, and a thin absorber, which are commonly present in practical CdTe thin-film solar cells. A thin CdTe absorber contributes to the right branch of the U-shape due to a punch-through effect at reverse or zero biases, when the CdTe absorber is nearly fully depleted. A rectifying back-contact contributes to both branches of the U-shape due to voltage sharing with the front junction under a forward bias and early punch-through under a reverse bias. Deep levels contribute to the right branch, but also raise the bottom of the U-shape, leading to an overestimate of carrier density.

  14. Magnetic graphene oxide modified with choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvent for the solid-phase extraction of protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanhua; Wang, Yuzhi; Pan, Qi; Wang, Ying; Ding, Xueqin; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-06-01

    Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on choline chloride (ChCl) have been synthesized and coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4@GO) to form Fe3O4@GO-DES for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein. X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize Fe3O4@GO-DES, and the results indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4@GO-DES. The UV-vis spectrophotometer was used to measure the concentration of protein after extraction. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction amount was influenced by the types of DESs, solution temperature, solution ionic strength, extraction time, protein concentration and the amount of Fe3O4@GO-DES. Comparison of Fe3O4@GO and Fe3O4@GO-DES was carried out by extracting bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme. The experimental results showed that the proposed Fe3O4@GO-DES performs better than Fe3O4@GO in the extraction of acidic protein. Desorption of protein was carried out by eluting the solid extractant with 0.005 mol L(-1) Na2HPO4 contained 1 mol L(-1) NaCl. The obtained elution efficiency was about 90.9%. Attributed to the convenient magnetic separation, the solid extractant could be easily recycled.

  15. Analysis of black pepper volatiles by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography: A comparison of terpenes profiles with hydrodistillation.

    PubMed

    Jeleń, Henryk H; Gracka, Anna

    2015-10-30

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is widely used in food flavor compounds analysis in majority for profiling volatile compounds. Based on such profiles conclusions are often drawn concerning the percentage composition of volatile compounds in particular food, spices or raw materials. This paper focuses on the usefulness of SPME for the profiling of volatile compounds from spices using black pepper as an example. SPME profiles obtained in different analytical conditions were compared to the profile of pepper volatiles obtained using hydrodistillation in Clevenger apparatus. The profiles of both monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes of black pepper were highly dependent on sample weight (0.1 and 1g samples were tested), and extraction time (durations from 2 to 120min were tested), regardless of the SPME fiber used (PDMS and CAR/PDMS coatings were used). The characteristic phenomenon for extraction from dry ground pepper was the decrease of monoterpenes % share in volatiles with increasing extraction times, whereas at the same time the % contents of sesquiterpenes increased. Addition of water to ground pepper substantially changed extraction kinetics and mutual proportions of mono to sesquiterpenes compared to dry samples by minimizing changes in mono- to sesquiterpenes ratio in different extraction times. Obtained results indicate that SPME can be a fast extraction method for volatiles of black pepper. Short extraction times (2-10min) in conjunction with the fast GC analysis (2.1min) proposed here may offer fast alternative to hydrodistillation allowing black pepper terpenes characterization. PMID:26427328

  16. Analysis of black pepper volatiles by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography: A comparison of terpenes profiles with hydrodistillation.

    PubMed

    Jeleń, Henryk H; Gracka, Anna

    2015-10-30

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is widely used in food flavor compounds analysis in majority for profiling volatile compounds. Based on such profiles conclusions are often drawn concerning the percentage composition of volatile compounds in particular food, spices or raw materials. This paper focuses on the usefulness of SPME for the profiling of volatile compounds from spices using black pepper as an example. SPME profiles obtained in different analytical conditions were compared to the profile of pepper volatiles obtained using hydrodistillation in Clevenger apparatus. The profiles of both monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes of black pepper were highly dependent on sample weight (0.1 and 1g samples were tested), and extraction time (durations from 2 to 120min were tested), regardless of the SPME fiber used (PDMS and CAR/PDMS coatings were used). The characteristic phenomenon for extraction from dry ground pepper was the decrease of monoterpenes % share in volatiles with increasing extraction times, whereas at the same time the % contents of sesquiterpenes increased. Addition of water to ground pepper substantially changed extraction kinetics and mutual proportions of mono to sesquiterpenes compared to dry samples by minimizing changes in mono- to sesquiterpenes ratio in different extraction times. Obtained results indicate that SPME can be a fast extraction method for volatiles of black pepper. Short extraction times (2-10min) in conjunction with the fast GC analysis (2.1min) proposed here may offer fast alternative to hydrodistillation allowing black pepper terpenes characterization.

  17. Profiles of chloride and stable isotopes in pore-water obtained from a 2000 m-deep borehole through the Mesozoic sedimentary series in the eastern Paris Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensenouci, F.; Michelot, J. L.; Matray, J. M.; Savoye, S.; Tremosa, J.; Gaboreau, S.

    Water stable isotopes and chloride profiles in pore-water through more than 800 m of sediments were obtained from a 2000 m-deep borehole (EST 433) drilled by Andra in the eastern Paris Basin. Vapour exchange method and aqueous leaching were used to obtain the stable isotope and chloride concentrations of pore-water from 24 rock samples. Petrophysical measurements included water contents, grain densities and porosities of the studied formations. Pore-water and some groundwater samples collected during the drilling are mainly of meteoric origin: they plot near the Global Meteoric Water Line, distributed between heavy-isotope depleted Oxfordian groundwater and enriched Triassic groundwater, in good agreement with previous data. The δ2H and δ18O values describe curved profiles in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, and show an increase with depth below this formation (Dogger and Liassic). Similar trends were observed for the chloride concentrations, except in the Liassic formation where they are more or less constant. The low chloride concentrations in the basal Jurassic layers indicate that the source of salinity to the Dogger aquifer is likely the middle Liassic formation and not the Triassic salt as previously suggested. A preliminary modelling exercise showed that currently available diffusion parameters (diffusion coefficients and accessible porosities) might be used to properly simulate these exchanges for deuterium. This is not the case for chloride, perhaps because the used values for anion accessible porosity were not relevant and/or the applied modelling conditions were unsuitable.

  18. Comparison of phase velocities from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and results calculated from borehole shear-wave velocity profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Hsi-Ping; Boore, David M.; Joyner, William B.; Oppenheimer, David H.; Warrick, Richard E.; Zhang, Wenbo; Hamilton, John C.; Brown, Leo T.

    2000-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities (VS) are widely used for earthquake ground-motion site characterization. VS data are now largely obtained using borehole methods. Drilling holes, however, is expensive. Nonintrusive surface methods are inexpensive for obtaining VS information, but not many comparisons with direct borehole measurements have been published. Because different assumptions are used in data interpretation of each surface method and public safety is involved in site characterization for engineering structures, it is important to validate the surface methods by additional comparisons with borehole measurements. We compare results obtained from a particular surface method (array measurement of surface waves associated with microtremor) with results obtained from borehole methods. Using a 10-element nested-triangular array of 100-m aperture, we measured surface-wave phase velocities at two California sites, Garner Valley near Hemet and Hollister Municipal Airport. The Garner Valley site is located at an ancient lake bed where water-saturated sediment overlies decomposed granite on top of granite bedrock. Our array was deployed at a location where seismic velocities had been determined to a depth of 500 m by borehole methods. At Hollister, where the near-surface sediment consists of clay, sand, and gravel, we determined phase velocities using an array located close to a 60-m deep borehole where downhole velocity logs already exist. Because we want to assess the measurements uncomplicated by uncertainties introduced by the inversion process, we compare our phase-velocity results with the borehole VS depth profile by calculating fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave phase velocities from an earth model constructed from the borehole data. For wavelengths less than ~2 times of the array aperture at Garner Valley, phase-velocity results from array measurements agree with the calculated Rayleigh-wave velocities to better than 11%. Measurement errors become larger for wavelengths 2

  19. Pharmacokinetic profile of ABELCET (amphotericin B lipid complex injection): combined experience from phase I and phase II studies.

    PubMed Central

    Adedoyin, A; Bernardo, J F; Swenson, C E; Bolsack, L E; Horwith, G; DeWit, S; Kelly, E; Klasterksy, J; Sculier, J P; DeValeriola, D; Anaissie, E; Lopez-Berestein, G; Llanos-Cuentas, A; Boyle, A; Branch, R A

    1997-01-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) has been the most effective systemic antifungal agent, but its use is limited by the dose-limiting toxicity of the conventional micellar dispersion formulation (Fungizone). New formulations with better and improved safety profiles are being developed and include ABELCET (formerly ABLC), but their dispositions have not been well characterized; hence, the reason for their improved profiles remains unclear. This report details the pharmacokinetics of ABELCET examined in various pharmacokinetic and efficacy studies by using whole-blood measurements of AmB concentration performed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The data indicated that the disposition of AmB after administration of ABELCET is different from that after administration of Fungizone, with a faster clearance and a larger volume of distribution. It exhibits complex and nonlinear pharmacokinetics with wide interindividual variability, extensive distribution, and low clearance. The pharmacokinetics were unusual. Clearance and volume of distribution were increased with dose, peak and trough concentrations after multiple dosings increased less than proportionately with dose, steady state appeared to have been attained in 2 to 3 days, despite an estimated half-life of up to 5 days, and there was no evidence of significant accumulation in the blood. The data are internally consistent, even though they were gathered under different conditions and circumstances. The pharmacokinetics of ABELCET suggest that lower concentrations in blood due to higher clearance and greater distribution may be responsible for its improved toxicity profile compared to those of conventional formulations. PMID:9333048

  20. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, Phase II, Post-Secondary Education Profile: Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    Pesticide- and toxicology-related programs were reviewed in 21 states and in 26 academic institutions. These programs represent a sample, only, of the various programs available nationwide. Enrollment profiles are given for both pesticide and toxicology programs. The programs described in these profiles are served by a total of 620 faculty.…

  1. Effects of self-heating and phase change on the thermal profile of hydrogen isotopes in confined geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Baxamusa, S. Field, J.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; Suratwala, T.; Sater, J.

    2014-03-28

    Growth of high-quality single-crystal hydrogen in confined geometries relies on the in situ formation of seed crystals. Generation of deuterium-tritium seed crystals in a confined geometry is governed by three effects: self-heating due to tritium decay, external thermal environment, and latent heat of phase change at the boundary between hydrogen liquid and vapor. A detailed computation of the temperature profile for liquid hydrogen inside a hollow shell, as is found in inertial confinement fusion research, shows that seeds are likely to form at the equatorial plane of the shell. Radioactive decay of tritium to helium slowly alters the composition of the hydrogen vapor, resulting in a modified temperature profile that encourages seed formation at the top of the shell. We show that the computed temperature profile is consistent with a variety of experimental observations.

  2. A crustal model of the ultrahigh-pressure Dabie Shan orogenic belt, China, derived from deep seismic refraction profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Chun-Yong; Zeng, Rong-Sheng; Mooney, W.D.; Hacker, B.R.

    2000-01-01

    We present a new crustal cross section through the east-west trending ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) Dabie Shan orogenic belt, east central China, based on a 400-km-long seismic refraction profile. Data from our profile reveal that the cratonal blocks north and south of the orogen are composed of 35-km-thick crust consisting of three layers (upper, middle, and lower crust) with average seismic velocities of 6.0±0.2 km/s, 6.5±0.1 km/s, and 6.8±0.1 km/s. The crust reaches a maximum thickness of 41.5 km beneath the northern margin of the orogen, and thus the present-day root beneath the orogen is only 6.5 km thick. The upper mantle velocity is 8.0±0.1 km/s. Modeling of shear wave data indicate that Poisson's ratio increases from 0.24±0.02 in the upper crust to 0.27±0.03 in the lower crust. This result is consistent with a dominantly felsic upper crustal composition and a mafic lower crustal composition within the amphibolite or granulite metamorphic facies. Our seismic model indicates that eclogite, which is abundant in surface exposures within the orogen, is not a volumetrically significant component in the middle or lower crust. Much of the Triassic structure associated with the formation of the UHP rocks of the Dabie Shan has been obscured by post-Triassic igneous activity, extension and large-offset strike-slip faulting. Nevertheless, we can identify a high-velocity (6.3 km/s) zone in the upper (<5 km depth) crustal core of the orogen which we interpret as a zone of ultrahigh-pressure rocks, a north dipping suture, and an apparent Moho offset that marks a likely active strike-slip fault.

  3. A dual doubly vergent orogen in the Banda Arc continent-arc collision zone as observed on deep seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Prasetyo, H.; Blundell, D. J.; Pigram, C. J.; Barber, A. J.; Richardson, A.; Tjokosaproetro, S.

    1996-02-01

    New deep seismic reflection profiles across the Banda Arc of Indonesia reveal reflectors in the uppermost 50 km of the lithosphere. Combined with existing earthquake hypocenter locations and focal mechanisms, the new structural geometries inferred from the reflectors yield a more complete analysis of deformation during the past 10 m.y. and provide insights into how strain is partitioned across an orogenic belt in which volcanic arcs and continents converge. A clearly defined Wadati-Benioff zone, and recent deformation of shelf sediments observed on older shallow seismic profiles, indicated to previous workers that substantial convergence occurred at the Timor Trough. A few focal mechanisms, seafloor escarpments, and recent geodetic surveying indicate that convergence at ˜7 cm yr-1 currently (last 200 kyr?) occurs at the northern margin of the now inactive volcanic arc, the Wetar Thrust zone. Reflectors on the new seismic profiles are interpreted as thrust faults and folds that occur throughout the crust and within the uppermost mantle between the Timor Trough and Wetar Thrust. Specifically, basement reflectors beneath the toe of the accretionary complex have reverse-sense offsets that imply blind thrusts. The whole crust is horizontally shortened, not only the sedimentary cover rocks that previously deformed into duplexes above a decollément. Reflectors dipping away from both margins of the forearc basin and at the northern margin of the volcanic arc are interpreted as evidence of thrusting. Thus each arc represents a doubly vergent fold-and-thrust belt, but only the northern one is currently active. Crustal thicknesses inferred from seismic velocities, reflectors, and gravity anomalies are consistent with the merging of a thinned continental shelf margin with oceanic lithosphere to form an orogenic belt with at present 3-4 km of topographic relief in the region of eastern Timor.

  4. Deep Sequencing of the Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi Transcriptome Reveals Flavonoid Biosynthetic Profiling and Organ-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxin; Hou, Jingyi; Jiang, Chao; Li, Geng; Lu, Heng; Meng, Fanyun; Shi, Linchun

    2015-01-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi has long been used in traditional medicine to treat various such widely varying diseases and has been listed in the Chinese Pharmacopeia, the Japanese Pharmacopeia, the Korean Pharmacopoeia and the European Pharmacopoeia. Flavonoids, especially wogonin, wogonoside, baicalin, and baicalein, are its main functional ingredients with various pharmacological activities. Although pharmaological studies for these flavonoid components have been well conducted, the molecular mechanism of their biosynthesis remains unclear in S. baicalensis. In this study, Illumina/Solexa deep sequencing generated more than 91 million paired-end reads and 49,507 unigenes from S. baicalensis roots, stems, leaves and flowers. More than 70% unigenes were annotated in at least one of the five public databases and 13,627 unigenes were assigned to 3,810 KEGG genes involved in 579 different pathways. 54 unigenes that encode 12 key enzymes involved in the pathway of flavonoid biosynthesis were discovered. One baicalinase and three baicalein 7-O-glucuronosyltransferases genes potentially involved in the transformation between baicalin/wogonoside and baicalein/wogonin were identified. Four candidate 6-hydroxylase genes for the formation of baicalin/baicalein and one candidate 8-O-methyltransferase gene for the biosynthesis of wogonoside/wogonin were also recognized. Our results further support the conclusion that, in S. baicalensis, 3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone was the precursor of the four above compounds. Then, the differential expression models and simple sequence repeats associated with these genes were carefully analyzed. All of these results not only enrich the gene resource but also benefit research into the molecular genetics and functional genomics in S. baicalensis. PMID:26317778

  5. Layer Stripping Forward Tomography with S, ScS, and Sdiff phases to sharpen images of deep mantle shear velocity heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H.; Garnero, E.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's deep mantle has been shown to be heterogeneous at a wide spectrum of scales, from fine scale (e.g.,1-10 km) to degree 2 low velocity provinces (1000's of km lateral scale). Principle structures include large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) beneath the Pacific Ocean and Africa and southern Atlanic Ocean, and a circum-Pacific higher velocity band. At intermediate scales, structures include D" discontinuities and details associated with LLSVPs, such as sharp sides. Shorter scales include ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) and regions of scattering of high frequency waves. In this study we seek to improve upon our knowledge of global intermediate and small-scale shear wave structure in the lower mantle with an iterative Layer-Stripping Forward Tomography approach. This approach iteratively updates a starting tomographic model by mapping travel time residuals (between observations and predictions) from the surface (using shallow S wave phase) down to lowermost mantle depths (using deep S waves, ScS waves, and Sdiff waves). Modifications to the uppermost mantle are primarily aimed at properly correcting deep phases for shallow heterogeneity. Relatively uniform coverage of the deepest mantle is achieved with Sdiff. The core-reflected ScS contributes most strongly to our knowledge of shorter scale heterogeneity, but coverage is more limited that with Sdiff. Deep mantle S waves provide information on the vertical extent of lowermost mantle heterogeneity (e.g., LLSVPs), but similar to ScS, coverage is limited to source-receiver pairs with the proper distance range. We collected near 1200 global earthquakes global earthquakes from the last two decades, with depths greater than 30 km, and focused on data with clear and impulsive phases. In a semi-automatic scheme, we measured all S, ScS, and Sdiff times and document waveshape stability by constructing a mean shape of each phase for each event. Cross-correlation coefficients between individual records and the

  6. Haemato-biochemical and endocrine profiling of north western Himalayan Gaddi sheep during various physiological/reproductive phases

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, A.; Kumar, P.; Singh, M.; Vasishta, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to provide baseline data regarding haemato-biochemical and endocrine profiling of Gaddi sheep found in north western Himalayan region of Himachal Pradesh, India. Each random sample was collected from 45 Gaddi sheep reared in government sheep breeding farm Tal, Hamirpur, India, during various reproductive phases viz. anestrus, breeding season and post partum period. Haematology revealed significantly higher (P<0.05) RBC as well as haematocrit values in pregnant animals (n=23) during breeding season than during other reproductive phases. The number of platelets were significantly lower (P<0.05) and MCH, MCHC values were statistically higher (P<0.05) during postpartum period than during other reproductive phases. Blood biochemistry revealed significantly higher (P<0.05) concentrations of plasma cholesterol (83.98±3.68 mg/dl), plasma calcium (71.06±1.52 mg/l), magnesium (18.21±0.53 mg/l), potassium (5.10±0.13 mEq/l) and significantly lower (P<0.05) concentrations of plasma total protein (5.75±0.31 gm/dl), globulin (3.04±0.29 gm/dl) and sodium (138.83±1.83 mEq/l) during postpartum period in comparison to other reproductive phases. Endocrine profile revealed significantly higher (P<0.05) serum estrogen (60.97±1.24 pg/ml) and T4 (6.0±0.27 µg/ml) concentrations during postpartum phase. Similarly, significantly higher (P<0.05) serum progesterone (5.16±0.76 ng/ml) as well as TSH (0.70±0.14 µg/ml) concentration were recorded during pregnancy. From the study it can be concluded that physiological status significantly affects the blood metabolic and endocrine profile in Gaddi sheep. PMID:26623374

  7. Modeling and Observations of Phase-Mask Trapezoidal Profiles with Grating-Fiber Image Reproduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Lindesay, James V.; Lee, Hyung R.; Ndlela, Zolili U.; Thompso, Erica J.

    2000-01-01

    We report on an investigation of the trapezoidal design and fabrication defects in phase masks used to produce Bragg reflection gratings in optical fibers. We used a direct visualization technique to examine the nonuniformity of the interference patterns generated by several phase masks. Fringe patterns from the phase masks are compared with the analogous patterns resulting from two-beam interference. Atomic force microscope imaging of the actual phase gratings that give rise to anomalous fringe patterns is used to determine input parameters for a general theoretical model. Phase masks with pitches of 0.566 and 1.059 microns are modeled and investigated.

  8. Dividing phase-dependent cytotoxicity profiling of human embryonic lung fibroblast identifies candidate anticancer reagents.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Tang, Wei; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Human Embryonic Lung fibroblasts (HEL cells) are widely used as a normal cell in studies of cell biology and can be easily maintained in the resting phase. Here we aimed to discover compounds that exhibit cytotoxicity against HEL cells in the dividing phase, but not in the resting phase. The cytotoxicity of each compound against HEL cells either in the resting phase or in the dividing phase was determined by MTT assay. Ratios of the IC50 of cells in the resting phase and that of cells in the dividing phase (RRD) for these compounds were compared. We selected 44 compounds that exhibited toxic effects on HEL cells in the dividing phase from a chemical library containing 325 anticancer drugs and enzyme inhibitors. The RRD values of those compounds were widely distributed. Paclitaxel and docetaxel, which are clinically used as anticancer drugs, had RRD values larger than 2000. On the other hand, the RRD value of dimethyl sulfoxide, an organic solvent, was 1. The cytotoxic effect of paclitaxel on HEL cells in the dividing phase was attenuated by aphidicolin, hydroxyurea, and nocodazole, confirming that the cytotoxic effects of paclitaxel are dependent on cells being in the dividing phase. Thapsigargin, whose RRD value was 800, the third highest RRD value in the library, exhibited therapeutic effects in a mouse model of FM3A ascites carcinoma. We suggest that compounds with high RRD values for HEL cells are candidate anticancer chemotherapy seeds. PMID:27594296

  9. Soil Organic Matter Characterization by 13C-NMR and Thermal Analysis in Deep Tropical Soil Profiles from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store large quantities of carbon (C) as soil organic matter (SOM), a substantial proportion of which is stored deep (> 30 cm) in the soil profile. Characterization of tropical SOM remains difficult, in part due to the analytical challenges associated high iron and low C concentrations. In this study, we combined solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with analytical thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC; evolved CO2 gas analysis, CO2-EGA) to explore patterns in SOM composition in deep soil profiles from two contrasting soil types at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) in northeast Puerto Rico. Prior to 13C NMR, soils were repeatedly demineralized with hydrofluoric acid (HF) to remove paramagnetic compounds and concentrate organic matter. Given the scant information on tropical subsoil OM, we also sought to evaluate the effect of HF acid treatments on tropical subsoil SOM. HF treatments effectively enriched sample C and removed paramagnetic compounds, allowing us to obtain high-quality NMR spectra for low-C subsoils. C:N ratios before and after HF treatment were nearly identical (mean = 16.6 ± 0.8), suggesting that the SOM pool was not substantially fractionated, though C recoveries were low and variable. Thermal analyses confirmed the loss of a substantial fraction of the soil mineral matrix, however, retention of several endothermic regions in post-HF Inceptisol soils indicated that not all minerals were completely solubilized. In addition, important differences in the DSC and CO2-EGA thermograms were observed in comparing samples before versus after HF treatments. These results suggest that the organo-mineral associations were substantially altered, though it is not immediately clear the degree to which alterations in chemical composition versus binding association have changed. In addition to these qualitative changes, quantitative interpretations of 13C-NMR results from low-C and high

  10. Deep transcriptomic profiling reveals the similarity between endothelial cells cultured under static and oscillatory shear stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Congzhen; Meng, Fan; Jang, Inhwan; Jo, Hanjoong; Chen, Y Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease that preferentially develops in specific regions in the arterial tree. This characteristic is mainly attributed to the unique pattern of hemodynamic shear stress in vivo. High laminar shear stress (LS) found in straight lumen exerts athero-protective effects. Low or oscillatory shear stress (OS) present in regions of lesser curvature and arterial bifurcations predisposes arterial intima to atherosclerosis. Shear stress-regulated endothelial function plays an important role in the process of atherosclerosis. Most in vitro research studies focusing on the molecular mechanisms of endothelial function are performed in endothelial cells (ECs) under cultured static (ST) condition. Some findings, however, are not recapitulated in subsequent translational studies, mostly likely due to the missing biomechanical milieu. Here, we profiled the whole transcriptome of primary human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) under different shear stress conditions with RNA sequencing. Among 16,313 well-expressed genes, we detected 8,177 that were differentially expressed in OS vs. LS conditions and 9,369 in ST vs. LS conditions. Notably, only 1,618 were differentially expressed in OS vs. ST conditions. Hierarchical clustering of ECs demonstrated a strong similarity between ECs under OS and ST conditions at the transcriptome level. Subsequent pairwise heat mapping and principal component analysis gave further weight to the similarity. At the individual gene level, expressional analysis of representative well-known genes as well as novel genes showed a comparable amount at mRNA and protein levels in ECs under ST and OS conditions. In conclusion, the present work compared the whole transcriptome of HCAECs under different shear stress conditions at the transcriptome level as well as at the individual gene level. We found that cultured ECs are significantly different from those under LS conditions. Thus using cells under ST conditions is

  11. Deep sequencing-based transcriptome profiling analysis of bacteria-challenged Lateolabrax japonicus reveals insight into the immune-relevant genes in marine fish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Systematic research on fish immunogenetics is indispensable in understanding the origin and evolution of immune systems. This has long been a challenging task because of the limited number of deep sequencing technologies and genome backgrounds of non-model fish available. The newly developed Solexa/Illumina RNA-seq and Digital gene expression (DGE) are high-throughput sequencing approaches and are powerful tools for genomic studies at the transcriptome level. This study reports the transcriptome profiling analysis of bacteria-challenged Lateolabrax japonicus using RNA-seq and DGE in an attempt to gain insights into the immunogenetics of marine fish. Results RNA-seq analysis generated 169,950 non-redundant consensus sequences, among which 48,987 functional transcripts with complete or various length encoding regions were identified. More than 52% of these transcripts are possibly involved in approximately 219 known metabolic or signalling pathways, while 2,673 transcripts were associated with immune-relevant genes. In addition, approximately 8% of the transcripts appeared to be fish-specific genes that have never been described before. DGE analysis revealed that the host transcriptome profile of Vibrio harveyi-challenged L. japonicus is considerably altered, as indicated by the significant up- or down-regulation of 1,224 strong infection-responsive transcripts. Results indicated an overall conservation of the components and transcriptome alterations underlying innate and adaptive immunity in fish and other vertebrate models. Analysis suggested the acquisition of numerous fish-specific immune system components during early vertebrate evolution. Conclusion This study provided a global survey of host defence gene activities against bacterial challenge in a non-model marine fish. Results can contribute to the in-depth study of candidate genes in marine fish immunity, and help improve current understanding of host-pathogen interactions and evolutionary history

  12. Estimating production and consumption of solid reactive Fe phases in marine sediments from concentration profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    1D diffusion models may be used to estimate rates of production and consumption of dissolved metabolites in marine sediments, but are applied less often to the solid phase. Here we used a numerical inverse method to estimate solid phase Fe(III) and Fe(II) consumption and product...

  13. The utility of diversity profiling using Illumina 18S rRNA gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect and discriminate Toxoplasma gondii among the cyst-forming coccidia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Madalyn K; Phalen, David N; Donahoe, Shannon L; Rose, Karrie; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-01-30

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity to screen a single DNA sample and detect pathogen DNA from thousands of host DNA sequence reads, making it a versatile and informative tool for investigation of pathogens in diseased animals. The technique is effective and labor saving in the initial identification of pathogens, and will complement conventional diagnostic tests to associate the candidate pathogen with a disease process. In this report, we investigated the utility of the diversity profiling NGS approach using Illumina small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect Toxoplasma gondii in previously confirmed cases of toxoplasmosis. We then tested the diagnostic approach with species-specific PCR genotyping, histopathology and immunohistochemistry of toxoplasmosis in a Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) to systematically characterise the disease and associate causality. We show that the Euk7A/Euk570R primer set targeting the V1-V3 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene can be used as a species-specific assay for cyst-forming coccidia and discriminate T. gondii. Overall, the approach is cost-effective and improves diagnostic decision support by narrowing the differential diagnosis list with more certainty than was previously possible. Furthermore, it supplements the limitations of cryptic protozoan morphology and surpasses the need for species-specific PCR primer combinations.

  14. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, Phase II, Post-Secondary Education Profile: Noise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    Noise-related training programs were reviewed in nine degree-granting institutions in seven states. These programs represent a sample, only, of the various programs available nationwide. The enrollment profile and average number of graduates by degree level for the past three years are given, as well as the apparent enrollment trends by degree…

  15. Transcriptional Profiling of Human Endocervical Tissues Reveals Distinct Gene Expression in the Follicular and Luteal Phases of the Menstrual Cycle.

    PubMed

    Yildiz-Arslan, Sevim; Coon, John S; Hope, Thomas J; Kim, J Julie

    2016-06-01

    The endocervix plays an important role in providing appropriate protective mechanisms of the upper female reproductive tract (FRT) while at the same time providing the appropriate milieu for sperm transport. Hormone fluctuations throughout the menstrual cycle contribute to changes in the mucosal environment that render the FRT vulnerable to infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to identify genes in human endocervix tissues that were differentially expressed in the follicular versus the luteal phases of the menstrual cycle using gene expression profiling. A microarray using the IIlumina platform was performed with eight endocervix tissues from follicular and four tissues from luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Data analysis revealed significant differential expression of 110 genes between the two phases, with a P value <0.05 and a fold change cutoff of 1.5. Categorization of these genes, using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, MetaCore from Thomson Reuters, and DAVID, revealed genes associated with extracellular matrix remodeling and cell-matrix interactions, amino acid metabolism, and lipid metabolism, as well as immune regulation in the follicular phase tissues. In luteal phase tissues, genes associated with chromatin remodeling, inflammation, angiogenesis, oxidative stress, and immune cell regulation were predominately expressed. Using samples from additional patients' tissues, select genes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR; immunohistochemical staining was also done to examine protein levels. This is the first microarray analysis comparing gene expression in endocervix tissues in cycling women. This study identified key genes and molecular pathways that were differentially regulated during the menstrual cycle.

  16. Comparison of chromatographic band profiles obtained under microwave irradiated and non-irradiated reversed-phase liquid chromatography column

    SciTech Connect

    Galinada, Wilmer; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-08-01

    The possible influence of the application of microwave energy to a reversed-phase liquid chromatography column on the mass transfer kinetics and the thermodynamics of equilibrium between mobile and stationary phases was examined. Chromatograms of propylbenzene and phenol were recorded under the same experimental conditions, on the same column, successively irradiated and not. The effect of microwave irradiation on the mass transfer kinetics was determined by measuring the second moment of small pulses of propylbenzene in a 70:30 (v/v) solution of methanol in water and microwave outputs of 15 and 30 W. The effect of microwave irradiation on the equilibrium thermodynamics was determined by measuring the elution time of breakthrough curves of phenol at high concentrations in a 20:80 (v/v) solution of methanol and water and microwave outputs of 15, 50, and 150 W. A qualitative comparison of the profiles of the propylbenzene peaks obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation affects significantly the peak shapes. However, a qualitative comparison of the profiles of the breakthrough curves of phenol obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation has no significant effect on their shapes. The peak sharpening observed may be due to an increase in the diffusivity, resulting from the dielectric polarization under microwave irradiation. This effect is directly related to an increase of the rate of mass transfers in the column. In contrast, the similarity of the overloaded band profiles at high concentrations suggests that the equilibrium thermodynamics is unaffected by microwave irradiation. This may be explained by the transparence of the stationary phase to microwaves at 2.45 GHz. The column temperature was measured at the column outlet under irradiation powers of 15, 30, 50, and 150 W. It increases with increasing power, the corresponding effluent temperatures being 25 {+-} 1, 30 {+-} 1, 35 {+-} 1, and 45 {+-} 1 C, respectively.

  17. Comparison of chromatographic band profiles obtained under microwave irradiated and non-irradiated reversed-phase liquid chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Galinada, Wilmer A; Guiochon, Georges

    2005-10-28

    The possible influence of the application of microwave energy to a reversed-phase liquid chromatography column on the mass transfer kinetics and the thermodynamics of equilibrium between mobile and stationary phases was examined. Chromatograms of propylbenzene and phenol were recorded under the same experimental conditions, on the same column, successively irradiated and not. The effect of microwave irradiation on the mass transfer kinetics was determined by measuring the second moment of small pulses of propylbenzene in a 70:30 (v/v) solution of methanol in water and microwave outputs of 15 and 30 W. The effect of microwave irradiation on the equilibrium thermodynamics was determined by measuring the elution time of breakthrough curves of phenol at high concentrations in a 20:80 (v/v) solution of methanol and water and microwave outputs of 15, 50, and 150 W. A qualitative comparison of the profiles of the propylbenzene peaks obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation affects significantly the peak shapes. However, a qualitative comparison of the profiles of the breakthrough curves of phenol obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation has no significant effect on their shapes. The peak sharpening observed may be due to an increase in the diffusivity, resulting from the dielectric polarization under microwave irradiation. This effect is directly related to an increase of the rate of mass transfers in the column. In contrast, the similarity of the overloaded band profiles at high concentrations suggests that the equilibrium thermodynamics is unaffected by microwave irradiation. This may be explained by the transparence of the stationary phase to microwaves at 2.45 GHz. The column temperature was measured at the column outlet under irradiation powers of 15, 30, 50, and 150 W. It increases with increasing power, the corresponding effluent temperatures being 25+/-1, 30+/-1, 35+/-1, and 45+/-1 degrees C, respectively.

  18. Characterizing the phase profile of a vortex beam with angular-double-slit interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Long, Junling; Wang, Feiran; Wang, Yunlong; Zhang, Pei; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2013-12-01

    The diffracted intensity distribution of a Laguerre-Gaussian beam is studied with an angular-double-slit interferometer. We experimentally demonstrate that the spiral phase structure of a vortex beam can be clearly revealed in this interference geometry, and it gives us an efficient way to distinguish different orders of Laguerre-Gaussian beams. This angular-double-slit interferometer gives us a better understanding of the phase structure of a vortex beam and the interference phenomenon of vortex beams.

  19. Preparation of a nitro-substituted tris(indolyl)methane modified silica in deep eutectic solvents for solid-phase extraction of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Wang, Jiamin; Liao, Yuan; Shao, Shijun

    2016-05-01

    A new sorbent for solid-phase extraction was synthesized by chemical immobilization of nitro-substituted tris(indolyl)methane on silica in new and green deep eutectic solvents. Elemental analysis results indicated that deep eutectic solvents could be an alternative to the traditional solvents in preparing nitro-substituted tris(indolyl)methane modified silica. Coupled with high performance liquid chromatography, the extraction performance of the sorbent was evaluated by using four organic acids as model analytes. The rebinding experiments results showed that the nitro-substituted tris(indolyl)methane modified silica sorbent had a good adsorption capacity towards the selected organic acids. Under the appropriate experimental conditions, good precision and wide linear ranges with coefficient of determination (R(2)) of higher than 0.9957 were obtained, and the limits of detection were in the range of 0.50-2.0μgL(-1) for the organic acids tested. The developed solid-phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (SPE-HPLC-DAD) method was successfully applied for the determination of organic acids in two drinking samples with recoveries ranging from 76.7% to 110.0% and 67.7% to 104.0% for all the selected organic acids, respectively.

  20. Production of mineral surface area within deep weathering profiles at eroding vs. depositional hillslope locations: Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, B.; Yoo, K.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Nater, E.

    2014-12-01

    Geomorphic and biogeochemical processes and hillslope morphology are partly controlled by the extent and degree of chemical weathering between soil and bedrock. The production of mineral specific surface area (SSA) via chemical weathering is a critical variable for mechanistic understanding of weathering and provides an interface between minerals and the soil carbon cycle. We examined two 21-meter deep drill cores in the Laurels Schist at 141 MASL (summit) and 130 MASL (interfluve) in a 900 ha first order watershed in the Laurels Preserve, a forested land use end member in the Christina River Basin CZO. In addition to mineral SSA, we report elemental and mineralogical changes through both weathering profiles. Despite highly variable bedrock composition, mobile elements (Ca & Na) are depleted within 3-5 m below the ground surface, which is consistent with the removal of Ca-Na-plagioclase ((Na,Ca)Al(Si,Al)3O8) at this interval; we consider this depth as a weathering front. The water table in both boreholes was ~123 MASL (5/2014), which is well below the weathering front, suggesting that weathering processes are not coupled with groundwater interactions in this system. Clay XRD reveals the presence of secondary phyllosilicates including vermiculite, illite, and kaolinite in the upper 3 m of the summit weathering profile, which are weathering products of primary plagioclase, muscovite, and chlorite. The currently available clay mineralogy results are consistent with the decrease in total SSA from up to 20 m2g-1 at the surface to <5 m2g-1 below 3 m depth. Within the first 3 m from the surface, citrate-dithionate extractable iron contributed 30-60% of the total surface area. Therefore transformation of primary minerals to secondary phyllosilicate minerals, involving leaching loss of cations, was partly responsible for SSA production, but iron oxides play a significant role in production of SSA above the weathering front. This observation did not differ between

  1. Tradeoffs in Chemical and Thermal Variations in the Post-perovskite Phase Transition: Mixed phase regions in the Deep Lower Mantle?

    SciTech Connect

    Frank J Spera; David A. Yuen; Grace Giles

    2007-04-01

    The discovery of a phase-transition in Mg-rich perovskite (Pv) to a post-perovskite (pPv) phase at lower mantle depths and its relationship to D", lower mantle heterogeneity and iron content prompted an investigation of the relative importance of lower mantle compositional and temperature fluctuations in creating topographic undulations on mixed phase regions. Above the transition, Mg-rich Pv makes up ~ 70 per cent by mass of the lower mantle. Using results from experimental phase equilibria, first-principles computations and empirical scaling relations for Fe2+-Mg mixing in silicates, a preliminary thermodynamic model for the Pv to pPv phase transition in the divariant system MgSiO3-FeSiO3 is developed. Complexities associated with components Fe2O3 and Al2O3 and other phases (Ca-Pv, magnesiowustite) are neglected. The model predicts phase transition pressures are sensitive to the FeSiO3 content of perovskite (~ -1.5 GPa per one mole percent FeSiO3). This leads to considerable topography along the top boundary of the mixed phase region. The Clapeyron slope for the Pv→pPv transition at XFeSiO3= 0.1 is +11 MPa/K about 20% higher than for pure Mg-Pv. Increasing bulk concentration of iron elevates the mixed (two-phase) layer above the core–mantle boundary (CMB); increasing temperature acts to push the mixed layer deeper in the lower mantle perhaps into the D” thermal-compositional boundary layer resting upon the CMB. For various lower mantle geotherms and CMB temperatures, a single mixed layer of thickness ~300 km lies within the bottom 40% of the lower mantle. For low iron contents (XFeSiO3 ~ 5 mole percent or less), two (perched) mixed phase layers are found. This is the divariant analog to the univariant double-crosser of Hernlund, et al., 2005. The hotter the mantle, the deeper the mixed phase layer; the more iron-rich the lower mantle, the shallower the mixed phase layer. In a younger and hotter Hadean Earth with interior temperatures everywhere 200-500 K

  2. Development of a High-Performance, Low-Profile Translation Table with Wire Feedthrough for a Deep Space CubeSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Few, Alex

    2016-01-01

    NEAScout, a 6U cubesat and secondary payload on NASA's EM-1, will use an 85 sq m solar sail to travel to a near-earth asteroid at about 1 Astronomical Unit (about 1.5 x 10(exp 8) km) for observation and reconnaissance1. A combination of reaction wheels, reaction control system, and a slow rotisserie roll about the solar sail's normal axis were expected to handle attitude control and adjust for imperfections in the deployed sail during the 2.5-year mission. As the design for NEAScout matured, one of the critical design parameters, the offset in the center of mass and center of pressure (CP/CM offset), proved to be sub-optimal. After significant mission and control analysis, the CP/CM offset was accommodated by the addition of a new subsystem to NEAScout. This system, called the Active Mass Translator (AMT), would reside near the geometric center of NEAScout and adjust the CM by moving one portion of the flight system relative to the other. The AMT was given limited design space - 17 mm of the vehicle's assembly height-and was required to generate +/-8 cm by +/-2 cm translation to sub-millimeter accuracy. Furthermore, the design must accommodate a large wire bundle of small gage, single strand wire and coax cables fed through the center of the mechanism. The bend radius, bend resistance, and the exposure to deep space environment complicates the AMT design and operation and necessitated a unique design to mitigate risks of wire bundle damage, binding, and cold-welding during operation. This paper will outline the design constraints for the AMT, discuss the methods and reasoning for design, and identify the lessons learned through the designing, breadboarding and testing for the low-profile translation stages with wire feedthrough capability.

  3. In Vivo Profiling and Distribution of Known and Novel Phase I and Phase II Metabolites of Efavirenz in Plasma, Urine, and Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Aouri, Manel; Barcelo, Catalina; Ternon, Béatrice; Cavassini, Matthias; Anagnostopoulos, Alexia; Yerly, Sabine; Hugues, Henry; Vernazza, Pietro; Günthard, Huldrych F; Buclin, Thierry; Telenti, Amalio; Rotger, Margalida; Decosterd, Laurent A

    2016-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFV) is principally metabolized by CYP2B6 to 8-hydroxy-efavirenz (8OH-EFV) and to a lesser extent by CYP2A6 to 7-hydroxy-efavirenz (7OH-EFV). So far, most metabolite profile analyses have been restricted to 8OH-EFV, 7OH-EFV, and EFV-N-glucuronide, even though these metabolites represent a minor percentage of EFV metabolites present in vivo. We have performed a quantitative phase I and II metabolite profile analysis by tandem mass spectrometry of plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and urine samples in 71 human immunodeficiency virus patients taking efavirenz, prior to and after enzymatic (glucuronidase and sulfatase) hydrolysis. We have shown that phase II metabolites constitute the major part of the known circulating efavirenz species in humans. The 8OH-EFV-glucuronide (gln) and 8OH-EFV-sulfate (identified for the first time) in humans were found to be 64- and 7-fold higher than the parent 8OH-EFV, respectively. In individuals (n = 67) genotyped for CYP2B6, 2A6, and CYP3A metabolic pathways, 8OH-EFV/EFV ratios in plasma were an index of CYP2B6 phenotypic activity (P < 0.0001), which was also reflected by phase II metabolites 8OH-EFV-glucuronide/EFV and 8OH-EFV-sulfate/EFV ratios. Neither EFV nor 8OH-EFV, nor any other considered metabolites in plasma were associated with an increased risk of central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. In CSF, 8OH-EFV levels were not influenced by CYP2B6 genotypes and did not predict CNS toxicity. The phase II metabolites 8OH-EFV-gln, 8OH-EFV-sulfate, and 7OH-EFV-gln were present in CSF at 2- to 9-fold higher concentrations than 8OH-EFV. The potential contribution of known and previously unreported EFV metabolites in CSF to the neuropsychological effects of efavirenz needs to be further examined in larger cohort studies. PMID:26553012

  4. Comparison of ISO standard and TKR patient axial force profiles during the stance phase of gait.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Hannah J; Ngai, Valentina; Wimmer, Markus A

    2012-03-01

    Preclinical endurance testing of total knee replacements (TKRs) is performed using International Organization for Standardization (ISO) load and motion protocols. The standards are based on data from normal subjects and may not sufficiently mimic in vivo implant conditions. In this study, a mathematical model was used to calculate the axial force profile of 30 TKR patients with two current implant types, 22 with NexGen and eight with Miller-Galante II Cruciate-Retaining TKRs, and statistically compare the axial force specified by the ISO standard to the TKR patients. Significant differences were found between the axial forces of both groups of TKR patients and the ISO standard at local maxima and minima points in the first half of stance. The force impulse (area under the axial force curve, representing cumulative loading) was smaller for the ISO standard than the TKR patients, but only for those with NexGen implants. Waveform analysis using the coefficient of multiple correlation showed that the ISO and TKR patient axial force profiles were similar. The combined effect of ISO standard compressive load and motion differences from TKR patients could explain some of the differences between the wear scars on retrieved tibial components and those tested in total joint simulators. PMID:22558837

  5. Détermination du profil de modulation des réseaux holographiques de phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechahougui, S.; Harthong, J.; Medjahed, A.

    1993-12-01

    The complete knowledge of the geometrical and physic-chemical parameters of a periodically modulated volume material, permits the determination of the diffraction picture. Such a purely mathematical and numerical determination is of great scientific and technological interest. The modulation profile (given by its Fourier coefficients) is one of these parameters. It can be determinated a posteriori only by the measurement of the different diffracted intensities at different orders. Starting from this idea, we can achieve a new method (theoritically exact) which permits the study of the diffraction of an electromagnetic plane wave by a dielectric grating. This method leads to the numerical treatment of ordinary differential equation with variable by periodic coefficients. The method is presented here for the classical case of a wave with electric polarization parallel to the grating. For the analysis of the modulation profile, we have considered realistic models of profiles, contrary to the current models, which have only a numerical existence. In order to achieve our experimental work, we have developed two experimental set-up: the first for the recording and the second for the analysis of diffractive elements. The whole set-up can be directed with the aid of a software from a personal computer. The validity of results are discussed. La connaissance parfaite des paramètres géométriques et physico-chimiques d'un matériau de volume modulé périodiquement, donne une bonne connaissance de la figure de diffraction. Celle-ci a une grande importance scientifique et technologique. Le profil de modulation (donné par ses coefficients de Fourier) est l'un de ces paramètres qui ne peut être déterminé a posteriori qu'à partir de la répartition d'intensité entre les différents ordres. A partir de cette idée, nous avons établi une méthode exacte permettant l'étude de la diffraction d'une onde plane électromagnétique par un réseau diélectrique, qui conduit au

  6. A Universal Power-law Profile of Pseudo-phase-space Density-like Quantities in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Kyu-Hyun

    2014-06-01

    We study profiles of mass density, velocity dispersion (VD), and a combination of both using ~2000 nearly spherical and rotation-free Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. For observational stellar mass density ρsstarf(r), we consider a range of dark matter (DM) distribution ρDM(r) and VD anisotropy β(r) to investigate radial stellar VD σsstarfr(r) using the spherical Jeans equation. While mass and VD profiles vary appreciably depending on DM distribution and anisotropy, the pseudo-phase-space density-like combination \\rho (r)/\\sigma _\\star r^3(r) with total density ρ(r) = ρsstarf(r) + ρDM(r) is nearly universal. In the optical region, the negative logarithmic slope has a mean value of langχrang ≈ 1.86-1.90 with a galaxy-to-galaxy rms scatter of ≈0.04-0.06, which is a few times smaller than that of ρ(r) profiles. The scatter of χ can be increased by invoking wildly varying anisotropies that are, however, less likely because they would produce too large a scatter of line of sight VD profiles. As an independent check of this universality, we analyze stellar orbit-based dynamical models of 15 early-type galaxies (ETGs) of the Coma cluster provided by J. Thomas. Coma ETGs, with σsstarfr(r) replaced by the rms velocity of stars v sstarfrms(r) including net rotation, exhibit a similar universality with a slope of χ = 1.93 ± 0.06. Remarkably, the inferred values of χ for ETGs match well the slope ≈1.9 predicted by N-body simulations of DM halos. We argue that the inferred universal nature of \\rho (r)/\\sigma _\\star r^3(r) cannot be fully explained by equilibrium alone, implying that some astrophysical factors conspire and/or it reflects a fundamental principle in collisionless formation processes.

  7. HALOE altitude registration of atmospheric profile measurements: Lessons learned and improvements made during the data validation phase

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, G.M.; Gordley, L.L.; Russell, J.M. III

    1994-12-31

    Measurements by the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are producing high quality atmospheric profiles of trace gases involved in ozone chemistry. Using eight IR channels to sense the atmospheric absorption of sunlight, HALOE is providing scientists with high quality global fields of HCl, HF, O{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, NO, NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, aerosol extinctions and temperature, shedding new light on the dynamics and chemistry of the atmosphere. Critical to the retrieval of atmospheric constituent profiles from space-borne spectroscopic sensors is the ability to determine the true path through the atmosphere of measured radiation. Since becoming operational in October, 1991, new effort has been put into validating and refining the techniques required to estimate the tangent point altitude associated with each signal sample. This is accomplished by measuring transmission of sunlight in the CO{sub 2} 2.8 micron region, and registering the CO{sub 2} transmission profile with a modeled transmission profile based on temperature and pressure data from NMC or UKMO and an assumed CO{sub 2} mixing ratio. In this paper the authors report on lessons learned during the data validation phase, and improvements made to the altitude registration process. The parameters and processes involved include CO{sub 2} limb radiance inversion, signal processing, zenith angle estimation, refraction calculations, registration regions and aerosol effects. The authors also present the results of sensitivity and error analyses which reveal the accuracy required for each estimated parameter in order to register within the specified error budget.

  8. Investigation of aging effects from high voltage profiles in ceramic phase shifter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, S.; Sengupta, L.C.; Ngo, E.; O`Day, M.E.; Lancto, R.

    1994-12-01

    Ceramic composite materials comprised of Ba(0.60)Sr(0.40)TiO3 and Alumina and other non ferroelectric oxides have been fabricated for use in phased array antennas. These composites have shown superior electronic properties and have been incorporated into several antenna designs. However, minimal testing has been accomplished to determine the electrical aging and fatigue caused by the large electric fields required to operate these devices. In this paper, a systematic study of the effect of the application of large fields will he presented. The electronic properties of the BSTO-Oxide composites (pre-voltage application) will be presented and include the dielectric constant, loss tangent, and tunability (change in dielectric constant with applied field). The study of the change in the electronic properties after large voltages applications include results on the electronic aging and fatigue of the material and appropriate conditioning of the material for application in phased array antenna systems.

  9. Transcriptional Profiling of Human Endocervical Tissues Reveals Distinct Gene Expression in the Follicular and Luteal Phases of the Menstrual Cycle.

    PubMed

    Yildiz-Arslan, Sevim; Coon, John S; Hope, Thomas J; Kim, J Julie

    2016-06-01

    The endocervix plays an important role in providing appropriate protective mechanisms of the upper female reproductive tract (FRT) while at the same time providing the appropriate milieu for sperm transport. Hormone fluctuations throughout the menstrual cycle contribute to changes in the mucosal environment that render the FRT vulnerable to infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to identify genes in human endocervix tissues that were differentially expressed in the follicular versus the luteal phases of the menstrual cycle using gene expression profiling. A microarray using the IIlumina platform was performed with eight endocervix tissues from follicular and four tissues from luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Data analysis revealed significant differential expression of 110 genes between the two phases, with a P value <0.05 and a fold change cutoff of 1.5. Categorization of these genes, using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, MetaCore from Thomson Reuters, and DAVID, revealed genes associated with extracellular matrix remodeling and cell-matrix interactions, amino acid metabolism, and lipid metabolism, as well as immune regulation in the follicular phase tissues. In luteal phase tissues, genes associated with chromatin remodeling, inflammation, angiogenesis, oxidative stress, and immune cell regulation were predominately expressed. Using samples from additional patients' tissues, select genes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR; immunohistochemical staining was also done to examine protein levels. This is the first microarray analysis comparing gene expression in endocervix tissues in cycling women. This study identified key genes and molecular pathways that were differentially regulated during the menstrual cycle. PMID:27170437

  10. Changes in the chemical profile of cephalic salivary glands of Scaptotrigona postica (Hymenoptera, Meliponini) workers are phase related.

    PubMed

    Poiani, Silvana B; Morgan, E David; Drijfhout, Falko P; da Cruz-Landim, Carminda

    2015-09-01

    Most advanced eusocial bees recruit their nest mates to food resources. Recent studies in Meliponini species have revealed that the cephalic salivary (labial) glands (CSGs) are responsible for the production of scent trail pheromones. Studies on CSGs have shown that changes occur in worker glandular cell morphology from emergence from brood combs until forager phase, which may be correlated to changes in the composition of the CSG secretion. However, the composition of the CSG secretion and the chemical changes that occur in it according to the worker's life phase or tasks performed are unknown for many species, including Scaptotrigona postica. In this study, the chemical profile of CSG secretion in S. postica workers was studied. Glands were taken from specimens that were newly emerged (NE), working in the brood comb area (CA) and foraging (FO), and were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that the glandular secretion consists of oxygenated compounds of middle volatility (acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters and ether), and their quantity varies among the different life phases, increasing as the individual moves from intra- to extra-colonial activities. The NE phase contained the smallest variety and quantity of compounds. Because of the variability of compounds, the CA workers were separated into three subgroups according to the chemical constitution of their secretion. Forager workers showed the largest quantity and variety of chemical compounds. The major compounds in forager gland secretion were 7-hexadecen-1-yl acetate and 5-tetradecen-1-yl acetate. Statistical analysis indicates that the chemical composition of glandular secretion is phase related. PMID:26333928

  11. A phase I/II study to evaluate radiation therapy and hyperthermia for deep-seated tumours: a report of RTOG 89-08.

    PubMed

    Myerson, R J; Scott, C B; Emami, B; Sapozink, M D; Samulski, T V

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of deep hyperthermia in conjunction with radiation therapy. This study employed 'second generation' electromagnetic devices which were felt to be better able to confine heating and spare normal tissue than the devices evaluated in a previous study (RTOG 84-01). Sixty six patients at six institutions were enrolled on a prospective Phase I/II study. Eligible deep seated tumours were treated with a combination of external hyperthermia and radiation therapy. Radiation consisted of 1.7-2 Gy per fraction, 4-5 fractions per week, to > 20 Gy (previously irradiated lesions) or > 50 Gy (no previous radiation). Deep hyperthermia was delivered with electromagnetic devices: BSD 2000 for 92% of cases, Thermotron for 5% of cases, other low frequency electromagnetic for 4% of cases. Hyperthermia was delivered < or = twice weekly. Overall complete and partial response rates were 34% and 16% respectively. Response was not correlated with maximum tumour temperature or disease site. There was, however, a strong association with radiation dose: 54% CR with > or = 45 Gy versus 7% with < 45 Gy (p < 0.0001). The achieved temperatures were less than ideal. Although the average maximum tumor temperature was 41.9 degrees C (range 35.7 degrees C-46.7 degrees C), the minimum tumour temperatures were low. The average minimum tumour temperature was 38.5 degrees C and was never > 41.8 degrees C. Treatment was well tolerated with no fatalities. There were four acute grade 3 or 4 toxicities (6% of patients). Patient discomfort resulted in interruption or discontinuation of sessions in 30% of the sessions. In 12 cases (18% of patients) the planned course of hyperthermia was discontinued due to acute discomfort. The devices used in this study were better tolerated than the devices used in the previous Phase I/II deep hyperthermia trial (RTOG 84-01) with less patient discomfort and no problems with severe systemic cardiovascular stress

  12. Effect of resistivity profile on current decay time of initial phase of current quench in neon-gas-puff inducing disruptions of JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, S.; Ohno, N.; Shibata, Y.; Isayama, A.; Kawano, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Takizuka, T.; Okamoto, M.

    2013-11-15

    According to an early work [Y. Shibata et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 025015 (2010)] on the behavior of the plasma current decay in the JT-60U disruptive discharges caused by the radiative collapse with a massive neon-gas-puff, the increase of the internal inductance mainly determined the current decay time of plasma current during the initial phase of current quench. To investigate what determines the increase of the internal inductance, we focus attention on the relationship between the electron temperature (or the resistivity) profile and the time evolution of the current density profile and carry out numerical calculations. As a result, we find the reason of the increase of the internal inductance: The current density profile at the start of the current quench is broader than an expected current density profile in the steady state, which is determined by the temperature (or resistivity) profile. The current density profile evolves into peaked one and the internal inductance is increasing.

  13. Phase stabilization in cinnarizine complexes using X-ray profile analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagendrappa, G.; Urs, S. Subramanya Raj; Madhava, M. S.; Somashekar, R.

    2001-06-01

    Characterization of cobalt(II), cadmium(II), copper(II) and tin(II) cinnarizine complexes have been carried out using conductivity, electronic spectra, infrared, nmr, thermogravimetric and X-ray analyses to establish the nature of phase stabilization in these materials. Also, the intrinsic strain components present in these materials during the formation have been computed using wide-angle X-ray scattering analysis. The variation of the crystallite shape ellipsoid in these materials has been discussed on the basis of Hosemann's paracrystalline model.

  14. Nine-year change in statistical design, profile, and success rates of Phase II oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Paul, Barry; Marchenko, Olga; Song, Guochen; Patel, Neerali; Moschos, Stergios J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated nine-year trends in statistical design and other features of Phase II oncology clinical trials published in 2005, 2010, and 2014 in five leading oncology journals: Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, and Lancet Oncology. The features analyzed included cancer type, multicenter vs. single-institution, statistical design, primary endpoint, number of treatment arms, number of patients per treatment arm, whether or not statistical methods were well described, whether the drug was found effective based on rigorous statistical testing of the null hypothesis, and whether the drug was recommended for future studies.

  15. Study on seafood volatile profile characteristics during storage and its potential use for freshness evaluation by headspace solid phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Li, Gongke; Luo, Lin; Chen, Guonan

    2010-02-01

    Seafood volatile profile characteristics at different storage phases are various and can be used for freshness evaluation during storage. It is imperative to obtain the full volatile information prior to the further study of seafood volatile profile characteristics during storage. Also, the efficient data-processing method is another important factor for the interpretation of seafood volatile profile characteristics during storage and related potential volatile markers. In this work, a new analytical strategy, including the efficient sampling technique, sensitive detection and suitable data-processing method, for seafood freshness evaluation was developed based on the volatile profile characteristics during storage. First, the study of volatiles of seafood samples including razor clam, redspot swimming crab and prawn at different storage phases were conducted by headspace solid phase microextraction (HSSPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) detection. Then, seafood volatile profile characteristics at different storage phases were statistically interpreted by a combination data-processing method including normalization, principle component analysis (PCA) and common model strategy. The different seafood volatile profile characteristics and potential volatile markers were attempted to be distilled. The results tentatively suggested that the different seafood volatile profile characteristics during storage could reflect the transitional changing seafood freshness and provide more precise warning information for seafood spoilage during storage than any single chemical markers. This work developed an analytical method for study of seafood volatile profile characteristics and tentatively proposed a new idea of using seafood volatile profile characteristics during storage for the freshness evaluation from the point of view of analytical chemistry. PMID:20103118

  16. Simultaneous control on the intensity and phase profile of laser beam with Monge-Ampère equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaqin; Wu, Rengmao; Zheng, Zhenrong; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2014-12-01

    Laser beam shaping requires controlling the intensity and phase profile of the input laser beam simultaneously. In this paper, a method for designing double freeform surfaces is presented to solve the laser beam shaping problem. Based on Snell's law and conservation law of energy, a mathematical model is established to convert the double surfaces design problem into an elliptic Monge-Ampère equation with a nonlinear boundary problem by imposing a constraint on the optical path length between the input and output wavefronts. Two different configurations of the beam shaping system are discussed and the good results show clearly the Monge-Ampère equation method provides an effective tool in solving the challenging problem of laser beam shaping.

  17. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  18. Microarray profiling of secretory-phase endometrium from patients with recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rosfayati; Omar, Mohd Hashim; Shan, Lim Pei; Shafiee, Mohd Nasir; Jamal, Rahman; Mokhtar, Norfilza Mohd

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify differentially expressed genes and their related biological pathways in the secretory phase endometrium from patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM) and fertile subjects. Endometrial samples from RM and fertile patients were analyzed using the Affymetrix GeneChip® ST Array. The bioinformatic analysis using the Partek Genomic Suite revealed 346 genes (175 up-regulated and 171 down-regulated) that were differentially expressed in the endometrium of RM patients compared to the fertile subjects (fold change ≥1.5, p<0.005). Validation step using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) confirmed a similar expression pattern of four exemplary genes: one up-regulated gene (fibroblast growth factor 9, FGF9) and three down-regulated genes: integrin β3 (ITGB3), colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) and matrix-metalloproteinases 19 (MMP19). The Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and the Pathway Studio software have found 101 signaling pathways (p<0.05) associated with the affected genes including the FGFR3 /signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway and the CSF1R/STAT pathway. Cell adhesion, cell differentiation and angiogenesis were among biological processes indicated by this system. In conclusion, microarray technique is a useful tool to study gene expression in the secretory phase-endometrium of RM patients. The differences in endometrial gene expressions between healthy and RM subjects contribute to an increase in our knowledge on molecular mechanisms of RM development and may improve the outcome of pregnancies in high-risk women with RM.

  19. Persistent Paramagnons Deep in the Metallic Phase of Sr_{2-x}La_{x}IrO_{4}.

    PubMed

    Gretarsson, H; Sung, N H; Porras, J; Bertinshaw, J; Dietl, C; Bruin, Jan A N; Bangura, A F; Kim, Y K; Dinnebier, R; Kim, Jungho; Al-Zein, A; Moretti Sala, M; Krisch, M; Le Tacon, M; Keimer, B; Kim, B J

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the magnetic excitations of electron-doped Sr_{2-x}La_{x}IrO_{4} (0≤x≤0.10) using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the Ir L_{3} edge. The long-range magnetic order is rapidly lost with increasing x, but two-dimensional short-range order (SRO) and dispersive magnon excitations with nearly undiminished spectral weight persist well into the metallic part of the phase diagram. The magnons in the SRO phase are heavily damped and exhibit anisotropic softening. Their dispersions are well described by a pseudospin-1/2 Heisenberg model with exchange interactions whose spatial range increases with doping. We also find a doping-independent high-energy magnetic continuum, which is not described by this model. The spin-orbit excitons arising from the pseudospin-3/2 manifold of the Ir ions broaden substantially in the SRO phase, but remain largely separated from the low-energy magnons. Pseudospin-1/2 models are therefore a good starting point for the theoretical description of the low-energy magnetic dynamics of doped iridates. PMID:27636488

  20. High-latitude proton precipitation and light ion density profiles during the magnetic storm initial phase.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of precipitating protons and light ion densities by experiments on Ogo 4 indicate that widespread proton precipitation occurs in predawn hours during the magnetic storm initial phase from the latitude of the high-latitude ion trough, or plasmapause, up to latitudes greater than 75 deg. A softening of the proton spectrum is apparent as the plasmapause is approached. The separation of the low-latitude precipitation boundaries for 7.3-keV and 23.8-keV protons is less than about 1 deg, compared with a 3.6-deg separation that has been computed by using the formulas of Gendrin and Eather and Carovillano. Consideration of probable proton drift morphology leads to the conclusion that protons are injected in predawn hours, widespread precipitation occurring in the region outside the plasmapause. Protons less energetic than 7 keV drift eastward, whereas the more energetic protons drift westward, producing the observed dawn-dusk asymmetry for the lower-energy protons.

  1. Toxicity and composition profiles of solid phase extracts of oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Yue, Siqing; Ramsay, Bruce A; Wang, Jiaxi; Ramsay, Juliana

    2015-12-15

    After fractionation using sequential solid phase extraction, the presence of toxic components in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) was detected by the Microtox® acute toxicity assay using effect-directed analysis. The composition of each fraction was determined by high-resolution electrospray ionization-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to determine which chemical constituents in all seven fractions co-varied most strongly with toxicity. Although O2 compounds with double bond equivalence (DBE) between 3 and 9 positively correlated with toxicity, C15-C18 O2-NAs with DBE=4 (tricyclic structure), as well as C14-C17 O2-NAs with DBE=3 (bicyclic structure), were found to be most likely associated with OSPW toxicity, consistent with published toxicity studies of surrogate NAs. O4, many O3 (i.e. possibly hydroxylated O2 c-NAs) and a few O2 compounds were found to negatively correlate with toxicity. The results demonstrate the utility of the fractionation and the PLS-DA approach for evaluating composition-response relationships in a complex mixture and also contribute to a better understanding of the toxic compounds in OSPW. These findings will help to focus study on the most environmentally significant components in OSPW. PMID:26318810

  2. A UNIVERSAL POWER-LAW PROFILE OF PSEUDO-PHASE-SPACE DENSITY-LIKE QUANTITIES IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Kyu-Hyun

    2014-06-10

    We study profiles of mass density, velocity dispersion (VD), and a combination of both using ∼2000 nearly spherical and rotation-free Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. For observational stellar mass density ρ{sub *}(r), we consider a range of dark matter (DM) distribution ρ{sub DM}(r) and VD anisotropy β(r) to investigate radial stellar VD σ{sub *r}(r) using the spherical Jeans equation. While mass and VD profiles vary appreciably depending on DM distribution and anisotropy, the pseudo-phase-space density-like combination ρ(r)/σ{sub ⋆r}{sup 3}(r) with total density ρ(r) = ρ{sub *}(r) + ρ{sub DM}(r) is nearly universal. In the optical region, the negative logarithmic slope has a mean value of (χ) ≈ 1.86-1.90 with a galaxy-to-galaxy rms scatter of ≈0.04-0.06, which is a few times smaller than that of ρ(r) profiles. The scatter of χ can be increased by invoking wildly varying anisotropies that are, however, less likely because they would produce too large a scatter of line of sight VD profiles. As an independent check of this universality, we analyze stellar orbit-based dynamical models of 15 early-type galaxies (ETGs) of the Coma cluster provided by J. Thomas. Coma ETGs, with σ{sub *r}(r) replaced by the rms velocity of stars v {sub *rms}(r) including net rotation, exhibit a similar universality with a slope of χ = 1.93 ± 0.06. Remarkably, the inferred values of χ for ETGs match well the slope ≈1.9 predicted by N-body simulations of DM halos. We argue that the inferred universal nature of ρ(r)/σ{sub ⋆r}{sup 3}(r) cannot be fully explained by equilibrium alone, implying that some astrophysical factors conspire and/or it reflects a fundamental principle in collisionless formation processes.

  3. Measurement of the surface profile of an axicon lens with a polarization phase-shifting shearing interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Kumar, Y. Pavan

    2011-11-10

    We present a Twyman-Green interferometer (TGI)-based polarization phase-shifting shearing interferometric technique for testing the conical surface of an axicon (AX) lens. In this technique, the annular beam generated due to the passing of an expanded collimated laser beam traveling along the axis of revolution of the transparent glass AX element is split up into its reflected and transmitted components, having the plane of polarization in the orthogonal planes, by the polarization beam splitter (PBS) cube of the TGI-based optical setup. The split-up components are made to travel unequal paths along the two arms of the TGI and are recombined by the PBS. Because of the difference in path lengths traveled by the annular conical beams, a linear shear is introduced along the radial direction between the interfering components. Thus, the resulting interference pattern gives a map of the optical path difference (OPD) between two successive close points along a radial direction on the conical surface of the AX lens. The OPD map along radial directions, and hence the slopes/profiles of the conical surface, are obtained by applying polarization phase-shifting interferometry. Results obtained for an AX lens are presented.

  4. Effects of coformers on phase transformation and release profiles of carbamazepine cocrystals in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose based matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shi; Li, Mingzhong

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coformers on phase transformation and release profiles of carbamazepine (CBZ) cocrystals in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) based matrix tablets. It has been found that selection of different coformers of saccharin (SAC) and cinnamic acid (CIN) can affect the stability of CBZ cocrystals in solution, resulting in significant differences in the apparent solubility of CBZ. The dissolution advantage of CBZ-SAC cocrystals can only be shown for a short period during dissolution because of the fast conversion to its dihydrate form (DH). HPMC can partially inhibit the crystallisation of CBZ DH during dissolution of CBZ-SAC cocrystal. However, the increased viscosity of HPMC dissolution medium reduced the dissolution rate of CBZ-SAC cocrystals. Therefore the CBZ-SAC cocrystal formulation did not show any significant advantage in CBZ release rate. In contrast the improved CBZ dissolution rate of CBZ-CIN cocrystal can be realised in both solution and formulation due to its high stability. In conclusion, exploring and understanding the mechanisms of the phase transformation of pharmaceutical cocrystals in aqueous medium for selection of lead cocrystals is the key for success of product development.

  5. Design, methods and demographics from phase I of Alberta's Tomorrow Project cohort: a prospective cohort profile

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Paula J.; Solbak, Nathan M.; Haig, Tiffany R.; Whelan, Heather K.; Vena, Jennifer E.; Akawung, Alianu K.; Rosner, William K.; Brenner, Darren R.; Cook, Linda S.; Csizmadi, Ilona; Kopciuk, Karen A.; McGregor, S. Elizabeth; Friedenreich, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prospective cohorts have the potential to support multifactorial, health-related research, particularly if they are drawn from the general population, incorporate active and passive follow-up and permission is obtained to allow access by researchers to data repositories. This paper describes Phase I of the Alberta's Tomorrow Project cohort, a broad-based research platform designed to support investigations into factors that influence cancer and chronic disease risk. Methods: Adults aged 35-69 years living in Alberta, Canada, with no previous cancer diagnosis other than nonmelanoma skin cancer were recruited to the project by telephone-based random digit dialling. Participants were enrolled if they returned a Health and Lifestyle Questionnaire. Past year diet and physical activity questionnaires were mailed 3 months after enrolment. Consent was sought for active follow-up and linkage with administrative databases. Depending on enrolment date, participants were invited to complete up to 2 follow-up questionnaires (2004 and 2008). Results: Between 2001 and 2009, 31 072 (39% men) participants (mean age 50.2 [± 9.2] yr) were enrolled and 99% consented to linkage with administrative databases. Participants reported a wide range of educational attainment and household income. Compared with provincial surveillance data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Alberta's Tomorrow Project participants had higher body mass index, lower prevalence of smoking and similar distribution of chronic health conditions. Follow-up questionnaires were completed by 83% and 72% of participants in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Robust quality control measures resulted in low frequencies of missing data. Interpretation: Alberta's Tomorrow Project provides a robust platform, based on a prospective cohort design, to support research into risk factors for cancer and chronic disease. PMID:27730115

  6. Authigenic phase formation and microbial activity control Zr, Hf, and rare earth element distributions in deep-sea brine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censi, P.; Saiano, F.; Zuddas, P.; Nicosia, A.; Mazzola, S.; Raso, M.

    2014-02-01

    Sediments collected from hypersaline and anoxic deep-sea basins in the eastern Mediterranean (Thetis, Kryos, Medee, and Tyro) were characterised in terms of their mineralogical composition, the distributions of rare earth elements (REE), Zr, and Hf and their content of microbial DNA. We identified two major mineralogical fractions: one fraction of detritic origin was composed of quartz, gypsum, and low-Mg calcite bioclasts (with 0 < Mg < 0.07%) and another fraction of authigenic origin constituted of halite, dolomite, high-Mg calcite (with a Mg content of up to 22%) and rare bischofite and showed a textural evidence of microbial assemblages. We found that in the Medee and Tyro sediments, the shale-normalised REE pattern of these sediments is strongly enriched in middle REE (MREE), whereas in the Thetis and Tyro basins, a positive Gd anomaly in the residue was obtained after the removal of the water-soluble fraction. In all investigated basins, Y / Ho ratio clustered around chondritic values, whereas Zr / Hf ratio ranged from slightly subchondritic to superchondritic values. Subchondritic Y / Ho and Zr / Hf values were mainly found in the high-Mg carbonate having a microbial origin. The observed preferential removal of Zr with respect to Hf without significant partitioning of Y with respect to Ho indicates that the Zr / Hf ratio and Y-Ho fractionations are influenced by the microbial activity in the sediments. We propose that the concurrent Y-Ho and Zr-Hf fractionations are a suitable tracer of microbial activity in marine sediments.

  7. Experimental multi-phase CO2-brine-rock interactions at elevated temperature and pressure: Implications for CO2 sequestration in deep-saline aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, R.J.; Koksalan, T.

    2004-01-01

    Long-term CO2 saturated brine-rock experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of multiphase H2O-CO2 fluids on mineral equilibria and the potential for CO2 sequestration mineral phases within deep-saline aquifers. Experimental results were consistent with theoretical thermodynamic calculations when CO2-saturated brines were reacted with limestone rocks. The CO2-saturated brine-limestone reactions were characterized by compositional and mineralogical-changes in the aquifer fluid and formation rocks that were dependent on initial brine composition as were the changes in formation porosity, especially dissolved sulfate. The solubility of CO2 was enhanced in brines in the presence of both limestone and sandstone rocks relative to brines alone. Reactions between CO2 saturated brines and arkosic sandstones were characterized by desiccation of the brine and changes in the chemical composition of the brine suggesting fixation of CO2 in mineral phases. These reactions occured on a measurable but kinetically slow time scale at 120??C.

  8. Experimental multi-phase H2O-CO2 brine interactions at elevated temperature and pressure: Implications for CO2 sequestration in deep-saline aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, R.; Koksalan, T.

    2004-01-01

    The burning of fossil fuel and other anthropogenic activities have caused a continuous and dramatic 30% increase of atmospheric CO2 over the past 150 yr. CO2 sequestration is increasingly being viewed as a tool for managing these anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. CO2-saturated brine-rock experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of multiphase H2O-CO2 fluids on mineral equilibria and the potential for CO2 sequestration in mineral phases within deep-saline aquifers. Experimental results were generally consistent with theoretical thermodynamic calculations. The solubility of CO2 was enhanced in brines in the presence of both limestone and sandstone relative to brines alone. Reactions between CO2 saturated brines and arkosic sandstones were characterized by desiccation of the brine and changes in the chemical composition of the brine suggesting fixation of CO2 in mineral phases. These reactions were occurring on a measurable but kinetically slow time scale at 120??C.

  9. Petrology, phase equilibria and monazite geochronology of granulite-facies metapelites from deep drill cores in the Ordos Block of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Fang; Santosh, M.; Bockmann, Kiara; Kelsey, David E.; Hand, Martin; Hu, Jianmin; Wan, Yusheng

    2016-10-01

    Among the various Precambrian crustal blocks in the North China Craton (NCC), the geology and evolution of the Ordos Block remain largely enigmatic due to paucity of outcrop. Here we investigate granulite-facies metapelites obtained from deep-penetrating drill holes in the Ordos Block and report petrology, calculated phase equilibria and in-situ monazite LA-ICP-MS geochronology. The rocks we studied are two samples of cordierite-bearing garnet-sillimanite-biotite metapelitic gneisses and one graphite-bearing, two-mica granitic gneiss. The peak metamorphic age from LA-ICP-MS dating of monazite in all three samples is in the range of 1930-1940 Ma. The (U + Pb)-Th chemical ages through EPMA dating reveals that monazite occurring as inclusions in garnet are older than those in the matrix. Calculated metamorphic phase diagrams for the cordierite-bearing metapelite suggest peak P-T conditions ca. 7-9 kbar and 775-825 °C, followed by decompression and evolution along a clockwise P-T path. Our petrologic and age data are consistent with those reported from the Khondalite Belt in the Inner Mongolia Suture Zone in the northern part of the Ordos Block, suggesting that these granulite-facies metasediments represent the largest Paleoproterozoic accretionary belt in the NCC.

  10. Phase-Amplitude Coupling Is Elevated in Deep Sleep and in the Onset Zone of Focal Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mina; Frauscher, Birgit; Gotman, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between different EEG frequency bands have been widely investigated in normal and pathologic brain activity. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is one of the important forms of this interaction where the amplitude of higher frequency oscillations is modulated by the phase of lower frequency activity. Here, we studied the dynamic variations of PAC of high (gamma and ripple) and low (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) frequency bands in patients with focal epilepsy in different sleep stages during the interictal period, in an attempt to see if coupling is different in more or less epileptogenic regions. Sharp activities were excluded to avoid their effect on the PAC. The results revealed that the coupling intensity was generally the highest in stage N3 of sleep and the lowest in rapid eye movement sleep. We also compared the coupling strength in different regions [seizure onset zone (SOZ), exclusively irritative zone, and normal zone]. PAC between high and low frequency rhythms was found to be significantly stronger in the SOZ compared to normal regions. Also, the coupling was generally more elevated in spiking channels outside the SOZ than in normal regions. We also examined how the power in the delta band correlates to the PAC, and found a mild but statistically significant correlation between slower background activity in epileptic channels and the elevated coupling in these channels. The results suggest that an elevated PAC may reflect some fundamental abnormality, even after exclusion of sharp activities and even in the interictal period. PAC may therefore contribute to understanding the underlying dynamics of epileptogenic brain regions. PMID:27536227

  11. Phase-Amplitude Coupling Is Elevated in Deep Sleep and in the Onset Zone of Focal Epileptic Seizures.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mina; Frauscher, Birgit; Gotman, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between different EEG frequency bands have been widely investigated in normal and pathologic brain activity. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is one of the important forms of this interaction where the amplitude of higher frequency oscillations is modulated by the phase of lower frequency activity. Here, we studied the dynamic variations of PAC of high (gamma and ripple) and low (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) frequency bands in patients with focal epilepsy in different sleep stages during the interictal period, in an attempt to see if coupling is different in more or less epileptogenic regions. Sharp activities were excluded to avoid their effect on the PAC. The results revealed that the coupling intensity was generally the highest in stage N3 of sleep and the lowest in rapid eye movement sleep. We also compared the coupling strength in different regions [seizure onset zone (SOZ), exclusively irritative zone, and normal zone]. PAC between high and low frequency rhythms was found to be significantly stronger in the SOZ compared to normal regions. Also, the coupling was generally more elevated in spiking channels outside the SOZ than in normal regions. We also examined how the power in the delta band correlates to the PAC, and found a mild but statistically significant correlation between slower background activity in epileptic channels and the elevated coupling in these channels. The results suggest that an elevated PAC may reflect some fundamental abnormality, even after exclusion of sharp activities and even in the interictal period. PAC may therefore contribute to understanding the underlying dynamics of epileptogenic brain regions. PMID:27536227

  12. Neurological effects of deep diving.

    PubMed

    Grønning, Marit; Aarli, Johan A

    2011-05-15

    Deep diving is defined as diving to depths more than 50 m of seawater (msw), and is mainly used for occupational and military purposes. A deep dive is characterized by the compression phase, the bottom time and the decompression phase. Neurological and neurophysiologic effects are demonstrated in divers during the compression phase and the bottom time. Immediate and transient neurological effects after deep dives have been shown in some divers. However, the results from the epidemiological studies regarding long term neurological effects from deep diving are conflicting and still not conclusive. Prospective clinical studies with sufficient power and sensitivity are needed to solve this very important issue.

  13. Analysis of genes that influence sheep follicular development by different nutrition levels during the luteal phase using expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Luo, F; Jia, R; Ying, S; Wang, Z; Wang, F

    2016-06-01

    Nutrition is an important factor that regulates reproductive performance of sheep and affects follicle development. However, the correlation between nutrition and follicle development is poorly understood at the molecular level. To study its possible molecular mechanisms, we performed expression profiling of granulosa cells isolated from sheep that were fed different levels of nutrition levels during the luteal phase. To do this, ewes received a maintenance diet (M), and their estrus was synchronized by intravaginal progestogen sponges for 12 days. Ewes were randomly divided into the short-term dietary-restricted group (R; 0.5 × M) and the nutrient-supplemented group (S; 1.5 × M). RNA samples were extracted from granulosa cells. Transcriptome libraries from each group were constructed by Illumina sequencing. Among 18 468 detected genes, 170 genes were significantly differentially expressed, of which 140 genes were upregulated and 30 genes were downregulated in group S relative to group R. These genes could be candidates regulating follicular development in sheep. Gene Ontology, KEGG and clustering analyses were performed. Genes related to oocyte meiosis, such as ADCY7, were upregulated. We identified two important groups of related genes that were upregulated with improved nutrition: one group comprising the genes PTGS2, UCP2 and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and the other group comprising interleukin-1A and interleukin-1B. The genes within each group showed similar expression patterns. Additionally, all five genes are involved in the reproduction process. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to validate the results of expression profiling. These data in our study are an abundant genomic resource to expand the understanding of the molecular and cellular events underlying follicle development. PMID:26970339

  14. Fragment profiling of low molecular weight heparins using reversed phase ion pair liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Li, Daoyuan; Chi, Lequan; Du, Xuzhao; Bai, Xue; Chi, Lianli

    2015-04-30

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are linear and highly charged carbohydrate polymers prepared by chemical or enzymatic depolymerization of heparin. Compared to unfractionated heparin (UFH), LMWHs are prevalently used as clinical anticoagulant drugs due to their lower side effects and better bioavailability. The work presented herein provides a rapid and powerful fragment mapping method for structural characterization of LMWHs. The chain fragments of two types of LMWHs, enoxaparin and nadroparin, were generated by controlled enzymatic digestion with each of heparinase I (Hep I, Enzyme Commission (EC) # 4.2.2.7), heparinase II (Hep II, no EC # assigned) and heparinase III (Hep III, EC # 4.2.2.8). Reversed phase ion pair high performance liquid chromatography (RPIP-HPLC) coupled with electrospray ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-TOF-MS) was used to profile the oligosaccharide chains ranging from disaccharides to decasaccharides. A database containing all theoretical structural compositions was established to assist the mass spectra interpretation. The six digests derived by three enzymes from two types of LMWHs exhibited distinguishable fingerprinting patterns. And a total of 94 enoxaparin fragments and 109 nadroparin fragments were detected and identified. Besides the common LMWH oligosaccharides, many components containing characteristic LMWH structures such as saturated L-idopyranosuronic acid, 2,5-anhydro-D-mannitol, 1,6-anhydro-D-aminopyranose, as well as odd number oligosaccharides were also revealed. Quantitative comparison of major components derived from innovator and generic nadroparin products was presented. This approach to profile LMWHs' fragments offers a highly reproducible, high resolution and information-rich tool for evaluating the quality of this category of anticoagulant drugs or comparing structural similarities among samples from various sources.

  15. Rapid High-pH Reverse Phase StageTip for Sensitive Small-Scale Membrane Proteomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Dimayacyac-Esleta, Baby Rorielyn T; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Kitata, Reta Birhanu; Lin, Pei-Yi; Choong, Wai-Kok; Lin, Tai-Du; Wang, Yi-Ting; Weng, Shao-Hsing; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Arco, Susan D; Sung, Ting-Yi; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2015-12-15

    Membrane proteins are crucial targets for cancer biomarker discovery and drug development. However, in addition to the inherent challenges of hydrophobicity and low abundance, complete membrane proteome coverage of clinical specimen is usually hindered by the requirement of large amount of starting materials. Toward comprehensive membrane proteomic profiling for small amounts of samples (10 μg), we developed high-pH reverse phase (Hp-RP) combined with stop-and-go extraction tip (StageTip) technique, as a fast (∼15 min.), sensitive, reproducible, high-resolution and multiplexed fractionation method suitable for accurate quantification of the membrane proteome. This approach provided almost 2-fold enhanced detection of peptides encompassing transmembrane helix (TMH) domain, as compared with strong anion exchange (SAX) and strong cation exchange (SCX) StageTip techniques. Almost 5000 proteins (∼60% membrane proteins) can be identified in only 10 μg of membrane protein digests, showing the superior sensitivity of the Hp-RP StageTip approach. The method allowed up to 9- and 6-fold increase in the identification of unique hydrophobic and hydrophilic peptides, respectively. The Hp-RP StageTip method enabled in-depth membrane proteome profiling of 11 lung cancer cell lines harboring different EGFR mutation status, which resulted in the identification of 3983 annotated membrane proteins. This provides the largest collection of reference peptide spectral data for lung cancer membrane subproteome. Finally, relative quantification of membrane proteins between Gefitinib-resistant and -sensitive lung cancer cell lines revealed several up-regulated membrane proteins with key roles in lung cancer progression.

  16. Transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange: a versatile tool for shaping the current and energy profiles of relativistic electron bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Sun, Y.-E.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Maxwell, T.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    Over the recent years, the emergence of accelerator beamlines capable of exchanging the phase space coordinates between two degrees of freedom have opened the path toward the precise control of phase space distribution and in particular to the production of relativistic electron beams with shaped current profiles. After briefly reviewing the technique, we present its application to produce a train of sub-picosecond microbunches and report on its experimental implementation at the Fermilab's A0 photoinjector facility.

  17. Stable Deep Doping of Vapor-Phase Polymerized Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/Ionic Liquid Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Christoffer; Nicholas, James; Evans, Drew; Forsyth, Maria; Strømme, Maria; Sjödin, Martin; Howlett, Patrick C; Pozo-Gonzalo, Cristina

    2016-08-23

    Liquid-solution polymerization and vapor-phase polymerization (VPP) have been used to manufacture a series of chloride- and tosylate-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) carbon paper electrodes. The electrochemistry, specific capacitance, and specific charge were determined for single electrodes in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (emim dca) ionic liquid electrolyte. VPP-PEDOT exhibits outstanding properties with a specific capacitance higher than 300 F g(-1) , the highest value reported for a PEDOT-based conducting polymer, and doping levels as high as 0.7 charges per monomer were achieved. Furthermore, symmetric PEDOT supercapacitor cells with the emim dca electrolyte exhibited a high specific capacitance (76.4 F g(-1) ) and high specific energy (19.8 Wh kg(-1) ). A Ragone plot shows that the VPP-PEDOT cells combine the high specific power of conventional ("pure") capacitors with the high specific energy of batteries, a highly sought-after target for energy storage. PMID:27325487

  18. Stable Deep Doping of Vapor-Phase Polymerized Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/Ionic Liquid Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Christoffer; Nicholas, James; Evans, Drew; Forsyth, Maria; Strømme, Maria; Sjödin, Martin; Howlett, Patrick C; Pozo-Gonzalo, Cristina

    2016-08-23

    Liquid-solution polymerization and vapor-phase polymerization (VPP) have been used to manufacture a series of chloride- and tosylate-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) carbon paper electrodes. The electrochemistry, specific capacitance, and specific charge were determined for single electrodes in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (emim dca) ionic liquid electrolyte. VPP-PEDOT exhibits outstanding properties with a specific capacitance higher than 300 F g(-1) , the highest value reported for a PEDOT-based conducting polymer, and doping levels as high as 0.7 charges per monomer were achieved. Furthermore, symmetric PEDOT supercapacitor cells with the emim dca electrolyte exhibited a high specific capacitance (76.4 F g(-1) ) and high specific energy (19.8 Wh kg(-1) ). A Ragone plot shows that the VPP-PEDOT cells combine the high specific power of conventional ("pure") capacitors with the high specific energy of batteries, a highly sought-after target for energy storage.

  19. Variability of the X-Ray P Cygni Line Profiles from Circinus X-1 near Zero Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, N. S.; Brandt, W. N.

    2002-06-01

    The luminous X-ray binary Circinus X-1 has been observed twice near zero orbital phase using the High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) on board Chandra. The source was in a high-flux state during a flare for the first observation, and it was in a low-flux state during a dip for the second. Spectra from both flux states show clear P Cygni lines, predominantly from H-like and He-like ion species. These indicate the presence of a high-velocity outflow from the Cir X-1 system, which we interpret as an equatorial accretion-disk wind, and from the blueshifted resonance absorption lines we determine outflow velocities of 200-1900 km s-1 with no clear velocity differences between the two flux states. The line strengths and profiles, however, are strongly variable both between the two observations as well as within the individual observations. We characterize this variability and suggest that it is due to both changes in the amount of absorbing material along the line of sight as well as changes in the ionization level of the wind. We also refine constraints on the accretion-disk wind model using improved plasma diagnostics such as the He-like Mg XI triplet, and we consider the possibility that the X-ray absorption features seen from superluminal jet sources can generally be explained via high-velocity outflows.

  20. Phase I study of tivantinib in Japanese patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: Distinctive pharmacokinetic profiles from other solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Okusaka, Takuji; Aramaki, Takeshi; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Morimoto, Manabu; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Sato, Takashi; Ikawa, Yuta; Ikeda, Masafumi; Furuse, Junji

    2015-05-01

    A c-Met inhibitor tivantinib is a candidate anticancer agent for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and CYP2C19 is the key metabolic enzyme for tivantinib. Previous Japanese phase I studies in patients with solid tumors (except HCC) recommend 360 mg twice daily (BID) and 240 mg BID for CYP2C19 extensive metabolizers (EM) and poor metabolizers (PM), respectively. In this study, Japanese patients with HCC in whom sorafenib treatment has failed were enrolled to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of oral tivantinib as a single agent. The dose was escalated separately in EM and PM, from 120 mg BID to 240 mg BID, in both capsule and tablet formulations. A total of 28 patients (EM: 21, PM: 7) received tivantinib. At a dose of 120 mg BID, dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) did not develop in 12 EM (capsule: 6, tablet: 6) and 7 PM (capsule: 4, tablet: 3) during the DLT-observation period (for 29 days after first dosing). At this dose, the pharmacokinetic profiles of tivantinib (AUC0-12 and Cmax ) did not remarkably differ between EM and PM. When treated with 240 mg BID, 5 of 9 EM (capsule: 4 of 6, tablet: 1 of 3) developed neutropenia-related DLT accompanying plasma tivantinib concentration higher than expected from the previous studies. Consequently, PM did not receive 240 mg BID. In conclusion, 120 mg BID of tivantinib is recommended among Japanese patients with HCC regardless of CYP2C19 phenotype. PMID:25711511

  1. Reversed-phase liquid chromatographic profile of free amino acids in strawberry-tree (Arbutus unedo L.) honey.

    PubMed

    Spano, Nadia; Piras, Irene; Ciulu, Marco; Floris, Ignazio; Panzanelli, Angelo; Pilo, Maria I; Piu, Paola C; Sanna, Gavino

    2009-01-01

    The typical profile of the free amino acids contained in strawberry-tree (Arbutus unedo L.) honey is reported for the first time. An optimized reversed-phase liquid chromatographic (RP-LC) method with phenyl isothiocyanate precolumn derivatization was used. Fourteen free amino acids were identified and quantified in 16 analytical samples. Proline (65.63%) was found to be the most abundant free amino acid, followed by glutamic acid (6.49%), arginine (5.21%), alanine (5.17%), and phenylalanine (4.97%). The total free amino acid content of strawberry-tree honey (average value, 436 mg/kg) was found to be low in comparison to amounts cited in the literature concerning unifloral honeys. The analytical method was optimized and fully validated in terms of detection and quantitation limits, precision (by testing repeatability and reproducibility), linearity, and bias (by means of recovery tests). The acceptability of the validation protocol results was verified using Horwitz's mathematical model and AOAC guidelines. PMID:19714983

  2. Organohalogen compounds in deep-sea fishes from the western North Pacific, off-Tohoku, Japan: Contamination status and bioaccumulation profiles.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shin; Oshihoi, Tomoko; Ramu, Karri; Isobe, Tomohiko; Ohmori, Koji; Kubodera, Tsunemi; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2010-02-01

    Twelve species of deep-sea fishes collected in 2005 from the western North Pacific, off-Tohoku, Japan were analyzed for organohalogen compounds. Among the compounds analyzed, concentrations of DDTs and PCBs (up to 23,000 and 12,400 ng/g lipid wt, respectively) were the highest. The present study is the foremost to report the occurrence of brominated flame retardants such as PBDEs and HBCDs in deep-sea organisms from the North Pacific region. Significant positive correlations found between delta(15)N ( per thousand) and PCBs, DDTs and PBDEs suggest the high biomagnification potential of these contaminants in food web. The large variation in delta(13)C (per thousand) values observed between the species indicate multiple sources of carbon in the food web and specific accumulation of hydrophobic organohalogen compounds in benthic dwelling carnivore species like snubnosed eel. The results obtained in this study highlight the usefulness of deep-sea fishes as sentinel species to monitor the deep-sea environment. PMID:19837437

  3. Organohalogen compounds in deep-sea fishes from the western North Pacific, off-Tohoku, Japan: Contamination status and bioaccumulation profiles.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shin; Oshihoi, Tomoko; Ramu, Karri; Isobe, Tomohiko; Ohmori, Koji; Kubodera, Tsunemi; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2010-02-01

    Twelve species of deep-sea fishes collected in 2005 from the western North Pacific, off-Tohoku, Japan were analyzed for organohalogen compounds. Among the compounds analyzed, concentrations of DDTs and PCBs (up to 23,000 and 12,400 ng/g lipid wt, respectively) were the highest. The present study is the foremost to report the occurrence of brominated flame retardants such as PBDEs and HBCDs in deep-sea organisms from the North Pacific region. Significant positive correlations found between delta(15)N ( per thousand) and PCBs, DDTs and PBDEs suggest the high biomagnification potential of these contaminants in food web. The large variation in delta(13)C (per thousand) values observed between the species indicate multiple sources of carbon in the food web and specific accumulation of hydrophobic organohalogen compounds in benthic dwelling carnivore species like snubnosed eel. The results obtained in this study highlight the usefulness of deep-sea fishes as sentinel species to monitor the deep-sea environment.

  4. Cohort profile: LifeLines DEEP, a prospective, general population cohort study in the northern Netherlands: study design and baseline characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Tigchelaar, Ettje F; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Dekens, Jackie A M; Hermes, Gerben; Baranska, Agnieszka; Mujagic, Zlatan; Swertz, Morris A; Muñoz, Angélica M; Deelen, Patrick; Cénit, Maria C; Franke, Lude; Scholtens, Salome; Stolk, Ronald P; Wijmenga, Cisca; Feskens, Edith J M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is a critical need for population-based prospective cohort studies because they follow individuals before the onset of disease, allowing for studies that can identify biomarkers and disease-modifying effects, and thereby contributing to systems epidemiology. Participants This paper describes the design and baseline characteristics of an intensively examined subpopulation of the LifeLines cohort in the Netherlands. In this unique subcohort, LifeLines DEEP, we included 1539 participants aged 18 years and older. Findings to date We collected additional blood (n=1387), exhaled air (n=1425) and faecal samples (n=1248), and elicited responses to gastrointestinal health questionnaires (n=1176) for analysis of the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, microbiome, metabolome and other biological levels. Here, we provide an overview of the different data layers in LifeLines DEEP and present baseline characteristics of the study population including food intake and quality of life. We also describe how the LifeLines DEEP cohort allows for the detailed investigation of genetic, genomic and metabolic variation for a wide range of phenotypic outcomes. Finally, we examine the determinants of gastrointestinal health, an area of particular interest to us that can be addressed by LifeLines DEEP. Future plans We have established a cohort of which multiple data levels allow for the integrative analysis of populations for translation of this information into biomarkers for disease, and which will offer new insights into disease mechanisms and prevention. PMID:26319774

  5. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Subcutaneous Testosterone Enanthate Delivered via a Novel, Prefilled Single‐Use Autoinjector: A Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaminetsky, Jed; Swerdloff, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    , Swerdloff RS. Pharmacokinetic profile of subcutaneous testosterone enanthate delivered via a novel, prefilled single‐use autoinjector: A phase II study. Sex Med 2015;3:263–273. PMID:26797061

  6. Ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent based on emulsification liquid phase microextraction combined with microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry for valence speciation of chromium(III/VI) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    A new type of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been prepared and used as extraction solvents for ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent based emulsification liquid phase microextraction method (UA-DES-ELPME) for the determination and speciation of total chromium, chromium(III) and chromium(VI). The chromium concentration in DES rich phase (extraction phase) was determined by using microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS). The detection limit (LOD), the quantification limit (LOQ), preconcentration factor and relative standard deviation were found as 5.5µgL(-1), 18.2µgL(-1), 20 and 6%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed method was evaluated by the analysis of water the certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified environmental water and TMDA-54.4 Fortified Lake Water) and addition-recovery tests for water samples. PMID:27591663

  7. The spatial extent of the Deep Western Boundary Current into the Bounty Trough: new evidence from parasound sub-bottom profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Michael; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    Deep currents such as the Pacific Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) are strengthened periodically in Milankovitch cycles. We studied periodic fluctuations in seismic reflection pattern and reflection amplitude in order to detect cycles in the sedimentary layers of Bounty Trough and bounty fan, east of New Zealand. There, the occurrence of the obliquity frequency is caused only by the DWBC. Therefore, it provides direct evidence for the spatial extent of the DWBC. We can confirm the extent of the DWBC west of the outer sill, previously only inferred via erosional features at the outer sill. Further, our data allow an estimation of the extent of the DWBC into the Bounty Trough, limiting the DWBC presence to east of 178.15°E. Using the presented method a larger dataset will allow a chronological and areal mapping of sedimentation processes and hence provide information on glacial/interglacial cycles.

  8. Band profiles of reacting acido-basic compounds with water-methanol eluents at different SWpHs and ionic strengths in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-04-10

    Overloaded band profiles of aniline (25 microL injection of a 30.5mM solution) eluted with a methanol-aqueous buffer solution (30/70, v/v) were recorded at the exit of a 150 mm x 4.6mm column packed with 3.5 microm XBridge-C(18)porous particles. The SWpHs of the mobile phase was adjusted with phosphate (SWpHs approximately 2.7 and SWpHs approximately 7.5) or acetate buffers (SWpHs approximately 5.3) of different concentrations (11, 56, and 278 mM). The elution times and profiles of the bands observed at low ionic strength were successfully accounted for using the extended Debye-Hückel theory to estimate the activity coefficients of the ions in the bulk phase and a simple non-competitive Langmuir adsorption model, the adsorption of pure aniline or pure anilinium onto XBridge-C(18) being described by a Langmuir isotherm. The band profiles were calculated using this adsorption model and the equilibrium-dispersive model of chromatography. The calculated and the experimental band profiles are in excellent agreement at all buffer pH and ionic strength. This demonstrates that the elution times and the band profiles are controlled by the chromatographic dilution process and by the reaction of aniline with the buffer solution.

  9. Bacterial processes in the intermediate and deep layers of the Ionian Sea in winter 1999: Vertical profiles and their relationship to the different water masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, R.; Monticelli, L. S.; Seritti, A.; Santinelli, C.; Azzaro, M.; Boldrin, A.; La Ferla, R.; Ribera D'Alcalã, M.

    2003-09-01

    Dissolved and particulate organic carbon, bacterial biomass, microbial enzymatic activities (EEA: leucine aminopeptidase, β-glucosidase, and alkaline phosphatase), bacterial production, respiration rates, and bacterial growth efficiency were determined in 10 stations of the Ionian Sea (winter 1998-1999) with the aim of characterizing the recycling of biogenic carbon and phosphorus in the different water masses, previously identified on the basis of their hydrographical properties. All microbial activities decreased markedly with depth, with a sharp increase in the benthic boundary layer, where potential remineralization rates of phosphorus up to 1.03 μg P·dm-3d-1 and bacterial carbon production of 0.078 μg C·dm-3 d-1 were recorded. Those rates were close to the surface ones; the bacterial growth efficiency was also around 20%, similar to the surface value, sustaining the microbial food chain at the bottom. The daily hydrolysis of the organic carbon pool estimated by EEA varied from 0.67% (Ionian Surface Water) to 0.02% (Deep Water). Alkaline phosphatase activity was generally low in the intermediate and deep layers, in relation to the higher inorganic P content. The last facts support the hypothesis that deep waters of Ionian Sea, and in general of the entire Mediterranean basin, because of their young age, carry a larger amount of labile dissolved organic carbon, which reduces the need for a high recycling activity by bacterial community. As a matter of fact, a relatively higher activity per cell in carbon production rates was found in the deep layer where a large volume of the very recently formed Cretan Sea Outflow Water was present.

  10. Spectral properties and temperature radial profiles of Saturn's main rings by Cassini-VIMS: variability with solar phase and elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Brown, R. H.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Altobelli, N.; Spilker, L. J.; Hedman, M. M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cerroni, P.

    2013-10-01

    We report about Saturn's rings average spectral properties and temperature as retrieved from ten Cassini VIMS radial mosaics acquired between october 2004 and january 2010. The dataset includes observations taken with solar phase running between 12° to 136° and elevation angle between -21° to +5°. These observations, after being reduced in spectrograms, e.g. 2D arrays containing the VIS-IR spectral (0.35-5.0 μm) and spatial (from 73.500 to 141.375 km) information, allow us a direct comparison of the derived spectral properties on a common spatial scale. Significant changes in VIS reddening, water ice abundance and grain sizes are observed across different rings radial regions. When observed at high solar phases, a remarkable increase of VIS reddening and water ice band depths is found, as a consequence of the presence of a red contaminant intimately mixed within water ice grains. Ring's particles temperature is retrieved by using the wavelength of the 3.6 μm continuum peak on reflectance spectra as a marker. For pure water ice the position of the peak, as measured in laboratory, shifts towards shorter wavelengths when temperature decreases, from about 3.65 μm at 123 K to about 3.55 μm at 88 K. When applied to VIMS rings observations, this method allow us to infer the average temperature across ring regions sampled with 400 km-wide radial bins. VIMS temperature radial profiles are compared with similar CIRS measurements acquired at the same time. We have found a substantial agreement between VIMS and CIRS results for the A and B ring while VIMS measures higher temperatures than CIRS across C ring and CD as a consequence of the lower optical depth and deviation from pure water ice composition. In summary, VIMS results show that 1) across C ring and CD the 3.6 μm peak wavelength is always higher than across B and A rings: C and CD are warmer than A and B rings; 2) when the solar elevation angle decreases to 0° (equinox) the peak's position shifts at shorter

  11. Comparative study of the whisky aroma profile based on headspace solid phase microextraction using different fibre coatings.

    PubMed

    Câmara, J S; Marques, J C; Perestrelo, R M; Rodrigues, F; Oliveira, L; Andrade, P; Caldeira, M

    2007-05-25

    A dynamic headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry (GC-(IT)MS) method was developed and applied for the qualitative determination of the volatile compounds present in commercial whisky samples which alcoholic content was previously adjusted to 13% (v/v). Headspace SPME experimental conditions, such as fibre coating, extraction temperature and extraction time, were optimized in order to improve the extraction process. Five different SPME fibres were used in this study, namely, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), poly(acrylate) (PA), Carboxen-poly(dimethylsiloxane) (CAR/PDMS), Carbowax-divinylbenzene (CW/DVB) and Carboxen-poly(dimethylsiloxane)-divinylbenzene (CAR/PDMS/DVB). The best results were obtained using a 75 microm CAR/PDMS fibre during headspace extraction at 40 degrees C with stirring at 750 rpm for 60 min, after saturating the samples with salt. The optimised methodology was then applied to investigate the volatile composition profile of three Scotch whisky samples--Black Label, Ballantines and Highland Clan. Approximately seventy volatile compounds were identified in the these samples, pertaining at several chemical groups, mainly fatty acids ethyl esters, higher alcohols, fatty acids, carbonyl compounds, monoterpenols, C13 norisoprenoids and some volatile phenols. The ethyl esters form an essential group of aroma components in whisky, to which they confer a pleasant aroma, with "fruity" odours. Qualitatively, the isoamyl acetate, with "banana" aroma, was the most interesting. Quantitatively, significant components are ethyl esters of caprilic, capric and lauric acids. The highest concentration of fatty acids, were observed for caprilic and capric acids. From the higher alcohols the fusel oils (3-methylbutan-1-ol and 2.phenyletanol) are the most important ones.

  12. 30 CFR 203.43 - To which production do I apply the RSV earned from qualified deep wells or qualified phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Gas Wells on Leases Not Subject to Deep Water Royalty Relief § 203.43 To which production do I apply... production from qualified wells reported on the OGOR-A, including production that is not subject to royalty... production occurring on and after the later of: (i) May 3, 2004, for an RSV earned by a qualified deep...

  13. Climatological characteristics of deep and shallow precipitation clouds in summer over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiao; Fu, Yunfei

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is the highest plateau with complex terrain in the world, and it can affect the weather and climate of many regions through its mechanical and thermal effects. The precipitation types over TP are divided into deep (strong deep convection and weak deep convection) and shallow precipitations, according to the particular atmospheric vertical structures of TP. The climatological characteristics of the deep and shallow precipitations including their horizontal distributions, infrared signal characteristics of clouds, vertical structures, diurnal variations and local phase shifts over TP are investigated by utilizing combining measurements of the tropical rainfall measuring mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) and visible and infrared scanner (VIRS) in summer from 1998 to 2007. The results show that the precipitation over TP is mainly in the form of weak deep convection, which occupies 67.8% of total rain, then followed by shallow precipitation with 26.4% and the strong deep convection with 5.8%. The clouds for strong deep convection and weak deep convection are mainly composed of ice and ice-water mixed particles, respectively. The vertical profiles of deep precipitations firstly increase, and then decrease from the storm top altitude to the ground level, with maximizing at about 7.5 km altitude. In contrast, the vertical profile of the shallow precipitation only has an increasing process. The deep precipitations have significant diurnal variations. The precipitation frequencies for strong deep convection and weak deep convection both peak at 16 local time (LT), while the rain intensities for them peak at 13 and 18 LST, respectively. Furthermore, the rain intensity for strong deep convection is characterized by a secondary peak at 00 LT. For the shallow precipitation, the diurnal variation is relatively weaker. The precipitation frequency and intensity both peak at 20 LT, presenting the characteristic of night rain. The diurnal variations of

  14. Seismic Wide-Angle Reflection / Refraction Profiling from the DESIRE Project Reveals the Deep Structure Across the Southern Dead Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M.; Mechie, J.; Ab-Ayyash, K.; Ben-Avraham, Z.; El-Kelani, R.; Qabbani, I.; DESIRE Group

    2007-12-01

    As part of the DESIRE project a 240 km long seismic wide-angle reflection / refraction (WRR) profile was completed in spring 2006 across the Dead Sea Transform (DST) in the region of the southern Dead Sea basin. The DST with a total of about 105 km multi-stage left-lateral shear since about 18 Ma ago, accommodates the movement between the Arabian and African plates. It connects the spreading centre in the Red Sea with the Taurus collision zone in Turkey over a length of about 1100 km. With a sedimentary infill of about 10 km in places, the southern Dead Sea basin is the largest pull-apart basin along the DST and one of the largest pull-apart basins on Earth. The WRR measurements comprised 11 shots recorded by 200 three-component and 400 one- component instruments spaced 300 m to 1.2 km apart along the whole length of the E-W trending profile. Models of the P-wave velocity structure derived from the WRR data show that the sedimentary infill associated with the formation of the southern Dead Sea basin is about 8.5 km thick beneath the profile. With around an additional 2 km of older sediments, the depth to the seismic basement beneath the southern Dead Sea basin is about 11 km below sea level beneath the profile. In contrast, the interfaces below about 20 km depth, including the top of the lower crust and the Moho, show less than 3 km variation in depth beneath the profile as it crosses the southern Dead Sea basin. Thus the Dead Sea pull-apart basin is essentially an upper crustal feature with N-S upper crustal extension associated with the left-lateral motion along the DST. The boundary between the upper and lower crust at about 20 km depth must act as a decoupling zone. Thermo-mechanical modelling of the Dead Sea basin supports such a scenario.

  15. Multi-phase simulation of fast ion profile flattening due to Alfvén eigenmodes in a DIII-D experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, Y.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Bierwage, A.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-10-01

    A multi-phase simulation that is a combination of classical simulation and hybrid simulation for energetic particles interacting with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid is developed to simulate the nonlinear dynamics on the slowing down time scale of the energetic particles. The hybrid simulation code is extended with realistic beam deposition profile, collisions and losses, and is used for both the classical and hybrid phases. The code is run without MHD perturbations in the classical phase, while the interaction between the energetic particles and the MHD fluid is simulated in the hybrid phase. In a multi-phase simulation of DIII-D discharge #142111, the stored beam ion energy is saturated due to Alfvén eigenmodes (AE modes) at a level lower than in the classical simulation. After the stored fast ion energy is saturated, the hybrid simulation is run continuously. It is demonstrated that the fast ion spatial profile is significantly flattened due to the interaction with the multiple AE modes with amplitude v/vA ˜ δB/B ˜ O(10-4). The dominant AE modes are toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE modes), which is consistent with the experimental observation at the simulated moment. The amplitude of the temperature fluctuations brought about by the TAE modes is of the order of 1% of the equilibrium temperature. This is also comparable with electron cyclotron emission measurements in the experiment.

  16. Deep sequencing analysis of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase at baseline and time of failure in patients receiving rilpivirine in the phase III studies ECHO and THRIVE.

    PubMed

    Van Eygen, Veerle; Thys, Kim; Van Hove, Carl; Rimsky, Laurence T; De Meyer, Sandra; Aerssens, Jeroen; Picchio, Gaston; Vingerhoets, Johan

    2016-05-01

    Minority variants (1.0-25.0%) were evaluated by deep sequencing (DS) at baseline and virological failure (VF) in a selection of antiretroviral treatment-naïve, HIV-1-infected patients from the rilpivirine ECHO/THRIVE phase III studies. Linkage between frequently emerging resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) was determined. DS (llIumina®) and population sequencing (PS) results were available at baseline for 47 VFs and time of failure for 48 VFs; and at baseline for 49 responders matched for baseline characteristics. Minority mutations were accurately detected at frequencies down to 1.2% of the HIV-1 quasispecies. No baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs were detected in VFs; one responder carried 1.9% F227C. Baseline minority mutations associated with resistance to other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) were detected in 8/47 VFs (17.0%) and 7/49 responders (14.3%). Baseline minority nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) RAMs M184V and L210W were each detected in one VF (none in responders). At failure, two patients without NNRTI RAMs by PS carried minority rilpivirine RAMs K101E and/or E138K; and five additional patients carried other minority NNRTI RAMs V90I, V106I, V179I, V189I, and Y188H. Overall at failure, minority NNRTI RAMs and NRTI RAMs were found in 29/48 (60.4%) and 16/48 VFs (33.3%), respectively. Linkage analysis showed that E138K and K101E were usually not observed on the same viral genome. In conclusion, baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs and other NNRTI/NRTI RAMs were uncommon in the rilpivirine arm of the ECHO and THRIVE studies. DS at failure showed emerging NNRTI resistant minority variants in seven rilpivirine VFs who had no detectable NNRTI RAMs by PS. PMID:26412111

  17. Modeling migrations of slab-derived fluid in deep crust based on the considerations of solid phase deformation and wettability of solid-liquid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, J.; Tokunaga, T.

    2012-12-01

    In deep crust, it is considered that the solid phase tends to keep its polycrystalline structure while it flows as highly-viscous fluid, and that the fluid phase flows through polycrystalline solid as porous flow. Here, the solid-framework is considered to change its bulk volume due to the changes of fluid volumetric fraction. In addition, wettability of solid-liquid system, which is expressed as solid-liquid dihedral angle, is also considered to affect internal pore structure. Thus, the solid-framework deformation and wettability of solid-liquid system are considered to influence fluid migration. In this research, we firstly constructed the permeability model to formulate a relationship among solid-liquid dihedral angle, fluid fraction, and permeability based on the energetic and textural considerations of grain boundary interface. The permeability and the fluid fraction under minimum interfacial energy condition were expressed as functions of solid-liquid dihedral angle from this model. Then, we found that permeability can be written as functions of the fluid fraction and the permeability under minimum interfacial energy condition. Secondly, we formulated the deformation of solid-framework and fluid flow through the deforming framework. The governing equations included solid bulk viscosity and solid shear viscosity as necessary parameters to describe the behavior. Based on the derived governing equations, the one-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted with different solid viscosities. From the results where solid bulk/shear viscosity was set to be 1020 Pa×s, intervals with relatively high fluid fraction were formed and the intervals showed attenuated fluctuation of their fluid volume fraction. On the other hand, the results where solid bulk/shear viscosity was set to be 1019 Pa×s did not show such fluctuation. The complex interaction among fluid fraction, permeability, and solid viscosity could contribute to the observed phenomena, and further

  18. Decrease and increase profile of Cu, Cr and Pb during stable phase of removal by duckweed (Lemna minor L.).

    PubMed

    Uçüncü, Esra; Tunca, Evren; Fikirdeşici, Seyda; Altindağ, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    The present work details the decrease-increase profiles of Cu, Cr, and Pb by the aquatic plant Lemna minor. A mixture of these metals were utilized at different concentrations. Removal profiles of each metal was determined with water samples taken every 24 h for a 144 h period after the 48 h mark and was examined with correlation analysis. Removal profiles of Cr and Pb by L. minor from the mixture were observed to be highly similar with each other (r = 0.943). High proportion of Cr and Pb were removed compared to Cu and removal equations were defined with the aid of regression analysis.

  19. Stationary phases in the screening of drug/impurity profiles and in their separation method development: identification of columns with different and similar selectivities.

    PubMed

    Van Gyseghem, E; Jimidar, M; Sneyers, R; De Smet, M; Verhoeven, E; Vander Heyden, Y

    2006-06-01

    The classification or characterization of stationary phases based on chromatographic parameters, in general, requires different test solutes/mixtures and several mobile phases. To simplify the classification/characterization of reversed-phase liquid chromatographic columns, to be used in separating drug/impurity profiles, a new test procedure was proposed. It consists of injecting two mixtures of relatively similar active substances applying a standard gradient. The aim was to evaluate from this approach the selectivity differences and overall separation quality of newly tested columns compared to that in an earlier selected set of eight stationary phases. The selectivity differences of the columns were evaluated by correlation coefficient-based weighted-average-linkage dendrograms and color maps. Derringer's desirability functions were used to rank similar stationary phases according to their overall separation quality. Four columns of 27 examined were, for instance, considered different from the earlier selected eight and could be added to the selection. A number of tested stationary phases might be considered as alternatives for some from the initial set. For three columns the newly tested stationary phases did not contain alternatives.

  20. Analysis of expression profile of mce operon genes (mce1, mce2, mce3 operon) in different Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates at different growth phases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pratibha; Katoch, V.M.; Mohanty, K.K.; Chauhan, Devendra Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) has four homologous mammalian cell entry (mce) operons (mce1-4) that encode exported proteins and have a possible role in the virulence mechanism of this pathogen. The expression of mce operon is considered to be complex and not completely understood. Although expression of mce operon at different in vitro growth phases has been studied earlier, its expression in different M. tuberculosis isolates under different growth phases is not yet studied. The present preliminary study was conducted on a limited number of isolates to know the trend of expression pattern of mce operon genes in different M. tuberculosis isolates under different growth stages. Methods: In this study, we monitored the transcriptional profile of selected mce operon genes (mce1A, mce1D, mce2A, mce2D, mce3A, mce3C) in different M. tuberculosis isolates (MDR1, MDR2, and sensitive isolate) at early exponential and stationary phases using real-time quantitative PCR. Results: The expression ratio of all selected mce operon genes in all M. tuberculosis isolates was reduced at the initial phase and increased substantially at a later phase of growth. Higher expression of mce1 operon genes was found in all M. tuberculosis isolates as compared to other mce operon genes (mce2 and mce3 operons) at stationary growth phase. Interpretation & conclusions: The higher expression of mce operon genes at stationary phase (as compared to early exponential phase) suggested growth phase dependent expression of mce operon genes. This indicated that the mce operon genes might have a role in M. tuberculosis survival and adaptation on the onset of adverse condition like stationary phase. Identification of differentially expressed genes will add to our understanding of the bacilli involved in adaptation to different growth conditions. PMID:27377506

  1. Urine profiles and kidney histology following intravenous diatrizoate and iohexol in the degeneration phase of gentamicin nephropathy in rats. Effects on urine and serum profiles.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, H S; Golman, K; Larsen, S; Hemmingsen, L; Skaarup, P

    1991-11-01

    Urine chemical profiles were followed for three or nine days after intravenous injection of diatrizoate, iohexol, or saline in 30 rats, where a tubulointerstitial nephropathy was induced by gentamicin given over an eight-day period. Another ten rats injected with saline served as controls. Compared to injection of saline, both iohexol and diatrizoate induced dysfunction. The excretion of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase was significantly greater following iohexol than following diatrizoate. No significant differences between the two media were shown by the various serum components examined. Among the gentamicin-treated rats, light microscopy showed prolonged occurrence of tubular necrosis and a more intensive round cell infiltration following iohexol than following diatrizoate and saline. Both contrast media induced further temporary renal dysfunction in rats with gentamicin nephropathy; iohexol induced more morphologic changes than diatrizoate.

  2. Deep eutectic liquid organic salt as a new solvent for liquid-phase microextraction and its application in ligandless extraction and preconcentraion of lead and cadmium in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mehdi; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Tamaddon, Fatemeh; Azadi, Davood

    2015-11-01

    Deep eutectic liquid organic salt was used as the solvent and a liquid phase microextraction (DES-LPME) combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed for separation, preconcentration and determination of lead and cadmium in edible oils. A 4:1 mixture of deep eutectic solvent and 2% nitric acid (200 µL) was added to an oil sample. The mixture was vortexed and transferred into a water bath at 50 °C and stirred for 5 minutes. After the extraction was completed, the phases were separated by centrifugation, and the enriched analytes in the deep eutectic solvent phase were determined by ETAAS. Under optimized extraction conditions and for an oil sample of 28 g, enhancement factors of 198 and 195 and limits of detection (defined as 3 Sb/m) of 8 and 0. 2 ng kg(-1) were achieved for lead and cadmium respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of lead and cadmium in various edible oils. PMID:26452873

  3. Residual stress profiling in the ferrite and cementite phases of cold-drawn steel rods by synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Perez, M.L.; Mompean, F.J.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Atienza, J.M.; Elices, M.; Peng Rulin; Buslaps, T.

    2004-10-18

    Residual stress profiles have been measured in the ferrite and cementite phases of a cold-drawn eutectoid steel rod by neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction in three orientations (axial, radial and hoop). Neutron diffraction was employed to measure the ferrite stresses, whereas synchrotron radiation was used for ferrite and cementite stresses. Experimental results in the ferrite phase showed excellent agreement between both experimental techniques when gauge volume effects were accounted for. Axial cementite stresses were always tensile, with a maximum value close to 1700 MPa at the rod surface. Radial and hoop cementite stresses were compressive along the diameter of the rod, with a minimum of -1900 MPa at the rod center. A 3D-finite element simulation of the macro residual stresses resulting from cold-drawing showed remarkable agreement with those determined from the experimental measurements in the ferrite and cementite phases.

  4. Hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection for the profiling of fatty acids in vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Siang, Gan Hui; Makahleh, Ahmad; Saad, Bahruddin; Lim, Boey Peng

    2010-12-24

    The development of a two phase hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction technique, followed by gas-chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) for the profiling of the fatty acids (FAs) (lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, linolenic and arachidic) in vegetable oils is described. Heptadecanoic acid methyl ester was used as the internal standard. The FAs were transesterified to their corresponding methyl esters prior to the extraction. Extraction parameters such as type of extracting solvent, temperature, extraction time, stirring speed and salt addition were studied and optimized. Recommended conditions were extraction solvent, n-tridecane; extraction time, 35 min; extraction temperature, ambient; without addition of salt. Enrichment factors varying from 37 to 115 were achieved. Calibration curves for the nine FAs were well correlated (r(2)>0.994) within the range of 10-5000 μg L(-1). The limit of detection (signal:noise, 3) was 4.73-13.21 ng L(-1). The method was successfully applied to the profiling of the FAs in palm oils (crude, olein, kernel, and carotino cooking oil) and other vegetable oils (soybean, olive, coconut, rice bran and pumpkin). The encouraging enrichments achieved offer an interesting option for the profiling of the minor and major FAs in palm and other vegetable oils. PMID:21081239

  5. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry profiling of transgenic and non-transgenic maize for cultivar characterization.

    PubMed

    López, Ma Concepción García; Garcia-Cañas, Virginia; Alegre, Ma Luisa Marina

    2009-10-23

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-ESI-MS (ion trap)) method is developed, for the first time, for profiling transgenic and non-transgenic maize with the aim of cultivar characterization. To optimize chromatographic conditions the following parameters were studied: column, gradient, and ion-pairing reagent. Moreover, the influence in the MS signal of the variation of the capillary voltage and the accumulated ions in the trap was also studied. The developed method was applied to the profiling of different protein fractions (albumin, globulin, prolamin, and glutelin) isolated from Bt transgenic and non-transgenic maize cultivars. Moreover, different maize samples, namely, maize cultivars from different geographical origins (USA, Canada, France, and Spain), transgenic maize samples with certified GMO content, and three transgenic Bt maize cultivars with their isogenic non-transgenic counterparts (Aristis Bt vs. Aristis, PR33P67 vs. PR33P66, and DKC6575 vs. Tietar) were profiled by the developed method. Mass spectra obtained for certain peaks in the maize cultivars studied resulted, in some occasions, useful for cultivar characterization and differentiation. The comparison of UV and MS profiles and mass spectra corresponding to the protein fractions with those of the whole seeds enabled the assignment of some peaks. PMID:19748098

  6. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry profiling of transgenic and non-transgenic maize for cultivar characterization.

    PubMed

    López, Ma Concepción García; Garcia-Cañas, Virginia; Alegre, Ma Luisa Marina

    2009-10-23

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-ESI-MS (ion trap)) method is developed, for the first time, for profiling transgenic and non-transgenic maize with the aim of cultivar characterization. To optimize chromatographic conditions the following parameters were studied: column, gradient, and ion-pairing reagent. Moreover, the influence in the MS signal of the variation of the capillary voltage and the accumulated ions in the trap was also studied. The developed method was applied to the profiling of different protein fractions (albumin, globulin, prolamin, and glutelin) isolated from Bt transgenic and non-transgenic maize cultivars. Moreover, different maize samples, namely, maize cultivars from different geographical origins (USA, Canada, France, and Spain), transgenic maize samples with certified GMO content, and three transgenic Bt maize cultivars with their isogenic non-transgenic counterparts (Aristis Bt vs. Aristis, PR33P67 vs. PR33P66, and DKC6575 vs. Tietar) were profiled by the developed method. Mass spectra obtained for certain peaks in the maize cultivars studied resulted, in some occasions, useful for cultivar characterization and differentiation. The comparison of UV and MS profiles and mass spectra corresponding to the protein fractions with those of the whole seeds enabled the assignment of some peaks.

  7. Extremely deep profiling analysis of the atomic composition of thick (>100 μm) GaAs layers within power PIN diodes by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, M. N.; Drozdov, Yu. N.; Yunin, P. A.; Folomin, P. I.; Gritsenko, A. B.; Kryukov, V. L.; Kryukov, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    A new opportunity to analyze the atomic composition of thick (>100 μm) epitaxial GaAs layers by SIMS with lateral imaging of the cross section of a structure is demonstrated. The standard geometry of ldepth analysis turns out to be less informative owing to material redeposition from the walls of a crater to its floor occurring when the crater depth reaches several micrometers. The profiles of concentration of doping impurities Te and Zn and concentrations of Al and major impurities in PIN diode layers are determined down to a depth of 130 μm. The element sensitivity is at the level of 1016 at/cm3 (typical for depth analysis at a TOF.SIMS-5 setup), and the resolution is twice the diameter of the probing beam of Bi ions. The possibility of enhancing the depth resolution and the element sensitivity of the proposed analysis method is discussed.

  8. Identification and profiling of novel and conserved microRNAs during the flower opening process in Prunus mume via deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Pan, Huitang; Wang, Jia; Yang, Weiru; Cheng, Tangren; Zhang, Qixiang

    2014-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20-24 nucleotide) RNAs that are critical regulators of genes involved in diverse plant processes, including development, metabolism, abiotic stress and flowering. Prunus mume is a widely cultivated ornamental plant in East Asia that blooms in early spring, even at temperatures below 0 °C. While miRNAs involved in pistil development have been identified in P. mume, few studies have profiled miRNA expression patterns during flower opening. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to identify and profile miRNAs that function during flower opening in P. mume. We identified 47 conserved miRNA sequences belonging to 25 miRNA families from 92 loci in P. mume, along with 33 novel miRNA sequences from 43 loci, including their complementary miRNA* strands. The expression levels of most differentially expressed miRNAs decreased during flower opening, while miR156e-f and miR477b were upregulated at the flowering stage. We predicted 88 target genes for conserved and novel miRNAs using computational analysis and annotated their functions. Seven target genes, encoding squamosa promoter binding protein-like (SPL) and auxin response factor (ARF), scarecrow-like transcription factor (SCL) and APETALA2-like transcription factors (AP2), were verified by 5'-RACE to be the targets of miR156, miR167, miR171 and miR172, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR validated the expression of the miRNAs and seven target genes. The results help lay the foundation for investigating the roles of miRNAs in the blooming of P. mume. PMID:24343764

  9. Deciphering the Molecular Profile of Plaques, Memory Decline and Neuron Loss in Two Mouse Models for Alzheimer’s Disease by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bouter, Yvonne; Kacprowski, Tim; Weissmann, Robert; Dietrich, Katharina; Borgers, Henning; Brauß, Andreas; Sperling, Christian; Wirths, Oliver; Albrecht, Mario; Jensen, Lars R.; Kuss, Andreas W.; Bayer, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the central research questions on the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the elucidation of the molecular signatures triggered by the amyloid cascade of pathological events. Next-generation sequencing allows the identification of genes involved in disease processes in an unbiased manner. We have combined this technique with the analysis of two AD mouse models: (1) The 5XFAD model develops early plaque formation, intraneuronal Aβ aggregation, neuron loss, and behavioral deficits. (2) The Tg4–42 model expresses N-truncated Aβ4–42 and develops neuron loss and behavioral deficits albeit without plaque formation. Our results show that learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze and fear conditioning tasks in Tg4–42 mice at 12 months of age are similar to the deficits in 5XFAD animals. This suggested that comparative gene expression analysis between the models would allow the dissection of plaque-related and -unrelated disease relevant factors. Using deep sequencing differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and subsequently verified by quantitative PCR. Nineteen DEGs were identified in pre-symptomatic young 5XFAD mice, and none in young Tg4–42 mice. In the aged cohort, 131 DEGs were found in 5XFAD and 56 DEGs in Tg4–42 mice. Many of the DEGs specific to the 5XFAD model belong to neuroinflammatory processes typically associated with plaques. Interestingly, 36 DEGs were identified in both mouse models indicating common disease pathways associated with behavioral deficits and neuron loss. PMID:24795628

  10. Comparative profiling of differentially expressed microRNAs between the follicular and luteal phases ovaries of goats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Long; Chen, Tao; Sui, Menghua; Han, Chunyang; Fang, Fugui; Ma, Yuehui; Chu, Mingxing; Zhang, Xiaorong; Liu, Cuiyan; Ling, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    To explore if the regulation at post-transcriptional level of follicular phase (Fols) to luteal phase (Luts) transition occurs in the ovaries of Anhuai goats, the differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) of ovaries in the Fols and Luts were analyzed using Solexa sequencing in the study. In total, 320 known miRNAs were co-expressed in the two phases, 339 and 353 known miRNAs were expressed in the ovary in the Fols and Luts, respectively. In addition, 45 novel miRNAs were co-expressed in the two phases, 70 and 94 novel miRNAs were expressed in the ovary in the Fols and Luts, respectively. Let-7f was the highest expressed significantly different known miRNA in the two phases, and mir-159 was the highest expressed significantly different novel miRNA in the two phases, which may participate in the follicular-luteal transition of Anhuai goats. GO annotation and KEGG pathway analysis were applied to analyze the target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs detected in the two phases. The results will help to further understand the role of miRNAs in the regulation of follicular to luteal transition in goat ovaries. PMID:27610292

  11. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. PMID:20851447

  12. Sampled sinusoidal stimulation profile and multichannel fuzzy logic classification for monitor-based phase-coded SSVEP brain-computer interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manyakov, Nikolay V.; Chumerin, Nikolay; Robben, Arne; Combaz, Adrien; van Vliet, Marijn; Van Hulle, Marc M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. The performance and usability of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can be improved by new paradigms, stimulation methods, decoding strategies, sensor technology etc. In this study we introduce new stimulation and decoding methods for electroencephalogram (EEG)-based BCIs that have targets flickering at the same frequency but with different phases. Approach. The phase information is estimated from the EEG data, and used for target command decoding. All visual stimulation is done on a conventional (60-Hz) LCD screen. Instead of the ‘on/off’ visual stimulation, commonly used in phase-coded BCI, we propose one based on a sampled sinusoidal intensity profile. In order to fully exploit the circular nature of the evoked phase response, we introduce a filter feature selection procedure based on circular statistics and propose a fuzzy logic classifier designed to cope with circular information from multiple channels jointly. Main results. We show that the proposed visual stimulation enables us not only to encode more commands under the same conditions, but also to obtain EEG responses with a more stable phase. We also demonstrate that the proposed decoding approach outperforms existing ones, especially for the short time windows used. Significance. The work presented here shows how to overcome some of the limitations of screen-based visual stimulation. The superiority of the proposed decoding approach demonstrates the importance of preserving the circularity of the data during the decoding stage.

  13. Identification and profiling of growth-related microRNAs of the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus by using Solexa deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xianyun; Cui, Yanting; Gao, Baoquan; Liu, Ping; Li, Jian

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by post-transcriptional repression of mRNAs. The swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus is one of the most important crustacean species for aquaculture in China. However, to date no miRNAs have been reported to for modulating growth in P. trituberculatus. To investigate miRNAs involved in the growth of this species, we constructed six small RNA libraries for big individuals (BIs) and small individuals (SIs) from a highly inbred family. Six mixed RNA pools of five tissues (eyestalk, gill, heart, hepatopancreas, and muscle) were obtained. By aligning sequencing data with those for known miRNAs, a total of 404 miRNAs, including 339 known and 65 novel miRNAs, were identified from the six libraries. MiR-100 and miR-276a-3p were among the most prominent miRNA species. We identified seven differentially expressed miRNAs between the BIs and SIs, which were validated using real-time PCR. Preliminary analyzes of their putative target genes and GO and KEGG pathway analyzes showed that these differentially expressed miRNAs could play important roles in global transcriptional depression and cell differentiation of P. trituberculatus. This study reveals the first miRNA profile related to the body growth of P. trituberculatus, which would be particularly useful for crab breeding programs. PMID:27095170

  14. Grustal shortening in the Alpine Orogen: Results from deep seismic reflection profiling in the eastern Swiss Alps, Line NFP 20-east

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfiffner, O. A.; Frei, W.; Valasek, P.; StäUble, M.; Levato, L.; Dubois, L.; Schmid, S. M.; Smithson, S. B.

    1990-12-01

    The deep crustal seismic line NFP 20-EAST crosses almost the entire Swiss Alps. Despite the complex geometry of the well-exposed nappe structure and the considerable axial plunge of some of the units, the Vibroseis survey yielded coherent reflections from several individually identifiable nappe contacts. In the northern part of the survey the Vibroseis data closely match the internal structure of the Helvetic nappes and the underlying autochthonous-parautochthonous Mesozoic sediments. On the northern flank of the Aar massif, an external basement uplift, these Mesozoic sediments seem to rise from a depth of approximately 7-8 km below sea level to the surface in a series of steps which is interpreted to represent crustal shortening achieved by a combination of folding and thrusting. In the southern part of the survey it was possible to image a number of thin slivers of Mesozoic carbonates pinched between slabs of Penninic basement nappes as well as nappe contacts between lithologically contrasting units. In addition, it seems that the Insubric fault zone, which marks the contact between the Penninic zone and the Southern Alps and which outcrops about 30 km to the south of the survey, shows up as steeply north dipping reflections. The lower European crust in the northern part of the survey is relatively transparent as opposed to the Adriatic lower crust, whose reflective nature may stem from shear zones associated with Mesozoic crustal stretching. The base of both the European and Adriatic crust coincides with a 1-s-thick band of laterally discontinuous reflections. This reflection Moho drops to greater depths going from the north toward the center of the Alpine chain, where it disappears with a steep southerly dip. The Moho reappears as a reflection band farther south. This Moho gap is situated above the lithospheric root and may be caused by perturbations related to subduction of lower crustal material. The crustal-scale structure obtained from the Vibroseis data

  15. Deep Sequencing–Based Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Comprehensive Insights into the Responses of Nicotiana benthamiana to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus Infections Containing or Lacking RNA4

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huiyan; Sun, Haiwen; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Xianbing; Li, Dawei; Yu, Jialin; Han, Chenggui

    2014-01-01

    Background Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), encodes either four or five plus-sense single stranded RNAs and is the causal agent of sugar beet rhizomania disease, which is widely distributed in most regions of the world. BNYVV can also infect Nicotiana benthamiana systemically, and causes severe curling and stunting symptoms in the presence of RNA4 or mild symptoms in the absence of RNA4. Results Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analyses showed that the RNA4-encoded p31 protein fused to the red fluorescent protein (RFP) accumulated mainly in the nuclei of N. benthamiana epidermal cells. This suggested that severe RNA4-induced symptoms might result from p31-dependent modifications of the transcriptome. Therefore, we used next-generation sequencing technologies to analyze the transcriptome profile of N. benthamiana in response to infection with different isolates of BNYVV. Comparisons of the transcriptomes of mock, BN3 (RNAs 1+2+3), and BN34 (RNAs 1+2+3+4) infected plants identified 3,016 differentially expressed transcripts, which provided a list of candidate genes that potentially are elicited in response to virus infection. Our data indicate that modifications in the expression of genes involved in RNA silencing, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, cellulose synthesis, and metabolism of the plant hormone gibberellin may contribute to the severe symptoms induced by RNA4 from BNYVV. Conclusions These results expand our understanding of the genetic architecture of N. benthamiana as well as provide valuable clues to identify genes potentially involved in resistance to BNYVV infection. Our global survey of gene expression changes in infected plants reveals new insights into the complicated molecular mechanisms underlying symptom development, and aids research into new strategies to protect crops against viruses. PMID:24416380

  16. Measurement of gas-liquid partition coefficient and headspace concentration profiles of perfume materials by solid-phase microextraction and capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Liu; Wene

    2000-09-01

    An empirical model describing the relationship between the partition coefficients (K) of perfume materials in the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber stationary phase and the Linearly Temperature Programmed Retention Index (LTPRI) is obtained. This is established using a mixture of eleven selected fragrance materials spiked in mineral oil at different concentration levels to simulate liquid laundry detergent matrices. Headspace concentrations of the materials are measured using both static headspace and SPME-gas chromatography analysis. The empirical model is tested by measuring the K values for fourteen perfume materials experimentally. Three of the calculated K values are within 2-19% of the measured K value, and the other eleven calculated K values are within 22-59%. This range of deviation is understandable because a diverse mixture was used to cover most chemical functionalities in order to make the model generally applicable. Better prediction accuracy is expected when a model is established using a specific category of compounds, such as hydrocarbons or aromatics. The use of this method to estimate distribution constants of fragrance materials in liquid matrices is demonstrated. The headspace SPME using the established relationship between the gas-liquid partition coefficient and the LTPRI is applied to measure the headspace concentration of fragrances. It is demonstrated that this approach can be used to monitor the headspace perfume profiles over consumer laundry and cleaning products. This method can provide high sample throughput, reproducibility, simplicity, and accuracy for many applications for screening major fragrance materials over consumer products. The approach demonstrated here can be used to translate headspace SPME results into true static headspace concentration profiles. This translation is critical for obtaining the gas-phase composition by correcting for the inherent differential partitioning of analytes into the fiber stationary

  17. Deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  18. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  19. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech. PMID:26017442

  20. CO2 dynamics in the Amargosa Desert: Fluxes and isotopic speciation in a deep unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, M.A.; Striegl, R.G.; Prudic, D.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Natural unsaturated-zone gas profiles at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site, near Beatty, Nevada, reveal the presence of two physically and isotopically distinct CO2 sources, one shallow and one deep. The shallow source derives from seasonally variable autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration in the root zone. Scanning electron micrograph results indicate that at least part of the deep CO2 source is associated with calcite precipitation at the 110-m-deep water table. We use a geochemical gas-diffusion model to explore processes of CO2 production and behavior in the unsaturated zone. The individual isotopic species 12CO2, 13CO2, and 14CO2 are treated as separate chemical components that diffuse and react independently. Steady state model solutions, constrained by the measured PCO2 ??13C (in CO2), and ??14C (in CO2) profiles, indicate that the shallow CO2 source from root and microbial respiration composes ???97% of the annual average total CO2 production at this arid site. Despite the small contribution from deep CO2 production amounting to ???0.1 mol m-2 yr-1, upward diffusion from depth strongly influences the distribution of CO2 and carbon isotopes in the deep unsaturated zone. In addition to diffusion from deep CO2 production, 14C exchange with a sorbed CO2 phase is indicated by the modeled ??14C profiles, confirming previous work. The new model of carbon-isotopic profiles provides a quantitative approach for evaluating fluxes of carbon under natural conditions in deep unsaturated zones.

  1. Metabolic profile of mephedrone: Identification of nor-mephedrone conjugates with dicarboxylic acids as a new type of xenobiotic phase II metabolites.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Igor; Himl, Michal; Židková, Monika; Balíková, Marie; Lhotková, Eva; Páleníček, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic profile of mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone, 4-MMC), a frequently abused recreational drug, was determined in rats in vivo. The urine of rats dosed with a subcutaneous bolus dose of 20mg 4-MMC/kg was analysed by LC/MS. Ten phase I and five phase II metabolites were identified by comparison of their retention times and MS(2) spectra with those of authentic reference standards and/or with the MS(2) spectra of previously identified metabolites. The main metabolic pathway was N-demethylation leading to normephedrone (4-methylcathinone, 4-MC) which was further conjugated with succinic, glutaric and adipic acid. Other phase I metabolic pathways included oxidation of the 4-methyl group, carbonyl reduction leading to dihydro-metabolites and ω-oxidation at the position 3'. Five of the metabolites detected, namely, 4-carboxynormephedrone (4-carboxycathinone, 4-CC), 4-carboxydihydronormephedrone (4-carboxynorephedrine, 4-CNE), hydroxytolyldihydro-normephedrone (4-hydroxymethylnorephedrine, 4-OH-MNE) and conjugates of 4-MC with glutaric and adipic acid, have not been reported as yet. The last two conjugates represent a novel, hitherto unexploited, type of phase II metabolites in mammals together with an analogous succinic acid conjugate of 4-MC identified by Pozo et al. (2015). These conjugates might be potentially of great importance in the metabolism of other psychoactive amines.

  2. Development of a headspace-solid phase micro extraction method to monitor changes in volatile profile of rose (Rosa hybrida, cv David Austin) petals during processing.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Giulia; Nuzzi, Monica; Avitabile Leva, Alexa; Rizzolo, Anna

    2007-05-25

    In the present study, headspace solid phase microextraction combined to capillary gas chromatography (HS-SPME-GC) has been applied for the determination of changes in the volatile profile of rose petals (Rosa hybrida, cvs David Austin) following processing (heat treatment and addition as an ingredient to a food product--for example yoghurt). Four SPME fibres at two sampling temperatures (40 and 60 degrees C) with a sampling time of 30 min were examined. Volatile profiles were detected either by FID or/and by olfactometry (ODP-II, Gerstel). Fibre testing was performed using raw rose petals for sampling temperature selection and an 18 characteristic rose volatile standard mixture in water was used to compare fibre performances at the sampling temperature of 60 degrees C. Polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) fibre at the sampling temperature of 60 degrees C was the most suitable to sample the rose alcohols phenyl ethanol, citronellol, nerol, geraniol and eugenol, as assessed by GC-olfactometry, not only from raw petals, but also from processed rose petals and the food product. PDMS-DVB fibre also showed a desired low affinity to volatiles from yoghurt, which reduces the influence of food matrix on the volatile profile. The method was linear over two orders of magnitude and had satisfactory repeatability, with limits of detection for the rose alcohols ranging from <1 to 10 ng/ml concentration levels.

  3. Quantification of the pulse wave velocity of the descending aorta using axial velocity profiles from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsi-Yu; Peng, Hsu-Hsia; Wang, Jaw-Lin; Wen, Chih-Yung; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2006-10-01

    The pulse wave velocity (PWV) of aortic blood flow is considered a surrogate for aortic compliance. A new method using phase-contrast (PC)-MRI is presented whereby the spatial and temporal profiles of axial velocity along the descending aorta can be analyzed. Seventeen young healthy volunteers (the YH group), six older healthy volunteers (the OH group), and six patients with coronary artery disease (the CAD group) were studied. PC-MRI covering the whole descending aorta was acquired, with velocity gradients encoding the in-plane velocity. From the corrected axial flow velocity profiles, PWV was determined from the slope of an intersecting line between the presystolic and early systolic phases. Furthermore, the aortic elastic modulus (Ep) was derived from the ratio of the brachial pulse pressure to the strain of the aortic diameter. The PWV increased from YH to OH to CAD (541 +/- 94, 808 +/- 184, 1121 +/- 218 cm/s, respectively; P = 0.015 between YH and OH; P = 0.023 between OH and CAD). There was a high correlation between PWV and Ep (r = 0.861, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that age and CAD were independent risk factors for an increase in the PWV. Compared to existing methods, our method requires fewer assumptions and provides a more intuitive and objective way to estimate the PWV.

  4. Variable neutron star free precession in Hercules X-1 from evolution of RXTE X-ray pulse profiles with phase of the 35-d cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K.; Shakura, N.; Staubert, R.; Kochetkova, A.; Klochkov, D.; Wilms, J.

    2013-10-01

    Accretion of matter on to the surface of a freely precessing neutron star (NS) with a complex non-dipole magnetic field can explain the change of X-ray pulse profiles of Her X-1 observed by RXTE with the phase of the 35-d cycle. We demonstrate this using all available measurements of X-ray pulse profiles in the 9-13 keV energy range obtained with the RXTE/Proportional Counter Array (PCA). The measured profiles guided the elaboration of a geometrical model and the definition of locations of emitting poles, arcs and spots on the NS surface which satisfactorily reproduce the observed pulse profiles and their dependence on free precession phase. We have found that the observed trend of the times of the 35-d turn-ons on the O-C diagram, which can be approximated by a collection of consecutive linear segments around the mean value, can be described by our model by assuming a variable free precession period, with a fractional period change of about a few per cent. Under this assumption and using our model, we have found that the times of phase zero of the NS free precession (which we identify with the maximum separation of the brightest spot on the NS surface with the NS spin axis) occur about 1.6 d after the mean turn-on times inside each `stable' epoch, producing a linear trend on the O-C diagram with the same slope as the observed times of turn-ons. We propose that the 2.5 per cent changes in the free precession period that occur on time scales of several to tens of 35-d cycles can be related to wandering of the principal inertia axis of the NS body due to variations in the patterns of accretion on to the NS surface. The closeness of periods of the disc precession and the NS free precession can be explained by the presence of a synchronization mechanism in the system, which modulates the dynamical interaction of the gas streams and the accretion disc with the NS free precession period.

  5. Biological profiling of the ToxCast Phase II Chemical Library in Primary Human Cell Co-Culture Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA’s ToxCast research project was developed to address the need for high-throughput testing of chemicals and a pathway-based approach to hazard screening. Phase I of ToxCast tested over 300 unique compounds (mostly pesticides and antimicrobials). With the addition of Ph...

  6. Evaluation of Free To Grow, Phase II: Detailed Profile of the Free To Grow Project in California. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Mary

    The Free to Grow pilot project, developed by the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science and its Head Start project, operated between 1994 and 1999. Following a 2-year planning and development stage, 5 project sites went on to complete the 3-year implementation phase in California, Colorado, Kentucky, New York, and Puerto Rico; the…

  7. Health-Related Intensity Profiles of Physical Education Classes at Different Phases of the Teaching/Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronikowski, Michal; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Kantanista, Adam; Ciekot, Monika; Laudanska-Krzeminska, Ida; Szwed, Szymon

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the intensities of three types of physical education (PE) classes corresponding to the phases of the teaching/learning process: Type 1--acquiring and developing skills, Type 2--selecting and applying skills, tactics and compositional principles and Type 3--evaluating and improving performance skills. Material and methods: A…

  8. HST Multicolor (255-1042 nm) Photometry of Saturn's Main Rings. 1; Radial Profiles, Phase and Opening Angle Variations, and Regional Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; French, Richard G.; Dones, Luke; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The main rings of Saturn were observed with the Planetary Camera of the WFPC2 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) from September 1996 to August 2000 as the'ring opening angle to Earth and Sun increased from 4 deg to 24 deg, with a spread of phase angles between 0.3 deg and 6 deg at each opening angle. The rings were routinely observed in the five HST wideband UBVRI filters (F336W, F439W, F555W, F675W, and F814W) and occasionally in the F255W, F785LP, and F1042M filters. The emphasis in this series of papers will be on radial color (implying compositional) variations. In this first paper we describe the analysis technique and calibration procedure, note revisions in a previously published Voyager ring color data analysis, and present new results based on over 100 HST images. In the 300-600 nm spectral range where the rings are red, the 555nm/336nm ratio increases by about 14% as the phase angle increases from 0.3 deg to 6 deg. This effect, never reported previously for the rings, is significantly larger than the phase reddening which characterizes other icy objects, primarily because of the redness of the rings. However, there is no discernible tendency for color to vary with ring opening angle at a given phase angle, and there is no phase variation of color where the spectrum is flat. We infer from this combination of facts that multiple intraparticle scattering, either in a regolith or between facets of an unusually rough surface, is important in these geometries, but that multiple interparticle scattering in a vertically extended layer is not. Voyager color ratios at a phase angle of 14 deg are compatible with this trend, but calibration uncertainties prevent their use in quantitative modeling. Overall ring-average spectra are compatible with those of earlier work within calibration uncertainties, but ring spectra vary noticeably with region. We refine and subdivide the regions previously defined by others. The variation seen between radial profiles of

  9. Deep Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  10. Deep Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popke, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how the safety-related ruling by the National Federation of State High School Associations to eliminate the option of using 18-inch starting platforms in pools less than 4 feet deep may affect operators of swimming pools and the swim teams who use them. (EV)

  11. Early-phase GVHD gene expression profile in target versus non-target tissues: kidney, a possible target?

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, B; Al-Chaqmaqchi, H; Al-Hashmi, S; Brodin, D; Hassan, Z; Abedi-Valugerdi, M; Moshfegh, A; Hassan, M

    2013-02-01

    GVHD is a major complication after allo-SCT. In GVHD, some tissues like liver, intestine and skin are infiltrated by donor T cells while others like muscle are not. The mechanism underlying targeted tropism of donor T cells is not fully understood. In the present study, we aim to explore differences in gene expression profile among target versus non-target tissues in a mouse model of GVHD based on chemotherapy conditioning. Expression levels of JAK-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT), CXCL1, ICAM1 and STAT3 were increased in the liver and remained unchanged (or decreased) in the muscle and kidney after conditioning. At the start of GVHD the expression levels of CXCL9, ITGb2, SAA3, MARCO, TLR and VCAM1 were significantly higher in the liver or kidney compared with the muscle of GVHD animals. Moreover, biological processes of inflammatory reactions, leukocyte migration, response to bacterium and chemotaxis followed the same pattern. Our data show that both chemotherapy and allogenicity exclusively induce expression of inflammatory genes in target tissues. Moreover, gene expression profile and histopathological findings in the kidney are similar to those observed in the liver of GVHD mice.

  12. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  13. Synthesis of dynamic phase profile by the correlation technique for spatial control of optical beams in multiplexing and switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaychuk, Svitlana A.; Gnatovskyy, Vladimir O.; Sidorenko, Andrey V.; Pryadko, Igor I.; Negriyko, Anatoliy M.

    2015-11-01

    New approach for the correlation technique, which is based on multiple periodic structures to create a controllable angular spectrum, is proposed and investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The transformation of an initial laser beam occurs due to the actions of consecutive phase periodic structures, which may differ by their parameters. Then, after the Fourier transformation of a complex diffraction field, the output diffraction orders will be changed both by their intensities and by their spatial position. The controllable change of output angular spectrum is carried out by a simple control of the parameters of the periodic structures. We investigate several simple examples of such management.

  14. Profile summary.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    All drugs appearing in the Adis Profile Summary table have been selected based on information contained in R&D Insight trade mark, a proprietary product of Adis International. The information in the profiles is gathered from the world's medical and scientific literature, at international conferences and symposia, and directly from the developing companies themselves. The emphasis of Drugs in R&D is on the clinical potential of new drugs, and selection of agents for inclusion is based on products in late-phase clinical development that have recently had a significant change in status.

  15. Calf foetal and early life nutrition on grazing conditions: metabolic and endocrine profiles and body composition during the growing phase.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, V; Espasandin, A C; Astessiano, A L; Casal, A; López-Mazz, C; Carriquiry, M

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of nutrition during foetal and lactation periods on calf growth and body composition, and their association with changes in metabolic and endocrine profiles during the calf first year of life on purebred (Hereford and Angus) and cross-bred (F1) dam offspring. Forty cross-bred calves and their dams (purebred--PU: Hereford and Angus, and cross-bred--CR: F1) were used in a randomized block design with a factorial arrangement of herbage allowance of native pastures (high: Hi-HA and low: Lo-HA), 4 vs. 2.5 kg dry matter/kg body weight (BW) and dam genotype (PU vs. CR). Calf BW and blood samples were collected monthly from birth to 380±15 days of age, and body composition was estimated by the urea dilution technique at weaning (142±15 days) and 380 days. Calf birthweight did not differ among groups but from birth to 380 days, and BW was reduced (p=0.046) in Lo-PU offspring. Although Lo-CR calves achieved similar BW than Hi-PU and Hi-CR offspring, they showed an increased fat in detriment of lean tissue deposition. At birth, plasma total protein was less (p=0.04), while plasma glucose, insulin or IGF-I tended or were greater (p<0.072) in Hi-HA than Lo-HA calves. Greater (p<0.03) plasma total protein and/or glucose concentrations during the first months of lactation were observed in CR offspring associated with the greater dam milk production. Although glucose concentrations did not differ among calf groups after weaning, plasma insulin was greater (p=0.004) in Hi-PU than other groups at 380 days. Consistent with the reduced BW, Lo-PU offspring presented the lowest (p=0.026) plasma IGF-I from birth to 380 days. Herbage allowance of native grasslands during calf foetal and lactation periods interacted with maternal heterosis to affect, in the short and/or long term, calf BW or body composition, and metabolic and endocrine profiles. PMID:22712599

  16. Data for chromosome contacts and matched transcription profiles at three cell cycle phases in the fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Grand, Ralph S; O'Sullivan, Justin M

    2015-06-01

    The data described in this article pertains to Grand et al. (2014), "Chromosome conformation maps in fission yeast reveal cell cycle dependent sub nuclear structure" [1]. Temperature sensitive Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell division cycle (cdc) mutants, which are induced by a shift in temperature to 36 °C, were chosen for the analysis of genome structure in the G1 phase, G2 phase and mitotic anaphase of the cell cycle. Chromatin and total RNA were isolated from the same cell culture following synchronization. Two biological replicates were analyzed for each condition. The global, three-dimensional organization of the chromosomes was captured at high resolution using Genome Conformation Capture (GCC). GCC libraries and RNA samples were sequenced using an Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 platform (Beijing Genomics Institute (China)). DNA sequences were processed using the Topography suite v1.19 [2] to obtain chromosome contact frequency matrices. RNA sequences were processed using the Cufflinks pipeline [3] to measure gene transcript levels and how these varied between the conditions. All sequence data, processed GCC and transcriptome files are available under the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) accession number GSE52287 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE52287).

  17. Controlling the optical fiber output beam profile by focused ion beam machining of a phase hologram on fiber tip.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiho; Sparkes, Martin; O'Neill, William

    2015-02-01

    A phase hologram was machined on an optical fiber tip using a focused ion beam (FIB) system so that a ring-shaped beam emerges from the fiber tip. The fiber used for this work was a commercial single-mode optical fiber patch cable for a design wavelength of 633 nm with a germanosilicate core. The ring-shaped beam was chosen to ensure a simple geometry in the required phase hologram, though the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm can be used to calculate a hologram for an arbitrary beam shape. The FIB machining took approximately 45 min at 30 kV and 200 pA. The radius of the resulting ring beam was 0.083 m at 1 m standoff, as compared to 0.1 m as was initially desired. Results suggest that this imaging technique may provide a basis for a beam-shaping method with several advantages over the current commercial solutions, having permanent alignment, compactness, and mechanical robustness. However, it would appear that minimizing the speckle pattern will remain a critical challenge for this technique to become widely implemented.

  18. High-Resolution Profiling of Stationary-Phase Survival Reveals Yeast Longevity Factors and Their Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Erika; Campos, Sergio E.; González de la Cruz, Jorge; Gaspar, Ana P.; Jinich, Adrian; DeLuna, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Lifespan is influenced by a large number of conserved proteins and gene-regulatory pathways. Here, we introduce a strategy for systematically finding such longevity factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and scoring the genetic interactions (epistasis) among these factors. Specifically, we developed an automated competition-based assay for chronological lifespan, defined as stationary-phase survival of yeast populations, and used it to phenotype over 5,600 single- or double-gene knockouts at unprecedented quantitative resolution. We found that 14% of the viable yeast mutant strains were affected in their stationary-phase survival; the extent of true-positive chronological lifespan factors was estimated by accounting for the effects of culture aeration and adaptive regrowth. We show that lifespan extension by dietary restriction depends on the Swr1 histone-exchange complex and that a functional link between autophagy and the lipid-homeostasis factor Arv1 has an impact on cellular lifespan. Importantly, we describe the first genetic interaction network based on aging phenotypes, which successfully recapitulated the core-autophagy machinery and confirmed a role of the human tumor suppressor PTEN homologue in yeast lifespan and phosphatidylinositol phosphate metabolism. Our quantitative analysis of longevity factors and their genetic interactions provides insights into the gene-network interactions of aging cells. PMID:24586198

  19. High-resolution profiling of stationary-phase survival reveals yeast longevity factors and their genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Garay, Erika; Campos, Sergio E; González de la Cruz, Jorge; Gaspar, Ana P; Jinich, Adrian; Deluna, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Lifespan is influenced by a large number of conserved proteins and gene-regulatory pathways. Here, we introduce a strategy for systematically finding such longevity factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and scoring the genetic interactions (epistasis) among these factors. Specifically, we developed an automated competition-based assay for chronological lifespan, defined as stationary-phase survival of yeast populations, and used it to phenotype over 5,600 single- or double-gene knockouts at unprecedented quantitative resolution. We found that 14% of the viable yeast mutant strains were affected in their stationary-phase survival; the extent of true-positive chronological lifespan factors was estimated by accounting for the effects of culture aeration and adaptive regrowth. We show that lifespan extension by dietary restriction depends on the Swr1 histone-exchange complex and that a functional link between autophagy and the lipid-homeostasis factor Arv1 has an impact on cellular lifespan. Importantly, we describe the first genetic interaction network based on aging phenotypes, which successfully recapitulated the core-autophagy machinery and confirmed a role of the human tumor suppressor PTEN homologue in yeast lifespan and phosphatidylinositol phosphate metabolism. Our quantitative analysis of longevity factors and their genetic interactions provides insights into the gene-network interactions of aging cells.

  20. The sunburn response in human skin is characterized by sequential eicosanoid profiles that may mediate its early and late phases.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Lesley E; Gledhill, Karl; Masoodi, Mojgan; Haylett, Ann K; Brownrigg, Margaret; Thody, Anthony J; Tobin, Desmond J; Nicolaou, Anna

    2009-11-01

    Sunburn is a commonly occurring acute inflammatory process, with dermal vasodilatation and leukocyte infiltration as central features. Ultraviolet (UV) B-induced hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids releases polyunsaturated fatty acids, and their subsequent metabolism by cyclooxygenases (COXs) and lipoxygenases (LOXs) may produce potent eicosanoid mediators modulating different stages of the inflammation. Our objective was to identify candidate eicosanoids formed during the sunburn reaction in relation to its clinical and histological course. We exposed skin of healthy humans (n=32) to UVB and, for 72 h, examined expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids using LC/ESI-MS/MS, and examined immunohistochemical expression of COX-2, 12-LOX, 15-LOX, and leukocyte markers, while quantifying clinical erythema. We show that vasodilatory prostaglandins (PGs) PGE(2), PGF(2alpha), and PGE(3) accompany the erythema in the first 24-48 h, associated with increased COX-2 expression at 24 h. Novel, potent leukocyte chemoattractants 11-, 12-, and 8-monohydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) are elevated from 4 to 72 h, in association with peak dermal neutrophil influx at 24 h, and increased dermal CD3(+) lymphocytes and 12- and 15-LOX expression from 24 to 72 h. Anti-inflammatory metabolite 15-HETE shows later expression, peaking at 72 h. Sunburn is characterized by overlapping sequential profiles of increases in COX products followed by LOX products that may regulate subsequent events and ultimately its resolution.

  1. Characterization by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography of the volatile profile of protected designation of origin Montasio cheese during ripening.

    PubMed

    Innocente, N; Munari, M; Biasutti, M

    2013-01-01

    Montasio is a typical protected designation of origin (PDO) Italian semi-hard and semi-cooked cheese produced in northeast Italy from raw or thermized cow's milk. The PDO label implies that the product has distinctive characteristics that are connected to traditional production methods. The aim of this work was to precisely characterize the volatile fraction of this Italian cheese. The volatile profile can be considered a fingerprint because the flavor of a cheese variety is the result of a specific balance between the volatile compounds produced during the ripening process. Analysis of the volatile profile of Montasio cheese was performed by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography. Six cheesemaking trials were performed, each in a different dairy located within the Montasio cheese production area. Cheeses were analyzed at 5 stages of ripening (60, 90, 170, 300, and 365 d). Only 11 compounds were identified and measured: 5 fatty acids, 3 alcohols, 2 ketones, and 1 ester. The limited number of volatile compounds measured in the headspace of the Montasio cheese is probably due to the specific making process of this cheese, which affects evolution of the microflora and the biochemical processes of ripening. The total volatile fraction profile progressively increased from 60 to 170 d, after which time it remained almost steady. The most important contributors were found to be ethanol, short-chain fatty acids (C(2) to C(6)), diacetyl, and ethyl hexanoate. Ethanol and short-chain fatty acids increased up to 170 d, diacetyl increased up to 300 d and then declined, and ethyl hexanoate increased until the final stage.

  2. A reversed-phase capillary ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) method for comprehensive top-down/bottom-up lipid profiling

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qibin; Meng, Da; Issac, Giorgis; Zhao, Rui; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chu, Rosey K.; Zhou, Jianying; Tang, Keqi; Hu, Zeping; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-01-01

    Lipidomics is a critical part of metabolomics and aims to study all the lipids within a living system. We present here the development and evaluation of a sensitive capillary UPLC-MS method for comprehensive top-down/bottom-up lipid profiling. Three different stationary phases were evaluated in terms of peak capacity, linearity, reproducibility, and limit of quantification (LOQ) using a mixture of lipid standards representative of the lipidome. The relative standard deviations of the retention times and peak abundances of the lipid standards were 0.29% and 7.7%, respectively, when using the optimized method. The linearity was acceptable at >0.99 over 3 orders of magnitude, and the LOQs were sub-fmol. To demonstrate the performance of the method in the analysis of complex samples, we analyzed lipids extracted from a human cell line, rat plasma, and a model human skin tissue, identifying 446, 444, and 370 unique lipids, respectively. Overall, the method provided either higher coverage of the lipidome, greater measurement sensitivity, or both, when compared to other approaches of global, untargeted lipid profiling based on chromatography coupled with MS. PMID:22354571

  3. Analyses of Long Non-Coding RNA and mRNA profiling using RNA sequencing during the pre-implantation phases in pig endometrium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueying; Xue, Songyi; Liu, Xiaoran; Liu, Huan; Hu, Tao; Qiu, Xiaotian; Zhang, Jinlong; Lei, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of implantation in pig is accompanied by a coordinated interaction between the maternal uterine endometrium and conceptus development. We investigated the expression profiles of endometrial tissue on Days 9, 12 and 15 of pregnancy and on Day 12 of non-pregnancy in Yorkshire, and performed a comprehensive analysis of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in endometrial tissue samples by using RNA sequencing. As a result, 2805 novel lncRNAs, 2,376 (301 lncRNA and 2075 mRNA) differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 2149 novel transcripts were obtained by pairwise comparison. In agreement with previous reports, lncRNAs shared similar characteristics, such as shorter in length, lower in exon number, lower at expression level and less conserved than protein coding transcripts. Bioinformatics analysis showed that DEGs were involved in protein binding, cellular process, immune system process and enriched in focal adhesion, Jak-STAT, FoxO and MAPK signaling pathway. We also found that lncRNAs TCONS_01729386 and TCONS_01325501 may play a vital role in embryo pre-implantation. Furthermore, the expression of FGF7, NMB, COL5A3, S100A8 and PPP1R3D genes were significantly up-regulated at the time of maternal recognition of pregnancy (Day 12 of pregnancy). Our results first identified the characterization and expression profile of lncRNAs in pig endometrium during pre-implantation phases. PMID:26822553

  4. Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for High-Throughput Molecular Profiling of Sea Cucumber Cerebrosides.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zicai; Cong, Peixu; Zhang, Hongwei; Song, Yu; Li, Zhaojie; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu

    2015-07-01

    Usually, the chemical structures of cerebrosides in sea creatures are more complicated than those from terrestrial plants and animals. Very little is known about the method for high-throughput molecular profiling of cerebrosides in sea cucumbers. In this study, cerebrosides from four species of edible sea cucumbers, specifically, Apostichopus japonicas, Thelenota ananas, Acaudina molpadioides and Bohadschia marmorata, were rapidly identified using reversed-phase liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (RPLC-QToF-MS). [M + H](+) in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode were used to obtain the product ion spectra. The cerebroside molecules were selected according to the neutral loss fragments of 180 Da and then identified according to pairs of specific products of long-chain bases (LCB) and their precursor ions. A typical predominant LCB was 2-amino-1,3-dihydroxy-4-heptadecene (d17:1), which was acylated to form saturated and monounsaturated non-hydroxy and monohydroxy fatty acids with 17-25 carbon atoms. Simultaneously, the occurrence of 2-hydroxy-tricosenoic acid (C23:1h) was characteristic of sea cucumber cerebrosides, whereas this molecule was rarely discovered in plants, mammals, or fungi. The profiles of LCB and fatty acids (FA) distribution might be related to the genera of sea cucumber. These data will be useful for identification of cerebrosides using RPLC-QToF-MS.

  5. Determination of the solvent density profiles across mesopores of silica-C18 bonded phases in contact with acetonitrile/water mixtures: A semi-empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice

    2015-09-01

    The local volume fractions of water, acetonitrile, and C18-bonded chains across the 96Åmesopores of 5μm Symmetry particles were determined semi-empirically. The semi-empirical approach was based on previous molecular dynamics studies, which provided relevant mathematical expressions for the density profiles of C18 chains and water molecules, and on minor disturbance experiments, which measured the excess amount of acetonitrile adsorbed in the pores of Symmetry-C18 particles. The pore walls of the Symmetry-C18 material were in thermodynamic equilibrium with a series of binary mixtures of water and acetonitrile. The results show that C18 chains are mostly solvated by acetonitrile molecules, water is excluded from the C18-bonded layer, and acetonitrile concentrates across a 15-25Åthick interface region between the C18 layer and the bulk phase. These actual density profiles are expected to have a direct impact on the retention behaviour of charged, polar, and neutral analytes in RPLC. They also provide clues to predict the local mobility of analytes inside the pores and a sound physico-chemical description of the phenomenon of surface diffusion observed in RPLC.

  6. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  7. Efficacy profile of a bivalent Staphylococcus aureus glycoconjugated vaccine in adults on hemodialysis: Phase III randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Fattom, Ali; Matalon, Albert; Buerkert, John; Taylor, Kimberly; Damaso, Silvia; Boutriau, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) hemodialysis patients, a single dose of Staphylococcus aureus type 5 and 8 capsular polysaccharides (T5/T8) conjugated to nontoxic recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A investigational vaccine showed no efficacy against S. aureus bacteremia 1 year post-vaccination, but a trend for efficacy was observed over the first 40 weeks post-vaccination. Vaccine efficacy (VE) of 2 vaccine doses was therefore evaluated. In a double-blind trial 3359 ESRD patients were randomized (1:1) to receive vaccine or placebo at week 0 and 35. VE in preventing S. aureus bacteremia was assessed between 3–35 weeks and 3–60 weeks post-dose-1. Anti-T5 and anti-T8 antibodies were measured. Serious adverse events (SAEs) were recorded for 42 days post-vaccination and deaths until study end. No significant difference in the incidence of S. aureus bacteremia was observed between vaccine and placebo groups between weeks 3–35 weeks post-dose 1 (VE -23%, 95%CI: -98;23, p = 0.39) or at 3–60 weeks post-dose-1 (VE -8%, 95%CI: -57;26, p = 0.70). Day 42 geometric mean antibody concentrations were 272.4 μg/ml and 242.0 μg/ml (T5 and T8, respectively) in vaccinees. SAEs were reported by 24%/25.3% of vaccinees/placebo recipients. These data do not show a protective effect of either 1 or 2 vaccine doses against S. aureus bacteremia in ESRD patients. The vaccine induced a robust immune response and had an acceptable safety profile. Further investigation suggested possible suboptimal vaccine quality (manufacturing) and a need to expand the antigen composition of the vaccine. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00071214. PMID:25483694

  8. Single-crystal equation of state of phase D to lower mantle pressures and the effect of hydration on the buoyancy of deep subducted slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, A. D.; Mezouar, M.; Garbarino, G.; Bouvier, P.; Ghosh, S.; Rohrbach, A.; Sanchez-Valle, C.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the physical properties of the hydrous magnesium silicate phase D is important for the interpretation of the seismic anomalies observed in subducted slabs and to evaluate the effect of hydration on slab dynamics. Here we report the equation of state of phase D (Mg1.1Si1.8H2.5O6) up to 65 GPa obtained from high-precision single-crystal X-ray diffraction. A single-crystal of phase D was loaded in a diamond anvil cell using helium as pressure transmitting medium to ensure quasi-hydrostatic conditions during the entire data collection. The volume of phase D decreases smoothly over the entire pressure range, without the anomalies in the compressibility reported at 40 GPa in previous powder diffraction studies. If existing in phase D, a hydrogen bond symmetrization transition as predicted by first-principles calculation is therefore not associated with anomalies in the volume compression behavior. The isothermal bulk modulus KT and its pressure derivative K'T obtained from the fitting of the unit cell volumes using a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state are KT = 151.4 ± 1.2 GPa and K'T = 4.89 ±0.08, respectively. This bulk modulus is in good agreement with a recent single-crystal Brillouin scattering experiment. The presence of 16 vol. % of phase D in hydrous peridotite lithologies reduces the density by up to 2.6% at upper most lower mantle pressure-temperature conditions (1273 K and 30 GPa), phase D is thus a potential candidate to influence the buoyancy of hydrated stagnant slabs below the transition zone.

  9. Melting of phase D in the lower mantle and implications for recycling and storage of H2O in the deep mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sujoy; Schmidt, Max W.

    2014-11-01

    We determined the melting phase relations and conditions of the dense hydrous magnesium silicate phase D (nominally MgSi2O4(OH)2) on composition in MgO-SiO2-H2O (MSH), MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O (MASH), and FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O (FMASH), and on a mixture of phase D + olivine + enstatite (MSH) at 22-32 GPa and 1000-1800 °C. Contrasting to previous studies, we performed H2O-undersaturated experiments. Bulk compositions were synthetic mixtures of brucite + silica or brucite + olivine + enstatite on the silica-rich side of the tie-line perovskite-H2O. At 22-24 GPa, the maximum thermal stability of phase D is between 1350 and 1400 °C in MSH and FMASH, but 1600 °C at 24 GPa in the Fe-free, Al-bearing bulk composition (MASH). Apparently, addition of Al2O3 increases the stability field of phase D by 200 °C, an effect that is counter balanced by addition of FeO. At 32 GPa, the stability of phase D (MSH and FMASH) is between 1350 and 1400 °C. At 22 GPa, phase D melts to a Mg-rich melt coexisting with MgSi-ilmenite + stishovite, whereas at 24-32 GPa melt coexists with perovskite and stishovite. Even melts from bulk compositions in the silica-rich part of the MSH system (molar bulk Mg/Si < 0.5) are magnesian-rich (Mg/Si molar ratio of 2-5) and are distinct from aqueous fluids and hydrous melts at lower pressures. The temperature stabilities determined in this study indicate that slabs that thermally relax when stagnating on top of the 660-km discontinuity or penetrating into the lower mantle will have their last dense hydrous magnesium silicate phase, i.e., phase D, melting and producing a magnesian and hydrous melt that will rise through the transition zone. Such a melt could be responsible for observed low velocity zones, and may be neutrally buoyant at the 410-km discontinuity and will affect the structure and dynamics of the mantle.

  10. Proteome profiling of the growth phases of Leishmania pifanoi promastigotes in axenic culture reveals differential abundance of immunostimulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María del Carmen; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term that encompasses a compendium of neglected tropical diseases caused by dimorphic and digenetic protozoan parasites from the genus Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). The clinical manifestations of neotropical cutaneous leishmaniasis (NCL) caused by Leishmania pifanoi and other species of the "Leishmania mexicana complex" mainly correspond to anergic diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (ADCL), which is the origin of considerable morbidity. Despite the outstanding advances in the characterization of the trypanosomatid genomes and proteomes, the biology of this species has been scarcely explored. However, the close relation of L. pifanoi to the sequenced species L. mexicana and others included in the "L. mexicana complex" allowed us to perform a two-dimension electrophoresis (2DE) approach to the promastigote proteome at the differential expression level. Protein identifications were performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). This insight has revealed similarities and differences between L. pifanoi and other species responsible for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Interestingly, certain proteins that were previously described as immunostimulatory (elongation factor 1β, trypanothione peroxidase, heat shock protein 70, enolase, GDP-forming succinyl-CoA and aldehyde dehydrogenase) are more abundant in the final growth stages of promastigotes (late-logarithmic and/or stationary phase) in the case of L. pifanoi. PMID:26992294

  11. Safety Profile of Gutless Adenovirus Vectors Delivered into the Normal Brain Parenchyma: Implications for a Glioma Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghulam Muhammad, A.K.M.; Xiong, Weidong; Puntel, Mariana; Farrokhi, Catherine; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Salem, Alireza; Lacayo, Liliana; Pechnick, Robert N.; Kelson, Kyle R.; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Liu, Chunyan; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adenoviral vectors (Ads) have been evaluated in clinical trials for glioma. However, systemic immunity against the vectors can hamper therapeutic efficacy. We demonstrated that combined immunostimulation and cytotoxic gene therapy provides long-term survival in preclinical glioma models. Because helper-dependent high-capacity Ads (HC-Ads) elicit sustained transgene expression, in the presence of antiadenoviral immunity, we engineered HC-Ads encoding conditional cytotoxic herpes simplex type 1 thymidine kinase and immunostimulatory cytokine Fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand-3 under the control of the TetOn system. Escalating doses of combined HC-Ads (1×108, 1×109, and 1×1010 viral particles [VP]) were delivered into the rat brain. We assessed neuropathology, biodistribution, transgene expression, systemic toxicity, and behavioral impact at acute and chronic time points after vector delivery. Histopathological analysis did not reveal any evidence of toxicity or long-term inflammation at the lower doses tested. Vector genomes were restricted to the injection site. Serum chemistry did not uncover adverse systemic side effects at any of the doses tested. Taken together, our data indicate that doses of up to 1×109 VP of each HC-Ad can be safely administered into the normal brain. This comprehensive toxicity and biodistribution study will lay the foundations for implementation of a phase 1 clinical trial for GBM using HC-Ads. PMID:22950971

  12. Cytokine profile of a Holstein calf with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency during the acute-phase inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Takashi

    2002-12-01

    Changes in interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8 in serum, and their mRNA expression on neutrophils from a 4.6-month old Holstein young calf with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) during the acute phase were evaluated. IL-1beta concentrations in the serum of the calf with BLAD at age 143-162 days ranged from 8.7 to 16.6 ng/ml, whereas the values were less than 2.7 ng/ml in control calves. Serum IL-6 (0.04 ng/ml) was only detected on the 1st day when the animal was diagnosed with the BLAD. IL-1beta and IL-8 mRNA expression on neutrophils from the affected calf appeared to be similar to those of controls. Serum cytokine levels and their mRNA expression on neutrophils from the calf with BLAD appeared to be little affected by the deficient expression of beta(2)-integrin on leukocytes, and are considered to be modulated by the inflammatory stimuli. PMID:12520109

  13. Reversed-Phase Chromatography with Multiple Fraction Concatenation Strategy for Proteome Profiling of Human MCF10A Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wang, Yingchun; Clauss, Therese RW; Liu, Tao; Shen, Yufeng; Monroe, Matthew E.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Reno, Theresa; Moore, Ronald J.; Klemke, Richard L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-05-01

    Two dimensional liquid chromatography (2D LC) is commonly used for shotgun proteomics to improve the analysis dynamic range. Reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) has been routinely employed as the second dimensional separation prior to the mass spectrometric analysis. Construction of 2D separation with RP-RP arises a concern for the separation orthogonality. In this study, we applied a novel concatenation strategy to improve the orthogonality of 2D RP-RP formed by low pH (i.e., pH 3) and high pH (i.e., pH 10) RPLC. We confidently identified 3753 proteins (18570 unique peptides) and 5907 proteins (37633 unique peptides) from low pH RPLC-RP and high pH RPLC-RP, respectively, for a trypsin-digested human MCF10A cell sample. Compared with SCX-RP, the high pH-low pH RP-RP approach resulted in 1.8-fold and 1.6-fold in the number of peptide and protein identifications, respectively. In addition to the broader identifications, the High pH-low pH RP-RP approach has advantages including the improved protein sequence coverage, the simplified sample processing, and the reduced sample loss. These results demonstrated that the concatenation high pH-low pH RP-RP strategy is an attractive alternative to SCX for 2D LC shotgun proteomic analysis.

  14. Comparison of the effect of anti-hyperlipidemic drugs from different groups on the phase profile of liposomal membrane-a fluorescence anisotropy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandary, Suman; Basu, Ruma; Das, Sukhen; Nandy, Papiya

    2010-07-01

    The study compares the effect of incorporation of three different groups of anti-hyperlipidemic drugs, namely niacin, simvastatin, and fenofibrate on the phase profile of liposomal membranes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The fluorescence anisotropy studies, using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene as fluorescent probe, have shown that the lipophilic molecule fenofibrate changes phase behavior of DPPC liposomal membrane to a greater extent compared to the changes produced by amphiphilic simvastatin and hydrophilic niacin. This variation in effect can be attributed to the nature of the drug molecules and hence their location in different parts of the liposomal membrane. We have also calculated the changes in van't Hoff enthalpy values in all these three cases and observed that these values decreased with increase in drug concentrations in the case of simvastatin but for fenofibrate and niacin the effect is completely the reverse. In order to get a better insight, the fraction of motionally restricted lipid molecules has been calculated.

  15. Development of an achiral supercritical fluid chromatography method with ultraviolet absorbance and mass spectrometric detection for impurity profiling of drug candidates. Part I: Optimization of mobile phase composition.

    PubMed

    Lemasson, Elise; Bertin, Sophie; Hennig, Philippe; Boiteux, Hélène; Lesellier, Eric; West, Caroline

    2015-08-21

    Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is a very useful tool in the purpose of impurity profiling of drug candidates, as an adequate selection of stationary phases can provide orthogonal separations so as to maximize the chances to see all impurities. The purpose of the present work is to develop a method for chemical purity assessment. The first part, presented here, focuses on mobile phase selection to ensure adequate elution and detection of drug-like molecules, while the second part focuses on stationary phase selection for optimal separation and orthogonality. The use of additives in the carbon dioxide - solvent mobile phase in SFC is now commonplace, and enables in particular to increase the number of eluted compounds and to improve peak shapes. The objective of this first part was to test different additives (acids, bases, salts and water) for their chromatographic performance assessed in gradient elution with a diode-array detector, but also for the mass responses obtained with a single-quadrupole mass detector, equipped with an electrospray ionization source (Waters ACQUITY QDa). In this project, we used a selection of one hundred and sixty compounds issued from Servier Research Laboratories to screen a set of columns and additives in SFC with a Waters ACQUITY UPC(2) system. The selected columns were all high-performance columns (1.7-1.8μm with totally porous particles or 2.6-2.7μm with superficially porous particles) with a variety of stationary phase chemistries. Initially, eight additives dissolved in the methanol co-solvent were tested on a UPC(2) ACQUITY UPC(2) HSS C18 SB column. A Derringer desirability function was used to classify the additives according to selected criteria: elution capability, peak shapes, UV baseline drift, and UV and mass responses (signal-to-noise ratios). Following these tests, the two best additives (ammonium acetate and ammonium hydroxide) were tested on a larger number of columns (10) where the two additives appeared

  16. Fe-Ni-Cu-C-S phase relations at high pressures and temperatures - The role of sulfur in carbon storage and diamond stability at mid- to deep-upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuno, Kyusei; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2015-02-01

    Constraining the stable form of carbon in the deep mantle is important because carbon has key influence on mantle processes such as partial melting and element mobility, thereby affecting the efficiency of carbon exchange between the endogenic and exogenic reservoirs. In the reduced, mid- to deep-upper mantle, the chief host of deep carbon is expected to be graphite/diamond but in the presence of Fe-Ni alloy melt in the reduced mantle and owing to high solubility of carbon in such alloy phase, diamond may become unstable. To investigate the nature of stable, C-bearing phases in the reduced, mid- to deep-upper mantle, here we have performed experiments to examine the effect of sulfur on the phase relations of the Ni-rich portion of Fe-Ni ± Cu-C-S system, and carbon solubility in the Fe-Ni solid and Fe-Ni-S liquid alloys at 6-8 GPa and 800-1400 °C using a multianvil press. Low-temperature experiments for six starting mixes (Ni/(Fe + Ni) ∼ 0.61, 8-16 wt.% S) contain C-bearing, solid Fe-Ni alloy + Fe-Ni-C-S alloy melt + metastable graphite, and the solid alloy-out boundary is constrained, at 1150-1200 °C at 6 GPa and 900-1000 °C at 8 GPa for S-poor starting mix, and at 1000-1050 °C at 6 GPa and 900-1000 °C at 8 GPa for the S-rich starting mix. The carbon solubility in the liquid alloy significantly diminishes from 2.1 to 0.8 wt.% with sulfur in the melt increasing from 8 to 24 wt.%, irrespective of temperature. We also observed a slight decrease of carbon solubility in the liquid alloy with increasing pressure when alloy liquid contains >∼18 wt.% S, and with decreasing Ni/(Fe + Ni) ratio from 0.65 to ∼0.53. Based on our results, diamond, coexisting with Ni-rich sulfide liquid alloy is expected to be stable in the reduced, alloy-bearing oceanic mantle with C content as low as 20 to 5 ppm for mantle S varying between 100 and 200 ppm. Deep, reduced root of cratonic mantle, on the other hand, is expected to have C distributed among solid alloy, liquid alloy

  17. Patterns of GPS-TEC variation over low-latitude regions (African sector) during the deep solar minimum (2008 to 2009) and solar maximum (2012 to 2013) phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariku, Yekoye Asmare

    2015-03-01

    Due to the unique geometry of the geomagnetic fields near the magnetic equator and low-latitude regions, the satellite communication system in the African sector is strongly influenced by the effects resulting from the accumulation of electrons in their ionosphere. Hence, this paper investigates the patterns of the vertical total electron content (VTEC) variation detected by the Global Positioning System (GPS) over low-latitude regions during a very low (2008 to 2009) and a high solar activity (2012 to 2013) phases. The study has been carried out by considering eight ground-based dual-frequency GPS receivers installed recently at different regions in Ethiopia. In this work, the diurnal, monthly, and seasonal variations in the GPS-VTEC have been analyzed. It has been found that the diurnal variability of VTEC has shown minimum values at around 0300 UT (0600 local time (LT)) and maximum values nearly between 1000 and 1300 UT (1300 and 1600 LT) during both the low and the high activity phases. Moreover, the maximum and minimum of monthly mean hourly VTEC values are observed in October and July, respectively, during both the low (2009) and the high solar activity (2012) phases. It has also been depicted that seasonal mean hourly VTEC values have shown maxima and minima in the March equinox and the June solstice, respectively, during both the low and the high solar activity phases.

  18. Deep blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    From southern New Mexico to the Great Slave Lake of Canada, scientists from the United States and Canada recently detonated 10 underground chemical explosions to generate a clearer picture of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. Called Project Deep Probe, the experiment is designed to see through the crust and into the upper mantle to a depth of 300 miles.In the United States, Earth scientists from Rice University, Purdue University, and the University of Oregon are participating in the project. “Researchers hope to get a picture of the upper mantle beneath the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado Plateau, to understand the role the mantle played in formation and uplift,” says Alan Levander of Rice. To enhance that “picture,” 750 portable seismographs were placed along a roughly north-south line extending from Crownpoint, New Mexico to Edmonton, Alberta. The seismic recordings will be used to enhance weak seismic waves that penetrated the upper mantle.

  19. Heating deep seated eccentrically located tumors with an annular phased array system: a comparative clinical study using two annular array operating configurations.

    PubMed

    Samulski, T V; Kapp, D S; Fessenden, P; Lohrbach, A

    1987-01-01

    Regional heating administered with an annular array to 12 patients with deep-seated advanced malignant disease eccentrically located in the lower abdomen and pelvis is compared based on the annular array operating configuration. One configuration (4 quadrants active) delivers radiofrequency power with relative uniformity throughout the patient cross-section. The other (2 quadrants active) allows the radiofrequency power deposition to be shifted preferentially into the eccentrically located treatment volume. Phantom measurements have been made to demonstrate the redistribution of radiofrequency power that results when the annular array is operated in these respective configurations. Systemic responses (i.e. oral temperature rise, changes in blood pressure, and heart rate) to these regional hyperthermia applications are compared and are not significantly different with respect to these heating configurations. Temperature data obtained during treatment sessions using these two annular array operating configurations are analyzed based on the fraction of measured tumor and normal tissue temperatures exceeding or equal to a given index temperature. Although the two quadrant configuration is more efficient in delivering power to the treatment volume, this analysis does not indicate a significant gain in therapeutic heating as a result of this preferential power deposition. Treatment tolerance and heterogeneity with respect to tissue type and blood flow remained the dominant limiting factors with regard to temperatures achieved.

  20. Targeted and untargeted profiling of alkaloids in herbal extracts using online solid-phase extraction and high-resolution mass spectrometry (Q-Orbitrap).

    PubMed

    Nardin, Tiziana; Piasentier, Edi; Barnaba, Chiara; Larcher, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The biological activity of alkaloids (ALKs) and the different content of these natural products in herbs and plants have made them an attractive field for chemical studies. A screening method automatically combining online solid-phase purification and concentration of samples with analysis using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a hybrid quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometer was developed and is reported in this paper. The proposed quantification method was validated for 35 ALKs with reference to pure analytical standards. A further 48 ALKs were identified on the basis of their accurate mass and characterised for chromatographic retention time and fragmentation profile, following their confirmation in extracts of herbs already well documented in the literature. More than 250 other untargeted ALKs were also tentatively identified using literature information, such as exact mass and isotopic pattern. The mass spectrometer operated in positive ion mode and mass spectra were acquired, with full MS-data-dependent MS/MS analysis (full MS-dd MS/MS) at a resolution of 140 000. The method was linear up to an ALK concentration of 1000/3000 µg l(-1) , with R(2) always >0.99 and limits of detection ranging between 0.04 and 10 µg l(-1) . Accuracy, expressed as the recovery relative error, had a median value of 7.4%, and precision (relative standard deviation %) was generally lower than 10% throughout the quantitation range. The proposed method was then used to investigate the targeted and untargeted ALK profile of a selection of 18 alpine herbal plants, establishing that pyrrolizidine, pyrrolidine and piperidine ALKs were the most well represented. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27502171

  1. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2-4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Ende, Piet van den; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  2. Hepatic and Pulmonary Toxicogenomic Profiles in Mice Intratracheally Instilled With Carbon Black Nanoparticles Reveal Pulmonary Inflammation, Acute Phase Response, and Alterations in Lipid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, Julie A.; Halappanavar, Sabina; Saber, Anne T.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Williams, Andrew; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Yauk, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    Global pulmonary and hepatic messenger RNA profiles in adult female C57BL/6 mice intratracheally instilled with carbon black nanoparticles (NPs) (Printex 90) were analyzed to identify biological perturbations underlying systemic responses to NP exposure. Tissue gene expression changes were profiled 1, 3, and 28 days following exposure to 0.018, 0.054, and 0.162 mg Printex 90 alongside controls. Pulmonary response was marked by increased expression of inflammatory markers and acute phase response (APR) genes that persisted to day 28 at the highest exposure dose. Genes in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase pathway were increased, and those involved in cholesterol efflux were decreased at least at the highest dose on days 1 and 3. Hepatic responses mainly consisted of the HMG-CoA reductase pathway on days 1 (high dose) and 28 (all doses). Protein analysis in tissues and plasma of 0.162 mg Printex 90–exposed mice relative to control revealed an increase in plasma serum amyloid A on days 1 and 28 (p < 0.05), decreases in plasma high-density lipoprotein on days 3 and 28, an increase in plasma low-density lipoprotein on day 28 (p < 0.05), and marginal increases in total hepatic cholesterol on day 28 (p = 0.06). The observed changes are linked to APR. Although further research is needed to establish links between observations and the onset and progression of systemic disorders, the present study demonstrates the ability of NPs to induce systemic effects. PMID:22461453

  3. Overloaded elution band profiles of ionizable compounds in reversed-phase liquid chromatography: Influence of the competition between the neutral and the ionic species

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2008-01-01

    The parameters that affect the shape of the band profiles of acido-basic compounds under moderately overloaded conditions (sample size less than 500 nmol for a conventional column) in RPLC are discussed. Only analytes that have a single pK{sub a} are considered. In the buffer mobile phase used for their elution, their dissociation may, under certain conditions, cause a significant pH perturbation during the passage of the band. Two consecutive injections (3.3 and 10 {micro}L) of each one of three sample solutions (0.5, 5, and 50 mM) of ten compounds were injected on five C{sub 18}-bonded packing materials, including the 5 {micro}m Xterra-C{sub 18} (121 {angstrom}), 5 {micro}m Gemini-C{sub 18} (110 {angstrom}), 5 {micro}m Luna-C{sub 18}(2) (93 {angstrom}), 3.5 {micro}m Extend-C{sub 18} (80 {angstrom}), and 2.7 {micro}m Halo-C{sub 18} (90 {angstrom}). The mobile phase was an aqueous solution of methanol buffered at a constant {sub W}{sup W}pH of 6, with a phosphate buffer. The total concentration of the phosphate groups was constant at 50 mM. The methanol concentration was adjusted to keep all the retention factors between 1 and 10. The compounds injected were phenol, caffeine, 3-phenyl 1-propanol, 2-phenyl butyric acid, amphetamine, aniline, benzylamine, p-toluidine, procainamidium chloride, and propranololium chloride. Depending on the relative values of the analyte pK{sub a} and the buffer solution pH, these analytes elute as the neutral, the cationic, or the anionic species. The influence of structural parameters such as the charge, the size, and the hydrophobicity of the analytes on the shape of its overloaded band profile is discussed. Simple but general rules predict these shapes. An original adsorption model is proposed that accounts for the unusual peak shapes observed when the analyte is partially dissociated in the buffer solution during its elution.

  4. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  5. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  6. Differential Phenotypic and Functional Profiles of TcCA-2 -Specific Cytotoxic CD8+ T Cells in the Asymptomatic versus Cardiac Phase in Chagasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Egui, Adriana; Thomas, M. Carmen; Carrilero, Bartolomé; Segovia, Manuel; Alonso, Carlos; Marañón, Concepción; López, Manuel Carlos

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that the immune response mediated by T CD8+ lymphocytes plays a critical role in the control of Trypanosoma cruzi infection and that the clinical symptoms of Chagas disease appear to be related to the competence of the CD8+ T immune response against the parasite. Herewith, in silico prediction and binding assays on TAP-deficient T2 cells were used to identify potential HLA-A*02:01 ligands in the T. cruzi TcCA-2 protein. The TcCA-2-specific CD8+ T cells were functionality evaluated by Granzyme B and cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from Chagas disease patients stimulated with the identified HLA-A*02:01 peptides. The specific cells were phenotypically characterized by flow cytometry using several surface markers and HLA-A*02:01 APC-labeled dextramer loaded with the peptides. In the T. cruzi TcCA-2 protein four T CD8+ epitopes were identified which are processed and presented during Chagas disease. Interestingly, a differential cellular phenotypic profile could be correlated with the severity of the disease. The TcCA-2-specific T CD8+ cells from patients with cardiac symptoms are mainly effector memory cells (TEM and TEMRA) while, those present in the asymptomatic phase are predominantly naive cells (TNAIVE). Moreover, in patients with cardiac symptoms the percentage of cells with senescence features is significantly higher than in patients at the asymptomatic phase of the disease. We consider that the identification of these new class I-restricted epitopes are helpful for designing biomarkers of sickness pathology as well as the development of immunotherapies against T. cruzi infection. PMID:25816096

  7. MicroRNA Expression Profile in Bovine Granulosa Cells of Preovulatory Dominant and Subordinate Follicles during the Late Follicular Phase of the Estrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gebremedhn, Samuel; Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Ahmad, Ijaz; Sahadevan, Sudeep; Hossain, Md Munir; Hoelker, Michael; Rings, Franca; Neuhoff, Christiane; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Tesfaye, Dawit

    2015-01-01

    In bovine, ovarian follicles grow in a wave-like fashion with commonly 2 or 3 follicular waves emerging per estrous cycle. The dominant follicle of the follicular wave which coincides with the LH-surge becomes ovulatory, leaving the subordinate follicles to undergo atresia. These physiological processes are controlled by timely and spatially expressed genes and gene products, which in turn are regulated by post-transcriptional regulators. MicroRNAs, a class of short non-coding RNA molecules, are one of the important posttranscriptional regulators of genes associated with various cellular processes. Here we investigated the expression pattern of miRNAs in granulosa cells of bovine preovulatory dominant and subordinate follicles during the late follicular phase of bovine estrous cycle using Illumina miRNA deep sequencing. In addition to 11 putative novel miRNAs, a total of 315 and 323 known miRNAs were detected in preovulatory dominant and subordinate follicles, respectively. Moreover, in comparison with the subordinate follicles, a total of 64 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in preovulatory dominant follicles, of which 34 miRNAs including the miR-132 and miR-183 clusters were significantly enriched, and 30 miRNAs including the miR-17-92 cluster, bta-miR-409a and bta-miR-378 were significantly down regulated in preovulatory dominant follicles. In-silico pathway analysis revealed that canonical pathways related to oncogenesis, cell adhesion, cell proliferation, apoptosis and metabolism were significantly enriched by the predicted target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs. Furthermore, Luciferase reporter assay analysis showed that one of the differentially regulated miRNAs, the miR-183 cluster miRNAs, were validated to target the 3´-UTR of FOXO1 gene. Moreover FOXO1 was highly enriched in granulosa cells of subordinate follicles in comparison with the preovulatory dominant follicles demonstrating reciprocal expression pattern with miR-183

  8. Correction of Excitation Profile in Zero Echo Time (ZTE) Imaging Using Quadratic Phase-Modulated RF Pulse Excitation and Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Magland, Jeremy F.; Seifert, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Zero-echo Time (ZTE) imaging is a promising technique for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of short-T2 tissue nuclei in tissues. A problem inherent to the method currently hindering its translation to the clinic is the presence of a spatial encoding gradient during excitation, which causes the hard pulse to become spatially selective, resulting in blurring and shadow artifacts in the image. While shortening radiofrequency (RF) pulse duration alleviates this problem the resulting elevated RF peak power and specific absorption rate (SAR) in practice impede such a solution. In this work, an approach is described to correct the artifacts by applying quadratic phase-modulated RF excitation and iteratively solving an inverse problem formulated from the signal model of ZTE imaging. A simple pulse sequence is also developed to measure the excitation profile of the RF pulse. Results from simulations, phantom and in vivo studies, demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in correcting image artifacts caused by inhomogeneous excitation. The proposed method may contribute toward establishing ZTE MRI as a routine 3D pulse sequence for imaging protons and other nuclei with quasi solid-state behavior on clinical scanners. PMID:24710164

  9. A powerful methodological approach combining headspace solid phase microextraction, mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis for profiling the volatile metabolomic pattern of beer starting raw materials.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, João L; Figueira, José A; Rodrigues, Fátima P; Ornelas, Laura P; Branco, Ricardo N; Silva, Catarina L; Câmara, José S

    2014-10-01

    The volatile metabolomic patterns from different raw materials commonly used in beer production, namely barley, corn and hop-derived products - such as hop pellets, hop essential oil from Saaz variety and tetra-hydro isomerized hop extract (tetra hop), were established using a suitable analytical procedure based on dynamic headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by thermal desorption gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry detection (GC-qMS). Some SPME extraction parameters were optimized. The best results, in terms of maximum signal recorded and number of isolated metabolites, were obtained with a 50/30 μm DVB/CAR/PDMS coating fiber at 40 °C for 30 min. A set of 152 volatile metabolites comprising ketones (27), sesquiterpenes (26), monoterpenes (19), aliphatic esters (19), higher alcohols (15), aldehydes (11), furan compounds (11), aliphatic fatty acids (9), aliphatic hydrocarbons (8), sulphur compounds (5) and nitrogen compounds (2) were positively identified. Each raw material showed a specific volatile metabolomic profile. Monoterpenes in hop essential oil and corn, sesquiterpenes in hop pellets, ketones in tetra hop and aldehydes and sulphur compounds in barley were the predominant chemical families in the targeted beer raw materials. β-Myrcene was the most dominant volatile metabolite in hop essential oil, hop pellets and corn samples while, in barley, the predominant volatile metabolites were dimethyl sulphide and 3-methylbutanal and, in tetra hop, 6-methyl-2-pentanone and 4-methyl-2-pentanone. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed natural sample grouping among beer raw materials.

  10. Effect of the pH and the ionic strength on overloaded band profiles of weak bases onto neutral and charged surface hybrid stationary phases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-03-22

    This work reports on the effects of the solution pH and its ionic strength on the overloaded band profiles and the parameters of the adsorption isotherms of nortriptylinium hydrochloride on the bridge ethylene hybrid (BEH) and the charged surface hybrid (CSH) C18-bonded columns. The mobile phases used were mixtures of acetonitrile and water buffered with hydrogenophosphate, formate, acetate, and dihydrogenophosphate buffers. The results show that the adsorption behavior of this protonated base onto the BEH-C18 column depends barely on the mobile phase pH and is slightly affected by its ionic strength. From both physical and statistical viewpoints, the Linear-Langmuir model is the most relevant adsorption isotherm. According to the inverse method of chromatography, this model is consistent with weak dispersive interactions taking place onto the C18-bonded chains and some strong ion-dipole interactions with residual silanols. In contrast, adsorption on the CSH-C18 column depends on the applied W(S)pH, e.g., on the degree of ionization of the amine groups tethered to the CSH surface. For W(S)pH<3, the electrostatically modified Langmuir model (EML) is acceptable because analyte molecules cannot access and interact with any active sites due to the electrostatic repulsion by the positively charged adsorbent surface. At W(S)pH>7.0, the Linear-bi-Langmuir model describes best the weak adsorption of the protonated base molecules onto the C18 chains and their strong adsorption onto the residual silanols and neutral amine groups. PMID:23415137

  11. Periodicity Analysis of Apollo Deep Moonquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Junji

    2002-03-01

    The periodicity of about 27.3 days has been known for deep moonquakes observed by Apollo Seismic Network on the moon. There still remain the fluctuation of the periodicity about 2 days and the modulation due to Earth-Moon orbital configuration. In order to identify the category of deep moonquakes, detailed analysis of the periodicity of deep moonquakes is made by the Hilbert transform. Thirty groups of identified deep moonquakes with large event numbers are parameterized by their phases of occurrence timing in the Earth libration looking from the moon. Clearly shown is the periodicity of about 206 days resulting from the perturbation of perigee by the sun and 6 years from the beating of anomalistic and nodical periodicities. The former has been suggested fro m the amplitude variation of deep moonquake signals and is shown quantitatively here. There are many groups of deep moonquakes of which temporal variation of occurrence phases is so regular that the empirical formulae could be determined to predict the time of phases of deep moonquake occurrences. Standard deviation of observed and predicted phases of event occurrences at best is about 0.03 radian, which is about 3 hours. Most of standard deviations are twice or thrice larger than this. Some groups do not show clear regularity in occurrence phases. The present empirical analysis would not help for the identification of those groups of events. Generally speaking the average time interval of Apollo deep moonquakes is about 23 hours. The empirical formulae give the prediction of deep moonquake occurrences much precise than this, so that the present analysis would help the identification of category of deep moonquakes observing arrival times of signals measured in the future mission.

  12. Melting phase relation of nominally anhydrous, carbonated pelitic-eclogite at 2.5-3.0 GPa and deep cycling of sedimentary carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuno, Kyusei; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2011-05-01

    We have experimentally investigated melting phase relation of a nominally anhydrous, carbonated pelitic eclogite (HPLC1) at 2.5 and 3.0 GPa at 900-1,350°C in order to constrain the cycling of sedimentary carbon in subduction zones. The starting composition HPLC1 (with 5 wt% bulk CO2) is a model composition, on a water-free basis, and is aimed to represent a mixture of 10 wt% pelagic carbonate unit and 90 wt% hemipelagic mud unit that enter the Central American trench. Sub-solidus assemblage comprises clinopyroxene + garnet + K-feldspar + quartz/coesite + rutile + calcio-ankerite/ankeritess. Solidus temperature is at 900-950°C at 2.5 GPa and at 900-1,000°C at 3.0 GPa, and the near-solidus melt is K-rich granitic. Crystalline carbonates persist only 50-100°C above the solidus and at temperatures above carbonate breakdown, carbon exists in the form of dissolved CO2 in silica-rich melts and as a vapor phase. The rhyodacitic to dacitic partial melt evolves from a K-rich composition at near-solidus condition to K-poor, and Na- and Ca-rich composition with increasing temperature. The low breakdown temperatures of crystalline carbonate in our study compared to those of recent studies on carbonated basaltic eclogite and peridotite owes to Fe-enrichment of carbonates in pelitic lithologies. However, the conditions of carbonate release in our study still remain higher than the modern depth-temperature trajectories of slab-mantle interface at sub-arc depths, suggesting that the release of sedimentary carbonates is unlikely in modern subduction zones. One possible scenario of carbonate release in modern subduction zones is the detachment and advection of sedimentary piles to hotter mantle wedge and consequent dissolution of carbonate in rhyodacitic partial melt. In the Paleo-NeoProterozoic Earth, on the other hand, the hotter slab-surface temperatures at subduction zones likely caused efficient liberation of carbon from subducting sedimentary carbonates. Deeply subducted

  13. Photoelectric and luminescence properties of GaSb-Based nanoheterostructures with a deep Al(As)Sb/InAsSb/Al(As)Sb quantum well grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailova, M. P.; Andreev, I. A. Ivanov, E. V.; Konovalov, G. G.; Grebentshikova, E. A.; Yakovlev, Yu. P.; Hulicius, E.; Hospodkova, A.; Pangrac, Y.

    2013-08-15

    The luminescence and photoelectric properties of heterostructures with a deep Al(As)Sb/InAsSb/Al(As)Sb quantum well grown on n-GaSb substrates by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy are investigated. Intense superlinear luminescence and increased optical power as a function of the pump current in the photon energy range of 0.6-0.8 eV are observed at temperatures of T = 77 and 300 K. The photoelectric, current-voltage, and capacitance characteristics of these heterostructures are studied in detail. The photosensitivity is examined with photodetectors operating in the photovoltaic mode in the spectral range of 0.9-2.0 {mu}m. The sensitivity maximum at room temperature is observed at a wavelength of 1.55 {mu}m. The quantum efficiency, detectivity, and response time of the photodetectors were estimated. The quantum efficiency and detectivity at the peak of the photosensitivity spectrum are as high as {eta} = 0.6-0.7 and D{sub {lambda}max}{sup *} = (5-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm Hz{sup 1/2} W{sup -1}, respectively. The photodiode response time determined as the rise time of the photoresponse pulse from 0.1 to the level 0.9 is 100-200 ps. The photodiode transmission bandwidth is 2-3 GHz. Photodetectors with a deep Al(As)Sb/InAsSb/Al(As)Sb quantum well grown on n-GaSb substrates are promising foruse in heterodyne detection systems and in information technologies.

  14. Comprehensive profiling of ribonucleosides modification by affinity zirconium oxide-silica composite monolithic column online solid-phase microextraction - Mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Chu, Jie-Mei; Lan, Meng-Dan; Liu, Ping; Yang, Na; Zheng, Fang; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-09-01

    More than 140 modified ribonucleosides have been identified in RNA. Determination of endogenous modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive disease diagnostic strategy. However, detection of the modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids is challenging, especially for the low abundant modified ribonucleosides due to the serious matrix interferences of biological fluids. Here, we developed a facile preparation strategy and successfully synthesized zirconium oxide-silica (ZrO2/SiO2) composite capillary monolithic column that exhibited excellent performance for the selective enrichment of cis-diol-containing compounds. Compared with the boronate-based affinity monolith, the ZrO2/SiO2 monolith showed ∼2 orders of magnitude higher extraction capacity and can be used under physiological pH (pH 6.5-7.5). Using the prepared ZrO2/SiO2 composite monolith as the trapping column and reversed-phase C18 column as the analytical column, we further established an online solid-phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (online SPME-LC-MS/MS) analysis for the comprehensive profiling of ribonucleosides modification in human urine. Our results showed that 68 cis-diol-containing ribosylated compounds were identified in human urine, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest numbers of cis-diol-containing compounds were determined in a single analysis. It is worth noting that four modified ribonucleosides were discovered in the human urine for the first time. In addition, the quantification results from the pooled urine samples showed that compared to healthy controls, the contents of sixteen ribose conjugates in the urine of gastric cancer, eleven in esophagus cancer and seven in lymphoma increased more than two folds. Among these ribose conjugates, four ribose conjugates increased more than two folds in both gastric cancer and esophagus cancer; three ribose conjugates increased more than two

  15. Comprehensive profiling of ribonucleosides modification by affinity zirconium oxide-silica composite monolithic column online solid-phase microextraction - Mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Chu, Jie-Mei; Lan, Meng-Dan; Liu, Ping; Yang, Na; Zheng, Fang; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-09-01

    More than 140 modified ribonucleosides have been identified in RNA. Determination of endogenous modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive disease diagnostic strategy. However, detection of the modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids is challenging, especially for the low abundant modified ribonucleosides due to the serious matrix interferences of biological fluids. Here, we developed a facile preparation strategy and successfully synthesized zirconium oxide-silica (ZrO2/SiO2) composite capillary monolithic column that exhibited excellent performance for the selective enrichment of cis-diol-containing compounds. Compared with the boronate-based affinity monolith, the ZrO2/SiO2 monolith showed ∼2 orders of magnitude higher extraction capacity and can be used under physiological pH (pH 6.5-7.5). Using the prepared ZrO2/SiO2 composite monolith as the trapping column and reversed-phase C18 column as the analytical column, we further established an online solid-phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (online SPME-LC-MS/MS) analysis for the comprehensive profiling of ribonucleosides modification in human urine. Our results showed that 68 cis-diol-containing ribosylated compounds were identified in human urine, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest numbers of cis-diol-containing compounds were determined in a single analysis. It is worth noting that four modified ribonucleosides were discovered in the human urine for the first time. In addition, the quantification results from the pooled urine samples showed that compared to healthy controls, the contents of sixteen ribose conjugates in the urine of gastric cancer, eleven in esophagus cancer and seven in lymphoma increased more than two folds. Among these ribose conjugates, four ribose conjugates increased more than two folds in both gastric cancer and esophagus cancer; three ribose conjugates increased more than two

  16. [Respiratory changes in deep diving].

    PubMed

    Segadal, K; Gulsvik, A; Nicolaysen, G

    1989-01-30

    Deep diving refers to saturation diving to a depth of more than 180 m (1.9 MPa ambient pressure). In the 1990s diving to 400 m may be necessary on the Norwegian continental shelf. The safety margins are narrow and at such depths the respiratory system is subject to great strain. Respiratory resistance increases and the dynamic lung volumes are reduced as the pressure increases due to enhanced gas density. Helium is used together with oxygen as breathing gas and the lower density partly normalises the dynamic lung volumes. The respiratory system imposes clear limitations on the intensity and duration of physical work during deep diving. We lack systematic studies of lung mechanics, gas exchange and respiratory regulation in the different phases of deep dives. Demonstration of possible chronic occupational respiratory diseases connected to diving is dependent on follow-up over a long time.

  17. Respiratory changes with deep diving.

    PubMed

    Segadal, K; Gulsvik, A; Nicolaysen, G

    1990-01-01

    Deep diving refers to saturation diving to a depth of more than 180 m (1.9 MPa ambient pressure). In the 1990s diving to 400 m may be necessary on the Norwegian continental shelf. The safety margins are narrow and the respiratory system is subject to great strain at such depths. The respiratory resistance increases and the dynamic lung volumes are reduced as the pressure increases due to enhanced gas density. Helium is used together with oxygen as breathing gas and its lower density partly normalises the dynamic lung volumes. The respiratory system puts clear limitations on intensity and duration of physical work in deep diving. Systematic studies of lung mechanics, gas exchange and respiratory regulation in the different phases of deep dives are lacking. Detection of occupational respiratory disorder following diving are dependent on long-term follow-up.

  18. Monitoring of Intense Events of Deep Water Formations in the Northwestern Mediterranean over the last five years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houpert, Loïc; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Testor, Pierre; Bosse, Anthony; Mortier, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    A multi-platforms and integrated monitoring system in the framework of the Mediterranean Ocean Observing System on Environment (MOOSE) enables to monitor the deep water formation processes. Since 2007, it provides high frequency in-situ temperature, salinity vertical profiles, derived from CTD measurements on moorings, ships, and gliders, as well as horizontal and vertical currents from moorings. The aim of this study is to investigate the temporal scales associated to the deep convection phases. We also studied the interannual variability of the deep convection and its implication in the evolution of deep water thermohaline characteristics. Recent measurements from the mooring lines reveal the temporal evolution of the physical processes interfering in the phases of deep convection. Horizontal currents were strongly equivalent barotropic during each deployment and strong currents were also recorded during the different events of deep ocean convection: high frequencies vertical velocities exceeded 10 cm.s-1 during the violent vertical mixing phase and strong mesoscale horizontal currents reached 40cm.s-1 during the spreading/restratification phase. Using a eddy-detection method based on a kinematic model, more than 34 eddies crossing the mooring line were detected between November 2009 and July 2012, 19 cyclones and 15 anticyclones. The radii (resp. velocities) ranging from 1.9 km to 20.0 km (resp. 2.5 cm.s-1 to 25.1 cm.s-1 ). The main mode of the distribution of eddies radii is centered at 4km for the cyclones and 5km for the anticyclones. The apparition of newly-formed deep waters was detected in winter 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. In winter 2010, two newly-formed deep waters were detected after the deep convection event, both present a different potential temperature but a similar salinity, suggesting that both might be formed in the cyclonic gyre, but in different locations. In 2012, two new deep waters were detected at the mooring location, one was identified as

  19. Deep learning regularized Fisher mappings.

    PubMed

    Wong, W K; Sun, Mingming

    2011-10-01

    For classification tasks, it is always desirable to extract features that are most effective for preserving class separability. In this brief, we propose a new feature extraction method called regularized deep Fisher mapping (RDFM), which learns an explicit mapping from the sample space to the feature space using a deep neural network to enhance the separability of features according to the Fisher criterion. Compared to kernel methods, the deep neural network is a deep and nonlocal learning architecture, and therefore exhibits more powerful ability to learn the nature of highly variable datasets from fewer samples. To eliminate the side effects of overfitting brought about by the large capacity of powerful learners, regularizers are applied in the learning procedure of RDFM. RDFM is evaluated in various types of datasets, and the results reveal that it is necessary to apply unsupervised regularization in the fine-tuning phase of deep learning. Thus, for very flexible models, the optimal Fisher feature extractor may be a balance between discriminative ability and descriptive ability.

  20. 30 CFR 203.30 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well? 203.30 Section 203.30 Mineral Resources... for Drilling Ultra-Deep Wells on Leases Not Subject to Deep Water Royalty Relief § 203.30 Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well?...

  1. Toxicity Profile and Pharmacokinetic Study of A Phase I Low-Dose Schedule-Dependent Radiosensitizing Paclitaxel Chemoradiation Regimen for Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuhchyau Pandya, Kishan J.; Feins, Richard; Johnstone, David W.; Watson, Thomas; Smudzin, Therese; Keng, Peter C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: We report the toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic data of a schedule-dependent chemoradiation regimen using pulsed low-dose paclitaxel for radiosensitization in a Phase I study for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Paclitaxel at escalating doses of 15 mg/m{sup 2}, 20 mg/m{sup 2}, and 25 mg/m{sup 2} were infused on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with daily chest radiation in cohorts of 6 patients. Daily radiation was delayed for maximal G2/M arrest and apoptotic effect, an observation from preclinical investigations. Plasma paclitaxel concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Dose-limiting toxicities included 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 pneumonitis and 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 esophagitis. There was no Grade 4 or 5 pneumonitis or esophagitis. There was also no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia or neuropathy. For Dose Levels I (15 mg/m{sup 2}), II (20 mg/m{sup 2}), and III (25 mg/m{sup 2}), the mean peak plasma level was 0.23 {+-} 0.06 {mu}mol/l, 0.32 {+-} 0.05 {mu}mol/l, and 0.52 {+-} 0.14 {mu}mol/l, respectively; AUC was 0.44 {+-} 0.09 {mu}mol/l, 0.61 {+-} 0.1 {mu}mol/l, and 0.96 {+-} 0.23 {mu}mol/l, respectively; and duration of drug concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l (t > 0.05 {mu}mol/l) was 1.6 {+-} 0.3 h, 1.9 {+-} 0.2 h, and 3.0 {+-} 0.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation is associated with low toxicity. Pharmacokinetic data showed that plasma paclitaxel concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l for a minimum of 1.6 h was sufficient for effective radiosensitization.

  2. Combination of White Blood Cell Count at Presentation With Molecular Response at 3 Months Better Predicts Deep Molecular Responses to Imatinib in Newly Diagnosed Chronic-Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ya-Zhen; Jiang, Qian; Jiang, Hao; Lai, Yue-Yun; Zhu, Hong-Hu; Liu, Yan-Rong; Jiang, Bin; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of white blood cell (WBC) counts at presentation on the achievement of deep molecular response. A total of 362 newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients (CML-CP) receiving 400 mg/day imatinib were serially monitored for a median of 36 months (range 6–115). Patients showing an optimal response at 3, 6, and 12 months as defined by the 2013 European LeukemiaNet recommendations had significantly lower WBC counts at presentation than those showing nonoptimal responses (all P < 0.0001). Among the cutoff values with a similar Youden index, 150 × 10E9/L (abbreviated WBC > 150) was selected to identify the greatest amount of patients with the potential to achieve a sustained molecular response of 4.5 (MR4.5). Regardless of whether the Sokal risk score was included, the BCR-ABLIS value at 3 months, WBC counts at presentation, hemoglobin levels, and sex were the common independent predictors for an MR4.5, with the former 2 presenting the highest hazard risk. Low Sokal risk scores did not independently predict the achievement of an MR4.5. Patients with concurrent WBC > 150 and BCR-ABLIS ≤ 10% had a similar incidence of 4-year MR4.5 compared with patients with concurrent WBC ≤ 150 and BCR-ABLIS > 10% and concurrent WBC > 150 and BCR-ABLIS > 10% (13.5% vs 13.2% vs 8.8%, P = 0.47), and all of these values were significantly lower than the values for patients with concurrent WBC ≤ 150 and BCR-ABLIS ≤ 10% (55.0%, all P < 0.0001). Patients with concurrent WBC ≤ 150 and BCR-ABLIS ≤ 10% had better 4-year event-free survival rates, progression-free survival rates, and overall survival rates compared with patients with WBC > 150 or BCR-ABLIS > 10%. The combination of WBC count at presentation and BCR-ABLIS at 3 months provides improved predictions of deep molecular response in imatinib-treated CML-CP patients. Therefore, the WBC count at presentation might be used to

  3. Deep learning for computational biology.

    PubMed

    Angermueller, Christof; Pärnamaa, Tanel; Parts, Leopold; Stegle, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in genomics and imaging have led to an explosion of molecular and cellular profiling data from large numbers of samples. This rapid increase in biological data dimension and acquisition rate is challenging conventional analysis strategies. Modern machine learning methods, such as deep learning, promise to leverage very large data sets for finding hidden structure within them, and for making accurate predictions. In this review, we discuss applications of this new breed of analysis approaches in regulatory genomics and cellular imaging. We provide background of what deep learning is, and the settings in which it can be successfully applied to derive biological insights. In addition to presenting specific applications and providing tips for practical use, we also highlight possible pitfalls and limitations to guide computational biologists when and how to make the most use of this new technology. PMID:27474269

  4. Deep learning for computational biology.

    PubMed

    Angermueller, Christof; Pärnamaa, Tanel; Parts, Leopold; Stegle, Oliver

    2016-07-29

    Technological advances in genomics and imaging have led to an explosion of molecular and cellular profiling data from large numbers of samples. This rapid increase in biological data dimension and acquisition rate is challenging conventional analysis strategies. Modern machine learning methods, such as deep learning, promise to leverage very large data sets for finding hidden structure within them, and for making accurate predictions. In this review, we discuss applications of this new breed of analysis approaches in regulatory genomics and cellular imaging. We provide background of what deep learning is, and the settings in which it can be successfully applied to derive biological insights. In addition to presenting specific applications and providing tips for practical use, we also highlight possible pitfalls and limitations to guide computational biologists when and how to make the most use of this new technology.

  5. Cassini-VIMS observations of Saturn's main rings: I. Spectral properties and temperature radial profiles variability with phase angle and elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Brown, R. H.; Cerroni, P.; Altobelli, N.; Spilker, L. J.

    2014-10-01

    The spectral properties and thermal behavior of Saturn's rings are determined from a dataset of ten radial mosaics acquired by Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) between October 29th 2004 and January 27th 2010 with phase angle ranging between 5.7° and 132.4° and elevation angles between -23.5° and 2.6°. These observations, after reduction to spectrograms, e.g. 2D arrays containing the VIS-IR (0.35-5.1 μm) spectral information versus radial distance from Saturn (from 73.500 to 141.375 km, 400 km/bin), allow us to compare the derived spectral and thermal properties of the ring particles on a common reference. Spectral properties: rings spectra are characterized by an intense reddening at visible wavelengths while they maintain a strong similarity with water ice in the infrared domain. Significant changes in VIS reddening, water ice abundance and grain sizes are observed across different radial regions resulting in correlation with optical depth and local structures. The availability of observations taken at very different phase angles allows us to examine spectrophotometric properties of the ring's particles. When observed at high phase angles, a remarkable increase of visible reddening and water ice band depths is found, probably as a consequence of the presence of a red-colored contaminant intimately mixed within water ice grains and of multiple scattering. At low phases the analysis of the 3.2-3.6 μm range shows faint spectral signatures at 3.42-3.52 μm which are compatible with the CH2 aliphatic stretch. The 3.29 μm PAH aromatic stretch absorption is not clearly detectable on this dataset. VIMS results indicate that ring particles contain about 90-95% water ice while the remaining 5-10% is consistent with different contaminants like amorphous carbon or tholins. However, we cannot exclude the presence of nanophase iron or hematite produced by iron oxidation in the rings tenuous oxygen atmosphere, intimately mixed with the ice grains

  6. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  7. Taoism and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

    1988-01-01

    Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

  8. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  9. Basin-Wavelength Equatorial Deep Jet Signals Across Three Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngs, M. K.; Johnson, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Equatorial Deep Jets (EDJs) are equatorially trapped, stacked, zonal currents that reverse direction every few hundred meters in depth throughout much of the water column. This study evaluates their structure observationally in all three oceans using new high vertical resolution Argo float conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) instrument profiles from 2010--2014 augmented with historical shipboard CTD from 1972--2014 and lower vertical resolution Argo float profiles from 2007--2014. Vertical strain of density is calculated from the profiles and analyzed in a stretched vertical coordinate system determined from the mean vertical density structure. The power spectra of vertical strain in each basin are analyzed using a wavelet decomposition. In the Indian and Pacific oceans, there are two distinct peaks in the power spectra, one Kelvin-wave-like and the other entirely consistent with the dispersion relation of a linear first-meridional-mode equatorial Rossby wave. In the Atlantic Ocean, the first-meridional-mode Rossby wave signature is very strong, and dominates. In all three ocean basins Rossby-wave-like signatures are coherent across the basin width, and appear to have wavelengths the scale of the basin width, with periods of about 5 years in the Indian and Atlantic oceans and about 12 years in the Pacific Ocean. Their observed meridional scales are about 1.5 times the linear theoretical values. Their phase propagation is downward with time, implying upward energy propagation if linear wave dynamics hold.

  10. Deep Web video

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2016-07-12

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  11. Deep Space Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  12. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  13. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  14. Experimental Profiling of a Non-truncated Focused Gaussian Beam and Fine-tuning of the Quadratic Phase in the Fresnel Gaussian Shape Invariant

    SciTech Connect

    S., Juan Manuel Franco; Cywiak, Moises; Cywiak, David; Mourad, Idir

    2015-06-24

    A homodyne profiler is used for recording the intensity distribution of focused non-truncated Gaussian beams. The spatial distributions are obtained at planes in the vicinity of the back-focal plane of a focusing lens placed at different distances from a He–Ne laser beam with a Gaussian intensity profile. Comparisons of the experimental data with those obtained from the analytical equations for an ideal focusing lens allow us to propose formulae to fine-tune the quadratic term in the Fresnel Gaussian shape invariant at each interface of the propagated field. Furthermore, we give analytical expressions to calculate adequately the propagation of the field through an optical system.

  15. Unexpected bismuth concentration profiles in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy-grown Ga(As{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x})/GaAs superlattices revealed by Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A. W.; Babcock, S. E.; Guan, Y.; Forghani, K.; Anand, A.; Kuech, T. F.

    2015-03-01

    A set of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs multilayer quantum-well structures was deposited by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy at 390 °C and 420 °C. The precursor fluxes were introduced with the intent of growing discrete and compositionally uniform GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} well and GaAs barrier layers in the epitaxial films. High-resolution high-angle annular-dark-field (or “Z-contrast”) scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed concentration profiles that were periodic in the growth direction, but far more complicated in shape than the intended square wave. The observed composition profiles could explain various reports of physical properties measurements that suggest compositional inhomogeneity in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} alloys as they currently are grown.

  16. Deep Space 1 Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, D. H.

    1999-09-01

    Deep Space 1 (DS1), launched on October 24, 1998, is the first mission of NASA's New Millennium program. This program is chartered to flight validate high-risk, advanced technologies important for future space and Earth science programs. Twelve advanced technologies were chosen for validation on DS1. These include solar electric propulsion, high-power solar concentrator arrays, autonomous on-board optical navigation, two low-mass science instrument packages, and several telecommunications and microelectronics devices. The encounter of the DS1 spacecraft with the asteroid Braille on July 29,1999 represented the conclusion of the technology validation phase of the mission and the first encounter of the spacecraft with a deep space target. The validation of technologies has been completed. The presentation will describe the mission, science and technology objectives and results to date, and future plans for the project.

  17. COMPLEX VARIABILITY OF THE H{alpha} EMISSION LINE PROFILE OF THE T TAURI BINARY SYSTEM KH 15D: THE INFLUENCE OF ORBITAL PHASE, OCCULTATION BY THE CIRCUMBINARY DISK, AND ACCRETION PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Catrina M.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Mundt, Reinhard; Herbst, William; Winn, Joshua N. E-mail: cmj@rice.edu E-mail: wherbst@wesleyan.edu

    2012-06-01

    We have obtained 48 high-resolution echelle spectra of the pre-main-sequence eclipsing binary system KH 15D (V582 Mon, P = 48.37 days, e {approx} 0.6, M{sub A} = 0.6 M{sub Sun }, M{sub B} = 0.7 M{sub Sun }). The eclipses are caused by a circumbinary disk (CBD) seen nearly edge on, which at the epoch of these observations completely obscured the orbit of star B and a large portion of the orbit of star A. The spectra were obtained over five contiguous observing seasons from 2001/2002 to 2005/2006 while star A was fully visible, fully occulted, and during several ingress and egress events. The H{alpha} line profile shows dramatic changes in these time series data over timescales ranging from days to years. A fraction of the variations are due to 'edge effects' and depend only on the height of star A above or below the razor sharp edge of the occulting disk. Other observed variations depend on the orbital phase: the H{alpha} emission line profile changes from an inverse P-Cygni-type profile during ingress to an enhanced double-peaked profile, with both a blue and a red emission component, during egress. Each of these interpreted variations are complicated by the fact that there is also a chaotic, irregular component present in these profiles. We find that the complex data set can be largely understood in the context of accretion onto the stars from a CBD with gas flows as predicted by the models of eccentric T Tauri binaries put forward by Artymowicz and Lubow, Guenther and Kley, and de Val-Borro et al. In particular, our data provide strong support for the pulsed accretion phenomenon, in which enhanced accretion occurs during and after perihelion passage.

  18. Computer simulation of deep sulfate reduction in sediments of the Amazon Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, M.; Hensen, C.; Kasten, S.; Schulz, H. D.

    Pore water concentration profiles of sediments at a site on the Amazon Fan were investigated and simulated with the numerical model CoTReM (column transport and reaction model) to reveal the biogeochemical processes involved. The pore water profiles for gravity core GeoB 4417-7 showed a distinct sulfate-methane transition zone in which deep sulfate reduction occurs. Only a small sulfide peak could be observed at the reaction zone. Due to high amounts of iron minerals, the produced sulfide is instantaneously precipitated in form of iron sulfides. We present a simulation which starts from a steady state system with respect to pore water profiles for methane and sulfate. Furthermore, sulfide, iron, pH, pE, calcium and total inorganic carbon (TIC) were included in the simulation. The program calculated mineral equilibria to mackinawite, iron sulfides (more stable than mackinawite), iron hydroxides and calcite via saturation indices (SI) by a module incorporating the program PHREEQC (Parkhurst 1995). The measured sulfide and iron profiles are obtained in the simulation output by using a constant SI (=0) for mackinawite and calcite, while a depth dependent SI distribution is applied for the PHREEQC phases ``Pyrite'' and ``Fe(OH)3(a)'', representing a composition and the kinetics of different iron sulfides and iron hydroxides. These SI distributions control the results of sulfide and iron pore water profiles, especially conserving the sulfide profile at the reaction zone during the simulation. The results suggest that phases of iron hydroxides are dissolved, mackinawite is precipitated within, and other iron sulfides are precipitated below the reaction zone. The chemical reactivity of iron hydroxides corresponds to the rate of sulfide production. The system H2O-CO2-CaCO3 is generally successfully maintained during the simulation. Deviations to the measured pH profile suggest that further processes are active which are not included in the simulation yet.

  19. Characterisation of the aroma profiles of different honeys and corresponding flowers using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Seisonen, Sirli; Kivima, Evelin; Vene, Kristel

    2015-02-15

    The aroma profiles of thirteen different honey samples from four botanical origins: heather (Calluna vulgaris), raspberry (Rubus idaeus), rape (Brassica napus), alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus) and the blossoms of the four corresponding flowers were investigated to find odour-active compounds exclusively representing specific honeys based on odour-active compounds from the blossoms. Gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas-chromatography-olfactometry were used to determine and identify the odour-active compounds. Data was analysed using agglomerative hierarchical clustering and correspondence analysis. Honeys from the same botanical origin clustered together; however, none of the identified compounds were exclusive to a particular honey/blossom combination. Heather honey had the flavour profile most different to the others. Isophorone and 2-methylbutyric acid were found only in heather honeys. Heather honey was characterised by having more "sweet" and "candy-like" notes, raspberry honeys had more "green" notes, while alder buckthorn had more "honey" and "floral" notes.

  20. Presence of monoterpene synthase in four Labiatae species and Solid-Phase Microextraction- Gas chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy analysis of their aroma profiles

    PubMed Central

    Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Gohari, Ahmad Reza; Haddadi, Azita; Amin, Gholamreza; Nikan, Marjan; Hadjiakhoondi, Abbass

    2014-01-01

    Background: The family Lamiaceae (Labiatae) has included some medicinal plants. some monoterpene synthases, including linalool and limonene synthases, have been cloned and functionally characterized from several plants of Labiatae family. Materials and Methods: In this study, presence of linalool and limonene synthases, in four species of Labiatae family including Nepeta cataria, Lavandula angustifolia, Hyssopus officinalis and Salvia sclarea has been determined by molecular biological techniques together with the Head space SPME – GC-MS analysis of the aroma profile of these species. Results: Indicated that none of the plant species produced distinguishable bands with primer pairs related to d-limonene synthase. Distinguishable bands around 1800 bp in cDNA samples of L. angustifolia, H. officinalis and S. sclarea were observed regarding to the presence of linalool synthase. Head space SPME-GC-MS analysis of the aroma profiles of the above-mentioned plants showed that linalool (31.0%), linalyl acetate (18.2%), were found as the major compounds of L. angustifolia, while geraniol (5.5%), nerol (34.0%) and α- citral (52.0%) were identified as the main compounds of the N. cataria. The major components of H. officinalis and S. sclarea oils were determined as cis-pinocamphone (57.3%), and linalool (19.0%), linalyl acetate (51.5%), respectively. Conclusion: H. officinalis was rich of cyclic monoterpenes, L. angustifolia, N. cataria and S. sclarea showed considerable amount of linear monoterpenes. The aroma profile of the above-mentioned plants contained low concentration of sesquiterpenes except N. cataria, which indicated no sesquiterpene. The profiles of the main components of these plants are in agreement with molecular assays. PMID:24761118

  1. Development of an achiral supercritical fluid chromatography method with ultraviolet absorbance and mass spectrometric detection for impurity profiling of drug candidates. Part II. Selection of an orthogonal set of stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Lemasson, Elise; Bertin, Sophie; Hennig, Philippe; Boiteux, Hélène; Lesellier, Eric; West, Caroline

    2015-08-21

    Impurity profiling of organic products that are synthesized as possible drug candidates requires complementary analytical methods to ensure that all impurities are identified. Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is a very useful tool to achieve this objective, as an adequate selection of stationary phases can provide orthogonal separations so as to maximize the chances to see all impurities. In this series of papers, we have developed a method for achiral SFC-MS profiling of drug candidates, based on a selection of 160 analytes issued from Servier Research Laboratories. In the first part of this study, focusing on mobile phase selection, a gradient elution with carbon dioxide and methanol comprising 2% water and 20mM ammonium acetate proved to be the best in terms of chromatographic performance, while also providing good MS response [1]. The objective of this second part was the selection of an orthogonal set of ultra-high performance stationary phases, that was carried out in two steps. Firstly, a reduced set of analytes (20) was used to screen 23 columns. The columns selected were all 1.7-2.5μm fully porous or 2.6-2.7μm superficially porous particles, with a variety of stationary phase chemistries. Derringer desirability functions were used to rank the columns according to retention window, column efficiency evaluated with peak width of selected analytes, and the proportion of analytes successfully eluted with good peak shapes. The columns providing the worst performances were thus eliminated and a shorter selection of columns (11) was obtained. Secondly, based on 160 tested analytes, the 11 columns were ranked again. The retention data obtained on these columns were then compared to define a reduced set of the best columns providing the greatest orthogonality, to maximize the chances to see all impurities within a limited number of runs. Two high-performance columns were thus selected: ACQUITY UPC(2) HSS C18 SB and Nucleoshell HILIC. PMID:26195036

  2. Deep Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manshadi, Farzin

    2012-01-01

    ITU defines deep space as the volume of Space at distances from the Earth equal to, or greater than, 2 106 km. Deep Space Spacecraft have to travel tens of millions of km from Earth to reach the nearest object in deep space. Spacecraft mass and power are precious. Large ground-based antennas and very high power transmitters are needed to overcome large space loss and spacecraft's small antennas and low power transmitters. Navigation is complex and highly dependent on measurements from the Earth. Every deep space mission is unique and therefore very costly to develop.

  3. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Presented is Deep Space Network (DSN) progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition (TDA) research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  4. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Summaries are given of Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  5. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    DVT - discharge; Blood clot in the legs - discharge; Thromboembolism - discharge; Venous thromboembolism - deep vein thrombosis; Post-phlebitic syndrome - discharge; Post-thrombotic syndrome - discharge

  6. A deep reef in deep trouble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menza, C.; Kendall, M.; Rogers, C.; Miller, J.

    2007-10-01

    The well-documented degradation of shallower reefs which are often closer to land and more vulnerable to pollution, sewage and other human-related stressors has led to the suggestion that deeper, more remote offshore reefs could possibly serve as sources of coral and fish larvae to replenish the shallower reefs. Yet, the distribution, status, and ecological roles of deep (>30 m) Caribbean reefs are not well known. In this report, an observation of a deep reef which has undergone a recent extensive loss of coral cover is presented. In stark contrast to the typical pattern of coral loss in shallow reefs, the deeper corals were most affected. This report is the first description of such a pattern of coral loss on a deep reef.

  7. A deep reef in deep trouble

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menza, Charles; Kendall, M.; Rogers, C.; Miller, J.

    2007-01-01

    The well-documented degradation of shallower reefs which are often closer to land and more vulnerable to pollution, sewage and other human-related stressors has led to the suggestion that deeper, more remote offshore reefs could possibly serve as sources of coral and fish larvae to replenish the shallower reefs. Yet, the distribution, status, and ecological roles of deep (>30 m) Caribbean reefs are not well known. In this report, an observation of a deep reef which has undergone a recent extensive loss of coral cover is presented. In stark contrast to the typical pattern of coral loss in shallow reefs, the deeper corals were most affected. This report is the first description of such a pattern of coral loss on a deep reef.

  8. MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry coupled with multivariate pattern recognition analysis for the rapid biomarker profiling of Escherichia coli in different growth phases.

    PubMed

    Momo, Remi A; Povey, Jane F; Smales, C Mark; O'Malley, Christopher J; Montague, Gary A; Martin, Elaine B

    2013-10-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) has been exploited extensively in the field of microbiology for the characterisation of bacterial species, the detection of biomarkers for early disease diagnosis and bacterial identification. Here, the multivariate data analysis technique of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied to 'intact cell' MALDI-ToF MS data obtained from Escherichia coli cell samples to determine if such an approach could be used to distinguish between, and characterise, different growth phases. PLS-DA is a technique that has the potential to extract systematic variation from large and noisy data sets by identifying a lower-dimensional subspace that contains latent information. The application of PLS-DA to the MALDI-ToF data obtained from cells at different stages of growth resulted in the successful classification of the samples according to the growth phase of the bacteria cultures. A further outcome of the analysis was that it was possible to identify the mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio peaks or ion signals that contributed to the classification of the samples. The Swiss-Prot/TrEMBL database and primary literature were then used to provisionally assign a small number of these m/z ion signals to proteins, and these tentative assignments revealed that the major contributors from the exponential phase were ribosomal proteins. Additional assignments were possible for the stationary phase and the decline phase cultures where the proteins identified were consistent with previously observed biological interpretation. In summary, the results show that MALDI-ToF MS, PLS-DA and a protein database search can be used in combination to discriminate between 'intact cell' E. coli cell samples in different growth phases and thus could potentially be used as a tool in process development in the bioprocessing industry to enhance cell growth and cell engineering strategies.

  9. Modeling the Capillary Pressure for the Migration of the Liquid Phase in Granular Solid-Liquid-Vapor Systems: Application to the Control of the Composition Profile in W-Cu FGM Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missiaen, Jean-Michel; Raharijaona, Jean-Joël; Delannay, Francis

    2016-11-01

    A model is developed to compute the capillary pressure for the migration of the liquid phase out or into a uniform solid-liquid-vapor system. The capillary pressure is defined as the reduction of the overall interface energy per volume increment of the transferred fluid phase. The model takes into account the particle size of the solid particle aggregate, the packing configuration (coordination number, porosity), the volume fractions of the different phases, and the values of the interface energies in the system. The model is used for analyzing the stability of the composition profile during processing of W-Cu functionally graded materials combining a composition gradient with a particle size gradient. The migration pressure is computed with the model in two stages: (1) just after the melting of copper, i.e., when sintering and shape accommodation of the W particle aggregate can still be neglected and (2) at high temperature, when the system is close to full density with equilibrium particle shape. The model predicts well the different stages of liquid-phase migration observed experimentally.

  10. Modeling the Capillary Pressure for the Migration of the Liquid Phase in Granular Solid-Liquid-Vapor Systems: Application to the Control of the Composition Profile in W-Cu FGM Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missiaen, Jean-Michel; Raharijaona, Jean-Joël; Delannay, Francis

    2016-08-01

    A model is developed to compute the capillary pressure for the migration of the liquid phase out or into a uniform solid-liquid-vapor system. The capillary pressure is defined as the reduction of the overall interface energy per volume increment of the transferred fluid phase. The model takes into account the particle size of the solid particle aggregate, the packing configuration (coordination number, porosity), the volume fractions of the different phases, and the values of the interface energies in the system. The model is used for analyzing the stability of the composition profile during processing of W-Cu functionally graded materials combining a composition gradient with a particle size gradient. The migration pressure is computed with the model in two stages: (1) just after the melting of copper, i.e., when sintering and shape accommodation of the W particle aggregate can still be neglected and (2) at high temperature, when the system is close to full density with equilibrium particle shape. The model predicts well the different stages of liquid-phase migration observed experimentally.

  11. Characterization of Deep Sea Fish Gut Bacteria with Antagonistic Potential, from Centroscyllium fabricii (Deep Sea Shark).

    PubMed

    Bindiya, E S; Tina, K J; Raghul, Subin S; Bhat, Sarita G

    2015-06-01

    The bacterial isolates from Centroscyllium fabricii (deep sea shark) gut were screened for antagonistic activity by cross-streak method and disc diffusion assay. This study focuses on strain BTSS-3, which showed antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria including Salmonella Typhimurium, Proteus vulgaris, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus circulans, Bacillus macerans and Bacillus pumilus. BTSS3 was subjected to phenotypic characterization using biochemical tests, SEM imaging, exoenzyme profiling and antibiotic susceptibility tests. Comparative 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis indicated that this strain belonged to the genus Bacillus, with high (98%) similarity to 16S rDNA sequences of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The chemical nature of the antibacterial substance was identified by treatment with proteolytic enzymes. The antibacterial activity was reduced by the action of these enzymes pointing out its peptide nature. It was observed from the growth and production kinetics that the bacteriocin was produced in the eighth hour of incubation, i.e., during the mid-log growth phase of the bacteria. PMID:25740801

  12. Solid phase microextraction coupled with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for high-resolution metabolite profiling in apples: implementation of structured separations for optimization of sample preparation procedure in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Risticevic, Sanja; DeEll, Jennifer R; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2012-08-17

    Metabolomics currently represents one of the fastest growing high-throughput molecular analysis platforms that refer to the simultaneous and unbiased analysis of metabolite pools constituting a particular biological system under investigation. In response to the ever increasing interest in development of reliable methods competent with obtaining a complete and accurate metabolomic snapshot for subsequent identification, quantification and profiling studies, the purpose of the current investigation is to test the feasibility of solid phase microextraction for advanced fingerprinting of volatile and semivolatile metabolites in complex samples. In particular, the current study is focussed on the development and optimization of solid phase microextraction (SPME) - comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-ToFMS) methodology for metabolite profiling of apples (Malus × domestica Borkh.). For the first time, GC × GC attributes in terms of molecular structure-retention relationships and utilization of two-dimensional separation space on orthogonal GC × GC setup were exploited in the field of SPME method optimization for complex sample analysis. Analytical performance data were assessed in terms of method precision when commercial coatings are employed in spiked metabolite aqueous sample analysis. The optimized method consisted of the implementation of direct immersion SPME (DI-SPME) extraction mode and its application to metabolite profiling of apples, and resulted in a tentative identification of 399 metabolites and the composition of a metabolite database far more comprehensive than those obtainable with classical one-dimensional GC approaches. Considering that specific metabolome constituents were for the first time reported in the current study, a valuable approach for future advanced fingerprinting studies in the field of fruit biology is proposed. The current study also intensifies the understanding of SPME

  13. Advanced transponders for deep space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.; Kayalar, Selahattin; Yeh, Hen-Geul; Kyriacou, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Three architectures for advanced deep space transponders are proposed. The architectures possess various digital techniques such as fast Fourier transform (FFT), digital phase-locked loop (PLL), and digital sideband aided carrier detection with analog or digital turn-around ranging. Preliminary results on the design and conceptual implementation are presented. Modifications to the command detector unit (CDU) are also presented.

  14. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The progress is reported of Deep Space Network (DSN) research in the following areas: (1) flight project support, (2) spacecraft/ground communications, (3) station control and operations technology, (4) network control and processing, and (5) deep space stations. A description of the DSN functions and facilities is included.

  15. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition, research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is cited. Topics covered include: tracking and ground based navigation; spacecraft/ground communication; station control and operations technology; ground communications; and deep space stations.

  16. Deep-diving dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, John

    2012-08-01

    Dysbaric bone necrosis demonstrated in ichthyosaurs may be the result of prolonged deep diving rather than rapid ascent to escape predators. The bone lesions show structural and anatomical similarity to those that may occur in human divers and in the deep diving sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus.

  17. Deep Impact Spots Quarry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Sixty-nine days before it gets up-close-and-personal with a comet, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft successfully photographed its quarry, comet Tempel 1, at a distance of 39.7 million miles. The image, taken on April 25, 2005, is the first of many comet portraits Deep Impact will take leading up to its historic comet encounter on July 4.

  18. Evaluation of Protein Profiles From Treated Xenograft Tumor Models Identifies an Antibody Panel for Formalin-fixed and Paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Tissue Analysis by Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA)*

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Sabine; Zajac, Magdalena; Friess, Thomas; Ruge, Elisabeth; Rieder, Natascha; Gierke, Berthold; Heubach, Yvonne; Thomas, Marlene; Pawlak, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) are an established tool for measuring the expression and activation status of multiple proteins in parallel using only very small amounts of tissue. Several studies have demonstrated the value of this technique for signaling pathway analysis using proteins extracted from fresh frozen (FF) tissue in line with validated antibodies for this tissue type; however, formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE) is the standard method for tissue preservation in the clinical setting. Hence, we performed RPPA to measure profiles for a set of 300 protein markers using matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens to identify which markers performed similarly using the RPPA technique in fixed and unfixed tissues. Protein lysates were prepared from matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens of individual tumors taken from three different xenograft models of human cancer. Materials from both untreated mice and mice treated with either anti-HER3 or bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR monoclonal antibodies were analyzed. Correlations between signals from FF and FFPE tissue samples were investigated. Overall, 60 markers were identified that produced comparable profiles between FF and FFPE tissues, demonstrating significant correlation between the two sample types. The top 25 markers also showed significance after correction for multiple testing. The panel of markers covered several clinically relevant tumor signaling pathways and both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated proteins were represented. Biologically relevant changes in marker expression were noted when RPPA profiles from treated and untreated xenografts were compared. These data demonstrate that, using appropriately selected antibodies, RPPA analysis from FFPE tissue is well feasible and generates biologically meaningful information. The identified panel of markers that generate similar profiles in matched fixed and unfixed tissue samples may be clinically useful for pharmacodynamic studies of drug effect

  19. Evaluation of Protein Profiles From Treated Xenograft Tumor Models Identifies an Antibody Panel for Formalin-fixed and Paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Tissue Analysis by Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA).

    PubMed

    Bader, Sabine; Zajac, Magdalena; Friess, Thomas; Ruge, Elisabeth; Rieder, Natascha; Gierke, Berthold; Heubach, Yvonne; Thomas, Marlene; Pawlak, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) are an established tool for measuring the expression and activation status of multiple proteins in parallel using only very small amounts of tissue. Several studies have demonstrated the value of this technique for signaling pathway analysis using proteins extracted from fresh frozen (FF) tissue in line with validated antibodies for this tissue type; however, formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE) is the standard method for tissue preservation in the clinical setting. Hence, we performed RPPA to measure profiles for a set of 300 protein markers using matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens to identify which markers performed similarly using the RPPA technique in fixed and unfixed tissues. Protein lysates were prepared from matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens of individual tumors taken from three different xenograft models of human cancer. Materials from both untreated mice and mice treated with either anti-HER3 or bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR monoclonal antibodies were analyzed. Correlations between signals from FF and FFPE tissue samples were investigated. Overall, 60 markers were identified that produced comparable profiles between FF and FFPE tissues, demonstrating significant correlation between the two sample types. The top 25 markers also showed significance after correction for multiple testing. The panel of markers covered several clinically relevant tumor signaling pathways and both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated proteins were represented. Biologically relevant changes in marker expression were noted when RPPA profiles from treated and untreated xenografts were compared. These data demonstrate that, using appropriately selected antibodies, RPPA analysis from FFPE tissue is well feasible and generates biologically meaningful information. The identified panel of markers that generate similar profiles in matched fixed and unfixed tissue samples may be clinically useful for pharmacodynamic studies of drug effect

  20. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  1. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible.

  2. 30 CFR 203.30 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ROYALTY RATES OCS Oil, Gas, and Sulfur General Royalty Relief for Drilling Ultra-Deep Wells on Leases Not... a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well? 203.30 Section 203.30 Mineral Resources... drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well? Your lease may receive a royalty suspension volume...

  3. 30 CFR 203.32 - What other requirements or restrictions apply to royalty relief for a qualified phase 2 or phase...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to royalty relief for a qualified phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well? 203.32 Section 203.32 Mineral... Relief for Drilling Ultra-Deep Wells on Leases Not Subject to Deep Water Royalty Relief § 203.32 What other requirements or restrictions apply to royalty relief for a qualified phase 2 or phase 3...

  4. 30 CFR 203.30 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well? 203.30 Section 203.30 Mineral Resources... for royalty relief as a result of drilling a phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well? Your lease may... longitude in water depths entirely less than 400 meters deep. (b) The lease has not produced gas or oil...

  5. 30 CFR 203.32 - What other requirements or restrictions apply to royalty relief for a qualified phase 2 or phase...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to royalty relief for a qualified phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well? 203.32 Section 203.32 Mineral... requirements or restrictions apply to royalty relief for a qualified phase 2 or phase 3 ultra-deep well? (a) If a qualified ultra-deep well on your lease is within a unitized portion of your lease, the RSV...

  6. C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and Pig-Major acute phase protein profiles of pigs infected experimentally by different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Saco, Y; Martínez-Lobo, F; Cortey, M; Pato, R; Peña, R; Segalés, J; Prieto, C; Bassols, A

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) is the etiologic agent of PRRS, one of the most important diseases in swine worldwide. In the present work, the effects of different PRRSV strains were tested on a piglet experimental model to study the induced acute phase response. For this purpose, pigs (n=15 for each group) were intranasally inoculated with one of five PRRSV strains (isolates EU10, 12, 17, 18 from genotype 1 and isolate JA-142 from genotype 2). The acute phase response was monitored by measuring acute phase proteins (APPs). Specifically, the serum concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Pig-Major Acute Protein (Pig-MAP) was determined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days p.i. Clinical signs and growth performance were also monitored during the experiment. All animals became viremic after inoculation during the study period. The APP response was heterogeneous and dependent on the strain, being strains EU10, EU 18 and JA-142 those that induced the highest response and the strongest clinical signs. In general, Hp was the most sensitive biomarker for PRRSV infection, CRP behaved as moderate and Pig-MAP was the less responsive during the course of PRRSV experimental infection. Hp and CRP were significantly discriminatory between infected and control pigs, but not Pig-MAP.

  7. Dispersion retrieval from multi-level ultra-deep reactive-ion-etched microstructures for terahertz slow-wave circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Baik, Chan-Wook Young Ahn, Ho; Kim, Yongsung; Lee, Jooho; Hong, Seogwoo; Hee Choi, Jun; Kim, Sunil; Hun Lee, Sang; Min Kim, Jong; Hwang, Sungwoo; Yeon Jun, So; Yu, SeGi; Lawrence Ives, R.

    2014-01-13

    A multi-level microstructure is proposed for terahertz slow-wave circuits, with dispersion relation retrieved by scattering parameter measurements. The measured return loss shows strong resonances above the cutoff with negligible phase shifts compared with finite element analysis. Splitting the circuit into multi levels enables a low aspect ratio configuration that alleviates the loading effect of deep-reactive-ion etching on silicon wafers. This makes it easier to achieve flat-etched bottom and smooth sidewall profiles. The dispersion retrieved from the measurement, therefore, corresponds well to the theoretical estimation. The result provides a straightforward way to the precise determination of dispersions in terahertz vacuum electronics.

  8. Seafloor bathymetry in deep and shallow water marine CSEM responses of Nigerian Niger Delta oil field: Effects and corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folorunso, Adetayo Femi; Li, Yuguo

    2015-12-01

    Topography distortions in bathymetrically acquired marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic (mCSEM) responses are capable of misleading interpretation to the presence or absence of the target if not corrected for. For this reason, the effects and correction of bathymetry distortions on the deep and shallow seafloor mCSEM responses of the Niger Delta Oil province were examined in this paper. Marine CSEM response of the Niger Delta geological structure was modelled by using a 2.5D adaptive finite element forward modelling code. In both the deep water and shallow water cases, the bathymetry distortions in the electric field amplitude and phase were found to get smaller with increasing Tx-Rx offsets and contain short-wavelength components in the amplitude curves which persist at all Tx-Rx offsets. In the deep water, topographic effects on the reservoir signatures are not significant, but as water depth reduces, bathymetric distortions become more significant as a result of the airwave effects, masking the target signatures. The correction technique produces a good agreement between the flat-seafloor reservoir model and its equivalent bathymetric model in deep water at 0.25 Hz, while in shallow water, the corrected response only shows good agreement at shorter offsets but becomes complicated at longer offsets due to airwave effects. Transmission frequency was extended above and below 0.25 Hz in the frequency spectrum and the correction method applied. The bathymetry correction at higher frequency (1.75 Hz) is not effective in removing the topographic effects in either deep or shallow water. At 0.05 Hz for both seafloor scenarios, we obtained the best corrected amplitude profiles, removing completely the distortions from both topographic undulation and airwave effects in the shallow water model. Overall, the work shows that the correction technique is effective in reducing bathymetric effects in deep water at medium frequency and in both deep and shallow waters at a low

  9. Elevated nitrogen isotopic composition of nitrate in the deep North Pacific during the last ice age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwell, A. M.; Robinson, R. S.; Spivack, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Fixed nitrogen in the water column is an essential nutrient and its distribution is linked to the cycling of carbon, phosphorus, and oxygen. The history of the isotopic composition of deep water nitrate reflects past variations in the relative magnitude of water column versus sediment denitrification. We determined the isotopic compositions of N (δ15N) and O (δ18O) of dissolved nitrate in sedimentary pore fluid in the North Pacific Gyre in order to infer changes in the deep ocean δ15N and δ18O values. Samples were collected on cruise 195 aboard the R/V Knorr during January-February 2009 from cores recovered below depths greater than 5000 meters at sites EQP 10 and 11. We correct the measured isotopic compositions for in situ nitrate production. In the resulting corrected profiles, both δ15N and δ18O values increase, by 1.5‰ and 2‰, respectively, between the shallowest and deepest sample (27 mbsf). Water at these depths is relict and has only partially exchanged with deep waters since the last glacial maximum (LGM). These are lower limit estimates of the actual isotopic shifts since the LGM due to the dampening effects of diffusion. We compare the measured (corrected for in situ nitrate production) profiles with predicted profiles based on measured solid phase sedimentary δ15N values from sites that are below modern oxygen minimum zones, and the mean deep ocean nitrate δ15N estimates of Galbraith et al., (2013). The measured (corrected) δ15N profile is similar to the predicted profile of solid phase sedimentary δ15N. In contrast, the global δ15N estimate of Galbraith et al., (2013) does not produce a similar profile. The comparison suggests that regional changes in nitrogen cycling, (i.e. assimilation, remineralization, denitrification) are most likely responsible for the increased δ15N and δ18O in the past at our sites. We propose three possible driving mechanisms for the observed changes: 1) expanded water column denitrification in the deep waters

  10. Deep Moonquakes: Remaining Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    2004-01-01

    We have recently reexamined more than 9000 United States previously unidentified seismic events catalogued during the Apollo landing missions and positively identified for the first time about 30 deep moonquake nests on the far side of the Moon. Although only a few of them are currently locatable, the relative arrival times among stations for the rest and presence or absence of seismic signals at particular stations suggest that either (a) the region within about $40\\deg$ of the antipode is aseismic or (b) the deep interior of the Moon severely attenuates or deflects seismic waves. Aside from the obvious question of how to distinguish between such hypothetical models, this effort raised several more general questions concerning the use of deep moonquake signals to infer the structure and dynamics of the deep interior of the Moon. Among more important ones are: (1) How reliable are the seismic arrival picks from which to compute the seismic velocity variations in the Moon? (2) How do the possible lateral variations in seismic velocity affect the computed radial variation in seismic velocity at depth? (3) Can we tell more about the distribution and mechanism of deep moonquakes from the newly expanded database of identified deep moonquakes? Questions (1) and (2) are especially important because the inferred deep internal structure of the Moon depends critically on their answers. Answering these questions may demand additional data collected on future lunar missions, but some may be resolved with further examination of the existing data.

  11. Phase IV study comparing diurnal glycemic profile following the administration of 2 NPH plus regular human DNA recombinant insulin regimens in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) adult patients.

    PubMed

    Feleder, E C; Yerino, G A; Halabe, E K; Tombazzi, J L; Farias, J M

    2012-06-01

    Intensive insulin therapy (IIT) based on multiple daily injections of long plus rapid-acting insulin has been demonstrated to reduce mortality and morbidity associated with chronic hyperglycemia in T1DM patients. The objective of this study was to assess and compare the postprandial glycemic profile over a diurnal 12 h-period produced by the administration of a new NPH plus regular human DNA recombinant IIT (test regimen) relative to the reference IIT in T1DM patients. A phase IV, single-center, open-label, randomized, multiple-dose, balanced, cross-over study in 12 T1DM patients was conducted. Patients were assigned to receive either the test (Densulin® N (NPH) plus Densulin® R (regular),100 UI/ml, Denver Farma, Argentina) followed by the reference (InsulatardHM® (NPH) plus ActrapidHM®,100 UI/ml, Novo Nordisk Pharma Argentina) regimens or viceversa, according to a random sequence. Each treatment regimen consisted of 2 phases of an ambulatory run-in period of 7 days followed by 12 h confinement period. Blood glucose levels were measured. Glycemic profile was evaluated through glycemic plasma-concentration time curves, area under the time-concentration glycemic curves from basal to 2 h (GlyAUC0-2) and to 12 h (GlyAUC0-12) postprandial, and maximum glycemic postprandial concentration (GlyCmax). 12 hour glycemic concentration-time curves were similar for both test and reference regimens. Geometric least square means ratios Test/ref regimens and their 90% confidence interval for GlyAUC0-2, GlyAUC0-12 and GlyCmax were 94.33 (81.13-125.09), 107.75 (94.05-123.45) and 105 (92.89-118.68), respectively. Both regimens presented similar safety profile. This study demonstrated that the new human DNA recombinant NPH and regular insulin is equally effective to the reference regimen for postprandial diurnal glycemic profile.

  12. The deep Ionian Basin revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugend, Julie; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Arsenikos, Stavros; Frizon de Lamotte, Dominique; Blanpied, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The deep Eastern Mediterranean Basins (Ionian and Herodotus) are characterized by thick sedimentary sequences overlying an extremely thinned basement evidenced from different geophysical methods. Yet, the nature of the crust (continental or oceanic) and the timing of the extreme crustal and lithosphere thinning in the different sub-basins remain highly controversial, casting doubts on the tectonic setting related to the formation of this segment of the North Gondwana paleo-margin. We focus on the Ionian Basin located at the western termination of the Eastern Mediterranean with the aim of identifying, characterizing and mapping the deepest sedimentary sequences. We present tentative age correlations relying on calibrations and observations from the surrounding margins and basins (Malta shelf and Escarpment, Cyrenaica margin, Sirte Basin, Apulian Platform). Two-ship deep refraction seismic data (Expanding Spread Profiles from the PASIPHAE cruise) combined with reprocessed reflection data (from the ARCHIMEDE survey) enabled us to present a homogeneous seismic stratigraphy across the basin and to investigate the velocity structure of its basement. Based on our results, and on a review of geological and geophysical observations, we suggest an Upper Triassic-Early Dogger age for the formation of the deep Ionian Basin. The nature of the underlying basement remains uncertain, both highly-thinned continental and slow-spreading type oceanic crust being compatible with the available constraints. The narrow size and relatively short-lived evolution of the Ionian Basin lead us to suggest that it is more likely the remnant of an immature oceanic basin than of a stable oceanic domain. Eventually, upscaling these results at the scale of the Eastern Mediterranean Basins highlights the complex interaction observed between two propagating oceans: The Central Atlantic and Neo-Tethys.

  13. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  14. Deep Space 1 Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The completely assembled Deep Space 1 (DS-1) technology demonstrator spacecraft. The DS-1 spacecraft incorporates a number of advanced technology concepts in its mission, but none so 'high profile' as its Ion propulsion system. The name itself evokes visions of Star Trek and science fiction fantasy, although the idea actually dates from the 1950s. However, unlike the 'Warp Drive' propulsion system that zings the fictional starship Enterprise across the cosmos in minutes, the almost imperceptible thrust from the ion propulsion system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs. Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

  15. Profiling under UNIX by patching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1986-01-01

    Profiling under UNIX is done by inserting counters into programs either before or during the compilation or assembly phases. A fourth type of profiling involves monitoring the execution of a program, and gathering relevant statistics during the run. This method and an implementation of this method are examined, and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  16. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  17. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  18. Deep levels in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, George D.

    1983-03-01

    The 3d transition element ion impurities in silicon are reviewed for the broad insight they provide in understanding deep levels in semiconductors. As interstitials, their interaction with the host tends to confine the d-levels to the forbidden gap, providing many deep states. The interaction at the substitutional site is best considered as an interaction with the lattice vacancy, into which the impurity is placed. This interaction tends to repel deep a1 and t2 levels from the gap. When the levels are present, they are mostly vacancy-like and the defect is likely to display the large lattice relaxations characteristic of the vacancy.

  19. Modeling of the corrected D st * index temporal profile on the main phase of the magnetic storms generated by different types of solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, N. S.; Yermolaev, Yu. I.; Lodkina, I. G.

    2015-03-01

    A modeling of the corrected (taking into account the magnetopause currents [9]) D st * index during the main phase of magnetic storms generated by four types of the solar wind (SW), namely MC (10 storms), CIR (28 storms), Sheath (21 storms), and Ejecta (31 storms), is performed similarly to our previous work on the simple D st index [8]. The "Catalog of large-scale solar wind phenomena during 1976-2000" ([1], ftp://ftp.iki.rssi.ru/pub/omni/) prepared on the basis of the OMNI database, was used for the identification of SW types. The time behavior of D st * is approximated by a linear dependence on the integral electric field (sum E y ), dynamic pressure ( P d ), and fluctuation level (s B) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Three types of D st * modeling are performed: (1) by individual values of the approximation coefficients; (2) by approximation coefficients averaged over SW type, and (3) in the same way as in (2) but with allowance for the D st *-index values preceding the beginning of the main phase of the magnetic storm. The results of modeling the corrected D st * index are compared to modeling of the usual D st index. In the conditions of a strong statistical scatter of the approximation coefficients, the use of D st instead of D st * insignificantly influences the accuracy of the modeling and correlation coefficient.

  20. Resolution of volatile fuel compound profiles from Ascocoryne sarcoides: a comparison by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Volatile hydrocarbon production by Ascocoryne sacroides was studied over its growth cycle. Gas-phase compounds were measured continuously with a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and at distinct time points with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using head space solid phase microextraction (SPME). The PTR-MS ion signal permitted temporal resolution of the volatile production while the SPME results revealed distinct compound identities. The quantitative PTR-MS results showed the volatile production was dominated by ethanol and acetaldehyde, while the concentration of the remainder of volatiles consistently reached 2,000 ppbv. The measurement of alcohols from the fungal culture by the two techniques correlated well. Notable compounds of fuel interest included nonanal, 1-octen-3-ol, 1-butanol, 3-methyl- and benzaldehyde. Abiotic comparison of the two techniques demonstrated SPME fiber bias toward higher molecular weight compounds, making quantitative efforts with SPME impractical. Together, PTR-MS and SPME GC-MS were shown as valuable tools for characterizing volatile fuel compound production from microbiological sources. PMID:22480438

  1. Controls on deep versus near-surface soil CO2 production and soil organic matter turnover (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SIX, J. W.; Berhe, A.; Yanni, S.; Gillabel, J.; van oost, K.

    2013-12-01

    At the soil profile scale, driving factors of decomposition and C turnover can change independently with depth, making a depth-specific assessment of controlling factors, such as temperature, dry-wet cycles, and vertical soil movement, is essential. In a set of depth explicit experiments and modeling exercises, we have tried to elucidate the effects of these controlling factors within the soil profile. In a first experiment, we combined 13C- and 14C-methodology with fractionation techniques to assess the C turnover of labile versus resistant C across the soil profile. As expected, the turnover of labile C increased drastically with increasing soil depth and had a Q10 of 2.8 in the surface layer. In a second experiment, we measured CO2, O2, temperature, and soil water content in two plots at 15, 30, 50, 70, and 90 cm depths to further elucidate the temperature sensitivity of soil C across the profile. Under non-limiting moisture (θ>20%) the Q10 value for the A horizon was 5.3 decreasing to 1.3 at θ<10%. In the C2 horizon at θ>20%, Q10 was 3.1 indicating that it is less sensitive to temperature variations than topsoil when moisture is non-limiting. In a follow-up third experiment, we conducted a wetting and drying experiment to assess the effect of changing moisture regimes on deep soil C dynamics. We found that soil CO2 production across the soil profile was more sensitive to changes in soil moisture during the drying than wetting phases, especially in the top 30 cm of soil. On the contrary, soil CO2 production across the soil profile was more sensitive to changes in soil temperature during wetting than drying phase. Deep soil CO2 production was significantly more sensitive to changes in temperature during the wetting phase, compared to SOM in topsoil layers. Finally, we developed a depth-explicit SOM model based on carbon isotopes and radionuclides. We found that it was essential to include vertical soil transport and its depth attenuation in order to correctly

  2. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  3. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  4. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  5. Nurturing Deep Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Rachael

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the missing ingredient in school reform is soul, that is, deep connections among students, teachers, and administrators. Discusses five principles of leadership with soul: Personalize, pacing, permission, protection, and paradox. (PKP)

  6. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The various systems and subsystems are discussed for the Deep Space Network (DSN). A description of the DSN is presented along with mission support, program planning, facility engineering, implementation and operations.

  7. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Deep Space Network progress report is presented dealing with in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  8. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations. The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are emphasized.

  9. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The facilities, programming system, and monitor and control system for the deep space network are described. Ongoing planetary and interplanetary flight projects are reviewed, along with tracking and ground-based navigation, communications, and network and facility engineering.

  10. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress on the Deep Space Network (DSN) supporting research and technology, advanced development, engineering and implementation, and DSN operations is presented. The functions and facilities of the DSN are described.

  11. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A report is given of the Deep Space Networks progress in (1) flight project support, (2) tracking and data acquisition research and technology, (3) network engineering, (4) hardware and software implementation, and (5) operations.

  12. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are considered. Progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is reported.

  13. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization, of the Deep Space Network are summarized. Deep Space stations, ground communications, and network operations control capabilities are described. The network is designed for two-way communications with unmanned spacecraft traveling approximately 1600 km from earth to the farthest planets in the solar system. It has provided tracking and data acquisition support for the following projects: Ranger, Surveyor, Mariner, Pioneer, Apollo, Helios, Viking, and the Lunar Orbiter.

  14. Reading Knee-Deep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Freire told his audience at a seminar at the University of Massachusetts, "You need to read knee-deep in texts, for deeper than surface meanings, and you need to know the words to be able to do it" (quoted in Cleary, 2003). In a children's literature class, fifteen teachers and I traveled along a path that moved us toward reading knee-deep as we…

  15. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized along with deep space station, ground communication, and network operations control capabilities. Mission support of ongoing planetary/interplanetary flight projects is discussed with emphasis on Viking orbiter radio frequency compatibility tests, the Pioneer Venus orbiter mission, and Helios-1 mission status and operations. Progress is also reported in tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  16. Exploration for deep coal

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-15

    The most important factor in safe mining is the quality of the roof. The article explains how the Rosebud Mining Co. conducts drilling and exploration in 11 deep coal mine throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rosebud uses two Atlas Copco CS10 core drilling rigs mounted on 4-wheel drive trucks. The article first appeared in Atlas Copco's in-house magazine, Deep Hole Driller. 3 photos.

  17. Deep UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Schowalter, Leo

    2014-06-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) photons interact strongly with a broad range of chemical and biological molecules; compact DUV light sources could enable a wide range of applications in chemi/bio-sensing, sterilization, agriculture, and industrial curing. The much shorter wavelength also results in useful