Science.gov

Sample records for deep survey evolution

  1. Very deep IRAS survey - constraints on the evolution of starburst galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hacking, P.; Houck, J.R.; Condon, J.J.

    1987-05-01

    Counts of sources (primarily starburst galaxies) from a deep 60 microns IRAS survey published by Hacking and Houck (1987) are compared with four evolutionary models. The counts below 100 mJy are higher than expected if no evolution has taken place out to a redshift of approximately 0.2. Redshift measurements of the survey sources should be able to distinguish between luminosity-evolution and density-evolution models and detect as little as a 20 percent brightening or increase in density of infrared sources per billion years ago (H/0/ = 100 km/s per Mpc). Starburst galaxies cannot account for the reported 100 microns background without extreme evolution at high redshifts. 21 references.

  2. A very deep IRAS survey - Constraints on the evolution of starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacking, Perry; Condon, J. J.; Houck, J. R.

    1987-05-01

    Counts of sources (primarily starburst galaxies) from a deep 60 microns IRAS survey published by Hacking and Houck (1987) are compared with four evolutionary models. The counts below 100 mJy are higher than expected if no evolution has taken place out to a redshift of approximately 0.2. Redshift measurements of the survey sources should be able to distinguish between luminosity-evolution and density-evolution models and detect as little as a 20 percent brightening or increase in density of infrared sources per billion years ago (H/0/ = 100 km/s per Mpc). Starburst galaxies cannot account for the reported 100 microns background without extreme evolution at high redshifts.

  3. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. IV. EVOLUTION OF GALAXY STELLAR MASS FUNCTION BACK TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kajisawa, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Yamada, T.; Akiyama, M.; Tokoku, C.; Yoshikawa, T.; Tanaka, I.; Suzuki, R.; Konishi, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Ouchi, M.; Iwata, I.; Hamana, T.; Onodera, M.

    2009-09-10

    We use very deep near-infrared (NIR) imaging data obtained in MOIRCS Deep Survey (MODS) to investigate the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function back to z {approx} 3. The MODS data reach J = 24.2, H = 23.1, and K = 23.1 (5{sigma}, Vega magnitude) over 103 arcmin{sup 2} (wide) and J = 25.1, H = 23.7, and K = 24.1 over 28 arcmin{sup 2} (deep) in the GOODS-North region. The wide and very deep NIR data allow us to measure the number density of galaxies down to low stellar mass (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) even at high redshift with high statistical accuracy. The normalization of the mass function decreases with redshift, and the integrated stellar mass density becomes {approx}8%-18% of the local value at z {approx} 2 and {approx}4%-9% at z {approx} 3, which are consistent with results of previous studies in general fields. Furthermore, we found that the low-mass slope becomes steeper with redshift from {alpha} {approx} -1.3 at z {approx} 1 to {alpha} {approx} -1.6 at z {approx} 3 and that the evolution of the number density of low-mass (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) galaxies is weaker than that of M* ({approx}10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) galaxies. This indicates that the contribution of low-mass galaxies to the total stellar mass density has been significant at high redshift. The steepening of the low-mass slope with redshift is an opposite trend expected from the stellar mass dependence of the specific star formation rate reported in previous studies. The present result suggests that the hierarchical merging process overwhelmed the effect of the stellar mass growth by star formation and was very important for the stellar mass assembly of these galaxies at 1 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.

  4. The VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey: evolution in the halo occupation number since z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, U.; de la Torre, S.; Le Fèvre, O.; Guzzo, L.; Marinoni, C.; Meneux, B.; Pollo, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Lamareille, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Mazure, A.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; Cucciati, O.; de Ravel, L.; Gregorini, L.; Perez-Montero, E.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.

    2010-08-01

    We model the evolution of the mean galaxy occupation of dark matter haloes over the range 0.1 < z < 1.3, using the data from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey. The galaxy projected correlation function wp(rp) was computed for a set of luminosity-limited subsamples and fits to its shape were obtained using two variants of halo occupation distribution (HOD) models. These provide us with a set of best-fitting parameters, from which we obtain the average mass of a halo and average number of galaxies per halo. We find that after accounting for the evolution in luminosity and assuming that we are largely following the same population, the underlying dark matter halo shows a growth in mass with decreasing redshift as expected in a hierarchical structure formation scenario. Using two different HOD models, we see that the halo mass grows by 90 per cent over the redshift interval z = [0.5, 1.0]. This is the first time the evolution in halo mass at high redshifts has been obtained from a single data survey and it follows the simple form seen in N-body simulations with M(z) = M0 e-βz, and β = 1.3 +/- 0.30. This provides evidence for a rapid accretion phase of massive haloes having a present-day mass M0 ~ 1013.5 h-1 Msolar, with a m > 0.1 M0 merger event occurring between redshifts of 0.5 and 1.0. Furthermore, we find that more luminous galaxies are found to occupy more massive haloes irrespective of the redshift. Finally, the average number of galaxies per halo shows little increase from redshift z ~ 1.0 to ~0.5, with a sharp increase by a factor of ~3 from z ~ 0.5 to ~0.1, likely due to the dynamical friction of subhaloes within their host haloes. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, program 070.A-9007(A), and on data obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the CNRS of France, CNRC in Canada and the University of Hawaii. E-mail: abbas@oato.inaf.it

  5. Enhancing the Legacy of Spitzer and Herschel with the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen

    The next frontier for comprehensive galaxy surveys is the epoch at z~1.5-3.5, the peak of star formation and black hole activity. Despite the new windows that Spitzer and Herschel have opened up into the stellar and dust emission of distant galaxies and AGN during this key epoch, these studies have been limited by the lack of spectroscopic redshifts and the unknown physical conditions (e.g., metallicities, ionization) within the targeted galaxies. To realize the full potential of Spitzer and Herschel, we require a large spectroscopic survey that will: (a) efficiently assemble spectroscopic redshifts for large samples of galaxies at z=1.4-3.8; (b) yield the physical conditions, including the ionization and metallicities of these galaxies; and (c) easily obtain spectroscopic redshifts even for very dusty/confused galaxies. To this end, our team has been allocated a large program of 47 Keck nights with the multi-object near-IR spectrograph MOSFIRE to carry out the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field Survey (MOSDEF) in three of the Hubble CANDELS fields. MOSDEF will obtain rest-optical spectra of ~1500 galaxies at redshifts z=1.4-3.8, targeting many of the optical nebular emission lines and continuum features (e.g., [OII], [OIII], H-beta, H-alpha, [NII], [SII], 4000 Angstrom break, Ca H and K, and Mbg) that until now have been inaccessible for large samples of distant galaxies, but which are routinely used to measure the SFRs, dust attenuation, metal and gas content, and ionization and dynamical properties in nearby galaxies. MOSDEF spectroscopy provides a critical supporting role for the analysis of Spitzer and Herschel observations of distant galaxies. With this transformative dataset, we will perform the following analyses. First, we will use Spitzer and Herschel imaging, aided with spectroscopic redshifts from MOSDEF, to construct individual and mean dust SEDs for galaxies at redshifts 1.4

  6. Deep Imaging Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This is the first Deep Imaging Survey image taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. On June 22 and 23, 2003, the spacecraft obtained this near ultraviolet image of the Groth region by adding multiple orbits for a total exposure time of 14,000 seconds. Tens of thousands of objects can be identified in this picture.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission is led by the California Institute of Technology, which is also responsible for the science operations and data analysis. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., a division of Caltech, manages the mission and built the science instrument. The mission was developed under NASA's Explorers Program, managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The mission's international partners include South Korea and France.

  7. CHILES Con Pol: An ultra-deep JVLA survey probing galaxy evolution and cosmic magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; van Gorkom, Jacqueline; Rupen, Michael P.; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.; Bonzini, Margherita; Padovani, Paolo; Harrison, Ian; Brown, Michael L.; Gim, Hansung; Yun, Min S.; Maddox, Natasha; Stewart, Adam; Fender, Rob P.; Tremou, Evangelia; Chomiuk, Laura; Peters, Charee; Wilcots, Eric M.; Lazio, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    We are undertaking a 1000 hour campaign with the Karl G. Jansky VLA to survey 0.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field in full polarization continuum at 1.4 GHz. Our observations are part of a joint program with the spectral line COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES). When complete, we expect our CHILES Continuum Polarization (CHILES Con Pol) survey to reach an SKA-era sensitivity of 500 nJy per 4 arcsecond resolving beam, the deepest view of the radio sky yet. CHILES Con Pol will open new and fertile parameter space, with sensitivity to star formation rates of 10 Msun per year out to an unprecedented redshift of z=2, and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and sub-millimeter galaxies out to redshifts of z=8 and beyond. This rich resource will extend the utility of radio band studies beyond the usual radio quasar and radio galaxy populations, opening sensitivity to the starforming and radio-quiet AGN populations that form the bulk of extragalactic sources detected in the optical, X-ray, and infrared bands. In this talk I will outline the key science of CHILES Con Pol, including galaxy evolution and novel measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields. I will present initial results from the first 180 hours of the survey and describe our forthcoming Data Release 1. I invite the astronomical community to consider unique science that can be pursued with CHILES Con Pol radio data.

  8. Galaxy evolution from deep multi-wavelength infrared surveys: a prelude to Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Vaccari, M.; Berta, S.; Marchetti, L.; Mainetti, G.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Studies of the generation and assembly of stellar populations in galaxies largely benefit from far-IR observations, considering that the IR flux is a close prior to the rate of star formation (the bulk of which happens in dust-obscured environments). At the same time, major episodes of nuclear AGN accretion are also dust-obscured and visible in the IR. Aims: At the end of the Spitzer cryogenic mission and the onset of the Herschel era, we review our current knowledge of galaxy evolution at IR wavelengths, and model it to achieve as far as a complete view of the evolution of cosmic sources. We also develop new tools for the analysis of background fluctuations to constrain source counts in regimes of high confusion, as it happens for the Herschel sub-mm surveys. Methods: We analysed a wide variety of new data on galaxy evolution and high-redshift source populations from Spitzer cosmological surveys, and confront them with complementary data from mm ground-based observations and constraints from the far-IR diffuse radiation, as well as preliminary results from Herschel surveys. Results: These data confirm earlier indications about a very rapid increase in galaxy volume emissivity with redshift up to z ≃ 1 [ ρ(z) ∝ (1+z)4] , the fastest evolution rate observed for galaxies at any wavelengths. The observed Spitzer counts require a combination of fast evolution for the dominant population and a bumpy spectrum with substantial PAH emission at z ~ 1 to 2. Number counts at long wavelengths (70 through 1100 μm) confirm these results. All the present data require that the fast observed evolution from z = 0 to 1 flattens around redshift 1 and then keeps approximately constant up to z ≃ 2.5 at least. Our estimated redshift-dependent bolometric comoving energy density keeps lower at z ⪆ 1.5 than some previously published results based on either large extinction corrections, or large spectral extrapolations. Conclusions: The present-day IR/sub-mm data provide

  9. The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey: Final Public Release of ~ 35 000 Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei Covering 13 Billion Years of Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Maccagni, D.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Mellier, Y.; Merighi, R.; Merluzzi, P.; Moreau, C.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Vettolani, G.; Zamorani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    2014-03-01

    The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) final and public data release offers an excellent opportunity to revisit galaxy evolution with a sample of 35 016 galaxies and active galactic nuclei covering the redshift range 0 < z < 6.7. The VVDS includes three tiered surveys, the wide, deep and ultra-deep surveys, covering up to 8.7 square degrees, and each magnitude-selected with limits iAB = 22.5, 24 and 24.75 respectively. The VVDS redshifts, spectra, and all associated multi-wavelength data are available at http://cesam.lam.fr/vvds. The highlights and scientific legacy of the VVDS are summarised.

  10. Tracing Evolution of Starbursts and AGNs using Ultra-deep Radio and mm/smm Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min S.; Gim, Hansung; Morrison, Glenn; Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Owen, Frazer; Kellermann, Ken; Aretxaga, Itziar; Giavalisco, Mauro; Hughes, David; Lowenthal, James; Miller, Neal; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro

    2015-08-01

    There is growing evidence supporting a rapid build up of metals among massive galaxies during their rapid growth via an intense starburst in the early epochs. These star formation activities may be largely obscured in the UV and optical light, as in the local universe. If the growth of supermassive blackholes occurs at or nearly the same time, the accompanying AGN activity may also be heavily obscured. Ultra-deep surveys in the radio and far-infrared can offer extinction-free view of these systems, and the advent of new facilities such as the Jansky VLA, ALMA, and LMT now allows us to probe directly the population of starburst galaxies that are responsible for the bulk of the stellar mass build-up during the epoch of galaxy growth (SFR > 10-100 M⊙/yr at z≈2 or earlier). We will present our analysis of the properties of the micro-Jansky radio sources identified by new Jansky VLA surveys of the GOODS and COSMOS fields using the rich archival data already available (Herschel, Spitzer, Chandra, ALMA, LMT, etc.). Specifically, we find evidence for two populations of microJy radio sources with distinct spectral index distribution. We explore whether this reflects differences in the underlying powering mechanisms by examining their radio-FIR correlation and X-ray properties. We also find the previously reported apparent systematic change in the "q-value" with increasing redshift, and we examine the reality of this trend in some detail. Finally, we will also examine the spatial extent of activities for a subset of the sample where high angular resolution (better than 1") information is available.

  11. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Evolution of Void Statistics from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Charlie; Coil, Alison L.; White, Martin; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Yan, Renbin; Cooper, Michael C.; Gerke, Brian F.; Davis, Marc; Koo, David C.

    2005-12-01

    We present measurements of the void probability function (VPF) at z~1 using data from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) Redshift Survey and its evolution to z~0 using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We measure the VPF as a function of galaxy color and luminosity in both surveys and find that it mimics trends displayed in the two-point correlation function, ξ: namely, that samples of brighter, red galaxies have larger voids (i.e., are more strongly clustered) than fainter, blue galaxies. We also clearly detect evolution in the VPF with cosmic time, with voids being larger in comoving units at z~0. We find that the reduced VPF matches the predictions of a ``negative binomial'' model for galaxies of all colors, luminosities, and redshifts studied. This model lacks a physical motivation but produces a simple analytic prediction for sources of any number density and integrated two-point correlation function, ξ¯. This implies that differences in the VPF across different galaxy populations are consistent with being due entirely to differences in the population number density and ξ¯. We compare the VPF at z~1 to N-body ΛCDM simulations and find good agreement between the DEEP2 data and mock galaxy catalogs. Interestingly, we find that the dark matter particle reduced VPF follows the physically motivated ``thermodynamic'' model, while the dark matter halo reduced VPF more closely follows the negative binomial model. The robust result that all galaxy populations follow the negative binomial model appears to be due primarily to the clustering of dark matter halos. The reduced VPF is insensitive to changes in the parameters of the halo occupation distribution, in the sense that halo models with the same ξ¯ will produce the same VPF. For the wide range of galaxies studied, the VPF therefore does not appear to provide useful constraints on galaxy evolution models that cannot be gleaned from studies of ξ¯ alone.

  12. Physical properties of galaxies and their evolution in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. I. The evolution of the mass-metallicity relation up to z ~ 0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamareille, F.; Brinchmann, J.; Contini, T.; Walcher, C. J.; Charlot, S.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Zamorani, G.; Pozzetti, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Garilli, B.; Paltani, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Radovich, M.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.; Romano, A.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.

    2009-02-01

    Aims: We want to derive the mass-metallicity relation of star-forming galaxies up to z ~ 0.9, using data from the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. The mass-metallicity relation is commonly understood as the relation between the stellar mass and the gas-phase oxygen abundance. Methods: Automatic measurement of emission-line fluxes and equivalent widths have been performed on the full spectroscopic sample of the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. This sample is divided into two sub-samples depending on the apparent magnitude selection: wide (IAB < 22.5) and deep (IAB < 24). These two samples span two different ranges of stellar masses. Emission-line galaxies have been separated into star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei using emission line ratios. For the star-forming galaxies the emission line ratios have also been used to estimate gas-phase oxygen abundance, using empirical calibrations renormalized in order to give consistent results at low and high redshifts. The stellar masses have been estimated by fitting the whole spectral energy distributions with a set of stellar population synthesis models. Results: We assume at first order that the shape of the mass-metallicity relation remains constant with redshift. Then we find a stronger metallicity evolution in the wide sample as compared to the deep sample. We thus conclude that the mass-metallicity relation is flatter at higher redshift. At z ~ 0.77, galaxies at 109.4 solar masses have -0.18 dex lower metallicities than galaxies of similar masses in the local universe, while galaxies at 1010.2 solar masses have -0.28 dex lower metallicities. By comparing the mass-metallicity and luminosity-metallicity relations, we also find an evolution in mass-to-light ratio: galaxies at higher redshifts being more active. The observed flattening of the mass-metallicity relation at high redshift is analyzed as evidence in favor of the open-closed model. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope

  13. Size evolution of star-forming galaxies with 2 Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, B.; Le Fèvre, O.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Lemaux, B. C.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Maccagni, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorín, R.; Bardelli, S.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Hathi, N. P.; Koekemoer, A.; Pforr, J.; Tresse, L.; Dunlop, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The size of a galaxy encapsulates the signature of the different physical processes driving its evolution. The distribution of galaxy sizes in the Universe as a function of cosmic time is therefore a key to understand galaxy evolution. Aims: We aim to measure the average sizes and size distributions of galaxies as they are assembling before the peak in the comoving star formation rate density of the Universe to better understand the evolution of galaxies across cosmic time. Methods: We used a sample of ~1200 galaxies in the COSMOS and ECDFS fields with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts 2 ≤ zspec ≤ 4.5 in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS), representative of star-forming galaxies with iAB ≤ 25. We first derived galaxy sizes by applying a classical parametric profile-fitting method using GALFIT. We then measured the total pixel area covered by a galaxy above a given surface brightness threshold, which overcomes the difficulty of measuring sizes of galaxies with irregular shapes. We then compared the results obtained for the equivalent circularized radius enclosing 100% of the measured galaxy light r100T ~2.2 to those obtained with the effective radius re,circ measured with GALFIT. Results: We find that the sizes of galaxies computed with our non-parametric approach span a wide range but remain roughly constant on average with a median value r100T ~2.2 kpc for galaxies with 2 evolution of re with increasing redshift, down to sizes of <1 kpc at z ~ 4.5. We analyze the difference and find that parametric fitting of complex, asymmetric, multicomponent galaxies is severely underestimating their sizes. By comparing r100T with physical parameters obtained through fitting the spectral energy distribution we find that the star-forming galaxies that are the largest at any redshift are, on average, more massive and form more stars. We discover that galaxies present more concentrated light profiles with

  14. The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. Evolution of the major merger rate since z ~ 1 from spectroscopically confirmed galaxy pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ravel, L.; Le Fèvre, O.; Tresse, L.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Lamareille, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; Cucciati, O.; de La Torre, S.; Gregorini, L.; Memeo, P.; Perez-Montero, E.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Temporin, S.

    2009-05-01

    Context: The rate at which galaxies grow via successive mergers is a key element in understanding the main phases of galaxy evolution. Aims: We measure the evolution of the fraction of galaxies in pairs and the merging rate since redshift z 1 assuming a (H0 = 70 km s-1 Mpc-1, ΩM = 0.3 and ΩΛ = 0.7) cosmology. Methods: From the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey we use a sample of 6464 galaxies with I_AB ≤ 24 to identify 314 pairs of galaxies, each member with a secure spectroscopic redshift, which are close in both projected separation and in velocity. Results: We estimate that at z 0.9, 10.9 ± 3.2% of galaxies with MB(z) ≤ -18-Qz (Q = 1.11) are in pairs with separations Δ rp ≤ 20 h-1 kpc, Δ v≤ 500 km s-1, and with Δ MB ≤ 1.5, significantly larger than 3.8 ± 1.7% at z 0.5; thus, the pair fraction evolves as (1 + z)m with m = 4.73 ± 2.01. For bright galaxies with MB(z = 0) ≤ -18.77, the pair fraction is higher and its evolution with redshift is flatter with m = 1.50 ± 0.76, a property also observed for galaxies with increasing stellar masses. Early-type pairs (dry mergers) increase their relative fraction from 3% at z 0.9 to 12% at z 0.5. The star formation rate traced by the rest-frame [OII] EW increases by 26 ± 4% for pairs with the smallest separation rp ≤ 20 h-1 kpc. Following published prescriptions to derive merger timescales, we find that the merger rate of MB(z) ≤ -18-Qz galaxies evolves as N_mg = (4.96 ± 2.07)×10-4×(1 + z)2.20 ± 0.77 mergers Mpc-3 Gyr-1. Conclusions: The merger rate of galaxies with MB(z) ≤ -18-Qz has significantly evolved since z 1 and is strongly dependent on the luminosity or stellar mass of galaxies. The major merger rate increases more rapidly with redshift for galaxies with fainter luminosities or stellar mass, while the evolution of the merger rate for bright or massive galaxies is slower, indicating that the slow evolution reported for the brightest galaxies is not universal. The merger rate is also strongly

  15. CHILES Con Pol: Probing galaxy evolution, the dark Universe, and cosmic magnetism with a deep 1000 hour Jansky VLA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Chiles Con Pol Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We recently started a 1000 hour campaign to observe 0.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field in full polarization continuum at 1.4 GHz with the Jansky VLA, as part of a joint program with the spectral line COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES). When complete, we expect our CHILES Continuum Polarization (CHILES Con Pol) survey to reach an unprecedented SKA-era sensitivity of 0.7 uJy per 4 arcsecond FWHM beam. Here we present the key goals of CHILES Con Pol, which are to (i) produce a source catalog of legacy value to the astronomical community, (ii) measure differential source counts in total intensity, linear polarization, and circular polarization in order to constrain the redshift and luminosity distributions of source populations, (iii) perform a novel weak lensing study using radio polarization as an indicator of intrinsic alignment to better study dark energy and dark matter, and (iv) probe the unknown origin of cosmic magnetism by measuring the strength and structure of intergalactic magnetic fields in the filaments of large scale structure. The CHILES Con Pol source catalog will be a useful resource for upcoming wide-field surveys by acting as a training set for machine learning algorithms, which can then be used to identify and classify radio sources in regions lacking deep multiwavelength coverage.

  16. ESO imaging survey: infrared deep public survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, L. F.; Miralles, J.-M.; da Costa, L.; Madejsky, R.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Mignano, A.; Arnouts, S.; Benoist, C.; Dietrich, J. P.; Slijkhuis, R.; Zaggia, S.

    2006-09-01

    This paper is part of the series presenting the final results obtained by the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) project. It presents new J and Ks data obtained from observations conducted at the ESO 3.5 m New Technology Telescope (NTT) using the SOFI camera. These data were taken as part of the Deep Public Survey (DPS) carried out by the ESO Imaging Survey program, significantly extending the earlier optical/infrared EIS-DEEP survey presented in a previous paper of this series. The DPS-IR survey comprises two observing strategies: shallow Ks observations providing nearly full coverage of pointings with complementary multi-band (in general {UBVRI}) optical data obtained using ESO's wide-field imager (WFI) and deeper J and Ks observations of the central parts of these fields. Currently, the DPS-IR survey provides a coverage of roughly 2.1 square degrees ( 300 SOFI pointings) in Ks with 0.63 square degrees to fainter magnitudes and also covered in J, over three independent regions of the sky. The goal of the present paper is to briefly describe the observations, the data reduction procedures, and to present the final survey products which include fully calibrated pixel-maps and catalogs extracted from them. The astrometric solution with an estimated accuracy of ⪉0.15 arcsec is based on the USNO catalog and limited only by the accuracy of the reference catalog. The final stacked images presented here number 89 and 272, in J and K_s, respectively, the latter reflecting the larger surveyed area. The J and Ks images were taken with a median seeing of 0.77 arcsec and 0.8 arcsec. The images reach a median 5σ limiting magnitude of JAB˜23.06 as measured within an aperture of 2´´, while the corresponding limiting magnitude in KsAB is 21.41 and 22.16 mag for the shallow and deep strategies. Although some spatial variation due to varying observing conditions is observed, overall the observed limiting magnitudes are consistent with those originally proposed. The quality of the data

  17. Deep multicolor surveys of the galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szokoly, Gyula Pal

    1999-10-01

    I present various surveys that benefit from the tremendous improvements in observational astronomy in recent years and I develop new techniques to analyze data obtained in these new generation of surveys. In participation of upcoming, very deep near-infrared galaxy surveys, I constructed a survey aimed at determining the near-infrared luminosity function of galaxies. The evolutionary effects are much weaker at the red end of the atmospheric window ranging from the near- ultraviolet to about 2.2 μ m than in the optical and UV bands, as the infrared light coming from a galaxy is dominated by the old stellar population, while optical luminosity is strongly affected by the star formation history of galaxies. Measuring the luminosity function of galaxies is essential to interpret future surveys. Utilizing my deep, large area, multi-color optical galaxy survey, I studied the structure evolution of the Universe on cosmologically relevant scales. The multicolor nature of the survey (B, V, R and I bands) made it possible to estimate the radial distance to a very large number of galaxies very efficiently. Using these photometric redshifts, one can reduce the effects of galaxy evolution by analyzing galaxies at roughly the same redshift (lookback time). Due to the large area (about 1.5 square degrees) and very faint limiting magnitude (I = 23.8), structure evolution can be studied with a very high precision. I also propose a new object detection technique to replace traditional methods that use a single band or an arbitrarily co-added image. Our new technique uses all available bands of a survey and provides a nearly optimal way to take advantage of all the information available. We demonstrate the strength of this technique using the Hubble Deep Field, where we show that we can extend the detection limit significantly. We also show that this method can identify a significant number of objects that traditional techniques usually can not detect. Finally I propose a new

  18. The MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) Survey: Rest-frame Optical Spectroscopy for ~1500 H-selected Galaxies at 1.37 < z < 3.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriek, Mariska; Shapley, Alice E.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Siana, Brian; Coil, Alison L.; Mobasher, Bahram; Freeman, William R.; de Groot, Laura; Price, Sedona H.; Sanders, Ryan; Shivaei, Irene; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Aird, James; Azadi, Mojegan; Kassis, Marc; Bullock, James S.; Conroy, Charlie; Davé, Romeel; Kereš, Dušan; Krumholz, Mark

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. The MOSDEF survey aims to obtain moderate-resolution (R = 3000-3650) rest-frame optical spectra (˜3700-7000 Å) for ˜1500 galaxies at 1.37≤ z≤ 3.80 in three well-studied CANDELS fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-N. Targets are selected in three redshift intervals: 1.37≤ z≤ 1.70, 2.09≤ z≤ 2.61, and 2.95≤ z≤ 3.80, down to fixed {H}{AB} (F160W) magnitudes of 24.0, 24.5, and 25.0, respectively, using the photometric and spectroscopic catalogs from the 3D-HST survey. We target both strong nebular emission lines (e.g., [O ii] λ λ 3727,3730, Hβ, [O iii] λ λ 4960,5008, Hα, [N ii] λ λ 6550,6585, and [S ii] λ λ 6718,6733) and stellar continuum and absorption features (e.g., Balmer lines, Ca-ii H and K, Mgb, 4000 Å break). Here we present an overview of our survey, the observational strategy, the data reduction and analysis, and the sample characteristics based on spectra obtained during the first 24 nights. To date, we have completed 21 masks, obtaining spectra for 591 galaxies. For ˜80% of the targets we derive a robust redshift from either emission or absorption lines. In addition, we confirm 55 additional galaxies, which were serendipitously detected. The MOSDEF galaxy sample includes unobscured star-forming, dusty star-forming, and quiescent galaxies and spans a wide range in stellar mass (˜ {10}9-{10}11.5 {M}⊙ ) and star formation rate (˜ {10}0-{10}3 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1). The spectroscopically confirmed sample is roughly representative of an H-band limited galaxy sample at these redshifts. With its large sample size, broad diversity in galaxy properties, and wealth of available ancillary data, MOSDEF will transform our understanding of the stellar, gaseous, metal, dust, and black hole content of galaxies during the time when the universe was most active.

  19. SEDS: The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.; SEDS Team

    2009-05-01

    The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) will provide a unique opportunity to obtain the first complete census of the assembly of stellar mass and black holes as a function of cosmic time back to the era of reionization, yielding unique information on galaxy formation in the early Universe. The survey will also measure galaxy clustering over a wide redshift range, which will provide the critical link between galaxies and their dark matter halos and critical tests of models of early star formation. SEDS will achieve these goals by tracing the stellar mass growth in mass-selected samples of galaxies via their broadband spectral energy distributions. The baseline proposal is an unbiased survey with 12 hours/pointing at 3.6 and 4.5 microns over five well-studied fields of 0.90 square degree total. We expect to find (a) >10,000 galaxies at z = 4--6 (including 100 galaxies at z = 6), reaching galaxies down to 5 x 109 Msun at z = 6, necessary to robustly measure M* at that redshift, i.e., the galaxies that dominate the global stellar mass density, and (b) >100 massive galaxies at z = 7, which will firmly anchor the high mass end of the early galaxy populations and provide targets bright enough for future spectroscopic follow-up with 20--30 meter telescopes, JWST, and ALMA. The proposed five-field deep survey will enable several secondary science objectives. These include: (1) galaxy evolution in the redshift range z 1--4, (2) mid-infrared variability for AGN identification, and (3) measurement of the cosmic infrared background spatial fluctuations. SEDS is the most efficient and most highly optimized program that we can imagine to achieve core scientific goals of the warm mission and is a unique program that will leave an important legacy for years to come.

  20. Evidence of a fast evolution of the UV luminosity function beyond redshift 6 from a deep HAWK-I survey of the GOODS-S field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Boutsia, K.; Grazian, A.; Pentericci, L.; Bouwens, R.; Dickinson, M.; Giavalisco, M.; Santini, P.; Cristiani, S.; Fiore, F.; Gallozzi, S.; Giallongo, E.; Maiolino, R.; Mannucci, F.; Menci, N.; Moorwood, A.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Renzini, A.; Rosati, P.; Salimbeni, S.; Testa, V.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: We perform a deep search for galaxies in the redshift range 6.5≤ z≤ 7.5, to measure the evolution of the number density of luminous galaxies in this redshift range and derive useful constraints on the evolution of their luminosity function. Methods: We present here the first results of an ESO Large Programme, which exploits the unique combination of area and sensitivity provided in the near-IR by the camera Hawk-I at the VLT. We have obtained two Hawk-I pointings on the GOODS South field for a total of ˜32 observing hours, covering ˜90 arcmin^2. The images reach Y=26.7 mag for the two fields. We used public ACS images in the z band to select z-dropout galaxies with the colour criteria Z-Y≥ 1, Y-J<1.5, and Y-K<2. The other public data in the UBVRIJK bands are used to reject possible low redshift interlopers. The output has been compared with extensive Monte Carlo simulations to quantify the observational effects of our selection criteria, as well as the effects of photometric errors. Results: We detect 7 high-quality candidates in the magnitude range Y=25.5-26.7. This interval samples the critical range for M_* at z>6 (M1500≃ -19.5 to -21.5). After accounting for the expected incompleteness, we rule out a luminosity function constant from z=6 to z=7 at a 99% confidence level, even including the effects of cosmic variance. For galaxies brighter than M1500=-19.0, we derive a luminosity density ρ_UV= 1.5+2.0-0.9 × 1025 erg s-1 Hz^{-1 Mpc-3}, implying a decrease by a factor 3.5 from z=6 to z≃ 6.8. On the basis of our findings, we make predictions for the surface densities expected in future surveys, based on ULTRA-VISTA, HST-WFC3, or JWST-NIRCam, evaluating the best observational strategy to maximise their impact.

  1. The Gemini Deep Planet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Marois, Christian; Nadeau, Daniel; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Roche, Patrick F.; Rigaut, François; Graham, James R.; Jayawardhana, Ray; Johnstone, Doug; Kalas, Paul G.; Macintosh, Bruce; Racine, René

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of the Gemini Deep Planet Survey, a near-infrared adaptive optics search for giant planets and brown dwarfs around 85 nearby young stars. The observations were obtained with the Altair adaptive optics system at the Gemini North telescope, and angular differential imaging was used to suppress the speckle noise of the central star. Typically, the observations are sensitive to angular separations beyond 0.5" with 5 σ contrast sensitivities in magnitude difference at 1.6 μm of 9.5 at 0.5", 12.9 at 1", 15.0 at 2", and 16.5 at 5". These sensitivities are sufficient to detect planets more massive than 2 MJ with a projected separation in the range 40-200 AU around a typical target. Second-epoch observations of 48 stars with candidates (out of 54) have confirmed that all candidates are unrelated background stars. A detailed statistical analysis of the survey results is presented. Assuming a planet mass distribution dn/dm~m-1.2 and a semimajor-axis distribution dn/da~a-1, the 95% credible upper limits on the fraction of stars with at least one planet of mass 0.5-13 MJ are 0.28 for the range 10-25 AU, 0.13 for 25-50 AU, and 0.093 for 50-250 AU; this result is weakly dependent on the semimajor-axis distribution power-law index. The 95% credible interval for the fraction of stars with at least one brown dwarf companion having a semimajor axis in the range 25-250 AU is 0.019+0.083-0.015, irrespective of any assumption on the mass and semimajor-axis distributions. The observations made as part of this survey have resolved the stars HD 14802, HD 166181, and HD 213845 into binaries for the first time. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (United Kingdom), the National

  2. The BMW Deep X-ray Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Guzzo, L.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Lazzati, D.; Longhetti, M.; Molinari, E.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.; dell'Antonio, I.

    We describe the main features of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep optical CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys and will provide us with a fully independent probe of the evolution of the cluster abundance, in addition to significantly increasing the number of clusters known at z>0.6.

  3. SEDS: The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni; Willner, Steven; Arendt, Rick; Ashby, Matt; Barmby, Pauline; Bell, Eric; Bouwens, Rychard; Cattaneo, Andrea; Cox, Thomas J.; Croton, Darren; Dave, Romeel; Dunlop, James; Egami, Eiichi; Faber, Sandy; Finlator, Kristian; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hernquist, Lars; Hora, Joseph; Huang, Jiasheng; Illingworth, Garth; Kashlinsky, Alexander; Koekemoer, Anton; Koo, David; Labbe, Ivo; Lai, Kamson; Li, Yuexing; Lin, Lihwai; Mather, John; Mo, Houjun; Moseley, Harvey; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffrey; Noeske, Kai; Ouchi, Masami; Papovich, Casey; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robertson, Brant; Sarajedini, Vicki; Simard, Luc; Smith, Howard; Wechsler, Risa; Weiner, Ben; Wilson, Gillian; Wuyts, Stijn; Yamada, Toru; Yan, Haojing; van der Wel, Arjen

    2008-12-01

    The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) will provide a unique opportunity to obtain the first complete census of the assembly of stellar mass and black holes as a function of cosmic time back to the era of reionization, yielding unique information on galaxy formation in the early UniverseE The survey will also measure galaxy clustering over a wide redshift range, which will provide the critical link between galaxies and their dark matter halos and critical tests of models of early star formation. SEDS will achieve these goals by tracing the stellar mass growth in mass-selected samples of galaxies via their broadband spectral energy distributions. The baseline proposal is an unbiased survey with 12 hours/pointing at 3.6 and 4.5 microns over five well-studied fields of 0.90 square degree total. We expect to find (a) >10,000 galaxies at z D 4--6 (including ~1000 galaxies at z D 6), reaching galaxies down to ~5 x 10^9 Msun at z D 6, necessary to robustly measure M* at that redshift, i.e., the galaxies that dominate the global stellar mass density, and (b) >100 massive galaxies at z D 7, which will firmly anchor the high mass end of the early galaxy populations and provide targets bright enough for future spectroscopic follow-up with 20--30 meter telescopes, JWST, and ALMA. The proposed five-field deep survey will enable several secondary science objectives. These include: (1) galaxy evolution in the redshift range z ~ 1--4, (2) AGN variability, and (3) measurement of the cosmic infrared background spatial fluctuations. SEDS is the most efficient and most highly optimized program that we can imagine to achieve core scientific goals of the warm mission. The opportunity to probe the Universe so widely and at such a depth at mid-IR wavelengths will not come again in the foreseeable future. SEDS is a unique program that will leave an important legacy for years to come.

  4. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. VIII. EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS IN GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kajisawa, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Yamada, T.; Akiyama, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Yoshikawa, T.; Onodera, M.

    2010-11-01

    We study the evolution of star formation activity of galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3.5 as a function of stellar mass, using very deep NIR data taken with the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope in the GOODS-North region. The NIR imaging data reach K{approx} 23-24 Vega magnitude and they allow us to construct a nearly stellar-mass-limited sample down to {approx}10{sup 9.5-10} M{sub sun} even at z {approx} 3. We estimated star formation rates (SFRs) of the sample with two indicators, namely, the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m flux and the rest-frame 2800 A luminosity. The SFR distribution at a fixed M{sub star} shifts to higher values with increasing redshift at 0.5 < z < 3.5. More massive galaxies show stronger evolution of SFR at z {approx}> 1. We found galaxies at 2.5 < z < 3.5 show a bimodality in their SSFR distribution, which can be divided into two populations by a constant SSFR of {approx}2 Gyr{sup -1}. Galaxies in the low-SSFR group have SSFRs of {approx}0.5-1.0 Gyr{sup -1}, while the high-SSFR population shows {approx}10 Gyr{sup -1}. The cosmic SFR density (SFRD) is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11} M{sub sun} at 0.5 < z < 3.5, while the contribution of massive galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 11-11.5} M{sub sun} shows a strong evolution at z>1 and becomes significant at z {approx} 3, especially in the case with the SFR based on MIPS 24 {mu}m. In galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11.5} M{sub sun}, those with a relatively narrow range of SSFR ({approx}<1 dex) dominates the cosmic SFRD at 0.5 < z < 3.5. The SSFR of galaxies that dominate the SFRD systematically increases with redshift. At 2.5 < z < 3.5, the high-SSFR population, which is relatively small in number, dominates the SFRD. Major star formation in the universe at higher redshift seems to be associated with a more rapid growth of stellar mass of galaxies.

  5. Pan-STARRS-1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System-1 (Pan-STARRS-1, PS1) has been in full science operation since Spring 2010 and concluded the observing program for the PS1 Science Consortium (PS1SC) in early 2014. The Medium Deep Survey (MDS) component of the program regularly visited 10 fields (~7 sq. deg. each) with significant multi-wavelength overlap from previous and concurrent surveys (e.g. SDSS, DEEP2, CDFS, COSMOS, GALEX) for 25% of the total time allocation. The cadence generally includes the g,r,i,z filters for a MDS field every 3 days over the 6-8 month season the field is visible, with the y filter done primarily during bright time. The nightly stacks of eight exposures typically reach depths of r,i~23.5 mag. Development work continued to improve the single exposure processing though to deep stacks during the transient event discovery and other science consortium programs over the course of the survey, the culmination of those improvements being applied in a more uniformly reprocessed dataset used for the public data release. A summary of the MDS public data release products will be presented.For details on PS1 and the Science Collaboration, visit http://ps1sc.org/

  6. Microclimate controls on weathering: Insights into deep critical zone evolution from seismic refraction surveys in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, N.; Kirby, E.; Nyblade, A.; Brantley, S. L.; Clarke, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of regolith is fundamental to the functioning and structure of the critical zone - the physically and chemically altered material formed from in situ parent bedrock that is available for transport. Understanding how regolith production and transport respond to perturbations in climate and/or tectonic forcing remains a first-order question. At the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHO), high resolution LiDAR-derived topographic data and depths to hand auger refusal reveal a systematic asymmetry in hillslope gradient and mobile regolith thickness; both are greater on north-facing hillslopes. Hydrologic and geochemical studies at the SSHO also suggest asymmetric sediment transport, fluid flow, and mineral weathering with respect to hillslope aspect. Here, we combine shallow seismic surveys completed along 4 hillslope transects (2 north-facing and 2-south facing), 2 ridgetops transects, and subsurface observations in boreholes to investigate the role of climate in inducing fracturing and priming the development of the observed asymmetry. Comparisons of shallow p-wave velocities with borehole and pit observations lead us to hypothesize the presence of three distinct layers at SSHO: 1) a deep, high velocity layer that is consistent with unweathered shale bedrock; 2) an intermediate velocity layer that is consistent with fractured and chemically altered bedrock which overlies unaltered bedrock, and 3) a shallow, slow velocity layer that is consistent with mobile material or shallow soil. Shallow p-wave velocity profiles suggest differences in thickness for both the mobile and immobile regolith material with respect to aspect. Patterns of p-wave velocities with depth are consistent with patterns of fracture densities observed in boreholes and with predictive cracking intensity models related to frost action. The models and data are consistent with climate as a primary driver for the development of asymmetry in the subsurface architecture at

  7. DeepSurveyCam--A Deep Ocean Optical Mapping System.

    PubMed

    Kwasnitschka, Tom; Köser, Kevin; Sticklus, Jan; Rothenbeck, Marcel; Weiß, Tim; Wenzlaff, Emanuel; Schoening, Timm; Triebe, Lars; Steinführer, Anja; Devey, Colin; Greinert, Jens

    2016-01-28

    Underwater photogrammetry and in particular systematic visual surveys of the deep sea are by far less developed than similar techniques on land or in space. The main challenges are the rough conditions with extremely high pressure, the accessibility of target areas (container and ship deployment of robust sensors, then diving for hours to the ocean floor), and the limitations of localization technologies (no GPS). The absence of natural light complicates energy budget considerations for deep diving flash-equipped drones. Refraction effects influence geometric image formation considerations with respect to field of view and focus, while attenuation and scattering degrade the radiometric image quality and limit the effective visibility. As an improvement on the stated issues, we present an AUV-based optical system intended for autonomous visual mapping of large areas of the seafloor (square kilometers) in up to 6000 m water depth. We compare it to existing systems and discuss tradeoffs such as resolution vs. mapped area and show results from a recent deployment with 90,000 mapped square meters of deep ocean floor.

  8. DeepSurveyCam—A Deep Ocean Optical Mapping System

    PubMed Central

    Kwasnitschka, Tom; Köser, Kevin; Sticklus, Jan; Rothenbeck, Marcel; Weiß, Tim; Wenzlaff, Emanuel; Schoening, Timm; Triebe, Lars; Steinführer, Anja; Devey, Colin; Greinert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Underwater photogrammetry and in particular systematic visual surveys of the deep sea are by far less developed than similar techniques on land or in space. The main challenges are the rough conditions with extremely high pressure, the accessibility of target areas (container and ship deployment of robust sensors, then diving for hours to the ocean floor), and the limitations of localization technologies (no GPS). The absence of natural light complicates energy budget considerations for deep diving flash-equipped drones. Refraction effects influence geometric image formation considerations with respect to field of view and focus, while attenuation and scattering degrade the radiometric image quality and limit the effective visibility. As an improvement on the stated issues, we present an AUV-based optical system intended for autonomous visual mapping of large areas of the seafloor (square kilometers) in up to 6000 m water depth. We compare it to existing systems and discuss tradeoffs such as resolution vs. mapped area and show results from a recent deployment with 90,000 mapped square meters of deep ocean floor. PMID:26828495

  9. DeepSurveyCam--A Deep Ocean Optical Mapping System.

    PubMed

    Kwasnitschka, Tom; Köser, Kevin; Sticklus, Jan; Rothenbeck, Marcel; Weiß, Tim; Wenzlaff, Emanuel; Schoening, Timm; Triebe, Lars; Steinführer, Anja; Devey, Colin; Greinert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Underwater photogrammetry and in particular systematic visual surveys of the deep sea are by far less developed than similar techniques on land or in space. The main challenges are the rough conditions with extremely high pressure, the accessibility of target areas (container and ship deployment of robust sensors, then diving for hours to the ocean floor), and the limitations of localization technologies (no GPS). The absence of natural light complicates energy budget considerations for deep diving flash-equipped drones. Refraction effects influence geometric image formation considerations with respect to field of view and focus, while attenuation and scattering degrade the radiometric image quality and limit the effective visibility. As an improvement on the stated issues, we present an AUV-based optical system intended for autonomous visual mapping of large areas of the seafloor (square kilometers) in up to 6000 m water depth. We compare it to existing systems and discuss tradeoffs such as resolution vs. mapped area and show results from a recent deployment with 90,000 mapped square meters of deep ocean floor. PMID:26828495

  10. Pan-STARRS-1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Mark; PS1-IPP Team, PS1 Science Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System-1 (Pan-STARRS-1, PS1) has been in full operation since Spring 2010 and concluded the PS1 Science Consortium (PS1SC) observational program in early 2014. The Medium Deep Survey (MDS) component of the program, allocated 25% of the time, regularly visited 10 fields (~7 sq. deg. each) with significant multi-wavelength overlap from previous and concurrent surveys (e.g. SDSS, DEEP2, CDFS, COSMOS, GALEX). The cadence generally includes the g,r,i,z filters for a MDS field every 3 days with a nightly stack depth of r,i~23.5 mag and the y filter primarily during bright time over the 6-8 month season the field is visible. While regularly producing data for the transient event discovery and science consortium programs, development work continued to improve the single exposures though production of deep stacks for reprocessing into the final and public release. The data products, to be publicly available after the post-observing proprietary period, will be summarized.For details on PS1 and the Science Collaboration, visit http://ps1sc.org/

  11. ISO deep far-infrared survey in the ``Lockman Hole". II. Power spectrum analysis: evidence of a strong evolution in number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhara, H.; Kawara, K.; Sato, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Okuda, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Sofue, Y.; Wakamatsu, K.; Cowie, L. L.; Joseph, R. D.; Sanders, D. B.

    2000-09-01

    We investigate the characteristics of FIR brightness fluctuations at 90 mu m and 170 mu m in the Lockman Hole, which were surveyed with ISOPHOT aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). We first calculated the angular correlation function of each field and then its Fourier transform (the angular Power Spectral Density: PSD) over the spatial frequency range of f=0.05-1 arcmin-1. The PSDs are found to be rather flat at low spatial frequencies (f <= 0.1 arcmin-1), slowly decreasing toward higher frequencies. These spectra are unlike the power-law ones seen in the IR cirrus fluctuations, and are well explained by randomly distributed point sources. Furthermore, point-to-point comparison between 90 mu m and 170 mu m brightness shows a linear correlation between them, and the slope of the linear fit is much shallower than that expected from the IR cirrus color, and is consistent with the color of galaxies at low or moderate redshift (z<1). We conclude that the brightness fluctuations in the Lockman Hole are not caused by the IR cirrus, but are most likely due to faint star-forming galaxies. We also give the constraints on the galaxy number counts down to 35 mJy at 90 mu m and 60 mJy at 170 mu m, which indicate the existence of a strong evolution down to these fluxes in the counts. The galaxies responsible for the fluctuations also significantly contribute to the cosmic infrared background radiation. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA. The ISOPHOT data presented in this paper was reduced using PIA, which is a joint development by ESA Astrophysics Division and the ISOPHOT consortium.

  12. Accelerated evolution of the Lyα luminosity function at z ≳ 7 revealed by the Subaru ultra-deep survey for Lyα emitters at z = 7.3

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Naito, Yoshiaki; Momose, Rieko; Yuma, Suraphong; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Furusawa, Hisanori; Iye, Masanori

    2014-12-10

    We present the ultra-deep Subaru narrowband imaging survey for Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 7.3 in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) and Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) fields (∼0.5 deg{sup 2}) with a total integration time of 106 hr. Exploiting our new sharp bandwidth filter, NB101, installed on the Suprime-Cam, we have reached L(Lyα) = 2.4 × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1} (5σ) for z = 7.3 LAEs, about four times deeper than previous Subaru z ≳ 7 studies, which allows us to reliably investigate the evolution of the Lyα luminosity function (LF) for the first time down to the luminosity limit same as those of Subaru z = 3.1-6.6 LAE samples. Surprisingly, we only find three and four LAEs in the SXDS and COSMOS fields, respectively, while one expects a total of ∼65 LAEs by our survey in the case of no Lyα LF evolution from z = 6.6 to 7.3. We identify a decrease of the Lyα LF from z = 6.6 to 7.3 at the >90% confidence level from our z = 7.3 Lyα LF with the best-fit Schechter parameters of L{sub Lyα}{sup ∗}=2.7{sub −1.2}{sup +8.0}×10{sup 42} erg s{sup −1} and ϕ{sup ∗}=3.7{sub −3.3}{sup +17.6}×10{sup −4} Mpc{sup −3} for a fixed α = –1.5. Moreover, the evolution of the Lyα LF is clearly accelerated at z > 6.6 beyond the measurement uncertainties including cosmic variance. Because no such accelerated evolution of the UV-continuum LF or the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) is found at z ∼ 7, but suggested only at z > 8, this accelerated Lyα LF evolution is explained by physical mechanisms different from a pure SFR decrease but related to the Lyα production and escape in the process of cosmic reionization. Because a simple accelerating increase of intergalactic medium neutral hydrogen absorbing Lyα cannot be reconciled with Thomson scattering of optical depth measurements from WMAP and Planck, our findings may support new physical pictures suggested by recent theoretical studies, such as the existence of HI clumpy clouds within

  13. The Canada-France Deep Fields Photometric Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodwin, M.; Lilly, S. J.; McCracken, H. J.; Foucaud, S.; Le Fèvre, O.; Crampton, D.

    2002-12-01

    The Canada-France Deep Fields is a UBVRIZ imaging survey covering 1 deg2 to I ~ 25. A template-fitting photometric redshift algorithm has been developed and rigorously tested, producing redshifts with a dispersion of Δ z/(1+z) ~ 0.08 for galaxies at 0Deep Field. Statistically motivated confidence intervals are computed taking into account the unique redshift likelihood function for each galaxy. Previous results from the CFDF include measurements of the angular correlation function of galaxies to I ~ 25 (McCracken et al. 2001, A&A, 376, 756) and of colour-selected Lyman Break Galaxies (Foucaud et al. 2002, submitted). The CFDF photometric redshift survey, calibrated with CFRS spectroscopy, was designed to study galaxy evolution since z ~ 1.3. With the full 3-D spatial information, real-space clustering and luminosity density evolution will be quantified over this redshift range. In this talk I will present the first results from the photometric redshift component of the survey.

  14. SEDS: The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Survey Design, Photometry, and Deep IRAC Source Counts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Arendt, A.; Barmby, P.; Barro, G; Bell, E. F.; Bouwens, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Croton, D.; Dave, R.; Dunlop, J. S.; Egami, E.; Faber, S.; Finlator, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hernquist, L.; Hora, J. L.; Illingworth, G.; Kashlinsky, A; Koekmoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Moseley, H.

    2013-01-01

    The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) is a very deep infrared survey within five well-known extragalactic science fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the Hubble Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. SEDS covers a total area of 1.46 deg(exp 2) to a depth of 26 AB mag (3sigma) in both of the warm Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands at 3.6 and 4.5 micron. Because of its uniform depth of coverage in so many widely-separated fields, SEDS is subject to roughly 25% smaller errors due to cosmic variance than a single-field survey of the same size. SEDS was designed to detect and characterize galaxies from intermediate to high redshifts (z = 2-7) with a built-in means of assessing the impact of cosmic variance on the individual fields. Because the full SEDS depth was accumulated in at least three separate visits to each field, typically with six-month intervals between visits, SEDS also furnishes an opportunity to assess the infrared variability of faint objects. This paper describes the SEDS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. Deep IRAC counts for the more than 300,000 galaxies detected by SEDS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. Discrete IRAC sources contribute 5.6 +/- 1.0 and 4.4 +/- 0.8 nW / square m/sr at 3.6 and 4.5 micron to the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB). IRAC sources cannot contribute more than half of the total CIB flux estimated from DIRBE data. Barring an unexpected error in the DIRBE flux estimates, half the CIB flux must therefore come from a diffuse component.

  15. Physical properties of galaxies and their evolution in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. II. Extending the mass-metallicity relation to the range z ≈ 0.89-1.24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Montero, E.; Contini, T.; Lamareille, F.; Brinchmann, J.; Walcher, C. J.; Charlot, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Radovich, M.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.

    2009-02-01

    Aims: We present a continuation of our study about the relation between stellar mass and gas-phase metallicity in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS). In this work we extend the determination of metallicities up to redshift ≈1.24 for a sample of 42 star-forming galaxies with a mean redshift value of 0.99. Methods: For a selected sample of emission-line galaxies, we use both diagnostic diagrams and empirical calibrations based on [Oii] emission lines along with the empirical relation between the intensities of the [Oiii] and [Neiii] emission lines and the theoretical ratios between Balmer recombination emission lines to identify star-forming galaxies and to derive their metallicities. We derive stellar masses by fitting the whole spectral energy distribution with a set of stellar population synthesis models. Results: These new methods allow us to extend the mass-metallicity relation to higher redshift. We show that the metallicity determinations are consistent with more established strong-line methods. Taken together this allows us to study the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation up to z ≈ 1.24 with good control of systematic uncertainties. We find an evolution with redshift of the average metallicity of galaxies very similar to those reported in the literature: for a given stellar mass, galaxies at z ~ 1 have, on average, a metallicity ~ 0.3 dex lower than galaxies in the local universe. However we do not see any significant metallicity evolution between redshifts z ~ 0.7 (Paper I) and z ~ 1.0 (this paper). We find also the same flattening of the mass-metallicity relation for the most massive galaxies as reported in Paper I at lower redshifts, but again no apparent evolution of the slope is seen between z ~ 0.7 and z ~ 1.0. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, program 070.A-9007, and on data obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the CNRS in France, CNRC in Canada and the

  16. An ALMA survey of submillimeter galaxies in the extended Chandra deep field south: The redshift distribution and evolution of submillimeter galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J. M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Thomson, A. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Bertoldi, F.; Karim, A.; De Breuck, C.; Chapman, S. C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Da Cunha, E.; Hodge, J. A.; Schinnerer, E.; Dannerbauer, H.; Greve, T. R.; Ivison, R. J.; Knudsen, K. K.; Poggianti, B. M.; and others

    2014-06-20

    We present the first photometric redshift distribution for a large sample of 870 μm submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with robust identifications based on observations with ALMA. In our analysis we consider 96 SMGs in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, 77 of which have 4-19 band photometry. We model the SEDs for these 77 SMGs, deriving a median photometric redshift of z {sub phot} = 2.3 ± 0.1. The remaining 19 SMGs have insufficient photometry to derive photometric redshifts, but a stacking analysis of Herschel observations confirms they are not spurious. Assuming that these SMGs have an absolute H-band magnitude distribution comparable to that of a complete sample of z ∼ 1-2 SMGs, we demonstrate that they lie at slightly higher redshifts, raising the median redshift for SMGs to z {sub phot} = 2.5 ± 0.2. Critically we show that the proportion of galaxies undergoing an SMG-like phase at z ≥ 3 is at most 35% ± 5% of the total population. We derive a median stellar mass of M {sub *} = (8 ± 1) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, although there are systematic uncertainties of up to 5 × for individual sources. Assuming that the star formation activity in SMGs has a timescale of ∼100 Myr, we show that their descendants at z ∼ 0 would have a space density and M{sub H} distribution that are in good agreement with those of local ellipticals. In addition, the inferred mass-weighted ages of the local ellipticals broadly agree with the look-back times of the SMG events. Taken together, these results are consistent with a simple model that identifies SMGs as events that form most of the stars seen in the majority of luminous elliptical galaxies at the present day.

  17. The BMW Deep X-Ray Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Luigi; Moretti, Alberto; Campana, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; Dell'Antonio, Ian; Lazzati, Davide; Longhetti, Marcella; Molinari, Emilio; Panzera, Maria Rosa; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    We briely describe the main features and first results of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys.

  18. The Gemini Deep Planet Survey - GDPS

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R; Marois, C; Nadeau, D; Oppenheimer, B R; Roche, P F; Rigaut, F; Graham, J R; Jayawardhana, R; Johnstone, D; Kalas, P G; Macintosh, B; Racine, R

    2007-06-01

    We present the results of the Gemini Deep Planet Survey, a near-infrared adaptive optics search for giant planets and brown dwarfs around nearby young stars. The observations were obtained with the Altair adaptive optics system at the Gemini North telescope and angular differential imaging was used to suppress the speckle noise of the central star. Detection limits for the 85 stars observed are presented, along with a list of all faint point sources detected around them. Typically, the observations are sensitive to angular separations beyond 0.5-inch with 5{sigma} contrast sensitivities in magnitude difference at 1.6 {micro}m of 9.6 at 0.5-inch, 12.9 at 1-inch, 15 at 2-inch, and 16.6 at 5-inch. For the typical target of the survey, a 100 Myr old K0 star located 22 pc from the Sun, the observations are sensitive enough to detect planets more massive than 2 M{sub Jup} with a projected separation in the range 40-200 AU. Depending on the age, spectral type, and distance of the target stars, the minimum mass that could be detected with our observations can be {approx}1 M{sub Jup}. Second epoch observations of 48 stars with candidates (out of 54) have confirmed that all candidates are unrelated background stars. A detailed statistical analysis of the survey results, which provide upper limits on the fractions of stars with giant planet or low mass brown dwarf companions, is presented. Assuming a planet mass distribution dn/dm {proportional_to} m{sup -1.2} and a semi-major axis distribution dn/da {proportional_to} a{sup -1}, the upper limits on the fraction of stars with at least one planet of mass 0.5-13 M{sub Jup} are 0.29 for the range 10-25 AU, 0.13 for 25-50 AU, and 0.09 for 50-250 AU, with a 95% confidence level; this result is weakly dependent on the semi-major axis distribution power-law index. Without making any assumption on the mass and semi-major axis distributions, the fraction of stars with at least one brown dwarf companion having a semi-major axis in the

  19. Deep Surveys for Inner Oort Cloud Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Chadwick A.; Tholen, David J.; Sheppard, Scott S.

    2015-11-01

    We are undertaking two deep wide-field surveys to discover extremely distant solar system objects. While our target solar system population is the Inner Oort Cloud objects such as 2012 VP113 and Sedna, we are also sensitive to other populations with high perihelia such as the Scattered Kuiper Belt Objects and the highest perihelion Kuiper Belt Objects which have similar arguments of perihelion to the Inner Oort Cloud Objects. These unusual populations are thought to consist primarily of highly eccentric objects which spend most of their orbits hundreds or thousands of AU from the sun. Large aperture telescopes are needed to reach the faintness limits, red magnitudes of 23.5 to 25, required for detection of even the large members of the population. In addition, wide fields of view are also needed since the sky density of the detectable members of the populations approach 1 in 100 square degrees even with large telescopes.Our primary discovery instruments are the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4 meter Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on Subaru Telescope at Maunakea. Each of these instruments has a tremendously wide field of view considering the size of the telescope they are mounted on. DECam has a field of view of about 3 square degrees and HSC has a field of view of about 1.75 square degrees. We will present our survey progress in terms of sky area covered and new objects discovered and highlight some of our more interesting findings.

  20. Evolution: Ocean Models Reveal Life in Deep Seas.

    PubMed

    Eizaguirre, Christophe

    2016-09-26

    Even though the deep sea represents the largest area in the world, evolution of species from those environments remains largely unstudied. A series of recent papers indicate that combining molecular tools with biophysical models can help us resolve some of these deep mysteries.

  1. Evolution: Ocean Models Reveal Life in Deep Seas.

    PubMed

    Eizaguirre, Christophe

    2016-09-26

    Even though the deep sea represents the largest area in the world, evolution of species from those environments remains largely unstudied. A series of recent papers indicate that combining molecular tools with biophysical models can help us resolve some of these deep mysteries. PMID:27676306

  2. Site Characterization of Deep Bedrock with Integrated Geophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J.; Kim, C.; Eun, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    In order to utilize the deep underground storage facility stable for a long time, precise site characterization is required before its construction. Various kinds of geophysical survey as well as drilling and geological survey should be used to know the status of deep bedrock. A research had been conducted to make the site characterization of deep bedrock for several years, and to achieve its purpose, integrated geophysical survey were applied to the test area which had gneiss bedrock. DC resistivity survey for six surficial profiles was conducted to find the appropriate location of drilling survey. Cross-hole/surface-to-hole resistivity tomography survey and borehole reflection radar survey were applied to the drill holes after its installation completed. Three bore holes of which length was 500 meter were drilled to investigate the status of deep bedrock, and cross-hole tomography survey was applied between two boreholes among these. Also borehole reflection radar survey was conducted to another two boreholes. Deep seated fracture zones which were not identified with the surficial geological and resistivity survey were found through the analysis of tomography section. Fracture zones were consisted of steep slope fault and these were also identified with the result of borehole radar section. After the basic survey was completed, one of three holes was extended to the depth of 1 km. Radar reflection survey which was only available to the deep drill-hole was applied. Because steel casing was installed to the depth of 750 m to stabilize the extended drill-hole, resistivity method was not available and borehole radar reflection method was only available among the geophysical method used in this research. Through results of radar reflection survey, several fracture zones were identified for the newly extended section of drill hole and some of those facture has relatively large size and passed through the bore hole.

  3. Deep insight from simple models of evolution.

    PubMed

    Schwefel, Hans-Paul

    2002-01-01

    On one hand, people admire the often strikingly efficient results of organic evolution. On the other hand, however, they decry mutation and selection to be a rather prodigal, inefficient trial-and-error strategy. Taking into account the parallel information processing in a heterogeneous population and sexual propagation with recombination, as well as the genetic control of the reproduction accuracy, computer simulated evolution reveals a couple of interesting, sometimes surprising, properties of nature's learning-by-doing algorithm. Survival of the fittest, Spencer's résumé of Darwin's view, turns out to be a bad advice if taken literally. Individual death, forgetting, and even regression show up to be necessary ingredients of the life game. Whether the process should be named gradualistic or punctualistic, is a matter of the observer's point of view.

  4. Origin and Evolution of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sironi, Vittorio A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly describes how the electrical stimulation, used since antiquity to modulate the nervous system, has been a fundamental tool of neurophysiologic investigation in the second half of the eighteenth century and was subsequently used by the early twentieth century, even for therapeutic purposes. In mid-twentieth century the advent of stereotactic procedures has allowed the drift from lesional to stimulating technique of deep nuclei of the brain for therapeutic purposes. In this way, deep brain stimulation (DBS) was born, that, over the last two decades, has led to positive results for the treatment of medically refractory Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. In recent years, the indications for therapeutic use of DBS have been extended to epilepsy, Tourette’s syndrome, psychiatric diseases (depression, obsessive–compulsive disorder), some kinds of headache, eating disorders, and the minimally conscious state. The potentials of the DBS for therapeutic use are fascinating, but there are still many unresolved technical and ethical problems, concerning the identification of the targets for each disease, the selection of the patients and the evaluation of the results. PMID:21887135

  5. A very deep IRAS survey at the north ecliptic pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Hacking, P. B.; Condon, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    The data from approximately 20 hours observation of the 4- to 6-square degree field surrounding the north ecliptic pole have been combined to produce a very deep IR survey at the four IRAS bands. Scans from both pointed and survey observations were included in the data analysis. At 12 and 25 microns the deep survey is limited by detector noise and is approximately 50 times deeper than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). At 60 microns the problems of source confusion and Galactic cirrus combine to limit the deep survey to approximately 12 times deeper than the PSC. These problems are so severe at 100 microns that flux values are only given for locations corresponding to sources selected at 60 microns. In all, 47 sources were detected at 12 microns, 37 at 25 microns, and 99 at 60 microns. The data-analysis procedures and the significance of the 12- and 60-micron source-count results are discussed.

  6. The WIRCam Deep Survey. II. Mass selected clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielby, R. M.; Gonzalez-Perez, V.; McCracken, H. J.; Ilbert, O.; Daddi, E.; Le Fèvre, O.; Hudelot, P.; Kneib, J.-P.; Mellier, Y.; Willott, C.

    2014-08-01

    We present an analysis of the clustering of galaxies from z ≈ 2 to the present day using the WIRCam Deep Survey (WIRDS). WIRDS combines deep optical data from the CFHTLS Deep fields with its own deep near-infrared data, providing a photometric data-set over an effective area of 2.4 deg2, from which accurate photometric redshifts and stellar masses can be estimated. We use the data to calculate the angular correlation function for galaxy samples split by star-formation activity, stellar mass and redshift. Using WIRDS with its large total area and multiple fields gives a low cosmic variance contribution to the error, which we estimate to be less than ~2.8%. Based on power-law fits, we estimate the real-space clustering for each sample, determining clustering lengths and power-law slopes. For galaxies selected by constant mass, we find that the clustering scale shows no evolution up to z ≈ 2. Splitting the galaxy sample by mass, we see a consistent trend for higher mass galaxies to have larger clustering scales at all redshifts considered. We use our results to test the galform semi-analytical model of galaxy formation and evolution. The observed trends are well matched by the model galaxies for both the redshift evolution and the mass dependence of the galaxy clustering. We split the galaxy population into passive and star-forming populations based on rest-frame dust-corrected NUV-r colours. We find that the passive galaxy populations show a significantly larger clustering scale at all redshifts than the star-forming population below masses of M⋆ ~ 1011 h-1 M⊙, showing that even at z ≈ 2 passive galaxies exist in denser environments than the bulk of the star-forming galaxy population. For star-forming galaxies with stellar masses of M⋆ ≳ 1011 h-1 M⊙, we find a clustering strength of ~8 h-1 Mpc across all redshifts, comparable to the measurements for the passive population. Additionally, for star-forming galaxies we see that clustering strength

  7. The variable sky of deep synoptic surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgway, Stephen T.; Matheson, Thomas; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Olsen, Knut A.; Howell, Steve B.

    2014-11-20

    The discovery of variable and transient sources is an essential product of synoptic surveys. The alert stream will require filtering for personalized criteria—a process managed by a functionality commonly described as a Broker. In order to understand quantitatively the magnitude of the alert generation and Broker tasks, we have undertaken an analysis of the most numerous types of variable targets in the sky—Galactic stars, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and asteroids. It is found that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be capable of discovering ∼10{sup 5} high latitude (|b| > 20°) variable stars per night at the beginning of the survey. (The corresponding number for |b| < 20° is orders of magnitude larger, but subject to caveats concerning extinction and crowding.) However, the number of new discoveries may well drop below 100 per night within less than one year. The same analysis applied to GAIA clarifies the complementarity of the GAIA and LSST surveys. Discovery of AGNs and QSOs are each predicted to begin at ∼3000 per night and decrease by 50 times over four years. Supernovae are expected at ∼1100 per night, and after several survey years will dominate the new variable discovery rate. LSST asteroid discoveries will start at >10{sup 5} per night, and if orbital determination has a 50% success rate per epoch, they will drop below 1000 per night within two years.

  8. The Evolution of Brazilian Portuguese: A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoge, Henry W., Comp.

    This third section of the research project, "The Syntax of Contemporary Brazilian Portuguese," presents a descriptive and historical survey of the evolution of the language. Included in the work are: (1) a summary of historical concern with this subject reflecting literary and linguistic interest, (2) classification and discussion of language…

  9. CANDELS: THE COSMIC ASSEMBLY NEAR-INFRARED DEEP EXTRAGALACTIC LEGACY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Grogin, Norman A.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brown, Thomas M.; Casertano, Stefano; Kocevski, Dale D.; Faber, S. M.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Alexander, David M.; Almaini, Omar; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Barden, Marco; Bell, Eric F.; Bournaud, Frederic; Cassata, Paolo; Castellano, Marco; Challis, Peter; Chary, Ranga-Ram; and others

    2011-12-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) is designed to document the first third of galactic evolution, over the approximate redshift (z) range 8-1.5. It will image >250,000 distant galaxies using three separate cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope, from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared, and will find and measure Type Ia supernovae at z > 1.5 to test their accuracy as standardizable candles for cosmology. Five premier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected, each with extensive ancillary data. The use of five widely separated fields mitigates cosmic variance and yields statistically robust and complete samples of galaxies down to a stellar mass of 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} to z Almost-Equal-To 2, reaching the knee of the ultraviolet luminosity function of galaxies to z Almost-Equal-To 8. The survey covers approximately 800 arcmin{sup 2} and is divided into two parts. The CANDELS/Deep survey (5{sigma} point-source limit H = 27.7 mag) covers {approx}125 arcmin{sup 2} within Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)-N and GOODS-S. The CANDELS/Wide survey includes GOODS and three additional fields (Extended Groth Strip, COSMOS, and Ultra-deep Survey) and covers the full area to a 5{sigma} point-source limit of H {approx}> 27.0 mag. Together with the Hubble Ultra Deep Fields, the strategy creates a three-tiered 'wedding-cake' approach that has proven efficient for extragalactic surveys. Data from the survey are nonproprietary and are useful for a wide variety of science investigations. In this paper, we describe the basic motivations for the survey, the CANDELS team science goals and the resulting observational requirements, the field selection and geometry, and the observing design. The Hubble data processing and products are described in a companion paper.

  10. A deep 6-centimeter radio source survey.

    PubMed

    Fomalont, E B; Kellermann, K I; Wall, J V; Weistrop, D

    1984-07-01

    The Very Large Array has been used to survey a small region of sky at a wavelength of 6 centimeters down to a completeness level of 60 microjanskys-about 100 times weaker than the faintest radio sources that have been detected with other instruments. The observed source count at flux densities below 100 millijanskys converges in a manner similar to the lower frequency counts, although there is some evidence for an excess of sources weaker than 100 microjanskys. The sources in the survey are preferentially identified with faint galaxies. PMID:17775641

  11. A Deep Optical Survey of the Ecliptic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1997-01-01

    This was an observing-intensive investigation into the newly discovered regions of the solar system beyond Neptune. The research was focussed on the use of unique imaging facilities on telescopes atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii, although other observatories (in Arizona and Chile) were also occasionally used. We secured about 20 nights of telescope time per year for our 'Medium Depth Wide Area' survey (JLC96). In this, we covered 5 sq. deg. of sky to apparent red magnitude 24.2. We used a high quantum efficiency Tektronix 2048x2048 CCD for all observations in this program. We secured observing time at the UH 2.2 meter for testing the suitability of a much larger array CCD camera for survey work (an 8192x8192 pixel device). We obtained observing runs at the twin Schmidt telescopes of Kitt Peak National Observatory and Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Observatory in order to assess the number of bright Kuiper Belt objects, Centaurs and gas giant Trojans.

  12. DEEP 21 cm H I OBSERVATIONS AT z {approx} 0.1: THE PRECURSOR TO THE ARECIBO ULTRA DEEP SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Freudling, Wolfram; Zwaan, Martin; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Meyer, Martin; Catinella, Barbara; Minchin, Robert; Calabretta, Mark; Momjian, Emmanuel; O'Neil, Karen

    2011-01-20

    The 'ALFA Ultra Deep Survey' (AUDS) is an ongoing 21 cm spectral survey with the Arecibo 305 m telescope. AUDS will be the most sensitive blind survey undertaken with Arecibo's 300 MHz Mock spectrometer. The survey searches for 21 cm H I line emission at redshifts between 0 and 0.16. The main goals of the survey are to investigate the H I content and probe the evolution of H I gas within that redshift region. In this paper, we report on a set of precursor observations with a total integration time of 53 hr. The survey detected a total of eighteen 21 cm emission lines at redshifts between 0.07 and 0.15 in a region centered around {alpha}{sub 2000} {approx} 0{sup h}, {delta} {approx} 15{sup 0}42'. The rate of detection is consistent with the one expected from the local H I mass function. The derived relative H I density at the median redshift of the survey is {rho}{sub H{sub I}}[z = 0.125] = (1.0 {+-} 0.3){rho}{sub 0}, where {rho}{sub 0} is the H I density at zero redshift.

  13. Initial results from a ROSAT deep survey in Lynx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. F.; Windhorst, R. A.; Maccacaro, T.; Burstein, D.; Franklin, B. E.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koo, D. C.; Mathis, D. F.; Morgan, W. A.; Neuschaefer, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results from a deep (70 ksec) Rosat survey of the high galactic latitude selected area Lynx.3A are presented. Lynx.3A sensitivity was previously studied in both the optical radio, with deep Westerbork surveys and deep multicolor Charge Couple Device (CCD) images form the Palomar 200 inch Four-Shooter. About 70 x-ray sources were detected within the central 40 foot diameter region of the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC), observed surface densities of approximately 200 x-ray sources/sq deg are suggested, and these x-ray sources alone account for approximately 30 percent of the cosmic x-ray background (0.9 to 2.2 keV). An initial look at the observed x-ray logN - logS curve is presented, but a detailed assessment requires further study. The 4 sigma limit of about 7 times 10 to the minus 15th power erg/s.sq cm (0.5 to 2.0 keV) is considerably deeper then the Einstein deep surveys, and of comparable sensitivity to the deepest current Rosat surveys. Cross correlation with our Four Shooter optical catalogs yields at least one likely optical candidate for nearly all of the Rosat x-ray sources; a number of the likely optical identifications have colors of quasi-stellar objects (and stellar PSF), but in other cases galaxies/groups are also viable candidates.

  14. The Secret Lives Of Galaxies Unveiled In Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    Two of NASA's Great Observatories, bolstered by the largest ground-based telescopes around the world, are beginning to harvest new clues to the origin and evolution of galaxies. It's a bit like finding a family scrapbook containing snapshots that capture the lives of family members from infancy through adolescence to adulthood. "This is the first time the cosmic tale of how galaxies build themselves has been traced reliably to such early times in the universe's life," said Mauro Giavalisco, head of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) portion of the survey, and research astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore. The HST has joined forces with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to survey a relatively broad swath of sky encompassing tens of thousands of galaxies stretching far back into time. The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), scheduled for launch in August, will soon join this unprecedented survey. Called the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), astronomers are studying galaxy formation and evolution over a wide range of distances and ages. The project is tracing the assembly history of galaxies, the evolution of their stellar populations, and the gusher of energy from star formation and active nuclei powered by immense black holes. HST astronomers report the sizes of galaxies clearly increase continuously from the time the universe was about 1 billion years old to an age of 6 billion years. This is approximately half the current age of the universe, 13.7 billion years. GOODS astronomers also find the star birth rate rose mildly, by about a factor of three, between the time the universe was about one billion years old and 1.5 billion years old, and remained high until about 7 billion years ago, when it quickly dropped to one-tenth the earlier "baby boomer" rate. This is further evidence major galaxy building trailed off when the universe was about half its current age. GOODS Chandra Deep Fields South Chandra Deep Field

  15. The Secret Lives Of Galaxies Unveiled In Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    Two of NASA's Great Observatories, bolstered by the largest ground-based telescopes around the world, are beginning to harvest new clues to the origin and evolution of galaxies. It's a bit like finding a family scrapbook containing snapshots that capture the lives of family members from infancy through adolescence to adulthood. "This is the first time the cosmic tale of how galaxies build themselves has been traced reliably to such early times in the universe's life," said Mauro Giavalisco, head of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) portion of the survey, and research astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore. The HST has joined forces with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to survey a relatively broad swath of sky encompassing tens of thousands of galaxies stretching far back into time. The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), scheduled for launch in August, will soon join this unprecedented survey. Called the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), astronomers are studying galaxy formation and evolution over a wide range of distances and ages. The project is tracing the assembly history of galaxies, the evolution of their stellar populations, and the gusher of energy from star formation and active nuclei powered by immense black holes. HST astronomers report the sizes of galaxies clearly increase continuously from the time the universe was about 1 billion years old to an age of 6 billion years. This is approximately half the current age of the universe, 13.7 billion years. GOODS astronomers also find the star birth rate rose mildly, by about a factor of three, between the time the universe was about one billion years old and 1.5 billion years old, and remained high until about 7 billion years ago, when it quickly dropped to one-tenth the earlier "baby boomer" rate. This is further evidence major galaxy building trailed off when the universe was about half its current age. GOODS Chandra Deep Fields South Chandra Deep Field

  16. Prospects for the study of evolution in the deep biosphere.

    PubMed

    Biddle, Jennifer F; Sylvan, Jason B; Brazelton, William J; Tully, Benjamin J; Edwards, Katrina J; Moyer, Craig L; Heidelberg, John F; Nelson, William C

    2011-01-01

    Since the days of Darwin, scientists have used the framework of the theory of evolution to explore the interconnectedness of life on Earth and adaptation of organisms to the ever-changing environment. The advent of molecular biology has advanced and accelerated the study of evolution by allowing direct examination of the genetic material that ultimately determines the phenotypes upon which selection acts. The study of evolution has been furthered through examination of microbial evolution, with large population numbers, short generation times, and easily extractable DNA. Such work has spawned the study of microbial biogeography, with the realization that concepts developed in population genetics may be applicable to microbial genomes (Martiny et al., 2006; Manhes and Velicer, 2011). Microbial biogeography and adaptation has been examined in many different environments. Here we argue that the deep biosphere is a unique environment for the study of evolution and list specific factors that can be considered and where the studies may be performed. This publication is the result of the NSF-funded Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) theme team on Evolution (www.darkenergybiosphere.org).

  17. Prospects for the Study of Evolution in the Deep Biosphere

    PubMed Central

    Biddle, Jennifer F.; Sylvan, Jason B.; Brazelton, William J.; Tully, Benjamin J.; Edwards, Katrina J.; Moyer, Craig L.; Heidelberg, John F.; Nelson, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Since the days of Darwin, scientists have used the framework of the theory of evolution to explore the interconnectedness of life on Earth and adaptation of organisms to the ever-changing environment. The advent of molecular biology has advanced and accelerated the study of evolution by allowing direct examination of the genetic material that ultimately determines the phenotypes upon which selection acts. The study of evolution has been furthered through examination of microbial evolution, with large population numbers, short generation times, and easily extractable DNA. Such work has spawned the study of microbial biogeography, with the realization that concepts developed in population genetics may be applicable to microbial genomes (Martiny et al., 2006; Manhes and Velicer, 2011). Microbial biogeography and adaptation has been examined in many different environments. Here we argue that the deep biosphere is a unique environment for the study of evolution and list specific factors that can be considered and where the studies may be performed. This publication is the result of the NSF-funded Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) theme team on Evolution (www.darkenergybiosphere.org). PMID:22319515

  18. The VIMOS-VLT deep survey: the group catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Marinoni, C.; Iovino, A.; Bardelli, S.; Adami, C.; Mazure, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Maccagni, D.; Temporin, S.; Zucca, E.; De Lucia, G.; Blaizot, J.; Garilli, B.; Meneux, B.; Zamorani, G.; Le Fèvre, O.; Cappi, A.; Guzzo, L.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Ilbert, O.; Lamareille, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Vergani, D.; Pérez-Montero, E.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: We present a homogeneous and complete catalogue of optical galaxy groups identified in the purely flux-limited (17.5 ≤ IAB ≤ 24.0) VIMOS-VLT deep redshift Survey (VVDS). Methods: We use mock catalogues extracted from the Millennium Simulation, to correct for potential systematics that might affect the overall distribution as well as the individual properties of the identified systems. Simulated samples allow us to forecast the number and properties of groups that can be potentially found in a survey with VVDS-like selection functions. We use them to correct for the expected incompleteness and, to asses in addition, how well galaxy redshifts trace the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of the underlying mass overdensity. In particular, on these mock catalogues we train the adopted group-finding technique i.e., the Voronoi-Delaunay Method (VDM). The goal is to fine-tune its free parameters, recover in a robust and unbiased way the redshift and velocity dispersion distributions of groups (n(z) and n(σ), respectively), and maximize, at the same time, the level of completeness and purity of the group catalogue. Results: We identify 318 VVDS groups with at least 2 members in the range 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 1.0, among which 144 (/30) with at least 3 (/5) members. The sample has an overall completeness of ~60% and a purity of ~50%. Nearly 45% of the groups with at least 3 members are still recovered if we run the algorithm with a particular parameter set that maximizes the purity (~75%) of the resulting catalogue. We use the group sample to explore the redshift evolution of the fraction fb of blue galaxies (U-B ≤ 1) in the redshift range 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 1. We find that the fraction of blue galaxies is significantly lower in groups than in the global population (i.e. in the whole ensemble of galaxies irrespective of their environment). Both of these quantities increase with redshift, the fraction of blue galaxies in groups exhibiting a marginally significant steeper

  19. MOIRCS Deep Survey. IX. Deep Near-Infrared Imaging Data and Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajisawa, Masaru; Ichikawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Ichi; Yamada, Toru; Akiyama, Masayuki; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tokoku, Chihiro; Katsuno Uchimoto, Yuka; Konishi, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Omata, Koji; Ouchi, Masami; Iwata, Ikuru; Hamana, Takashi; Onodera, Masato

    2011-03-01

    We present deep J-, H-, and Ks-band imaging data of the MOIRCS Deep Survey (MODS), which was carried out with the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope in the GOODS-North region. The data reach 5σ total limiting magnitudes for point sources of J = 23.9, H = 22.8, and Ks = 22.8 (Vega magnitude) over 103 arcmin2 (wide field). In 28 arcmin2 of the survey area, which is an ultra-deep field of the MODS (deep field), the data reach 5σ depths of J = 24.8, H = 23.4, and Ks = 23.8. The spatial resolutions of the combined images are FWHM ˜0''.6 and ˜0''.5 for the wide and deep fields in all bands, respectively. Combining the MODS data with the multi-wavelength public data taken with the HST, Spitzer, and other ground-based telescopes in the GOODS field, we constructed a multi-wavelength photometric catalog of Ks-selected sources. Using the catalog, we present Ks-band number counts and near-infrared color distribution of the detected objects; we also demonstrate some selection techniques with the NIR colors for high redshift galaxies. These data and catalog are publicly available via Internet.

  20. Deep near-infrared survey of the Southern Sky (DENIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deul, E.

    1992-01-01

    DENIS (Deep Near-Infrared Survey of the Southern Sky) will be the first complete census of astronomical sources in the near-infrared spectral range. The challenges of this novel survey are both scientific and technical. Phenomena radiating in the near-infrared range from brown dwarfs to galaxies in the early stages of cosmological evolution, the scientific exploitation of data relevant over such a wide range requires pooling expertise from several of the leading European astronomical centers. The technical challenges of a project which will provide an order of magnitude more sources than given by the IRAS space mission, and which will involve advanced data-handling and image-processing techniques, likewise require pooling of hardware and software resources, as well as of human expertise. The DENIS project team is composed of some 40 scientists, computer specialists, and engineers located in 5 European Community countries (France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, and Spain), with important contributions from specialists in Australia, Brazil, Chile, and Hungary. DENIS will survey the entire southern sky in 3 colors, namely in the I band at a wavelength of 0.8 micron, in the 1.25 micron J band, and in the 2.15 micron K' band. The sensitivity limits will be 18th magnitude in the I band, 16th in the J band, and 14.5th in the K' band. The angular resolution achieved will be 1 arcsecond in the I band, and 3.0 arcseconds in the J and K' bands. The European Southern Observatory 1 m telescope on La Silla will be dedicated to survey use during operations expected to last four years, commencing in late 1993. DENIS aims to provide the astronomical community with complete digitized infrared images of the full southern sky and a catalogue of extracted objects, both of the best quality and in readily accessible form. This will be achieved through dedicated software packages and specialized catalogues, and with assistance from the Leiden and Paris Data Analysis Centers. The data

  1. THE VLA SURVEY OF CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH. V. EVOLUTION AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SUB-MILLIJANSKY RADIO SOURCES AND THE ISSUE OF RADIO EMISSION IN RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Padovani, P.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-10

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 {mu}Jy at the field center and redshift {approx}5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P {approx}> 3 x 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1}) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for {approx}30% of the sample and {approx}60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at {approx}< 0.1 mJy. This implies that future, large area sub-millijansky surveys, given the appropriate ancillary multiwavelength data, have the potential of being able to assemble vast samples of radio-quiet AGNs, bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  2. Cool Dwarf Scale Heights from the Deep Lens Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorman, P.; Loomba, D.; Boeshaar, P.; Ryan, R.

    2011-12-01

    We have added 1.12 sq. deg. of survey J-band (1.2μm) deep imaging (J = 21.4, 5σ) from Palomar WIRC and 2.5 sq. deg. of targeted FLAMINGOS imaging (median depth J = 20.44, 5σ) to 4 sq. deg. of deep Rz' imaging from the Deep Lens Survey. Using color models derived from photometry and spectroscopy of known M, L, and T dwarfs, we assign a spectral type probability to each object, and calculate model likelihoods for sech2 and exponential disks of various scale heights by comparing the predicted distance distribution to the estimated object distances. The best-fit exponential scale heights for M9-L2 and L2-L5 dwarfs are ZS = 345 pc and 324 pc, respectively; however, the sech2 models show a possible decrease in the scale height from Z0 = 575 pc to 175 pc between those two groups, which may indicate a weakness in the previously used exponential models.

  3. THE GALAXY OPTICAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Forman, William R.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Moustakas, John

    2012-03-20

    We present the galaxy optical luminosity function for the redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.75 from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey, a spectroscopic survey of 7.6 deg{sup 2} in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Our statistical sample is composed of 12,473 galaxies with known redshifts down to I = 20.4 (AB). Our results at low redshift are consistent with those from Sloan Digital Sky Survey; at higher redshift, we find strong evidence for evolution in the luminosity function, including differential evolution between blue and red galaxies. We find that the luminosity density evolves as (1 + z){sup (0.54{+-}0.64)} for red galaxies and (1 + z){sup (1.64{+-}0.39)} for blue galaxies.

  4. Microbial Evolution at High Pressure: Deep Sea and Laboratory Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated hydrostatic pressures are present in deep-sea and deep-Earth environments where this physical parameter has influenced the evolution and characteristics of life. Piezophilic (high-pressure-adapted) microbes have been isolated from diverse deep-sea settings, and would appear likely to occur in deep-subsurface habitats as well. In order to discern the factors enabling life at high pressure my research group has explored these adaptations at various levels, most recently including molecular analyses of deep-sea trench communities, and through the selective evolution of the model microbe Escherichia coli in the laboratory to progressively higher pressures. Much of the field work has focused on the microbes present in the deeper portions of the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT)and in the Peru-Chile Trench (PCT), from 6-8.5 km below the sea surface (~60-85 megapascals pressure). Culture-independent phylogenetic data on the Bacteria and Archaea present on particles or free-living, along with data on the microeukarya present was complemented with genomic analyses and the isolation and characterization of microbes in culture. Metagenomic analyses of the PRT revealed increased genome sizes and an overrepresentation at depth of sulfatases for the breakdown of sulfated polysaccharides and specific categories of transporters, including those associated with the transport of diverse cations or carboxylate ions, or associated with heavy metal resistance. Single-cell genomic studies revealed several linneages which recruited to the PRT metagenome far better than existing marine microbial genome sequences. analyses. Novel high pressure culture approaches have yielded new piezophiles including species preferring very low nutrient levels, those living off of hydrocarbons, and those adapted to various electron donor/electron acceptor combinations. In order to more specifically focus on functions enabling life at increased pressure selective evolution experiments were performed with

  5. Deep X-ray and UV Surveys of Galaxies with Chandra, XMM-Newton, and GALEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Only with the deepest Chandra surveys has X-ray emission from normal and star forming galaxies (as opposed to AGN, which dominate the X-ray sky) been accessible at cosmologically interesting distances. The X-ray emission from accreting binaries provide a critical glimpse into the binary phase of stellar evolution and studies of the hot gas reservoir constrain past star formation. UV studies provide important, sensitive diagnostics of the young star forming populations and provide the most mature means for studying galaxies at 2 < zeta < 4. This talk will review current progress on studying X-ray emission in concert with UV emission from normal/star-forming galaxies at higher redshift. We will also report on our new, deep surveys with GALEX and XMM-Newton in the nearby Coma cluster. These studies are relevant to DEEP06 as Coma is the nearest rich cluster of galaxies and provides an important benchmark for high-redshift studies in the X-ray and UV wavebands. The 30 ks GALEX (note: similar depth to the GALEX Deep Imaging Survey) and the 110 ks XMM observations provide extremely deep coverage of a Coma outskirts field, allowing the construction of the UV and X-ray luminosity function of galaxies and important constraints on star formation scaling relations such as the X-ray-Star Formation Rate correlation and the X-ray/Stellar Mass correlation. We will discuss what we learn from these deep observations of Coma, including the recently established suppression of the X-ray emission from galaxies in the Coma outskirts that is likely associated with lower levels of past star formation and/or the results of tidal gas stripping.

  6. Metabolic Evolution of a Deep-Branching Hyperthermophilic Chemoautotrophic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium restricted to hydrothermal vents and hot springs. These characteristics make it an excellent model system for studying the early evolution of metabolism. Here we present the whole-genome metabolic network of this organism and examine in detail the driving forces that have shaped it. We make extensive use of phylometabolic analysis, a method we recently introduced that generates trees of metabolic phenotypes by integrating phylogenetic and metabolic constraints. We reconstruct the evolution of a range of metabolic sub-systems, including the reductive citric acid (rTCA) cycle, as well as the biosynthesis and functional roles of several amino acids and cofactors. We show that A. aeolicus uses the reconstructed ancestral pathways within many of these sub-systems, and highlight how the evolutionary interconnections between sub-systems facilitated several key innovations. Our analyses further highlight three general classes of driving forces in metabolic evolution. One is the duplication and divergence of genes for enzymes as these progress from lower to higher substrate specificity, improving the kinetics of certain sub-systems. A second is the kinetic optimization of established pathways through fusion of enzymes, or their organization into larger complexes. The third is the minimization of the ATP unit cost to synthesize biomass, improving thermodynamic efficiency. Quantifying the distribution of these classes of innovations across metabolic sub-systems and across the tree of life will allow us to assess how a tradeoff between maximizing growth rate and growth efficiency has shaped the long-term metabolic evolution of the biosphere. PMID:24516572

  7. Deep phylogeny and evolution of sponges (phylum Porifera).

    PubMed

    Wörheide, G; Dohrmann, M; Erpenbeck, D; Larroux, C; Maldonado, M; Voigt, O; Borchiellini, C; Lavrov, D V

    2012-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are a diverse taxon of benthic aquatic animals of great ecological, commercial, and biopharmaceutical importance. They are arguably the earliest-branching metazoan taxon, and therefore, they have great significance in the reconstruction of early metazoan evolution. Yet, the phylogeny and systematics of sponges are to some extent still unresolved, and there is an on-going debate about the exact branching pattern of their main clades and their relationships to the other non-bilaterian animals. Here, we review the current state of the deep phylogeny of sponges. Several studies have suggested that sponges are paraphyletic. However, based on recent phylogenomic analyses, we suggest that the phylum Porifera could well be monophyletic, in accordance with cladistic analyses based on morphology. This finding has many implications for the evolutionary interpretation of early animal traits and sponge development. We further review the contribution that mitochondrial genes and genomes have made to sponge phylogenetics and explore the current state of the molecular phylogenies of the four main sponge lineages (Classes), that is, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, Calcarea, and Homoscleromorpha, in detail. While classical systematic systems are largely congruent with molecular phylogenies in the class Hexactinellida and in certain parts of Demospongiae and Homoscleromorpha, the high degree of incongruence in the class Calcarea still represents a challenge. We highlight future areas of research to fill existing gaps in our knowledge. By reviewing sponge development in an evolutionary and phylogenetic context, we support previous suggestions that sponge larvae share traits and complexity with eumetazoans and that the simple sedentary adult lifestyle of sponges probably reflects some degree of secondary simplification. In summary, while deep sponge phylogenetics has made many advances in the past years, considerable efforts are still required to achieve a

  8. Field Galaxy Evolution with the MUNICS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drory, Niv; Feulner, Georg; Hopp, Ulrich; Snigula, Jan; Bender, Ralf

    The Munich Near-IR Cluster Survey (MUNICS) is a K'-selected survey uniformly covering 1 square degree in the J and K' near-IR bands. The survey area consists of 8 13.2 × 26.2 arcmin randomly selected fields at high galactic latitude, as well as 13 7 × 7 arcmin fields targeted towards 0.6 < z <1.5 QSOs. The 3 σ detection limits for a point source are 19.5 in the K'-band and 21.5 in the J-band. The data have been acquired at the 3.5m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory using the Ω - Prime camera. Optical photometry in the V, R, and I bands was obtained for a subsample of the survey fields covering 0.35 square degrees in total. These data have been obtained at the 2.2m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory and the 2.7m telescope at McDonald Observatory. These data enable us to determine photometric redshifts for the galaxies and thus are of great importance in selecting and confirming cluster candidates as well as individual galaxies for follow-up spectroscopy. The project has two main scientific aims, namely - the identification of galaxy clusters at redshifts around unity, and - the selection of a fair sample of field early-type galaxies at similar redshifts for evolutionary studies. Near-IR selection is an efficient tool for tracing the massive galaxy population at redshifts around unity because of its high sensitivity for evolved stellar populations even in the presence of moderate star formation activity. The formation and evolution of the population of massive galaxies is still a matter of lively and controversial debate. While models of hierarchical galaxy formation consistently predict a steep decline in the number density of massive spheroidals, they have a rather large number of free parameters, some of which involve ill-understood processes. Observation has not yet been successful in constraining the ranges of the involved model parameters tightly enough, so that comparisons between theory and experiment are difficult to interpret.

  9. Hα Emitting Galaxies in the Deep And Wide Narrowband Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Alicia; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; DAWN Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present new measurements of the Hα luminosity function (LF) and star formation rate (SFR) volume density for galaxies at z˜0.62. Our results are part of the Deep And Wide Narrowband Survey (DAWN), a unique infrared imaging program with large areal coverage (˜1.1 deg2 over 5 fields) and sensitivity (9.9 × 10-18 erg/cm2/s at 5σ). The present sample, based on a single DAWN field, contains 85 Hα emission-line candidates at z˜0.62, 25% of which have spectroscopic confirmations. These candidates have been selected through comparison of narrow and broad-band images and through matching with existing catalogs in the COSMOS field. The dust-corrected LF is well described by a Schechter function. We calculate a SFR density of ρSFR =10(-1.15±0.07) M○ / yr/ Mpc3. We compare our results to already existing surveys at similar redshifts and find that our faint slope of the LF is flatter than that of most other surveys and that our SFR density is higher than that reported from similar surveys at z<2.

  10. CANDELS: The Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, anton M.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Riess, Adam G.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Alexander, David M.; Almaini, Omar; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Barden, Marco; Bell, Eric F.; Bournaud, Frederic; Brown, Thomas M.; Caputi, Karina I.; Casertano, Stefano; Cassata, Paolo; Challis, Peter; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Cheung, Edmond; Cirasuolo, Michele; DeMello, Duilla; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Straughn, Amber N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) is designed to document the first third of galactic evolution, from z approx. 8 - 1.5. It will image > 250,000 distant galaxies using three separate cameras on the Hubble Space Tele8cope, from the mid-UV to near-IR, and will find and measure Type Ia supernovae beyond z > 1.5 to test their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Five premier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected, each with extensive ancillary data. The use of five widely separated fields mitigates cosmic variance and yields statistically robust and complete samples of galaxies down to a stellar mass of 10(exp 9) solar mass to z approx. 2, reaching the knee of the UV luminosity function of galaxies to z approx. 8. The survey covers approximately 800 square arc minutes and is divided into two parts. The CANDELS/Deep survey (5(sigma) point-source limit H =27.7mag) covers approx. 125 square arcminutes within GOODS-N and GOODS-S. The CANDELS/Wide survey includes GOODS and three additional fields (EGS, COSMOS, and UDS) and covers the full area to a 50(sigma) point-source limit of H ? or approx. = 27.0 mag. Together with the Hubble Ultradeep Fields, the strategy creates a three-tiered "wedding cake" approach that has proven efficient for extragalactic surveys. Data from the survey are non-proprietary and are useful for a wide variety of science investigations. In this paper, we describe the basic motivations for the survey, the CANDELS team science goals and the resulting observational requirements, the field selection and geometry, and the observing design.

  11. When is stacking confusing? The impact of confusion on stacking in deep H I galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Papastergis, Emmanouil

    2016-01-01

    We present an analytic model to predict the H I mass contributed by confused sources to a stacked spectrum in a generic H I survey. Based on the ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) correlation function, this model is in agreement with the estimates of confusion present in stacked Parkes telescope data, and was used to predict how confusion will limit stacking in the deepest Square Kilometre Array precursor H I surveys. Stacking with LADUMA (Looking At the Distant Universe with MeerKAT) and DINGO UDEEP (Deep Investigation of Neutral Gas Origins - Ultra Deep) data will only be mildly impacted by confusion if their target synthesized beam size of 10 arcsec can be achieved. Any beam size significantly above this will result in stacks that contain a mass in confused sources that is comparable to (or greater than) that which is detectable via stacking, at all redshifts. CHILES (COSMOS H I Large Extragalactic Survey) 5 arcsec resolution is more than adequate to prevent confusion influencing stacking of its data, throughout its bandpass range. FAST (Five hundred metre Aperture Spherical Telescope) will be the most impeded by confusion, with H I surveys likely becoming heavily confused much beyond z = 0.1. The largest uncertainties in our model are the redshift evolution of the H I density of the Universe and the H I correlation function. However, we argue that the two idealized cases we adopt should bracket the true evolution, and the qualitative conclusions are unchanged regardless of the model choice. The profile shape of the signal due to confusion (in the absence of any detection) was also modelled, revealing that it can take the form of a double Gaussian with a narrow and wide component.

  12. The infrared medium-deep survey. II. How to trigger radio AGNs? Hints from their environments

    SciTech Connect

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Chapman, Scott; Pak, Soojong; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-10

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ∼25 deg{sup 2} and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (M{sub u} – M{sub r} ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  13. The Infrared Medium-Deep Survey. II. How to Trigger Radio AGNs? Hints from their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Chapman, Scott; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Pak, Soojong; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-01

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ~25 deg2 and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (Mu - Mr ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  14. Spitzer Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud: Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, Margaret; Babler, Brian; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Blum, Robert; Boulanger, Francois; Churchwell, Edward; Cohen, Martin; Engelbracht, Charles; Frogel, Jay; Fukui, Yasuo; Gallagher, Jay; Gordon, Karl; Gorjian, Varoujan; Harris, Jason; Hora, Joseph; Indebetouw, Remy; Jansen, Stephen; Kawamura, Akiko; Kelly, Douglas; Kemper, Ciska; Latter, William; Leitherer, Claus; Madden, Suzanne; Meade, Marilyn; Misselt, Karl; Mizuno, Norikazu; Mizuno, Akira; Mould, Jeremy; Nota, Antonella; Oey, Sally; Olsen, Knut; Onishi, Toshikazu; Paladini, Roberta; Panagia, Nino; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Reach, William; Shibai, Hiroshi; Shuji, Sato; Smith, Linda; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Tielens, Xander; Ueta, Toshiya; van Dyk, Schuyler; Volk, Kevin; Werner, Michael; Whitney, Barbara; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2005-06-01

    The recycling of matter between the interstellar medium (ISM) and stars drives the evolution of a galaxy's visible matter. To understand this recycling, we propose to study the physical processes of the ISM, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Due to its proximity, favorable viewing angle, multi-wavelength information, and measured tidal interactions with the Milky Way (MW) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the LMC is uniquely suited for surveying the agents of a galaxy's evolution (SAGE), the ISM and stars. Our uniform and unbiased survey of the LMC (7x7 degrees) in all IRAC and MIPS bands will have much better wavelength coverage, up to ~1000 times better point source sensitivity and ~11 times better angular resolution than previous IR surveys. Full and uniform coverage of the LMC is necessary to study the galaxy as a system, to develop a template for more distant galaxies and to create an archival data set (rights waived) that promises a lasting legacy to match current LMC surveys at other wavelengths. SAGE will reveal over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse ISM with column densities >1.2e21 H/cm2. In contrast to the MW and SMC, the diffuse IR emission in the LMC can be unambiguously associated with individual gas/dust clouds, thereby permitting unique studies of dust processes in the ISM. SAGE's complete census of newly formed stars with masses >1-3 Msun will reveal whether tidally-triggered star formation events in the LMC are sustained or short-lived. SAGE's complete census of evolved stars with mass loss rates >1e-8 Msun/yr will quantitatively measure the rate at which evolved stars inject mass into the ISM. SAGE will be the crucial link between Spitzer's survey of individual IR sources in the MW (GLIMPSE) and its surveys of galaxies (e.g., SINGS) and a stepping stone to the

  15. Normal and Starburst Galaxies in Deep X-ray Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann

    2006-01-01

    This talk will cover progress of the last several years in unraveling the nature of normal and starburst galaxies in deep X-ray surveys. This includes discussion of the normal galaxy X-ray Luminosity Function in deep field and cluster surveys and what it tells us about the binary populations in galaxies. The utility of broad band X-ray emission, especially as compared to other multiwavelength measurements of current/recent star formation, will be reviewed. These broad band X-ray measurements of star formation are based upon X-ray/Star Formation Rate correlations that span the currently available redshift range (0 < z < 1). I will also discuss new efforts underway to systematically characterize the X-ray emission from galaxies in group and cluster environments, including a new effort underway in the Coma cluster of galaxies. I will finish with discussion of the redshift frontier for studies of X-ray star formation, currently 2 approx.4, where the UV-selected Lyman Break galaxies are the best glimpse we have into X-ray emission from star formation in the early Universe. Lyman Break galaxies are of particular interest due to the overlap in basic properties with starburst galaxies in the more local Universe. Understanding the outflows in such starburst galaxies is of critical importance to constraining the "stellar" portion of cosmic feedback. The talk will close with a brief discussion of distant normal galaxy science with future X-ray observatories such as the upcoming Con-X/XEUS mission(s).

  16. ESO imaging survey. Deep public survey: Multi-color optical data for the Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnouts, S.; Vandame, B.; Benoist, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; da Costa, L.; Schirmer, M.; Mignani, R. P.; Slijkhuis, R.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hook, R.; Madejsky, R.; Rité, C.; Wicenec, A.

    2001-11-01

    This paper presents multi-passband optical data obtained from observations of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), located at alpha ~ 3h 32m, delta ~ -27o 48'. The observations were conducted at the ESO/MPG 2.2 m telescope at La Silla using the 8kx8k Wide-Field Imager (WFI). This data set, taken over a period of one year, represents the first field to be completed by the ongoing Deep Public Survey (DPS) being carried out as a part of the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) project. This paper describes the optical observations, the techniques employed for un-supervised pipeline processing and the general characteristics of the final data set. Image processing has been performed using multi-resolution image decomposition techniques adapted to the EIS pipeline. The automatic processing steps include standard de-bias and flat-field, automatic removal of satellite tracks, de-fringing/sky-subtraction, image stacking/mosaicking and astrometry. Stacking of dithered images is carried out using pixel-based astrometry which enables the efficient removal of cosmic rays and image defects, yielding remarkably clean final images. The final astrometric calibration is based on a pre-release of the GSC-II catalog and has an estimated intrinsic accuracy of la 0.10 arcsec, with all passbands sharing the same solution. The paper includes data taken in six different filters (U'UBVRI). The data cover an area of about 0.25 square degrees reaching 5sigma limiting magnitudes of U'AB=26.0, UAB=25.7, BAB=26.4, VAB=25.4, RAB=25.5 and IAB= 24.7 mag, as measured within a 2 x FWHM aperture. The optical data covers an area of ~ 0.1 square degrees for which moderately deep observations in two near-infrared bands are also available, reaching 5sigma limiting magnitudes of JAB ~ 23.4 and KAB ~ 22.6. The current optical/infrared data also fully encompass the region of the deep X-ray observations recently completed by the Chandra telescope. The optical data presented here, as well as the infrared data released

  17. DEEP GALEX UV SURVEY OF THE KEPLER FIELD. I. POINT SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Manuel; Chávez, Miguel; Bertone, Emanuele; Lloyd, James; Mamajek, Eric E.; Martin, D. Christopher; Neill, James D.

    2015-11-10

    We report observations of a deep near-ultraviolet (NUV) survey of the Kepler field made in 2012 with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Complete All-Sky UV Survey Extension (CAUSE). The GALEX-CAUSE Kepler survey (GCK) covers 104 square degrees of the Kepler field and reaches a limiting magnitude of NUV ≃ 22.6 at 3σ. Analysis of the GCK survey has yielded a catalog of 669,928 NUV sources, of which 475,164 are cross-matched with stars in the Kepler Input Catalog. Approximately 327 of 451 confirmed exoplanet host stars and 2614 of 4696 candidate exoplanet host stars identified by Kepler have NUV photometry in the GCK survey. The GCK catalog should enable the identification and characterization of UV-excess stars in the Kepler field (young solar-type and low-mass stars, chromospherically active binaries, white dwarfs, horizontal branch stars, etc.), and elucidation of various astrophysics problems related to the stars and planetary systems in the Kepler field.

  18. A 6 GHz Synoptic Survey of the COSMOS Deep Field with the JVLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sink, Joseph R.; Myers, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) covers two square degrees, and is observed over a large portion of the electromagnetic spectrum from X-ray to Radio. Key science goals of COSMOS include probing the evolution of galaxies, AGN, and large scale structures of the Universe. As well as constraining cosmological models and the star and structure formation history of the Universe. The wide range of frequencies and deep surveys are suitable for many astrophysical studies.Beginning in 2013, observations of the COSMOS field in C-band (4 - 8 GHz) using the JVLA have been carried out in every configuration spanning 21 months (April 2013 - Jan 2015) for a total of 13 observations. The observations are comprised of 1 hour time blocks using a technique called On-The-Fly Mosaicking (OTFM). Using OTFM we see an increased efficiency for an allotted observation block by collecting data as the array scans across the field, rather than a pointed mosaic which requires settle down time after each new pointing. Each observation consists of 2160 1-second integrations on 432 phase centers that require calibration and image processing before they can be mosaicked to create the final image of the entire COSMOS field.The primary science goal of this survey is to identify, catalog, and study the variable and transient radio sources in the COSMOS field, comparing these to other radio, optical, IR, and X-ray observations. The main class of variables we are interested in Active Galactic Nuclei.

  19. Simulation of deep one- and two-dimensional redshift surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. Richard, III

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that slice or pencil-beam redshift surveys of galaxies can be simulated in a box with nonequal sides. This method saves a lot of computer time and memory while providing essentially the same results as from whole-cube simulations. A 2457.6/h Mpc-long rod (out to a redshift z = 0.58 in two opposite directions) is simulated using the standard biased cold dark matter model as an example to mimic the recent deep pencil-beam surveys by Broadhurst et al. (1990). The structures (spikes) seen in these simulated samples occur when the narrow pencil-beam pierces walls, filaments, and clusters appearing randomly along the line-of-sight. A statistical test for goodness of fit to a periodic lattice has been applied to the observations and the simulations. It is found that the statistical significance level (P = 15.4 percent) is not strong enough to reject the null hypothesis that the observations and the simulations were drawn at random from the same set.

  20. Collective Landmarks for Deep Time: A New Tool for Evolution Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Evolution is a fundamental, organising concept in biology, yet there is widespread resistance to evolution among US students and there are rising creationist challenges in Europe. Resistance to evolution is linked to lack of understanding of the age of the Earth. An understanding of deep time is thus essential for effective biology education.…

  1. Precision cosmology with a combination of wide and deep Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cluster surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Khedekar, Satej; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Das, Sudeep

    2010-08-15

    We show the advantages of a wedding cake design for Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cluster surveys. We show that by dividing up a cluster survey into a wide and deep survey, one can essentially recover the cosmological information that would be diluted in a single survey of the same duration due to the uncertainties in our understanding of cluster physics. The parameter degeneracy directions of the deep and wide surveys are slightly different, and combining them breaks these degeneracies effectively. A variable depth survey with a few thousand clusters is as effective at constraining cosmological parameters as a single depth survey with a much larger cluster sample.

  2. A Deep HRI Survey of Low-Mass PMS Stars in NGC 2264

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, Brian

    1999-01-01

    Brian Patten is the Principal Investigator of the NASA ADP project 'A Deep HRI Survey of Low-Mass PMS Stars in NGC 2264'. This project was funded to support primarily the data reduction and analysis for new ROSAT data to be acquired in ROSAT AO8. For AO8 we were awarded two deep (100 ks) exposures with the ROSAT HRI instrument of a rotation and proper-motion selected sample of young (3 Myr - 15 Myr), low-mass, PMS stars in the populous star-forming region NGC 2264. These X-ray data were to be combined with an extensive rotation database for members of this cluster to allow us, for the first time, to probe the early evolution of magnetic dynamo activity for both fully convective stars and those stars found lower on the Hayashi tracks which have developed radiative cores. This database would have been used to study the interrelationship between coronal activity level, interior structure, and rotation rate as a function of mass and age.in the PMS and to define empirical constraints for theoretical models of angular momentum and magnetic dynamo evolution.

  3. Deep crustal reflections from a Vibroseis survey in northern Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finckh, P.; Ansorge, J.; Mueller, St.; Sprecher, Chr.

    1984-10-01

    In 1982 a Vibroseis survey comprising 180 km of reflection profiles was run in northern Switzerland in order to investigate the suitability of the crystalline basement for the deposition of highly radioactive waste. A configuration was chosen with 144 channels, 25 m of geophone spacing, 20 s sweeps ranging from 11 to 61 Hz and stacking of 4 or 8 sweeps of 3 simultaneous vibrators at twice the geophone spacing. The listening time was generally 4 s and at 4 sites it was extended to 11s for the detection of deeper crustal reflectors. This survey unravelled the complicated fault and thrust system beneath the Swiss folded Jura mountains. The stack from 4 s to 11 s reveals clearly a strong sloping reflector between 3.0 and 3.5 s which is strong evidence for a pronounced differentiation in the upper crust. A series of reflections is observed between 5.8 and 7.2 s the top of which can be correlated with the Conrad discontinuity. A strong "layered" signal between 9.0 and 9.5 s is interpreted as reflections from the M-discontinuity. The main features are compatible with results from nearby refraction surveys in the southern Rhinegraben rift system which show a distinct velocity increase of about 0.5 km/s in the lower crust at a depth ranging from 15 to 20 km, followed by an inversion zone or a laminated structure before reaching the Moho at about 27 km depth. The correlation of the field recordings with the first 10 s of the up-sweep only, shows some loss of resolution in the uppermost 3 s because of the lower frequency content of the signal. However, the lower parts of the sections are nearly identical. The fact that the deeper reflectors in the sections can consistently be traced laterally is a strong argument for using this processing technique. Thus high-coverage Vibroseis surveys utilizing up-sweep can be processed for deep crustal reflections even if the recording time is restricted to the standard 4 s, provided the surface static corrections are carried out with high

  4. Asteroid Size-Frequency Distribution (The ISO Deep Asteroid Survey)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    2001-01-01

    A total of six deep exposures (using AOT CAM01 with a 6" PFOV) through the ISOCAM LW10 filter (IRAS Band 1, i.e., 12 micro-m) were obtained on an approximately 15 arcminute square field centered on the ecliptic plane. Point sources were extracted using the technique described by Desert, et al. Two known asteroids appear in these frames and 20 sources moving with velocities appropriate for main belt asteroids are present. Most of the asteroids detected have flux densities less than 1 mJy, i.e., between 150 and 350 times fainter than any of the asteroids observed by Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). These data provide the first direct measurement of the 12 micro-m sky-plane density for asteroids on the ecliptic equator. The median zodiacal foreground, as measured by ISOCAM during this survey, is found to be 22.1 +/- 1.5 mJy per pixel, i.e., 26.2 +/- 1.7 MJy/sr. The results presented here imply that the actual number of kilometer-sized asteroids is significantly greater than previously believed and in reasonable agreement with the Statistical Asteroid Model.

  5. High Resolution Deep X-ray Surveys: A Unique Probe of the High-Z Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the origin and growth of the supermassive black holes SMBHs that lie at the centers of most, if not all, galaxies at all redshifts is crucial for obtaining the full picture of both BH and galaxy evolution. Enormous progress has been made in the understanding of the galaxy population in the Universes first few Gyrs. On the contrary, there is still the puzzle that giant SMBHs already exist at z=6-7, implying massive seed black holes or highly super-Eddington accretion at the earliest times. This is because the search for z6 Active Galactic Nuclei i.e., accreting SMBHs is still limited to the optically selected sources from the SDSS or CFHQS surveys, which probe the unobscured accretion. Instead, X-ray surveys can probe the obscured high-z, low mass population, which represent the bulk of rapid early SMBH growth, and are therefore essential for obtain an unbiased sample of the accreting SMBHs. I will present the most recent results on the high redshift Universe as we know it from the current Chandra X-ray surveys and discuss what we can expect from planned and proposed future X-ray observatories. High spatial resolution is crucial to locate faint X-ray sources and identify their counterpart in future deep optical images. Increasing the surveys sensitivity to the limits allowed by the X-ray Surveyor, we will be able to collect sizable samples of z6 low luminosity and low mass AGN to study their early growth. Comparison with galaxy formation and evolution at similar redshift will provide the means to understand the SMBH-galaxy relation at the earliest epochs.

  6. Galaxy Evolution Within the Kilo-Degree Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; Napolitano, N. R.; La Barbera, F.; Roy, N.; Radovich, M.; Getman, F.; Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; Capaccioli, M.; Longo, G.

    The ESO Public Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the VLT Survey Telescope and the OmegaCAM camera. KiDS will scan 1,500 deg2 in four optical filters (u, g, r, i). Designed to be a weak lensing survey, it is ideal for galaxy evolution studies, thanks to the high spatial resolution of VST, the excellent seeing and the photometric depth. The surface photometry has provided with structural parameters (e.g. size and Sérsic index), aperture and total magnitudes have been used to obtain photometric redshifts from Machine Learning methods and stellar masses/luminositites from stellar population synthesis. Our project aimed at investigating the evolution of the colour and structural properties of galaxies with mass and environment up to redshift z ˜ 0.5 and more, to put constraints on galaxy evolution processes, as galaxy mergers.

  7. The Hawaii K-band galaxy survey. 1: Deep K-band imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Gardner, J. P.; Hu, E. M.; Songaila, A.; Hodapp, K.-W.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of a very deep K-band survey with a 5 sigma total galaxy magnitude limit of K = 21.9 in the deepest field. A 5 sigma K-band-selected sample of 123 galaxies is presented, together with their optical colors. Only three galaxies in this sample are not detected at the 1 sigma level in Kron-Cousins I band. At K less than or = 20 the reddest (I-K) color is 5.1 +/- 0.4, and 15 of the 123 objects in the deep field sample have (I-K) greater than 4. In the blue, the galaxies show a rapid blueward trend at magnitudes beyond K = 19, dropping from a median (B-K) = 6 at K = 18 to a median (B-K) of only 4.2 at K = 21.5. The surface density of (I-K) greater than 4 objects is interpreted to imply either that there is a significant evolution toward later types in the colors of the normal galaxy population beyond z = 11 or that galaxies have faded by that redshift.

  8. DISK EVOLUTION IN OB ASSOCIATIONS: DEEP SPITZER/IRAC OBSERVATIONS OF IC 1795

    SciTech Connect

    Roccatagliata, Veronica; Bouwman, Jeroen; Henning, Thomas; Gennaro, Mario; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Feigelson, Eric; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Lawson, Warrick A.

    2011-06-01

    We present a deep Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) survey of the OB association IC 1795 carried out to investigate the evolution of protoplanetary disks in regions of massive star formation. Combining Spitzer/IRAC data with Chandra/Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations, we find 289 cluster members. An additional 340 sources with an infrared excess, but without X-ray counterpart, are classified as cluster member candidates. Both surveys are complete down to stellar masses of about 1 M{sub sun}. We present pre-main-sequence isochrones computed for the first time in the Spitzer/IRAC colors. The age of the cluster, determined via the location of the Class III sources in the [3.6]-[4.5]/[3.6] color-magnitude diagram, is in the range of 3-5 Myr. As theoretically expected, we do not find any systematic variation in the spatial distribution of disks within 0.6 pc of either O-type star in the association. However, the disk fraction in IC 1795 does depend on the stellar mass: sources with masses >2 M{sub sun} have a disk fraction of {approx}20%, while lower mass objects (2-0.8 M{sub sun}) have a disk fraction of {approx}50%. This implies that disks around massive stars have a shorter dissipation timescale.

  9. The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. Testing the gravitational instability paradigm at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinoni, C.; Guzzo, L.; Cappi, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Pollo, A.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Scaramella, R.; de la Torre, S.; Virey, J. M.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Ilbert, O.; Lamareille, F.; Marano, B.; Mathez, G.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Abbas, U.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; Buzzi, A.; Cucciati, O.; de Ravel, L.; Gregorini, L.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Perez-Montero, E.; Taxil, P.; Temporin, S.; Walcher, C. J.

    2008-08-01

    We have reconstructed the three-dimensional density fluctuation maps to z˜ 1.5 using the distribution of galaxies observed in the VVDS-Deep survey. We use this overdensity field to measure the evolution of the probability distribution function and its lower-order moments over the redshift interval 0.7< z <1.5. We apply a self-consistent reconstruction scheme which includes a complete non-linear description of galaxy biasing and which has been thoroughly tested on realistic mock samples. We find that the variance and skewness of the galaxy distribution evolve over this redshift interval in a way that is remarkably consistent with predictions of first- and second-order perturbation theory. This finding confirms the standard gravitational instability paradigm over nearly 9 Gyr of cosmic time and demonstrates the importance of accounting for the non-linear component of galaxy biasing to consistently reproduce the higher-order moments of the galaxy distribution and their evolution.

  10. Deep Structure and Evolution of the Cyprus Arc, With Implications for the Tectonic Evolution of Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, M. J.; Spakman, W.; Govers, R.; Ben-Avraham, Z.

    2006-12-01

    This study addresses the easternmost segment of the convergent plate boundary in the Mediterranean, encompassing the Cyprus arc and its connection to the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone and the Dead Sea fault. Seismic activity along the arc is limited (certainly relative to the adjacent Hellenic arc). Although marine geophysical surveys have elucidated many pertinent features of the region, the plate boundary configuration is not well understood. Therefore, we use seismic tomography results to study the deep structure of this plate boundary segment. We find that the deep structure of the eastern part of the Cyprus arc, exhibiting a broad zone of sinistral deformation at the surface, is very similar to the eastern segment of the Hellenic subduction zone. A slab related anomaly is missing here in the upper mantle, and this part can be identified as a STEP fault zone (Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator; see Govers and Wortel, EPSL, v. 236, p. 505-523, 2005), allowing S-SW directed slab retreat. We propose that the inception of the STEP fault and the associated back-arc extension is triggered by the continental collision and subsequent slab detachment in the Bitlis suture to the east. From a quantitative analysis of tomographic anomalies in the mantle below the Bitlis suture zone (Hafkenscheid et al., JGR, v. 111, 2006) slab detachment is inferred to have taken place at 8-12 Ma, the younger end of this age range being more pertinent for the westernmost Bitlis segment. Slab detachment creates an edge to the subducting slab, which is a favourable condition for the inception of a STEP fault. The slab in the central part of the Cypus arc has become detached possibly resulting from the collision with the Eratosthenes Seamount in the (Late) Pliocene. Only in the northwestern segment of the arc below the Antalya Basin and the Isparta Angle the slab appears to be continuous. The short duration of the time window between inception of STEP faulting and collision with the

  11. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  12. Investigating the Local and High Redshift Universe With Deep Survey Data and Ground-Based Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel Charles

    Large multiwavelength surveys are now driving the frontiers of astronomical research. I describe results from my work using data from two large astronomical surveys: the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), which has obtained deep photometric and spectroscopic data on two square degrees of the sky using many of the most powerful telescopes in the world, and the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) Survey, which uses the highly sensitive slitless spectroscopic capability of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 to detect star-forming galaxies over most of the universe's history. First I describe my work on the evolution of the high-redshift quasar luminosity function, an important observational quantity constraining the growth of the supermassive black holes in the early universe. I show that the number density of faint quasars declines rapidly above z ˜ 3. This result is discussed in the context of cosmic reionization and the coevolution of galaxies and their central black holes. Next I present results of a multi-year campaign of near-infrared spectroscopy with FIRE, a world-class near-infrared spectrometer on the Magellan Baade 6.5 meter telescope in Chile, targeting emission-line galaxies at z ˜ 2 discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our results showed that the typical emission-line galaxy at this redshift has low-metallicity, low dust obscuration, high ionization parameter, and little evidence for significant active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution to the emission lines. We also find evidence that high redshift star-forming galaxies have enhanced nitrogen abundances. This result has interesting implications for the nature of the star formation in such galaxies -- in particular, it could mean that a large fraction of such galaxies harbor substantial populations of Wolf-Rayet stars, which are massive, evolved stars ejecting large amounts of enriched matter into the interstellar medium. Finally, I will discuss the discovery of three

  13. Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey -- UDS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey {CANDELS}is designed to document the ?rst third of galactic evolution from z =8 to 1.5 via deep imaging of more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IRand ACS. It will also find the first Type Ia SNe beyond z > 1.5 andestablish their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Fivepremier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected from the SpitzerExtragalactic Deep Survey {SEDS} to provide complementary IRAC imagingdata down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource for stellar masses at allredshifts. The use of ?ve widely separated ?elds mitigates cosmicvariance and yields statistically robust and complete samples ofgalaxies down to 10^9 solar masses out to z 8.The program merges two originally separate MCT proposals. The Faberprogram incorporates a ?Wide? imaging survey in three separate fieldsto 2 orbit depth over 0.2 sq. degrees, plus a ?Deep? imaging surveyto 12 orbit depth in the two GOODS regions over 0.04 sq. degrees.In combination with ultra-deep imaging from the Hubble Ultradeep Fieldprogram {GO 11563}, the result is a three-tiered strategy that ef?cientlysamples both bright/rare and faint/common extragalactic objects. TheFerguson program adds an extensive high-redshift Type Ia SNe search,plus ultraviolet "daytime" UVIS exposures in GOODS-N to exploit theCVZ opportunity in that field.This program, GO 12064, is part of the Wide mosaic survey, which has thefollowing field centers and sizes: Field ID RA{2000} Dec{2000} WFC3 Dim. PA on sky UDS 02 17 38 -05 12 02 4x11 270 COSMOS 10 00 31 +02 24 00 4x11 180 EGS 14 19 31 +52 54 10 3x15 41 Science highlights from the Wide program: * Underlying structural properties of galaxies as revealed by WFC3-IR images sensitive to older stars {beyond the 4000-A break} and less affected by dust than ACS. A key redshift is z 2, where star-formation peaks, QSOs are most abundant, and where restframe B-band is still accessible to WFC3. Sample questions include: - Structure in young

  14. A Socratic Method for Surveying Students' Readiness to Study Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Before beginning a series of presentations on evolution, it would be prudent to survey the general level of students' understanding of prerequisite basic concepts of reproduction, heredity, ontology, and phenotypic diversity so that teachers can avoid devoting time to well-known subjects of general knowledge and can spend more time on subjects…

  15. A deep redshift survey of field galaxies. Comments on the reality of the Butcher-Oemler effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, David C.; Kron, Richard G.

    1987-01-01

    A spectroscopic survey of over 400 field galaxies has been completed in three fields for which we have deep UBVI photographic photometry. The galaxies typically range from B=20 to 22 and possess redshifts z from 0.1 to 0.5 that are often quite spiky in distribution. Little, if any, luminosity evolution is observed up to redshifts z approx 0.5. By such redshifts, however, an unexpectedly large fraction of luminous galaxies has very blue intrinsic colors that suggest extensive star formation; in contrast, the reddest galaxies still have colors that match those of present-day ellipticals.

  16. Viral evolution in deep time: lentiviruses and mammals.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Robert J

    2012-02-01

    Lentiviruses are a distinctive genus of retroviruses that cause chronic, persistent infections in mammals, including humans. The emergence of pandemic HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection during the late 20th century shaped a view of lentiviruses as 'modern' viruses. However, recent research has revealed an entirely different perspective, elucidating aspects of an evolutionary relationship with mammals that extends across many millions of years. Such deep evolutionary history is likely to be typical of many host-virus systems, fundamentally underpinning their interactions in the present day. For this reason, establishing the deep history of virus and host interaction is key to developing a fully informed approach to tackling viral diseases. Here, I use the example of lentiviruses to illustrate how paleovirological, geographic and genetic calibrations allow observations of virus and host interaction across a wide range of temporal and spatial scales to be integrated into a coherent ecological and evolutionary framework. PMID:22197521

  17. MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY FROM THE SPITZER DEEP WIDE-FIELD SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, Szymon; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Assef, Roberto J.; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Gorjian, V.; Griffith, R.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Brodwin, M.; Bock, J. J.; Borys, C.; Brand, K.; Grogin, N.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cool, R.; Cooray, A.; Croft, S.; Dey, Arjun; Gonzalez, A.; Ivison, R.

    2010-06-10

    We use the multi-epoch, mid-infrared Spitzer Deep Wide-Field Survey to investigate the variability of objects in 8.1 deg{sup 2} of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey Booetes field. We perform a Difference Image Analysis of the four available epochs between 2004 and 2008, focusing on the deeper 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands. Out of 474, 179 analyzed sources, 1.1% meet our standard variability selection criteria that the two light curves are strongly correlated (r>0.8) and that their joint variance ({sigma}{sub 12}) exceeds that for all sources with the same magnitude by 2{sigma}. We then examine the mid-IR colors of the variable sources and match them with X-ray sources from the XBooetes survey, radio catalogs, 24 {mu}m selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates, and spectroscopically identified AGNs from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES). Based on their mid-IR colors, most of the variable sources are AGNs (76%), with smaller contributions from stars (11%), galaxies (6%), and unclassified objects, although most of the stellar, galaxy, and unclassified sources are false positives. For our standard selection criteria, 11%-12% of the mid-IR counterparts to X-ray sources, 24 {mu}m AGN candidates, and spectroscopically identified AGNs show variability. The exact fractions depend on both the search depth and the selection criteria. For example, 12% of the 1131 known z>1 AGNs in the field and 14%-17% of the known AGNs with well-measured fluxes in all four Infrared Array Camera bands meet our standard selection criteria. The mid-IR AGN variability can be well described by a single power-law structure function with an index of {gamma} {approx} 0.5 at both 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, and an amplitude of S {sub 0} {approx_equal} 0.1 mag on rest-frame timescales of 2 yr. The variability amplitude is higher for shorter rest-frame wavelengths and lower luminosities.

  18. White dwarfs in the UKIRT infrared deep sky survey data release

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Kalirai, J. S.; Leggett, S. K.; Lodieu, N.; Bergeron, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2014-06-20

    We have identified 8 to 10 new cool white dwarfs from the Large Area Survey (LAS) Data Release 9 of the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The data set was paired with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to obtain proper motions and a broad ugrizYJHK wavelength coverage. Optical spectroscopic observations were secured at Gemini Observatory and confirm the degenerate status for eight of our targets. The final sample includes two additional white dwarf candidates with no spectroscopic observations. We rely on improved one-dimensional model atmospheres and new multi-dimensional simulations with CO5BOLD to review the stellar parameters of the published LAS white dwarf sample along with our additional discoveries. Most of the new objects possess very cool atmospheres with effective temperatures below 5000 K, including two pure-hydrogen remnants with a cooling age between 8.5 and 9.0 Gyr, and tangential velocities in the range 40 km s{sup –1} ≤v {sub tan} ≤ 60 km s{sup –1}. They are likely thick disk 10-11 Gyr old objects. In addition, we find a resolved double degenerate system with v {sub tan} ∼ 155 km s{sup –1} and a cooling age between 3.0 and 5.0 Gyr. These white dwarfs could be disk remnants with a very high velocity or former halo G stars. We also compare the LAS sample with earlier studies of very cool degenerates and observe a similar deficit of helium-dominated atmospheres in the range 5000 < T {sub eff} (K) < 6000. We review the possible explanations for the spectral evolution from helium-dominated toward hydrogen-rich atmospheres at low temperatures.

  19. A single evolutionary innovation drives the deep evolution of symbiotic N2-fixation in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Werner, Gijsbert D A; Cornwell, William K; Sprent, Janet I; Kattge, Jens; Kiers, E Toby

    2014-06-10

    Symbiotic associations occur in every habitat on earth, but we know very little about their evolutionary histories. Current models of trait evolution cannot adequately reconstruct the deep history of symbiotic innovation, because they assume homogenous evolutionary processes across millions of years. Here we use a recently developed, heterogeneous and quantitative phylogenetic framework to study the origin of the symbiosis between angiosperms and nitrogen-fixing (N2) bacterial symbionts housed in nodules. We compile the largest database of global nodulating plant species and reconstruct the symbiosis' evolution. We identify a single, cryptic evolutionary innovation driving symbiotic N2-fixation evolution, followed by multiple gains and losses of the symbiosis, and the subsequent emergence of 'stable fixers' (clades extremely unlikely to lose the symbiosis). Originating over 100 MYA, this innovation suggests deep homology in symbiotic N2-fixation. Identifying cryptic innovations on the tree of life is key to understanding the evolution of complex traits, including symbiotic partnerships.

  20. A single evolutionary innovation drives the deep evolution of symbiotic N2-fixation in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Gijsbert D. A.; Cornwell, William K.; Sprent, Janet I.; Kattge, Jens; Kiers, E. Toby

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic associations occur in every habitat on earth, but we know very little about their evolutionary histories. Current models of trait evolution cannot adequately reconstruct the deep history of symbiotic innovation, because they assume homogenous evolutionary processes across millions of years. Here we use a recently developed, heterogeneous and quantitative phylogenetic framework to study the origin of the symbiosis between angiosperms and nitrogen-fixing (N2) bacterial symbionts housed in nodules. We compile the largest database of global nodulating plant species and reconstruct the symbiosis’ evolution. We identify a single, cryptic evolutionary innovation driving symbiotic N2-fixation evolution, followed by multiple gains and losses of the symbiosis, and the subsequent emergence of ‘stable fixers’ (clades extremely unlikely to lose the symbiosis). Originating over 100 MYA, this innovation suggests deep homology in symbiotic N2-fixation. Identifying cryptic innovations on the tree of life is key to understanding the evolution of complex traits, including symbiotic partnerships. PMID:24912610

  1. X-ray Evolution of Normal Galaxies in the 6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, Bret; Basu-Zych, Antara; Mineo, Stefano; Brandt, W. Niel; Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Fragos, Tassos; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Luo, Bin; Xue, Yongquan; Bauer, Franz E.; Gilfanov, Marat; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Ranalli, Piero; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Tozzi, Paolo; Trump, Jonathan R.; Vignali, Cristian; Wang, JunXian; Yukita, Mihoko; Zezas, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    I will discuss recent efforts to quantify the evolution of X-ray binary (XRB) populations through cosmic time using the 6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. The formation of XRBs is sensitive to galaxy properties like stellar age and metallicity---properties that have evolved significantly in the broader galaxy population throughout cosmic history. I will show that scaling relations between X-ray emission from low-mass XRBs (LMXBs) with stellar mass (LX/M) and high-mass XRBs (HMXBs) with star-formation rate (LX/SFR) change significantly with redshift, such that LX(LMXB)/M ~ (1+z)^2-3 and LX(HMXB)/SFR ~ (1+z). These findings are consistent with population synthesis models, which attribute the increase in LMXB and HMXB scaling relations with redshift as being due to declining host galaxy stellar ages and metallicities, respectively. These findings have important implications for the X-ray emission from young, low-metallicity galaxies at high redshift, which are likely to be more X-ray luminous per SFR and play a significant role in the heating of the intergalactic medium.

  2. In Brief: Evolution teacher survey; Effects of drought on rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2005-05-01

    More than 30% of teachers responding to an informal survey indicated that they feel pressured to include creationism, intelligent design, or other nonscientific alternatives to evolution in their science classrooms. An experiment to simulate the effects of climate change and severe drought on a parcel of rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon has found that some parts of the affected forest tolerated the dry condition by absorbing water from deeper in the soil.

  3. Deep 20-GHz survey of the Chandra Deep Field South and SDSS Stripe 82: source catalogue and spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, Thomas M. O.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Chhetri, Rajan; Ekers, Ronald D.; Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Murphy, Tara; Norris, Ray P.; Waldram, Elizabeth M.; Whittam, Imogen H.

    2014-04-01

    We present a source catalogue and first results from a deep, blind radio survey carried out at 20 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, with follow-up observations at 5.5, 9 and 18 GHz. The Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) deep pilot survey covers a total area of 5 deg2 in the Chandra Deep Field South and in Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We estimate the survey to be 90 per cent complete above 2.5 mJy. Of the 85 sources detected, 55 per cent have steep spectra (α _{1.4}^{20} < -0.5) and 45 per cent have flat or inverted spectra (α _{1.4}^{20} ≥ -0.5). The steep-spectrum sources tend to have single power-law spectra between 1.4 and 18 GHz, while the spectral indices of the flat- or inverted-spectrum sources tend to steepen with frequency. Among the 18 inverted-spectrum (α _{1.4}^{20} ≥ 0.0) sources, 10 have clearly defined peaks in their spectra with α _{1.4}^{5.5} > 0.15 and α 9^{18} < -0.15. On a 3-yr time-scale, at least 10 sources varied by more than 15 per cent at 20 GHz, showing that variability is still common at the low flux densities probed by the AT20G-deep pilot survey. We find a strong and puzzling shift in the typical spectral index of the 15-20-GHz source population when combining data from the AT20G, Ninth Cambridge and Tenth Cambridge surveys: there is a shift towards a steeper-spectrum population when going from ˜1 Jy to ˜5 mJy, which is followed by a shift back towards a flatter-spectrum population below ˜5 mJy. The 5-GHz source-count model by Jackson & Wall, which only includes contributions from FRI and FRII sources, and star-forming galaxies, does not reproduce the observed flattening of the flat-spectrum counts below ˜5 mJy. It is therefore possible that another population of sources is contributing to this effect.

  4. Geologic evolution of the Bering Sea Komandorksy deep basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, N.A.

    1986-07-01

    The deep-water Komandorsky basin is located in the southwestern part of the Bering Sea. On the east, it is separated from the Aleutian basin by the submerged Shirshov Ridge; on the west, it is bordered by structures of the north Kamchatka accretionary prism. The Komandorsky basin is characterized by strongly dissected relief of it acoustic basement, which is overlain by a 1.5 to 2.0-km thick sedimentary cover. The western part of the basin is occupied by a rift zone, which is characterized by modern seismicity and high heat flow. It is considered to be the axial zone of Miocene-Pleistocene spreading. On the north terrace of the Komandorsky island arc, traced active volcanos provide evidence that subduction is occurring under the arc from the north. The spreading rift zone is reflected on the continent in Miocene-Pleistocene volcanic rocks, characterized by typical oceanic tholeiitic composition. The Komandorsky basin formed as a result of spreading during the Maestrichtian. Spreading within the basin occurred during the early and middle Oligocene and the late Miocene. East and west of the spreading axis, accretionary prisms formed. The latter are observed along the western flank of the Shirshov Ridge and on the eastern sides of the Kamchatka Peninsula and Koraginsky Island.

  5. Kinematic and dynamic evolution of deep water breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Owen M.; Peltzer, Rodney D.; Wang, Henry T.; Schultz, William W.

    1996-07-01

    Experiments were performed to exploit the dispersive properties of unsteady surface waves and to induce breaking by using a modified chirp pulse technique to focus the wave energy at a specific location in the Naval Research Laboratory deep water wave channel. The experiments have resulted in a highly resolved archive of breaking events ranging from wave steepening and incipient breaking to spilling and to plunging. The potential energy density, the crest front steepness, the horizontal asymmetry, and other geometric properties of an incipient breaker vary only within a moderate band about their mean values over the extent of these experiments. Thus the properties of an incipient unsteady breaker are well defined. The application of the phase-time or Hilbert transform method to the data set provides new insights into the local properties of the unsteady wave breaking. Recently, spectral and piecewise-linear algorithms for two-dimensional potential flow were developed and used by Schultz et al. [1994] to compare the onset of breaking for several methods of energy input to the unsteady wave system. The computations show that steep plunging waves occur when energy input rates are large. The various energy input methods exhibit similar breaking trends in the limit as the energy input rate becomes small in that incipient spilling breakers form when the potential energy is approximately 52 to 54% of the energy for the most energetic Stokes wave, with the formation of a singularity immediately before the crest.

  6. Cloning Hubble Deep Fields. II. Models for Evolution by Bright Galaxy Image Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwens, Rychard; Broadhurst, Tom; Silk, Joseph

    1998-10-01

    In a companion paper, we outlined a methodology for generating parameter-free, model-independent ``no-evolution'' fields of faint galaxy images, demonstrating the need for significant evolution in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) at faint magnitudes. Here we incorporate evolution into our procedure, by transforming the input bright galaxy images with redshift, for comparison with the HDF at faint magnitudes. Pure luminosity evolution is explored with the assumption that galaxy surface brightness evolves uniformly, at a rate chosen to reproduce the I-band counts. This form of evolution exacerbates the size discrepancy identified by our no-evolution simulations by increasing the area of a galaxy visible to a fixed isophote. Reasonable dwarf-augmented models are unable to generate the count excess invoking moderate rates of stellar evolution. A plausible fit to the counts and sizes is provided by ``mass-conserving'' density-evolution, consistent with small-scale hierarchical growth, in which the product of disk area and space density is conserved with redshift. Here the increased surface brightness generated by stellar evolution is accommodated by the reduced average galaxy size, for a wide range of geometries. These models are useful for calculating the rates of incompleteness and the degree of overcounting. Finally we demonstrate the potential for improvement in quantifying evolution at fainter magnitudes using the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera, with its superior UV and optical performance.

  7. SCORPIO: a deep survey of radio emission from the stellar life-cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Leto, P.; Ingallinera, A.; Buemi, C. S.; Agliozzo, C.; Cavallaro, F.; Cerrigone, L.

    2015-11-01

    Radio emission has been detected in a broad variety of stellar objects from all stages of stellar evolution. However, most of our knowledge originates from targeted observations of small samples, which are strongly biased to sources which are peculiar at other wavelengths. In order to tackle this problem we have conducted a deep 1.4 GHz survey by using the Australian Telescope Compact Array, with a net bandwidth of 1.7 GHz (1.4-3.1 GHz) , following the same observing setup as that used for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey project, this time choosing a region more appropriate for stellar work. In this paper, the Stellar Continuum Originating from Radio Physics In Ourgalaxy (SCORPIO) project is presented as well as results from the pilot experiment. The achieved rms is 30 μJy and the angular resolution ˜10 arcsec. 614 point-like sources have been extracted just from the pilot field. Only 34 of them are classified in SIMBAD or the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. About 80 per cent of the extracted sources are reported in one of the inspected catalogues and 50 per cent of them appears to belong to a reddened stellar/Galactic population. However, the evaluation of extragalactic contaminants is very difficult without further investigations. Interesting results have been obtained for extended radio sources that fall in the SCORPIO field. Many roundish-like structures (indicated as bubbles in the following) have been found, some of which are classified at other wavelengths. However, for all of these sources, our project has provided us with images of unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution.

  8. Cluster galaxy evolution with the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Amy Elizabeth

    Understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies is a principal goal of modern cosmology. In this thesis, we place constraints on galaxy evolution models using the largest sample of high redshift clusters to date. Our sample consists of 63 clusters at 0.3 ≲ z ≲ 0.9 drawn from the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey (LCDCS). This survey differs from traditional optical surveys in that we detect clusters as regions of excess surface brightness relative to the background sky rather than selecting overdensities of resolved galaxies. Therefore, not only does this sample result in a significant increase in the number of known clusters at these redshifts, but because our cluster identification criteria is independent of those utilized in previous surveys, this catalog provides an independent, well-defined sample with which to compare the results of more traditional surveys. In this work, we take a two-pronged approach to studying galaxy evolution. First, we examine the luminosity and color evolution of the bright cluster galaxies as a class. Specifically, we measure the evolution of: (1) M*I , the characteristic luminosity of cluster galaxies, (2) the location of the red envelope in V--I and I--K', and (3) the fraction of blue galaxies (i.e. the Butcher-Oemler effect; Butcher & Oemler 1984). Our data suggest that luminous early type galaxies (or the progenitors of current day early type galaxies) form the bulk of their stellar populations at high redshifts ( ≲ 5) and that many of these galaxies, if not all, experience a short term episode of star formation at lower redshifts (1.5 < z < 2). Second, we narrow the focus and study a single type of cluster galaxy, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). We constrain the amount of luminosity and color evolution of BCGs, particularly in the context of recent claims in the literature of significant mass accretion since z ˜ 1 (Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Burke, Collins, & Mann 2000). Consistent with previous results (Burke

  9. A Deep Chandra ACIS Survey of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Kilgard, Roy E.

    2016-08-01

    We have obtained a deep X-ray image of the nearby galaxy M51 using Chandra. Here we present the catalog of X-ray sources detected in these observations and provide an overview of the properties of the point-source population. We find 298 sources within the D 25 radii of NGC 5194/5, of which 20% are variable, a dozen are classical transients, and another half dozen are transient-like sources. The typical number of active ultraluminous X-ray sources in any given observation is ˜5, and only two of those sources persist in an ultraluminous state over the 12 yr of observations. Given reasonable assumptions about the supernova remnant population, the luminosity function is well described by a power law with an index between 1.55 and 1.7, only slightly shallower than that found for populations dominated by high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which suggests that the binary population in NGC 5194 is also dominated by HMXBs. The luminosity function of NGC 5195 is more consistent with a low-mass X-ray binary dominated population. Based on observations made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract #NAS83060, and the data were obtained through program GO1-12115.

  10. A Deep Chandra ACIS Survey of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Kilgard, Roy E.

    2016-08-01

    We have obtained a deep X-ray image of the nearby galaxy M51 using Chandra. Here we present the catalog of X-ray sources detected in these observations and provide an overview of the properties of the point-source population. We find 298 sources within the D 25 radii of NGC 5194/5, of which 20% are variable, a dozen are classical transients, and another half dozen are transient-like sources. The typical number of active ultraluminous X-ray sources in any given observation is ˜5, and only two of those sources persist in an ultraluminous state over the 12 yr of observations. Given reasonable assumptions about the supernova remnant population, the luminosity function is well described by a power law with an index between 1.55 and 1.7, only slightly shallower than that found for populations dominated by high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which suggests that the binary population in NGC 5194 is also dominated by HMXBs. The luminosity function of NGC 5195 is more consistent with a low-mass X-ray binary dominated population. Based on observations made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract #NAS83060, and the data were obtained through program GO1-12115.

  11. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX): an All Sky Ultraviolet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana; GALEX Team

    We are preparing a mission to perform imaging and spectroscopic surveys of the sky in the Ultraviolet. GALEX (The GALaxy Evolution EXplorer) will fill in the crucial missing piece of the spectrum so that our knowledge of the sky from 100 micron to 10 A is complete. The Palomar Sky Survey has served as the fundamental resource for research in optical astronomy for over thirty years, and the IRAS, EUVE, and Rosat satellites provided similar databases for the infrared, extreme ultraviolet, and X-ray regimes. GALEX will provide a catalog with an order of magnitude more sources than any of these experiments, and will produce an unprecedented statistically powerful database of UV images and spectra of nearby and distant galaxies, linked to a multiwavelength archive. GALEX is approved as a NASA Small Explorer (SMEX) mission, to fly in 2001. GALEX will perform a series of spectroscopic and imaging surveys in the space ultraviolet band (1300-3000A ), that will map the history and probe the causes of star formation over the 0evolution, when most stars, elements, and galaxy disks were formed. GALEX will provide a direct measurement of each the redshift (using metal lines and the Lyman break), extinction (using the UV spectral slope), and star formation rate (UV luminosity) in 100,000 galaxies, with efficient slitless grism spectroscopy. It will determine whether rapid evolution has occured in the star formation rate, or in the extinction or initial mass function. The GALEX database will furnish a direct link between rest frame UV properties of galaxies seen locally to those that dominate the faint blue galaxy population. As such, it will provide a framework for the interpretation of the deepest HST images and those that may be obtained by the NGST.

  12. Radio variability in the Phoenix Deep Survey at 1.4 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. J.; Drury, J. A.; Bell, M. E.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2016-09-01

    We use archival data from the Phoenix Deep Survey to investigate the variable radio source population above 1 mJy beam-1 at 1.4 GHz. Given the similarity of this survey to other such surveys we take the opportunity to investigate the conflicting results which have appeared in the literature. Two previous surveys for variability conducted with the Very Large Array (VLA) achieved a sensitivity of 1 mJy beam-1. However, one survey found an areal density of radio variables on time-scales of decades that is a factor of ˜4 times greater than a second survey which was conducted on time-scales of less than a few years. In the Phoenix deep field we measure the density of variable radio sources to be ρ = 0.98 deg-2 on time-scales of 6 months to 8 yr. We make use of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared cross-ids, and identify all variable sources as an active galactic nucleus of some description. We suggest that the discrepancy between previous VLA results is due to the different time-scales probed by each of the surveys, and that radio variability at 1.4 GHz is greatest on time-scales of 2-5 yr.

  13. Shapley Supercluster Survey: Galaxy evolution from filaments to cluster cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merluzzi, P.; Busarello, G.; Haines, C. P.; Mercurio, A.; Okabe, N.; Pimbblet, K. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Bourdin, H.; Mazzotta, P.; Capaccioli, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Schipani, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a multiwavelength survey of the Shapley Supercluster (SSC; z ˜ 0.05) covering a contiguous area of 260 h^{-2}_{70} Mpc2 including the supercluster core. The project main aim is to quantify the influence of cluster-scale mass assembly on galaxy evolution in one of the most massive structures in the local Universe. The Shapley Supercluster Survey (ShaSS) includes nine Abell clusters (A3552, A3554, A3556, A3558, A3559, A3560, A3562, AS0724, AS0726) and two poor clusters (SC1327-312, SC1329-313) showing evidence of cluster-cluster interactions. Optical (ugri) and near-infrared (K) imaging acquired with VLT Survey Telescope and Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy allow us to study the galaxy population down to m⋆ + 6 at the supercluster redshift. A dedicated spectroscopic survey with AAOmega on the Anglo-Australian Telescope provides a magnitude-limited sample of supercluster members with 80 per cent completeness at ˜m⋆ + 3. We derive the galaxy density across the whole area, demonstrating that all structures within this area are embedded in a single network of clusters, groups and filaments. The stellar mass density in the core of the SSC is always higher than 9 × 109 M⊙ Mpc-3, which is ˜40× the cosmic stellar mass density for galaxies in the local Universe. We find a new filamentary structure (˜7 Mpc long in projection) connecting the SSC core to the cluster A3559, as well as previously unidentified density peaks. We perform a weak-lensing analysis of the central 1 deg2 field of the survey obtaining for the central cluster A3558 a mass of M_{500}=7.63_{-3.40}^{+3.88}× 10^{14} M_{⊙}, in agreement with X-ray based estimates.

  14. A Deep Submillimeter Survey of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce-Price, D.; Richer, J. S.; Greaves, J. S.; Holland, W. S.; Jenness, T.; Lasenby, A. N.; White, G. J.; Matthews, H. E.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Dent, W. R. F.; Zylka, R.; Mezger, P.; Hasegawa, T.; Oka, T.; Omont, A.; Gilmore, G.

    2000-12-01

    We present first results from a submillimeter continuum survey of the Galactic center ``central molecular zone'' (CMZ), made with the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. SCUBA's scan-map mode has allowed us to make extremely wide field maps of thermal dust emission with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. We also discuss some issues related to the elimination of artifacts in scan-map data. Our simultaneous 850/450 μm maps have a total size of approximately 2.8d×0.5d (400×75 pc) elongated along the Galactic plane. They cover the Sagittarius A region, including Sgr A*, the circumnuclear disk, and the 20 and 50 km s-1 clouds; the area around the Pistol; Sgr B2, the brightest feature on the maps; and at their Galactic western and eastern edges the Sgr C and Sgr D regions. There are many striking features such as filaments and shell-like structures as well as point sources such as Sgr A* itself. The total mass in the CMZ is greater than that revealed in previous optically thin molecular line maps by a factor of ~3, and new details are revealed on scales down to 0.33 pc across this 400 pc-wide region.

  15. Evolutional and ecological implications of the properties of deep-sea barophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yayanos, A A

    1986-12-01

    The rate of reproduction of deep-sea bacteria from six different capture depths between 1957 and 10,476 meters was studied as a function of temperature and pressure. The results showed the following: the true deep-sea bacteria of different depths have several characteristics, presumably evolutionally derived, distinguishing them from each other and from bacteria of atmospheric-pressure environments; pressure plays a significant role in determining the distribution of oceanic life; and pressure-adapted bacteria are easily recovered from and ubiquitous in the deep ocean. Organisms evolving in habitats of different temperatures and pressures need to be studied to understand the physical limits of life, the distribution of life within the earth and its oceans, the role of organisms in organic diagenesis and petroleum formation, and the possible existence of life on and within other planets.

  16. Multiparametrical survey to understand the dynamic of monitored deep seated Landslide (La Clapière DSL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palis, Edouard; Lebourg, Thomas; Vidal, Maurin; Vitard, Clement; Tric, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The geology and the structure of a deep seated landslide (La Clapiere with 65 million m3, south eastern France) explains the complex hydrology of the site which plays a key-role in the destabilization and the multiphase dynamics of the slope (water circulation within the sliding mass, fluid exchanges between superficial and deep layers aquifer through faults). To understand fluid circulations within the unstable slope, a pluri-annual multi parametric survey was set up, but since 18 months the survey combines new research multiparametric station. The landslide (La Clapiere) is located in the Argentera-Mercantour massif, and it has been instrumented since 1982 by academic researchers and since 2003 by the Multidisciplinary Observatory of Versant Instabilities (OMIV, the French National Observation Service (SNO)). A permanent electrical tomography monitoring was installed on the landslide since November 2012 to complement the actual monitoring system (GPS, seismic, pluviometric and hydrogeologic data). The aim of this study is to analyze the temporal evolution of resistivity, positioning and pluviometry during the November 2012 to March 2013 period. A qualitative and statistical approach by clustering, principal component analysis (PCA), and probability density function (Pdf) of resistivity data, coupled with pluviometric and GPS data provides a better understanding of the dynamics in this place. Rainfall induces strong accelerations of the rockslide movement. This new statistical study also explained the major roles of the fault and the basement of the landslide, and the time chronology of the water flow in the massif.

  17. The deep XMM-Newton Survey of M 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiele, H.; Pietsch, W.; Haberl, F.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Barnard, R.; Williams, B. F.; Kong, A. K. H.; Kolb, U.

    2011-10-01

    Aims: The largest Local Group spiral galaxy, M 31, has been completely imaged for the first time, obtaining a luminosity lower limit ~1035 erg s-1 in the 0.2-4.5 keV band. Our XMM-Newton EPIC survey combines archival observations along the major axis, from June 2000 to July 2004, with observations taken between June 2006 and February 2008 that cover the remainder of the D25 ellipse. The main goal of the paper is to study the X-ray source population of M 31. Methods: An X-ray catalogue of 1897 sources was created, with 914 detected for the first time. Source classification and identification were based on X-ray hardness ratios, spatial extent of the sources, and cross correlation with catalogues in the X-ray, optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths. We also analysed the long-term variability of the X-ray sources and this variability allows us to distinguish between X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei (AGN). Furthermore, supernova remnant classifications of previous studies that did not use long-term variability as a classification criterion could be validated. Including previous Chandra and ROSAT observations in the long-term variability study allowed us to detect additional transient or at least highly variable sources, which are good candidate X-ray binaries. Results: Fourteen of the 30 supersoft source (SSS) candidates represent supersoft emission of optical novae. Many of the 25 supernova remnants (SNRs) and 31 SNR candidates lie within the 10 kpc dust ring and other star-forming regions in M 31. This connection between SNRs and star-forming regions implies that most of the remnants originate in type II supernovae. The brightest sources in X-rays in M 31 belong to the class of X-ray binaries (XRBs). Ten low-mass XRBs (LMXBs) and 26 LMXB candidates were identified based on their temporal variability. In addition, 36 LMXBs and 17 LMXB candidates were identified owing to correlations with globular clusters and globular cluster candidates. From optical and X

  18. The Void Galaxy Survey: Galaxy Evolution and Gas Accretion in Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, Kathryn; van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.; Beygu, Burcu; van de Weygaert, Rien; van der Hulst, J. M.; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; Peletier, Reynier F.

    2016-10-01

    Voids represent a unique environment for the study of galaxy evolution, as the lower density environment is expected to result in shorter merger histories and slower evolution of galaxies. This provides an ideal opportunity to test theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Imaging of the neutral hydrogen, central in both driving and regulating star formation, directly traces the gas reservoir and can reveal interactions and signs of cold gas accretion. For a new Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), we have carefully selected a sample of 59 galaxies that reside in the deepest underdensities of geometrically identified voids within the SDSS at distances of ~100 Mpc, and pursued deep UV, optical, Hα, IR, and HI imaging to study in detail the morphology and kinematics of both the stellar and gaseous components. This sample allows us to not only examine the global statistical properties of void galaxies, but also to explore the details of the dynamical properties. We present an overview of the VGS, and highlight key results on the HI content and individually interesting systems. In general, we find that the void galaxies are gas rich, low luminosity, blue disk galaxies, with optical and HI properties that are not unusual for their luminosity and morphology. We see evidence of both ongoing assembly, through the gas dynamics between interacting systems, and significant gas accretion, seen in extended gas disks and kinematic misalignments. The VGS establishes a local reference sample to be used in future HI surveys (CHILES, DINGO, LADUMA) that will directly observe the HI evolution of void galaxies over cosmic time.

  19. Initial OSSE Sky Survey Observation: Deep Survey in the Virgo Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The OSSE Virgo survey covered about 1% of the sky, using eight weeks of observing time on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and was performed in conjunction with the EGRET and COMPTEL instruments on CGRO. A fundamental aspect of the survey was the development of data reduction techniques for the scanning data from the OSSE detectors. A direct algebraic approach for spatially deconvolving the data was developed. For the survey work, no background observations isolated from the survey region were acquired, unlike normal discrete source observations. The survey, reduction method covers the mapped region with a grid of pixels, and estimates the flux from each pixel by least-squares agreement with the data, assuming positivity constraints. This technique has led to the detection of compact sources at hard X-ray energies within the Virgo region, and the OSSE survey studies have been extended to the south galactic pole and north Ecliptic pole, with similar analysis techniques.

  20. The WIRCam Deep Survey. I. Counts, colours, and mass-functions derived from near-infrared imaging in the CFHTLS deep fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielby, R.; Hudelot, P.; McCracken, H. J.; Ilbert, O.; Daddi, E.; Le Fèvre, O.; Gonzalez-Perez, V.; Kneib, J.-P.; Marmo, C.; Mellier, Y.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Willott, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    We present a new near-infrared imaging survey in the four CFHTLS deep fields: the WIRCam Deep Survey or "WIRDS". WIRDS comprises extremely deep, high quality (FWHM ~ 0.6″) J, H, and Ks imaging covering a total effective area of 2.1 deg2 and reaching AB 50% completeness limits of ≈ 24.5. We combine our images with the CFHTLS to create a unique eight-band ugrizJHKS photometric catalogues in the four CFHTLS deep fields; these four separate fields allow us to make a robust estimate of the effect of cosmic variance for all our measurements. We use these catalogues in combination with ≈ 9800 spectroscopic redshifts to estimate precise photometric redshifts (σΔz/(1 + z) ≲ 0.03 at i < 25), galaxy types, star-formation rates and stellar masses for a unique sample of ≈ 1.8 million galaxies. Our JHKs number counts are consistent with previous studies. We apply the "BzK" selection to our gzK filter set and find that the star forming BzK selection successfully selects 76% of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.4 < z < 2.5 in our photometric catalogue, based on our photometric redshift measurement. Similarly the passive BzK selection returns 52% of the passive 1.4 < z < 2.5 population identified in the photometric catalogue. We present the mass functions of the total galaxy population as a function of redshift up to z = 2 and present fits using double Schechter functions. A mass-dependent evolution of the mass function is seen with the numbers of galaxies with masses of M ≲ 1010.75 still evolving at z ≲ 1, but galaxies of higher mass reaching their present day numbers by z ~ 0.8-1. This is consistent with the present picture of downsizing in galaxy evolution. We compare our results with the predictions of the GALFORM semi-analytical galaxy formation model and find that the simulations provide a relatively successful fit to the observed mass functions at intermediate masses (i.e. 10 ≲ log (M/M⊙) ≲ 11). However, as is common with semi

  1. The ALHAMBRA Survey: Evolution of Galaxy Spectral Segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado-Gil, Ll.; Arnalte-Mur, P.; Martínez, V. J.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Stefanon, M.; Ascaso, B.; López-Sanjuán, C.; Márquez, I.; Pović, M.; Viironen, K.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cerviño, M.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Masegosa, J.; Moles, M.; Molino, A.; del Olmo, A.; Paredes, S.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the clustering of galaxies as a function of spectral type and redshift in the range 0.35 < z < 1.1 using data from the Advanced Large Homogeneous Area Medium Band Redshift Astronomical (ALHAMBRA) survey. The data cover 2.381 deg2 in 7 fields, after applying a detailed angular selection mask, with accurate photometric redshifts {{[}}{σ }z\\lt 0.014(1+z){{]}} down to IAB < 24. From this catalog we draw five fixed number density redshift-limited bins. We estimate the clustering evolution for two different spectral populations selected using the ALHAMBRA-based photometric templates: quiescent and star-forming galaxies. For each sample we measure the real-space clustering using the projected correlation function. Our calculations are performed over the range [0.03, 10.0] h-1 Mpc, allowing us to find a steeper trend for {r}p≲ 0.2 {h}-1 Mpc, which is especially clear for star-forming galaxies. Our analysis also shows a clear early differentiation in the clustering properties of both populations: star-forming galaxies show weaker clustering with evolution in the correlation length over the analyzed redshift range, while quiescent galaxies show stronger clustering already at high redshifts and no appreciable evolution. We also perform the bias calculation where similar segregation is found, but now it is among the quiescent galaxies where a growing evolution with redshift is clearer (abrigatted). These findings clearly corroborate the well-known color-density relation, confirming that quiescent galaxies are mainly located in dark matter halos that are more massive than those typically populated by star-forming galaxies.

  2. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: DESIGN, OBSERVATIONS, DATA REDUCTION, AND REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Harker, Justin J.; Lai, Kamson; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan Renbin; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P. E-mail: djm70@pitt.edu E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu E-mail: koo@ucolick.org E-mail: phillips@ucolick.org; and others

    2013-09-15

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z {approx} 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude M{sub B} = -20 at z {approx} 1 via {approx}90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg{sup 2} divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R{sub AB} = 24.1. Objects with z {approx}< 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted {approx}2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z {approx} 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 A doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm{sup -1} grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R {approx} 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or

  3. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L; Guhathakurta, Puraga; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Wilmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z approx. 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z approx. 1 via approx.90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 Sq. deg divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R(sub AB) = 24.1. Objects with z approx. < 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted approx. 2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z approx. 1.45, where the [O ii] 3727 Ang. doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm(exp -1) grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R approx. 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other

  4. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Connolly, A. J.; Kaiser, N.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lin, Lihwai; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Luppino, G. A.; Marinoni, C.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Metevier, Anne; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2013-09-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z ~ 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z ~ 1 via ~90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg2 divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R AB = 24.1. Objects with z <~ 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted ~2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z ~ 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 Å doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm-1 grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R ~ 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other artifacts that in some cases remain after data reduction. Redshift

  5. Resource competition, character displacement, and the evolution of deep corolla tubes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gironés, Miguel A; Santamaría, Luis

    2007-09-01

    It is normally thought that deep corolla tubes evolve when the plant's successful reproduction is contingent on having a corolla tube longer than the tongue of the flower's pollinators. Combining optimal foraging theory and quantitative genetics in a spatially explicit, individual-based model, we show that flowers with long corolla tubes can alternatively evolve because they promote resource partitioning among nectar feeders and increase the probability of conspecific pollen transfer. When there is competition for resources, long-tongued flower visitors feed preferentially at deep flowers and short-tongued visitors at shallow flowers. Both plant species thus benefit when the depths of their corollas are so different that each flower visitor specializes on one species. Resource competition can promote the evolution of deep corollas despite the presence of significant amounts of noise, such as deviations from optimal foraging behavior due to perceptual errors or temporal fluctuations in the relative abundance of competing pollinator species. Our results can explain the evolution of long corollas in a number of systems that do not conform to the traditional view.

  6. Structural geology and evolution of the Mississippi Fan fold belt, deep Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, P. ); Buffler, R.T. )

    1992-02-01

    The Mississippi Fan fold belt, located in the deep Gulf of Mexico beneath the upper and middle Mississippi Fan, is characterized mainly by basinward-verging anticlines and associated thrust faults. The fold belt extends approximately 300 km eastward and is approximately 50 km wide. Based on correlations with deep Gulf of Mexico seismic sequences (Challenger, Campeche, Lower Mexican Ridges, Middle Mexican Ridges, and Upper Mexican Ridges), the folded strata are interpreted to be Upper Jurassic through Miocene. Salt tongues or sheets in the lower slope have overridden and partly masked parts of the fold belt. In this paper, the authors concentrate on the Mississippi Fan fold belt, and (1) describe the structural geology of the Mississippi Fan fold belt, (2) document the relationships of tectonics and sedimentation within the fold belt, (3) show the timing of structural growth and evolution of the fold belt based on new ages for deep Gulf of Mexico sequences, and (4) present a model for the evolution of the fold belt. Geometric and detailed kinematic descriptions of the fold belt and their relationship to syntectonic sedimentation are not included here, but are the subject of current research. These fold belts are of particular interest to the petroleum industry because of the large size of the structures and the potential for large petroleum accumulations.

  7. Large-Scale Transportation Network Congestion Evolution Prediction Using Deep Learning Theory

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Internet of Things (IoT), transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation. PMID:25780910

  8. Large-scale transportation network congestion evolution prediction using deep learning theory.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Internet of Things (IoT), transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation. PMID:25780910

  9. Large-scale transportation network congestion evolution prediction using deep learning theory.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Internet of Things (IoT), transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation.

  10. THE DEEP3 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: KECK/DEIMOS SPECTROSCOPY IN THE GOODS-N FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Michael C.; Aird, James A.; Coil, Alison L. E-mail: acoil@ucsd.edu

    2011-03-15

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations in the GOODS-N field completed using DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope as part of the DEEP3 Galaxy Redshift Survey. Observations of 370 unique targets down to a limiting magnitude of R {sub AB} = 24.4 yielded 156 secure redshifts. In addition to redshift information, we provide sky-subtracted one- and two-dimensional spectra of each target. Observations were conducted following the procedures of the Team Keck Redshift Survey (TKRS), thereby producing spectra that augment the TKRS sample while maintaining the uniformity of its spectral database.

  11. Cathodic protection survey of deep-water structures and subsea installations

    SciTech Connect

    Leask, L.J. )

    1989-11-01

    The successful and efficient cathodic protection (CP) survey of a deep water structure using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) has remained an enigma to many corrosion engineers in oil companies. The location of the corrosion group within the company structure often plays a major role in the success of the project. Operators locate their corrosion departments in different groups, some in the offshore/onshore operations and others in the design group. This location often has a bearing on the financial and operational approach to the project. The author discusses how a successful CP survey is both an achievable and exciting project with experienced preplanning and selection of the correct equipment.

  12. CP survey of deep water structures and subsea installations using an ROV

    SciTech Connect

    Leask, L.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The successful and efficient CP survey of a deep water structure using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) has remained an enigma to many corrosion engineers in oil companies. The location of the corrosion group within the company structure often plays a major role in the success of the project. Operators locate their corrosion departments in different groups, some in the offshore/onshore operations and others in the design group. This location often has a bearing on the financial and operational approach to the project. This paper discusses how a successful CP survey is both an achievable and exciting project with experienced pre- planning and selection of the correct equipment.

  13. Did shifting seawater sulfate concentrations drive the evolution of deep-sea methane-seep ecosystems?

    PubMed

    Kiel, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    The origin and evolution of the faunas inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents and methane seeps have been debated for decades. These faunas rely on a local source of sulfide and other reduced chemicals for nutrition, which spawned the hypothesis that their evolutionary history is independent from that of photosynthesis-based food chains and instead driven by extinction events caused by deep-sea anoxia. Here I use the fossil record of seep molluscs to show that trends in body size, relative abundance and epifaunal/infaunal ratios track current estimates of seawater sulfate concentrations through the last 150 Myr. Furthermore, the two main faunal turnovers during this time interval coincide with major changes in seawater sulfate concentrations. Because sulfide at seeps originates mostly from seawater sulfate, variations in sulfate concentrations should directly affect the base of the food chain of this ecosystem and are thus the likely driver of the observed macroecologic and evolutionary patterns. The results imply that the methane-seep fauna evolved largely independently from developments and mass extinctions affecting the photosynthesis-based biosphere and add to the growing body of evidence that the chemical evolution of the oceans had a major impact on the evolution of marine life. PMID:25716797

  14. Did shifting seawater sulfate concentrations drive the evolution of deep-sea methane-seep ecosystems?

    PubMed

    Kiel, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    The origin and evolution of the faunas inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents and methane seeps have been debated for decades. These faunas rely on a local source of sulfide and other reduced chemicals for nutrition, which spawned the hypothesis that their evolutionary history is independent from that of photosynthesis-based food chains and instead driven by extinction events caused by deep-sea anoxia. Here I use the fossil record of seep molluscs to show that trends in body size, relative abundance and epifaunal/infaunal ratios track current estimates of seawater sulfate concentrations through the last 150 Myr. Furthermore, the two main faunal turnovers during this time interval coincide with major changes in seawater sulfate concentrations. Because sulfide at seeps originates mostly from seawater sulfate, variations in sulfate concentrations should directly affect the base of the food chain of this ecosystem and are thus the likely driver of the observed macroecologic and evolutionary patterns. The results imply that the methane-seep fauna evolved largely independently from developments and mass extinctions affecting the photosynthesis-based biosphere and add to the growing body of evidence that the chemical evolution of the oceans had a major impact on the evolution of marine life.

  15. Did shifting seawater sulfate concentrations drive the evolution of deep-sea methane-seep ecosystems?

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the faunas inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents and methane seeps have been debated for decades. These faunas rely on a local source of sulfide and other reduced chemicals for nutrition, which spawned the hypothesis that their evolutionary history is independent from that of photosynthesis-based food chains and instead driven by extinction events caused by deep-sea anoxia. Here I use the fossil record of seep molluscs to show that trends in body size, relative abundance and epifaunal/infaunal ratios track current estimates of seawater sulfate concentrations through the last 150 Myr. Furthermore, the two main faunal turnovers during this time interval coincide with major changes in seawater sulfate concentrations. Because sulfide at seeps originates mostly from seawater sulfate, variations in sulfate concentrations should directly affect the base of the food chain of this ecosystem and are thus the likely driver of the observed macroecologic and evolutionary patterns. The results imply that the methane-seep fauna evolved largely independently from developments and mass extinctions affecting the photosynthesis-based biosphere and add to the growing body of evidence that the chemical evolution of the oceans had a major impact on the evolution of marine life. PMID:25716797

  16. CANDELS MULTIWAVELENGTH CATALOGS: SOURCE IDENTIFICATION AND PHOTOMETRY IN THE CANDELS UKIDSS ULTRA-DEEP SURVEY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Fontana, Adriano; Castellano, Marco; Ferguson, Henry C.; Dahlen, Tomas; Grogin, Norman; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandy M.; Guo, Yicheng; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Peth, Michael; Almaini, Omar; Collaboration: CANDELS team; and others

    2013-06-01

    We present the multiwavelength-ultraviolet to mid-infrared-catalog of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Ultra-Deep Survey field observed as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). Based on publicly available data, the catalog includes the CANDELS data from the Hubble Space Telescope (near-infrared WFC3 F125W and F160W data and visible ACS F606W and F814W data); u-band data from CFHT/Megacam; B, V, R{sub c} , i', and z' band data from Subaru/Suprime-Cam; Y and K{sub s} band data from VLT/HAWK-I; J, H, and K band data from UKIDSS (Data Release 8); and Spitzer/IRAC data (3.6, 4.5 {mu}m from SEDS; 5.8 and 8.0 {mu}m from SpUDS). The present catalog is F160W-selected and contains 35, 932 sources over an area of 201.7 arcmin{sup 2} and includes radio- and X-ray-detected sources and spectroscopic redshifts available for 210 sources.

  17. A Dataset of Deep-Sea Fishes Surveyed by Research Vessels in the Waters around Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Jack; Yeh, Hsin-Ming; Lee, Mao-Yin; Chen, Lee-Sea; Lin, Hen-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The study of deep-sea fish fauna is hampered by a lack of data due to the difficulty and high cost incurred in its surveys and collections. Taiwan is situated along the edge of the Eurasia fig, at the junction of three Large Marine Ecosystems or Ecoregions of the East China Sea, South China Sea and the Philippines. As nearly two-thirds of its surrounding marine ecosystems are deep-sea environments, Taiwan is expected to hold a rich diversity of deep-sea fish. However, in the past, no research vessels were employed to collect fish data on site. Only specimens, caught by bottom trawl fishing in the waters hundreds of meters deep and missing precise locality information, were collected from Dasi and Donggang fishing harbors. Began in 2001, with the support of National Science Council, research vessels were made available to take on the task of systematically collecting deep-sea fish specimens and occurrence records in the waters surrounding Taiwan. By the end of 2006, a total of 3,653 specimens, belonging to 26 orders, 88 families, 198 genera and 366 species, were collected in addition to data such as sampling site geographical coordinates and water depth, and fish body length and weight. The information, all accessible from the “Database of Taiwan’s Deep-Sea Fauna and Its Distribution (http://deepsea.biodiv.tw/)” as part of the “Fish Database of Taiwan,” can benefit the study of temporal and spatial changes in distribution and abundance of fish fauna in the context of global deep-sea biodiversity. PMID:25610339

  18. A Dataset of Deep-Sea Fishes Surveyed by Research Vessels in the Waters around Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Jack; Yeh, Hsin-Ming; Lee, Mao-Yin; Chen, Lee-Sea; Lin, Hen-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The study of deep-sea fish fauna is hampered by a lack of data due to the difficulty and high cost incurred in its surveys and collections. Taiwan is situated along the edge of the Eurasia fig, at the junction of three Large Marine Ecosystems or Ecoregions of the East China Sea, South China Sea and the Philippines. As nearly two-thirds of its surrounding marine ecosystems are deep-sea environments, Taiwan is expected to hold a rich diversity of deep-sea fish. However, in the past, no research vessels were employed to collect fish data on site. Only specimens, caught by bottom trawl fishing in the waters hundreds of meters deep and missing precise locality information, were collected from Dasi and Donggang fishing harbors. Began in 2001, with the support of National Science Council, research vessels were made available to take on the task of systematically collecting deep-sea fish specimens and occurrence records in the waters surrounding Taiwan. By the end of 2006, a total of 3,653 specimens, belonging to 26 orders, 88 families, 198 genera and 366 species, were collected in addition to data such as sampling site geographical coordinates and water depth, and fish body length and weight. The information, all accessible from the "Database of Taiwan's Deep-Sea Fauna and Its Distribution (http://deepsea.biodiv.tw/)" as part of the "Fish Database of Taiwan," can benefit the study of temporal and spatial changes in distribution and abundance of fish fauna in the context of global deep-sea biodiversity.

  19. THE CFHTLS-DEEP CATALOG OF INTERACTING GALAXIES. I. MERGER RATE EVOLUTION TO z = 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Bridge, C. R.; Carlberg, R. G.; Sullivan, M.

    2010-02-01

    We present the rest-frame optical galaxy merger fraction between 0.2 < z < 1.2, as a function of stellar mass and optical luminosity, as observed by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Deep Survey (CFHTLS-Deep). We developed a new classification scheme to identify major galaxy-galaxy mergers based on the presence of tidal tails and bridges. These morphological features are signposts of recent and ongoing merger activity. Through the visual classification of all galaxies, down to i{sub vega} <= 22.2 (approx27,000 galaxies) over 2 square degrees, we have compiled the CFHTLS-Deep Catalog of Interacting Galaxies, with approx 1600 merging galaxies. We find the merger fraction to be 4.3% +- 0.3% at z approx 0.3 and 19.0% +- 2.5% at z approx 1, implying evolution of the merger fraction going as (1 + z) {sup m}, with m = 2.25 +- 0.24. This result is inconsistent with a mild or non-evolving (m < 1.5) scenario at a approx>4sigma level of confidence. A mild trend, where by massive galaxies with M{sub *}>10{sup 10.7} M{sub sun} are undergoing fewer mergers than less massive systems (M{sub *} approx 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}), consistent with the expectations of galaxy assembly downsizing is observed. Our results also show that interacting galaxies have on average SFRs double that found in non-interacting field galaxies. We conclude that (1) the optical galaxy merger fraction does evolve with redshift, (2) the merger fraction depends mildly on stellar mass, with lower mass galaxies having higher merger fractions at z < 1, and (3) star formation is triggered at all phases of a merger, with larger enhancements at later stages, consistent with N-body simulations.

  20. A Deep, High-Resolution Survey of the Low-Frequency Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenc, E.; Garrett, M. A.; Wucknitz, O.; Anderson, J. M.; Tingay, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the first wide-field, very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) survey at 90 cm. The survey area consists of two overlapping 28 deg2 fields centered on the quasar J0226+3421 and the gravitational lens B0218+357. A total of 618 sources were targeted in these fields, based on identifications from Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) data. Of these sources, 272 had flux densities that, if unresolved, would fall above the sensitivity limit of the VLBI observations. A total of 27 sources were detected as far as 2° from the phase center. The results of the survey suggest that at least 10% of moderately faint (S ~ 100 mJy) sources found at 90 cm contain compact components smaller than ~0.1''-0.3'' and stronger than 10% of their total flux densities. A ~90 mJy source was detected in the VLBI data that was not seen in the WENSS and NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) data and may be a transient or highly variable source that has been serendipitously detected. This survey is the first systematic (and nonbiased), deep, high-resolution survey of the low-frequency radio sky. It is also the widest field of view VLBI survey with a single pointing to date, exceeding the total survey area of previous higher frequency surveys by 2 orders of magnitude. These initial results suggest that new low-frequency telescopes, such as LOFAR, should detect many compact radio sources and that plans to extend these arrays to baselines of several thousand kilometers are warranted.

  1. The X-Ray Evolution of Early-Type Galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Bell, E. F.; McIntosh, D. H.; Bauer, F. E.; Hasinger, G.; Mainieri, V.; Miyaji, T.; Schneider, D. P.; Steffen, A. T.

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the evolution over the last 6.3 Gyr of cosmic time (i.e., since z~0.7) of the average X-ray properties of early-type galaxies within the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S). Our early-type galaxy sample includes 539 objects with red sequence colors and Sérsic indices larger than n=2.5, which were selected jointly from the COMBO-17 (Classifying Objects by Medium-Band Observations in 17 Filters) and GEMS (Galaxy Evolution from Morphologies and SEDs) surveys. We utilize the deep Chandra observations over the E-CDF-S and X-ray stacking analyses to constrain primarily the average X-ray emission from ``normal'' early-type galaxies (i.e., those that are not dominated by luminous AGNs). We study separately optically luminous (LB~1010-1011 LB,solar) and faint (LB~109.3-1010 LB,solar) galaxy samples, which we expect to have soft (0.5-2.0 keV) X-ray emission dominated by hot (~1 keV) interstellar gas and low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations, respectively. The AGN fraction of our optically luminous sample evolves with redshift in a manner consistent with the (1+z)3 evolution observed in other investigations of X-ray-selected AGNs. We find that the X-ray-to-B-band mean luminosity ratio (LX/LB) for normal optically luminous galaxies does not evolve significantly over z~0.0-0.7. This lack of X-ray evolution implies a general balance between the heating and cooling of the hot gas. If transient AGN activity is largely responsible for maintaining this balance, then we infer that mechanical power must be dominating the feedback out to z~0.7. Furthermore, in this scenario the average mechanical AGN power must remain roughly constant over the last half of cosmic time. For our optically faint early-type galaxies, we find suggestive evidence that LX/LB increases with redshift over z~0.0-0.5.

  2. The CfA Einstein Observatory extended deep X-ray survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primini, F. A.; Murray, S. S.; Huchra, J.; Schild, R.; Burg, R.

    1991-01-01

    All IPC exposures in the Einstein Extended Deep X-ray Survey program have been reanalyzed. The current survey covers about 2.3 sq deg with a typical limiting sensitivity of about 5 x 10 to the -14th ergs/sq cm/s in the energy range from 0.8-3.5 keV. A total of 25 IPC sources are detected above a threshold of 4.5 sigma. A total of 18 are detected independently in the HRI, leading to the identification of six with stars and 11 with extragalactic objects. The remaining sources are classified as extragalactic. The population of identified extragalactic objects is dominated by QSOs, with one or two possible clusters. The basic conclusions of the original survey remain unchanged.

  3. Deep Crustal Structure beneath Large Igneous Provinces and the Petrologic Evolution of Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M. A.; Ridley, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    We present a review of seismological constraints on deep crustal structures underlying large igneous provinces (LIPs), largely from wide-angle seismic refraction surveys. The main purpose of this review is to ascertain whether this seismic evidence is consistent with, or contrary to, petrological models for the genesis of flood basalt lavas. Where high-quality data are available beneath continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces (Emeishan, Columbia River, Deccan, Siberia), high-velocity structures (Vp ~6.9-7.5 km/sec) are typically found immediately overlying the Moho in layers of order ~5-15 km thick. Oceanic plateau (OP) LIPs exhibit similar layers, with a conspicuous layer of very high crustal velocity (Vp~7.7 km/sec) beneath the enormous Ontong-Java plateau. These structures are similar to inferred ultramafic underplating structures seen beneath active hotspots such as Hawaii, the Marquesas, and La Reunion. Petrogenetic models for flood basalt volcanism based on hot plume melting beneath mature lithosphere suggest that these deep seismic structures may consist in large part of cumulate bodies of olivine and clinopyroxene which result from ponding and deep-crustal fractionation of ultramafic primary melts. Such fractionation is necessary to produce basalts with typical MgO contents of ~6-8%, as observed for the vast bulk of observed flood basalts, from primary melts with MgO contents of order ~15-18% (or greater) such as result from hot, deep melting beneath the lithosphere. The volumes of cumulate bodies and ultramafic intrusions in the lowermost crust, often described in the literature as “underplating,” are comparable to those of the overlying basaltic formations, also consistent with petrological models. Further definition of the deep seismic structure beneath such prominent LIPs as the Ontong-Java Plateau could place better constraints on flood basalt petrogenesis by determining the relative volumes of ultramafic bodies and basaltic lavas, thereby better

  4. Deep Crustal Structure beneath Large Igneous Provinces and the Petrologic Evolution of Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Mark; Ridley, Victoria

    2010-05-01

    We present a review of seismological constraints on deep crustal structures underlying large igneous provinces (LIPs), largely from wide-angle seismic refraction surveys. The main purpose of this review is to ascertain whether this seismic evidence is consistent with, or contrary to, petrological models for the genesis of flood basalt lavas. Where high-quality data are available beneath continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces (Emeishan, Columbia River, Deccan, Siberia), high-velocity structures (Vp ~6.9-7.5 km/sec) are typically found immediately overlying the Moho in layers of order ~5-15 km thick. Oceanic plateau (OP) LIPs exhibit similar layers, with a conspicuous layer of very high crustal velocity (Vp~7.7 km/sec) beneath the enormous Ontong-Java plateau. These structures are similar to inferred ultramafic underplating structures seen beneath active hotspots such as Hawaii, the Marqueses, and La Reunion. Petrogenetic models for flood basalt volcanism based on hot plume melting beneath mature lithosphere suggest that these deep seismic structures may consist in large part of cumulate bodies of olivine and clinopyroxene which result from ponding and deep-crustal fractionation of ultramafic primary melts. Such fractionation is necessary to produce basalts with typical MgO contents of ~6-8%, as observed for the vast bulk of observed flood basalts, from primary melts with MgO contents of order ~15-18% (or greater) such as result from hot, deep melting beneath the lithosphere. The volumes of cumulate bodies and ultramafic intrusions in the lowermost crust, often described in the literature as "underplating," are comparable to those of the overlying basaltic formations, also consistent with petrological models. Further definition of the deep seismic structure beneath such prominent LIPs as the Ontong-Java Plateau could place better constraints on flood basalt petrogenesis by determining the relative volumes of ultramafic bodies and basaltic lavas, thereby better

  5. Deep crustal structure beneath large igneous provinces and the petrologic evolution of flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Victoria A.; Richards, Mark A.

    2010-09-01

    We present a review of seismological constraints on deep crustal structures underlying large igneous provinces (LIPs), largely from wide-angle seismic refraction surveys. The main purpose of this review is to ascertain whether this seismic evidence is consistent with, or contrary to, petrological models for the genesis of flood basalt lavas. Where high-quality data are available beneath continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces (Emeishan, Columbia River, Deccan, Siberia), high-velocity structures (Vp ˜ 6.9-7.5 km/sec) are typically found immediately overlying the Moho in layers of order ˜5-15 km thick. Oceanic plateau (OP) LIPs exhibit similar layers, with a conspicuous layer of very high crustal velocity (Vp ˜ 7.7 km/sec) beneath the enormous Ontong-Java plateau. These structures are similar to inferred ultramafic underplating structures seen beneath active hot spots such as Hawaii, the Marquesas, and La Reunion. Petrogenetic models for flood basalt volcanism based on hot plume melting beneath mature lithosphere suggest that these deep seismic structures may consist in large part of cumulate bodies of olivine and clinopyroxene which result from ponding and deep-crustal fractionation of ultramafic primary melts. Such fractionation is necessary to produce basalts with typical MgO contents of ˜6-8%, as observed for the vast bulk of observed flood basalts, from primary melts with MgO contents of order ˜15-18% (or greater) such as result from hot, deep melting beneath the lithosphere. The volumes of cumulate bodies and ultramafic intrusions in the lowermost crust, often described in the literature as "underplating," are comparable to those of the overlying basaltic formations, also consistent with petrological models. Further definition of the deep seismic structure beneath such prominent LIPs as the Ontong-Java Plateau could place better constraints on flood basalt petrogenesis by determining the relative volumes of ultramafic bodies and basaltic lavas, thereby

  6. Low Mass Galaxy Evolution In The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbert, James; Teplitz, Harry; Scarlata, Claudia; Siana, Brian; Malkan, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Henry, Alaina; Atek, Hakim; Fosbury, Robert; Ross, Nathanial; Hathi, Nimish; Bridge, Carrie; Bunker, Andrew; Dressler, Alan; Shim, Hyunjin; Bedregal, Alejandro; Dominguez, Alberto; Rafelski, Marc; Masters, Dan

    2012-12-01

    The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel (WISP) Survey uses nearly 1000 HST orbits to study the epoch of peak star formation. Its slitless grism spectroscopy over a wide, continuous spectral range (0.8-1.7 micron) provides an unbiased selection of thousands of emission line galaxies over 0.5 < z < 2.5. Hundreds of these galaxies are detected in multiple emission lines, allowing for important diagnostics of metallicity and dust extinction. We propose deep 3.6 micron imaging (5 sigma, 0.9 micro-Jy) of 39 of the deepest WISP fields observed with the combination of G102+G141 grisms, in order to detect emission-line galaxies down to 0.1 L*. Combined with our HST optical and near-IR photometry, these IRAC data will be critical to determining accurate stellar masses for both passive and active galaxies in our survey. We will determine the evolution of the faint end slope of the stellar mass function and the mass-metallicity relation down to low-mass galaxies, including measurement of a possible mass-metallicity-SFR fundamental plane. The addition of the IRAC photometry will also provide much stronger constraints on dust extinction and star formation history, especially when combined with information available from the emission lines themselves.

  7. Convective scale interaction: Arc cloud lines and the development and evolution of deep convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James Francis Whitehurst

    1986-01-01

    Information is used from satellite data and research aircraft data to provide new insights concerning the mesoscale development and evolution of deep convection in an atmosphere typified by weak synoptic-scale forcing. The importance of convective scale interaction in the development and evolution of deep convection is examined. This interaction is shown to manifest itself as the merger and intersection of thunderstorm outflow boundaries (arc cloud lines) with other convective lines, areas or boundaries. Using geostationary satellite visible and infrared data convective scale interaction is shown to be responsible for over 85 percent of the intense convection over the southeast U.S. by late afternoon, and a majority of that area's afternoon rainfall. The aircraft observations provided valuable information concerning critically important regions of the arc cloud line: (1) the cool outflow region, (2) the density surge line interface region; and (3) the sub-cloud region above the surge line. The observations when analyzed with rapid scan satellite data, helped in defining the arc cloud line's life cycle as 3 evolving stages.

  8. The Hawk-I UDS and GOODS Survey (HUGS): Survey design and deep K-band number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Paris, D.; Targett, T. A.; Boutsia, K.; Castellano, M.; Galametz, A.; Grazian, A.; McLure, R.; Merlin, E.; Pentericci, L.; Wuyts, S.; Almaini, O.; Caputi, K.; Chary, R.-R.; Cirasuolo, M.; Conselice, C. J.; Cooray, A.; Daddi, E.; Dickinson, M.; Faber, S. M.; Fazio, G.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Giavalisco, M.; Grogin, N. A.; Hathi, N.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lucas, R. A.; Nonino, M.; Rix, H. W.; Renzini, A.; Rosario, D.; Santini, P.; Scarlata, C.; Sommariva, V.; Stark, D. P.; van der Wel, A.; Vanzella, E.; Wild, V.; Yan, H.; Zibetti, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a new, ultra-deep, near-infrared imaging survey executed with the Hawk-I imager at the ESO VLT, of which we make all the data (images and catalog) public. This survey, named HUGS (Hawk-I UDS and GOODS Survey), provides deep, high-quality imaging in the K and Y bands over the portions of the UKIDSS UDS and GOODS-South fields covered by the CANDELS HST WFC3/IR survey. In this paper we describe the survey strategy, the observational campaign, the data reduction process, and the data quality. We show that, thanks to exquisite image quality and extremely long exposure times, HUGS delivers the deepest K-band images ever collected over areas of cosmological interest, and in general ideally complements the CANDELS data set in terms of image quality and depth. In the GOODS-S field, the K-band observations cover the whole CANDELS area with a complex geometry made of 6 different, partly overlapping pointings, in order to best match the deep and wide areas of CANDELS imaging. In the deepest region (which includes most of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field) exposure times exceed 80 hours of integration, yielding a 1 - σ magnitude limit per square arcsec of ≃28.0 AB mag. The seeing is exceptional and homogeneous across the various pointings, confined to the range 0.38-0.43 arcsec. In the UDS field the survey is about one magnitude shallower (to match the correspondingly shallower depth of the CANDELS images) but includes also Y-band band imaging (which, in the UDS, was not provided by the CANDELS WFC3/IR imaging). In the K-band, with an average exposure time of 13 hours, and seeing in the range 0.37-0.43 arcsec, the 1 - σ limit per square arcsec in the UDS imaging is ≃27.3 AB mag. In the Y-band, with an average exposure time ≃8 h, and seeing in the range 0.45-0.5 arcsec, the imaging yields a 1 - σ limit per square arcsec of ≃28.3 AB mag. We show that the HUGS observations are well matched to the depth of the CANDELS WFC3/IR data, since the majority

  9. Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey -- GOODS-South Field, Non-SNe-Searched Visits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Sandra

    2011-10-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey {CANDELS}is designed to document the ?rst third of galactic evolution from z =8 to 1.5 via deep imaging of more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IRand ACS. It will also find the first Type Ia SNe beyond z > 1.5 andestablish their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Fivepremier multi-wavelength sky regions selected from the SpitzerExtragalactic Deep Survey {SEDS} provide complementary IRAC imagingdata down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource for stellar masses at allredshifts. The use of ?ve widely separated ?elds mitigates cosmicvariance and yields statistically robust and complete samples ofgalaxies down to 10^9 solar masses out to z 8.The program merges two originally separate MCT proposals. The Faberprogram incorporates a ?Wide? imaging survey in three separate fieldsto 2 orbit depth over 0.2 sq. degrees, plus a ?Deep? imaging surveyto 12 orbit depth in the two GOODS regions over 0.04 sq. degrees.When combined with ultra-deep imaging from the Hubble Ultradeep Fieldprogram {GO 11563}, the result is a three-tiered strategy that ef?cientlysamples both bright/rare and faint/common extragalactic objects. TheFerguson program adds an extensive high-redshift Type Ia SNe search,plus ultraviolet "daytime" UVIS exposures in GOODS-N to exploit theCVZ opportunity in that field.This program, GO 12064, is part of the Wide mosaic survey, which has thefollowing field centers and sizes: Field ID RA{2000} Dec{2000} WFC3 Dim. PA on sky UDS 02 17 38 -05 12 02 4x11 270 COSMOS 10 00 31 +02 24 00 4x11 180 EGS 14 19 31 +52 54 10 3x15 41 Science highlights from the Wide program: * Underlying structural properties of galaxies as revealed by WFC3-IR images sensitive to older stars {beyond the 4000-A break} and less affected by dust than ACS. A key redshift is z 2, where star-formation peaks, QSOs are most abundant, and where restframe B-band is still accessible to WFC3. Sample questions include: - Structure in young vs. old

  10. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: THE VORONOI-DELAUNAY METHOD CATALOG OF GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Noeske, Kai; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin

    2012-05-20

    We present a public catalog of galaxy groups constructed from the spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fourth data release from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) Galaxy Redshift Survey, including the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The catalog contains 1165 groups with two or more members in the EGS over the redshift range 0 < z < 1.5 and 1295 groups at z > 0.6 in the rest of DEEP2. Twenty-five percent of EGS galaxies and fourteen percent of high-z DEEP2 galaxies are assigned to galaxy groups. The groups were detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method (VDM) after it has been optimized on mock DEEP2 catalogs following similar methods to those employed in Gerke et al. In the optimization effort, we have taken particular care to ensure that the mock catalogs resemble the data as closely as possible, and we have fine-tuned our methods separately on mocks constructed for the EGS and the rest of DEEP2. We have also probed the effect of the assumed cosmology on our inferred group-finding efficiency by performing our optimization on three different mock catalogs with different background cosmologies, finding large differences in the group-finding success we can achieve for these different mocks. Using the mock catalog whose background cosmology is most consistent with current data, we estimate that the DEEP2 group catalog is 72% complete and 61% pure (74% and 67% for the EGS) and that the group finder correctly classifies 70% of galaxies that truly belong to groups, with an additional 46% of interloper galaxies contaminating the catalog (66% and 43% for the EGS). We also confirm that the VDM catalog reconstructs the abundance of galaxy groups with velocity dispersions above {approx}300 km s{sup -1} to an accuracy better than the sample variance, and this successful reconstruction is not strongly dependent on cosmology. This makes the DEEP2 group catalog a promising probe of the growth of cosmic structure that can potentially be used for cosmological tests.

  11. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Voronoi-Delaunay Method Catalog of Galaxy Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Marinoni, Christian; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Conroy, Charlie; Cooper, Michael C.; Faber, S.M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaiser, Nick; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; /Maryland U.

    2012-02-14

    We use the first 25% of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey spectroscopic data to identify groups and clusters of galaxies in redshift space. The data set contains 8370 galaxies with confirmed redshifts in the range 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, over one square degree on the sky. Groups are identified using an algorithm (the Voronoi-Delaunay Method) that has been shown to accurately reproduce the statistics of groups in simulated DEEP2-like samples. We optimize this algorithm for the DEEP2 survey by applying it to realistic mock galaxy catalogs and assessing the results using a stringent set of criteria for measuring group-finding success, which we develop and describe in detail here. We find in particular that the group-finder can successfully identify {approx}78% of real groups and that {approx}79% of the galaxies that are true members of groups can be identified as such. Conversely, we estimate that {approx}55% of the groups we find can be definitively identified with real groups and that {approx}46% of the galaxies we place into groups are interloper field galaxies. Most importantly, we find that it is possible to measure the distribution of groups in redshift and velocity dispersion, n({sigma}, z), to an accuracy limited by cosmic variance, for dispersions greater than 350 km s{sup -1}. We anticipate that such measurements will allow strong constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy in the future. Finally, we present the first DEEP2 group catalog, which assigns 32% of the galaxies to 899 distinct groups with two or more members, 153 of which have velocity dispersions above 350 km s{sup -1}. We provide locations, redshifts and properties for this high-dispersion subsample. This catalog represents the largest sample to date of spectroscopically detected groups at z {approx} 1.

  12. Experimental palaeobiomechanics: What can engineering tell us about evolution in deep time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Philip

    2016-04-01

    What did Tyrannosaurus rex eat? This is the sort of question that immediately bombards any palaeontologist when interacting with the general public. Even among scientists, how extinct animals moved or fed is a major objective of the palaeobiological research agenda. The last decade has seen a sharp increase in the technology and experimental methods available for collecting biomechanical data, which has greatly improved out ability to examine the function of both live and extinct animals. With new technologies and methods come new pitfalls and opportunities. In this review, I address three aspects of experimental biomechanics that exemplify the challenges and opportunities it provides for addressing deep-time problems in palaeontology. 1) Interpretation: It has never been easier to acquire large amounts of high-quality biomechanical data on extinct animals. However, the lack of behavioural information means that interpreting this data can be problematic. We will never know precisely what a dinosaur ate, but we can explore what constraints there might have been on the mechanical function of its jaws. Palaeobiomechanics defines potential function and becomes especially effective when dealing with multiple examples. 2) Comparison: Understanding the potential function of one extinct animal is interesting; however, examining mechanical features across multiple taxa allows for a greater understanding of biomechanical variation. Comparative studies help identify common trends and underlying mechanical principles which can have long reaching influences on morphological evolution. 3) Evolution: The physical principles established through comparative biomechanical studies can be utilized in phylogenetic comparative methods in order to explore evolutionary morphology across clades. Comparative evolutionary biomechanics offers potential for exploring the evolution of functional systems in deep time utilizing experimental biomechanical data.

  13. OT2_sserje01_2: THE HERSCHEL-AKARI NEP DEEP SURVEY: the cosmological history of stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serjeant, S.

    2011-09-01

    We propose a far-IR and submm mapping survey of the premier AKARI deep field in the North Ecliptic Pole, in PACS/SPIRE parallel mode. This is the only major deep infrared field not yet covered by Herschel guaranteed or open time key projects. The outstanding and unparalleled continuous mid-IR photometric coverage from AKARI, far better than equivalent Spitzer surveys, enables a wide range of galaxy evolution diagnostics unachievable in any other survey field (including Herschel HerMES/PEP fields), by spanning the wavelengths of redshifted PAH and silicate features and the peak energy output of AGN dust tori. The investment by AKARI in the NEP represents ~10 percent of the entire pointed observations available throughout the lifetime of AKARI. Our proposal remedies the remarkable omission from Herschel's legacy surveys of the premier extragalactic deep field from another IR space telescope. We will simultaneously identify and find photometric redshifts for the Herschel point source population, make stacking analysis detections of the galaxies which dominate the submm extragalactic background light as a function of redshift, determine the bolometric power outputs of the galaxies that dominate the submm background, compare the UV/optical/mid-IR continuum/PAH/far-IR/submm/radio star formation rate estimator in the most comprehensive IR survey data set to date, and track the coupled stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion throughout most of the history of the Universe. In OT1 the HOTAC concluded "The science output from the proposed survey will be outstanding [...] The panel was convinced that these observations should be done" but it since became clear that priority 2 time is very unlikely to be executed, so we request reclassification to priority 1.

  14. Evidence for isolated evolution of deep-sea ciliate communities through geological separation and environmental selection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) are isolated habitats at the bottom of the eastern Mediterranean Sea, which originate from the ancient dissolution of Messinian evaporites. The different basins have recruited their original biota from the same source, but their geological evolution eventually constituted sharp environmental barriers, restricting genetic exchange between the individual basins. Therefore, DHABs are unique model systems to assess the effect of geological events and environmental conditions on the evolution and diversification of protistan plankton. Here, we examine evidence for isolated evolution of unicellular eukaryote protistan plankton communities driven by geological separation and environmental selection. We specifically focused on ciliated protists as a major component of protistan DHAB plankton by pyrosequencing the hypervariable V4 fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA. Geospatial distributions and responses of marine ciliates to differential hydrochemistries suggest strong physical and chemical barriers to dispersal that influence the evolution of this plankton group. Results Ciliate communities in the brines of four investigated DHABs are distinctively different from ciliate communities in the interfaces (haloclines) immediately above the brines. While the interface ciliate communities from different sites are relatively similar to each other, the brine ciliate communities are significantly different between sites. We found no distance-decay relationship, and canonical correspondence analyses identified oxygen and sodium as most important hydrochemical parameters explaining the partitioning of diversity between interface and brine ciliate communities. However, none of the analyzed hydrochemical parameters explained the significant differences between brine ciliate communities in different basins. Conclusions Our data indicate a frequent genetic exchange in the deep-sea water above the brines. The “isolated island

  15. FIRBACK. II. Data reduction and calibration of the 170 μ m ISO deep cosmological survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagache, G.; Dole, H.

    2001-06-01

    We present the final reduction and calibration of the FIRBACK ISOPHOT data. FIRBACK is a deep cosmological survey performed at 170 mu m. This paper deals with the ISOPHOT C200 camera with the C160 filter. We review the whole data reduction process and compare our final calibration with DIRBE (for the extended emission) and IRAS (for point sources). The FIRBACK source extraction and galaxy counts is discussed in a companion paper (Dole et al. \\cite{Doleprep}). Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, The Netherlands and the UK) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  16. The WIRCAM Deep Infrared Cluster Survey. I. Groups and clusters at z ⪆ 1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielby, R. M.; Finoguenov, A.; Tanaka, M.; McCracken, H. J.; Daddi, E.; Hudelot, P.; Ilbert, O.; Kneib, J. P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mellier, Y.; Nandra, K.; Petitjean, P.; Srianand, R.; Stalin, C. S.; Willott, C. J.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: We use a combination of CFHTLS deep optical data, WIRcam Deep Survey (WIRDS) near-infrared data and XMM-Newton survey data to identify z ⪆ 1.1 clusters in the CFHTLS D1 and D4 fields. Counterparts to such clusters can not be identified without deep near-infrared data and as such the total of ≈ 1 deg2 of J, H and Ks band imaging provided by WIRDS is an indispensable tool in such work. Methods: Using public XMM X-ray data, we identify extended X-ray sources in the two fields. The resulting catalogue of extended X-ray sources was then analyzed for optical/near-infrared counterparts, using a red-sequence algorithm applied to the deep optical and near-infrared data. Redshifts of candidate groups and clusters were estimated using the median photometric redshifts of detected counterparts and where available these were combined with spectroscopic data (from VVDS deep and ultra-deep and using AAT AAOmega data). Additionally, we surveyed X-ray point sources for potential group systems at the limit of our detection range in the X-ray data. A catalogue of z > 1.1 cluster candidates in the two fields has been compiled and cluster masses, radii and temperatures have been estimated using the scaling relations. Results: The catalogue of group and cluster candidates consists of 15 z ⪆ 1.1 objects. We find several massive clusters (M ⪆ 1014 {M_⊙}) and a number of lower mass clusters/groups. Three of the detections are previously published extended X-ray sources. Of note is JKSC 041 (previously detected via Chandra X-ray data and reported as a z = 1.9 cluster based on UKIDSS infrared imaging) for which we identify a number of structures at redshifts of z = 0.8, z = 0.96, z = 1.13 and z = 1.49 (but see no evidence of a structure at z = 1.9). We also make an independent detection of the massive cluster, XMMXCS J2215.9-1738, for which we estimate a redshift of z = 1.37 (compared to the spectroscopically confirmed redshift of z = 1.45). We use the z ⪆ 1.1 catalogue to

  17. Star formation and galaxy evolution since z˜2: Results from multiwavelength surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbin, Drew

    Our recent studies in galaxy evolution have revealed a surprising new paradigm of star formation. Contrary to the notion that major mergers play an increasingly dominant role going backwards in cosmic history, we find that over the last ˜10 Gyr, much of star formation has been fueled by accreting cold gas from the cosmic web. Accretion rates were presumably larger in the past, so star forming systems may have very different properties in the early Universe and today. Large scale astronomical surveys, such as the Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) have provided a wealth of extragalactic data covering a statistically large number of sources. Targeted, niche surveys, like our fine structure line survey of star forming galaxies in the early Universe observed with the redshift (z) Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS) have provided detailed observations of high interest sources. We have made use of this diverse set of data to study galaxy evolution from the epoch of peak star formation at z=1-2 up to the present. Data from HerMES is a reliable probe of infrared emission, particularly useful for characterizing the far infrared dust peak, and therefore determining star formation rates out to redshifts of a few. Deep integrations with the Herschel SPIRE photometer rapidly reach the confusion limit, tempering its utility in studying faint high redshift galaxies. With appropriate care taken to identify blended sources, however, HerMES data is useful in identifying bright, redshifted, star forming sources. We have compiled spectral energy distributions from HerMES and ancillary data and found that, even sources at high redshift are well fit by local star forming galaxy templates. In the local Universe, spectroscopic SDSS data has allowed us to estimate crucial galaxy properties on ˜105 sources, providing an opportunity to observe general statistical trends, and constrain theories of galaxy evolution. A toy model of cold

  18. The DEEP3 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Keck/DEIMOS Spectroscopy in the GOODS-N Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Michael C.; Aird, James A.; Coil, Alison L.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin

    2011-03-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations in the GOODS-N field completed using DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope as part of the DEEP3 Galaxy Redshift Survey. Observations of 370 unique targets down to a limiting magnitude of R AB = 24.4 yielded 156 secure redshifts. In addition to redshift information, we provide sky-subtracted one- and two-dimensional spectra of each target. Observations were conducted following the procedures of the Team Keck Redshift Survey (TKRS), thereby producing spectra that augment the TKRS sample while maintaining the uniformity of its spectral database. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  19. NO EVIDENCE FOR EVOLUTION IN THE FAR-INFRARED-RADIO CORRELATION OUT TO z {approx} 2 IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Minnie Y.; Huynh, Minh T.; Helou, George; Norris, Ray P.; Dickinson, Mark; Frayer, Dave; Monkiewicz, Jacqueline A.

    2011-04-20

    We investigate the 70 {mu}m far-infrared-radio correlation (FRC) of star-forming galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) out to z > 2. We use 70 {mu}m data from the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (FIDEL), which comprises the most sensitive ({approx}0.8 mJy rms) and extensive far-infrared deep field observations using MIPS on the Spitzer Space Telescope, and 1.4 GHz radio data ({approx}8 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms) from the Very Large Array. In order to quantify the evolution of the FRC, we use both survival analysis and stacking techniques, which we find give similar results. We also calculate the FRC using total infrared luminosity and rest-frame radio luminosity, q{sub TIR}, and find that q{sub TIR} is constant (within 0.22) over the redshift range 0-2. We see no evidence for evolution in the FRC at 70 {mu}m, which is surprising given the many factors that are expected to change this ratio at high redshifts.

  20. The influence of deep mantle heterogeneity on the rhythms and scales of surface topography evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, Maëlis; Coltice, Nicolas; Flament, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Earth's surface, the interface between external processes and internal dynamics (lithosphere motions and mantle convection), is continuously reorganised. A large part of Earth's topography is generated by mantle motions and lithospheric stresses [1], which impacts for instance the global sea-level, the dynamics of sedimentary basins and the geoid. Studying how surface topography evolves in both space and time thus not only provides information on the rhythms and scales of evolution of those processes, but would also be a tool for the study of the mantle motions and properties from which it originates [2]. In this study, we propose to characterise the spatial and temporal scales of evolution of surface topography in 2D spherical annulus numerical models of mantle convection developing a plate-like behaviour. We use the geodynamical code StagYY [3] to first determine a mantle convection regime generating a surface topography with Earth-like amplitudes and realistic mantle dynamics at first order (e.g. high Rayleigh number, reasonable lithosphere thickness, pseudo-plastic lithosphere rheology generating plate tectonics). We then use this convection regime to investigate how the presence of stable deep-rooted thermochemical heterogeneities influence the rhythms of evolution of surface topography. We analyse our results to identify how the timescales of evolution are connected with the lengthscales of topography, in light of the tectonic histories produced by the models. References: [1] M. Gurnis, Long-term controls of eustatic and epeirogenic motions by mantle convection, GSA Today, 2(7):141-157, 1992. [2] B.H. Hager, R.W. Clayton, M.A. Richards, R.P. Comer, and A.M. Dziewonski, Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid, Nature, 313:541-545, 1985. [3] J.W. Hernlund and P.J. Tackley, Modeling mantle convection in the spherical annulus, Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors, 171(1):48-54, 2008.

  1. SMUVS: Spitzer Matching survey of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep Stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputi, Karina; Ashby, Matthew; Fazio, Giovanni; Huang, Jiasheng; Dunlop, James; Franx, Marijn; Le Fevre, Olivier; Fynbo, Johan; McCracken, Henry; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Muzzin, Adam; Ilbert, Olivier; Somerville, Rachel; Wechsler, Risa; Behroozi, Peter; Lu, Yu

    2014-12-01

    We request 2026.5 hours to homogenize the matching ultra-deep IRAC data of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes, producing a final area of ~0.6 square degrees with the deepest near- and mid-IR coverage existing in any such large area of the sky (H, Ks, [3.6], [4.5] ~ 25.3-26.1 AB mag; 5 sigma). The UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes are contained within the larger COSMOS field, which has a rich collection of multi-wavelength, ancillary data, making it ideal to study different aspects of galaxy evolution with high statistical significance and excellent redshift accuracy. The UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes are the region of the COSMOS field where these studies can be pushed to the highest redshifts, but securely identifying high-z galaxies, and determining their stellar masses, will only be possible if ultra-deep mid-IR data are available. Our IRAC observations will allow us to: 1) extend the galaxy stellar mass function at redshifts z=3 to z=5 to the intermediate mass regime (M~5x10^9-10^10 Msun), which is critical to constrain galaxy formation models; 2) gain a factor of six in the area where it is possible to effectively search for z>=6 galaxies and study their properties; 3) measure, for the first time, the large-scale structure traced by an unbiased galaxy sample at z=5 to z=7, and make the link to their host dark matter haloes. This cannot be done in any other field of the sky, as the UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes form a quasi-contiguous, regular-shape field, which has a unique combination of large area and photometric depth. 4) provide a unique resource for the selection of secure z>5 targets for JWST and ALMA follow up. Our observations will have an enormous legacy value which amply justifies this new observing-time investment in the COSMOS field. Spitzer cannot miss this unique opportunity to open up a large 0.6 square-degree window to the early Universe.

  2. The Complex Evolution of Comet Nuclei: Evidence from Deep Impact and Stardust-NExT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverka, J.; Stardust-NExT Science Team

    2011-12-01

    Spacecraft exploration of comets is revealing that far from being dirty snowballs that have changed little since their formation 4.6 billion years ago, many comet nuclei have undergone complex evolution. Observations of 9P/Tempel 1 made by Deep Impact (DI) in 2005 and Stardust-NExT (SN) in 2011 provide evidence for diverse geologic processes including the formation of layered structures, the episodic eruption of materials from the interior onto the surface, the formation of pit-like depressions and scarps by sublimation of volatiles, etc. A significant fraction of Tempel 1's activity appears to be associated with the back-wasting of scarps. Scarps on the comet display a variety of morphologies. Comparisons of DI and SN images reveal that the rate of scarp retreat varies from place to place. These observations point to differences in composition and/or texture of surface materials.

  3. The Metal Abundances across Cosmic Time (MACT) Survey. I. Optical Spectroscopy in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Malkan, Matthew A.; Rigby, Jane R.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; de los Reyes, Mithi A.; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-09-01

    Deep rest-frame optical spectroscopy is critical for characterizing and understanding the physical conditions and properties of the ionized gas in galaxies. Here, we present a new spectroscopic survey called “Metal Abundances across Cosmic Time” or { M }{ A }{ C }{ T }, which will obtain rest-frame optical spectra for ˜3000 emission-line galaxies. This paper describes the optical spectroscopy that has been conducted with MMT/Hectospec and Keck/DEIMOS for ≈1900 z = 0.1-1 emission-line galaxies selected from our narrowband and intermediate-band imaging in the Subaru Deep Field. In addition, we present a sample of 164 galaxies for which we have measured the weak [O iii]λ4363 line (66 with at least 3σ detections and 98 with significant upper limits). This nebular emission line determines the gas-phase metallicity by measuring the electron temperature of the ionized gas. This paper presents the optical spectra, emission-line measurements, interstellar properties (e.g., metallicity, gas density), and stellar properties (e.g., star formation rates, stellar mass). Paper II of the { M }{ A }{ C }{ T } survey (Ly et al.) presents the first results on the stellar mass-gas metallicity relation at z ≲ 1 using the sample with [O iii]λ4363 measurements.

  4. Attitudes and behaviour regarding deep dentin caries removal: a survey among German dentists.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Meyer-Lueckel, H; Dörfer, C; Paris, S

    2013-01-01

    Incomplete removal of deep caries has been shown to reduce the risks of pulp exposure and postoperative pulpal complications. It is therefore of interest whether dentists perform one- or two-step incomplete excavation, and which criteria and methods they use to assess and provide removal of deep caries. This study investigated the attitudes and behaviour of dentists in northern Germany using a new, validated questionnaire. The survey included 2,346 practitioners, 821 (35%) of whom responded. Demographic and sensitivity analysis did not indicate selection bias. 50% of dentists considered only complete excavation, even if pulp exposure was likely. If caries was to be removed incompletely, 77% considered two-step excavation. Hardness was the most important criterion to assess excavation. To treat an exposed pulp, 75% of dentists considered direct capping, 70% refused incomplete excavation fearing caries progression or pulp damage, and 59% reported to prefer more invasive treatment to facilitate restoration longevity. Over 50% recognised an influence of professional regulations on their treatment decisions. There was a moderate correlation between attitudes and behaviour of dentists, with dentists who suspected residual caries to be harmful rejecting incomplete excavation and vice versa. Cluster analysis identified two groups of dentists with opposite attitudes and behaviour, independently from dentist's age or gender. In conclusion, the majority of surveyed dentists was sceptical about leaving caries during excavation and does not practice incomplete caries removal. Therefore, benefits of partial excavation should be highlighted in under- and postgraduate education and regulatory incentives modified to promote minimally invasive techniques.

  5. The Metal Abundances across Cosmic Time (MACT) Survey. I. Optical Spectroscopy in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Malkan, Matthew A.; Rigby, Jane R.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; de los Reyes, Mithi A.; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-09-01

    Deep rest-frame optical spectroscopy is critical for characterizing and understanding the physical conditions and properties of the ionized gas in galaxies. Here, we present a new spectroscopic survey called “Metal Abundances across Cosmic Time” or { M }{ A }{ C }{ T }, which will obtain rest-frame optical spectra for ∼3000 emission-line galaxies. This paper describes the optical spectroscopy that has been conducted with MMT/Hectospec and Keck/DEIMOS for ≈1900 z = 0.1–1 emission-line galaxies selected from our narrowband and intermediate-band imaging in the Subaru Deep Field. In addition, we present a sample of 164 galaxies for which we have measured the weak [O iii]λ4363 line (66 with at least 3σ detections and 98 with significant upper limits). This nebular emission line determines the gas-phase metallicity by measuring the electron temperature of the ionized gas. This paper presents the optical spectra, emission-line measurements, interstellar properties (e.g., metallicity, gas density), and stellar properties (e.g., star formation rates, stellar mass). Paper II of the { M }{ A }{ C }{ T } survey (Ly et al.) presents the first results on the stellar mass–gas metallicity relation at z ≲ 1 using the sample with [O iii]λ4363 measurements.

  6. The Vimos VLT deep survey. Global properties of 20,000 galaxies in the IAB < 22.5 WIDE survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garilli, B.; Le Fèvre, O.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Le Brun, V.; de la Torre, S.; Meneux, B.; Tresse, L.; Franzetti, P.; Zamorani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Gregorini, L.; Vergani, D.; Bottini, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Vettolani, G.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Gavignaud, I.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Lamareille, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Zucca, E.; Blaizot, J.; Bongiorno, A.; Cucciati, O.; Mellier, Y.; Moreau, C.; Paioro, L.

    2008-08-01

    .1 deg2 for a sample limited in magnitude to IAB = 22.5. Comparing galaxy densities from the four fields shows that in a redshift bin Δz = 0.1 at z ~ 1 one still has factor-of-two variations over areas as large as ~ 0.25 deg2. This level of cosmic variance agrees with that obtained by integrating the galaxy two-point correlation function estimated from the F22 field alone. It is also in fairly good statistical agreement with that predicted by the Millennium simulations. The VVDS WIDE survey currently provides the largest area coverage among redshift surveys reaching z ~ 1. The variance estimated over the survey fields shows explicitly how clustering results from deep surveys of even 1 deg2 size should be interpreted with caution. The survey data represent a rich data base to select complete sub-samples of high-quality spectra and to study galaxy ensemble properties and galaxy clustering over unprecedented scales at these redshifts. The redshift catalog of the 4 deg2 F22 field is publicly available at http://cencosw.oamp.fr.

  7. Geophysical evidence for melt in the deep lunar interior and implications for lunar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A.; Connolly, J. A. D.; Pommier, A.; Noir, J.

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of lunar laser ranging and seismic data has yielded evidence that has been interpreted to indicate a molten zone in the lowermost mantle overlying a fluid core. Such a zone provides strong constraints on models of lunar thermal evolution. Here we determine thermochemical and physical structure of the deep Moon by inverting lunar geophysical data (mean mass and moment of inertia, tidal Love number, and electromagnetic sounding data) in combination with phase-equilibrium computations. Specifically, we assess whether a molten layer is required by the geophysical data. The main conclusion drawn from this study is that a region with high dissipation located deep within the Moon is required to explain the geophysical data. This region is located within the mantle where the solidus is crossed at a depth of ˜1200 km (≥1600°C). Inverted compositions for the partially molten layer (150-200 km thick) are enriched in FeO and TiO2 relative to the surrounding mantle. The melt phase is neutrally buoyant at pressures of ˜4.5-4.6 GPa but contains less TiO2 (<15 wt %) than the Ti-rich (˜16 wt %) melts that produced a set of high-density primitive lunar magmas (density of 3.4 g/cm3). Melt densities computed here range from 3.25 to 3.45 g/cm3 bracketing the density of lunar magmas with moderate-to-high TiO2 contents. Our results are consistent with a model of lunar evolution in which the cumulate pile formed from crystallization of the magma ocean as it overturned, trapping heat-producing elements in the lower mantle.

  8. The International Deep Planet Survey. II. The frequency of directly imaged giant exoplanets with stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galicher, R.; Marois, C.; Macintosh, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Barman, T.; Konopacky, Q.; Song, I.; Patience, J.; Lafrenière, D.; Doyon, R.; Nielsen, E. L.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Radial velocity and transit methods are effective for the study of short orbital period exoplanets but they hardly probe objects at large separations for which direct imaging can be used. Aims: We carried out the international deep planet survey of 292 young nearby stars to search for giant exoplanets and determine their frequency. Methods: We developed a pipeline for a uniform processing of all the data that we have recorded with NIRC2/Keck II, NIRI/Gemini North, NICI/Gemini South, and NACO/VLT for 14 yr. The pipeline first applies cosmetic corrections and then reduces the speckle intensity to enhance the contrast in the images. Results: The main result of the international deep planet survey is the discovery of the HR 8799 exoplanets. We also detected 59 visual multiple systems including 16 new binary stars and 2 new triple stellar systems, as well as 2279 point-like sources. We used Monte Carlo simulations and the Bayesian theorem to determine that 1.05+2.80-0.70% of stars harbor at least one giant planet between 0.5 and 14 MJ and between 20 and 300 AU. This result is obtained assuming uniform distributions of planet masses and semi-major axes. If we consider power law distributions as measured for close-in planets instead, the derived frequency is 2.30+5.95-1.55%, recalling the strong impact of assumptions on Monte Carlo output distributions. We also find no evidence that the derived frequency depends on the mass of the hosting star, whereas it does for close-in planets. Conclusions: The international deep planet survey provides a database of confirmed background sources that may be useful for other exoplanet direct imaging surveys. It also puts new constraints on the number of stars with at least one giant planet reducing by a factor of two the frequencies derived by almost all previous works. Tables 11-15 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  9. Surveying Galaxy Evolution in the Far-Infrared: A Far-Infrared All-Sky Survey Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, D. J.; Amato, M. J.; Dwek, E.; Freund, M. M.; Gardner, J. P.; Kashlinsky, A.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Half of the total luminosity in the Universe is emitted at rest wavelengths approximately 80-100 microns. At the highest known galaxy redshifts (z greater than or equal to 6) this energy is redshifted to approximately 600 microns. Quantifying the evolution of galaxies at these wavelengths is crucial to our understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe following the big bang. Surveying the whole sky will find the rare and unique objects, enabling follow-up observations. SIRCE, the Survey of Infrared Cosmic Evolution, is such a mission concept under study at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. A helium-cooled telescope with ultrasensitive detectors can image the whole sky to the confusion limit in 6 months. Multiple wavelength bands permit the extraction of photometric redshifts, while a large telescope yields a low confusion limit. We discuss the implications of such a survey for galaxy formation and evolution, large-scale structure, star formation, and the structure of interstellar dust.

  10. The 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North Survey and the 250 ks Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey: Improved Point-source Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y. Q.; Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Lehmer, B. D.; Yang, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present improved point-source catalogs for the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N) and the 250 ks Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S) Surveys, implementing a number of recent improvements in Chandra source-cataloging methodology. For CDF-N/E-CDF-S, we provide a main catalog that contains 683/1003 X-ray sources detected with wavdetect at a false-positive probability threshold of 10-5 that also satisfy a binomial-probability source-selection criterion of P\\lt 0.004/P < 0.002. Such an approach maximizes the number of reliable sources detected: a total of 196/275 main-catalog sources are new compared to the Alexander et al. CDF-N/Lehmer et al. E-CDF-S main catalogs. We also provide CDF-N/E-CDF-S supplementary catalogs that consist of 72/56 sources detected at the same wavdetect threshold and having P of 0.004-0.1/0.002-0.1 and {K}s≤slant 22.9/{K}s≤slant 22.3 mag counterparts. For all ≈ 1800 CDF-N and E-CDF-S sources, including the ≈ 500 newly detected ones (these being generally fainter and more obscured), we determine X-ray source positions utilizing centroid and matched-filter techniques; we also provide multiwavelength identifications, apparent magnitudes of counterparts, spectroscopic and/or photometric redshifts, basic source classifications, and estimates of observed active galactic nucleus and galaxy source densities around respective field centers. Simulations show that both the CDF-N and E-CDF-S main catalogs are highly reliable and reasonably complete. Background and sensitivity analyses indicate that the on-axis mean flux limits reached represent a factor of ≈ 1.5-2.0 improvement over the previous CDF-N and E-CDF-S limits. We make our data products publicly available.

  11. The Evolution of Technology in the Deep Space Network: A History of the Advanced Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layland, J. W.; Rauch, L. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) of 1995 might be described as the evolutionary result of 45 years of deep space communication and navigation, together with the synergistic activities of radio science and radar and radio astronomy. But the evolution of the DSN did not just happen - it was carefully planned and created. The evolution of the DSN has been an ongoing engineering activity, and engineering is a process of problem solving under constraints, one of which is technology. In turn, technology is the knowledge base providing the capability and experience for practical application of various areas of science, when needed. The best engineering solutions result from optimization under the fewest constraints, and if technology needs are well anticipated (ready when needed), then the most effective engineering solution is possible. Throughout the history of the DSN it has been the goal and function of DSN advanced technology development (designated the DSN Advanced Systems Program from 1963 through 1994) to supply the technology needs of the DSN when needed, and thus to minimize this constraint on DSN engineering. Technology often takes considerable time to develop, and when that happens, it is important to have anticipated engineering needs; at times, this anticipation has been by as much as 15 years. Also, on a number of occasions, mission malfunctions or emergencies have resulted in unplanned needs for technology that has, in fact, been available from the reservoir of advanced technology provided by the DSN Advanced Systems Program. Sometimes, even DSN engineering personnel fail to realize that the organization of JPL permits an overlap of DSN advanced technology activities with subsequent engineering activities. This can result in the flow of advanced technology into DSN engineering in a natural and sometimes almost unnoticed way. In the following pages, we will explore some of the many contributions of the DSN Advanced Systems Program that were provided to DSN

  12. Luminous and High Stellar Mass Candidate Galaxies at z ≈ 8 Discovered in the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haojing; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Ryan, Russell E.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A.; Dickinson, Mark; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Davé, Romeel; Faber, S. M.; Papovich, Casey; Guo, Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lee, Kyoung-soo; Reddy, Naveen; Cooray, Asantha R.; Siana, Brian D.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ashby, Matthew; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Lucas, Ray A.; Dekel, Avishai; Pentericci, Laura; Conselice, Christopher J.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lai, Kamson

    2012-12-01

    One key goal of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey is to track galaxy evolution back to z ≈ 8. Its two-tiered "wide and deep" strategy bridges significant gaps in existing near-infrared surveys. Here we report on z ≈ 8 galaxy candidates selected as F105W-band dropouts in one of its deep fields, which covers 50.1 arcmin2 to 4 ks depth in each of three near-infrared bands in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey southern field. Two of our candidates have J < 26.2 mag, and are >1 mag brighter than any previously known F105W-dropouts. We derive constraints on the bright end of the rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function of galaxies at z ≈ 8, and show that the number density of such very bright objects is higher than expected from the previous Schechter luminosity function estimates at this redshift. Another two candidates are securely detected in Spitzer Infrared Array Camera images, which are the first such individual detections at z ≈ 8. Their derived stellar masses are on the order of a few × 109 M ⊙, from which we obtain the first measurement of the high-mass end of the galaxy stellar mass function at z ≈ 8. The high number density of very luminous and very massive galaxies at z ≈ 8, if real, could imply a large stellar-to-halo mass ratio and an efficient conversion of baryons to stars at such an early time.

  13. Computer System for Analysis of Molecular Evolution Modes (SAMEM): analysis of molecular evolution modes at deep inner branches of the phylogenetic tree.

    PubMed

    Gunbin, Konstantin V; Suslov, Valentin V; Genaev, Mikhail A; Afonnikov, Dmitry A

    SAMEM (System for Analysis of Molecular Evolution Modes), a web-based pipeline system for inferring modes of molecular evolution in genes and proteins (http://pixie.bionet.nsc.ru/samem/), is presented. Pipeline 1 performs analyses of protein-coding gene evolution; pipeline 2 performs analyses of protein evolution; pipeline 3 prepares datasets of genes and/or proteins, performs their primary analysis, and builds BLOSUM matrices; pipeline 4 checks if these genes really are protein-coding. Pipeline 1 has an all-new feature, which allows the user to obtain K(R)/K(C) estimates using several different methods. An important feature of pipeline 2 is an original method for analyzing the rates of amino acid substitutions at the branches of a phylogenetic tree. The method is based on Markov modeling and a non-parametric permutation test, which compares expected and observed frequencies of amino acid substitutions, and infers the modes of molecular evolution at deep inner branches.

  14. Correlation of deep moonquakes and mare basalts: Implications for lunar mantle structure and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chuan; Muirhead, Alicia C.; Zhong, Shijie

    2012-07-01

    The genesis of mare basalts and deep moonquakes are important events that have major implications for understanding the thermal evolution and interior dynamics of the Moon. The eruption of mare basalts predominantly from 3.9 Ga to 3 Ga ago represents one of the most important events in lunar geological history. Deep moonquakes recorded by the Apollo Seismic Network show the dynamic nature of the present-day lunar mantle. In this study, we have correlated the presence of the mare basalts, using FeO concentration as a proxy, with the epicenters of 52 well-located deep moonquake (DMQ) clusters. We determine FeO concentrations of 13 wt.% or higher to be representative of the mare basalt deposits. Our analysis shows that over 63% of the DMQs occur within 1° from the mare basalt deposits, while over 80% of the DMQs are within 5° from the mare basalt deposits. Our analysis also shows that for the same amount of randomly distributed DMQs within a spherical cap on the nearside that encompasses all the nearside DMQs, the probability of over 80% of the DMQs occurring within 5° from the mare basalt deposits is about 0.01, thus rejecting a random distribution of the DMQs with respect to the mare basalts. The correlation between mare basalts and the DMQs from our analysis suggests that the mare basalts may be derived from melting processes at relatively large depths, consistent with previous petrology and geodynamic studies. We propose that the water and volatiles in the mare basalt source material (i.e., a mixture of ilmenite cumulates and olivine orthopyroxene, together called MIC) play an important role in causing the DMQs and that the DMQs delineate the present-day locations of MIC in the deep mantle. Since the mare basalts are predominately distributed on the nearside, our results further suggest that the DMQs may indeed be largely nearside features, which is a prediction that can be tested in future lunar seismic exploration.

  15. INTEGRAL/IBIS deep extragalactic survey: M81, LMC and 3C 273/Coma fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereminskiy, Ilya A.; Krivonos, Roman A.; Lutovinov, Alexander A.; Sazonov, Sergey Yu.; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G.; Sunyaev, Rashid A.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of a deep survey of three extragalactic fields, M81 (exposure of 9.7 Ms), Large Magellanic Cloud (6.8 Ms) and 3C 273/Coma (9.3 Ms), in the hard X-ray (17-60 keV) energy band with the IBIS telescope onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, based on 12 years of observations (2003-2015). The combined survey reaches a 4σ peak sensitivity of 0.18 mCrab (2.6 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2) and sensitivity better than 0.25 and 0.87 mCrab over 10 per cent and 90 per cent of its full area of 4900 deg2, respectively. We have detected in total 147 sources at S/N > 4σ, including 37 sources observed in hard X-rays for the first time. The survey is dominated by extragalactic sources, mostly active galactic nuclei (AGN). The sample of identified sources contains 98 AGN (including 64 Seyfert galaxies, seven low-ionization nuclear emission-line region galaxies, three X-ray bright optically normal galaxies, 16 blazars and eight AGN of unclear optical class), two galaxy clusters (Coma and Abell 3266), 17 objects located in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (13 high- and two low-mass X-ray binaries and two X-ray pulsars), three Galactic cataclysmic variables, one ultraluminous X-ray source (M82 X-1) and one blended source (SWIFT J1105.7+5854). The nature of 25 sources remains unknown, so that the survey's identification is currently complete at 83 per cent. We have constructed AGN number-flux relations (log N-log S) and calculated AGN number densities in the local Universe for the entire survey and for each of the three extragalactic fields.

  16. RATS-Kepler - a deep high-cadence survey of the Kepler field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Gavin; Brooks, Adam; Hakala, Pasi; Barclay, Thomas; Garcia-Alvarez, David; Antoci, Victoria; Greiss, Sandra; Still, Martin; Steeghs, Danny; Gänsicke, Boris; Reynolds, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We outline the purpose, strategy and first results of a deep, high-cadence, photometric survey of the Kepler field using the Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma and the MDM 1.3 m Telescope on Kitt Peak. Our goal was to identify sources located in the Kepler field of view which are variable on a time-scale of a few minutes to 1 h. The astrophysically most-interesting sources would then have been candidates for observation using Kepler using 1 min sampling. Our survey covered ˜42 per cent of the Kepler field of view, and we have obtained light curves for 7.1 × 105 objects in the range 13 < g < 20. We have discovered more than 100 variable sources which have passed our two stage identification process. As a service to the wider community, we make our data products and cleaned CCD images available to download. We obtained Kepler data of 18 sources which we found to be variable using our survey, and we give an overview of the currently available data here. These sources include a pulsating DA white dwarf, 11 δ Sct stars which have dominant pulsation periods in the range 24 min to 2.35 h, three contact binaries, and a cataclysmic variable (V363 Lyr). One of the δ Sct stars is in a contact binary.

  17. A very deep IRAS survey at l(II) = 97 deg, b(II) = +30 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacking, Perry; Houck, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A deep far-infrared survey is presented using over 1000 scans made of a 4 to 6 sq. deg. field at the north ecliptic pole by the IRAS. Point sources from this survey are up to 100 times fainter than the IRAS point source catalog at 12 and 25 micrometers, and up to 10 times fainter at 60 and 100 micrometers. The 12 and 25 micrometer maps are instrumental noise-limited, and the 60 and 100 micrometer maps are confusion noise-limited. The majority of the 12 micrometer point sources are stars within the Milky Way. The 25 micrometer sources are composed almost equally of stars and galaxies. About 80% of the 60 micrometer sources correspond to galaxies on Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) enlargements. The remaining 20% are probably galaxies below the POSS detection limit. The differential source counts are presented and compared with what is predicted by the Bahcall and Soneira Standard Galaxy Model using the B-V-12 micrometer colors of stars without circumstellar dust shells given by Waters, Cote and Aumann. The 60 micrometer source counts are inconsistent with those predicted for a uniformly distributed, nonevolving universe. The implications are briefly discussed.

  18. Search for cosmic strings in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J. L.; Albin, E.; James, K. A.; Goldman, J.; Maruyama, D.; Smoot, G. F.

    2008-06-15

    We search Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Program images collected as part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey for pairs of galaxies consistent with the gravitational lensing signature of a cosmic string. Our technique includes estimates of the efficiency for finding the lensed galaxy pair. In the north (south) survey field we find no evidence out to a redshift of greater than 0.5 (0.3) for cosmic strings to a mass per unit length limit of G{mu}/c{sup 2}<3.0x10{sup -7} at 95% confidence limits (C.L.). In the combined 314.9 arcmin{sup 2} of the north and south survey fields this corresponds to a global limit on {omega}{sub strings}<0.02. Our limit on G{mu}/c{sup 2} is more than an order of magnitude lower than searches for individual strings in cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Our limit is higher than other CMB and gravitational wave searches, however, we note that it is less model dependent than these other searches.

  19. Photometric identification of objects from Galaxy Evolution Explorer Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preethi, K.; Gudennavar, S. B.; Bubbly, S. G.; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah

    2014-01-01

    We have used Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observations to extract seven band photometric magnitudes for over 80 000 objects in the vicinity of the North Galactic Pole. Although these had been identified as stars by the SDSS pipeline, we found through fitting with model spectral energy distributions that most were, in fact, of extragalactic origin. Only about 9 per cent of these objects turned out to be main-sequence stars and about 11 per cent were white dwarfs and red giants collectively, while galaxies and quasars contributed to the remaining 80 per cent of the data. We have classified these objects into different spectral types (for the stars) and into different galactic types (for the galaxies). As part of our fitting procedure, we derive the distance and extinction to each object and the photometric redshift towards galaxies and quasars. This method easily allows for the addition of any number of observations to cover a more diverse range of wavelengths, as well as the addition of any number of model templates. The primary objective of this work is to eventually derive a three-dimensional extinction map of the Milky Way Galaxy.

  20. Deep sea three component magnetic survey using ROV in the hydrothermal vent of the Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.; Park, C.

    2011-12-01

    We conducted magnetic survey at Apr., 2011 in the western slope of the caldera of TA25, the Lau Basin, the southwestern Pacific using IBRV(Ice Breaker Research Vessel) ARAON of KORDI(Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute), ROV(Remotely Operated Vehicle) of Oceaneering Co. and three component magnetometer(Fig. 1,Fig. 2). The deep-sea three component magnetic survey lines are the 13 N-S lines(100 m spacing) and the 2 E-W lines(Fig. 2). The depth ranges of the survey area are from about 900 m to 1200 m, below sea level. For the magnetic survey, the magnetometer sensor and the data logger was attached with the upper part and lower part of ROV, respectively(Fig. 2). We wanted to make the distance between the magnetometer sensor and ROV over 2 m long to reduce the noise effect of ROV. But, for the safe of deployment and recovery of ROV, the distance between the magnetometer sensor and ROV was 126 cm(Fig. 2). In the magnetic survey, ROV followed the planning tracks at 25~30 m above seafloor using the altimeter and USBL(Ultra Short Base Line) of ROV. IBRV ARAON accompanied ROV on the magnetic survey. The three component magnetometer measure the X(North), Y(East) and Z(Vertical) vector components of a magnetic field. A motion sensor(Oxtans) provided us the data of pitch, roll, yaw for the correction of the magnetic data to the motion of ROV. The data of the magnetometer sensor and the motion sensor were recorded on a notebook through the optical cable of ROV and the network of ARON using magnetometer software. The precision positions of magnetic data were merged by the post-processing of USBL of ROV. Hydrothermal fluids over Curie temperature can quickly alter or replace the iron-rich magnetic minerals, reducing the magnetic remanence of the crustal rocks, in some cases to near 0A/m magnetization. So, the obtained three component magnetic data are fully utilized by finding possible hydrothermal vents of the survey area.

  1. The complex evolutionary history of seeing red: molecular phylogeny and the evolution of an adaptive visual system in deep-sea dragonfishes (Stomiiformes: Stomiidae).

    PubMed

    Kenaley, Christopher P; Devaney, Shannon C; Fjeran, Taylor T

    2014-04-01

    The vast majority of deep-sea fishes have retinas composed of only rod cells sensitive to only shortwave blue light, approximately 480-490 nm. A group of deep-sea dragonfishes, the loosejaws (family Stomiidae), possesses far-red emitting photophores and rhodopsins sensitive to long-wave emissions greater than 650 nm. In this study, the rhodopsin diversity within the Stomiidae is surveyed based on an analysis of rod opsin-coding sequences from representatives of 23 of the 28 genera. Using phylogenetic inference, fossil-calibrated estimates of divergence times, and a comparative approach scanning the stomiid phylogeny for shared genotypes and substitution histories, we explore the evolution and timing of spectral tuning in the family. Our results challenge both the monophyly of the family Stomiidae and the loosejaws. Despite paraphyly of the loosejaws, we infer for the first time that far-red visual systems have a single evolutionary origin within the family and that this shift in phenotype occurred at approximately 15.4 Ma. In addition, we found strong evidence that at approximately 11.2 Ma the most recent common ancestor of two dragonfish genera reverted to a primitive shortwave visual system during its evolution from a far-red sensitive dragonfish. According to branch-site tests for adaptive evolution, we hypothesize that positive selection may be driving spectral tuning in the Stomiidae. These results indicate that the evolutionary history of visual systems in deep-sea species is complex and a more thorough understanding of this system requires an integrative comparative approach.

  2. THE LARGE APEX BOLOMETER CAMERA SURVEY OF THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, A.; Kovacs, A.; Menten, K. M.; Coppin, K.; Smail, Ian; Greve, T. R.; Walter, F.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunlop, J. S.; Ivison, R. J.; Knudsen, K. K.; Bertoldi, F.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. N.; Chapman, S. C.; Cox, P.; De Breuck, C.; Gawiser, E.; Lutz, D.; Koekemoer, A. M.

    2009-12-20

    We present a sensitive 870 mum survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) combining 310 hr of observing time with the Large Apex BOlometer Camera (LABOCA) on the APEX telescope. The LABOCA ECDFS Submillimetre Survey (LESS) covers the full 30' x 30' field size of the ECDFS and has a uniform noise level of sigma{sub 870{sub m}}u{sub m} approx 1.2 mJy beam{sup -1}. LESS is thus the largest contiguous deep submillimeter survey undertaken to date. The noise properties of our map show clear evidence that we are beginning to be affected by confusion noise. We present a catalog of 126 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) detected with a significance level above 3.7sigma, at which level we expect five false detections given our map area of 1260 arcmin{sup 2}. The ECDFS exhibits a deficit of bright SMGs relative to previously studied blank fields but not of normal star-forming galaxies that dominate the extragalactic background light (EBL). This is in line with the underdensities observed for optically defined high redshift source populations in the ECDFS (BzKs, DRGs, optically bright active galactic nucleus, and massive K-band-selected galaxies). The differential source counts in the full field are well described by a power law with a slope of alpha = -3.2, comparable to the results from other fields. We show that the shape of the source counts is not uniform across the field. Instead, it steepens in regions with low SMG density. Towards the highest overdensities we measure a source-count shape consistent with previous surveys. The integrated 870 mum flux densities of our source-count models down to S{sub 870{sub m}}u{sub m} = 0.5 mJy account for >65% of the estimated EBL from COBE measurements. We have investigated the clustering of SMGs in the ECDFS by means of a two-point correlation function and find evidence for strong clustering on angular scales <1' with a significance of 3.4sigma. Assuming a power-law dependence for the correlation function and a typical

  3. Shear wave velocity analysis of a deep seated gravel landslide structure using the microtremor survey method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, L.; Xu, X.; Liao, H.; Geng, X.-Y.

    2015-09-01

    The depth and geometry of potential failure surface is the fundamental for evaluating the mechanisms of a landslide. Traditional techniques to acquire information on potential sliding surface are mainly drilling, pitting, and trenching, but these techniques are time consuming and expensive. In this study, microtremor signals and the dispersion curves of surface wave are extracted from the vertical component of microtremor records using the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method to estimate shear wave velocity structure. The results suggest that the buried depth of phyllite bedrock is approximately 47.4m, and the thickness of weathered bedrock layer is about 9.9m at about 57.3m deep, which could be interpreted as the potential sliding surface of this landslide, in accordance with borehole data. The microtremor survey method (MSM) is flexible, non-invasive, relatively quick and deployable on the landslide. It clearly demonstrat that it is an effective tool to improve the drilling success rate, and hence allow a large scale and high density investigation of structure characteristics of a deep seated landslide.

  4. Cosmic Shear Results from the Deep Lens Survey. II. Full Cosmological Parameter Constraints from Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Michael D.; Schmidt, Samuel; Wittman, David

    2016-06-01

    We present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude {r}{lim}˜ 27 (5σ ), is designed as a precursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing \\gt 10 deg2 cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9 yr results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives {{{Ω }}}m={0.293}-0.014+0.012, {σ }8={0.833}-0.018+0.011, {H}0={68.6}-1.2+1.4 {\\text{km s}}-1 {{{Mpc}}}-1, and {{{Ω }}}b=0.0475+/- 0.0012 for ΛCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ˜50%. When we do not assume flatness for ΛCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint {{{Ω }}}k=-{0.010}-0.015+0.013 from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which, however, is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation-of-state parameter w is tightly constrained when baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding w=-{1.02}-0.09+0.10 with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to w=-1.03+/- 0.03. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also with the predictions of a ΛCDM universe.

  5. Stirring by deep cyclones and the evolution of Denmark strait overflow water observed at line W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, M.; Toole, J. M.; Torres, D. J.; Smethie, W. M.; Joyce, T. M.; Curry, R. G.

    2016-03-01

    Shipboard velocity and water property data from 18 transects across the North Atlantic Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) near 40 °N are examined to study the evolution of the Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW) component of the DWBC and mixing between DSOW and the interior. The examined transects along Line W - which stretches from the continental shelf south of New England to Bermuda - were made between 1994 and 2014. The shipboard data comprise measurements at regular stations of velocity from lowered acoustic Doppler current profilers, CTD profiles and trace gas chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) concentrations from bottle samples at discrete depths. Comparison of the Line W velocity sections with concurrent sea surface height maps from satellite altimetry indicates that large cyclones in the deep ocean accompany intermittent quasi-stationary meander troughs in the Gulf Stream path at Line W. A composite of 5 velocity sections along Line W suggests that a typical cyclone reaches swirl speeds of greater than 30 cm s-1 at 3400-m depth and has a radius (distance between the center and the maximum velocity) of 75 km. Tracer data suggest that these cyclones affect not only the deep velocity structure along Line W, but also provide a mechanism for water exchange between the DWBC's DSOW and the interior. Vigorous exchange is corroborated by a mismatch in the CFC-11:CFC-12 and CFC-113:CFC-12 ratio ages calculated for DSOW at Line W. During the most recent 5-year period (2010-2014), a decrease in DSOW density has been driven by warming (increasing by almost 0.1 °C) as salinity has increased only slightly (by 0.003, which is close to the 0.002 uncertainty of the measurements). The abyssal ocean offshore of the DWBC and Gulf Stream and deeper than 3000-m depth has freshened at a rate of 6×10-4 yr-1 since at least 2003. Density here remains nearly unchanged over this period, due to temperature compensation, though a linear cooling trend in the abyssal ocean (to compensate the

  6. DUAL SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES IN THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Comerford, Julia M.; Schluns, Kyle; Greene, Jenny E.; Cool, Richard J.

    2013-11-01

    Dual supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with kiloparsec-scale separations in merger-remnant galaxies are informative tracers of galaxy evolution, but the avenue for identifying them in large numbers for such studies is not yet clear. One promising approach is to target spectroscopic signatures of systems where both SMBHs are fueled as dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or where one SMBH is fueled as an offset AGN. Dual AGNs may produce double-peaked narrow AGN emission lines, while offset AGNs may produce single-peaked narrow AGN emission lines with line-of-sight velocity offsets relative to the host galaxy. We search for such dual and offset systems among 173 Type 2 AGNs at z < 0.37 in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES), and we find two double-peaked AGNs and five offset AGN candidates. When we compare these results to a similar search of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey and match the two samples in color, absolute magnitude, and minimum velocity offset, we find that the fraction of AGNs that are dual SMBH candidates increases from z = 0.25 to z = 0.7 by a factor of ∼6 (from 2/70 to 16/91, or 2.9{sup +3.6}{sub -1.9}% to 18{sup +5}{sub -5}%). This may be associated with the rise in the galaxy merger fraction over the same cosmic time. As further evidence for a link with galaxy mergers, the AGES offset and dual AGN candidates are tentatively ∼3 times more likely than the overall AGN population to reside in a host galaxy that has a companion galaxy (from 16/173 to 2/7, or 9{sup +3}{sub -2}% to 29{sub -19}{sup +26}%). Follow-up observations of the seven offset and dual AGN candidates in AGES will definitively distinguish velocity offsets produced by dual SMBHs from those produced by narrow-line region kinematics, and will help sharpen our observational approach to detecting dual SMBHs.

  7. Evolution and functional characterisation of melanopsins in a deep-sea chimaera (elephant shark, Callorhinchus milii).

    PubMed

    Davies, Wayne I L; Tay, Boon-Hui; Zheng, Lei; Danks, Janine A; Brenner, Sydney; Foster, Russell G; Collin, Shaun P; Hankins, Mark W; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Hunt, David M

    2012-01-01

    Non-visual photoreception in mammals is primarily mediated by two splice variants that derive from a single melanopsin (OPN4M) gene, whose expression is restricted to a subset of retinal ganglion cells. Physiologically, this sensory system regulates the photoentrainment of many biological rhythms, such as sleep via the melatonin endocrine system and pupil constriction. By contrast, melanopsin exists as two distinct lineages in non-mammals, opn4m and opn4x, and is broadly expressed in a wide range of tissue types, including the eye, brain, pineal gland and skin. Despite these findings, the evolution and function of melanopsin in early vertebrates are largely unknown. We, therefore, investigated the complement of opn4 classes present in the genome of a model deep-sea cartilaginous species, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), as a representative vertebrate that resides at the base of the gnathostome (jawed vertebrate) lineage. We reveal that three melanopsin genes, opn4m1, opn4m2 and opn4x, are expressed in multiple tissues of the elephant shark. The two opn4m genes are likely to have arisen as a result of a lineage-specific duplication, whereas "long" and "short" splice variants are generated from a single opn4x gene. By using a heterologous expression system, we suggest that these genes encode functional photopigments that exhibit both "invertebrate-like" bistable and classical "vertebrate-like" monostable biochemical characteristics. We discuss the evolution and function of these melanopsin pigments within the context of the diverse photic and ecological environments inhabited by this chimaerid holocephalan, as well as the origin of non-visual sensory systems in early vertebrates.

  8. Evolution and functional characterisation of melanopsins in a deep-sea chimaera (elephant shark, Callorhinchus milii).

    PubMed

    Davies, Wayne I L; Tay, Boon-Hui; Zheng, Lei; Danks, Janine A; Brenner, Sydney; Foster, Russell G; Collin, Shaun P; Hankins, Mark W; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Hunt, David M

    2012-01-01

    Non-visual photoreception in mammals is primarily mediated by two splice variants that derive from a single melanopsin (OPN4M) gene, whose expression is restricted to a subset of retinal ganglion cells. Physiologically, this sensory system regulates the photoentrainment of many biological rhythms, such as sleep via the melatonin endocrine system and pupil constriction. By contrast, melanopsin exists as two distinct lineages in non-mammals, opn4m and opn4x, and is broadly expressed in a wide range of tissue types, including the eye, brain, pineal gland and skin. Despite these findings, the evolution and function of melanopsin in early vertebrates are largely unknown. We, therefore, investigated the complement of opn4 classes present in the genome of a model deep-sea cartilaginous species, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), as a representative vertebrate that resides at the base of the gnathostome (jawed vertebrate) lineage. We reveal that three melanopsin genes, opn4m1, opn4m2 and opn4x, are expressed in multiple tissues of the elephant shark. The two opn4m genes are likely to have arisen as a result of a lineage-specific duplication, whereas "long" and "short" splice variants are generated from a single opn4x gene. By using a heterologous expression system, we suggest that these genes encode functional photopigments that exhibit both "invertebrate-like" bistable and classical "vertebrate-like" monostable biochemical characteristics. We discuss the evolution and function of these melanopsin pigments within the context of the diverse photic and ecological environments inhabited by this chimaerid holocephalan, as well as the origin of non-visual sensory systems in early vertebrates. PMID:23251480

  9. Short and long term evolution of deep giant submarine dunes in continental shelf environment: the example of the 'Banc du Four' (Western Brittany, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzetti, M.; Le Roy, P.; Garlan, T.; Delacourt, C.; Thibaud, R.; Cancouet, R.; Graindorge, D.; Prunier, C.; Sukhovich, A.; Deschamps, A.

    2013-12-01

    The deep sandwave dynamics is still in debate. Understanding the migration processes and the resulting evolution of their 3D internal architecture are scientifically challenging. To address these questions we realized two swath bathymetry surveys complemented with seismic reflection across the large sandwaves field named 'Banc du Four'. It is located offshore the Western Brittany and is composed of more 500 dunes. Some of the dunes' wavelengths and heights exceed 1000m and 30m respectively placing them among the largest dunes ever described. Equilibrium laws obtained from our morphological analysis are not completely in agreement with those described in previous studies of similar structures in shallow waters. Relatively high migration velocities on deep continental shelves (from 3 to 20m.yr-1) attest of their still present dynamical equilibrium. Internal-external morphological and kinematical analyses show the existence of two different dynamic regimes. Interpretation of the seismic reflection data allowed reconstructing long-term evolution of the sandbank and the establishment of progressive connections between stepped submarine channels and tidal dynamics during the last sea-level rise.

  10. The morphology of faint galaxies in Medium Deep Survey images using WFPC2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Casertano, S.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G. F.; Glazebrook, K.; Santiago, B.; Huchra, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    First results from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey images taken with Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) demonstrate that galaxy classifications can be reliably performed to magnitudes I814 approximately less than 22.0 in the F815W band. Published spectroscopic surveys to this depth indicate a mean redshift of bar-z approximately 0.5. We have classified over 200 galaxies in nine WFPC2 fields according to a basic morphological scheme. The majority of these faint galaxies appear to be similar to regular Hubble-sequence examples observed at low redshift. To the precision of our classification scheme, the relative proportion of spheroidal and disk systems of normal appearance is as expected from nearby samples, indicating that the bulk of the local galaxy population was in place at half the Hubble time. However, the most intriguing result is the relatively high proportion (approximately 40%) of objects which are in some way anomalous, and which may be of relevance in understanding the origin of the familiar excess population of faint galaxies established by others. These diverse objects include apparently interacting pairs whose multiple structure is only revealed with HST's angular resolution, galaxies with superluminous star-forming regions, diffuse low surface brightness galaxies of various forms, and compact galaxies. These anomalous galaxies contribute a substantial fraction of the excess counts at our limiting magnitude, and may provide insights into the 'faint blue galaxy' problem.

  11. SXDF-ALMA 2-arcmin2 deep survey: 1.1-mm number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ich; Tamura, Yoichi; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S.

    2016-06-01

    We report 1.1-mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (≥4σ) sources detected in a continuous 2.0-arcmin2 area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fitting function of the number counts, we find that ˜40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S1.1mm > 0.2 mJy.

  12. Modelling the effect of repositioning on the evolution of skeletal muscle damage in deep tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Demol, Jan; Deun, Dorien Van; Haex, Bart; Oosterwyck, Hans Van; Sloten, Jos Vander

    2013-04-01

    Deep tissue injury (DTI) is a localized area of tissue necrosis that originates in the subcutaneous layers under an intact skin and tends to develop when soft tissue is compressed for a prolonged period of time. In clinical practice, DTI is particularly common in bedridden patients and remains a serious issue in todays health care. Repositioning is generally considered to be an effective preventive measure of pressure ulcers. However, limited experimental research and no computational studies have been undertaken on this method. In this study, a methodology was developed to evaluate the influence of different repositioning intervals on the location, size and severity of DTI in bedridden patients. The spatiotemporal evolution of compressive stresses and skeletal muscle viability during the first 48 h of DTI onset was simulated for repositioning schemes in which a patient is turned every 2, 3, 4 or 6 h. The model was able to reproduce important experimental findings, including the morphology and location of DTI in human patients as well as the discrepancy between the internal tissue loads and the contact pressure at the interface with the environment. In addition, the model indicated that the severity and size of DTI were reduced by shortening the repositioning intervals. In conclusion, the computational framework presented in this study provides a promising modelling approach that can help to objectively select the appropriate repositioning scheme that is effective and efficient in the prevention of DTI.

  13. COOL WHITE DWARFS FOUND IN THE UKIRT INFRARED DEEP SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, S. K.; Nitta, A.; Lodieu, N.

    2011-07-01

    We present the results of a search for cool white dwarfs in the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS). The UKIDSS LAS photometry was paired with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to identify cool hydrogen-rich white dwarf candidates by their neutral optical colors and blue near-infrared colors, as well as faint reduced proper motion magnitudes. Optical spectroscopy was obtained at Gemini Observatory and showed the majority of the candidates to be newly identified cool degenerates, with a small number of G- to K-type (sub)dwarf contaminants. Our initial search of 280 deg{sup 2} of sky resulted in seven new white dwarfs with effective temperature T{sub eff} {approx} 6000 K. The current follow-up of 1400 deg{sup 2} of sky has produced 13 new white dwarfs. Model fits to the photometry show that seven of the newly identified white dwarfs have 4120 K {<=}T{sub eff} {<=} 4480 K, and cooling ages between 7.3 Gyr and 8.7 Gyr; they have 40 km s{sup -1} {<=} v{sub tan} {<=} 85 km s{sup -1} and are likely to be thick disk 10-11 Gyr-old objects. The other half of the sample has 4610 K {<=}T{sub eff} {<=} 5260 K, cooling ages between 4.3 Gyr and 6.9 Gyr, and 60 km s{sup -1} {<=} v{sub tan} {<=} 100 km s{sup -1}. These are either thin disk remnants with unusually high velocities, or lower-mass remnants of thick disk or halo late-F or G stars.

  14. The evolution of volcano-hosted geothermal systems based on deep wells from Karaha-Telaga Bodas, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.N.; Allis, R.G.; Nemcok, M.; Powell, T.S.; Bruton, C.J.; Wannamaker, P.E.; Raharjo, I.B.; Norman, D.I.

    2008-01-01

    Temperature and pressure surveys, fluid samples, and petrologic analyses of rock samples from deep drill holes at the Karaha - Telaga Bodas geothermal field on the volcanic ridge extending northward from Galunggung Volcano, West Java, have provided a unique opportunity to characterize the evolution of an active volcano-hosted geothermal system. Wells up to 3 km in depth have encountered temperatures as high as 353??C and a weakly altered granodiorite that intruded to within 2 to 3 km of the surface. The intrusion is shallowest beneath the southern end of the field where an acid lake overlies a nearly vertical low resistivity structure (<10 ohm-m) defined by magnetotelluric measurements. This structure is interpreted to represent a vapor-dominated chimney that provides a pathway to the surface for magmatic gases. Four distinct hydrothermal mineral assemblages document the evolution of the geothermal system and the transition from liquid- to vapor-dominated conditions. The earliest assemblage represents the initial liquid-dominated system generated during emplacement of the granodiorite between 5910 ?? 76 and 4200 ?? 150 y BP. Tourmaline, biotite, actinolite, epidote and clay minerals were deposited contemporaneously at progressively greater distances from the intrusive contact (assemblage 1). At 4200 ?? 150 y BP, flank collapse and the formation of the volcano's crater, Kawah Galunggung, resulted in catastrophic decompression and boiling of the hydrothermal fluids. This event initiated development of the modern vapor-dominated regime. Chalcedony and then quartz were deposited as the early low salinity liquids boiled (assemblage 2). Both vapor- and liquid-rich fluid inclusions were trapped in the quartz crystals. Liquid-rich fluid inclusions from the southern part of the field record salinities ranging from 0 to 26 weight percent NaCl- CaCl2 equivalent and locally contain fluorite daughter crystals. We suggest, based on temperature-salinity relationships and evidence

  15. Survey incompleteness and the evolution of the QSO luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majewski, Steven R.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Kron, Richard G.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Smetanka, John J.; Koo, David C.

    1993-01-01

    We concentrate on a type of QSO survey which depends on selecting QSO candidates based on combinations of colors. Since QSO's have emission lines and power-law continua, they are expected to yield broadband colors unlike those of stellar photospheres. Previously, the fraction of QSO's expected to be hiding (unselected) within the locus of stellar (U-J, J-F) colors was estimated at about 15 percent. We have now verified that the KK88 survey is at least 11 percent incomplete, but have determined that it may be as much as 34 percent incomplete. The 'missing' QSO's are expected to be predominantly at z less than or = 2.2. We have studied the proper motion and variability properties of all stellar objects with J less than or = 22.5 or F less than or = 21.5 in the SA 57 field which has previously been surveyed with a multicolor QSO search by KK88.

  16. IDENTIFYING LUMINOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN DEEP SURVEYS: REVISED IRAC SELECTION CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    Donley, J. L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Brusa, M.; Salvato, M.; Capak, P.; Cardamone, C. N.; Civano, F.; Ilbert, O.; Impey, C. D.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Miyaji, T.; Sanders, D. B.; Trump, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    Spitzer/IRAC selection is a powerful tool for identifying luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For deep IRAC data, however, the AGN selection wedges currently in use are heavily contaminated by star-forming galaxies, especially at high redshift. Using the large samples of luminous AGNs and high-redshift star-forming galaxies in COSMOS, we redefine the AGN selection criteria for use in deep IRAC surveys. The new IRAC criteria are designed to be both highly complete and reliable, and incorporate the best aspects of the current AGN selection wedges and of infrared power-law selection while excluding high-redshift star-forming galaxies selected via the BzK, distant red galaxy, Lyman-break galaxy, and submillimeter galaxy criteria. At QSO luminosities of log L{sub 2-10keV}(erg s{sup -1}) {>=}44, the new IRAC criteria recover 75% of the hard X-ray and IRAC-detected XMM-COSMOS sample, yet only 38% of the IRAC AGN candidates have X-ray counterparts, a fraction that rises to 52% in regions with Chandra exposures of 50-160 ks. X-ray stacking of the individually X-ray non-detected AGN candidates leads to a hard X-ray signal indicative of heavily obscured to mildly Compton-thick obscuration (log N{sub H} (cm{sup -2}) = 23.5 {+-} 0.4). While IRAC selection recovers a substantial fraction of luminous unobscured and obscured AGNs, it is incomplete to low-luminosity and host-dominated AGNs.

  17. Deep Photometry of Galaxies in the VEGAS Survey: The Case of NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spavone, M.

    The VST-VEGAS project is aimed at observing and studying a rich sample of nearby early-type galaxies in order to systematically characterize their properties over a wide baseline of sizes and out to the faint outskirts where data are rather scarce so far. The external regions of galaxies more easily retain signatures about the formation and evolution mechanisms which shaped them, as their relaxation time are longer, and they are more weakly influenced by processes such as mergers, secular evolution, central black hole activity, and supernova feedback on the ISM, which tend to level age and metallicity gradients. The collection of a wide photometric dataset of a large number of galaxies in various environmental conditions, may help to shed light on these questions. To this end VEGAS exploits the potential of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) which provides high quality images of 1 deg2 field of view in order to satisfy both the requirement of high resolution data and the need of studying nearby, and thus large, objects. We present a detailed study of the surface photometry of the elliptical galaxy NGC4472 and of smaller ETGs in its field, performed by using new g and i bands images to constrain the formation history of this nearby giant galaxy, and to investigate the presence of very faint substructures in its surroundings.

  18. Deep CCD Field Surveys: Numbers of Very Low Mass Stars in the Halo and Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeshaar, Patricia C.; Tyson, Tony; Bernstein, Gary

    1994-12-01

    Deep three band (B_J < 27.5, R < 26.4, I < 25 mag) CCD images of 12 high galactic latitude fields covering a total of 144 arcmin(2) on the sky have been obtained as part of a 4-m survey done at CTIO over the past decade. Together with a single 2048(2) CCD field covering 48 sq. arcmin on the sky obtained at KPNO, these data have been analyzed to search for M dwarfs near the halo and disk hydrogen burning limits. Our color data have been carefully calibrated using stars of different luminosities which have spectroscopically determined metallicities, in order to separate out the different population types. We find no evidence for a population of very low mass M dwarfs sufficient to account for an important fraction of the halo dark matter. For the least luminous halo M subdwarfs (M_V ~ 15) our survey is complete out to 3000 pc, covering a volume of approx. 205,000 pc(3) . We detect 6 objects having colors consistent with M subdwarfs of M_V = 13.5 -- 15, though this sample may be contaminated by 1--2 misclassified compact high redshift galaxies of similar color which appear stellar. Our finding is consistent with the halo luminosity function determined in the solar neighborhood by Dahn and Liebert (1994 Proceedings of the ESO workshop: "The Bottom of the Main Sequence and Beyond"). They predict that we should find 5 +/- 3 of the least luminous subdwarfs within our volume. By comparison, the halo luminosity function of Richer and Fahlman (1992, Nature 358, 383) would predict over five times as many low mass M subdwarfs than we find in our surveys. Moreover, with a completeness limit of 500 pc, we find no excess of the least luminous disk M dwarfs (dM8-9, M_V ~ 18 -- 19) beyond that predicted by the luminosity function determined from a large area CCD Transit Instrument Survey (Kirpatrick et al 1994, ApJS 94, 749). Our data similarly suggest that the latest M dwarfs have a scale height much smaller than the 350 pc. value widely used for earlier M dwarfs.

  19. The Swift serendipitous survey in deep XRT GRB fields (SwiftFT). I. The X-ray catalog and number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puccetti, S.; Capalbi, M.; Giommi, P.; Perri, M.; Stratta, G.; Angelini, L.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Chincarini, G.; Cusumano, G.; Gehrels, N.; Moretti, A.; Nousek, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: An accurate census of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) is a key step in investigating the nature of the correlation between the growth and evolution of super massive black holes and galaxy evolution. X-ray surveys provide one of the most efficient ways of selecting AGN. Methods: We searched for X-ray serendipitous sources in over 370 Swift-XRT fields centered on gamma ray bursts detected between 2004 and 2008 and observed with total exposures ranging from 10 ks to over 1 Ms. This defines the Swift Serendipitous Survey in deep XRT GRB fields, which is quite broad compared to existing surveys (~33 square degrees) and medium depth, with a faintest flux limit of 7.2 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5 to 2 keV energy range (4.8 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 at 50% completeness). The survey has a high degree of uniformity thanks to the stable point spread function and small vignetting correction factors of the XRT, moreover is completely random on the sky as GRBs explode in totally unrelated parts of the sky. Results: In this paper we present the sample and the X-ray number counts of the high Galactic-latitude sample, estimated with high statistics over a wide flux range (i.e., 7.2 × 10-16 ÷ ~ 5 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band and 3.4 × 10-15 ÷ ~ 6 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 2-10 keV band). We detect 9387 point-like sources with a detection Poisson probability threshold of ≤ 2 × 10-5, in at least one of the three energy bands considered (i.e. 0.3-3 keV, 2-10 keV, and 0.3-10 keV), for the total sample, while 7071 point-like sources are found at high Galactic-latitudes (i.e. |b| ≥ 20 deg). The large number of detected sources resulting from the combination of large area and deep flux limits make this survey a new important tool for investigating the evolution of AGN. In particular, the large area permits finding rare high-luminosity objects like QSO2, which are poorly sampled by other surveys, adding precious information for the luminosity function

  20. deepBase v2.0: identification, expression, evolution and function of small RNAs, LncRNAs and circular RNAs from deep-sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ling-Ling; Li, Jun-Hao; Wu, Jie; Sun, Wen-Ju; Liu, Shun; Wang, Ze-Lin; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (e.g. miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (e.g. lincRNAs and circRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of various cellular processes. However, only a very small fraction of these enigmatic RNAs have been well functionally characterized. In this study, we describe deepBase v2.0 (http://biocenter.sysu.edu.cn/deepBase/), an updated platform, to decode evolution, expression patterns and functions of diverse ncRNAs across 19 species. deepBase v2.0 has been updated to provide the most comprehensive collection of ncRNA-derived small RNAs generated from 588 sRNA-Seq datasets. Moreover, we developed a pipeline named lncSeeker to identify 176 680 high-confidence lncRNAs from 14 species. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of various ncRNAs were profiled. We identified approximately 24 280 primate-specific, 5193 rodent-specific lncRNAs, and 55 highly conserved lncRNA orthologs between human and zebrafish. We annotated 14 867 human circRNAs, 1260 of which are orthologous to mouse circRNAs. By combining expression profiles and functional genomic annotations, we developed lncFunction web-server to predict the function of lncRNAs based on protein-lncRNA co-expression networks. This study is expected to provide considerable resources to facilitate future experimental studies and to uncover ncRNA functions.

  1. deepBase v2.0: identification, expression, evolution and function of small RNAs, LncRNAs and circular RNAs from deep-sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ling-Ling; Li, Jun-Hao; Wu, Jie; Sun, Wen-Ju; Liu, Shun; Wang, Ze-Lin; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (e.g. miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (e.g. lincRNAs and circRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of various cellular processes. However, only a very small fraction of these enigmatic RNAs have been well functionally characterized. In this study, we describe deepBase v2.0 (http://biocenter.sysu.edu.cn/deepBase/), an updated platform, to decode evolution, expression patterns and functions of diverse ncRNAs across 19 species. deepBase v2.0 has been updated to provide the most comprehensive collection of ncRNA-derived small RNAs generated from 588 sRNA-Seq datasets. Moreover, we developed a pipeline named lncSeeker to identify 176 680 high-confidence lncRNAs from 14 species. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of various ncRNAs were profiled. We identified approximately 24 280 primate-specific, 5193 rodent-specific lncRNAs, and 55 highly conserved lncRNA orthologs between human and zebrafish. We annotated 14 867 human circRNAs, 1260 of which are orthologous to mouse circRNAs. By combining expression profiles and functional genomic annotations, we developed lncFunction web-server to predict the function of lncRNAs based on protein-lncRNA co-expression networks. This study is expected to provide considerable resources to facilitate future experimental studies and to uncover ncRNA functions. PMID:26590255

  2. A Systematic Survey of Protoclusters at z ~ 3-6 in the CFHTLS Deep Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshikawa, Jun; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Overzier, Roderik; Malkan, Matthew A.; Furusawa, Hisanori; Ishikawa, Shogo; Onoue, Masafusa; Ota, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Niino, Yuu; Uchiyama, Hisakazu

    2016-08-01

    We present the discovery of three protoclusters at z ˜ 3-4 with spectroscopic confirmation in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Deep Fields. In these fields, we investigate the large-scale projected sky distribution of z ˜ 3-6 Lyman-break galaxies and identify 21 protocluster candidates from regions that are overdense at more than 4σ overdensity significance. Based on cosmological simulations, it is expected that more than 76% of these candidates will evolve into a galaxy cluster of at least a halo mass of 1014 M ⊙ at z = 0. We perform follow-up spectroscopy for eight of the candidates using Subaru/FOCAS, Keck II/DEIMOS, and Gemini-N/GMOS. In total we target 462 dropout candidates and obtain 138 spectroscopic redshifts. We confirm three real protoclusters at z = 3-4 with more than five members spectroscopically identified and find one to be an incidental overdense region by mere chance alignment. The other four candidate regions at z ˜ 5-6 require more spectroscopic follow-up in order to be conclusive. A z = 3.67 protocluster, which has 11 spectroscopically confirmed members, shows a remarkable core-like structure composed of a central small region (<0.5 physical Mpc) and an outskirts region (˜1.0 physical Mpc). The Lyα equivalent widths of members of the protocluster are significantly smaller than those of field galaxies at the same redshift, while there is no difference in the UV luminosity distributions. These results imply that some environmental effects start operating as early as at z ˜ 4 along with the growth of the protocluster structure. This study provides an important benchmark for our analysis of protoclusters in the upcoming Subaru/HSC imaging survey and its spectroscopic follow-up with the Subaru/PFS that will detect thousands of protoclusters up to z ˜ 6.

  3. A Systematic Survey of Protoclusters at z ~ 3–6 in the CFHTLS Deep Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshikawa, Jun; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Overzier, Roderik; Malkan, Matthew A.; Furusawa, Hisanori; Ishikawa, Shogo; Onoue, Masafusa; Ota, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Niino, Yuu; Uchiyama, Hisakazu

    2016-08-01

    We present the discovery of three protoclusters at z ˜ 3–4 with spectroscopic confirmation in the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Deep Fields. In these fields, we investigate the large-scale projected sky distribution of z ˜ 3–6 Lyman-break galaxies and identify 21 protocluster candidates from regions that are overdense at more than 4σ overdensity significance. Based on cosmological simulations, it is expected that more than 76% of these candidates will evolve into a galaxy cluster of at least a halo mass of 1014 M ⊙ at z = 0. We perform follow-up spectroscopy for eight of the candidates using Subaru/FOCAS, Keck II/DEIMOS, and Gemini-N/GMOS. In total we target 462 dropout candidates and obtain 138 spectroscopic redshifts. We confirm three real protoclusters at z = 3–4 with more than five members spectroscopically identified and find one to be an incidental overdense region by mere chance alignment. The other four candidate regions at z ˜ 5–6 require more spectroscopic follow-up in order to be conclusive. A z = 3.67 protocluster, which has 11 spectroscopically confirmed members, shows a remarkable core-like structure composed of a central small region (<0.5 physical Mpc) and an outskirts region (˜1.0 physical Mpc). The Lyα equivalent widths of members of the protocluster are significantly smaller than those of field galaxies at the same redshift, while there is no difference in the UV luminosity distributions. These results imply that some environmental effects start operating as early as at z ˜ 4 along with the growth of the protocluster structure. This study provides an important benchmark for our analysis of protoclusters in the upcoming Subaru/HSC imaging survey and its spectroscopic follow-up with the Subaru/PFS that will detect thousands of protoclusters up to z ˜ 6.

  4. Reconstructing the Dynamics of HIV Evolution within Hosts from Serial Deep Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Art F. Y.; Swenson, Luke C.; Bunnik, Evelien M.; Edo-Matas, Diana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Harrigan, P. Richard

    2012-01-01

    At the early stage of infection, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor for host cell entry. The subsequent emergence of HIV variants that use the CXCR4 coreceptor in roughly half of all infections is associated with an accelerated decline of CD4+ T-cells and rate of progression to AIDS. The presence of a ‘fitness valley’ separating CCR5- and CXCR4-using genotypes is postulated to be a biological determinant of whether the HIV coreceptor switch occurs. Using phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolutionary dynamics of HIV within hosts enables us to discriminate between competing models of this process. We have developed a phylogenetic pipeline for the molecular clock analysis, ancestral reconstruction, and visualization of deep sequence data. These data were generated by next-generation sequencing of HIV RNA extracted from longitudinal serum samples (median 7 time points) from 8 untreated subjects with chronic HIV infections (Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS). We used the known dates of sampling to directly estimate rates of evolution and to map ancestral mutations to a reconstructed timeline in units of days. HIV coreceptor usage was predicted from reconstructed ancestral sequences using the geno2pheno algorithm. We determined that the first mutations contributing to CXCR4 use emerged about 16 (per subject range 4 to 30) months before the earliest predicted CXCR4-using ancestor, which preceded the first positive cell-based assay of CXCR4 usage by 10 (range 5 to 25) months. CXCR4 usage arose in multiple lineages within 5 of 8 subjects, and ancestral lineages following alternate mutational pathways before going extinct were common. We observed highly patient-specific distributions and time-scales of mutation accumulation, implying that the role of a fitness valley is contingent on the genotype of the transmitted variant. PMID:23133358

  5. Reconstructing the dynamics of HIV evolution within hosts from serial deep sequence data.

    PubMed

    Poon, Art F Y; Swenson, Luke C; Bunnik, Evelien M; Edo-Matas, Diana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Harrigan, P Richard

    2012-01-01

    At the early stage of infection, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor for host cell entry. The subsequent emergence of HIV variants that use the CXCR4 coreceptor in roughly half of all infections is associated with an accelerated decline of CD4+ T-cells and rate of progression to AIDS. The presence of a 'fitness valley' separating CCR5- and CXCR4-using genotypes is postulated to be a biological determinant of whether the HIV coreceptor switch occurs. Using phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolutionary dynamics of HIV within hosts enables us to discriminate between competing models of this process. We have developed a phylogenetic pipeline for the molecular clock analysis, ancestral reconstruction, and visualization of deep sequence data. These data were generated by next-generation sequencing of HIV RNA extracted from longitudinal serum samples (median 7 time points) from 8 untreated subjects with chronic HIV infections (Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS). We used the known dates of sampling to directly estimate rates of evolution and to map ancestral mutations to a reconstructed timeline in units of days. HIV coreceptor usage was predicted from reconstructed ancestral sequences using the geno2pheno algorithm. We determined that the first mutations contributing to CXCR4 use emerged about 16 (per subject range 4 to 30) months before the earliest predicted CXCR4-using ancestor, which preceded the first positive cell-based assay of CXCR4 usage by 10 (range 5 to 25) months. CXCR4 usage arose in multiple lineages within 5 of 8 subjects, and ancestral lineages following alternate mutational pathways before going extinct were common. We observed highly patient-specific distributions and time-scales of mutation accumulation, implying that the role of a fitness valley is contingent on the genotype of the transmitted variant.

  6. Galaxy pairs in deep HST images: Evidence for evolution in the galaxy merger rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkey, Jordan M.; Keel, William C.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Franklin, Barbara E.

    1994-01-01

    We use four deep serendipitous fields observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camera to constrain the rate of galaxy merging between the current epoch and z approximately equals 0.7. Since most mergers occur between members of bound pairs, the merger rate is given to a good approximation by (half) the rate of disappearance of galaxies in pairs. An objective criterion for pair membership shows that 34% +/- 9% of our HST galaxies with I = 18-22 belong to pairs, compared to 7% locally. This means that about 13% of the galaxy population has disappeared due to merging in the cosmic epoch corresponding to this magnitude interval (or 0.1 approximately less than z approximately less than 0.7). Our pair fraction is a lower limit: correction for pair members falling below our detection threshold might raise the fraction to approximately 50%. Since we address only two-galaxy merging, these values do not include physical systems of higher multiplicity. Incorporating I-band field-galaxy redshift distributions, the pair fraction grows with redshift as alpha(1 + z)(exp 3.5 +/- 0.5) and the merger rate as (1 + z)(exp 2.5 +/- 0.5). This may have significant implications for the interpretation of galaxy counts (disappearance of faint blue galaxies), the cosmological evolution of faint radio sources and quasars (which evolve approximately as (1 + z)(exp 3), the similarity in the power law is necessary but not sufficient evidence for a causal relation), statistics of QSO companions, the galaxy content in distant clusters, and the merging history of a 'typical' galaxy.

  7. Formation and Evolution of Massive Stars: Current Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Koter, A.

    2016-10-01

    The advent of multi-object spectrographs on 8-10 m class telescopes has provided the opportunity to perform detailed atmospheric analysis of samples of several hundreds of massive stars, prior studies being limited to several tens of objects at most. These analyses have highlighted some serious problems regarding our understanding of massive-star evolution. A central theme in the findings is the prominent role of multiplicity, with the majority of high-mass stars being in close binary systems of which the components will interact at some point in their lives.

  8. Survey of some recent stellar-evolution calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, A. V.

    1978-01-01

    The stellar-evolution program developed by Sweigart (1973) was used to compute main sequence turnoff, red giant sequences, and horizontal branch sequences for many values of helium abundance and heavy-element abundance. The immediate aim has been to produce a self-consistent set of evolutionary sequences for wide ranges in the composition and mass. The long-term aim involves application to cluster HR diagrams and the integrated properties of galaxies. Turnoff sequences, red giant sequences, and horizontal branch sequences are discussed.

  9. Testing CDM predictions with a deep HI survey of the Sculptor group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmeier, Tobias; Koribalski, Baerbel; Meyer, Martin; Popping, Attila; Obreschkow, Danail

    2013-04-01

    As a consequence of the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm, galaxies are thought to form and evolve in a continuous process of mergers and accretion of dark-matter haloes. Some of the predictions resulting from this scenario include the presence of hundreds of satellites in galaxies groups like our Local Group as well as the presence of a "cosmic web" of dark matter and gas that interconnects galaxies, groups, and clusters. To put the predictions of the CDM paradigm to the test, we propose to map the northern part of the nearby Sculptor group in the 21-cm HI emission down to an extremely low HI column density level of about 1.4×10^17 cm^-2, using the multi-beam system at Parkes. The aims of the observations are to directly detect and study the cosmic web and to create a complete census of gaseous galaxies and satellites with M_HI >~ 10^6 M_sun to investigate the "missing satellites" problem. The survey data will be complemented with archival data at UV, optical, and IR wavelengths as well as existing, deep ATCA HI data of the major Sculptor group galaxies.

  10. DEEP NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE PIPE NEBULA. II. DATA, METHODS, AND DUST EXTINCTION MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.; Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco

    2010-12-20

    We present a new set of high-resolution dust extinction maps of the nearby and essentially starless Pipe Nebula molecular cloud. The maps were constructed from a concerted deep near-infrared imaging survey with the ESO-VLT, ESO-NTT, CAHA 3.5 m telescopes, and 2MASS data. The new maps have a resolution three times higher than the previous extinction map of this cloud by Lombardi et al. and are able to resolve structures down to 2600 AU. We detect 244 significant extinction peaks across the cloud. These peaks have masses between 0.1 and 18.4 M{sub sun}, diameters between 1.2 and 5.7 x 10{sup 4} AU (0.06 and 0.28 pc), and mean densities of about 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, all in good agreement with previous results. From the analysis of the mean surface density of companions we find a well-defined scale near 1.4 x 10{sup 4} AU below which we detect a significant decrease in structure of the cloud. This scale is smaller than the Jeans length calculated from the mean density of the peaks. The surface density of peaks is not uniform but instead it displays clustering. Extinction peaks in the Pipe Nebula appear to have a spatial distribution similar to the stars in Taurus, suggesting that the spatial distribution of stars evolves directly from the primordial spatial distribution of high-density material.

  11. Measuring M Dwarf Rotation in the Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Erin R.; Williams, Peter K. G.; Berger, Edo

    2016-01-01

    The rise of large-format CCDs and automated detection methods has greatly increased the tractability of large-scale studies of stellar rotation. Studies of the relationship between stellar rotation and magnetic activity show a strong correlation, supporting the concept of a rotationally-driven dynamo. However, the number of confirmed rotation periods for stars in the fully convective regime, whose magnetic dynamos are less well understood, remains low. Here we report on ongoing work to measure rotation periods for the M dwarf stellar population observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1/MDS). We refine an initial sample of around 4.3 million sources using color cuts in each of the five Pan-STARRS 1 filters. Of these sources, we estimate there to be around 135,000 sources which are candidate M dwarfs with a spectral type of M1 or higher. We discuss the outcomes of various rotation period detection methods and present preliminary results. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  12. Evolution and Detection of Polymorphic and Metamorphic Malwares: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashu; K. Sahay, S.

    2014-03-01

    Malwares are big threat to digital world and evolving with high complexity. It can penetrate networks, steal confidential information from computers, bring down servers and can cripple infrastructures etc. To combat the threat/attacks from the malwares, anti- malwares have been developed. The existing anti-malwares are mostly based on the assumption that the malware structure does not changes appreciably. But the recent advancement in second generation malwares can create variants and hence posed a challenge to anti-malwares developers. To combat the threat/attacks from the second generation malwares with low false alarm we present our survey on malwares and its detection techniques.

  13. Distant FR I radio galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field: implications for the cosmological evolution of radio-loud AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snellen, I. A. G.; Best, P. N.

    2001-12-01

    Deep and high-resolution radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field and flanking fields have shown the presence of two distant edge-darkened FRI radio galaxies, allowing for the first time an estimate of their high-redshift space density. If it is assumed that the space density of FRI radio galaxies at z>1 is similar to that found in the local Universe, then the chance of finding two FRI radio galaxies at these high radio powers in such a small area of sky is <1 per cent. This suggests that these objects were significantly more abundant at z>1 than at present, effectively ruling out the possibility that FRI radio sources undergo no cosmological evolution. We suggest that FRI and FRII radio galaxies should not be treated as intrinsically distinct classes of objects, but that the cosmological evolution is simply a function of radio power with FRI and FRII radio galaxies of similar radio powers undergoing similar cosmological evolutions. Since low-power radio galaxies have mainly FRI morphologies and high-power radio galaxies have mainly FRII morphologies, this results in a generally stronger cosmological evolution for the FRIIs than the FRIs. We believe that additional support from the V/Vmax test for evolving and non-evolving population of FRIIs and FRIs respectively is irrelevant, since this test is sensitive over very different redshift ranges for the two classes.

  14. The Hubble Space Telescope Medium Deep Survey with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera. 1: Methodology and results on the field near 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Casertano, S.; Im, M.; Wyckoff, E. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G. F.; Elson, R. A. W.; Glazebrook, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present results from the Medium Deep Survey (MDS), a Key Project using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Wide Field Camera (WFC) images of random fields have been taken in 'parallel mode' with an effective resolution of 0.2 sec full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the V(F555W) and I(F785LP) filters. The exposures presented here were targeted on a field away from 3C 273, and resulted in approximately 5 hr integration time in each filter. Detailed morphological structure is seen in galaxy images with total integrated magnitudes down to V approximately = 22.5 and I approximately = 21.5. Parameters are estimated that best fit the observed galaxy images, and 143 objects are identified (including 23 stars) in the field to a fainter limiting magnitude of I approximately = 23.5. We outline the extragalactic goals of the HST Medium Deep Survey, summarize our basic data reduction procedures, and present number (magnitude) counts, a color-magnitude diagram for the field, surface brightness profiles for the brighter galaxies, and best-fit half-light radii for the fainter galaxies as a function of apparent magnitude. A median galaxy half-light radius of 0.4 sec is measured, and the distribution of galaxy sizes versus magnitude is presented. We observe an apparent deficit of galaxies with half-light radii between approximately 0.6 sec and 1.5 sec, with respect to standard no-evolution or mild evolution cosmological models. An apparent excess of compact objects (half-light radii approximately 0.1 sec) is also observed with respect to those models. Finally, we find a small excess in the number of faint galaxy pairs and groups with respect to a random low-redshift field sample.

  15. Ocean Melting Greenland (OMG) bathymetric survey of northwest Greenland and implications for the recent evolution of its glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Rignot, E. J.; Willis, J. K.; Fenty, I. G.

    2015-12-01

    Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) is a five-year Earth Ventures Suborbital Mission funded by NASA to investigate the role of the oceans in ice loss around the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet, which includes measurements of seafloor bathymetry from multibeam surveys and airborne gravity, glacier surface elevation from high-frequency radar interferometry, and temperature/salinity/depth from vessels and airborne-dropped probes. Here, we describe the results of the 2016 bathymetry survey of northwest Greenland that took place in the summer of 2015: july 22-August 19 and Sept 2-Sept 16 spanning from Ilulissat to Thule AFB in north Greenland, and to be complemented by a survey of southeast Greenland in 2016. We deployed a multibeam Reson 7160 with 512 beams installed on the hull of the Cape Race vessel, with enhanced capabilities for fjord wall and ice face mapping. The survey tracks were optimized based on the IBCAO3 database, recent cruises, airborne gravity data collected by NASA Operation IceBridge which indicated the presence of troughs, bed topography mapped inland using a mass conservation approach, the spatial distribution of ice discharge to locate the largest outlets and maximizing the number of major fjords sampled during the survey, with the goal to identify all troughs that are major pathways for subsurface ocean heat, and constrain as many glacier ice front thickness as permitted by time and the practicality of navigating the ice-choked fjords. The data reveal many deep, U-shaped, submarine valleys connected to the glaciers, intercut with sills and over deepened in narrower passages where former glaciers and ice streams merged into larger units; as well as fjords ending in shallow plateaus with glaciers in retreated positions. The presence of warm, salty water of Atlantic origin (AW) in the fjords is documented using CTD. Some glaciers sit on shallow plateaus in cold, fresh polar waters (PW) at the end of deep fjords, while others are deeper and standing in

  16. Numerical Simulation of Possible Evolution Scenarios of the Rosone Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation (Italian Alps, Piedmont)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirulli, Marina

    2016-06-01

    The large, deep-seated Rosone landslide (Western Italian Alps) has been known since the beginning of the twentieth century as an active phenomenon characterized by a slow but constant evolution. Its possible evolution, in terms of a catastrophic rock avalanche, could have serious consequences on several elements at risk, including a hydroelectric power plant. Runout estimates are needed to identify the potential impact on the territory of such an event and, when possible, to minimize hazard areas. This article analyses the evolution of three potential rock avalanche scenarios, with decreasing probability of occurrence and increasing impact on land planning. A comparison between runout results obtained by other authors and some new analyses that have been carried out with the three-dimensional continuum mechanics-based RASH3D code is made and commented on by highlighting the advantages, but also the limits, of using a more complete tool, such as RASH3D.

  17. The WARPS Survey - VIII. Evolution of the galaxy cluster X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koens, L. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Jones, L. R.; Ebeling, H.; Horner, D. J.; Perlman, E. S.; Phillipps, S.; Scharf, C. A.

    2013-11-01

    We present measurements of the galaxy cluster X-ray Luminosity Function (XLF) from the Wide Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey (WARPS) and quantify its evolution. WARPS is a serendipitous survey of the central region of ROSAT pointed observations and was carried out in two phases (WARPS-I and WARPS-II). The results here are based on a final sample of 124 clusters, complete above a flux limit of 6.5 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1, with members out to redshift z ˜ 1.05, and a sky coverage of 70.9 deg2. We find significant evidence for negative evolution of the XLF, which complements the majority of X-ray cluster surveys. To quantify the suggested evolution, we perform a maximum likelihood analysis and conclude that the evolution is driven by a decreasing number density of high-luminosity clusters with redshift, while the bulk of the cluster population remains nearly unchanged out to redshift z ≈ 1.1, as expected in a low-density universe. The results are found to be insensitive to a variety of sources of systematic uncertainty that affect the measurement of the XLF and determination of the survey selection function. We perform a Bayesian analysis of the XLF to fully account for uncertainties in the local XLF on the measured evolution, and find that the detected evolution remains significant at the 95 per cent level. We observe a significant excess of clusters in the WARPS at 0.1 < z < 0.3 and LX ≈ 2 × 1043 erg s-1 compared with the reference low-redshift XLF, or our Bayesian fit to the WARPS data. We find that the excess cannot be explained by sample variance, or Eddington bias, and is unlikely to be due to problems with the survey selection function.

  18. From Romanticism to Deep Ecology: The Continuing Evolution in American Environmental Thought.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerson, David

    2000-01-01

    Describes the contributions to deep ecology of Henry Thoreau, who advocated acting upon strongly held convictions; John Muir, who adopted a biocentric view of nature; and Aldo Leopold, who formulated an egalitarian ecosystem ethic. While deep ecology is moving toward a new vision of humankind's relation to nature, it has yet to coalesce into a…

  19. A deep Spitzer survey of circumstellar disks in the young double cluster, h and χ Persei

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutier, Ryan; Currie, Thayne; Jayawardhana, Ray; Rieke, George H.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Balog, Zoltan E-mail: currie@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-12-01

    We analyze very deep Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) photometry of ∼12, 500 members of the 14 Myr old Double Cluster, h and χ Persei, building upon our earlier, shallower Spitzer Cycle 1 studies. Numerous likely members show infrared (IR) excesses at 8 μm and 24 μm, indicative of circumstellar dust. The frequency of stars with 8 μm excess is at least 2% for our entire sample, slightly lower (higher) for B/A stars (later type, lower mass stars). Optical spectroscopy also identifies gas in about 2% of systems, but with no clear trend between the presence of dust and gas. Spectral energy distribution modeling of 18 sources with detections at optical wavelengths through MIPS 24 μm reveals a diverse set of disk evolutionary states, including a high fraction of transitional disks, though similar data for all disk-bearing members would provide constraints. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we combine our results with those for other young clusters to study the global evolution of dust/gas disks. For nominal cluster ages, the e-folding times (τ{sub 0}) for the frequency of warm dust and gas are 2.75 Myr and 1.75 Myr, respectively. Assuming a revised set of ages for some clusters, these timescales increase to 5.75 and 3.75 Myr, respectively, implying a significantly longer typical protoplanetary disk lifetime than previously thought. In both cases, the transitional disk duration, averaged over multiple evolutionary pathways, is ≈1 Myr. Finally, 24 μm excess frequencies for 4-6 M {sub ☉} stars appear lower than for 1-2.5 M {sub ☉} stars in other 10-30 Myr old clusters.

  20. A Deep Spitzer Survey of Circumstellar Disks in the Young Double Cluster, h and χ Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, Ryan; Currie, Thayne; Rieke, George H.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Balog, Zoltan; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-12-01

    We analyze very deep Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) photometry of ~12, 500 members of the 14 Myr old Double Cluster, h and χ Persei, building upon our earlier, shallower Spitzer Cycle 1 studies. Numerous likely members show infrared (IR) excesses at 8 μm and 24 μm, indicative of circumstellar dust. The frequency of stars with 8 μm excess is at least 2% for our entire sample, slightly lower (higher) for B/A stars (later type, lower mass stars). Optical spectroscopy also identifies gas in about 2% of systems, but with no clear trend between the presence of dust and gas. Spectral energy distribution modeling of 18 sources with detections at optical wavelengths through MIPS 24 μm reveals a diverse set of disk evolutionary states, including a high fraction of transitional disks, though similar data for all disk-bearing members would provide constraints. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we combine our results with those for other young clusters to study the global evolution of dust/gas disks. For nominal cluster ages, the e-folding times (τ0) for the frequency of warm dust and gas are 2.75 Myr and 1.75 Myr, respectively. Assuming a revised set of ages for some clusters, these timescales increase to 5.75 and 3.75 Myr, respectively, implying a significantly longer typical protoplanetary disk lifetime than previously thought. In both cases, the transitional disk duration, averaged over multiple evolutionary pathways, is ≈1 Myr. Finally, 24 μm excess frequencies for 4-6 M ⊙ stars appear lower than for 1-2.5 M ⊙ stars in other 10-30 Myr old clusters.

  1. The Evolution of Multiculturalism in Britain and Germany: An Historical Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panayi, Panikos

    2004-01-01

    This paper is an introductory survey of the evolution of multiculturalism in Britain and Germany over the past two centuries. The historical approach argues that the main determinants of difference between these nation states lie in their long-term traditional attitudes towards immigrants and ethnic minorities. It focuses upon the patterns of…

  2. Carbonate mound evolution and coral diagenesis viewed by U-series dating of deep water corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, N.; Ricard, E.; Blamart, D.; van der Land, C.; Colin, C.; Foubert, A.; van Rooij, D.; van Weering, T.

    2007-12-01

    U-series dating of constructional deep sea corals is a powerful tool to reconstruct the evolution of carbonate mound sediments driven by coral growth, sediment trapping and diagenesis. Here we have investigated in great detail the time framework of constructional corals such as L. pertusa and M. oculata on 5 different mounds of the eastern North Atlantic (on Rockall Bank and in Porcupine Seabight) taken at variable depth and location (610 to 880m water depth). Periods favorable for coral growth are the Holocene and prior interglacials such as marine isotope stage 5 and 7, while glacial coral growth seems inhibited or extremely reduced. Coral development is almost continuous throughout the Holocene since mound re-colonization about 10,500 years ago. Mound accumulation rates vary between 20 and 220 cm/kyr determined from the coral age - depth relationship in each core. Those changes are most likely driven by changes between horizontal and vertical mound accumulation, food supply and ocean circulation. In addition, coral dating allowed to identify an important erosional event recorded in core MD01-2455G from Rockall Bank. Here a 1m thick sediment layer containing ancient corals likely from the start of Holocene re-colonization was displaced (collapsed) from further upslope on top of younger corals of ~2500 to 3000 years age. Prior to the initiation of coral growth diagenesis occurred frequently resulting in (1) the construction of so called carbonate hardgrounds and/or (2) the dissolution of the pre-Holocene coral framework. Solely, the deepest selected core in Porcupine Seabight (MD01-2463G at 880m depth) reveals coral re-colonization on an undisturbed ancient reef structure that dates back to 250,000 years. Diagenesis of earlier coral reef generations leading to coral dissolution leads to a loss of magnetic susceptibility and open system behavior of the coral skeletons with respect to U-series dating. While the processes causing such diagenetic layers are barely

  3. Evolution of Continental Lower Crust Recorded By an Exhumed Deep Crustal Intracontinental Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumond, G.; Mahan, K. H.; Regan, S. P.; Williams, M. L.; Goncalves, P.; Wood, V. R.

    2014-12-01

    Exposures of deep crustal shear zones are fundamental records of strain localization and the temporal evolution of ductile to brittle behavior as these tectonites were exhumed to the surface. We present results from a decade of field-based research on a deeply exhumed (~35 km-paleodepths) strike-slip shear zone in the western Churchill province of the Canadian Shield. The Grease River shear zone is a >400 km-long and 7 km-thick structure that cuts the Athabasca granulite terrane, North America's largest exposure of continental lower crust (>20,000 km2). The shear zone is dominated by granulite- to amphibolite-grade L-S and L>S tectonites characterized by penetrative NE-striking steeply-dipping foliations with gently-plunging to sub-horizontal stretching and intersection lineations. These fabrics are locally overprinted by pseudotachylyte and narrow (<500 m-thick) greenschist-grade zones of cataclasite. Dextral kinematics are defined by deflected foliation trajectories, C' shear bands, and well-developed σ- and δ-type porphyroclasts of Kfs + Pl + Opx + Grt + Hb in felsic to intermediate granulite paragneisses and orthogneisses. Data collected along a well-exposed, nearly 150 km-long segment of the shear zone documents a >100 m.y. episodic record of transpressive to strike-slip intracontinental strain accumulation that coincided with two oppositely convergent orogenies: the east-vergent arc-continent collision of the 1.94-1.90 Ga Taltson orogen and the west-vergent continent-continent collision of the 1.9-1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson orogen. Deformation mechanisms evolved from distributed ductile dynamic recrystallization and grain-size reduction to localized pseudotachylyte development, cataclastic flow, and brittle faulting. Lower crustal behavior during strain localization was dynamic. Melt-weakened mono-cyclic crust was juxtaposed against strong isobarically-cooled poly-cyclic crust along the shear zone at 1.92-1.90 Ga. Brittle-ductile reactivation of the structure

  4. Conducting health survey research in a deep rural South African community: challenges and adaptive strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In many parts of the developing world, rural health requires focused policy attention, informed by reliable, representative health data. Yet there is surprisingly little published material to guide health researchers who face the unique set of hurdles associated with conducting field research in remote rural areas. Methods In this paper we provide a detailed description of the key challenges encountered during health survey field research carried out in 2010 in a deep rural site in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The aim of the field research was to collect data on the health of children aged 10 to 17 years old, and their primary adult caregivers, as part of a larger national health survey; the research was a collaboration between several South African and foreign universities, South African national government departments, and various NGO partners. In presenting each of the four fieldwork challenges encountered on this site, we describe the initial planning decisions made, the difficulties faced when implementing these in the field, and the adaptive strategies we used to respond to these challenges. We reflect on learnings of potential relevance for the research community. Results Our four key fieldwork challenges were scarce research capacity, staff relocation tensions, logistical constraints, and difficulties related to community buy-in. Addressing each of these obstacles required timely assessment of the situation and adaptation of field plans, in collaboration with our local NGO partner. Adaptive strategies included a greater use of local knowledge; the adoption of tribal authority boundaries as the smallest geopolitical units for sampling; a creative developmental approach to capacity building; and planned, on-going engagement with multiple community representatives. Conclusions We argue that in order to maintain high scientific standards of research and manage to ‘get the job done’ on the ground, it is necessary to respond to fieldwork challenges

  5. IMPROVED MOCK GALAXY CATALOGS FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY FROM SUBHALO ABUNDANCE AND ENVIRONMENT MATCHING

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.

    2013-09-15

    We develop empirical methods for modeling the galaxy population and populating cosmological N-body simulations with mock galaxies according to the observed properties of galaxies in survey data. We use these techniques to produce a new set of mock catalogs for the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey based on the output of the high-resolution Bolshoi simulation, as well as two other simulations with different cosmological parameters, all of which we release for public use. The mock-catalog creation technique uses subhalo abundance matching to assign galaxy luminosities to simulated dark-matter halos. It then adds color information to the resulting mock galaxies in a manner that depends on the local galaxy density, in order to reproduce the measured color-environment relation in the data. In the course of constructing the catalogs, we test various models for including scatter in the relation between halo mass and galaxy luminosity, within the abundance-matching framework. We find that there is no constant-scatter model that can simultaneously reproduce both the luminosity function and the autocorrelation function of DEEP2. This result has implications for galaxy-formation theory, and it restricts the range of contexts in which the mock catalogs can be usefully applied. Nevertheless, careful comparisons show that our new mock catalogs accurately reproduce a wide range of the other properties of the DEEP2 catalog, suggesting that they can be used to gain a detailed understanding of various selection effects in DEEP2.

  6. A Rapid Radiocarbon Method for Age Surveys of Southern Ocean Deep-sea Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A.; Robinson, L. F.; Gerlach, D. S.; Jenkins, W. J.; McNichol, A. P.

    2008-12-01

    Deep-sea corals provide a unique archive of past ocean radiocarbon because they are sessile and can be dated independently using U-series nuclides. One difficulty, however, is that using current techniques it is impractical to date large numbers of corals in order to determine which specimens have the appropriate ages for radiocarbon reconstructions. Here we present results from a quick method of making graphite for radiocarbon dating that reduces the amount of sample preparation time, thus allowing us to date a greater number of corals. In addition, these rapid age surveys provide important information on coral age populations, allowing us to examine coral distributions through time. The corals used in this study come from a sample set of about 6,000 specimens of Flabellum, Balanophyllia and Desmophyllum spp. collected from the Drake Passage area (50S -70S, 120 m-1700 m depth). Replicate samples from a single coral yielded a standard deviation of 81 years (n=9). Variations in sample mass (3 to 85 mg) have no clear effect on the Fm and furthermore, a simple cleaning using methanol yields the same results as a more involved cleaning procedure that includes an oxidizing solution and perchloric acid rinse. To improve the efficiency of the method, we assumed a delta13C = 0 per mil. This assumption is likely our largest source of uncertainty, resulting in offsets of up to 200 radiocarbon years over a reasonable range of delta13C. This level of uncertainty is sufficiently low to allow distinction between corals from different time periods over the past 35 ky (e.g. Last Glacial Maximum, Younger Dryas, etc.). To date, we have found corals from Burdwood Bank dating from the modern to the Younger Dryas and corals from the Drake Passage dating from the modern to Heinrich Event 1, which will be used in future paleo-climatic reconstructions in this important part of the ocean.

  7. Assessing the deep drilling potential of Lago de Tota, Colombia, with a seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, B. W.; Wattrus, N. J.; Fonseca, H.; Velasco, F.; Escobar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reconciling orbital-scale patterns of inter-hemispheric South American climate during the Quaternary requires continuous, high-resolution paleoclimate records that span multiple glacial cycles from both hemispheres. Southern Andean Quaternary climates are represented by multi-proxy results from Lake Titicaca (Peru-Bolivia) spanning the last 400 ka and by pending results from the Lago Junin Drilling Project (Peru). Although Northern Andean sediment records spanning the last few million years have been retrieved from the Bogota and Fúquene Basins in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes, climatic reconstructions based on these cores have thus far been limited to pollen-based investigations. When viewed together with the Southern Hemisphere results, these records suggest an anti-phased hemispheric climatic response during glacial cycles. In order to better assess orbital-scale climate responses, however, independent temperature and hydroclimate proxies from the Northern Hemisphere are needed in addition to vegetation histories. As part of this objective, an effort is underway to develop a paleoclimate record from Lago de Tota (3030 m asl), the largest lake in Colombia and the third largest lake in the Andes. One of 17 highland tectonic basins in Eastern Cordillera, Lago de Tota formed during Tertiary uplift that deformed pre-foreland megasequences, synrift and back-arc megasequences. The precise age and thickness of sediments in the Lago de Tota basin has not previously been established. Here, we present results from a recent single-channel seismic reflection survey collected with a small (5 cubic inch) air gun and high-resolution CHIRP sub-bottom data. With these data, we examine the depositional history and sequence stratigraphy of Lago de Tota and assess its potential as a deep drilling target.

  8. Blue not brown: UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey T dwarfs with suppressed K-band flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, D. N.; Burningham, B.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pinfield, D. J.; Lucas, P. W.; Leggett, S. K.; Tinney, C. G.; Day-Jones, A. C.; Weights, D. J.; Lodieu, N.; Pérez Prieto, J. A.; Nickson, E.; Zhang, Z. H.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Jenkins, J. S.; Tamura, M.

    2011-06-01

    We have used blue near-infrared colours to select a group of 12 spectroscopically confirmed United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) T dwarfs later than T4. From amongst these, we identify the first two kinematic halo T-dwarf candidates. Blue near-infrared colours have been attributed to collisionally induced hydrogen absorption, which is enhanced by either high surface gravity or low metallicity. Proper motions are measured and distances estimated, allowing the determination of tangential velocities. U and V components are estimated for our objects by assuming Vrad= 0. From this, ULAS J0926+0835 is found to have U= 62 km s-1 and V=-140 km s-1, and ULAS J1319+1209 is found to have U= 192 km s-1 and V=-92 km s-1. These values are consistent with potential halo membership. However, these are not the bluest objects in our selection. The bluest is ULAS J1233+1219, with J-K=-1.16 ± 0.07, and surprisingly this object is found to have young disc-like U and V. Our sample also contains Hip 73786B, companion to the metal-poor K5 dwarf Hip 73786. Hip 73786 is a metal-poor star, with [Fe/H] =-0.3 ± 0.1 and is located at a distance of 19 ± 0.7 pc. U, V, W space velocity components are calculated for Hip 73786A and B, finding that U=-48 ± 7 km s-1, V=-75 ± 4 km s-1 and W=-44 ± 8 km s-1. From the properties of the primary, Hip 73786B is found to be at least 1.6-Gyr old. As a metal-poor object, Hip 73786B represents an important addition to the sample of known T dwarf benchmarks.

  9. The evolution of neutral gas in damped Lyman α systems from the XQ-100 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Ellison, S. L.; Prochaska, J. X.; Berg, T. A. M.; López, S.; D'Odorico, V.; Becker, G. D.; Christensen, L.; Cupani, G.; Denney, K. D.; Pâris, I.; Worseck, G.; Gorosabel, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present a sample of 38 intervening damped Lyman α (DLA) systems identified towards 100 z > 3.5 quasars, observed during the XQ-100 survey. The XQ-100 DLA sample is combined with major DLA surveys in the literature. The final combined sample consists of 742 DLAs over a redshift range approximately 1.6 < zabs < 5.0. We develop a novel technique for computing Ω_{H I}^DLA as a continuous function of redshift, and we thoroughly assess and quantify the sources of error therein, including fitting errors and incomplete sampling of the high column density end of the column density distribution function. There is a statistically significant redshift evolution in Ω_{H I}^DLA (≥3σ) from z ˜ 2 to z ˜ 5. In order to make a complete assessment of the redshift evolution of Ω_{H I}, we combine our high-redshift DLA sample with absorption surveys at intermediate redshift and 21-cm emission line surveys of the local universe. Although Ω_{H I}^DLA, and hence its redshift evolution, remains uncertain in the intermediate-redshift regime (0.1 < zabs < 1.6), we find that the combination of high-redshift data with 21-cm surveys of the local universe all yield a statistically significant evolution in Ω_{H I} from z ˜ 0 to z ˜ 5 (≥3σ). Despite its statistical significance, the magnitude of the evolution is small: a linear regression fit between Ω_{H I} and z yields a typical slope of ˜0.17 × 10-3, corresponding to a factor of ˜4 decrease in Ω_{H I} between z = 5 and z = 0.

  10. Starbursts and Galaxy Evolution: results from COSMOS survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Hinojosa Goñi, R.; Jairo Méndez Abreu, J.; Sánchez Alméida, J.

    2016-06-01

    The search for starbursts galaxies in COSMOS database by a tailored procedure that uses the photometry from SUBARU, results in 220 targets at z<0.5. The typical mass of the starburst is 10^8 and its distribution is similar to that of the quiescent galaxies in the survey at the same redshift range. From the detailed analysis of the galaxies images using the HST, the star forming clumps are characterized. The galaxies are of three different kinds, Snot, Snot and diffuse light and multiple knots. The mass of the knots are typically one order of magnitude below that of the host galaxy and the clumps in multiple knot galaxies are bigger the closer they are to the center. The sSFR however does not change with the particular position of the burst in their host galaxy, which suggests a similar process independently of their location. This result applies also to the galaxies at the largest z range (0.9). Our interpretation is that the star formation is happening at all possible locations on the galaxy discs, possibly from gas accreted from the halo or the IGM, with clumps which grow as they spiral and get to the centermost regions. Our previous work on nearby SF -tadpole galaxies of similar mass reported metallicity drops coinciding with the location of the burst what we have interpreted as SF driven by cold flows. Our results in COSMOS would be consistent with a similar interpretation and a scenario in which medium mass disks are growing by gas accretion that show up as scattered starbursts knots.

  11. The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. Tracing the galaxy stellar mass assembly history over the last 8 Gyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergani, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Iovino, A.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Maccagni, D.; Lamareille, F.; Le Fèvre, O.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Guzzo, L.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Picat, J. P.; Scaramella, R.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Foucaud, S.; Gavignaud, I.; Ilbert, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Radovich, M.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Gregorini, L.; Perez-Montero, E.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Temporin, S.

    2008-08-01

    Aims: Our aim is to investigate the history of mass assembly for galaxies of different stellar masses and types. Methods: We selected a mass-limited sample of 4048 objects from the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) in the redshift interval 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.3. We then used an empirical criterion, based on the amplitude of the 4000 ÅBalmer break (D_n4000), to separate the galaxy population into spectroscopically early- and late-type systems. The equivalent width of the [OII]3727 line is used as proxy for the star formation activity. We also derived a type-dependent stellar mass function in three redshift bins. Results: We discuss to what extent stellar mass drives galaxy evolution, showing for the first time the interplay between stellar ages and stellar masses over the past 8 Gyr. Low-mass galaxies have small D_n4000 and at increasing stellar mass, the galaxy distribution moves to higher D_n4000 values as observed in the local Universe. As cosmic time goes by, we witness an increasing abundance of massive spectroscopically early-type systems at the expense of the late-type systems. This spectral transformation of late-type systems into old massive galaxies at lower redshift is a process started at early epochs (z > 1.3) and continuing efficiently down to the local Universe. This is also confirmed by the evolution of our type-dependent stellar mass function. The underlying stellar ages of late-type galaxies apparently do not show evolution, most likely as a result of a continuous and efficient formation of new stars. All star formation activity indicators consistently point towards a star formation history peaked in the past for massive galaxies, with little or no residual star formation taking place in the most recent epochs. In contrast, most of the low-mass systems show just the opposite characteristics, with significant star formation present at all epochs. The activity and efficiency of forming stars are mechanisms that depend on galaxy stellar mass, and the stellar

  12. AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Survey. Revision of the catalogue via a new image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Arimatsu, K.; Oi, N.; Takagi, T.; Oyabu, S.; Goto, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Malkan, M.; Pearson, C.; Małek, K.; Solarz, A.

    2013-11-01

    Context. We present the revised near- to mid-infrared catalogue of the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole deep survey. The survey has the unique advantage of continuous filter coverage from 2 to 24 μm over nine photometric bands, but the initial version of the survey catalogue leaves room for improvement in the image analysis stage; the original images are strongly contaminated by the behaviour of the detector and the optical system. Aims: The purpose of this study is to devise new image analysis methods and to improve the detection limit and reliability of the source extraction. Methods: We removed the scattered light and stray light from the Earth limb, and corrected for artificial patterns in the images by creating appropriate templates. We also removed any artificial sources due to bright sources by using their properties or masked them out visually. In addition, for the mid-infrared source extraction, we created detection images by stacking all six bands. This reduced the sky noise and enabled us to detect fainter sources more reliably. For the near-infrared source catalogue, we considered only objects with counterparts from ground-based catalogues to avoid fake sources. For our ground-based catalogues, we used catalogues based on the CFHT/MegaCam z' band, CFHT/WIRCam Ks band and Subaru/Scam z' band. Objects with multiple counterparts were all listed in the catalogue with a merged flag for the AKARI flux. Results: The detection limits of all mid-infrared bands were improved by ~20%, and the total number of detected objects was increased by ~2000 compared with the previous version of the catalogue; it now has 9560 objects. The 5σ detection limits in our catalogue are 11, 9, 10, 30, 34, 57, 87, 93, and 256 μJy in the N2, N3, N4, S7, S9W, S11, L15, L18W, and L24 bands, respectively. The astrometric accuracies of these band detections are 0.48, 0.52, 0.55, 0.99, 0.95, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, and 1.6 arcsec, respectively. The false-detection rate of all nine bands was decreased

  13. Numerical Simulation of Rock Mass Damage Evolution During Deep-Buried Tunnel Excavation by Drill and Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhua; Lu, Wenbo; Hu, Yingguo; Chen, Ming; Yan, Peng

    2015-09-01

    Presence of an excavation damage zone (EDZ) around a tunnel perimeter is of significant concern with regard to safety, stability, costs and overall performance of the tunnel. For deep-buried tunnel excavation by drill and blast, it is generally accepted that a combination of effects of stress redistribution and blasting is mainly responsible for development of the EDZ. However, few open literatures can be found to use numerical methods to investigate the behavior of rock damage induced by the combined effects, and it is still far from full understanding how, when and to what degree the blasting affects the behavior of the EDZ during excavation. By implementing a statistical damage evolution law based on stress criterion into the commercial software LS-DYNA through its user-subroutines, this paper presents a 3D numerical simulation of the rock damage evolution of a deep-buried tunnel excavation, with a special emphasis on the combined effects of the stress redistribution of surrounding rock masses and the blasting-induced damage. Influence of repeated blast loadings on the damage extension for practical millisecond delay blasting is investigated in the present analysis. Accompanying explosive detonation and secession of rock fragments from their initial locations, in situ stress in the immediate vicinity of the excavation face is suddenly released. The transient characteristics of the in situ stress release and induced dynamic responses in the surrounding rock masses are also highlighted. From the simulation results, some instructive conclusions are drawn with respect to the rock damage mechanism and evolution during deep-buried tunnel excavation by drill and blast.

  14. European Christians are at the forefront in accepting evolution: results from an internet-based survey.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David P

    2010-01-01

    Beliefs regarding the origins of the universe and life differ substantially between groups of people and are often particularly associated with religious worldviews. It is important to understand factors associated with evolution and creationism beliefs and unacceptance of scientific evidence for evolution. An internet-based survey was conducted to elicit information from people who self-identify as Christians, atheists, agnostics and other belief systems, as well as by geographical location and other demographic variables, on acceptance of evolution or creationism, certainty with which each position is believed, and reasons for rejecting the alternative. It was found that almost 60% of Christians believe in creationism and less than 10% believe in natural evolution. Worldwide, these proportions were relatively consistent across all locations except for in Europe. Among European Christians the majority of Christians believe in a form of evolution. It was found that the vast majority (87%) of Christians are 'absolutely certain' about their beliefs, compared with the minority of atheists and agnostics claiming 'absolute certainty'. Generally, reasons Christians did not accept evolution were based not on evidence but on religious doctrine. In contrast, the most common reason for not accepting the existence of a god by atheists who supported evolution was the lack of evidence. Innovative strategies may be required to communicate evolutionary science effectively to non-European Christians. PMID:21040420

  15. European Christians are at the forefront in accepting evolution: results from an internet-based survey.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David P

    2010-01-01

    Beliefs regarding the origins of the universe and life differ substantially between groups of people and are often particularly associated with religious worldviews. It is important to understand factors associated with evolution and creationism beliefs and unacceptance of scientific evidence for evolution. An internet-based survey was conducted to elicit information from people who self-identify as Christians, atheists, agnostics and other belief systems, as well as by geographical location and other demographic variables, on acceptance of evolution or creationism, certainty with which each position is believed, and reasons for rejecting the alternative. It was found that almost 60% of Christians believe in creationism and less than 10% believe in natural evolution. Worldwide, these proportions were relatively consistent across all locations except for in Europe. Among European Christians the majority of Christians believe in a form of evolution. It was found that the vast majority (87%) of Christians are 'absolutely certain' about their beliefs, compared with the minority of atheists and agnostics claiming 'absolute certainty'. Generally, reasons Christians did not accept evolution were based not on evidence but on religious doctrine. In contrast, the most common reason for not accepting the existence of a god by atheists who supported evolution was the lack of evidence. Innovative strategies may be required to communicate evolutionary science effectively to non-European Christians.

  16. GTC/OSIRIS SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION OF A FAINT L SUBDWARF IN THE UKIRT INFRARED DEEP SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Lodieu, N.

    2010-01-10

    We present the discovery of an L subdwarf in 234 deg{sup 2} common to the UK InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey Large Area Survey Data Release 2 and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3. This is the fifth L subdwarf announced to date, the first one identified in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, and the faintest known. The blue optical and near-infrared colors of ULAS J135058.86+081506.8 and its overall spectra energy distribution are similar to the known mid-L subdwarfs. Low-resolution optical (700-1000 nm) spectroscopy with the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy spectrograph on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio de Canarias reveals that ULAS J135058.86+081506.8 exhibits a strong K I pressure-broadened line at 770 nm and a red slope longward of 800 nm, features characteristics of L-type dwarfs. From direct comparison with the four known L subdwarfs, we estimate its spectral type to be sdL4-sdL6 and derive a distance in the interval 94-170 pc. We provide a rough estimate of the space density for mid-L subdwarfs of 1.5 x 10{sup -4} pc{sup -3}.

  17. Subglacial morphology and glacial evolution of the Palmer deep outlet system, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, Eugene; Amblàs, David; Gilbert, Robert; Brachfeld, Stefanie; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Rebesco, Michele; Canals, Miquel; Urgeles, Roger

    2006-04-01

    The Palmer Deep is an erosional, inner-shelf trough located at the convergence of ice flow from three distinct accumulation centers. It served as a funnel for ice flow out across the continental shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula. Swath mapping of 1440 km 2 of seafloor in and adjacent to the Palmer Deep basin defines a large paleo-ice stream that flowed 230 km across the Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf during the Last Glacial Maximum (MIS-2). The unique perspective and detail of the Palmer Deep physiography allow us to recognize several phases of erosion and deposition in the outlet basin. These events are uniquely constrained by two ODP drill cores (sites 1099 and 1098) that together recovered over 150 m of latest Pleistocene and Holocene sediment. We divide this region of the continental shelf into three zones based upon mega- to meso-scale bathymetric features and emphasize that all three were part of one glacial outlet during the most recent period of glaciation. These zones include from inner shelf to outer shelf: the Palmer Deep basin, the Palmer Deep Outlet Sill and the Hugo Island Trough. Specific seafloor features associated with these zones include: relict terraces, sub-glacial lake deltas, channels and levees, debris slopes, spindle and out bed forms, mega-scale glacial lineations, morainal banks, and bank breach points. The origin of many of these features can be linked to the development of a sub-glacial lake basin within the Palmer Deep during or prior to MIS-2, its subsequent drainage, and recession of the Palmer Deep ice stream system. This sub-glacial lake system is reconstructed at the head of a major paleo-ice stream.

  18. The XMM Deep Survey in the CDF-S. VII. UV catalogue of the Optical Monitor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, M.; Talavera, A.; Vagnetti, F.; Trevese, D.; Comastri, A.; Paolillo, M.; Ranalli, P.; Vignali, C.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has repeatedly observed the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) in 33 epochs (2001-2010) through the XMM-CDFS Deep Survey. During the X-ray observations, XMM-OM targeted the central 17 × 17 arcmin2 region of the X-ray field of view, providing simultaneous optical/UV coverage of the CDF-S. The resulting set of data can be used to build an XMM-OM catalogue of the CDF-S, filling the UV spectral coverage between the optical surveys and GALEX observations. Aims: We present the UV catalogue of the XMM-CDFS Deep Survey. Its main purpose is to provide complementary UV average photometric measurements of known optical/UV sources in the CDF-S, taking advantage of the unique characteristics of the survey (UV and X-ray simultaneous data, time monitoring ~8.5 years, multi-wavelength photometry). The data reduction is also intended to improve the standard source detection on individual observations by cataloguing faint sources by stacking their exposure images. Methods: We re-processed the XMM-OM data of the survey and stacked the exposures from consecutive observations using the standard Science Analysis System (SAS) tools to process the data obtained during single observations. Average measurements of detections with SAS good quality flags from individual observations and from stacked images were joined to compile the catalogue. Sources were validated through the cross-identification within the ESO Imaging survey (Arnouts et al. 2001) and the COMBO-17 survey (Wolf et al. 2004). Results: Photometric data of 1129 CDF-S sources are provided in the catalogue, and optical/UV/X-ray photometric and spectroscopic information from other surveys are also included. The stacking extends the detection limits by ~1 mag in the three UV bands, contributing ~30% of the catalogued UV sources. The comparison with the available measurements in similar spectral bands confirms the validity of the XMM-OM calibration. The combined COMBO-17/X-ray classification

  19. A Glimpse at South Atlantic Deep and Surface Water Evolution over the Last 40 Ky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waelbroeck, C.; Vazquez Riveiros, N.; Arz, H. W.; Gottschalk, J.; Skinner, L. C.; Dokken, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present sub-millennially resolved time series from core MD08-3167, retrieved at 23°S and 1950 m water depth on the Namibian margin during 2008 RETRO cruise. At present, this region is characterised by upwelling of eastern South Atlantic central water from 150-500 m depth. Stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C) and Mg/Ca were measured on the planktonic foraminifer Globigerina bulloides, which may be assumed to thrive in upwelled waters. Stable isotopes were also measured on the benthic foraminifer Cibicides wuellerstorfi. Core MD08-3167 records were dated based on 23 14C dates covering the last 30 ky. Water δ18O was computed from G. bulloides δ18O and Mg/Ca measurements. A sharp decrease in G. bulloides δ18O paralleled by a sharp increase in G. bulloides Mg/Ca temperature from ~10 to 14 °C takes place over 1000 y between ~18.5 and 17.5 calendar ky BP (ka). After a wide maximum at ~14°C centred about 15 ka, G. bulloides Mg/Ca temperature decreases to 13°C at 13 ka, in phase with the Antarctic cold reversal, then increases to reach an Early Holocene optimum at 16 °C at 9 ka, before decreasing to reach ~15°C, i.e. modern temperatures at 50 m depth. Upwelled water δ18O (δ18Ow) decreases by 1.8‰ from the last glacial maximum (LGM) to the Late Holocene. The evolution of δ18Ow is marked by a sharp 0.9‰ decrease in parallel with the 4°C warming recorded by G. bulloides Mg/Ca, then essentially follows the decrease in global mean ocean δ18O inferred from sea level rise. Our records thus indicate that upwelled waters were both ~4°C colder and 0.9‰ enriched during the LGM relative to the modern ocean after correction for sea level rise. LGM low SSTs can thus not be attributed to enhanced advection of subpolar waters into the Benguela current. In contrast, our records suggest enhanced upwelling of colder water along the continental margin during the LGM that could originate from a mixture of re-circulated South Atlantic central water, glacial North Atlantic

  20. LUMINOUS STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE GALAXY EVOLUTION EXPLORER-SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, J. B.; Bianchi, L.

    2010-02-15

    We have a Galaxy Evolution Explorer-Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample that isolates intermediate redshift QSOs. Some 1% of the spectroscopic sample consists of galaxies in starburst or post-starburst stages. We discuss the most luminous 10 of these, which have redshifts between 0.18 and 0.6. We present spectroscopic measures and derive star formation rates. Two of the six with Mg II coverage reveal outflows in this line. None shows any sign of active galactic nucleus activity. We discuss their star formation histories and their place in galaxy evolution.

  1. Worldwide estimates of deep natural gas resources based on the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Crovelli, R.A.; Bartberger, C.E.; Takahashi, K.I.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey recently assessed undiscovered conventional gas and oil resources in eight regions of the world outside the U.S. The resources assessed were those estimated to have the potential to be added to reserves within the next thirty years. This study is a worldwide analysis of the estimated volumes and distribution of deep (>4.5 km or about 15,000 ft), undiscovered conventional natural gas resources based on this assessment. Two hundred forty-six assessment units in 128 priority geologic provinces, 96 countries, and two jointly held areas were assessed using a probabilistic Total Petroleum System approach. Priority geologic provinces were selected from a ranking of 937 provinces worldwide. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment Team did not assess undiscovered petroleum resources in the U.S. For this report, mean estimated volumes of deep conventional undiscovered gas resources in the U.S. are taken from estimates of 101 deep plays (out of a total of 550 conventional plays in the U.S.) from the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources. A probabilistic method was designed to subdivide gas resources into depth slices using a median-based triangular probability distribution as a model for drilling depth to estimate the percentages of estimated gas resources below various depths. For both the World Petroleum Assessment 2000 and the 1995 National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources, minimum, median, and maximum depths were assigned to each assessment unit and play; these depths were used in our analysis. Two-hundred seventy-four deep assessment units and plays in 124 petroleum provinces were identified for the U.S. and the world. These assessment units and plays contain a mean undiscovered conventional gas resource of 844 trillion cubic ft (Tcf) occuring at depths below 4.5 km. The deep undiscovered conventional gas resource (844 Tcf) is about 17% of the total world gas resource (4,928 Tcf) based on

  2. De-biased populations of Kuiper belt objects from the deep ecliptic survey

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, E. R.; Benecchi, S. D.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Elliot, J. L.; Buie, M. W.; Trilling, D. E.; Wasserman, L. H.

    2014-09-01

    The Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES) was a survey project that discovered hundreds of Kuiper Belt objects from 1998 to 2005. Extensive follow-up observations of these bodies has yielded 304 objects with well-determined orbits and dynamical classifications into one of several categories: Classical, Scattered, Centaur, or 16 mean-motion resonances with Neptune. The DES search fields are well documented, enabling us to calculate the probability on each frame of detecting an object with its particular orbital parameters and absolute magnitude at a randomized point in its orbit. The detection probabilities range from a maximum of 0.32 for the 3:2 resonant object 2002 GF {sub 32} to a minimum of 1.5 × 10{sup –7} for the faint Scattered object 2001 FU {sub 185}. By grouping individual objects together by dynamical classes, we can estimate the distributions of four parameters that define each class: semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and object size. The orbital element distributions (a, e, and i) were fit to the largest three classes (Classical, 3:2, and Scattered) using a maximum likelihood fit. Using the absolute magnitude (H magnitude) as a proxy for the object size, we fit a power law to the number of objects versus H magnitude for eight classes with at least five detected members (246 objects). The Classical objects are best fit with a power-law slope of α = 1.02 ± 0.01 (observed from 5 ≤ H ≤ 7.2). Six other dynamical classes (Scattered plus five resonances) have consistent magnitude distribution slopes with the Classicals, provided that the absolute number of objects is scaled. Scattered objects are somewhat more numerous than Classical objects, while there are only a quarter as many 3:2 objects as Classicals. The exception to the power law relation is the Centaurs, which are non-resonant objects with perihelia closer than Neptune and therefore brighter and detectable at smaller sizes. Centaurs were observed from 7.5 < H < 11, and that population is best

  3. A visual survey technique for deep-water fishes: estimating anglerfish Lophius spp. abundance in closed areas.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, F D; Collie, N; Stewart, M; Scala, L; Fernandes, P G

    2013-10-01

    A visual survey technique was employed to estimate the abundance and distribution of anglerfish Lophius spp. in areas where destructive sampling methods, such as trawling, are unacceptable. To enable visual surveying at depths of over 300 m, a deep towed vehicle was developed equipped with video, lights and other sensors and was towed at speeds of up to 1·5 m s⁻¹ and altitudes of up to 10 m (from the seabed) to survey large areas of the seabed around the Rockall Bank in the north-west Atlantic Ocean. The system allowed for areas up to 125 000 m² to be surveyed, a substantial area comparable to that surveyed by demersal-trawl sampling. Lophius spp. densities ranged from 15 to 736 fish km⁻²; these are comparable to estimated Lophius spp. densities determined by trawl surveys in adjacent areas. Estimates of Lophius spp. abundance in the closed areas ranged between 99,855 and 176,887 for the time series considered (2007-2011). PMID:24090546

  4. Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33): A Deep X-ray Survey of the Nearest Face-on Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetz, Terrance J.; Tuellmann, R.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Kuntz, K.; Long, K. S.; Williams, B.; Blair, W. P.; Edgar, R. J.; Ghavamian, P.; Haberl, F.; Helfand, D.; Hughes, J. P.; Kirshner, R.; Mazeh, T.; Pannuti, T.; Pietsch, W.; Shporer, A.; Smith, R. K.; Winkler, P. F.; ChASeM33 Team

    2009-01-01

    The Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33) is a deep survey of the nearest face-on Spiral Galaxy. The 1.4 Ms survey covers the galaxy out to R 18 arcmin ( 4 kpc at 790 kpc), providing the most extensive high spatial resolution assessment of the X-ray source populations available for M33. Mosaic images of the ChASeM33 observations show several hundred individual X-ray sources as well as soft diffuse emission from the hot interstellar medium. Bright extended emission surrounds the nucleus and is also detected from the giant HII regions NGC604 and IC131. Fainter extended emission and numerous individual sources appear to trace the inner spiral structure. An initial source catalog based on 2/3 of the survey data has been published, and published papers based on the survey include: the discovery of the first eclipsing black hole binary system, an analysis of the brightest supernova remnant in M33, an analysis of the giant HII region NGC604, and an analysis of a number of transient sources. A catalog for the whole survey has now been prepared. We will discuss the improvements made in reducing the data and the approach for detecting and characterizing sources. Adjacent poster presentations include analyses of the new catalog, the X-ray emitting giant HII region (IC131), the supernova remnant population, a preliminary analysis of the diffuse emission, and initial results of a new radio survey complementing the X-ray survey. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Chandra Award Number G06-7073A and contract NAS8-03060.

  5. THE TAIWAN ECDFS NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY: ULTRA-DEEP J AND K{sub S} IMAGING IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD-SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Wang, Wei-Hao; Hsieh, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Lihwai; Lim, Jeremy; Ho, Paul T. P.; Yan Haojing

    2012-12-15

    We present ultra-deep J and K{sub S} imaging observations covering a 30' Multiplication-Sign 30' area of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDFS) carried out by our Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS). The median 5{sigma} limiting magnitudes for all detected objects in the ECDFS reach 24.5 and 23.9 mag (AB) for J and K{sub S} , respectively. In the inner 400 arcmin{sup 2} region where the sensitivity is more uniform, objects as faint as 25.6 and 25.0 mag are detected at 5{sigma}. Thus, this is by far the deepest J and K{sub S} data sets available for the ECDFS. To combine TENIS with the Spitzer IRAC data for obtaining better spectral energy distributions of high-redshift objects, we developed a novel deconvolution technique (IRACLEAN) to accurately estimate the IRAC fluxes. IRACLEAN can minimize the effect of blending in the IRAC images caused by the large point-spread functions and reduce the confusion noise. We applied IRACLEAN to the images from the Spitzer IRAC/MUSYC Public Legacy in the ECDFS survey (SIMPLE) and generated a J+K{sub S} -selected multi-wavelength catalog including the photometry of both the TENIS near-infrared and the SIMPLE IRAC data. We publicly release the data products derived from this work, including the J and K{sub S} images and the J+K{sub S} -selected multi-wavelength catalog.

  6. Overview of North Ecliptic Pole Deep Multi-wavelength Survey as a Probe of the Cosmic Noon Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Oi, Nagisa

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the North Ecliptic Pole deep (0.5 deg2, NEP-Deep) multi-wavelength survey covering from X-ray to radio-wave is presented. The NEP-Deep provides us with several thousands of 15 μm or 18 μm selected sample of galaxies, which is the largest sample ever made at these wavelengths. A continuous filter coverage in the mid-infrared wavelength (7, 9, 11, 15, 18, and 24 μm) is unique and vital to diagnose the contributions from starbursts and AGNs in the galaxies out to z=2. The goal of the project is to resolve the nature of the cosmic star formation history at the cosmic noon era (e.g. z=1--2), and to find a clue to understand its decline from z=1 to present universe by utilizing the unique power of the multiwavelength survey. To achieve the goal we use a few diagnostic physical parameters unique to the NEP dataset: specific star-formation rate, dust attenuation, and obscured AGN fraction, etc.It is also noteworthy that the NEP is the legacy field thanks to its high visibility by the space observatories, such as eROSITA, Euclid, JWST, and SPICA. SPICA, the next generation large cooled space telescope is extremely powerful to study the rise and fall of the cosmic star-formation history in the universe.

  7. Decompression syndrome and the evolution of deep diving physiology in the Cetacea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, Brian Lee; Rothschild, Bruce M.

    2008-09-01

    Whales repetitively dive deep to feed and should be susceptible to decompression syndrome, though they are not known to suffer the associated pathologies. Avascular osteonecrosis has been recognized as an indicator of diving habits of extinct marine amniotes. Vertebrae of 331 individual modern and 996 fossil whales were subjected to macroscopic and radiographic examination. Avascular osteonecrosis was found in the Oligocene basal odontocetes (Xenorophoidea) and in geologically younger mysticetes, such as Aglaocetus [a sister taxon to Balaenopteridae + (Balaenidae + Eschrichtiidae) clade]. These are considered as early “experiments” in repetitive deep diving, indicating that they independently converged on their similar specialized diving physiologies.

  8. A Near-infrared Survey of the Rosette Complex: Clues of Early Cluster Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Ferreira, Bruno

    2008-05-01

    The majority of stars in our galaxy are born in embedded clusters, which can be considered the fundamental units of star formation. We have recently surveyed the star forming content of the Rosette Complex using FLAMINGOS in order to investigate the properties of its embedded clusters. We discuss the results of our near-infrared imaging survey. In particular, we on the first evidence for the early evolution and expansion of the embedded clusters. In addition we present data suggesting a temporal sequence of cluster formation across the cloud and discuss the influence of the HII region on the star forming history of the Rosette.

  9. The ROSAT Deep Survey. 2; Optical Identification, Photometry and Spectra of X-Ray Sources in the Lockman Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M.; Hasinger, G.; Gunn, J.; Schneider, D.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Lehmann, I.; MacKenty, J.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

    1998-01-01

    The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the 0.5 - 2 keV band larger than 5.5 x 10(exp -15)erg/sq cm/s in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper 1). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux.

  10. Too Little, Too Late: How the Tidal Evolution of Hot Jupiters Affects Transit Surveys of Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debes, John H.; Jackson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The tidal evolution of hot Jupiters may change the efficiency of transit surveys of stellar clusters. The orbital decay that hot Jupiters suffer may result in their destruction, leaving fewer transiting planets in older clusters. We calculate the impact tidal evolution has for different assumed stellar populations, including that of 47 Tuc, a globular cluster that was the focus of an intense HST search for transits. We find that in older clusters one expects to detect fewer transiting planets by a factor of two for surveys sensitive to Jupiter-like planets in orbits out to 0.5 AU, and up to a factor of 25 for surveys sensitive to Jupiter-like planets in orbits out to 0.08 AU. Additionally, tidal evolution affects the distribution of transiting planets as a function of semi-major axis, producing larger orbital period gaps for transiting planets as the age of the cluster increases. Tidal evolution can explain the lack of detected exoplanets in 47 Tuc without invoking other mechanisms. Four open clusters residing within the Kepler fields of view have ages that span 0.4-8 Gyr-if Kepler can observe a significant number of planets in these clusters, it will provide key tests for our tidal evolution hypothesis. Finally, our results suggest that observers wishing to discover transiting planets in clusters must have sufficient accuracy to detect lower mass planets, search larger numbers of cluster members, or have longer observation windows to be confident that a significant number of transits will occur for a population of stars.

  11. TOO LITTLE, TOO LATE: HOW THE TIDAL EVOLUTION OF HOT JUPITERS AFFECTS TRANSIT SURVEYS OF CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Jackson, Brian

    2010-11-10

    The tidal evolution of hot Jupiters may change the efficiency of transit surveys of stellar clusters. The orbital decay that hot Jupiters suffer may result in their destruction, leaving fewer transiting planets in older clusters. We calculate the impact tidal evolution has for different assumed stellar populations, including that of 47 Tuc, a globular cluster that was the focus of an intense Hubble Space Telescope search for transits. We find that in older clusters, one expects to detect fewer transiting planets by a factor of 2 for surveys sensitive to Jupiter-like planets in orbits out to 0.5 AU, and up to a factor of 25 for surveys sensitive to Jupiter-like planets in orbits out to 0.08 AU. Additionally, tidal evolution affects the distribution of transiting planets as a function of the semimajor axis, producing larger orbital period gaps for transiting planets as the age of the cluster increases. Tidal evolution can explain the lack of detected exoplanets in 47 Tuc without invoking other mechanisms. Four open clusters residing within the Kepler fields of view have ages that span 0.4-8 Gyr-if Kepler can observe a significant number of planets in these clusters, it will provide key tests for our tidal evolution hypothesis. Finally, our results suggest that observers wishing to discover transiting planets in clusters must have sufficient accuracy to detect lower mass planets, search larger numbers of cluster members, or have longer observation windows to be confident that a significant number of transits will occur for a population of stars.

  12. Terrestrial Laser Scanner survey: a new system to monitor geomorphological evolution of the Vesuvius crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Teresa; Somma, Renato; Pesci, Arianna; Pignalosa, Antonio; Marino, Ermanno; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Each year the Vesuvius crater is interested by numerous landslides that are detected by seismic stations of the monitoring network of Osservatorio Vesuviano (INGV). Our aim is investigate the possible geomorphological evolution of Vesuvius crater by analyzing high resolution DTM acquired in last decade and comparing multitemporal 3D models created from terrestrial laser scanning surveys. The last TLS survey was executed in October 2015 by means of Reigl VZ1000 interfaced by RiscanPro software, while previous observations belong to Optech ILRIS 3D acquisitions. Actually, data relative to May 2005, October 2006, June 2009 and 2011 are considered, each one composed of about 20 aligned point clouds provided by measuring from about 6 station points. Digital surface models from different periods will be compared in order to evaluate possible volume changes due to landslides and rockfalls. In order to support our estimates, we also acquired GNSS data. For both data after a procedure of alignment of scans in a local reference, they have been georeferenced in UTM-WGS84 reference system. The present study indicates that the method used can be useful to detect geomorphological evolution of Vesuvius crater. Therefore, in the future we have planned other scans surveys with aim to monitor the evolution of the Vesuvius crater.

  13. Trends in Continuous Deep Sedation until Death between 2007 and 2013: A Repeated Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joachim; Rietjens, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background Continuous deep sedation until death is a highly debated medical practice, particularly regarding its potential to hasten death and its proper use in end-of-life care. A thorough analysis of important trends in this practice is needed to identify potentially problematic developments. This study aims to examine trends in the prevalence and practice characteristics of continuous deep sedation until death in Flanders, Belgium between 2007 and 2013, and to study variation on physicians’ degree of palliative training. Methods Population-based death certificate study in 2007 and 2013 in Flanders, Belgium. Reporting physicians received questionnaires about medical practices preceding the patient’s death. Patient characteristics, clinical characteristics (drugs used, duration, artificial nutrition/hydration, intention and consent), and palliative care training of attending physician were recorded. We posed the following question regarding continuous deep sedation: ‘Was the patient continuously and deeply sedated or kept in a coma until death by the use of one or more drugs’. Results After the initial rise of continuous deep sedation to 14.5% in 2007 (95%CI 13.1%-15.9%), its use decreased to 12.0% in 2013 (95%CI 10.9%-13.2%). Compared with 2007, in 2013 opioids were less often used as sole drug and the decision to use continuous deep sedation was more often preceded by patient request. Compared to non-experts, palliative care experts more often used benzodiazepines and less often opioids, withheld artificial nutrition/hydration more often and performed sedation more often after a request from or with the consent of the patient or family. Conclusion Worldwide, this study is the first to show a decrease in the prevalence of continuous deep sedation. Despite positive changes in performance and decision-making towards more compliance with due care requirements, there is still room for improvement in the use of recommended drugs and in the involvement of

  14. The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey final data release: a spectroscopic sample of 35 016 galaxies and AGN out to z ~ 6.7 selected with 17.5 ≤ iAB ≤ 24.75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Cassata, P.; Cucciati, O.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Moreau, C.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Zamorani, G.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; de la Torre, S.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; Lemaux, B.; López-Sanjuan, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Mellier, Y.; Merighi, R.; Merluzzi, P.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Scaramella, R.; Tasca, L.; Vergani, D.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Deep representative surveys of galaxies at different epochs are needed to make progress in understanding galaxy evolution. Aims: We describe the completed VIMOS VLT Deep Survey and the final data release of 35 016 galaxies and type-I AGN with measured spectroscopic redshifts covering all epochs up to redshift z ~ 6.7, in areas from 0.142 to 8.7 square degrees, and volumes from 0.5 × 106 to 2 × 107 h-3 Mpc3. Methods: We selected samples of galaxies based solely on their i-band magnitude reaching iAB = 24.75. Spectra were obtained with VIMOS on the ESO-VLT integrating 0.75 h, 4.5 h, and 18 h for the Wide, Deep, and Ultra-Deep nested surveys, respectively. We demonstrate that any "redshift desert" can be crossed successfully using spectra covering 3650 ≤ λ ≤ 9350 Å. A total of 1263 galaxies were again observed independently within the VVDS and from the VIPERS and MASSIV surveys. They were used to establish the redshift measurements reliability, to assess completeness in the VVDS sample, and to provide a weighting scheme taking the survey selection function into account. We describe the main properties of the VVDS samples, and the VVDS is compared to other spectroscopic surveys in the literature. Results: In total we have obtained spectroscopic redshifts for 34 594 galaxies, 422 type-I AGN, and 12 430 Galactic stars. The survey enabled identifying galaxies up to very high redshifts with 4669 redshifts in 1 ≤ zspec ≤ 2, 561 in 2 ≤ zspec ≤ 3, and 468 with zspec > 3, and specific populations like Lyman-α emitters were identified out to z = 6.62. We show that the VVDS occupies a unique place in the parameter space defined by area, depth, redshift coverage, and number of spectra. Conclusions: The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey provides a comprehensive survey of the distant universe, covering all epochs since z ~ 6, or more than 12 Gyr of cosmic time, with a uniform selection, which is the largest such sample to date. A wealth of science results derived from

  15. STREGA: STRucture and Evolution of the GAlaxy - I. Survey overview and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Cignoni, M.; Dall'Ora, M.; Bono, G.; Ripepi, V.; Brocato, E.; Raimondo, G.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Coppola, G.; Moretti, M. I.; Stetson, P. B.; Calamida, A.; Cantiello, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Cappellaro, E.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; De Martino, D.; Di Cecco, A.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Silvotti, R.; Buonanno, R.; Getman, F.; Napolitano, N. R.; Pulone, L.; Schipani, P.

    2014-11-01

    STREGA (STRucture and Evolution of the GAlaxy) is a guaranteed time survey being performed at the VST (the ESO Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope) to map about 150 square degrees in the Galactic halo, in order to constrain the mechanisms of galactic formation and evolution. The survey is built as a 5 yr project, organized in two parts: a core programme to explore the surrounding regions of selected stellar systems and a second complementary part to map the southern portion of the Fornax orbit and extend the observations of the core programme. The adopted stellar tracers are mainly variable stars (RR Lyraes and long-period variables) and main-sequence turn-off stars for which observations in the g, r, i bands are obtained. We present an overview of the survey and some preliminary results for three observing runs that have been completed. For the region centred on ω Cen (37 deg2), covering about three tidal radii, we also discuss the detected stellar density radial profile and angular distribution, leading to the identification of extratidal cluster stars. We also conclude that the cluster tidal radius is about 1.2 deg, in agreement with values in the literature based on the Wilson model.

  16. Subaqueous terminus evolution at Tasman Glacier, New Zealand, as determined by remote-controlled survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdie, Heather; Bealing, Paul; Tidey, Emily; Harrison, Justin

    2016-04-01

    The presence of subaqueous ice ramps at the terminus of calving glaciers result from a combination of subaerial and subaqueous processes. These ice ramps eventually buoyantly calve, an event that can be hazardous to companies operating boat tours on proglacial lakes. However our knowledge of ice ramp forming processes, and feedbacks associated with their evolution, is sparse. We are using a remote controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry at an active calving margin. This vessel, mounted with both depth and side-scan sonar, can map subaqueous portions of the terminus right up to the active calving face at no risk to the operators. Surveys at the Tasman Glacier terminus over three consecutive years have revealed that subaqueous ice ramps are ephemeral features. In 2015 multiple ice ramps extended out into the lake from the terminus by 100-200 m, with the ramp surface being as much as 60 m below the water line at its outer perimeter. The maximum depth of the Tasman Lake at this time was 240 m. Within one month of the survey taking place, the largest of these ice ramps had calved and disintegrated. The consistent location of ice ramps between surveys indicates that other factors, like subglacial hydrology, may influence ice ramp evolution.

  17. The QSO Evolution Derived from the HBQS and Other Complete QSO Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Franca, Fabio; Cristiani, Stefano

    1997-05-01

    An Homogeneous Bright QSO Survey (HBQS) has been carried out in the framework of an ESO Key programme. 327 QSOs (with M_B<-23 and 0.3survey, corresponding to a surface density of 0.013(+.007}_{-.005) deg(-2) . If the data from the Edinburgh QSO Survey are included, an overdensity of a factor 2.5 is observed, corresponding to a surface density of 0.016+/- 0.005 deg(-2) . In order to derive the QSO optical luminosity function we used Monte Carlo simulations that take into account of the selection criteria, photometric errors and QSO spectral slope distribution. We have combined our data with the Edinburgh QSO Survey, the Large Bright QSO Survey, Durham/AAT survey, ESO/AAT faint survey and the (ZM)(2) B survey. The luminosity function can be represented with a Pure Luminosity Evolution, L(z)~ (1+z)(k) , of a two power-law both for q_0 = 0.5 and q_0 = 0.1. For q_0 = 0.5 the k evolution parameter is k=3.26+/- 0.07, slower than the previous Boyle's (1992) estimate k=3.45. A flatter slope beta = -3.72 +/- 0.13 of the bright part of the luminosity function is also required. If a spread in the QSO spectral slope of sigma_ gamma = 0.3 and 0.5 is taken into account, the k parameter drops to 3.2 and 3.0 respectively. The observed overdensity of bright QSOs is concentrated at redshifts lower than 0.6. It results that in the range 0.3evolution in order to adequately represent the data in the whole 0.3

  18. The Evolution of Early-type Field Galaxies Selected from a NICMOS Map of the Hubble Deep Field North

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, R; Stanford, S A; Budavari, T; Conselice, C J

    2004-03-03

    The redshift distribution of well-defined samples of distant early-type galaxies offers a means to test the predictions of monolithic and hierarchical galaxy formation scenarios. NICMOS maps of the entire Hubble Deep Field North in the F110W and F160W filters, when combined with the available WFPC2 data, allow us to calculate photometric redshifts and determine the morphological appearance of galaxies at rest-frame optical wavelengths out to z {approx} 2.5. Here we report results for two subsamples of early-type galaxies, defined primarily by their morphologies in the F160W band, which were selected from the NICMOS data down to H{sub 160AB} < 24.0. A primary subsample is defined as the 34 galaxies with early-type galaxy morphologies and early-type galaxy spectral energy distributions. The secondary subsample is defined as those 42 objects which have early-type galaxy morphologies with non-early type galaxy spectral energy distributions. The observed redshift distributions of our two early-type samples do not match that predicted by a monolithic collapse model, which shows an overabundance at z > 1.5. A (V/V{sub max}) test confirms this result. When the effects of passive luminosity evolution are included in the calculation, the mean value of Vmax for the primary sample is 0.22 {+-} 0.05, and 0.31 {+-} 0.04 for all the early-types. A hierarchical formation model better matches the redshift distribution of the HDF-N early-types at z > 1.5, but still does not adequately describe the observed early-types. The hierarchical model predicts significantly bluer colors on average than the observed early-type colors, and underpredicts the observed number of early-types at z {approx} 2. Though the observed redshift distribution of the early-type galaxies in our HDF-NICMOS sample is better matched by a hierarchical galaxy formation model, the reliability of this conclusion is tempered by the restricted sampling area and relatively small number of early-type galaxies selected by

  19. A Synthesis of Late Miocene Through Pliocene Evolution of Glaciation as Inferred From Deep Sea Geochemical Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billups, K.

    2008-12-01

    During the Miocene through Pliocene climate evolved from an early Miocene climatic optimum (~16 Ma) followed by major expansion of the Antarctic ice sheet during the middle Miocene (~15 Ma), to an early Pliocene interval of relative global warmth (5 to 3.5 Ma) followed by the onset of wide spread Northern Hemisphere Glaciation during the late Pliocene (~3 Ma). Here I review the evolution of Miocene/Pliocene glaciation as recorded in the geochemistry of deep sea sediments. Much of what we know about past climate change comes from the oxygen isotopic composition of benthic foraminifera. Although this proxy outlines large scale changes in the degree of polar glaciation, the absolute magnitude and the relationship between ice extent and ocean temperature cannot be uniquely determined. The recent development of foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios as a proxy for paleotemperatures provides an opportunity to improve our understanding of Miocene/Pliocene climate change on both tectonic and orbital time scales. For example, paired δ18O and Mg/Ca deep water records show that middle Miocene expansion of ice predates cooling of Southern Ocean surface waters providing evidence for the importance of heat and moisture transport in Antarctic ice growth (Shevenell and Kennett, 2007). Relatively few deep sea studies have focused on late Miocene climate, and foraminiferal δ18O records do not support major oceanographic and climatic changes. Although, the late Miocene may have been a time of global cooling, especially in the circum- Antarctic region, with the establishment of a grounded West Antarctic ice sheet. The early Pliocene, in contrast, has been the focus of much research because of the relevance to understanding intervals of sustained global climatic warmth with near modern-day tectonic configuration, warm upwelling regions, and elevated CO2 levels with respect to the pre-industrial atmosphere. The deep sea δ18O record, however, suggests that Antarctic ice sheet size remained

  20. Bent-tailed Radio Sources in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey of the Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, supplemented by the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South. Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 BT sources, 4 diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (1 relic, 2 halos, and 1 unclassified object), and a further 7 complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range 1022 <= P 1.4 GHz <= 1026 W Hz-1, with redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kiloparsecs up to about 1 Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here, one is the most distant BT source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be associated with known clusters: a wide-angle tail source in A3141 and a putative radio relic which appears at the infall region between the galaxy group MZ 00108 and the galaxy cluster AMPCC 40. Further observations are required to confirm the relic detection, which, if successful, would demonstrate this to be the least powerful relic yet seen with P 1.4 GHz = 9 × 1022 W Hz-1. Using these data, we predict future 1.4 GHz all-sky surveys with a resolution of ~10 arcsec and a sensitivity of 10 μJy will detect of the order of 560,000 extended low-surface-brightness radio sources of which 440,000 will have a BT morphology.

  1. Bent-tailed radio sources in the australia telescope large area survey of the Chandra deep field south

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, supplemented by the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South. Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 BT sources, 4 diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (1 relic, 2 halos, and 1 unclassified object), and a further 7 complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range 10{sup 22} ≤ P {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≤ 10{sup 26} W Hz{sup –1}, with redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kiloparsecs up to about 1 Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here, one is the most distant BT source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be associated with known clusters: a wide-angle tail source in A3141 and a putative radio relic which appears at the infall region between the galaxy group MZ 00108 and the galaxy cluster AMPCC 40. Further observations are required to confirm the relic detection, which, if successful, would demonstrate this to be the least powerful relic yet seen with P {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} = 9 × 10{sup 22} W Hz{sup –1}. Using these data, we predict future 1.4 GHz all-sky surveys with a resolution of ∼10 arcsec and a sensitivity of 10 μJy will detect of the order of 560,000 extended low-surface-brightness radio sources of which 440,000 will have a BT morphology.

  2. A Survey of z ~ 6 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Deep Stripe. I. A Flux-Limited Sample at zAB < 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Annis, James; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Chiu, Kuenley; Lin, Huan; Lupton, Robert H.; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.

    2008-03-01

    We present the discovery of five quasars at z ~ 6 selected from 260 deg2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern survey, a deep imaging survey obtained by repeatedly scanning a stripe along the celestial equator. The five quasars with 20 < zAB < 21 are 1-2 magnitudes fainter than the luminous z ~ 6 quasars discovered in the SDSS main survey. One of them was independently discovered by the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey. These quasars, combined with another z ~ 6 quasar known in this region, make a complete flux-limited quasar sample at zAB < 21. The sample spans the redshift range 5.85 <= z <= 6.12 and the luminosity range -26.5 <= M 1450 <= -25.4 (H 0 = 70 km s-1 Mpc-1, Ω m = 0.3, and ΩΛ = 0.7). We use the 1/Va method to determine that the comoving quasar spatial density at langzrang = 6.0 and langM 1450rang = -25.8 is (5.0 ± 2.1) × 10-9 Mpc-3 mag-1. We model the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ~ 6 as a power law Φ(L 1450) vprop L β 1450. The slope β calculated from a combination of our sample and the luminous SDSS quasar sample is -3.1 ± 0.4, significantly steeper than the slope of the QLF at z ~ 4. Based on the derived QLF, we find that the quasar/active galactic nucleus (AGN) population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z ~ 6 unless the IGM is very homogeneous and the luminosity (L*1450) at which the QLF power law breaks is very low. Based on observations obtained with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium; the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution; the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and was made possible by the generous financial

  3. Deep Sea Trenches and Radioactive Water. Crustal Evolution Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  4. The case for a deep-atmospheric in situ mission to address the highest priority Decadal Survey questions for Venus (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Garvin, J. B.; Glaze, L. S.; Campbell, B. A.; Fisher, M. E.; Flores, A.; Gilmore, M. S.; Johnson, N.; Kiefer, W. S.; Lorenz, R. D.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Ravine, M. A.; Webster, C. R.; Zolotov, M. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Current understanding of Venus lags behind that for Mars, with a major disparity of information concerning noble and trace gases and the small scale surface processes needed for comparative studies of terrestrial planet evolution. Despite global surface mapping by Magellan, discoveries by Venera landers, and ongoing atmospheric observations by the Venus Express (VEx) orbiter, significant questions about Venus remain unanswered. To place Venus into its proper context with respect to Mars and Earth, it is necessary to obtain new measurements that address top issues identified in the National Research Council (NRC) Solar System Decadal Survey: (1) evolution of the atmosphere, history of climate, and evidence of past hydrologic cycles; (2) history of volatiles and sedimentary cycles; and (3) planetary surface evolution. To answer these questions, new measurements are needed. First and foremost, in situ noble gas measurements are needed to constrain solar system formation and Venus evolution. In particular, the isotopic ratios of Xe and Kr can provide unique insights into planetary accretion. Isotopic measurements of nitrogen (15N/14N) will place important constraints on atmospheric loss processes. Current knowledge of this ratio has a substantial uncertainty of ×20%. VEx observations of hydrogen isotopes indicate the D/H ratio above the clouds is substantially greater than measured by Pioneer Venus, and varies with height. High precision measurements of the vertical distribution of the D/H isotopic ratio below the cloud layers will provide constraints on models of the climate history of water on Venus. The majority of atmospheric mass is located below the clouds. Current data suggest intense interaction among atmospheric gases down to the surface. The haze within the cloud region of unknown composition plays a central role in the radiative balance. Photochemically-derived species (H2SO4, OCS, CO, Sn) are subjected to thermochemical reactions below the clouds

  5. A Very High Resolution, Deep-Towed Multichannel Seismic Survey in the Yaquina Basin off Peru ? Technical Design of the new Deep-Tow Streamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, J.; Breitzke, M.

    2002-12-01

    Within the project INGGAS a new deep towed acoustic profiling instrument consisting of a side scan sonar fish and a 26 channel seismic streamer has been developed for operation in full ocean depth. The digital channels are build by single hydrophones and three engineering nodes (EN) which are connected either by 1 m or 6.5 m long cable segments. Together with high frequent surface sources (e.g. GI gun) this hybrid system allows to complete surveys with target resolutions of higher frequency content than from complete surface based configurations. Consequently special effort has been addressed to positioning information of the submerged towed instrument. Ultra Short Base Line (USBL) navigation of the tow fish allows precise coordinate evaluation even with more than 7 km of tow cable. Specially designed engineering nodes comprise a single hydrophone with compass, depth, pitch and roll sensors. Optional extension of the streamer up to 96 hydrophone nodes and 75 engineering nodes is possible. A telemetry device allows up- and downlink transmission of all system parameters and all recorded data from the tow fish in real time. Signals from the streamer and the various side scan sensors are multiplexed along the deep-sea cable. Within the telemetry system coaxial and fiber optic connectors are available and can be chosen according to the ships needs. In case of small bandwidth only selected portions of data are transmitted onboard to provide full online quality control while a copy of the complete data set is stored within the submerged systems. Onboard the record strings of side scan and streamer are demultiplexed and distributed to the quality control (QC) systems by Ethernet. A standard marine multichannel control system is used to display shot gather, spectra and noise monitoring of the streamer channels as well as data storage in SEG format. Precise navigation post processing includes all available positioning information from the vessel (DGPS), the USBL, the

  6. Cosmic Accretion and Galaxy Co-Evolution: Lessons from the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    2011-05-01

    The Chandra deep fields reveal that most cosmic accretion onto supermassive black holes is obscured by gas and dust. The GOODS and MUSYC multiwavelength data show that many X-ray-detected AGN are faint and red (or even undetectable) in the optical but bright in the infrared, as is characteristic of obscured sources. (N.B. The ECDFS is most sensitive to the AGN that constitute the X-ray background, namely, moderate luminosity AGN, with log Lx=43-44, at moderate redshifts, 0.5deep medium-band optical imaging in 18 filters with Subaru's Suprime-Cam, we can derive the color-mass distributions out to z<1.2. (With deep near-IR HST imaging and spectroscopy we can extend this to z 2.5.) After correcting for dust reddening, we find that AGN host galaxies at z 1 are either newly arrived on the red sequence or still forming stars in the blue cloud, while at z 0 most AGN hosts are in the green valley, avoiding the blue cloud. These results suggest two modes of black hole growth: a vigorous initial phase that may be strong enough to turn off star formation, and a later moderate phase, on the red sequence, sufficient to keep gas too hot for star formation. At lower redshifts, this activity has mostly died down, presumably because there is less gas available for star formation or accretion.

  7. The Fornax Deep Survey with VST. I. The Extended and Diffuse Stellar Halo of NGC 1399 out to 192 kpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iodice, E.; Capaccioli, M.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Spavone, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Paolillo, M.; Peletier, R. F.; Cantiello, M.; Lisker, T.; Wittmann, C.; Venhola, A.; Hilker, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Pota, V.; Schipani, P.

    2016-03-01

    We have started a new, deep multi-imaging survey of the Fornax cluster, dubbed the Fornax Deep Survey (FDS), at the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). In this paper we present the deep photometry inside two square degrees around the bright galaxy NGC 1399 in the core of the cluster. We found that the core of the Fornax cluster is characterized by a very extended and diffuse envelope surrounding the luminous galaxy NGC 1399: we map the surface brightness out to 33 arcmin (˜192 kpc) from the galaxy center and down to μg ˜ 31 mag arcsec-2 in the g band. The deep photometry allows us to detect a faint stellar bridge in the intracluster region on the west side of NGC 1399 and toward NGC 1387. By analyzing the integrated colors of this feature, we argue that it could be due to the ongoing interaction between the two galaxies, where the outer envelope of NGC 1387 on its east side is stripped away. By fitting the light profile, we found that there exists a physical break radius in the total light distribution at R = 10 arcmin (˜58 kpc) that sets the transition region between the bright central galaxy and the outer exponential halo, and that the stellar halo contributes 60% of the total light of the galaxy (Section 3.5). We discuss the main implications of this work on the build-up of the stellar halo at the center of the Fornax cluster. By comparing with the numerical simulations of the stellar halo formation for the most massive bright cluster galaxies (i.e., 13\\lt {log}{M}200/{M}⊙ \\lt 14), we find that the observed stellar halo mass fraction is consistent with a halo formed through the multiple accretion of progenitors with stellar mass in the range 108-1011 M⊙. This might suggest that the halo of NGC 1399 has also gone through a major merging event. The absence of a significant number of luminous stellar streams and tidal tails out to 192 kpc suggests that the epoch of this strong interaction goes back to an early formation epoch. Therefore, different from the Virgo

  8. Joint US-Japan Observations with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO): Deep Surveys and Observations of High-Z Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, David B.

    1997-01-01

    Several important milestones were passed during the past year of our ISO observing program: (1) Our first ISO data were successfully obtained. ISOCAM data were taken for our primary deep field target in the 'Lockman Hole'. Thirteen hours of integration (taken over 4 contiguous orbits) were obtained in the LW2 filter of a 3 ft x 3 ft region centered on the position of minimum HI column density in the Lockman Hole. The data were obtained in microscanning mode. This is the deepest integration attempted to date (by almost a factor of 4 in time) with ISOCAM. (2) The deep survey data obtained for the Lockman Hole were received by the Japanese P.I. (Yoshi Taniguchi) in early December, 1996 (following release of the improved pipeline formatted data from Vilspa), and a copy was forwarded to Hawaii shortly thereafter. These data were processed independently by the Japan and Hawaii groups during the latter part of December 1996, and early January, 1997. The Hawaii group made use of the U.S. ISO data center at IPAC/Caltech in Pasadena to carry out their data reduction, while the Japanese group used a copy of the ISOCAM data analysis package made available to them through an agreement with the head of the ISOCAM team, Catherine Cesarsky. (3) Results of our LW2 Deep Survey in the Lockman Hole were first reported at the ISO Workshop "Taking ISO to the Limits: Exploring the Faintest Sources in the Infrared" held at the ISO Science Operations Center in Villafranca, Spain (VILSPA) on 3-4 February, 1997. Yoshi Taniguchi gave an invited presentation summarizing the results of the U.S.-Japan team, and Dave Sanders gave an invited talk summarizing the results of the Workshop at the conclusion of the two day meeting. The text of the talks by Taniguchi and Sanders are included in the printed Workshop Proceedings, and are published in full on the Web. By several independent accounts, the U.S.-Japan Deep Survey results were one of the highlights of the Workshop; these data showed

  9. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: galaxies in the deep 850 μm survey, and the star-forming `main sequence'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, M. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Roseboom, I.; Geach, J. E.; Cirasuolo, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Banerji, M.; Bourne, N.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Chapman, S.; Hughes, D. H.; Jenness, T.; McLure, R. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Werf, P. van der

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the properties of the galaxies selected from the deepest 850-μm survey undertaken to date with (Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2) SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. A total of 106 sources (>5σ) were uncovered at 850 μm from an area of ≃150 arcmin2 in the centre of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA/Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) field, imaged to a typical depth of σ850 ≃ 0.25 mJy. We utilize the available multifrequency data to identify galaxy counterparts for 80 of these sources (75 per cent), and to establish the complete redshift distribution for this sample, yielding bar{z} = 2.38± 0.09. We have also been able to determine the stellar masses of the majority of the galaxy identifications, enabling us to explore their location on the star formation rate:stellar mass (SFR:M*) plane. Crucially, our new deep 850-μm-selected sample reaches flux densities equivalent to SFR ≃ 100 M⊙ yr-1, enabling us to confirm that sub-mm galaxies form the high-mass end of the `main sequence' (MS) of star-forming galaxies at z > 1.5 (with a mean specific SFR of sSFR = 2.25 ± 0.19 Gyr-1 at z ≃ 2.5). Our results are consistent with no significant flattening of the MS towards high masses at these redshifts. However, our results add to the growing evidence that average sSFR rises only slowly at high redshift, resulting in log10sSFR being an apparently simple linear function of the age of the Universe.

  10. Development of novel electromagnetic antenna for deep target marine CSEM survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Majid Niaz; Yahya, Noorhana; Shafie, Afza; Nasir, Nadeem; Kashif, Muhammad; Zaid, Hasnah Mohd

    2012-09-01

    Marine controlled source electromagnetic method (MCSEM) is a new and versatile method for hydrocarbon detection. Deep sea hydrocarbon reservoir exploration is still challenging and expensive. Due to unreliability for the detection of DHIs using seismic data, new methods have been investigated. Sea bed logging (SBL) is a new technique for the detection of deep target hydrocarbon and has potential to reduce the risks of DHIs (direct hydrocarbon indicators) in deep sea environment. The magnitude of EM waves is very important for the detection of deep target hydrocarbon reservoir below 4000m from the sea floor. Nanotechnology has been introduced very effective and shows promising results in many research fields. Ferrite magnetic materials play an important role in many applications due to its versatile magnetic properties. The aluminum based EM antenna is developed and NiZn, YIG ferrite as magnetic feeders are used to increase the field strength from EM antenna. FESEM images show that grain size increases with the increase of sintering temperature and ranges from 30 to 60nm for Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4 where as grain size increases from 45 to 110nm for Y3Fe5O12 samples. Due to better magnetic properties, samples (Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4-PVDF) sintered at 950°C and (Y3Fe5O12-PVDF) sintered at 1350°C were used as magnetic feeders for the EM antenna. It was investigated that magnitude of EM waves from the novel EM antenna with (Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4-PVDF) sintered at 950°C and Y3Fe5O12-PVDF) sintered at 1150°C increases up to 143% and 220% respectively in the lab scale environment. Modeling results by using CST software shows that new EM antenna with magnetic feeders has an ability to increase the D, E, B and H field components. This novel EM antenna with magnetic feeders may be used for the deep target hydrocarbon detection due to enhanced field strength. This new EM transmitter based on nanotechnology may open new horizons for oil and gas industry for deep target hydrocarbon reservoir.

  11. International Conference: Milky Way Surveys: The Structure and Evolution of Our Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, Dan

    2004-01-01

    We were granted NASA support for partial sponsorship of an international conference on Galactic science, held June 15-17, 2003 and hosted by the Institute for Astrophysical Research at Boston University. This conference, entitled 'Milky Way Surveys: The Structure and Evolution of Our Galaxy' drew some 125 scientific experts, researchers, and graduate students to Boston to: (1) Present large area survey plans and findings; (2) Discuss important remaining questions and puzzles in Galactic science; and (3) To inform and excite students and researchers about the potential for using large area survey databases to address key Galactic science questions. An international Scientific Organizing Committee for this conference crafted a tightly packed two-day conference designed to highlight many recent and upcoming large area surveys (including 2MASS, SDSS, MSX, VLA-HI, GRS, and SIRTF/GLIMPSE) and current theoretical understandings and questions. By bringing together experts in the conduct of Galactic surveys and leading theorists, new ways of attacking long-standing scientific questions were encouraged. The titles of most of the talks and posters presented are attached to the end of this report.

  12. Deep drilling of ancient Lake Ohrid (Balkan region) to capture over 1 million years of evolution and global climate cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Bernd; Francke, Alexander; Wilke, Thomas; Krastel, Sebastian; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Sulpizio, Roberto; Reicherter, Klaus; Leng, Melanie; Grazhdani, Andon; Trajanovski, Sasho; Levkov, Zlatko; Reed, Jane; Wonik, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ancient lakes, with sediment records spanning >1 million years, are very rare. The UNESCO World Heritage site of Lake Ohrid in the Balkan region is thought to be the oldest lake in continuous existence in Europe and, with 212 endemic species described to date, is a hotspot of evolution. An international group of scientists working on a project entitled 'Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO)' realized a deep drilling campaign of Lake Ohrid in spring 2013. Based on several coring seismic campaigns between 2004 and 2011, Lake Ohrid became the target of an ICDP deep drilling campaign, with specific research aims: (i) obtain precise information about the age and origin of the lake, (ii) unravel the lake's seismotectonic history, (iii) obtain a continuous record of Quaternary volcanic activity and climate change, and (iv) investigate the influence of major geological/environmental events on evolution and the generation of extraordinary endemic biodiversity. Drilling began in April 2013 using the Deep Lake Drilling System (DLDS) of DOSECC (USA). The campaign, completed by late May, was deemed one of the most successful ICDP lake drilling projects, with a total of ~2100 m of sediment recovered from four different sites. At the central "DEEP" site, hydro-acoustic data indicated a maximum sediment fill of ca. 700 m, of which the uppermost 568 m was recovered. Coarse gravel and pebbles underlying clay and shallow water facies hampered deeper penetration. A total of 1526 m of sediment cores was collected from six boreholes, with a composite field recovery ('master core') of 544 m (95%). Three additional sites were drilled in order to analyze lake-level fluctuations, catchment dynamics, biodiversity and evolution processes ("Cerava", deepest drilled depth: 90 m), to investigate active tectonics and spring dynamics ("Gradiste", deepest drilled depth: 123 m), and to try to understand the geological origins of the Ohrid Basin ("Pestani

  13. Galaxy Populations and Evolution in Clusters IV Deep H 1 Observations of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conselice, Christopher J.; ONeil, Karen; Gallagher, John S.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present deep Arecibo H I and WIYN optical observations of Virgo Cluster dwarf elliptical galaxies. Based on this data we argue that a significant fraction of low-mass galaxies in the Virgo Cluster recently underwent evolution. Our new observations consist of H I 21 cm line observations for 22 classified dE galaxies with optical radial velocities consistent with membership in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster members VCC 390 and VCC 1713 are detected with H 1 masses M H1= 6 x 10 sup 7 and 8 x 10 sup 7 M , respectively, while MH I values in the remaining 20 dE galaxies have upper limits as low as about 5 x 1O sup 5 M. We combine our results with those for 26 other Virgo Cluster dE galaxies with H 1 observations in the literature, seven of which have H I detection claims.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: International Deep Planet Survey results (Galicher+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galicher, R.; Marois, C.; Macintosh, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Barman, T.; Konopacky, Q.; Song, I.; Patience, J.; Lafreniere, D.; Doyon, R.; Nielsen, E. L.

    2016-07-01

    Ages, spectral types and distances of 286 nearby stars. Contrast detection limits of the imaging survey. Multiple stellar systems. Detected exoplanets, sub-stellar candidates and background objects. (5 data files).

  15. Deep seismic survey images crustal structure of Tornquist Zone beneath southern Baltic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The Tornquist Zone is Europe's longest tectonic lineament and bisects the continent in a NW-SE direction from the North Sea (off NW Denmark) to the Black Sea. New deep seismic reflection and coincident refraction data have been collected across its 50 km wide, intensely faulted and inverted NW part. The marine reflection profile in the area north of Bornholm Island shows a tilted block structure in the rigid upper crust, whereas the lower crust seems to be more gently uplifted. A complex transition from the highly reflective lower crust to the mantle is indicated by mantle reflections and a curious wide-angle event recorded by a landstation on Bornholm Island. The authors suggest that deep-reaching inversion tectonics, induced by Alpine and Carpathian orogeny, were responsible for the development of the gross crust-mantle structure of the Tornquist Zone in the study area, which seems to be similar to that in Poland.

  16. Spectroscopic CCD surveys for quasars at large redshift. I - A deep PFUEI survey. [Prime Focus Universal Extragalactic Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M.; Schneider, D. P.; Gunn, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    A survey for faint quasars has been conducted using slitless spectroscopy with the PFUEI at the 200 inch (5 m) telescope. The survey covers a total of 0.91 sq deg in 113 fields at galactic latitudes above 30 deg. Calibrated spectra in the range 4500-7200 A were obtained for more than 9000 objects. Emission-line candidates were selected on the basis of two criteria: the equivalent width must exceed 50 A, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detection of the line versus the sky background should be larger than 7. Among 45 candidates so selected, subsequent slit spectroscopy confirmed 27 emission-line objects. Among these, 17 are emission-line galaxies with redshifts in the range 0.04-0.31, and 10 are quasars with redshifts between 0.91 and 2.66. The well-defined selection criteria for these objects, together with the distribution of rest frame equivalent widths of the emission lines, allow derivation of the area of sky covered as a function of the continuum limiting magnitude. The observed number of quasars in the redshift range 0.7-2.7 agrees well with that predicted by the luminosity function models published by Schmidt and Green in 1983. It is concluded that quasars with an absolute magnitude of M(B) = -25 suffer a redshift cutoff near or below a redshift of 3.

  17. Deep brain stimulation and ablation for obsessive compulsive disorder: evolution of contemporary indications, targets and techniques.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Travis S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Stanford, Arielle D; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Surgical therapy for treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) remains an effective option for well-selected patients managed within a multidisciplinary setting. Historically, lesions within the limbic system have been used to control both obsessive thoughts and repetitive compulsions associated with this disease. We discuss classical targets as well as contemporary neuromodulatory approaches that have been shown to provide symptomatic relief. Recently, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior limb of the internal capsule/ventral striatum received Conformité Européene (CE) mark and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals for treatment of intractable OCD. Remarkably, this is the first such approval for neurosurgical intervention in a strictly psychiatric indication in modern times. This target is discussed in detail along with alternative targets currently being proposed. We close with a discussion of gamma knife capsulotomy, a modality with deep historical roots. Further directions in the surgical treatment of OCD will require better preoperative predictors of postoperative responses, optimal selection of individualized targets, and rigorous reporting of adverse events and standardized outcomes. To meet these challenges, centers must be equipped with a multidisciplinary team and patient-centered approach to ensure adequate screening and follow up of patients with this difficult-to-treat condition. PMID:24099662

  18. Reverse transcriptase directs viral evolution in a deep ocean methane seep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B. G.; Bagby, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Deep ocean methane seeps are sites of intense microbial activity, with complex communities fueled by aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophy. Methane consumption in these communities has a substantial impact on the global carbon cycle, yet little is known about their evolutionary history or their likely evolutionary trajectories in a warming ocean. As in other marine systems, viral predation and virally mediated horizontal gene transfer are expected to be major drivers of evolutionary change in these communities; however, the host cells' resistance to cultivation has impeded direct study of the viral population. We conducted a metagenomic study of viruses in the anoxic sediments of a deep methane seep in the Santa Monica Basin in the Southern California Bight. We retrieved 1660 partial viral genomes, tentatively assigning 1232 to bacterial hosts and 428 to archaea. One abundant viral genome, likely hosted by Clostridia species present in the sediment, was found to encode a diversity-generating retroelement (DGR), a module for reverse transcriptase-mediated directed mutagenesis of a distal tail fiber protein. While DGRs have previously been described in the viruses of human pathogens, where diversification of viral tail fibers permits infection of a range of host cell types, to our knowledge this is the first description of such an element in a marine virus. By providing a mechanism for massively broadening potential host range, the presence of DGRs in these systems may have a major impact on the prevalence of virally mediated horizontal gene transfer, and even on the phylogenetic distances across which genes are moved.

  19. Ectoparasitism on deep-sea fishes in the western North Atlantic: In situ observations from ROV surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quattrini, Andrea; Demopoulos, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    A complete understanding of how parasites influence marine ecosystem functioning requires characterizing a broad range of parasite-host interactions while determining the effects of parasitism in a variety of habitats. In deep-sea fishes, the prevalence of parasitism remains poorly understood. Knowledge of ectoparasitism, in particular, is limited because collection methods often cause dislodgment of ectoparasites from their hosts. High-definition video collected during 43 remotely operated vehicle surveys (2013–2014) provided the opportunity to examine ectoparasitism on fishes across habitats (open slope, canyon, seamount, cold seep) and depths (494–4689 m) off the northeastern U.S., while providing high-resolution images and valuable observations of fish behavior. Only 9% (n = 125 individuals) of all observed fishes (25 species) were confirmed with ectoparasites, but higher percentages (∼33%) were observed for some of the most abundant fish species (e.g., Antimora rostrata). Ectoparasites included two copepod families (Lernaeopodidae, Sphyriidae) that infected four host species, two isopod families (Cymothoidae, Aegidae) that infected three host species, and one isopod family (Gnathiidae) that infected 19 host species. Hyperparasitism was also observed. As host diversity declined with depth, ectoparasite diversity declined; only gnathiids were observed at depths down to 3260 m. Thus, gnathiids appear to be the most successful group to infect a diversity of fishes across a broad depth range in the deep sea. For three dominant fishes (A. rostrata, Nezumia bairdii, Synaphobranchus spp.), the abundance and intensity of ectoparasitism peaked in different depths and habitats depending on the host species examined. Notably, gnathiid infections were most intense on A. rostrata, particularly in submarine canyons, suggesting that these habitats may increase ectoparasite infections. Although ectoparasitism is often overlooked in deep-sea benthic communities

  20. Ectoparasitism on deep-sea fishes in the western North Atlantic: In situ observations from ROV surveys.

    PubMed

    Quattrini, Andrea M; Demopoulos, Amanda W J

    2016-12-01

    A complete understanding of how parasites influence marine ecosystem functioning requires characterizing a broad range of parasite-host interactions while determining the effects of parasitism in a variety of habitats. In deep-sea fishes, the prevalence of parasitism remains poorly understood. Knowledge of ectoparasitism, in particular, is limited because collection methods often cause dislodgment of ectoparasites from their hosts. High-definition video collected during 43 remotely operated vehicle surveys (2013-2014) provided the opportunity to examine ectoparasitism on fishes across habitats (open slope, canyon, seamount, cold seep) and depths (494-4689 m) off the northeastern U.S., while providing high-resolution images and valuable observations of fish behavior. Only 9% (n = 125 individuals) of all observed fishes (25 species) were confirmed with ectoparasites, but higher percentages (∼33%) were observed for some of the most abundant fish species (e.g., Antimora rostrata). Ectoparasites included two copepod families (Lernaeopodidae, Sphyriidae) that infected four host species, two isopod families (Cymothoidae, Aegidae) that infected three host species, and one isopod family (Gnathiidae) that infected 19 host species. Hyperparasitism was also observed. As host diversity declined with depth, ectoparasite diversity declined; only gnathiids were observed at depths down to 3260 m. Thus, gnathiids appear to be the most successful group to infect a diversity of fishes across a broad depth range in the deep sea. For three dominant fishes (A. rostrata, Nezumia bairdii, Synaphobranchus spp.), the abundance and intensity of ectoparasitism peaked in different depths and habitats depending on the host species examined. Notably, gnathiid infections were most intense on A. rostrata, particularly in submarine canyons, suggesting that these habitats may increase ectoparasite infections. Although ectoparasitism is often overlooked in deep-sea benthic communities, our

  1. Ectoparasitism on deep-sea fishes in the western North Atlantic: In situ observations from ROV surveys.

    PubMed

    Quattrini, Andrea M; Demopoulos, Amanda W J

    2016-12-01

    A complete understanding of how parasites influence marine ecosystem functioning requires characterizing a broad range of parasite-host interactions while determining the effects of parasitism in a variety of habitats. In deep-sea fishes, the prevalence of parasitism remains poorly understood. Knowledge of ectoparasitism, in particular, is limited because collection methods often cause dislodgment of ectoparasites from their hosts. High-definition video collected during 43 remotely operated vehicle surveys (2013-2014) provided the opportunity to examine ectoparasitism on fishes across habitats (open slope, canyon, seamount, cold seep) and depths (494-4689 m) off the northeastern U.S., while providing high-resolution images and valuable observations of fish behavior. Only 9% (n = 125 individuals) of all observed fishes (25 species) were confirmed with ectoparasites, but higher percentages (∼33%) were observed for some of the most abundant fish species (e.g., Antimora rostrata). Ectoparasites included two copepod families (Lernaeopodidae, Sphyriidae) that infected four host species, two isopod families (Cymothoidae, Aegidae) that infected three host species, and one isopod family (Gnathiidae) that infected 19 host species. Hyperparasitism was also observed. As host diversity declined with depth, ectoparasite diversity declined; only gnathiids were observed at depths down to 3260 m. Thus, gnathiids appear to be the most successful group to infect a diversity of fishes across a broad depth range in the deep sea. For three dominant fishes (A. rostrata, Nezumia bairdii, Synaphobranchus spp.), the abundance and intensity of ectoparasitism peaked in different depths and habitats depending on the host species examined. Notably, gnathiid infections were most intense on A. rostrata, particularly in submarine canyons, suggesting that these habitats may increase ectoparasite infections. Although ectoparasitism is often overlooked in deep-sea benthic communities, our

  2. THE VLA-COSMOS SURVEY. IV. DEEP DATA AND JOINT CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Schinnerer, E.; Sargent, M. T.; Bondi, M.; Smolcic, V.; Bertoldi, F.; Datta, A.; Carilli, C. L.; Blain, A.; Scoville, N. Z.; Ciliegi, P.; Koekemoer, A.

    2010-06-15

    In the context of the VLA-COSMOS Deep project, additional VLA A array observations at 1.4 GHz were obtained for the central degree of the COSMOS field and combined with the existing data from the VLA-COSMOS Large project. A newly constructed Deep mosaic with a resolution of 2.''5 was used to search for sources down to 4{sigma} with 1{sigma} {approx} 12 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} in the central 50' x 50'. This new catalog is combined with the catalog from the Large project (obtained at 1.''5 x 1.''4 resolution) to construct a new Joint catalog. All sources listed in the new Joint catalog have peak flux densities of {>=}5{sigma} at 1.''5 and/or 2.''5 resolution to account for the fact that a significant fraction of sources at these low flux levels are expected to be slightly resolved at 1.''5 resolution. All properties listed in the Joint catalog, such as peak flux density, integrated flux density, and source size, are determined in the 2.''5 resolution Deep image. In addition, the Joint catalog contains 43 newly identified multi-component sources.

  3. The VIMOS VLT deep survey. The K-band follow-up in the 0226-04 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporin, S.; Iovino, A.; Bolzonella, M.; McCracken, H. J.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scaramella, R.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; de la Torre, S.; Lamareille, F.; Mellier, Y.; Walcher, C. J.

    2008-04-01

    We present a new K_s-band survey that represents a significant extension to the previous wide-field K_s-band imaging survey within the 0226-04 field of the VIMOS-VLT deep survey (VVDS). The new data add ~458 arcmin2 to the previous imaging program, thus allowing us to cover a total contiguous area of ~600 arcmin2 within this field. Sources were identified both directly on the final K-band mosaic image and on the corresponding, deep χ^2-g'r'i' image from the CFHT Legacy Survey in order to reduce contamination, while ensuring compilation of a truly K-selected catalogue down to the completeness limit of the K_s-band. The newly determined K_s-band magnitudes are used in combination with the ancillary multiwavelength data for determining accurate photometric redshifts. The final catalogue totals ~52 000 sources, out of which ~4400 have a spectroscopic redshift from the VVDS first epoch survey. The catalogue is 90% complete down to KVega = 20.5 mag. We present K_s-band galaxy counts and angular correlation function measurements down to this magnitude limit. Our results are in good agreement with previously published work. We show that using K magnitudes to determine photometric redshifts significantly lowers the incidence of catastrophic errors. The data presented in this paper are publicly available through the CENCOS database. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, La Silla, Chile, programme 075.A-0752(A), on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, programme 070.A-9007(A), and on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products

  4. Depth as a driver of evolution in the deep sea: Insights from grenadiers (Gadiformes: Macrouridae) of the genus Coryphaenoides.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Michelle R; Violi, Biagio; Gray, Howard W I; Neat, Francis; Drazen, Jeffrey C; Grubbs, R Dean; Roa-Varón, Adela; Sutton, Tracey; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2016-11-01

    Here we consider the role of depth as a driver of evolution in a genus of deep-sea fishes. We provide a phylogeny for the genus Coryphaenoides (Gadiformes: Macrouridae) that represents the breadth of habitat use and distributions for these species. In our consensus phylogeny species found at abyssal depths (>4000m) form a well-supported lineage, which interestingly also includes two non-abyssal species, C. striaturus and C. murrayi, diverging from the basal node of that lineage. Biogeographic analyses suggest the genus may have originated in the Southern and Pacific Oceans where contemporary species diversity is highest. The abyssal lineage seems to have arisen secondarily and likely originated in the Southern/Pacific Oceans but diversification of this lineage occurred in the Northern Atlantic Ocean. All abyssal species are found in the North Atlantic with the exception of C. yaquinae in the North Pacific and C. filicauda in the Southern Ocean. Abyssal species tend to have broad depth ranges and wide distributions, indicating that the stability of the deep oceans and the ability to live across wide depths may promote population connectivity and facilitate large ranges. We also confirm that morphologically defined subgenera do not agree with our phylogeny and that the Giant grenadier (formerly Albatrossia pectoralis) belongs to Coryphaenoides, indicating that a taxonomic revision of the genus is needed. We discuss the implications of our findings for understanding the radiation and diversification of this genus, and the likely role of adaptation to the abyss. PMID:27475496

  5. The Evolution of Normal Galaxy X-Ray Emission through Cosmic History: Constraints from the 6 MS Chandra Deep Field-South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Mineo, S.; Brandt, W. N.; Eufrasio, R. T.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Luo, B.; Xue, Y. Q.; Bauer, F. E.; Gilfanov, M.; Ranalli, P.; Schneider, D. P.; Shemmer, O.; Tozzi, P.; Trump, J. R.; Vignali, C.; Wang, J.-X.; Yukita, M.; Zezas, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present measurements of the evolution of normal-galaxy X-ray emission from z\\quad ≈ 0-7 using local galaxies and galaxy samples in the ≈6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. The majority of the CDF-S galaxies are observed at rest-frame energies above 2 keV, where the emission is expected to be dominated by X-ray binary (XRB) populations; however, hot gas is expected to provide small contributions to the observed-frame ≲1 keV emission at z ≲ 1. We show that a single scaling relation between X-ray luminosity ({L}{{X}}) and star-formation rate (SFR) literature, is insufficient for characterizing the average X-ray emission at all redshifts. We establish that scaling relations involving not only SFR, but also stellar mass ({M}\\star ) and redshift, provide significantly improved characterizations of the average X-ray emission from normal galaxy populations at z\\quad ≈ 0-7. We further provide the first empirical constraints on the redshift evolution of X-ray emission from both low-mass XRB (LMXB) and high-mass XRB (HMXB) populations and their scalings with {M}\\star and SFR, respectively. We find {L}2-10{keV}(LMXB)/{M}\\star \\propto {(1+z)}2-3 and {L}2-10{keV}(HMXB)/SFR \\propto \\quad (1+z), and show that these relations are consistent with XRB population-synthesis model predictions, which attribute the increase in LMXB and HMXB scaling relations with redshift as being due to declining host galaxy stellar ages and metallicities, respectively. We discuss how emission from XRBs could provide an important source of heating to the intergalactic medium in the early universe, exceeding that of active galactic nuclei.

  6. Cenozoic geomorphological and paleo-environmental evolution survey using multi-source data conformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunhai; Sun, Ze; Li, Chaoling; Yu, Qingwen; Zhang, Kexin; Kou, Xiaohu; Wang, Wanguo

    2007-06-01

    The earth surface information is very important in study of Cenozoic geomorphological evolution and paleo-environment evolution. In this essay, we adopt remote sensing data, DEM data and finity geological survey data to study the valley geomorphology. It indicates there are seven river terrace developed in Huangshui river area and saved integrity. we can recognize high flood plain, T1 terrace, T2 terrace and T3 terrace in remote sensing image. From the study on geomorphology using Digital elevation model(DEM), We made the diagram of geomophological geological map based on three-dimension DEM data in Minhe area, identify three planation surfaces and 11 Denudation surfaces and discuss the distribution, altitude, uplift speed of different planation surface. We also discuss the method in distinguish Cenozoic strata with other geological body.

  7. Evolution of fusion hindrance for asymmetric systems at deep sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, A.; Mahata, K.; Pandit, S. K.; Nanal, V.; Ichikawa, T.; Hagino, K.; Navin, A.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Parkar, V. V.; Ramachandran, K.; Rout, P. C.; Kumar, Abhinav; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of fusion cross-sections of 7Li and 12C with 198Pt at deep sub-barrier energies are reported to unravel the role of the entrance channel in the occurrence of fusion hindrance. The onset of fusion hindrance has been clearly observed in 12C +198Pt system but not in 7Li +198Pt system, within the measured energy range. Emergence of the hindrance, moving from lighter (6,7Li) to heavier (12C, 16O) projectiles is explained employing a model that considers a gradual transition from a sudden to adiabatic regime at low energies. The model calculation reveals a weak effect of the damping of coupling to collective motion for the present systems as compared to that obtained for systems with heavier projectiles.

  8. Deep seismic refraction experiment in northeast Brazil: New constraints for Borborema province evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Marcus Vinicius A. G. de; Berrocal, Jesus; Soares, José E. P.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.

    2015-03-01

    The Borborema Province of northeastern Brazil is a major Proterozoic crustal province that, until now, has never been explored using deep crustal seismic methods. Here are reported the first results obtained from a high-quality seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile that has defined the internal seismic velocity structure and thickness of the crust in this region. Almost 400 recording stations were deployed in the Deep Seismic Refraction (DSR) experiment through an NW-SE ca. 900 km linear array and 19 shots were exploded at every 50 km along the line. Data from the 10 southeastern most shots of the seismic profile were processed in this work. The main features and geological structures crossed by the studied portion of the profile belong to the so-called Central Sub-province of the Borborema tectonic province. The crustal model obtained is compatible with a typical structure of extended crust. The model was essentially divided into three layers: upper crust, lower crust, and a half-space represented by the shallower portion of the mantle. The Moho is an irregular interface with depth ranging between 31.7 and 34.5 km, and beneath the Central Sub-province it varies from 31.5 to 33 km depth, where its limits are related to major crustal discontinuities. The distribution of velocities within the crust is heterogeneous, varying vertically from 5.7 to 6.3 km/s in the upper crust and from 6.45 to 6.9 km/s in the lower crust. From the average crustal velocity distribution it is evident that the Central Sub-province has seismic characteristics different from neighboring domains. The crust is relatively thin and crustal thickness variations in the profile are subtle due to stretching that occurred in the Cretaceous, during the fragmentation of Pangaea, opening of the South Atlantic Ocean and separation of South America from Africa.

  9. Microstructural and geochemical constraints on the evolution of deep arc lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Emily J.; Soustelle, Vincent; Hirth, Greg; Saal, Alberto E.; Kruckenberg, Seth C.; Eiler, John M.

    2016-07-01

    Mantle xenoliths from the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, sampled a vertical column (60-120 km) of lithosphere that formed during Mesozoic continental arc magmatism. This lithosphere experienced an anticlockwise P-T-t path resulting in rapid cooling that effectively "quenched in" features inherited from earlier high-temperature conditions. Here we combine new mineral chemistry data (water, trace element, and major element concentrations) with mineral crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) to investigate the relationship between melt infiltration and deformation. The peridotites record a refertilization trend with increasing depth, starting from shallow, coarse-protogranular, less-melt-infiltrated spinel peridotite with strong, orthorhombic olivine CPO to deep, fine-porphyroclastic, highly melt-infiltrated garnet peridotite with weak, axial-[010] olivine CPO. In contrast to the observed axial-[010] CPOs, subgrain boundary orientations and misorientation axes suggest the dominant activation of the (001)[100] slip system, suggesting deformation under moderately hydrous conditions. After accounting for effects of subsolidus cooling, we see coherent trends between mineral trace element abundance and water content, indicating that melt infiltration led to an increase in water content of the peridotites. However, measured olivine and pyroxene water contents in all peridotites (5-10 and 30-500 wt ppm, respectively) are lower than that required to promote dominant (001)[100] slip system observed in both natural and experimental samples. These results suggest that deformation occurred earlier along the P-T path, probably during or shortly after hydrous melt infiltration. Subsequent rapid cooling at 90 Ma led to water loss from olivine (owing to decreased solubility at low temperature), leaving behind a deep arc lithosphere that remained viscously coupled to the Farallon slab until the opening of the slab window in the late Cenozoic.

  10. Evo-devo, deep homology and FoxP2: implications for the evolution of speech and language

    PubMed Central

    Scharff, Constance; Petri, Jana

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of novel morphological features, such as feathers, involves the modification of developmental processes regulated by gene networks. The fact that genetic novelty operates within developmental constraints is the central tenet of the ‘evo-devo’ conceptual framework. It is supported by findings that certain molecular regulatory pathways act in a similar manner in the development of morphological adaptations, which are not directly related by common ancestry but evolved convergently. The Pax6 gene, important for vision in molluscs, insects and vertebrates, and Hox genes, important for tetrapod limbs and fish fins, exemplify this ‘deep homology’. Recently, ‘evo-devo’ has expanded to the molecular analysis of behavioural traits, including social behaviour, learning and memory. Here, we apply this approach to the evolution of human language. Human speech is a form of auditory-guided, learned vocal motor behaviour that also evolved in certain species of birds, bats and ocean mammals. Genes relevant for language, including the transcription factor FOXP2, have been identified. We review evidence that FoxP2 and its regulatory gene network shapes neural plasticity in cortico-basal ganglia circuits underlying the sensory-guided motor learning in animal models. The emerging picture can help us understand how complex cognitive traits can ‘descend with modification’. PMID:21690130

  11. Completeness - III. Identifying characteristic systematics and evolution in galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Russell; Teodoro, Luís.; Hendry, Martin

    2012-03-01

    This paper continues our development of non-parametric tests for analysing the completeness in apparent magnitude of magnitude-redshift surveys. The purpose of this third and final paper in our completeness series is twofold: first, we explore how certain forms of incompleteness for a given flux-limited galaxy redshift survey would manifest themselves in the 'robust'Tc and Tv completeness estimators introduced in our earlier papers; secondly, we provide a comprehensive error propagation for these estimators. This work was initiated by Rauzy and then extended and developed by Johnston, Teodoro & Hendry (Completeness I) and Teodoro, Johnston & Hendry (Completeness II). Here, we seek to consolidate the ideas laid out in these previous papers. In particular, our goal is to provide for the observational community statistical tools that will be more easily applicable to real survey data. By using both real surveys and Monte Carlo mock survey data, we have found distinct, characteristic behaviour of the Tc and Tv estimators which identify incompleteness in the form of e.g. missing objects within a particular magnitude range. Conversely, we have identified signatures of 'over' completeness, in cases where a survey contains a small region in apparent magnitude that may have too many objects relative to the rest of the data set. Identifying regions of incompleteness (in apparent magnitude) in this way provides a powerful means to e.g. improve weighting schemes for estimating luminosity functions, or for more accurately determining the selection function required to employ measures of galaxy clustering as a cosmological probe. We also demonstrate how incompleteness resulting from luminosity evolution can be identified and provide a framework for using our estimators as a robust tool for constraining models of luminosity evolution. Finally, we explore the error propagation for Tc and Tv. This builds on Completeness II by allowing the definition of these estimators, and their

  12. Reservoir Space Evolution of Volcanic Rocks in Deep Songliao Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, M.; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; HU, J.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Recent years, large amount of natural gas has been discovered in volcanic rock of Lower Crataceous of Songliao basin. Volcanic reservoirs have become one of the important target reservoir types of eastern basin of China. In order to study the volcanic reservoirs, we need to know the main factors controlling the reservoir space. By careful obsercation on volcanic drilling core, casting thin sections and statistical analysis of petrophysical properties of volcanic reservoir in Songliao basin, it can be suggested that the igneous rock reservoir in Yingcheng formation of Lower Crataceous is composed of different rock types, such ad rohylite, rohylitic crystal tuff, autoclastic brecciation lava and so on. There are different reservoirs storage space in in various lithological igneous rocks, but they are mainly composed of primary stoma, secondary solution pores and fractures.The evolution of storage space can be divided into 3 stage: the pramary reservoir space,exogenic leaching process and burial diagenesis.During the evolution process, the reservoir space is effected by secondary minerals, tectonic movement and volcanic hydrothermal solution. The pore of volcanic reservoirs can be partially filled by secondary minerals, but also may be dissoluted by other chemical volcanic hydrothermal solution. Therefore, the favorable places for better-quality volcanic reservoirs are the near-crater facies of vocanic apparatus and dissolution zones on the high position of paleo-structures.

  13. CANDIDATE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AT z > 1.3 IDENTIFIED IN THE SPITZER SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE DEEP FIELD SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rettura, A.; Stern, D.; Martinez-Manso, J.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Mei, S.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Bartlett, J. G.

    2014-12-20

    We present 279 galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.3 selected from the 94 deg{sup 2} Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) survey. We use a simple algorithm to select candidate high-redshift clusters of galaxies based on Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data combined with shallow all-sky optical data. We identify distant cluster candidates adopting an overdensity threshold that results in a high purity (80%) cluster sample based on tests in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the Boötes field. Our simple algorithm detects all three 1.4 < z ≤ 1.75 X-ray detected clusters in the Boötes field. The uniqueness of the SSDF survey resides not just in its area, one of the largest contiguous extragalactic fields observed with Spitzer, but also in its deep, multi-wavelength coverage by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Herschel/SPIRE, and XMM-Newton. This rich data set will allow direct or stacked measurements of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect decrements or X-ray masses for many of the SSDF clusters presented here, and enable a systematic study of the most distant clusters on an unprecedented scale. We measure the angular correlation function of our sample and find that these candidates show strong clustering. Employing the COSMOS/UltraVista photometric catalog in order to infer the redshift distribution of our cluster selection, we find that these clusters have a comoving number density n{sub c}=(0.7{sub −0.6}{sup +6.3})×10{sup −7} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup −3} and a spatial clustering correlation scale length r {sub 0} = (32 ± 7) h {sup –1} Mpc. Assuming our sample is comprised of dark matter halos above a characteristic minimum mass, M {sub min}, we derive that at z = 1.5 these clusters reside in halos larger than M{sub min}=1.5{sub −0.7}{sup +0.9}×10{sup 14} h{sup −1} M{sub ⊙}. We find that the mean mass of our cluster sample is equal to M{sub mean}=1.9{sub −0.8}{sup +1.0}×10{sup 14} h{sup −1} M{sub ⊙}; thus, our sample contains the progenitors of

  14. Feasibility of a time-domain electromagnetic survey for mapping deep-sea hydrothermal deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, H.; KIM, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) surveying has already become a popular tool for hydrocarbon exploration. Possible targets of the marine CSEM survey, other than hydrocarbon, may be marine hydrothermal mineral deposits. In transient EM (TEM) measurements, secondary fields which contain information on hydrothermal deposits in the seafloor can be measured in the absence of strong primary fields. The TEM system is useful to the development of compact, autonomous instruments which are well suited to submersible-based surveys. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of applying an in-loop TEM system to the detection of marine hydrothermal deposits through a one-dimensional modeling and inversion study. The feasibility study showed that TEM responses are very sensitive to a highly conductive layer. Time-domain target responses are larger and appear earlier in horizontal magnetic fields than in vertical ones. An inverse problem is formulated with the Gauss-Newton method and solved with the damped and smoothness-constrained least-squares approach. The test example for a marine hydrothermal TEM survey demonstrated that the depth extent, conductivity and thickness of the highly conductive layer are well resolved.

  15. A Survey Analysis of Alcohol Use at a Black University in the Deep South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenier, Charles E.; Borskey, Erma J.; Folse, Debbie W.

    1998-01-01

    Presents findings from a scientific survey of student drug and alcohol behavior at Southern University, an all-black university. Results indicate that alcohol and wine coolers are the drinks of choice. Most of the students are moderate drinkers; however, 13% can be classified as relatively high risk. (MKA)

  16. Growth response of a deep-water ferromanganese crust to evolution of the Neogene Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banakar, V.K.; Hein, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    A deep-water ferromanganese crust from a Central Indian Ocean seamount dated previously by 10Be and 230Th(excess) was studied for compositional and textural variations that occurred throughout its growth history. The 10Be/9Be dated interval (upper 32 mm) yields an uniform growth rate of 2.8 ?? 0.1 mm/Ma [Frank, M., O'Nions, R.K., 1998. Sources of Pb for Indian Ocean ferromanganese crusts: a record of Himalayan erosion. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 158, pp. 121-130.] which gives an extrapolated age of ~ 26 Ma for the base of the crust at 72 mm and is comparable to the maximum age derived from the Co-model based growth rate estimates. This study shows that Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide precipitation did not occur from the time of emplacement of the seamount during the Eocene (~ 53 Ma) until the late Oligocene (~ 26 Ma). This paucity probably was the result of a nearly overlapping palaeo-CCD and palaeo-depth of crust formation, increased early Eocene productivity, instability and reworking of the surface rocks on the flanks of the seamount, and lack of oxic deep-water in the nascent Indian Ocean. Crust accretion began (older zone) with the formation of isolated cusps of Fe-Mn oxide during a time of high detritus influx, probably due to the early-Miocene intense erosion associated with maximum exhumation of the Himalayas (op. cit.). This cuspate textured zone extends from 72 mm to 42 mm representing the early-Miocene period. Intense polar cooling and increased mixing of deep and intermediate waters at the close of the Oligocene might have led to the increased oxygenation of the bottom-water in the basin. A considerable expansion in the vertical distance between the seafloor depth and the CCD during the early Miocene in addition to the influx of oxygenated bottom-water likely initiated Fe-Mn crust formation. Pillar structure characterises the younger zone, which extends from 40 mm to the surface of the crust, i.e., ~ 15 Ma to Present. This zone is characterised by > 25% higher

  17. Regional Comparisons from a Global Survey of Deep-Ocean Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.; Matsumoto, H.; Lau, T. K.; Mellinger, D. K.; Fowler, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    A NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab archive of continuous deep-ocean sound recordings from hydrophones deployed in the equatorial East Pacific (EEP), central Mid-Atlantic (CMA), northern Mid-Atlantic (NMA), Bering Sea (BS), Antarctic Peninsula (ANP), and Indian Ocean (IO) provides insight into the overall structure for the deep-water global sound field. The hydrophones are moored in the SOFAR channel, taking advantage of the efficient propagation characteristics that enable the instruments to effectively monitor large sections of the global oceans. Although not always concurrent, the deployment of the hydrophone arrays from 1996 to present allows for an up-to-date assessment of the global-scale distribution of ocean sound levels in discrete frequency bands. Comparisons of intra- and inter-annual time-averaged ambient-sound levels reveal strong latitudinal variations, where higher latitudes correspond with higher noise levels. Seismic and volcanic activity dominate the lower frequency bands (0-10 Hz) within all of the hydrophone arrays. Of interest is the periodic nature of broad-band ice noise observed in the ANP acoustic data, suggesting a climate link for these signals related to ice breakup during seasonal warming events (Matsumoto et al., 2008). In addition, the multi-species marine-mammal vocalizations observed in all of our hydrophone datasets dominate sound-energy levels at specific frequencies.

  18. Focused Evolution of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Revealed by Structures and Deep Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Baoshan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wang, Charlene; Chen, Xuejun; Longo, Nancy S.; Louder, Mark; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Perfetto, Stephen; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Shi, Wei; Wu, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Simek, Melissa; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Connors, Mark; Mullikin, James C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.

    2013-03-04

    Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.

  19. A Deep Percolation Model for Estimating Ground-Water Recharge: Documentation of Modules for the Modular Modeling System of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaccaro, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    A daily water-budget model for estimating ground-water recharge, the Deep Percolation Model, was modularized for inclusion into the U.S. Geological Survey's Modular Modeling System. The model was modularized in order to facilitate estimation of ground-water recharge under a large range in climatic, landscape, and land-use and land-cover conditions. The model can be applied to areas as large as regions or as small as a field plot. An overview of the Modular Modeling System and the Deep Percolation Model is presented. Data requirements, parameters, and variables for the model are described. The modules that compose the Deep Percolation Model are documented.

  20. Deep drilling; Probing beneath the earth's surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.250

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on boreholes from 4.5 to greater than 10 kilometers deep that are pushing back the boundaries of earth science as they yield information that is used to refine seismic surveys, chart the evolution of sedimentary basins and shield volcanos, and uncover important clues on the origin and migration of mantle-derived water and gas.

  1. Mapping the deep: The past and future promise of transneptunian surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, M.

    2014-07-01

    Exploring the populations and structure of the outer Solar System requires us to examine the sky. The improving sophistication of astronomical techniques have brought us in the last century from painstaking naked-eye examination of photographic plates to identify moving sources, to supercomputer-powered image subtraction that can pull moving sources from the depths of the Galactic plane. Such advances in our ability to discover new objects have allowed us to build an understanding of the Solar System's distant populations. The continued effort to survey the sky for new discoveries has explored the phase space of much of the transneptunian (TNO) size distribution. At the largest end, from wide-field surveys with small-to-medium optical telescopes in both North and Southern Hemispheres, the dwarf planets are now complete to m˜19.5 (Schwamb et al. 2014) and nearing completion to m˜21.5. Infrared surveys such as WISE have constrained the absence of a brown dwarf or large gas giant planet such that there can be no Saturn out to 28,000 au and no Jupiter out to 82,000 au (Luhman 2014). Similarly, pulsar timing measurements exclude line-of-sight shifts of the Solar System's barycentre due to any lurking giant planet (Verbiest et al. 2008); such timing measurements will only be improved by the Square Kilometre Array's all-sky decadal measurements of pulsars (Seto & Cooray 2007). The smaller, more abundant TNOs have been slowly constrained by surveys on larger facilities (as listed in Kavelaars et al and Petit et al. 2008): their part of the size distribution has a clear change in slope near H of 7 (Fraser et al. 2014). Characterisation of objects for their size, albedo, thermal properties and density has followed more slowly: Spitzer and Herschel have given us thermal properties; broad-band photometric surveys have shown that the colours of TNOs present distinct surface classes, ranging from the reddest in the Solar System to fully neutral reflectors; while large

  2. Documentation for the machine-readable version of a deep objective-prism survey for large Magellanic cloud members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This catalog contains 1273 proven or probable Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) members, as found on deep objective-prism plates taken with the Curtis Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The stars are generally brighter than about photographic magnitude 14. Approximate spectral types were determined by examination of the 580 A/mm objective-prism spectra; approximate 1975 positions were obtained by measuring relative to the 1975 coordinate grids on the Uppsala-Mount Stromlo Atlas of the LMC (Gascoigne and Westerlund 1961), and approximate photographic magnitudes were determined by averaging image density measures from the plates and image-diameter measures on the 'B' charts. The machine-readable version of the LMC survey catalog is described to enable users to read and process the tape file without problems or guesswork.

  3. The optical identification content of the Einstein Observatory deep X-ray survey of a region in Pavo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Murray, S. S.; Giacconi, R.; Bechtold, J.; Murdin, P.; Smith, M.; Macgillivray, H. T.; Ward, M.; Danziger, J.; Lub, J.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented from the Einstein deep X-ray survey in Pavo, with correlated optical and radio observations of a complete sample of candidate identifications. There are 16 X-ray sources detected with positional accuracy better than 10 arcsec, of which five are identified, with a further seven (and a maximum nine) probable identifications. Of the identified sources, four are QSOs with J-magnitude about 20 (one is an inverted spectrum radio source) and one is associated with extended emission from a pair or cluster of galaxies. Of the probable identifications, one is a galaxy and the rest are a subset of a yellow stellar object population which may also be QSOs. Identifications with QSOs and QSO candidates with J less than 24 account for 60-80 percent of the detected sources.

  4. THE VERY LARGE ARRAY 1.4 GHz SURVEY OF THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: SECOND DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Neal A.; Bonzini, Margherita; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Padovani, Paolo; Rosati, Piero; Fomalont, Edward B.; Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Tozzi, Paolo; Vattakunnel, Shaji

    2013-04-01

    Deep radio observations at 1.4 GHz for the Extended Chandra Deep Field South were performed in 2007 June through September and presented in a first data release. The survey was made using six separate pointings of the Very Large Array with over 40 hr of observation per pointing. In the current paper, we improve on the data reduction to produce a second data release (DR2) mosaic image. This DR2 image covers an area of about a third of a square degree, reaches a best rms sensitivity of 6 {mu}Jy, and has a typical sensitivity of 7.4 {mu}Jy per 2.''8 by 1.''6 beam. We also present a more comprehensive catalog, including sources down to peak flux densities of five or more times the local rms noise along with information on source sizes and relevant pointing data. We discuss in some detail the consideration of whether sources are resolved under the complication of a radio image created as a mosaic of separate pointings each suffering some degree of bandwidth smearing, and the accurate evaluation of the flux densities of such sources. Finally, the radio morphologies and optical/near-IR counterpart identifications are used to identify 17 likely multiple-component sources and arrive at a catalog of 883 radio sources, which is roughly double the number of sources contained in the first data release.

  5. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey COADD: 275 deg{sup 2} of deep Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging on stripe 82

    SciTech Connect

    Annis, James; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Dodelson, Scott; Hao, Jiangang; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E.; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Lampeitl, Hubert; Lin, Huan; Miknaitis, Gajus; Yanny, Brian; Strauss, Michael A.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Becker, Andrew C.; Ivezić, Željko; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie

    2014-10-20

    We present details of the construction and characterization of the coaddition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 ugriz imaging data. This survey consists of 275 deg{sup 2} of repeated scanning by the SDSS camera over –50° ≤ α ≤ 60° and –1.°25 ≤ δ ≤ +1.°25 centered on the Celestial Equator. Each piece of sky has ∼20 runs contributing and thus reaches ∼2 mag fainter than the SDSS single pass data, i.e., to r ∼ 23.5 for galaxies. We discuss the image processing of the coaddition, the modeling of the point-spread function (PSF), the calibration, and the production of standard SDSS catalogs. The data have an r-band median seeing of 1.''1 and are calibrated to ≤1%. Star color-color, number counts, and PSF size versus modeled size plots show that the modeling of the PSF is good enough for precision five-band photometry. Structure in the PSF model versus magnitude plot indicates minor PSF modeling errors, leading to misclassification of stars as galaxies, as verified using VVDS spectroscopy. There are a variety of uses for this wide-angle deep imaging data, including galactic structure, photometric redshift computation, cluster finding and cross wavelength measurements, weak lensing cluster mass calibrations, and cosmic shear measurements.

  6. The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion - temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Susan; Hilton, Matt; Rooney, Philip J.; Caldwell, Caroline; Kay, Scott T.; Collins, Chris A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Romer, A. Kathy; Bermeo, Alberto; Bernstein, Rebecca; da Costa, Luiz; Gifford, Daniel; Hollowood, Devon; Hoyle, Ben; Jeltema, Tesla; Liddle, Andrew R.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Mann, Robert G.; Mayers, Julian A.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Ogando, Ricardo; Sahlén, Martin; Stahl, Benjamin; Stott, John P.; Thomas, Peter A.; Viana, Pedro T. P.; Wilcox, Harry

    2016-08-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature (σv-TX) relation up to z = 1 using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 z > 0.5 clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero (σv∝T0.86 ± 0.14E(z)-0.37 ± 0.33). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.

  7. Deep crustal structure of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico: Implications for rift evolution and seafloor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, Drew R.; Van Avendonk, Harm J. A.; Christeson, Gail L.; Norton, Ian O.; Karner, Garry D.; Johnson, Christopher A.; Snedden, John W.

    2014-09-01

    We image deep crustal structure using marine seismic refraction data recorded by a linear array of ocean-bottom seismometers in the Gulf of Mexico Basin Opening project (GUMBO Line 3) in order to provide new constraints on the nature of continental and oceanic crust in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. GUMBO Line 3 extends ~524 km from the continental shelf offshore Pensacola, Florida, across the De Soto Canyon and into the central Gulf basin. Travel times from long offset, wide angle reflections and refractions resolve compressional seismic velocities and layer boundaries for sediment, crystalline crust, and upper mantle. We compare our results with coincident multichannel seismic reflection data. Our velocity model recovers shallow seismic velocities (~2.0-4.5 km/s) that we interpret as evaporites and clastic sediments. A Cretaceous carbonate platform is interpreted beneath the De Soto Canyon with seismic velocities >5.0 km/s. Crystalline continental crust thins seaward along GUMBO Line 3 from 23-10 km across the De Soto Canyon. High seismic velocity lower crust (>7.2 km/s) is interpreted as extensive syn-rift magmatism and possibly mafic underplating, common features at volcanic rift margins with high mantle potential temperatures. In the central Gulf basin we interpret thick oceanic crust (>8 km) emplaced at a slow full-spreading rate (~24 mm/yr). We suggest a sustained thermal anomaly during slow seafloor-spreading conditions led to voluminous basalt flows from a spreading ridge that overprinted seafloor magnetic anomalies in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Morphology of the triggering and evolution of a deep moist convective system in the Mediterranean Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, Elisabetta; Ferraris, Luca; Molini, Luca; Siccardi, Franco; Kranzlmueller, Dieter; Parodi, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Gaining a deeper physical understanding of the high impact weather events (HIWE) which affected the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) in the last years (Cinqueterre 2011, Southern France 2011, Genoa 2011, Southern Spain 2012, and Genoa 2014) is strongly motivated by the social request to reduce the casualties and the economical impacts due to these highly-localized and hardly-predictable phenomena. One of the most recent HIWE observed in the WMB hit the Genoa city center, on October 2014 less than 3 years after the very similar one which already affected the city on November 2011. Taking advantage of the availability of both observational data and modelling results (WRF-ARW runs) at the micro-α meteorological scale (2 km - 0.2 km and 1 hour or less, Orlanski, 1975), this paper provides new insights about the triggering mechanism and the subsequent spatio-temporal evolution of 2014 HIWE. The major feature that emerged from the very fine grid spacing simulations is the effect of a kind of virtual topography created on the Ligurian sea by the convergence of the cold current outflowing from the Po valley and the warm and moist south-easterly flow.

  9. Spitzer Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud: Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE). I. Overview and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D.; Indebetouw, Remy; Hora, Joseph L.; Whitney, Barbara; Blum, Robert; Reach, William; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Meade, Marilyn; Babler, Brian; Engelbracht, Charles W.; For, Bi-Qing; Misselt, Karl; Vijh, Uma; Leitherer, Claus; Cohen, Martin; Churchwell, Ed B.; Boulanger, Francois; Frogel, Jay A.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gallagher, Jay; Gorjian, Varoujan; Harris, Jason; Kelly, Douglas; Kawamura, Akiko; Kim, SoYoung; Latter, William B.; Madden, Suzanne; Markwick-Kemper, Ciska; Mizuno, Akira; Mizuno, Norikazu; Mould, Jeremy; Nota, Antonella; Oey, M. S.; Olsen, Knut; Onishi, Toshikazu; Paladini, Roberta; Panagia, Nino; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Shibai, Hiroshi; Sato, Shuji; Smith, Linda; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Ueta, Toshiya; van Dyk, Schuyler; Volk, Kevin; Werner, Michael; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2006-12-01

    We are performing a uniform and unbiased imaging survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC; ~7deg×7deg) using the IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 μm) and MIPS (24, 70, and 160 μm) instruments on board the Spitzer Space Telescope in the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) survey, these agents being the interstellar medium (ISM) and stars in the LMC. This paper provides an overview of the SAGE Legacy project, including observing strategy, data processing, and initial results. Three key science goals determined the coverage and depth of the survey. The detection of diffuse ISM with column densities >1.2×1021 H cm-2 permits detailed studies of dust processes in the ISM. SAGE's point-source sensitivity enables a complete census of newly formed stars with masses >3 Msolar that will determine the current star formation rate in the LMC. SAGE's detection of evolved stars with mass-loss rates >1×10-8 Msolar yr-1 will quantify the rate at which evolved stars inject mass into the ISM of the LMC. The observing strategy includes two epochs in 2005, separated by 3 months, that both mitigate instrumental artifacts and constrain source variability. The SAGE data are nonproprietary. The data processing includes IRAC and MIPS pipelines and a database for mining the point-source catalogs, which will be released to the community in support of Spitzer proposal cycles 4 and 5. We present initial results on the epoch 1 data for a region near N79 and N83. The MIPS 70 and 160 μm images of the diffuse dust emission of the N79/N83 region reveal a similar distribution to the gas emissions, especially the H I 21 cm emission. The measured point-source sensitivity for the epoch 1 data is consistent with expectations for the survey. The point-source counts are highest for the IRAC 3.6 μm band and decrease dramatically toward longer wavelengths, consistent with the fact that stars dominate the point-source catalogs and the dusty objects detected at the longer wavelengths are rare

  10. UltraVISTA: a new ultra-deep near-infrared survey in COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, H. J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Dunlop, J.; Franx, M.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Le Fèvre, O.; Holt, J.; Caputi, K. I.; Goranova, Y.; Buitrago, F.; Emerson, J. P.; Freudling, W.; Hudelot, P.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Magnard, F.; Mellier, Y.; Møller, P.; Nilsson, K. K.; Sutherland, W.; Tasca, L.; Zabl, J.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we describe the first data release of the UltraVISTA near-infrared imaging survey of the COSMOS field. We summarise the key goals and design of the survey and provide a detailed description of our data reduction techniques. We provide stacked, sky-subtracted images in YJHKs and narrow-band filters constructed from data collected during the first year of UltraVISTA observations. Our stacked images reach 5σAB depths in an aperture of 2″ diameter of ~25 in Y and ~24 in JHKs bands and all have sub-arcsecond seeing. To this 5σ limit, our Ks catalogue contains 216 268 sources. We carry out a series of quality assessment tests on our images and catalogues, comparing our stacks with existing catalogues. The 1σ astrometric rms in both directions for stars selected with 17.0 < Ks(AB) < 19.5 is ~0.08″ in comparison to the publicly-available COSMOS ACS catalogues. Our images are resampled to the same pixel scale and tangent point as the publicly available COSMOS data and so may be easily used to generate multi-colour catalogues using this data. All images and catalogues presented in this paper are publicly available through ESO's "phase 3" archiving and distribution system and from the UltraVISTA web site. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under ESO programme ID 179.A-2005 and on data products produced by TERAPIX and the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit on behalf of the UltraVISTA consortium.Catalogs are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/544/A156

  11. A deep survey for Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars. I - Motivation, search technique, and first results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Smith, Lindsey F.; Potter, Michael; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from a survey of large areas of the southern Milky Way for Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars to 17-18th magnitude, carried out using direct narrowband and broadband Schmidt plates. Thirteen new WR stars were detected in an about 40-deg-sq region in Carina, where 24 WR stars were already known; the new stars were found to be significantly redder, fainter, and farther away than the known stars. Of the new WR stars, 11 are of subtype WN, and two are WC, compared to the 17 WN and seven WC stars among the previously known WR stars in the same area.

  12. Deep mantle heat flow and thermal evolution of the Earth's core based on thermo-chemical mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, T.; Tackley, P.; Buffett, B.

    2004-12-01

    A coupled core-mantle evolution model that combines the global heat balance in the core with a fully-dynamical thermo-chemical mantle convection [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004 published in EPSL] is used to investigate the deep mantle heat flow that is required to sustain the magnetic field generated by the geodynamo process. Effects of a radioactive heat source due to potassium in the core are also included in the global heat balance in the Earth??s core. Two important parameters are checked in this study; (1) density variation between depleted hartzbergite and basaltic material (0 to 3 percent) and (2) concentration of radioactive potassium in the core alloy (0ppm to 400ppm). The parameter set that most closely satisfies the criteria of size of the inner core (1220km at present time) is around 2 percent of density difference in a convecting mantle and 200ppm of radioactive heat source in the core. The concentration of potassium in the core is consistent with the geochemical approach [Murthy et al., 2003] but smaller than other successful thermal evolution models [Labrosse, 2003; Nimmo et al., 2004]. Heat flow through the core-mantle boundary and the contribution of radioactive heat sources in the core are consistent with theoretical estimates [e.g. Buffett, 2002] and geochemical constraints [Gessmann and Wood, 2002]. The power available to the geodynamo, based on the predicted heat flow through the core-mantle boundary, is approximately four times greater than the value predicted by numerical models of the geodynamo [Christensen and Kutzner, 2004] but closer to theoretical estimates [e.g. Buffett, 2002].

  13. GALAXY EVOLUTION EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF CS AND OH EMISSION IN COMET 9P/TEMPEL 1 DURING DEEP IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, Paul D.; McCandliss, Stephan R.; Morgenthaler, Jeffrey P.; Lisse, Carey M.; Weaver, Harold A.; A'Hearn, Michael F.

    2010-03-10

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) observations of comet 9P/Tempel 1 using the near-ultraviolet (NUV) objective grism were made before, during and after the Deep Impact event that occurred on 2005 July 4 at 05:52:03 UT when a 370 kg NASA spacecraft was maneuvered into the path of the comet. The NUV channel provides usable spectral information in a bandpass covering 2000-3400 A with a point source spectral resolving power of R {approx} 100. The primary spectral features in this range include solar continuum scattered from cometary dust and emissions from OH and CS molecular bands centered near 3085 and 2575 A, respectively. In particular, we report the only cometary CS emission detected during this event. The observations allow the evolution of these spectral features to be tracked over the period of the encounter. In general, the NUV emissions observed from Tempel 1 are much fainter than those that have been observed by GALEX from other comets. However, it is possible to derive production rates for the parent molecules of the species detected by GALEX in Tempel 1 and to determine the number of these molecules liberated by the impact. The derived quiescent production rates are Q(H{sub 2}O) = 6.4 x 10{sup 27} molecules s{sup -1} and Q(CS{sub 2}) = 6.7 x 10{sup 24} molecules s{sup -1}, while the impact produced an additional 1.6 x 10{sup 32} H{sub 2}O molecules and 1.3 x 10{sup 29} CS{sub 2} molecules, a similar ratio as in quiescent outgassing.

  14. UAV survey of a Thyrrenian micro-tidal beach for shoreline evolution update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassai, Guido; Pugliano, Giovanni; Di Paola, Gianluigi; Mucerino, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Coastal geomorphology requires increasingly accurate topographic information of the beach systems to perform reliable simulation of coastal erosion, flooding phenomena, and coastal vulnerability assessment. Among the range of terrestrial and aerial methods available to produce such a dataset, this study tests the utility of low-altitude aerial imageries collected by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The image-based approach was selected whilst searching for a rapid, inexpensive, and highly automated method, able to produce 3D information from unstructured aerial images. In particular, it was used to generate a high-resolution Digital Surface Model (DSM) of the micro-tidal beach of Serapo - Gaeta (LT) in order to obtain recent update of erosional/accretional trends already established through historical shoreline evolution. A UAV exacopter (fig. 1a) was used, weighing about 2500g, carrying on board a GPS and multi-directional accelerometer to ensure a recovery of the beach features (fig. 1b) through a sweep with constant speed, direction and altitude. The on-board camera was a Canon 16M pixels, with fixed and constant focal takeoff in order to perform the 3D cloud points. Six adjacent strips were performed for the survey realization with pictures taken every second in sequence, in order to allow a minimum 80% overlap. A direct on site survey was also carried out with a DGPS for the placement of GPS markers and the geo-referencing of the final product (fig. 1c). Each flight with constant speed, direction and altitude recorded from 500 to 800 shots. The height of flight was dictated by the scale of the final report, an altitude of 100m was used for the beach survey. The topographic survey on the ground for the placement of the control points was performed with the Trimble R6 DGPS in RTK mode. The long-term shoreline evolution was obtained by a sixty-year historical shoreline time-series, through the analysis of a number of aerial photographs dating from 1954 to 2013. The

  15. Deep Magnetotelluric survey on Crete Island across the Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisperi, D.; Smirnov, M.; Kokologiannakis, A.; Pentes, G.; Makris, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Crete Island is located in a prominent position at the fore-arc of the Hellenic Subduction Zone (HSZ), thus enabling onshore study of the Earth's deep structure. The area is characterized by a complicated geological and geotectonic setting as well as by intense geodynamics that manifests itself in high seismicity. The aim of the ongoing research project 'MagnetoTellurics in studying Geodynamics of the hEllenic ARc (MT-GEAR)' is to contribute to the investigation of the geoelectric structure of Southern Aegean, and particularly to try to image the Hellenic Subduction Zone. In this context, onshore magnetotelluric (MT) measurements were carried out in July 2013 on Crete Island, comprising three parallel profiles aligned to the North-South (NS) direction, yielding a site spacing of about 5 to 10 km. In total, 21 broad-band MT soundings were conducted in the period range of 0.003-1000 s organized in the three 36Km, 30Km and 42Km long NS trending profiles. Data were collected using two different types of MT instruments (an EMI MT24LF and two Uppsala type MTU2000 systems) which were running simultaneously. We present the resulting model of the conductivity structure of the HSZ in the area of Crete.

  16. THE EVOLUTION OF THE FAR-UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND STAR FORMATION RATE DENSITY OF THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH FROM z = 0.2 TO 1.2 WITH SWIFT/UVOT

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, Lea M. Z.; Gronwall, Caryl; Wolf, Christopher; Siegel, Michael H.; Hagen, Alex; Hoversten, Erik A.; Page, Mathew

    2015-08-01

    We use deep Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) near-ultraviolet (1600–4000 Å) imaging of the Chandra Deep Field South to measure the rest-frame far-UV (FUV; 1500 Å) luminosity function (LF) in four redshift bins between z = 0.2 and 1.2. Our sample includes 730 galaxies with u < 24.1 mag. We use two methods to construct and fit the LFs: the traditional V{sub max} method with bootstrap errors, and a maximum likelihood estimator. We observe luminosity evolution such that M* fades by ∼2 mag from z ∼ 1 to z ∼ 0.3, implying that star formation activity was substantially higher at z ∼ 1 than today. We integrate our LFs to determine the FUV luminosity densities and star formation rate densities (SFRDs) from z = 0.2 to 1.2. We find evolution consistent with an increase proportional to (1 + z){sup 1.9} out to z ∼ 1. Our luminosity densities and star formation rates are consistent with those found in the literature but are, on average, a factor of ∼2 higher than previous FUV measurements. In addition, we combine our UVOT data with the MUSYC survey to model the galaxies’ ultraviolet-to-infrared spectral energy distributions and estimate the rest-frame FUV attenuation. We find that accounting for the attenuation increases the SFRDs by ∼1 dex across all four redshift bins.

  17. The International Deep Planet Survey. I. The frequency of wide-orbit massive planets around A-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, A.; Patience, J.; Marois, C.; Bonavita, M.; De Rosa, R. J.; Macintosh, B.; Song, I.; Doyon, R.; Zuckerman, B.; Lafrenière, D.; Barman, T.

    2012-08-01

    Breakthrough direct detections of planetary companions orbiting A-type stars confirm the existence of massive planets at relatively large separations, but dedicated surveys are required to estimate the frequency of similar planetary systems. To measure the first estimation of the giant exoplanetary systems frequency at large orbital separation around A-stars, we have conducted a deep-imaging survey of young (8-400 Myr), nearby (19-84 pc) A- and F-stars to search for substellar companions in the ~10-300 AU range. The sample of 42 stars combines all A-stars observed in previous AO planet search surveys reported in the literature with new AO observations from VLT/NaCo and Gemini/NIRI. It represents an initial subset of the International Deep Planet Survey (IDPS) sample of stars covering M- to B-stars. The data were obtained with diffraction-limited observations in H- and Ks-band combined with angular differential imaging to suppress the speckle noise of the central stars, resulting in typical 5σ detection limits in magnitude difference of 12 mag at 1'', 14 mag at 2'' and 16 mag at 5'' which is sufficient to detect massive planets. A detailed statistical analysis of the survey results is performed using Monte Carlo simulations. Considering the planet detections, we estimate the fraction of A-stars having at least one massive planet (3-14 MJup) in the range 5-320 AU to be inside 5.9-18.8% at 68% confidence, assuming a flat distribution for the mass of the planets. By comparison, the brown dwarf (15-75 MJup) frequency for the sample is 2.0-8.9% at 68% confidence in the range 5-320 AU. Assuming power law distributions for the mass and semimajor axis of the planet population, the AO data are consistent with a declining number of massive planets with increasing orbital radius which is distinct from the rising slope inferred from radial velocity (RV) surveys around evolved A-stars and suggests that the peak of the massive planet population around A-stars may occur

  18. Detailed record of the Neogene Sr isotopic evolution of seawater from DSDP Site 590B. [Deep Sea Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    A detailed study of strontium isotope variations in Neogene marine carbonate sediments from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 590B, using techniques that allow the /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio to be determined to better than +/- 0.000 01, gives a high-resolution record of the Sr isotopic evolution of seawater. The data show that the rate of change of the marine /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio has varied significantly even on time scales as short as 1 m.y. Periods of particularly rapid growth appear to follow major marine regressions and probably reflect an increase in the delivery of radiogenic Sr from the continents coupled with a decreased submarine carbonate dissolution rate (greater carbonate compensation depth). Periods of relatively slowly changing /sup 97/Sr//sup 86/Sr follow major marine transgressions. On the basis of correlations with the marine oxygen isotope record and the times of major continental glacier growth, it is inferred that the effects of sea-level variations are modified by climatic factors that affect the intensity of continental weathering and runoff. The effects of sea-floor generation rate variations are not discernible for the Neogene. The maximum attainable stratigraphic resolution using Sr isotopes is between 0.1 and 2 m.y. for this time period. 24 references.

  19. A deep redshift survey of IRAS galaxies towards the Bootes void

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, Arjun; Strauss, Michael A.; Huchra, John

    1990-01-01

    Redshifts were measured for a complete sample of galaxies detected by the IRAS within 11.5 deg of the center of the void in Bootes discovered by Kirshner et al (1981). There are 12 IRAS galaxies within the void as defined by the above authors, seven of which were discovered in this survey. One of these has a companion at the same redshift. The resulting density of IRAS galaxies in the void is measured to be between 1/6 and 1/3 of the average density; the uncertainty is dominated by Poisson statistics. Good agreement is found between the selection function and number density derived from the present sample and those derived from the all-sky sample of Strauss (1989). The optical spectra of the newly found galaxies in the void are typical of IRAS galaxies in the field.

  20. Deep CCD Photometry and RR Lyrae Survey for the Outer-Halo Globular Cluster NGC 6229

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Borissova, J.; Spassova, N.; Ferraro, F. R.; Buonanno, R.; Sweigart, A. V.

    1997-12-01

    Deep BV CCD photometry for a large field covering the outer-halo Galactic globular cluster NGC 6229 is presented. For the first time, a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaching below the main-sequence turnoff has been obtained for this cluster. Previous results regarding the overall morphology of the horizontal and giant branches are confirmed. In addition, several candidate blue straggler stars are identified. However, a preliminary analysis of the cluster's CMD suggests that the putative extreme horizontal branch population suggested by Borissova et al. (1997, AJ, 113, 692) may not be present. Unfortunately, the innermost cluster regions could not be studied due to crowding. Comparison of the cluster CMD locus with the latest isochrones from VandenBerg (1997, private communication) is also presented, as is a study of the cluster age relative to a few well-studied reference globulars, using both the ``horizontal" and ``vertical" methods. We also report on an investigation of the variable stars in NGC 6229. We obtained new light curves and re-derived the periods, amplitudes and mean V and B-V magnitudes for 17 RR Lyrae stars listed in Sawyer Hogg's (1973, Publ. David Dunlap Obs., 3, No. 6) catalog. We obtained the first light curves for the RR Lyrae candidates No. 155 and No. 88 (Carney et al. 1991, AJ, 101, 1699), and confirm variability of their star No. 134, as well as of the RR Lyrae stars V3, V8 and V12 suspected by Borissova et al. (1997). A search for variable stars in our 5 x 5 arcmin field does not lead to any new variable candidates.

  1. Atwater Valley Deep-Towed Sidescan Sonar Imagery and Bathymetric Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Joan M. Gardner; Mike Czarnecki; Rick Hagen; Clyde Nishimura; Warren Wood; Chad Vaughn; Jody Bruton; Pat Hart; Emil Bergeron; Deborah Hutchinson

    2005-11-22

    The purpose of this project was to conduct detailed surface mapping of one of the areas drilled by the Joint Industry Project with ChevronTexaco to understand gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico. The gently sloping, mostly flat floor of the Mississippi Canyon is interrupted by mounds and depressions that presumably reflect the complex geology and geohydrology related to turbidite deposition and pervasive salt tectonism. The seafloor mounds we mapped in this study occur in approximately 1300 water depth along the floor of the Mississippi Canyon in lease block areas Atwater Valley 13 and 14. High resolution sidescan sonar (100 kHz and 500 kHz) backscatter imagery, and chirp sub-bottom profiler data were collected using the DT1 deep-towed oceanographic mapping instrument, concentrating on the region directly adjacent to and surrounding two mounds identified as, mounds D and F, and in the region directly adjacent to and surrounding the mounds. The backscatter data have been mosaiced and normalized to provide information on the shape and extent of the mounds, the possible lateral extent of fauna, such as mussel and clam fields on the mounds, possible seep related flows and the occurrence of carbonate material. The extent of a mudflow can be mapped on the southeastern side of mound F. The backscatter data show extremely high-resolution detail about the shape, relief, and morphology of the mounds. This information, coupled with porewater chemistry , DTAGS and heatflow data form a coherent picture of possible mechanics for fluid venting and flora/fauna of the seeps in this region.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: z~4-7 Lyman break galaxies in Hubble deep fields (Harikane+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikane, Y.; Ouchi, M.; Ono, Y.; More, S.; Saito, S.; Lin, Y.-T.; Coupon, J.; Shimasaku, K.; Shibuya, T.; Price, P. A.; Lin, L.; Hsieh, B.-C.; Ishigaki, M.; Komiyama, Y.; Silverman, J.; Takata, T.; Tamazawa, H.; Toshikawa, J.

    2016-07-01

    We use 10 deep optical-near-IR imaging data sets of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)-North-Deep, GOODS-North-Wide, GOODS-South-Deep, GOODS-South-Wide, Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS)-All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS), CANDELS-Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS), CANDELS-Ultra Deep Survey (UDS), Hubble Frontier Field (HFF)-Abell2744P, and HFF-MACS0416P that are taken with ACS and WFC3 on the HST. The total area of the Hubble data is ~600arcmin2. The typical FWHMs of the PSFs of ACS and WFC3 images are 0.1" and 0.2", respectively. (1 data file).

  3. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  4. Deep Time Ecosystem Engineers: The Correlation between Palaeozoic Vegetation, Evolution of Physical Riverine Habitats, and Plant and Animal Terrestrialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, N. S.; Gibling, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    corridors narrowed throughout the Ordovician and Silurian, the potential importance of riparian zones as a global biome would have increased as they became more extensive in continental environments. Furthermore, the move towards climatic controls on the ephemeral or perennial nature of streams would have boosted the diversity of temporally diverse hydrodynamic regimes. As single-thread meandering channels and extensive muddy floodplains, stabilised by vegetation, became significant components of the global suite of alluvial geomorphic components throughout the Siluro-Devonian, further diversification of the extent and diversity of physical habitats within the global riparian biome occurred. Into the Carboniferous, the evolution of the anabranching habit within alluvial systems created further new physical landforms for colonization and would have promoted increasingly complex hyporheic flow regimes. Furthermore the associated advent of arborescent vegetation and, specifically, the large woody debris supplied by this, would have created a wealth of new microhabitats for continental organisms. The expanding extent and diversity of physical alluvial niches during the Palaeozoic can be argued to be an underappreciated driver of the terrestrialization of early continental life. The study of the deep time fossil and stratigraphic record also illustrates that vegetation is a fundamental prerequisite for the creation of biogeomorphic alluvial landforms and physical habitats and microhabitats.

  5. Thermal evolution and exhumation of deep-level batholithic exposures, southernmost Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saleeby, J.; Farley, K.A.; Kistler, R.W.; Fleck, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The Tehachapi complex lies at the southern end of the Sierra Nevada batholith adjacent to the Neogene-Quaternary Garlock fault. The complex is composed principally of high-pressure (8-10 kbar) Cretaceous batholithic rocks, and it represents the deepest exposed levels of a continuous oblique crustal section through the southern Sierra Nevada batholith. Over the southern ???100 km of this section, structural/petrologic continuity and geochronological data indicate that ???35 km of felsic to intermediate-composition crust was generated by copious arc magmatism primarily between 105 and 99 Ma. In the Tehachapi complex, these batholithic rocks intrude and are bounded to the west by similar-composition gneissic-textured high-pressure batholithic rocks emplaced at ca. 115-110 Ma. This lower crustal complex is bounded below by a regional thrust system, which in Late Cretaceous time tectonically eroded the underlying mantle lithosphere, and in series displaced and underplated the Rand Schist subduction assemblage by low-angle slip from the outboard Franciscan trench. Geophysical and mantle xenolith studies indicate that the remnants of this shallow subduction thrust descend northward through the crust and into the mantle, leaving the mantle lithosphere intact beneath the greater Sierra Nevada batholith. This north-dipping regional structure records an inflection in the Farallon plate, which was segmented into a shallow subduc-tion trajectory to the south and a normal steeper trajectory to the north. We combine new and published data from a broad spectrum of thermochronom-eters that together form a coherent data array constraining the thermal evolution of the complex. Integration of these data with published thermobarometric and petro-genetic data also constrains the tectonically driven decompression and exhumation history of the complex. The timing of arc magmatic construction of the complex, as denoted above, is resolved by a large body of U/Pb zircon ages. High

  6. Morphological Survey of Microbial Mats Near Deep-Sea Thermal Vents †

    PubMed Central

    Jannasch, Holger W.; Wirsen, Carl O.

    1981-01-01

    A microscopic survey is presented of the most commonly observed and morphologically conspicuous microorganisms found attached to natural surfaces or to artificial materials deposited in the immediate vicinity of thermal submarine vents at the Galapagos Rift ocean spreading zone at a depth of 2,550 meters. Of special interest were the following findings: (i) all surfaces intermittently exposed to H2S-containing hydrothermal fluid were covered by layers, ca. 5 to 10 μm thick, of procaryotic, gram-negative cells interspaced with amorphous metal (Mn-Fe) deposits; (ii) although some of the cells were encased by dense metal deposits, there was little apparent correlation between metal deposition and the occurrence of microbial mats, (iii) highly differentiated forms appeared to be analogues of certain cyanobacteria, (iv) isolates from massive mats of a prosthecate bacterium could be identified as Hyphomicrobium spp., (v) intracellular membrane systems similar to those found in methylotrophic and nitrifying bacteria were observed in approximately 20% of the cells composing the mats, (vi) thiosulfate enrichments made from mat material resulted in isolations of different types of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria including the obligately chemolithotrophic genus Thiomicrospira. Images PMID:16345722

  7. Radio properties of M33 supernova remnants: results from a new deep JVLA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; White, Richard L.; Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2016-06-01

    We have carried out new 6 and 20 cm observations of M33 with the Jansky Very Large Array, primarily to study the properties of supernova remnants in the galaxy. Our scaled array observations have a limiting sensitivity of about 25 μJy (5σ) and a resolution of 5`` (FWHM), corresponding to a spatial resolution of 20 pc at the distance of M33. We detect about 85 of the SNRs contained in the list of 137 optically identified SNRs described by Long et al. (2010), and a few additional objects from the survey of Lee & Lee (2014). A substantial fraction of the optical SNRs not detected are in regions where emission from H II recombination makes identification of non-thermal emission from the SNR difficult. We also discuss a blind search for SNRs based on the radio emission alone. Of the SNRs we detect in this search at radio wavelengths, 53 have also been detected at X-ray wavelengths. Thus we are able make a direct comparison of the X-ray, optical, and radio properties of the SNRs in M33, the first time that has been possible to a significant extent in an external spiral galaxy.

  8. A deep proper motion catalog within the Sloan digital sky survey footprint

    SciTech Connect

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy M.; Hippel, Ted von; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James W.; Williams, Kurtis A.; DeGenarro, Steven; Jeffery, Elizabeth E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil E-mail: ted.vonhippel@erau.edu E-mail: jamesliebert@gmail.com E-mail: studiofortytwo@yahoo.com

    2014-12-01

    A new proper motion catalog is presented, combining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with second epoch observations in the r band within a portion of the SDSS imaging footprint. The new observations were obtained with the 90prime camera on the Steward Observatory Bok 90 inch telescope, and the Array Camera on the U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 1.3 m telescope. The catalog covers 1098 square degrees to r = 22.0, an additional 1521 square degrees to r = 20.9, plus a further 488 square degrees of lesser quality data. Statistical errors in the proper motions range from 5 mas year{sup −1} at the bright end to 15 mas year{sup −1} at the faint end, for a typical epoch difference of six years. Systematic errors are estimated to be roughly 1 mas year{sup −1} for the Array Camera data, and as much as 2–4 mas year{sup −1} for the 90prime data (though typically less). The catalog also includes a second epoch of r band photometry.

  9. Revisiting Brightest Cluster Galaxy Evolution with the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Amy E.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Dalcanton, Julianne J.

    2002-02-01

    We investigate the influence of environment on brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) evolution using a sample of 63 clusters at 0.3<=z<=0.9 drawn primarily from the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey and follow-up V, I, and K' photometry. The luminosity evolution of the entire BCG sample is not adequately described by a single evolutionary model. Using the integrated light from the cluster detection as a proxy for cluster LX and the suggestion by Burke, Collins, & Mann, we set LX=2×1044 ergs s-1 to be the division between high- and low-luminosity clusters. At high redshift (z>0.6) BCGs from low-LX clusters are fainter, on average, than those from high-LX clusters and are best modeled as having constant luminosity with redshift. The BCGs from high-LX clusters are best modeled as having a stellar population that formed at large redshift (zform>5) and is passively evolving. However, for the entire BCG population, the observed V-I and I-K' colors are well described by a single evolutionary model in which the stellar populations have zform>5 and subsequently passively evolve. We conclude that accretion is proportionally more significant for BCGs in lower mass clusters at these redshifts (a factor of 2-4 increase in mass since z~1 for the low-LX systems; Aragon-Salamanca and coworkers) and that the accreted matter is in the form of systems with evolved stellar populations.

  10. A Pilot Deep Survey for X-Ray Emission from fuvAGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, R.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Stute, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in three of six fuvAGB stars observed—the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long timescales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ˜(0.002-0.2) L⊙ and the X-ray-emitting plasma temperatures are ˜(35-160) × 106 K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively cool (<20,000 K). In addition, the high X-ray luminosities specifically argue against emission originating in the coronae of main-sequence companions. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  11. Deep Advanced Camera for Surveys Imaging in the Globular Cluster NGC 6397: the Cluster Color-Magnitude Diagram and Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, Harvey B.; Dotter, Aaron; Hurley, Jarrod; Anderson, Jay; King, Ivan; Davis, Saul; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Kalirai, Jason; Paust, Nathaniel; Rich, R. Michael; Shara, Michael M.

    2008-06-01

    We present the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) from deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging in the globular cluster NGC 6397. The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) was used for 126 orbits to image a single field in two colors (F814W, F606W) 5' SE of the cluster center. The field observed overlaps that of archival WFPC2 data from 1994 and 1997 which were used to proper motion (PM) clean the data. Applying the PM corrections produces a remarkably clean CMD which reveals a number of features never seen before in a globular cluster CMD. In our field, the main-sequence stars appeared to terminate close to the location in the CMD of the hydrogen-burning limit predicted by two independent sets of stellar evolution models. The faintest observed main-sequence stars are about a magnitude fainter than the least luminous metal-poor field halo stars known, suggesting that the lowest-luminosity halo stars still await discovery. At the bright end the data extend beyond the main-sequence turnoff to well up the giant branch. A populous white dwarf cooling sequence is also seen in the cluster CMD. The most dramatic features of the cooling sequence are its turn to the blue at faint magnitudes as well as an apparent truncation near F814W = 28. The cluster luminosity and mass functions were derived, stretching from the turnoff down to the hydrogen-burning limit. It was well modeled with either a very flat power-law or a lognormal function. In order to interpret these fits more fully we compared them with similar functions in the cluster core and with a full N-body model of NGC 6397 finding satisfactory agreement between the model predictions and the data. This exercise demonstrates the important role and the effect that dynamics has played in altering the cluster initial mass function.

  12. The VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey: Lyα emission and stellar populations of star-forming galaxies at 2 < z < 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathi, N. P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Ilbert, O.; Cassata, P.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Lemaux, B. C.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorín, R.; Bardelli, S.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Guaita, L.; Koekemoer, A.; Paltani, S.; Pforr, J.; Ribeiro, B.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Capak, P.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cuby, J. G.; de la Torre, S.; Dunlop, J.; Fotopoulou, S.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Wang, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate spectral and photometric properties of 854 faint (iAB ≲ 25 mag) star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2 < z < 2.5 using the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS) spectroscopic data and deep multi-wavelength photometric data in three extensively studied extragalactic fields (ECDFS, VVDS, COSMOS). These SFGs were targeted for spectroscopy as a result of their photometric redshifts. The VUDS spectra are used to measure the UV spectral slopes (β) as well as Lyα equivalent widths (EW). On average, the spectroscopically measured β (-1.36 ± 0.02), is comparable to the photometrically measured β (-1.32 ± 0.02), and has smaller measurement uncertainties. The positive correlation of β with the spectral energy distribution (SED)-based measurement of dust extinction Es(B-V) emphasizes the importance of β as an alternative dust indicator at high redshifts. To make a proper comparison, we divide these SFGs into three subgroups based on their rest-frame Lyα EW: SFGs with no Lyα emission (SFGN; EW ≤ 0 Å), SFGs with Lyα emission (SFGL; EW > 0 Å), and Lyα emitters (LAEs; EW ≥ 20 Å). The fraction of LAEs at these redshifts is ~10%, which is consistent with previous observations. We compared best-fitSED-estimated stellar parameters of the SFGN, SFGL and LAE samples. For the luminosities probed here (~ L∗), we find that galaxies with and without Lyα in emission have small but significant differences in their SED-based properties. We find that LAEs have less dust, and lower star-formation rates (SFR) compared to non-LAEs. We also find that LAEs are less massive compared to non-LAEs, though the difference is smaller and less significant compared to the SFR and Es(B-V). When we divide the LAEs according to their Spitzer/IRAC 3.6 μm fluxes, we find that the fraction of IRAC-detected (m3.6 ≲ 25 mag) LAEs is much higher than the fraction of IRAC-detected narrow band (NB)-selected LAEs at z ≃ 2-3. This could imply that UV-selected LAEs

  13. LOFAR/H-ATLAS: a deep low-frequency survey of the Herschel-ATLAS North Galactic Pole field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, M. J.; Gürkan, G.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; Best, P. N.; de Gasperin, F.; Rafferty, D. A.; Read, S. C.; Sabater, J.; Shimwell, T. W.; Smith, D. J. B.; Tasse, C.; Bourne, N.; Brienza, M.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Chyży, K. T.; Conway, J.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S. A.; Maddox, S. J.; Jarvis, M. J.; Mahony, E. K.; Morganti, R.; Prandoni, I.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Valiante, E.; White, G. J.

    2016-10-01

    We present Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) High-Band Array observations of the Herschel-ATLAS North Galactic Pole survey area. The survey we have carried out, consisting of four pointings covering around 142 deg2 of sky in the frequency range 126-173 MHz, does not provide uniform noise coverage but otherwise is representative of the quality of data to be expected in the planned LOFAR wide-area surveys, and has been reduced using recently developed `facet calibration' methods at a resolution approaching the full resolution of the data sets (˜10 × 6 arcsec) and an rms off-source noise that ranges from 100 μJy beam-1 in the centre of the best fields to around 2 mJy beam-1 at the furthest extent of our imaging. We describe the imaging, cataloguing and source identification processes, and present some initial science results based on a 5σ source catalogue. These include (i) an initial look at the radio/far-infrared correlation at 150 MHz, showing that many Herschel sources are not yet detected by LOFAR; (ii) number counts at 150 MHz, including, for the first time, observational constraints on the numbers of star-forming galaxies; (iii) the 150-MHz luminosity functions for active and star-forming galaxies, which agree well with determinations at higher frequencies at low redshift, and show strong redshift evolution of the star-forming population; and (iv) some discussion of the implications of our observations for studies of radio galaxy life cycles.

  14. Low solar elongation searches for NEO: a deep sky test and its implications for survey strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boattini, Andrea; Milani, A.; Gronchi, G. F.; Spahr, T.; Valsecchi, G. B.

    2007-05-01

    A survey for NEOs aiming at 90% completeness for a given size range cannot ignore that a significant fraction of the population passes in the neighborhood of opposition either never or very rarely or only in very poor observing conditions. Thus, a fraction of the available telescope time needs to be used at low solar elongations in the so called "sweet spots". However, there are several penalties for such sweet spot observations: i) poorer observing conditions, implying a lower limiting magnitude; ii) shorter available observing time for each night; iii) more difficult orbit determination. Other classes of objects are poorly observed either because of higher apparent magnitude (especially Main Belt Asteroids, MBAs) or because of too slow motion (distant objects); however, this makes easier to find the NEOs. We have tested the observations and the mathematical methods of identification/orbit determination on two sweet spot test runs conducted in 2005. One performed at La Silla (ESO) with the 2.2-m and 3.5-m NTT and the other one conducted at Mauna Kea with 3.6-m CFHT and 8.3-m Subaru. Also, when short arc observations from different observing nights have to be identified, a specific difficulty occurs at the sweet spots: the same set of observations from three nights can be fitted to two incompatible orbits, in most cases including one NEO (often Aten) and one MBA. This can lead to two different failures in deciding wether a NEO has been discovered: a false positive leads to the waste of resources (follow-up, computations) for a MBA which would be more easily discovered at opposition, a false negative leads to the loss of the NEO which may not be reobservable soon. In this way we generated a large number of examples of possible discoveries with two well determined but incompatible solutions. Most of the MBA-NEO alternatives resulted in a known MBA or in a new designated one as soon as it was confirmed by a later observations. Of the 9 real NEOs detected, 1 has been

  15. Trace element content of sedimentary pyrite as a new proxy for deep-time ocean-atmosphere evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Large, Ross R.; Halpin, Jacqueline A.; Danyushevsky, Leonid V.; Maslennikov, Valeriy V.; Bull, Stuart W.; Long, John A.; Gregory, Daniel D.; Lounejeva, Elena; Lyons, Timothy W.; Sack, Patrick J.; McGoldrick, Peter J.; Calver, Clive R.

    2014-03-01

    Sedimentary pyrite formed in the water column, or during diagenesis in organic muds, provides an accessible proxy for seawater chemistry in the marine rock record. Except for Mo, U, Ni and Cr, surprisingly little is known about trace element trends in the deep time oceans, even though they are critical to developing better models for the evolution of the Earth's atmosphere and evolutionary pathways of life. Here we introduce a novel approach to simultaneously quantify a suite of trace elements in sedimentary pyrite from marine black shales. These trace element concentrations, at least in a first-order sense, track the primary elemental abundances in coeval seawater. In general, the trace element patterns show significant variation of several orders of magnitude in the Archaean and Phanerozoic, but less variation on longer wavelengths in the Proterozoic. Certain trace elements (e.g., Ni, Co, As, Cr) have generally decreased in the oceans through the Precambrian, other elements (e.g., Mo, Zn, Mn) have generally increased, and a further group initially increased and then decreased (e.g., Se and U). These changes appear to be controlled by many factors, in particular: 1) oxygenation cycles of the Earth's ocean-atmosphere system, 2) the composition of exposed crustal rocks, 3) long term rates of continental erosion, and 4) cycles of ocean anoxia. We show that Ni and Co content of seawater is affected by global Large Igneous Province events, whereas redox sensitive trace elements such as Se and Mo are affected by atmosphere oxygenation. Positive jumps in Mo and Se concentrations prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE1, c. 2500 Ma) suggest pulses of oxygenation may have occurred as early as 2950 Ma. A flat to declining pattern of many biologically important nutrient elements through the mid to late Proterozoic may relate to declining atmosphere O2, and supports previous models of nutrient deficiency inhibiting marine evolution during this period. These trace elements (Mo

  16. The Host Galaxy Properties of Variability Selected AGN in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinis, S.; Gezari, S.; Kumar, S.; Burgett, W. S.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-07-01

    We study the properties of 975 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected by variability in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium deep Survey. Using complementary multi-wavelength data from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared, we use spectral energy distribution fitting to determine the AGN and host properties at z < 1 and compare to a well-matched control sample. We confirm the trend previously observed: that the variability amplitude decreases with AGN luminosity, but we also observe that the slope of this relation steepens with wavelength, resulting in a “redder when brighter” trend at low luminosities. Our results show that AGNs are hosted by more massive hosts than control sample galaxies, while the rest frame dust-corrected NUV - r color distribution of AGN hosts is similar to control galaxies. We find a positive correlation between the AGN luminosity and star formation rate (SFR), independent of redshift. AGN hosts populate the entire range of SFRs within and outside of the Main Sequence of star-forming galaxies. Comparing the distribution of AGN hosts and control galaxies, we show that AGN hosts are less likely to be hosted by quiescent galaxies and more likely to be hosted by Main Sequence or starburst galaxies.

  17. Molecular survey of sulphate-reducing bacteria in the deep-sea sediments of the west Pacific Warm Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Xiao, Xiang; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Fengping

    2008-08-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) community in the deep-sea sediments of the west Pacific Warm Pool (WP) was surveyed by molecular phylogenetic analyses using primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene fragments of SRB. Specific 16S rRNA gene libraries from five sediment layers (1-cm, 3-cm, 6-cm, 10-cm and 12-cm layer) of the 12-cm core of WP-0 were constructed. The clones in the five libraries were differentiated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and representative clones were selected to sequence. It was found that the clones fell into four groups, which were closest related to Desulfotomaculum, Desulfacinum, Desulfomonile and Desulfanuticus. Desulfacinum-like clones were only detected in the upper layers of the sediment core, whereas Desulfomonile-like clones were only present in the deeper layers. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was further carried out to visualize and count the SRB and bacteria in the five sediment layers. It was found that SRB constituted only a small proportion of the bacteria community (0.34% 1.95%), it had the highest content in the 3-cm layer (1.95%) and had a depth-related decreasing tendency along the 12-cm core.

  18. EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROBING EVOLUTION AND REIONIZATION SPECTROSCOPICALLY (PEARS) GRISM SURVEY. II. THE COMPLETE SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pirzkal, Nor; Rothberg, Barry; Ly, Chun; Grogin, Norman A.; Dahlen, Tomas; Noeske, Kai G.; Bellini, Andrea; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Cohen, Seth H.; Mechtley, Matthew; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Walsh, Jeremy R.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Straughn, Amber N.

    2013-07-20

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitess grism spectroscopic data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random survey of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations complemented by the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data, we are able to identify star-forming galaxies (SFGs) within the redshift volume 0 < z < 1.5. Star-forming regions in the PEARS survey are pinpointed independently of the host galaxy. This method allows us to detect the presence of multiple emission-line regions (ELRs) within a single galaxy. We identified a total of 1162 H{alpha}, [O III], and/or [O II] emission lines in the PEARS sample of 906 galaxies to a limiting flux of {approx}10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The ELRs have also been compared to the properties of the host galaxy, including morphology, luminosity, and mass. From this analysis, we find three key results: (1) the computed line luminosities show evidence of a flattening in the luminosity function with increasing redshift; (2) the star-forming systems show evidence of complex morphologies with star formation occurring predominantly within one effective (half-light) radius. However, the morphologies show no correlation with host stellar mass. (3) Also, the number density of SFGs with M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} decreases by an order of magnitude at z {<=} 0.5 relative to the number at 0.5 < z < 0.9, supporting the argument of galaxy downsizing.

  19. The BLUEDISK Survey: molecular gas distribution and scaling relations in the context of galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, D.; Bigiel, F.; Wang, J.; Pety, J.; Usero, A.; Roychowdhury, S.; Carton, D.; Hulst, J. M. van der; Józsa, G. I. G.; García, M. Gonzalez; Saintonge, A.

    2016-08-01

    One of the key goals of the BLUEDISK survey is to characterize the impact of gas accretion in disc galaxies in the context of galaxy evolution. It contains 50 disc galaxies in the stellar mass range 1010 - 1011 M⊙, of which half are bluer and more H I-rich galaxies than their H I-normal (control) counterparts. In this paper, we investigate how ongoing disc growth affects the molecular gas distribution and the star-formation efficiency in these galaxies. We present 12CO observations from the IRAM 30-m telescope in 26 galaxies of the BLUEDISK survey. We compare the amount and spatial distribution of the molecular gas to key quantities such as atomic gas, stellar mass and surface density, star-formation rate and metallicity. We analyse the star-formation rate per unit gas (SFR/H I and SFR/H2) and relate all those parameters to general galaxy properties (H I-rich/control disc, morphology, etc.). We find that the H I-rich galaxies have similar H2 masses as the control galaxies. In their centres, H I-rich galaxies have lower H2/H I ratios and marginally shorter molecular gas depletion times. However, the main differences between the two samples occur in the outer parts of the discs, with the H I-rich galaxies having slightly smaller CO discs (relative to the optical radius R25) and steeper CO and metallicity gradients than the control galaxies. The ongoing accretion of H I at large radii has thus not led to an appreciable growth of the CO discs in our sample. Based on depletion times, we estimate that this gas will contribute to star formation on time-scales of at least 5 Gyr.

  20. THE HETDEX PILOT SURVEY. IV. THE EVOLUTION OF [O II] EMITTING GALAXIES FROM z {approx} 0.5 TO z {approx} 0

    SciTech Connect

    Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P.; Zeimann, Gregory R. E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu E-mail: grzeimann@psu.edu; and others

    2013-05-20

    We present an analysis of the luminosities and equivalent widths of the 284 z < 0.56 [O II]-emitting galaxies found in the 169 arcmin{sup 2} pilot survey for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). By combining emission-line fluxes obtained from the Mitchell spectrograph on the McDonald 2.7 m telescope with deep broadband photometry from archival data, we derive each galaxy's dereddened [O II] {lambda}3727 luminosity and calculate its total star formation rate. We show that over the last {approx}5 Gyr of cosmic time, there has been substantial evolution in the [O II] emission-line luminosity function, with L* decreasing by {approx}0.6 {+-} 0.2 dex in the observed function, and by {approx}0.9 {+-} 0.2 dex in the dereddened relation. Accompanying this decline is a significant shift in the distribution of [O II] equivalent widths, with the fraction of high equivalent-width emitters declining dramatically with time. Overall, the data imply that the relative intensity of star formation within galaxies has decreased over the past {approx}5 Gyr, and that the star formation rate density of the universe has declined by a factor of {approx}2.5 between z {approx} 0.5 and z {approx} 0. These observations represent the first [O II]-based star formation rate density measurements in this redshift range, and foreshadow the advancements which will be generated by the main HETDEX survey.

  1. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, Erik A.

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set (~ 105 galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy Hα equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M is Γ = 1.5 ± 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around Mr,0.1 = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has Mr,0.1 ~ -21) are well fit by a universal Γ ~ 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These

  2. Evolution of Group Galaxies from the First Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, I. H.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; Gladders, M.

    2012-04-01

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f red) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 <= z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the "probability friends-of-friends" algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z ~ 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z >~ 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f red than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f red by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M *), total group stellar mass (M *, grp, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r grp), and local galaxy density (Σ5). We find that M * is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f red and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f red on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M *. Massive galaxies (M * >~ 1011 M ⊙) show little dependence of f red on r grp, M *, grp, and Σ5 over the redshift range. The dependence of f red on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M * <~ 1010.6 M ⊙. We observe an apparent "group down-sizing" effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f red. We find a dependence of f red on both r grp and Σ5 after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r grp, there is a significant dependence of f red on Σ5, while r grp gradients of f red are seen for galaxies in similar Σ5 regions. This indicates that galaxy group environment has a residual effect over that of local galaxy density (or vice versa), and both parameters need

  3. AzTEC COSMOS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min Su; Ade, P. A.; Aretxaga, I.; Austermann, J.; Bock, J. J.; Hughes, D.; Kang, Y.; Kim, S.; Lowenthal, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Scott, K.; Wilson, G.

    2006-12-01

    The Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) is a 2 square degree HST/ACS survey specifically designed to probe galaxy evolution as a function of time and environment (PI: N. Scoville). In addition to the extensive HST data, the COSMOS team has acquired deep multi-wavelength data from radio to X-ray (VLA, Spitzer, NOAO, CFHT, Subaru, Galex, Chandra, XMM). Spectroscopic surveys are currently under way using Magellan, Kecks, and VLT, and an extensive photometric redshift database is also being assembled. Future surveys using major new instruments such as Herschel are also being planned. To take advantage of these rich complementary databases, we have undertaken a 1100 micron imaging survey of a 30' x 30' field centered just north of the earlier mm/submm surveys by the Bolocam on CSO and MAMBO on the 30-m telescope, with a small overlap. We will present some of the preliminary results from the survey.

  4. THE BLACK HOLE-BULGE MASS RELATION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD-SOUTH SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, Malte; Silverman, John D.

    2013-04-10

    We present results from a study to determine whether relations-established in the local universe-between the mass of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies are in place at higher redshifts. We identify a well-constructed sample of 18 X-ray-selected, broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey with 0.5 < z < 1.2. This redshift range is chosen to ensure that Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging is available with at least two filters that bracket the 4000 A break, thus providing reliable stellar mass estimates of the host galaxy by accounting for both young and old stellar populations. We compute single-epoch, virial black hole (BH) masses from optical spectra using the broad Mg II emission line. For essentially all galaxies in our sample, their total stellar mass content agrees remarkably well, given their BH masses, with local relations of inactive galaxies and active SMBHs. We further decompose the total stellar mass into bulge and disk components separately with full knowledge of the HST point-spread function. We find that {approx}80% of the sample is consistent with the local M{sub BH}-M{sub *,{sub Bulge}} relation even with 72% of the host galaxies showing the presence of a disk. In particular, bulge-dominated hosts are more aligned with the local relation than those with prominent disks. We further discuss the possible physical mechanisms that are capable of building up the stellar mass of the bulge from an extended disk of stars over the subsequent 8 Gyr.

  5. A WISE Survey of Star Formation in the Milky Way: New Insight into Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Xavier

    We propose to measure the recent star formation rate (SFR) in the Perseus Arm of the Milky Way galaxy and its relation to the surface density of gas, whether molecular or atomic on a range of scales from star forming clusters through large star forming complexes to the full scale of the Galactic Arm. We will test the connection between the SFR-gas relationship in the Galaxy and comparable measurements made in external galaxies in order to probe its origin and better understand the role and contribution of star formation to cosmological galaxy evolution. We also propose to study star formation that has been triggered by the recent formation of massive star clusters in order to discern the mechanisms of triggering that may be operating on super bubble size scales of more than 100 parsecs. This study will allow us to understand one of the key factors that sets the efficiency with which gas becomes stars as galaxies evolve with time. In order to achieve these goals, we will carry out a census of young stellar objects in the outer Milky Way Perseus Arm, using data gathered by the WISE and 2MASS all-sky surveys, with additional use of archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We will develop and refine a young star finding algorithm that uses WISE and 2MASS photometry to identify and classify young stars and filters out contaminating objects such as background galaxies. We will measure the gas content with extinction maps made with data from 2MASS. We will test the triggered star formation models by analyzing the spatial distributions of young stars in super-bubbles and massive star forming regions in the Perseus Arm. This study will produce a key, like-for-like comparison between the extragalactic star formation rate-molecular gas relation and the Galactic relation and will advance the progress in linking Galactic and extragalactic studies of star formation, studying massive star forming regions that are representative of the major mode of star formation. The

  6. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: No Evidence for Evolution in the M• -σ* Relation to z˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Brandt, W. N.; Denney, Kelly D.; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Kochanek, Christopher S.; McGreer, Ian D.; Merloni, Andrea; Peterson, Bradley M.; Petitjean, Patrick; Schneider, Donald P.; Schulze, Andreas; Strauss, Michael A.; Tao, Charling; Trump, Jonathan R.; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    We present host stellar velocity dispersion measurements for a sample of 88 broad-line quasars at 0.1\\lt z\\lt 1 (46 at z\\gt 0.6) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project. High signal-to-noise ratio coadded spectra (average S/N≈ 30 per 69 km {{s}-1} pixel) from SDSS-RM allowed for the decomposition of the host and quasar spectra and for measurements of the host stellar velocity dispersions and black hole (BH) masses using the single-epoch (SE) virial method. The large sample size and dynamic range in luminosity ({{L}5100}={{10}43.2-44.7} erg {{s}-1}) lead to the first clear detection of a correlation between SE virial BH mass and host stellar velocity dispersion far beyond the local universe. However, the observed correlation is significantly flatter than the local relation, suggesting that there are selection biases in high-z luminosity-threshold quasar samples for such studies. Our uniform sample and analysis enable an investigation of the redshift evolution of the {{M}\\bullet }-{{σ }*} relation relatively free of caveats by comparing different samples/analyses at disjoint redshifts. We do not observe evolution of the {{M}\\bullet }-{{σ }*} relation in our sample up to z˜ 1, but there is an indication that the relation flattens toward higher redshifts. Coupled with the increasing threshold luminosity with redshift in our sample, this again suggests that certain selection biases are at work, and simple simulations demonstrate that a constant {{M}\\bullet }-{{σ }*} relation is favored to z˜ 1. Our results highlight the scientific potential of deep coadded spectroscopy from quasar monitoring programs, and offer a new path to probe the co-evolution of BHs and galaxies at earlier times.

  7. Evolution in the Volumetric Type Ia Supernova Rate from the Supernova Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrett, K.; Sullivan, M.; Conley, A.; González-Gaitán, S.; Carlberg, R.; Fouchez, D.; Ripoche, P.; Neill, J. D.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Pritchet, C.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Baumont, S.; Lidman, C.; Perlmutter, S.; Walker, E. S.

    2012-08-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate (SNRIa) as a function of redshift for the first four years of data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). This analysis includes 286 spectroscopically confirmed and more than 400 additional photometrically identified SNe Ia within the redshift range 0.1 <= z <= 1.1. The volumetric SNRIa evolution is consistent with a rise to z ~ 1.0 that follows a power law of the form (1+z)α, with α = 2.11 ± 0.28. This evolutionary trend in the SNLS rates is slightly shallower than that of the cosmic star formation history (SFH) over the same redshift range. We combine the SNLS rate measurements with those from other surveys that complement the SNLS redshift range, and fit various simple SN Ia delay-time distribution (DTD) models to the combined data. A simple power-law model for the DTD (i.e., vpropt -β) yields values from β = 0.98 ± 0.05 to β = 1.15 ± 0.08 depending on the parameterization of the cosmic SFH. A two-component model, where SNRIa is dependent on stellar mass (M stellar) and star formation rate (SFR) as SNRIa(z) = A × M stellar(z) + B × SFR(z), yields the coefficients A = (1.9 ± 0.1) × 10-14 SNe yr-1 M -1 ⊙ and B = (3.3 ± 0.2) × 10-4 SNe yr-1 (M ⊙ yr-1)-1. More general two-component models also fit the data well, but single Gaussian or exponential DTDs provide significantly poorer matches. Finally, we split the SNLS sample into two populations by the light-curve width (stretch), and show that the general behavior in the rates of faster-declining SNe Ia (0.8 <= s < 1.0) is similar, within our measurement errors, to that of the slower objects (1.0 <= s < 1.3) out to z ~ 0.8.

  8. Genome survey sequencing provides clues into glucosinolate biosynthesis and flowering pathway evolution in allotetrapolyploid Brassica juncea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brassica juncea is an economically important vegetable crop in China, oil crop in India, condiment crop in Europe and selected for canola quality recently in Canada and Australia. B. juncea (2n = 36, AABB) is an allotetraploid derived from interspecific hybridization between B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and B. nigra (2n = 16, BB), followed by spontaneous chromosome doubling. Results Comparative genome analysis by genome survey sequence (GSS) of allopolyploid B. juncea with B. rapa was carried out based on high-throughput sequencing approaches. Over 28.35 Gb of GSS data were used for comparative analysis of B. juncea and B. rapa, producing 45.93% reads mapping to the B. rapa genome with a high ratio of single-end reads. Mapping data suggested more structure variation (SV) in the B. juncea genome than in B. rapa. We detected 2,921,310 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with high heterozygosity and 113,368 SVs, including 1-3 bp Indels, between B. juncea and B. rapa. Non-synonymous polymorphisms in glucosinolate biosynthesis genes may account for differences in glucosinolate biosynthesis and glucosinolate components between B. juncea and B. rapa. Furthermore, we identified distinctive vernalization-dependent and photoperiod-dependent flowering pathways coexisting in allopolyploid B. juncea, suggesting contribution of these pathways to adaptation for survival during polyploidization. Conclusions Taken together, we proposed that polyploidization has allowed for accelerated evolution of the glucosinolate biosynthesis and flowering pathways in B. juncea that likely permit the phenotypic variation observed in the crop. PMID:24502855

  9. Structure and photometry of an I less than 20.5 galaxy sample from the Hubble Space Telescope medium deep survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Andrew C.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Koo, David C.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Reitzel, David B.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    1995-05-01

    A set of 100 faint galaxies from nine Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera (WFC) I-band images have been analyzed as part of the Medium Deep Survey (MDS) Key Project. This sample reaches a depth of I approximately less than or equal to 20.5 (corresponding to B approximately 22-23) and complements the first set of fainter galaxies analyzed by the MDS team. Images were deconvolved using the Lucy-Richardson algorithm and a newly developed procedure designed to yield a more reliable determination of structure in the low-S/N regime. These deconvolved images were used to characterize the structure of the galaxies through quantative measurements of total magnitudes, half-light radii, exponential disk scale lengths, and disk-to-total rations. Extensive testing was done to establish the validity of the procedures used and to characterize the degree of systematic errors present in the analysis techniques. The observed size-magnitude distribution appears consistent with a scenario in which luminous galaxies have evolved little in intrinsic luminosity, size, or structure over recent epochs in a 'normal' cosmology (0 less than q0 less than 0.5 and Lambda0 = 0). The predicted nonevolving distributions were based on models designed to fit existing counts, colors, and redshifts of faint galaxies and on the observed correlations between metric rest-frame size and luminosity found in a nearby galaxy sample studied by Kent (1984-1985). The typical galaxy in our sample is expected to be at z approximately equal to 0.3, and to have a luminosity approximately 0.5 mag fainter than L* and a half-light radius of approximately 1 sec or approximately 6 kpc (H 0 = 50 km/s Mpc). The observed distribution of disk-to-total ratios, while uncertain, is in agreement with that of Kent's sample and thus supports the view that substantial evolution has not occurred over the look-back times characteristic of our sample.

  10. EVOLUTION OF GROUP GALAXIES FROM THE FIRST RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Li, I. H.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; Gladders, M. E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: gladders@oddjob.uchicago.edu

    2012-04-20

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f{sub red}) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 {<=} z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the 'probability friends-of-friends' algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z {approx} 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z {approx}> 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f{sub red} than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f{sub red} by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M{sub *}), total group stellar mass (M{sub *,grp}, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r{sub grp}), and local galaxy density ({Sigma}{sub 5}). We find that M{sub *} is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f{sub red} and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f{sub red} on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M{sub *}. Massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) show little dependence of f{sub red} on r{sub grp}, M{sub *,grp}, and {Sigma}{sub 5} over the redshift range. The dependence of f{sub red} on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10.6} M{sub Sun }. We observe an apparent 'group down-sizing' effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f{sub red}. We find a dependence of f{sub red} on both r{sub grp} and {Sigma}{sub 5} after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r{sub grp}, there is a significant dependence of f{sub red} on {Sigma}{sub 5}, while r{sub grp

  11. ISOCAM observations in the Lockman Hole . II. The 14.3 μm deep survey: Data reduction, catalogue and source counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodighiero, G.; Lari, C.; Fadda, D.; Franceschini, A.; Elbaz, D.; Cesarsky, C.

    2004-12-01

    We present a new analysis of the ISOCAM 14.3 μm deep survey in a 20 × 20 square arcmins area in the Lockman Hole. This survey is intermediate between the ultra-deep surveys and the shallow surveys in the ELAIS fields. The data have been analyzed with the method presented by Lari et al. (\\cite{Lar01}). We have produced a catalogue of 283 sources detected above the 5-σ threshold, with fluxes in the interval 0.1-8 mJy. The catalogue is 90% complete at 1 mJy. The positional accuracy, estimated from the cross-correlation of infrared and optical sources, is around 1.5 arcsec. The search for the optical counterparts of the sources in the survey is performed on a medium-deep r' band optical image (5σ depth of r'=25), making use of the radio detections when available. The photometry has been checked through simulations and by comparing the data with those presented in a shallower and more extended ISOCAM survey in the Lockman Hole, that we have presented in a companion paper. Only 15% of the 14.3 μm sources do not have an optical counterpart down to r'=25 mag. We use the 6.7/14.3 μm colour as a star/galaxy separator, together with a visual inspection of the optical image and an analysis of the observed Spectral Energy Distribution of the ISOCAM sources. The stars in the sample turn out to be only 6% of the sample. We discuss the 14.3 μm counts of extragalactic sources, combining our catalogue with that obtained from the shallower ISOCAM survey. The data in the two surveys are consistent, and our results fully support the claims in previous works for the existence of an evolving population of infrared galaxies, confirming the evident departure from non-evolutionary model predictions. Based on observations obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA). Tables 2 and 3 are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130

  12. New Measurements of the Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations in Deep SpitzerllRAC Survey Data and their Cosmological Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Arendt, R. G.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Mather, J.; Moseley, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    We extend the previous measurements of CIB fluctuations to angular scales of less than or equal to 1 degree new data obtained in the course of the 2,000+ hour Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Two fields with completed observations of approximately equal to 12 hr/pixel are analyzed for source-subtracted CIB fluctuations at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers. The fields, EGS and UDS, cover a total area of approximately 0.25 deg and lie at high Galactic and Ecliptic latitudes, thus minimizing cirrus and zodiacal light contributions to the fluctuations. The observations have been conducted at 3 distinct epochs separated by about 6 months. As in our previous studies, the fields were assembled using the self-calibration method which is uniquely suitable for probing faint diffuse backgrounds. The assembled fields were cleaned off the bright sources down to the low shot noise levels corresponding to AB mag approximately equal to 25, Fourier-transformed and their power spectra evaluated. The noise was estimated from the time-differenced data and subtracted from the signal isolating the fluctuations remaining above the noise levels. The power spectra of the source-subtracted fields remain identical (within the observational uncertainties) for the three epochs of observations indicating that zodiacal light contributes negligibly to the fluctuations. By comparing to the measurements for the same regions at 8 micrometers we demonstrate that Galactic cirrus cannot account for the levels of the fluctuations either. The signal appears isotropically distributed on the sky as required by its origin in the CIB fluctuations. This measurement thus extends our earlier results to the important range of sub-degree scales. We find that the CIB fluctuations continue to diverge to more than 10 times those of known galaxy populations on angular scales out to less than or equal to 1 degree. The low shot noise levels remaining in the diffuse maps indicate that the large scale fluctuations arise from spatial

  13. New aerogeophysical survey targets crustal architecture and tectonic evolution of East Antarctica in the Recovery frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraccioli, F.; Forsberg, R.; Jordan, T. A.; Matsuoka, K.; Olesen, A. V.; Ghidella, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    East Antarctica is the size of the conterminous US; it represents the least known continent on Earth despite being regarded as a keystone in Gondwana, Rodinia and possibly even earlier Columbia/Nuna supercontinents. Significant progress has however been made in recent years in the exploration of East Antarctica using airborne geophysical techniques. Spurred by the International Polar Year major collaborative international aerogeophysical campaigns have been performed over the Wilkes Subglacial Basin, the Aurora Subglacial Basin and the Gamburtsev Mountains in recent years, and these are continuing to provide fundamental new glimpses into the crustal architecture in interior East Antarctica, as well as several new interpretations regarding its linkages with tectonic and geodynamic evolution from Precambrian to Mesozoic/Cenozoic times. Here we present the first results of a major reconnaissance aerogeophysical survey over the largely unexplored Recovery ice stream catchment in East Antarctica completed during the IceGRAV 2012-13 field campaign, as part of an international Danish, Norwegian, UK and Argentine collaboration. Over 29,000 line km of new radio-echo sounding, laser altimetry, gravity and magnetic data were acquired using a British Antarctic Survey Twin Otter that surveyed the region. We focus primarily on the new potential field datasets for the area. Specifically, we present the first aeromagnetic anomaly maps, free air and Bouguer and isostatic residual maps obtained for the region. These images provide new geophysical perspectives that are required in order to address a cascade of open questions over this region. Where are the major tectonic boundaries between the Coats Land Block, the Shackleton Range, and the collage of different provinces recently proposed from aeromagnetic studies in Dronning Maud Land (Mieth and Jokat, 2013, GR)? Is the Coats Land crustal block a tectonic tracer for Laurentia (Loewy et al., 2011, Geology), and how and when was this

  14. Constraints From Deep-Imaging Magnetotellurics on the Lithospheric Structure and Evolution of the Enigmatic Okwa Terrane, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, M. R.; Jones, A. G.; Evans, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Okwa Terrane, located in central Botswana, is perhaps one of the least understood terranes within the southern African Archean to Palaeoproterozoic tectonic framework. Thick Quaternary Kalahari sand-cover provides minimal crustal exposure with which to define the nature and evolution of the terrane: its potential affiliations and tectonic relationships with adjacent terranes remain speculative and largely unconstrained. The Okwa Terrane, as defined primarily in potential field images, is bounded to the west and north by the Early Proterozoic Rehoboth Terrane, to the south by the Archean Kaapvaal Craton, and to the east, across a poorly defined boundary, by the Palaeoproterozoic Magondi orogenic belt and the Archean Zimbabwe Craton. While the Okwa Terrane is inferred in some interpretations to constitute the northern-most portion of the Kaapvaal Craton, there is no direct evidence to support an Archean lithospheric stabilisation age for the terrane. The oldest recorded crustal ages, for intrusive granites located in the Okwa Inlier, are between 2.1 and 2.0 Ga. Gneissic deformation of the granites is recognised at ~1.8 Ga and, in alternative interpretations, is regarded as the accretion age of the Okwa Terrane with the Kaapvaal Craton along the major east-west trending Palala Shear Zone. A reported diamondiferous kimberlite pipe in the Gope cluster of the Okwa Terrane suggests a lithospheric thickness in excess of the depth of the diamond stability field (~160 km), at least at the time of kimberlite eruption at ~80 Ma. The multinational Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment (SAMTEX) has acquired, during the period between 2003 and 2008, more than 730 magnetotelluric (MT) sites along 14,000 kilometers of profile length across southern Africa. In acquiring MT data on two orthogonal ~600 km-long profiles across the Okwa Terrane, SAMTEX provides the first deep crustal and lithospheric mantle images of the terrane. MT stations were installed at roughly 20 km

  15. THE CLUSTERING OF GALAXIES IN THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: LUMINOSITY AND COLOR DEPENDENCE AND REDSHIFT EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Hong; Zehavi, Idit; Zheng Zheng; Weinberg, David H.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Blanton, Michael; Chen Yanmei; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; McBride, Cameron K.; Ho, Shirley; Ross, Nicholas P.; Kazin, Eyal; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Nuza, Sebastian E.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Parejko, John K.; and others

    2013-04-20

    We measure the luminosity and color dependence and the redshift evolution of galaxy clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Ninth Data Release. We focus on the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of subsets of its CMASS sample, which includes about 260,000 galaxies over {approx}3300 deg{sup 2} in the redshift range 0.43 < z < 0.7. To minimize the selection effect on galaxy clustering, we construct well-defined luminosity and color subsamples by carefully accounting for the CMASS galaxy selection cuts. The 2PCF of the whole CMASS sample, if approximated by a power-law, has a correlation length of r{sub 0} = 7.93 {+-} 0.06 h {sup -1} Mpc and an index of {gamma} = 1.85 {+-} 0.01. Clear dependences on galaxy luminosity and color are found for the projected 2PCF in all redshift bins, with more luminous and redder galaxies generally exhibiting stronger clustering and steeper 2PCF. The color dependence is also clearly seen for galaxies within the red sequence, consistent with the behavior of SDSS-II main sample galaxies at lower redshifts. At a given luminosity (k + e corrected), no significant evolution of the projected 2PCFs with redshift is detected for red sequence galaxies. We also construct galaxy samples of fixed number density at different redshifts, using redshift-dependent magnitude thresholds. The clustering of these galaxies in the CMASS redshift range is found to be consistent with that predicted by passive evolution. Our measurements of the luminosity and color dependence and redshift evolution of galaxy clustering will allow for detailed modeling of the relation between galaxies and dark matter halos and new constraints on galaxy formation and evolution.

  16. Evolution of Temperature and Carbon Storage Within the Deep Southeast Atlantic Ocean Across the Last Glacial/Interglacial Cycle Inferred from a Highly-Resolved Sedimentary Depth Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C. D.; Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Slowey, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    Many models show that the relative intensity of stratification is a primary variable governing the sequestration and release of carbon from the ocean over ice ages. The wide-scale observations necessary to test these model-derived hypotheses are not yet sufficient, but sedimentary depth transects represent a promising approach for making progress. Here we present paired stable isotopic (d18O, d13C) and trace metal data (Mg/Ca, B/Ca) from benthic foraminifera collected from a highly vertically-resolved depth transect from the mid-depth and deep SE Atlantic. These observations, which cover Marine Isotope Stages 5e, 5d, 5a, 4, and the Last Glacial Maximum, document the evolution of glacial conditions from the previous interglacial, and provide detailed observations regarding the magnitude and timing of changes in temperature and salinity within the deep ocean at key time points over the last glacial/interglacial cycle. Furthermore, the comparison between purely 'physical' tracers (i.e. Mg/Ca, d18O) and tracers sensitive to the carbon cycle (i.e. d13C and B/Ca) provides critical insight into the relationship between deep/mid-depth stratification and global carbon dynamics. Notably among our observations, the paired stable isotope and trace metal results strongly suggest that much of the ice-age cooling of deep South Atlantic occurred at the MIS 5e/5d transition, while the onset of salinity stratification in the mid-depth South Atlantic occurred at the MIS 5/4 transition.

  17. A Determination of the Intergalactic Redshift Dependent UV-Optical-NIR Photon Density Using Deep Galaxy Survey Data and the Gamma-Ray Opacity of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the intensity and photon spectrum of the intergalactic background light (IBL) as a function of red shift using an approach based on observational data obtained at in different wavelength bands from local to deep galaxy surveys. Our empirically based approach allows us, for the firs.t time, to obtain a completely model independent determination of the IBL and to quantify its uncertainties. Using our results on the IBL, we then place upper and lower limits on the opacity of the universe to gamma-rays, independent of previous constraints.

  18. EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROBING EVOLUTION AND REIONIZATION SPECTROSCOPICALLY (PEARS) GRISM SURVEY. I. THE SOUTH FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Straughn, Amber N.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Grogin, Norman; Panagia, Nino; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Jansen, Rolf A.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; Gronwall, Caryl; Walsh, Jeremy; Pasquali, Anna; Xu, Chun

    2009-10-15

    We present results of a search for emission-line galaxies (ELGs) in the southern fields of the Hubble Space Telescope Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) grism survey. The PEARS South Fields consist of five Advanced Camera for Surveys pointings (including the Hubble Ultra Deep Field) with the G800L grism for a total of 120 orbits, revealing thousands of faint object spectra in the GOODS-South region of the sky. ELGs are one subset of objects that are prevalent among the grism spectra. Using a two-dimensional detection and extraction procedure, we find 320 emission lines originating from 226 galaxy 'knots' within 192 individual galaxies. Line identification results in 118 new grism-spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies in the GOODS-South Field. We measure emission-line fluxes using standard Gaussian fitting techniques. At the resolution of the grism data, the H{beta} and [O III] doublet are blended. However, by fitting two Gaussian components to the H{beta} and [O III] features, we find that many of the PEARS ELGs have high [O III]/H{beta} ratios compared to other galaxy samples of comparable luminosities. The star formation rates of the ELGs are presented, as well as a sample of distinct giant star-forming regions at z {approx} 0.1-0.5 across individual galaxies. We find that the radial distances of these H II regions in general reside near the galaxies' optical continuum half-light radii, similar to those of giant H II regions in local galaxies.

  19. The VVDS-VLA deep field. II. Optical and near infrared identifications of VLA S1.4 GHz > 80 μ Jy sources in the VIMOS VLT deep survey VVDS-02h field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciliegi, P.; Zamorani, G.; Bondi, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Gregorini, L.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Radovich, M.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Parma, P.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Merluzzi, P.; Paltani, S.; Pollo, A.; Zucca, E.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; Gavignaud, I.; Pellò, R.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper we present the optical and near-infrared identifications of the 1054 radio sources detected in the 20 cm deep radio survey down to a 5σ flux limit of ~80 μJy obtained with the VLA in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey VVDS-02h deep field. Using U,B,V,R,I and K data, with limiting magnitudes of UAB˜25.4, BAB˜26.5, VAB˜26.2, RAB˜25.9 IAB˜25.0, JAB˜24.2, KAB˜23.9 (50% completeness) we identified 718 radio sources (~74% of the whole sample). The photometric redshift analysis shows that, in each magnitude bin, the radio sample has a higher median photometric redshift than the whole optical sample, while the median (V-I)AB color of the radio sources is redder than the median color of the whole optical sample. These results suggest that radio detection is preferentially selecting galaxies with higher intrinsic optical luminosity. From the analysis of the optical properties of the radio sources as function of the radio flux, we found that while about 35% of the radio sources are optically unidentified in the higher radio flux bin (S> 1.0 mJy), the percentage of unidentified sources decreases to about 25% in the faintest bins (S< 0.5 mJy). The median IAB magnitude for the total sample of radio sources, i.e. including also the unidentified ones, is brighter in the faintest radio bins than in the bin with higher radio flux. This suggests that most of the faintest radio sources are likely to be associated to relatively lower radio luminosity objects at relatively modest redshift, rather than radio-powerful, AGN type objects at high redshift. Using a classification in early-type and late-type galaxies based on the (B-I)AB color and the photometric redshift, we found that the majority of the radio sources below ~0.15 mJy are indeed late-type star forming galaxies. Finally, the radio sources without optical counterpart in our deep imaging have a median radio flux of 0.15 mJy, equal to that of identified sources. Given the very faint optical limits, these

  20. A LABOCA SURVEY OF THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH-SUBMILLIMETER PROPERTIES OF NEAR-INFRARED SELECTED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Greve, T. R.; Walter, F.; Bell, E. F.; Dannerbauer, H.; Rix, H.-W.; Schinnerer, E.; Weiss, A.; Kovacs, A.; Smail, I.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Alexander, D.; Zheng, X. Z.; Knudsen, K. K.; Bertoldi, F.; De Breuck, C.; Dickinson, M.; Gawiser, E.; Lutz, D.; Brandt, N.; Chapman, S. C.

    2010-08-10

    Using the 330 hr ESO-MPG 870 {mu}m survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S) obtained with the Large Apex BOlometer CAmera (LABOCA) on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX), we have carried out a stacking analysis at submillimeter (submm) wavelengths of a sample of 8266 near-infra-red (near-IR) selected (K {sub vega} {<=} 20) galaxies, including 893 BzK galaxies, 1253 extremely red objects (EROs), and 737 distant red galaxies (DRGs), selected from the Multi-wavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). We measure average 870 {mu}m fluxes of 0.22 {+-} 0.01 mJy (22.0{sigma}), 0.48 {+-} 0.04 mJy (12.0{sigma}), 0.39 {+-} 0.03 mJy (13.0{sigma}), and 0.43 {+-} 0.04 mJy (10.8{sigma}) for the K {sub vega} {<=} 20, BzK, ERO, and DRG samples, respectively. For the BzK, ERO, and DRG sub-samples, which overlap to some degree and are likely to be at z {approx_equal} 1-2, this implies an average far-IR luminosity of {approx}(1-5) x 10{sup 11} L{sub sun} and star formation rate (SFR) of {approx}20-90 M{sub sun} . Splitting the BzK galaxies into star-forming (sBzK) and passive (pBzK) galaxies, the former is significantly detected (0.50 {+-} 0.04 mJy, 12.5{sigma}) while the latter is only marginally detected (0.34 {+-} 0.10 mJy, 3.4{sigma}), thus confirming that the sBzK and pBzK criteria to some extent select obscured, star-forming, and truly passive galaxies, respectively. The K {sub vega} {<=} 20 galaxies are found to contribute 7.27 {+-} 0.34 Jy deg{sup -2} (16.5% {+-} 5.7%) to the 870 {mu}m extragalactic background light (EBL). sBzK and pBzK galaxies contribute 1.49 {+-} 0.22 Jy deg{sup -2} (3.4% {+-} 1.3%) and 0.20 {+-} 0.14 Jy deg{sup -2} (0.5% {+-} 0.3%) to the EBL. We present the first delineation of the average submm signal from the K {sub vega} {<=} 20 selected galaxies and their contribution to the submm EBL as a function of (photometric) redshift, and find a decline in the average submm signal (and therefore IR luminosity and SFR) by a factor {approx}2

  1. Climate processes shape the evolution of populations and species leading to the assembly of modern biotas - examples along a continuum from shallow to deep time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    California experiences droughts, so lets begin with the effects of streamflow variation on population evolution in a coastal lagoon-specialist endangered fish, the tidewater goby. Streamflow controls the closing and opening of lagoons to the sea determining genetic isolation or gene flow. Here evolution is a function of habitat preference for closing lagoons. Other estuarine fishes, with different habitat preferences, differentiate at larger spatial scales in response to longer glacio-eustatic control of estuarine habitat. Species of giraffes in Africa are a puzzle. Why do the ranges of large motile, potentially interbreeding, species occur in contact each other without hybridization? The answer resides in the timing of seasonal precipitation. Although the degree of seaonality of climate does not vary much between species, the timing of precipitation and seasonal "greenup" does. This provides a selective advantage to reproductive isolation, as reproductive timing can be coordinated in each region with seasonal browse availability for lactating females. Convective rainfall in Africa follows the sun and solar intensity is influenced by the precession cycle such that more extensive summer rains fell across the Sahara and South Asia early in the Holocene, this may also contribute to the genetic isolation and speciation of giraffes and others savanna species. But there also appears to be a correlation with rarity (CITES designation) of modern wetland birds, as the dramatic drying of the late Holocene landscape contributes to this conservation concern. Turning back to the West Coast we find the most diverse temperate coastal fauna in the world, yet this diversity evolved and is a relict of diversity accumulation during the apex of upwelling in the late Miocene, driven by the reglaciation of Antarctica. Lastly we can see that the deep-sea evolution is broadly constrained by the transitions from greenhouse to icehouse worlds over the last 90 mya as broad periods of warm

  2. Adiabatic Survey of Subdwarf B Star Oscillations. III. Effects of Extreme Horizontal Branch Stellar Evolution on Pulsation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpinet, S.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Dorman, Ben

    2002-06-01

    We present the final results of a large, systematic survey of the adiabatic oscillation properties of models of subdwarf B (sdB) stars. This survey is aimed at providing the minimal theoretical background with which to understand the asteroseismological characteristics of the recently discovered class of pulsating sdB stars (the EC 14026 objects). In this paper, the last of a series of three, we consider the effects of stellar evolution on the pulsation eigenmodes of sdB star models. We specifically analyze the adiabatic properties of 149 equilibrium models culled from seven distinct extreme horizontal branch evolutionary sequences. Those have been chosen in order to span fully the region of parameter space where real sdB stars are found. We primarily focus on the evolution of the pulsation periods (P) and the rates of period change (dP/dt), which are both a priori observable quantities. Both the acoustic and gravity branches of stellar oscillations are considered. In light of the results derived in the first two papers of this series, we discuss how the values of P and dP/dt relate to the various structural adjustments that sdB stars undergo during evolution. We find that the acoustic modes react primarily to the secular variations of the surface gravity. In contrast, we identify three main factors that regulate the period evolution of gravity modes: these are the variations brought about by evolution in both the surface gravity and the effective temperature, as well as the onset and growth of a chemical discontinuity between the C-O-enriched nucleus and the helium-rich mantle. We also find, as expected from our previous results, that the period evolution of the pulsation modes in sdB stars is further complicated by trapping effects (microtrapping in the case of p-modes) and by avoided crossings between modes. The latter occur preferentially in certain regions of parameter space. We provide our final results in the form of extensive tabular data in the appendices

  3. A survey of surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    A new era for the field of Galactic structure is about to be opened with the advent of wide-area digital sky surveys. In this article, the author reviews the status and prospects for research for 3 new ground-based surveys: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Deep Near-Infrared Survey of the Southern Sky (DENIS) and the Two Micron AU Sky Survey (2MASS). These surveys will permit detailed studies of Galactic structure and stellar populations in the Galaxy with unprecedented detail. Extracting the information, however, will be challenging.

  4. Spatial Correlation of Deep Moonquakes and Mare Basalts and Implications for Lunar Present-day Mantle Structure, Magmatism and Thermal Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, A. C.; Zhong, S.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand the evolution and interior dynamics of the Moon, it is necessary to understand the petrogenesis of the mare basalts which dominate the nearside surface. Samples and observations from the Apollo program have helped put constraints on the composition and the geological processes of the mare basalts. Geochemical and petrological studies of lunar samples suggest that this magmatism must have originated from a heterogeneous mantle and were mostly emplaced between 3.85 and 3.0 billion years ago although the depth of the source regions of the mare basalts is poorly constrained by petrological experiments with estimated depths ranging from 100 to 500 km [Shearer et al, 2006]. This leads to different hypotheses with shallow and deep physical processes for mare basalt genesis [Zhong et al, 2000 and Wieczorek and Phillips, 2000]. Another important first order observation from the Apollo era is the presence of moonquakes recorded by the Apollo Seismic Network. Significant work has been done to locate the hypocenters of the moonquakes, especially those deemed deep moonquake clusters [e.g., Nakamura, 1982]. The deep moonquakes (DMQs) were found to occur at depths of 700-900 km in about 300 clusters or “nests” mostly on the nearside [Nakamura 2003, 2005]. Understanding the location and cause of the DMQ will help constrain the current state of the mantle, including the presence of heterogeneties. While it remains unresolved whether the nearside distribution of DMQs is due to biasing effects of the nearside distribution of Apollo seismic stations, it has been suggested that most of the DMQ nests tend to occur near mare basalt terrains [Minshull and Goult, 1988]. In this study, we have correlated the presence of mare basalts with the epicenters of ~100 deep moonquake clusters, using recent remote sensing data of FeO as a proxy for mare basalts [e.g.,Lawrence et al, 2000] and newly compiled locations of DMQs clusters [Nakamura, 2005]. Our results show that

  5. COSMIC SHEAR RESULTS FROM THE DEEP LENS SURVEY. I. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON {Omega} {sub M} AND {sigma}{sub 8} WITH A TWO-DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Schneider, Michael D.; Wittman, David; Schmidt, Samuel; Hilbert, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    We present a cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), a deep BVRz multi-band imaging survey of five 4 deg{sup 2} fields with two National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) 4 m telescopes at Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo. For both telescopes, the change of the point-spread-function (PSF) shape across the focal plane is complicated, and the exposure-to-exposure variation of this position-dependent PSF change is significant. We overcome this challenge by modeling the PSF separately for individual exposures and CCDs with principal component analysis (PCA). We find that stacking these PSFs reproduces the final PSF pattern on the mosaic image with high fidelity, and the method successfully separates PSF-induced systematics from gravitational lensing effects. We calibrate our shears and estimate the errors, utilizing an image simulator, which generates sheared ground-based galaxy images from deep Hubble Space Telescope archival data with a realistic atmospheric turbulence model. For cosmological parameter constraints, we marginalize over shear calibration error, photometric redshift uncertainty, and the Hubble constant. We use cosmology-dependent covariances for the Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis and find that the role of this varying covariance is critical in our parameter estimation. Our current non-tomographic analysis alone constrains the {Omega} {sub M}-{sigma}{sub 8} likelihood contour tightly, providing a joint constraint of {Omega} {sub M} = 0.262 {+-} 0.051 and {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.868 {+-} 0.071. We expect that a future DLS weak-lensing tomographic study will further tighten these constraints because explicit treatment of the redshift dependence of cosmic shear more efficiently breaks the {Omega} {sub M}-{sigma}{sub 8} degeneracy. Combining the current results with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7 year (WMAP7) likelihood data, we obtain {Omega} {sub M} = 0.278 {+-} 0.018 and {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.815 {+-} 0.020.

  6. Hydraulic-gas transient processes within the overall phenomenological evolution of the French HLW deep geological disposal: current knowledge in PA perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, J.; Plas, F.

    2009-04-01

    Because of the creation of the disposal underground facilities, then of the ventilation of whole or part of these facilities during operating period, and finally of hydrogen production, mainly by anoxic corrosion of metallic components, in post-closure period, the phenomenological evolution of a radwaste deep geological repository and its surrounding host rock will be characterized by an hydraulic and gas transient phase until the overall system reach an equilibrium state. This paper presents the analysis of this transient phase carried out in France within the framework of the feasibility study of a HLW and ILLW deep geological disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay layer (Meuse/Haute Marne site) (Dossier 2005 Argile) according to the current state of knowledge: the broad outlines of the expected evolution are described in time and space from operating period to post closure period, taking into consideration the studied design concept (overall architecture, disposal zones, disposal modules, disposal cells, various types of waste, operating conditions…). More particularly for hydrogen, emphasis is focused on space and time organization of production and migration, in particular the various sources of production, the various pathways of migrations and interactions with hydraulics. Although the description is supported by a sound data base on hydraulic and gas production and migration (clay media, engineered materials, corrosion, radiolysis…) and numerical calculations at different scales of time and space, uncertainties exist both in phenomenology (Hydrogen production mechanisms, Hydrogen migration mechanisms in clay media, modeling of mechanisms, values of parameters…) and in simulation (in particular limitations to achieve the various time and space scales and some couplings). So deviations of the expected evolution are discussed. Results of this analysis show that the hydraulic and gas transient phase may present a complex organization in time and space

  7. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH. VI. CONSTRAINTS ON DARK ENERGY AND THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Kayo, Issha; Fukugita, Masataka; Inada, Naohisa; Strauss, Michael A.; Shin, Min-Su; Bahcall, Neta A.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Richards, Gordon T.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.; White, Richard L.

    2012-05-15

    We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention given to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.79{sup +0.06}{sub -0.07}(stat.){sup +0.06}{sub -0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w = -1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z {approx}< 1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as {nu}{sub n} {identical_to} dln {phi}{sub *}/dln (1 + z) and the velocity dispersion evolution {nu}{sub {sigma}} {identical_to} dln {sigma}{sub *}/dln (1 + z) are constrained to {nu}{sub n} = 1.06{sup +1.36}{sub -1.39}(stat.){sup +0.33}{sub -0.64}(syst.) and {nu}{sub {sigma}} = -0.05{sup +0.19}{sub -0.16}(stat.){sup +0.03}{sub -0.03}(syst.), respectively, when the SQLS result is combined with BAO and WMAP for flat models with a cosmological constant. We find that a significant amount of dark energy is preferred even after fully marginalizing over the galaxy evolution parameters. Thus, the statistics of lensed quasars robustly confirm the accelerated cosmic expansion.

  8. Rocky Mountain evolution: Tying Continental Dynamics of the Rocky Mountains and Deep Probe seismic experiments with receiver functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rumpfhuber, E.-M.; Keller, Gordon R.; Sandvol, E.; Velasco, A.A.; Wilson, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we have determined the crustal structure using three different receiver function methods using data collected from the northern transect of the Continental Dynamics of the Rocky Mountains (CD-ROM) experiment. The resulting migrated image and crustal thickness determinations confirm and refine prior crustal thickness measurements based on the CD-ROM and Deep Probe experiment data sets. The new results show a very distinct and thick lower crustal layer beneath the Archean Wyoming province. In addition, we are able to show its termination at 42??N latitude, which provides a seismic tie between the CD-ROM and Deep Probe seismic experiments and thus completes a continuous north-south transect extending from New Mexico into Alberta, Canada. This new tie is particularly important because it occurs close to a major tectonic boundary, the Cheyenne belt, between an Archean craton and a Proterozoic terrane. We used two different stacking techniques, based on a similar concept but using two different ways to estimate uncertainties. Furthermore, we used receiver function migration and common conversion point (CCP) stacking techniques. The combined interpretation of all our results shows (1) crustal thinning in southern Wyoming, (2) strong northward crustal thickening beginning in central Wyoming, (3) the presence of an unusually thick and high-velocity lower crust beneath the Wyoming province, and (4) the abrupt termination of this lower crustal layer north of the Cheyenne belt at 42??N latitude. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Evolution of the deep Atlantic water masses since the last glacial maximum based on a transient run of NCAR-CCSM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marson, Juliana M.; Mysak, Lawrence A.; Mata, Mauricio M.; Wainer, Ilana

    2016-08-01

    During the last deglaciation (from approximately 21 to 11 thousand years ago), the high latitudes of the Atlantic Ocean underwent major changes. Besides the continuous warming, the polar and subpolar ocean surface received a large amount of meltwater from the retracting ice sheets. These changes in temperature and salinity affected deep waters, such as the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) and the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), which are formed in the Southern Ocean and in the northern North Atlantic, respectively. In this study, we present the evolution of the physical properties and distribution of the AABW and the NADW since the last glacial maximum using the results of a transient simulation with NCAR-CCSM3. In this particular model scenario with a schematic freshwater forcing, we find that modern NADW, with its characteristic salinity maximum at depth, was absent in the beginning of the deglaciation, while its intermediate version—Glacial North Atlantic Intermediate Water (GNAIW)—was being formed. GNAIW was a cold and relatively fresh water mass that dominated intermediate depths between 60 and 20°N. At this time, most of the deep and abyssal Atlantic basin was dominated by AABW. Within the onset of the Bølling-Allerød period, at nearly 15 thousand years ago (ka), GNAIW expanded southwards when the simulated Meridional Overturning Circulation overshoots. The transition between GNAIW and NADW ocurred after that, when AABW was fresh enough to allow NADW to sink deeper in the water column. When the NADW appears (~11 ka), AABW retracts and is constrained to lie near the bottom.

  10. Facets of radio-loud AGN evolution : a LOFAR surveys perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radio observations provide a unique view of black holes in the Universe. This thesis presents low frequency radio images and uses the radio sources in those images to study the evolution of black holes and galaxies through the age of the Universe.

  11. The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Susan; Hilton, Matt; Rooney, Philip J.; Caldwell, Caroline; Kay, Scott T.; Collins, Chris A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Romer, A. Kathy; Bermeo, Alberto; Bernstein, Rebecca; da Costa, Luiz; Gifford, Daniel; Hollowood, Devon; Hoyle, Ben; Jeltema, Tesla; Liddle, Andrew R.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Mann, Robert G.; Mayers, Julian A.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Ogando, Ricardo; Sahlén, Martin; Stahl, Benjamin; Stott, John P.; Thomas, Peter A.; Viana, Pedro T. P.; Wilcox, Harry

    2016-11-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature (σv-TX) relation up to z = 1 using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high-redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 z > 0.5 clusters observed with the Gemini Multi Object Spectographs instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalization is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero (σv ∝ T0.86±0.14E(z)-0.37±0.33). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.

  12. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. VI. Constraints on Dark Energy and the Evolution of Massive Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; et al.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to \\Omega_\\Lambda=0.79^{+0.06}_{-0.07}(stat.)^{+0.06}_{-0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w=-1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z<1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as \

  13. The Role of Environment in Shaping Galaxy Evolution at High Redshift: Insights from the SpARCS Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Gillian

    2015-08-01

    Between z = 2 and z = 1, the main progenitors of present-day massive clusters undergo rapid collapse, and cluster members transform from active star-forming to quiescent galaxies. The SpARCS survey is one of the largest surveys designed to detect clusters of galaxies at z> 1, and has discovered hundreds of Spitzer IR-selected clusters.I will present results from GCLASS, a 25-night Gemini/GMOS spectroscopic follow-up survey of ten of the most massive SpARCS clusters at z~1, and explain what we are learning about quenching and stellar mass assembly of galaxies in these, the densest of environments, relative to the field population. I will explain how predictions and observations of the stellar mass growth of Brightest Cluster Galaxies, previously controversially divergent, are now coming into agreement, and discuss the evidence for the relative importance of mergers versus in-situ star formation in driving this stellar mass growth as a function of redshift.I will also present a sample of newly-confirmed clusters at z~2 for which we have HST spectroscopy and imaging, and have been targeting with Keck/MOSFIRE. I will conclude by discussing GOGREEN and DEEPDRILL, two new large surveys approved by Gemini & Spitzer, designed to study the effects of environment at lower stellar mass and at higher redshift, respectively. Collectively, these powerful new surveys are beginning to allow us to place constraints on the location and timescale of quenching and, in concert with both hydro-simulations and semi-analytic models, identify the complex role of environment in shaping galaxy evolution over cosmic time.

  14. Deep Structure and Evolution of The Central Graben, North Sea: Constraints From Seismic Observations and Numerical Dynamic Modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balling, N.; Frederiksen, S.; Nielsen, L.; Nørmark, E.; Nielsen, S. B.; Jacobsen, B. H.

    The Central Graben forms the southern arm of a three-arm rift system in the North Sea, with the Viking Graben as the northern arm and the Moray Firth Basin as the western arm. It is a 70-130 km wide graben with a length of about 550 km. High qual- ity normal-incidence and wide-angle seismic data from the MONA LISA deep seismic experiment across the Central Graben show crustal thinning by a factor of 2 in areas of thickest sedimentary sequences and localized seismic reflectivity in the upper mantle dipping away from the deepest parts of the graben. A numerical dynamic lithospheric model with significant Triassic and Late Jurassic extensional phases as well as Mid- dle Jurassic thermal doming accounts for the observed up to 8 km of Late Permian to Cenozoic sediments in the deepest parts of the Graben, for most of the observed lateral thickness variation of sedimentary formations and is consistent with both the deep-seismic data, present-day heat-flow and gravity data. The detailed crustal model produced by joint inverse modelling of seimic refraction data and gravity data shows a distinct thinning of the crust and local elevation of Moho by up to 5 km in a 40 km narrow zone below areas of thick upper Jurassic sediments. This Moho structure suggests that a relatively shallow and otherwise strong uppermost mantle has been interrupted, perhaps by mantle shear zones induced by strain softening as in our nu- merical model. The integrated seismic observational and numerical modelling results indicate that an initially pure-shear donimated extensional regime changed into an ex- tensional regime where simple shear played an important part with mantle shear zones developed during the Late Jurassic extension.

  15. Phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses reveal the evolution of bioluminescence and light detection in marine deep-sea shrimps of the family Oplophoridae (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Wong, Juliet M; Pérez-Moreno, Jorge L; Chan, Tin-Yam; Frank, Tamara M; Bracken-Grissom, Heather D

    2015-02-01

    Bioluminescence is essential to the survival of many organisms, particularly in the deep sea where light is limited. Shrimp of the family Oplophoridae exhibit a remarkable mechanism of bioluminescence in the form of a secretion used for predatory defense. Three of the ten genera possess an additional mode of bioluminescence in the form of light-emitting organs called photophores. Phylogenetic analyses can be useful for tracing the evolution of bioluminescence, however, the few studies that have attempted to reconcile the relationships within Oplophoridae have generated trees with low-resolution. We present the most comprehensive phylogeny of Oplophoridae to date, with 90% genera coverage using seven genes (mitochondrial and nuclear) across 30 oplophorid species. We use our resulting topology to trace the evolution of bioluminescence within Oplophoridae. Previous studies have suggested that oplophorid visual systems may be tuned to differentiate the separate modes of bioluminescence. While all oplophorid shrimp possess a visual pigment sensitive to blue-green light, only those bearing photophores have an additional pigment sensitive to near-ultraviolet light. We attempt to characterize opsins, visual pigment proteins essential to light detection, in two photophore-bearing species (Systellaspis debilis and Oplophorus gracilirostris) and make inferences regarding their function and evolutionary significance.

  16. Delayed Gratification Habitable Zones: When Deep Outer Solar System Regions Become Balmy During Post-Main Sequence Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    2003-06-01

    Like all low- and moderate-mass stars, the Sun will burn as a red giant during its later evolution, generating of solar luminosities for some tens of millions of years. During this post-main sequence phase, the habitable (i.e., liquid water) thermal zone of our Solar System will lie in the region where Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects orbit. Compared with the 1 AU habitable zone where Earth resides, this "delayed gratification habitable zone" (DGHZ) will enjoy a far less biologically hazardous environment - with lower harmful radiation levels from the Sun, and a far less destructive collisional environment. Objects like Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects, which are known to be rich in both water and organics, will then become possible sites for biochemical and perhaps even biological evolution. The Kuiper Belt, with >105 objects >=50 km in radius and more than three times the combined surface area of the four terrestrial planets, provides numerous sites for possible evolution once the Sun's DGHZ reaches it. The Sun's DGHZ might be thought to only be of academic interest owing to its great separation from us in time. However, ~109 Milky Way stars burn as luminous red giants today. Thus, if icy-organic objects are common in the 20-50 AU zones of these stars, as they are in our Solar System (and as inferred in numerous main sequence stellar disk systems), then DGHZs may form a niche type of habitable zone that is likely to be numerically common in the Galaxy.

  17. Delayed gratification habitable zones: when deep outer solar system regions become balmy during post-main sequence stellar evolution.

    PubMed

    Stern, S Alan

    2003-01-01

    Like all low- and moderate-mass stars, the Sun will burn as a red giant during its later evolution, generating of solar luminosities for some tens of millions of years. During this post-main sequence phase, the habitable (i.e., liquid water) thermal zone of our Solar System will lie in the region where Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects orbit. Compared with the 1 AU habitable zone where Earth resides, this "delayed gratification habitable zone" (DGHZ) will enjoy a far less biologically hazardous environment - with lower harmful radiation levels from the Sun, and a far less destructive collisional environment. Objects like Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects, which are known to be rich in both water and organics, will then become possible sites for biochemical and perhaps even biological evolution. The Kuiper Belt, with >10(5) objects > or =50 km in radius and more than three times the combined surface area of the four terrestrial planets, provides numerous sites for possible evolution once the Sun's DGHZ reaches it. The Sun's DGHZ might be thought to only be of academic interest owing to its great separation from us in time. However, approximately 10(9) Milky Way stars burn as luminous red giants today. Thus, if icy-organic objects are common in the 20-50 AU zones of these stars, as they are in our Solar System (and as inferred in numerous main sequence stellar disk systems), then DGHZs may form a niche type of habitable zone that is likely to be numerically common in the Galaxy.

  18. Delayed gratification habitable zones: when deep outer solar system regions become balmy during post-main sequence stellar evolution.

    PubMed

    Stern, S Alan

    2003-01-01

    Like all low- and moderate-mass stars, the Sun will burn as a red giant during its later evolution, generating of solar luminosities for some tens of millions of years. During this post-main sequence phase, the habitable (i.e., liquid water) thermal zone of our Solar System will lie in the region where Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects orbit. Compared with the 1 AU habitable zone where Earth resides, this "delayed gratification habitable zone" (DGHZ) will enjoy a far less biologically hazardous environment - with lower harmful radiation levels from the Sun, and a far less destructive collisional environment. Objects like Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects, which are known to be rich in both water and organics, will then become possible sites for biochemical and perhaps even biological evolution. The Kuiper Belt, with >10(5) objects > or =50 km in radius and more than three times the combined surface area of the four terrestrial planets, provides numerous sites for possible evolution once the Sun's DGHZ reaches it. The Sun's DGHZ might be thought to only be of academic interest owing to its great separation from us in time. However, approximately 10(9) Milky Way stars burn as luminous red giants today. Thus, if icy-organic objects are common in the 20-50 AU zones of these stars, as they are in our Solar System (and as inferred in numerous main sequence stellar disk systems), then DGHZs may form a niche type of habitable zone that is likely to be numerically common in the Galaxy. PMID:14577880

  19. A Deep Survey of Low-Redshift Absorbers and Their Connections with Galaxies: Probing the Roles of Dwarfs, Satellites, and Large-Scale Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    In the not-too-distant past, the study of galaxy evolution neglected the vast interface between the stars in a galaxy and intergalactic space except for the dynamical effects of dark matter. Thanks to QSO absorption line spectroscopy and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph {COS}, the circumgalactic medium {CGM} has come into sharp focus as a rich ecosystem playing a vital role in the evolution of the host galaxy. However, attributing the gas detected in absorption with host dwarf galaxies detected in optical surveys around the sightline becomes very difficult very quickly with increasing redshift. In addition, both targeted UV spectroscopy and ground-based galaxy surveys are resource intensive, which complicates compiling large, statistically robust samples of very-low-redshift absorber/galaxy pairs. We propose a CGM study of unprecedented statistical power by exploiting the vast number of sightlines in the HST/COS archive located within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey {SDSS} footprint to compile an estimated sample of 586 absorbers at z<0.015. This very-low-redshift criterion enables spectroscopic completeness down to L<0.01 L* galaxies in publicly available optical imaging and spectroscopy.Our survey is uniquely poised to address the following questions: {1} What is the role of dwarf galaxies that would be undetectable at higher redshift in giving rise to the gas detected in QSO spectroscopy? {2} How does galaxy environment and large-scale structure affect the CGM and what are the implications for environmental quenching of star formation? {3} How efficiently do feedback mechanisms expel metal-enriched gas to great distances into the galaxy halo and into the IGM?

  20. Comparison of galaxy clusters selected by weak-lensing, optical spectroscopy, and X-rays in the deep lens survey F2 field

    SciTech Connect

    Starikova, Svetlana; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Murray, Stephen S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.

    2014-05-10

    We compare galaxy clusters selected in Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the 4 deg{sup 2} Deep Lens Survey (DLS) F2 field to the cluster samples previously selected in the same field from a sensitive weak-lensing shear map derived from the DLS and from a detailed galaxy redshift survey—the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS). Our Chandra and XMM-Newton observations cover 1.6 deg{sup 2} of the DLS F2 field, including all 12 weak-lensing peaks above a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.5, along with 16 of the 20 SHELS clusters with published velocity dispersions >500 km s{sup –1}. We detect 26 extended X-ray sources in this area and confirm 23 of them as galaxy clusters using the optical imaging. Approximately 75% of clusters detected in either X-ray or spectroscopic surveys are found in both; these follow the previously established scaling relations between velocity dispersion, L {sub X}, and T {sub X}. A lower percentage, 60%, of clusters are in common between X-ray and DLS samples. With the exception of a high false-positive rate in the DLS weak-lensing search (5 out of 12 DLS candidates appear to be false), differences between the three cluster detection methods can be attributed primarily to observational uncertainties and intrinsic scatter between different observables and cluster mass.

  1. A Very High-Resolution Deep-Towed Multichannel Seismic Survey in the Yaquina Basin off Peru - First Data Processing Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Bialas, J.; Kostrov, A.

    2002-12-01

    The finely layered hemipelagic sediment coverage of the Yaquina Basin off Peru shows various features which can be related to the occurrence of fluid flow and gas hydrates. These features were the first test targets studied by a newly developed hybrid deep-towed digital multichannel seismic streamer and side scan sonar system. The streamer configuration used for this survey had an overall length of 75 m and consisted of a 50 m lead-in cable and 26 digital nodes separated by 1 m long cables. A conventional GI gun of 0.7 l volume and a Prakla-type airgun of 1.6 l volume were used as seismic sources and excited frequencies between about 20 - 300 Hz. Compared to formerly used deep-towed systems the determination of the position and depth of the streamer and side scan sonar fish is significantly improved by two components included in the newly developed system: (1) The ultra-short base line (USBL) system POSIDONIA maps the track and depth of the side scan sonar fish. (2) Three engineering nodes located at the beginning, middle and end of the streamer monitor the heading and depth variations along the streamer by a compass and depth sensor. By interpolation of these values depth and geographical coordinates of each streamer node can be computed relative to the position of the side scan sonar fish. Subsequent multichannel data processsing steps have to consider the asymmetric source-receiver geometry of the hybrid system and mainly include two steps: (1) A wavefield continuation which corrects the depth variations of the streamer and determines the wavefield in a constant reference depth. (2) A pre-stack migration which images the sedimentary structures based on all multichannel data. Examples from two locations are presented. In the first area, the deep tow seismic line crosses a formerly recorded MCS line (RV Sonne Cruise SO146, 2000) along which a weak BSR was observed. In the deep tow data several very small scale blanking zones or faults are additionally observed

  2. The XMM deep survey in the CDF-S. VIII. X-ray properties of the two brightest sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasawa, K.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Vito, F.; Brandt, W. N.; Carrera, F. J.; Lanzuisi, G.; Falocco, S.; Vagnetti, F.

    2015-02-01

    We present results from the deep XMM-Newton observations of the two brightest X-ray sources in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), PID 203 (z = 0.544) and PID 319 (z = 0.742). The long exposure of 2.5 Ms over a 10 year period (net 4 yr with a 6 yr gap) makes it possible to obtain high quality X-ray spectra of these two Type I AGN with X-ray luminosity of 1044 erg s-1, which is the typical luminosity for low-redshift PG quasars, and track their X-ray variability both in flux and spectral shape. Both sources showed X-ray flux variability of ~10-20% in rms, which is similar in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-7 keV) bands. PID 203, which has evidence for optical extinction, shows modest amount of absorption (NH≤ 1 × 1021 cm-2) in the X-ray spectrum. Fe K emission is strongly detected in both objects with EW ~ 0.2 keV. The lines in both objects are moderately broad and exhibit marginal evidence for variability in shape and flux, indicating that the bulk of the line emission comes from their accretion disks rather than distant tori.

  3. Predicting geomorphic evolution through integration of numerical-model scenarios and topographic/bathymetric-survey updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, N. G.; Long, J.; Dalyander, S.; Thompson, D.; Miselis, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Natural resource and hazard management of barrier islands requires an understanding of geomorphic changes associated with long-term processes and storms. Uncertainty exists in understanding how long-term processes interact with the geomorphic changes caused by storms and the resulting perturbations of the long-term evolution trajectories. We use high-resolution data sets to initialize and correct high-fidelity numerical simulations of oceanographic forcing and resulting barrier island evolution. We simulate two years of observed storms to determine the individual and cumulative impacts of these events. Results are separated into cross-shore and alongshore components of sediment transport and compared with observed topographic and bathymetric changes during these time periods. The discrete island change induced by these storms is integrated with previous knowledge of long-term net alongshore sediment transport to project island evolution. The approach has been developed and tested using data collected at the Chandeleur Island chain off the coast of Louisiana (USA). The simulation time period included impacts from tropical and winter storms, as well as a human-induced perturbation associated with construction of a sand berm along the island shoreline. The predictions and observations indicated that storm and long-term processes both contribute to the migration, lowering, and disintegration of the artificial berm and natural island. Further analysis will determine the relative importance of cross-shore and alongshore sediment transport processes and the dominant time scales that drive each of these processes and subsequent island morphologic response.

  4. Fundamental Study on the Dynamics of Heterogeneity-Enhanced CO2 Gas Evolution in the Shallow Subsurface During Possible Leakage from Deep Geologic Storage Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plampin, M. R.; Lassen, R. N.; Sakaki, T.; Pawar, R.; Jensen, K.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    A concern for geologic carbon sequestration is the potential for CO2 stored in deep geologic formations to leak upward into shallow freshwater aquifers where it can have potentially detrimental impacts to the environment and human health. Understanding the mechanisms of CO2 exsolution, migration and accumulation (collectively referred to as 'gas evolution') in the shallow subsurface is critical to predict and mitigate the environmental impacts. During leakage, CO2 can move either as free-phase or as a dissolved component of formation brine. CO2 dissolved in brine may travel upward into shallow freshwater systems, and the gas may be released from solution. In the shallow aquifer, the exsolved gas may accumulate near interfaces between soil types, and/or create flow paths that allow the gas to escape through the vadose zone to the atmosphere. The process of gas evolution in the shallow subsurface is controlled by various factors, including temperature, dissolved CO2 concentration, water pressure, background water flow rate, and geologic heterogeneity. However, the conditions under which heterogeneity controls gas phase evolution have not yet been precisely defined and can therefore not yet be incorporated into models used for environmental risk assessment. The primary goal of this study is to conduct controlled laboratory experiments to help fill this knowledge gap. With this as a goal, a series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to observe CO2 gas evolution in porous media at multiple scales. Deionized water was saturated with dissolved CO2 gas under a specified pressure (the saturation pressure) before being injected at a constant volumetric flow rate into the bottom of a 1.7 meter-tall by 5.7 centimeter-diameter column or a 2.4 meter-tall by 40 centimeter-wide column that were both filled with sand in various heterogeneous packing configurations. Both test systems were initially saturated with fresh water and instrumented with soil

  5. [The root of the deep and fast ongoing evolution of both structure and methodology of clinical research].

    PubMed

    Tavazzi, Luigi

    2016-03-01

    The growing scientific knowledge and technology development are leading to radical changes in biological and medical research. The prevalent lines of development deal with a pragmatic evolution of controlled clinical trials, a massive diffusion of observational research, which is progressively incorporated in clinical practice, new models and designs of clinical research, the systematic use of information technology to build up vast networks of medical centers producing huge amounts of shared data to be managed through the big data methodology, personalized as well as precision medicine, a reshaped physician-patient relationship based on a co-working principle. All this is leading to profound changes in public health governance, a renewal of clinical epidemiology and prevention, a modified structure of several specific sectors of medical care, hopefully guided by scientific evidences. A few aspects of such an evolving picture are discussed in this article.

  6. Comparing the Evolution of the Galaxy Disk Sizes with Cold Dark Matter Models: The Hubble Deep Field.

    PubMed

    Giallongo; Menci; Poli; D'Odorico; Fontana

    2000-02-20

    The intrinsic sizes of the field galaxies with IDeep Fields are shown as a function of their redshifts and absolute magnitudes using photometric redshifts derived from the multicolor catalogs and are compared with the cold dark matter (CDM) predictions. Extending to the lower luminosities and to the higher z that our previous analysis performed on the NTT field alone, we find the distribution of the galaxy disk sizes at different cosmic epochs is within the range predicted by typical CDM models. However, the observed size distribution of faint (MB>-19) galaxies is skewed with respect to the CDM predictions, and an excess of small-size disks (Rd<2 kpc) is already present at z approximately 0.5. The excess persists up to z approximately 3 and involves brighter galaxies. Such an excess may be reduced if luminosity-dependent effects, like starburst activity in interacting galaxies, are included in the physical mechanisms governing the star formation history in CDM models. PMID:10655168

  7. Modeling of coulpled deformation and permeability evolution during fault reactivation induced by deep underground injection of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Cappa, F.; Rutqvist, J.

    2010-06-01

    The interaction between mechanical deformation and fluid flow in fault zones gives rise to a host of coupled hydromechanical processes fundamental to fault instability, induced seismicity, and associated fluid migration. In this paper, we discuss these coupled processes in general and describe three modeling approaches that have been considered to analyze fluid flow and stress coupling in fault-instability processes. First, fault hydromechanical models were tested to investigate fault behavior using different mechanical modeling approaches, including slip interface and finite-thickness elements with isotropic or anisotropic elasto-plastic constitutive models. The results of this investigation showed that fault hydromechanical behavior can be appropriately represented with the least complex alternative, using a finite-thickness element and isotropic plasticity. We utilized this pragmatic approach coupled with a strain-permeability model to study hydromechanical effects on fault instability during deep underground injection of CO{sub 2}. We demonstrated how such a modeling approach can be applied to determine the likelihood of fault reactivation and to estimate the associated loss of CO{sub 2} from the injection zone. It is shown that shear-enhanced permeability initiated where the fault intersects the injection zone plays an important role in propagating fault instability and permeability enhancement through the overlying caprock.

  8. A Determination of the Intergalactic Redshift Dependent UV-Optical-NIR Photon Density Using Deep Galaxy Survey Data and the Gamma-ray Opacity of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Scully, Sean T.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the intensity and photon spectrum of the intergalactic background light (IBL) as a function of redshift using an approach based on observational data obtained in many different wavelength bands from local to deep galaxy surveys. This allows us to obtain an empirical determination of the IBL and to quantify its observationally based uncertainties. Using our results on the IBL, we then place 68% confidence upper and lower limits on the opacity of the universe to gamma-rays, free of the theoretical assumptions that were needed for past calculations. We compare our results with measurements of the extragalactic background light and upper limits obtained from observations made by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  9. THE MULTIWAVELENGTH SURVEY BY YALE-CHILE (MUSYC): DEEP MEDIUM-BAND OPTICAL IMAGING AND HIGH-QUALITY 32-BAND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE ECDF-S

    SciTech Connect

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Urry, C. Megan; Brammer, Gabriel; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Gawiser, Eric; Bond, Nicholas; Taylor, Edward; Damen, Maaike; Treister, Ezequiel; Cobb, Bethany E.; Schawinski, Kevin; Lira, Paulina; Murayama, Takashi; Saito, Tomoki; Sumikawa, Kentaro

    2010-08-15

    We present deep optical 18-medium-band photometry from the Subaru telescope over the {approx}30' x 30' Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). This field has a wealth of ground- and space-based ancillary data, and contains the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We combine the Subaru imaging with existing UBVRIzJHK and Spitzer IRAC images to create a uniform catalog. Detecting sources in the MUSYC 'BVR' image we find {approx}40,000 galaxies with R {sub AB} < 25.3, the median 5{sigma} limit of the 18 medium bands. Photometric redshifts are determined using the EAzY code and compared to {approx}2000 spectroscopic redshifts in this field. The medium-band filters provide very accurate redshifts for the (bright) subset of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, particularly at 0.1 < z < 1.2 and at z {approx}> 3.5. For 0.1 < z < 1.2, we find a 1{sigma} scatter in {Delta}z/(1 + z) of 0.007, similar to results obtained with a similar filter set in the COSMOS field. As a demonstration of the data quality, we show that the red sequence and blue cloud can be cleanly identified in rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams at 0.1 < z < 1.2. We find that {approx}20% of the red sequence galaxies show evidence of dust emission at longer rest-frame wavelengths. The reduced images, photometric catalog, and photometric redshifts are provided through the public MUSYC Web site.

  10. Deep structure of the Texas Gulf passive margin and its Ouachita-Precambrian basement: Results of the COCORP San Marcos arch survey

    SciTech Connect

    Culotta, R.; Latham, T.; Oliver, J.; Brown, L.; Kaufman, S. ); Sydow, M. )

    1992-02-01

    This COCORP deep seismic survey provides a comprehensive image of the southeast-Texas part of the Gulf passive margin and its accreted Ouachita arc foundation. Beneath the updip limit of the Cenozoic sediment wedge, a prominent antiformal structure is imaged within the interior zone of the buried late Paleozoic Ouachita orogen. The structure appears to involve Precambrian Grenville basement. The crest of the antiform is coincident with the Cretaceous-Tertiary Luling-Mexia-Talco fault zone. Some of these faults dip to the northwest, counter to the general regional pattern of down-to-the-basin faulting, and appear to sole into the top of the antiform, suggesting that the Ouachita structure has been reactivated as a hingeline to the subsiding passive margin. The antiform may be tied via this fault system and the Ouachita gravity gradient to the similar Devils River, Waco, and Benton uplifts, interpreted as Precambrian basement-cored massifs. Above the Paleozoic sequence, a possible rift-related graben is imaged near the updip limit of Jurassic salt. Paleoshelf edges of the major Tertiary depositional sequences are marked by expanded sections disrupted by growth faults and shale diapirs. Within the Wilcox Formation, the transect crosses the mouth of the 900-m-deep Yoakum Canyon, a principal pathway of sediment delivery from the Laramide belt to the Gulf. Beneath the Wilcox, the Comanchean (Lower Cretaceous) shelf edge, capped by the Stuart City reef, is imaged as a pronounced topographic break onlapped by several moundy sediment packages. Because this segment of the line parallels strike, the topographic break may be interpreted as a 2,000-m-deep embayment in the Cretaceous shelf-edge, and possibly a major submarine canyon older and deeper than the Yoakum Canyon.

  11. Analysis of the geological structure and tectonic evolution of Xingning-Jinghai sag in deep water area, northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaoying; Ren, Jianye; Lin, Zi; Yang, Linlong

    2015-04-01

    Recent years, oil and gas exploration of the Pearl River Mouth Basin in the northern margin of South China Sea continuously achieved historic breakthroughs. The Xingning-Jinghai sag, which is located in southeast of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, is a deep-water sag with a great exploration potential. Its tectonic evolution is extremely complex. It experienced Mesozoic subduction to Cenozoic intra-continental rifting background, and finally evolved into a deep-water sag of the northern continental margin of South China Sea. The geological characteristics and the tectonic evolution of Xingning-Jinghai sag was closely related to the process of formation and evolution of the passive continental margin of the northern South China Sea. It is confirmed by many geophysical data that compared with adjacent Chaoshan depression, the crustal thickness of Xingning-Jinghai sag was rapidly thinning, and it developed detachment faults with later magmatic intrusion. The development of detachment faults have dynamic significance for the spreading of the South China Sea. Based on the seismic geological interpretation of 2D seismic data in the study area, the characteristics of detachment fault and supra-detachment basin have been proposed in this study. The characteristics of the detachment fault are low angle and high ratio between heave and throw. The geometry of the detachment fault is a typical lisric shape, with the dip of fault decreasing generally from the seismic profile. The detachment basin where sediments are not deposited over a tilting hanging-wall block but onto a tectonically exhumed footwall which is different from the typical half graben basin. Seismic profiles indicate two different structural styles in the east and west part of Xingning-Jinghai sag. In the west of the sag, there developed two large detachment faults, which control their detachment basin systems and the typical H block, and the two detachment faults are dipping landward and seaward, respectively. In

  12. A survey of dental practitioners in Wales to evaluate the management of deep carious lesions with vital pulp therapy in permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Chin, J S; Thomas, M B; Locke, M; Dummer, P M H

    2016-09-23

    Objective To evaluate the management of deep carious lesions with vital pulp therapy in permanent teeth by dental practitioners within Wales.Design Postal questionnaire.Setting General practitioners (GDS), community (CDS) and hospital-based dentists (HDS) in Wales.Methods Community and hospital dental services with a remit for provision of restorative dentistry (CDS = 71; HDS = 46) and general dental practitioners (N = 510) were approached regarding their management of deep carious lesions with vital pulp therapy in permanent teeth. The postal questionnaire took the form of an anonymous survey. Questions covered usage parameters, training issues and reasons for material choice.Results The response rate was 29%. The majority of HDS (89%) used MTA or Biodentine for vital pulp therapy in contrast to GDS (41%) and CDS (32%). The main reasons cited for avoiding the use of MTA or Biodentine included cost, lack of training and difficulty in material handling.Conclusion Usage of MTA or Biodentine for vital pulp therapies is low in the general dental and community dental settings. Cost and lack of training are the main barriers for the uptake of these materials. Postgraduate training may be useful in addressing these barriers. Increasing their adoption would be advantageous as they have been shown to produce a more predictable outcome compared to traditional materials (for example, calcium hydroxide). PMID:27659637

  13. AN ALMA SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: SOURCE CATALOG AND MULTIPLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F.; Decarli, R.; Karim, A.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Edge, A. C.; Biggs, A. D.; De Breuck, C.; Ivison, R. J.; Weiss, A.; Bertoldi, F.; Brandt, W. N.; Chapman, S. C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Cox, P.; Dannerbauer, H.; Greve, T. R.; and others

    2013-05-01

    We present an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 0 survey of 126 submillimeter sources from the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (LESS). Our 870 {mu}m survey with ALMA (ALESS) has produced maps {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign deeper and with a beam area {approx}200 Multiplication-Sign smaller than the original LESS observations, doubling the current number of interferometrically-observed submillimeter sources. The high resolution of these maps allows us to resolve sources that were previously blended and accurately identify the origin of the submillimeter emission. We discuss the creation of the ALESS submillimeter galaxy (SMG) catalog, including the main sample of 99 SMGs and a supplementary sample of 32 SMGs. We find that at least 35% (possibly up to 50%) of the detected LABOCA sources have been resolved into multiple SMGs, and that the average number of SMGs per LESS source increases with LESS flux density. Using the (now precisely known) SMG positions, we empirically test the theoretical expectation for the uncertainty in the single-dish source positions. We also compare our catalog to the previously predicted radio/mid-infrared counterparts, finding that 45% of the ALESS SMGs were missed by this method. Our {approx}1.''6 resolution allows us to measure a size of {approx}9 kpc Multiplication-Sign 5 kpc for the rest-frame {approx}300 {mu}m emission region in one resolved SMG, implying a star formation rate surface density of 80 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, and we constrain the emission regions in the remaining SMGs to be <10 kpc. As the first statistically reliable survey of SMGs, this will provide the basis for an unbiased multiwavelength study of SMG properties.

  14. SXDF-ALMA 2 arcmin2 deep survey: Resolving and characterizing the infrared extragalactic background light down to 0.5 mJy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuki; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Aretxaga, Itziar; Dunlop, James S.; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hughes, David; Ikarashi, Soh; Ishii, Shun; Ivison, Rob J.; Izumi, Takuma; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kodama, Tadayuki; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Umehata, Hideki; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yabe, Kiyoto; Yun, Min S.

    2016-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of five submillimeter sources (S1.1mm = 0.54-2.02 mJy) that were detected during our 1.1 mm deep continuum survey in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF)-UDS-CANDELS field (2 arcmin2, 1σ = 0.055 mJy beam-1) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The two brightest sources correspond to a known single-dish (AzTEC) selected bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG), whereas the remaining three are faint SMGs newly uncovered by ALMA. If we exclude the two brightest sources, the contribution of the ALMA-detected faint SMGs to the infrared extragalactic background light is estimated to be ˜ 4.1^{+5.4}_{-3.0}Jy deg-2, which corresponds to ˜ 16^{+22}_{-12}% of the infrared extragalactic background light. This suggests that their contribution to the infrared extragalactic background light is as large as that of bright SMGs. We identified multiwavelength counterparts of the five ALMA sources. One of the sources (SXDF-ALMA3) is extremely faint in the optical to near-infrared region despite its infrared luminosity (L_IR˜eq 1× 10^{12} L_{⊙} or SFR ≃ 100 M⊙ yr-1). By fitting the spectral energy distributions at the optical-to-near-infrared wavelengths of the remaining four ALMA sources, we obtained the photometric redshifts (zphoto) and stellar masses (M*): zphoto ≃ 1.3-2.5, M* ≃ (3.5-9.5) × 1010 M⊙. We also derived their star formation rates (SFRs) and specific SFRs as ≃30-200 M⊙ yr-1 and ≃0.8-2 Gyr-1, respectively. These values imply that they are main sequence star-forming galaxies.

  15. SXDF-ALMA 2 arcmin2 deep survey: Resolving and characterizing the infrared extragalactic background light down to 0.5 mJy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuki; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Aretxaga, Itziar; Dunlop, James S.; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hughes, David; Ikarashi, Soh; Ishii, Shun; Ivison, Rob J.; Izumi, Takuma; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kodama, Tadayuki; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Umehata, Hideki; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yabe, Kiyoto; Yun, Min S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of five submillimeter sources (S1.1mm = 0.54-2.02 mJy) that were detected during our 1.1 mm deep continuum survey in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF)-UDS-CANDELS field (2 arcmin2, 1σ = 0.055 mJy beam-1) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The two brightest sources correspond to a known single-dish (AzTEC) selected bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG), whereas the remaining three are faint SMGs newly uncovered by ALMA. If we exclude the two brightest sources, the contribution of the ALMA-detected faint SMGs to the infrared extragalactic background light is estimated to be ˜ 4.1^{+5.4}_{-3.0}Jy deg-2, which corresponds to ˜ 16^{+22}_{-12}% of the infrared extragalactic background light. This suggests that their contribution to the infrared extragalactic background light is as large as that of bright SMGs. We identified multiwavelength counterparts of the five ALMA sources. One of the sources (SXDF-ALMA3) is extremely faint in the optical to near-infrared region despite its infrared luminosity (L_IR˜eq 1× 10^{12} L_{⊙} or SFR ≃ 100 M⊙ yr-1). By fitting the spectral energy distributions at the optical-to-near-infrared wavelengths of the remaining four ALMA sources, we obtained the photometric redshifts (zphoto) and stellar masses (M*): zphoto ≃ 1.3-2.5, M* ≃ (3.5-9.5) × 1010 M⊙. We also derived their star formation rates (SFRs) and specific SFRs as ≃30-200 M⊙ yr-1 and ≃0.8-2 Gyr-1, respectively. These values imply that they are main sequence star-forming galaxies.

  16. Deep-seated xenoliths and xenocrysts from Sytykanskaya pipe: evidence for the evolution of the mantle beneath Alakit, Yakutia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashchepkov, Igor; Vladykin, Nikolai; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Logvinova, Alla; Yudin, Denis; Karpenko, Mikhail; Palessky, Stanislav; Khmelnikova, Olga; Travin, Alexey; Salikhov, Ravil

    2014-05-01

    The concentrate from two phases of the kimberlite (breccia and porphyritic kimberlite) and about 130 xenoliths from the Sytykanskaya pipe of the Alakit field (Yakutia) were studied by EPMA and LAM ICP methods. Reconstructions of the PTXfO2 mantle sections were made separately for the two phases. The porphyritic kimberlites and breccia show differences in the minerals although the layering and pressure interval remains the same. For the porphyritic kimberlite the trends P- Fe# - CaO in garnet, fO2 are sub-vertical while the xenocrysts from the breccia show stepped and curved trends possibly due to interaction with fluids. Minerals within xenoliths show the widest variation in all pressure intervals. PT points for the ilmenites which trace the magmatic system show splitting of the magmatic source into two levels at the pyroxenite lens (4GPa) accompanied by peridotite contamination and an increase in Cr in ilmenites. Two groups of metasomatites with Fe#Ol ~ 10-12% and 13-15% were created by the melts derived from protokimberlites and trace the mantle columns from the lithosphere base (Ilm - Gar - Cr diopside) to Moho becoming essentially pyroxenitic (Cr-diopside with Phl). The first Opx-Gar-based mantle geotherm from the Alakit field has been constructed from15 associations and is close to 35 mw/m2 in the lower part of mantle section but deviates to high temperatures in the upper part of the mantle section. The oxidation state for the protokimberlite melts determined from ilmenites is higher than for the other pipes in the Yakutian kimberlite province which probably accounts for the decrease in the diamond grade of this pipe. The geochemistry of the minerals (garnets and clinopyroxenes) from breccias, metasomatic peridotite xenoliths and pyroxenites systematically differ. Xenocrysts from the breccia were produced by the most differentiated melts and enriched protokimberlite or carbonatite; they show highly inclined nearly linear REE patterns and deep troughs of HFSE

  17. Kinematical evidence for secular evolution in Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Font, Joan; Beckman, John E.

    2015-03-01

    We present a study of the kinematics of a sample of isolated spiral galaxies in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). We use Hα Fabry-Perot data from the GHαFaS instrument at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, complemented with images at 3.6 microns, in the R band and in the Hα filter. The resulting data cubes and velocity field maps allow a complete study of the kinematics of a galaxy, including in-depth investigations of the rotation curve, velocity moment maps, velocity residual maps, gradient maps and position-velocity (PV) diagrams. We find clear evidence of the secular evolution processes going on in these galaxies, such as asymmetries in the velocity field in the bar zone, and non-circular motions, probably in response to the potential of the structural components of the galaxies, or to past or present interactions.

  18. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) in Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Steven R.; Wilson, John C.; Hearty, Fred; Schiavon, Ricardo R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.

    2010-03-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a large-scale, near-infrared (H-band), high-resolution (R ~ 30,000), high S/N (≳100) spectroscopic survey of Milky Way stellar populations. APOGEE will operate from 1.51-1.68μm, a region that includes useful absorption lines from at least fifteen chemical species including α, odd-Z, and iron peak elements. The APOGEE instrument has a novel design featuring 300 science fibers feeding light to a mosaiced VPH grating and a six-element camera encased in a liquid nitrogen-cooled cryostat. A three year bright-time observing campaign will enable APOGEE to observe approximately 100,000 red giants across the Galactic bulge, disk and halo.

  19. A Broad Genomic Survey Reveals Multiple Origins and Frequent Losses in the Evolution of Respiratory Hemerythrins and Hemocyanins

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Durán, José M.; de Mendoza, Alex; Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Hejnol, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Hemerythrins and hemocyanins are respiratory proteins present in some of the most ecologically diverse animal lineages; however, the precise evolutionary history of their enzymatic domains (hemerythrin, hemocyanin M, and tyrosinase) is still not well understood. We survey a wide dataset of prokaryote and eukaryote genomes and RNAseq data to reconstruct the phylogenetic origins of these proteins. We identify new species with hemerythrin, hemocyanin M, and tyrosinase domains in their genomes, particularly within animals, and demonstrate that the current distribution of respiratory proteins is due to several events of lateral gene transfer and/or massive gene loss. We conclude that the last common metazoan ancestor had at least two hemerythrin domains, one hemocyanin M domain, and six tyrosinase domains. The patchy distribution of these proteins among animal lineages can be partially explained by physiological adaptations, making these genes good targets for investigations into the interplay between genomic evolution and physiological constraints. PMID:23843190

  20. The evolution of the Monte Vulture volcano (Southern Italy): Inferences from volcanological, geological and deep dipole electrical soundings data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Volpe, L.; Patella, D.; Rapisardi, L.; Tramacere, A.

    1984-10-01

    The activity of Monte Vulture started in the Middle Pleistocene; stratigraphic evidence suggests that the volcanic events may have occurred in the following succession: (1) formation of widespread pyroclastic pumice deposits; (2) sporadic and localized explosive and minor extrusive eruptions; (3) highly explosive eruptions with the formation of some tuff cones and of the oldest part of the Monte Vulture central volcano; and (4) activity at the central volcano, initially mainly explosive and successively increasingly effusive. The western part of the composite volcano, and probably also its summit part were affected by caldera collapses. The volcanic activity ended with hydromagmatic explosion, which formed two explosion craters. Monte Vulture was built up on the external units of the Southern Apennines at the western border of the foretrough. The upper part of the sedimentary substratum consists mainly of clayey formations of the Lagonegro and Sannitic units. Beneath these terrains radiolarites and cherty-limestones of the Lagonegro units outcrop west of Monte Vulture. Rocks of the Apulia carbonate platform were drilled east of the volcano. Deep dipole electrical soundings showed a resistant basement at a depth ranging from 0.2 km down to 4.3 km beneath Monte Vulture. Volcanological, geological and geoelectrical data allow us to hypothesize that: (a) the magma chamber could be located at the boundary between the rigid resistant basement and the overlying conductive plastic terrains; (b) the Apulia carbonate platform forms a structural high beneath the Monte Vulture; and (c) the overthrusting of the Lagonegro units on the Apulia platform may be located beneath the floors of the calderas of Monte Vulture.

  1. Bright and Faint Ends of Lyα Luminosity Functions at z = 2 Determined by the Subaru Survey: Implications for AGNs, Magnification Bias, and ISM H I Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Duval, Florent; Kusakabe, Haruka; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We present the Lyα luminosity functions (LFs) derived by our deep Subaru narrowband survey that identifies a total of 3137 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 in five independent blank fields. This sample of LAEs is the largest to date and covers a very wide Lyα luminosity range of {log}{L}{Lyα }=41.7{--}44.4 erg s-1. We determine the Lyα LF at z = 2.2 with unprecedented accuracy and obtain the best-fit Schechter parameters of {L}{Lyα }*={5.29}-1.13+1.67× {10}42 erg s-1, {φ }{Lyα }*={6.32}-2.31+3.08× {10}-4 Mpc-3, and α =-{1.75}-0.09+0.10, showing a steep faint-end slope. We identify a significant hump at the LF bright end ({log}{L}{Lyα }\\gt 43.4 erg s-1). Because all of the LAEs in the bright-end hump have a bright counterpart(s) in either the X-ray, UV, or radio data, this bright-end hump is not made by gravitational lensing magnification bias but by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These AGNs allow us to derive the AGN UV LF at z ˜ 2 down to the faint magnitude limit of M UV ≃ -22.5 and to constrain the faint-end slope of the AGN UV LF, α AGN = -1.2 ± 0.1, which is flatter than those at z > 4. Based on the Lyα and UV LFs from our and previous studies, we find an increase of Lyα escape fraction {f}{esc}{Lyα } from z ˜ 0 to 6 by two orders of magnitude. This large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase can be explained neither by the evolution of stellar population nor by outflow alone, but by the evolution of neutral hydrogen H i density in the interstellar medium that enhances dust attenuation for Lyα by resonance scattering. Our uniform expanding shell models suggest that the typical H i column density decreases from {N}{{H}{{I}}}˜ 7× {10}19 (z ˜ 0) to ˜1 × 1018 cm-2 (z ˜ 6) to explain the large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase.

  2. Bright and Faint Ends of Lyα Luminosity Functions at z = 2 Determined by the Subaru Survey: Implications for AGNs, Magnification Bias, and ISM H I Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Duval, Florent; Kusakabe, Haruka; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We present the Lyα luminosity functions (LFs) derived by our deep Subaru narrowband survey that identifies a total of 3137 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 in five independent blank fields. This sample of LAEs is the largest to date and covers a very wide Lyα luminosity range of {log}{L}{Lyα }=41.7{--}44.4 erg s‑1. We determine the Lyα LF at z = 2.2 with unprecedented accuracy and obtain the best-fit Schechter parameters of {L}{Lyα }*={5.29}-1.13+1.67× {10}42 erg s‑1, {φ }{Lyα }*={6.32}-2.31+3.08× {10}-4 Mpc‑3, and α =-{1.75}-0.09+0.10, showing a steep faint-end slope. We identify a significant hump at the LF bright end ({log}{L}{Lyα }\\gt 43.4 erg s‑1). Because all of the LAEs in the bright-end hump have a bright counterpart(s) in either the X-ray, UV, or radio data, this bright-end hump is not made by gravitational lensing magnification bias but by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These AGNs allow us to derive the AGN UV LF at z ˜ 2 down to the faint magnitude limit of M UV ≃ ‑22.5 and to constrain the faint-end slope of the AGN UV LF, α AGN = ‑1.2 ± 0.1, which is flatter than those at z > 4. Based on the Lyα and UV LFs from our and previous studies, we find an increase of Lyα escape fraction {f}{esc}{Lyα } from z ˜ 0 to 6 by two orders of magnitude. This large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase can be explained neither by the evolution of stellar population nor by outflow alone, but by the evolution of neutral hydrogen H i density in the interstellar medium that enhances dust attenuation for Lyα by resonance scattering. Our uniform expanding shell models suggest that the typical H i column density decreases from {N}{{H}{{I}}}˜ 7× {10}19 (z ˜ 0) to ˜1 × 1018 cm‑2 (z ˜ 6) to explain the large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase.

  3. Molecular Evolution of Aralkylamine N-Acetyltransferase in Fish: A Genomic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; You, Xinxin; Bian, Chao; Yu, Hui; Coon, Steven L.; Shi, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    All living organisms synchronize biological functions with environmental changes; melatonin plays a vital role in regulating daily and seasonal variations. Due to rhythmic activity of the timezyme aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), the blood level of melatonin increases at night and decreases during daytime. Whereas other vertebrates have a single form of AANAT, bony fishes possess various isoforms of aanat genes, though the reasons are still unclear. Here, we have taken advantage of multiple unpublished teleost aanat sequences to explore and expand our understanding of the molecular evolution of aanat in fish. Our results confirm that two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) led to the existence of three fish isoforms of aanat, i.e., aanat1a, aanat1b, and aanat2; in addition, gene loss led to the absence of some forms from certain special fish species. Furthermore, we suggest the different roles of two aanat1s in amphibious mudskippers, and speculate that the loss of aanat1a, may be related to terrestrial vision change. Several important sites of AANAT proteins and regulatory elements of aanat genes were analyzed for structural comparison and functional forecasting, respectively, which provides insights into the molecular evolution of the differences between AANAT1 and AANAT2. PMID:26729109

  4. Molecular Evolution of Aralkylamine N-Acetyltransferase in Fish: A Genomic Survey.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; You, Xinxin; Bian, Chao; Yu, Hui; Coon, Steven L; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms synchronize biological functions with environmental changes; melatonin plays a vital role in regulating daily and seasonal variations. Due to rhythmic activity of the timezyme aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), the blood level of melatonin increases at night and decreases during daytime. Whereas other vertebrates have a single form of AANAT, bony fishes possess various isoforms of aanat genes, though the reasons are still unclear. Here, we have taken advantage of multiple unpublished teleost aanat sequences to explore and expand our understanding of the molecular evolution of aanat in fish. Our results confirm that two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) led to the existence of three fish isoforms of aanat, i.e., aanat1a, aanat1b, and aanat2; in addition, gene loss led to the absence of some forms from certain special fish species. Furthermore, we suggest the different roles of two aanat1s in amphibious mudskippers, and speculate that the loss of aanat1a, may be related to terrestrial vision change. Several important sites of AANAT proteins and regulatory elements of aanat genes were analyzed for structural comparison and functional forecasting, respectively, which provides insights into the molecular evolution of the differences between AANAT1 and AANAT2. PMID:26729109

  5. Molecular Evolution of Aralkylamine N-Acetyltransferase in Fish: A Genomic Survey.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; You, Xinxin; Bian, Chao; Yu, Hui; Coon, Steven L; Shi, Qiong

    2015-12-31

    All living organisms synchronize biological functions with environmental changes; melatonin plays a vital role in regulating daily and seasonal variations. Due to rhythmic activity of the timezyme aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), the blood level of melatonin increases at night and decreases during daytime. Whereas other vertebrates have a single form of AANAT, bony fishes possess various isoforms of aanat genes, though the reasons are still unclear. Here, we have taken advantage of multiple unpublished teleost aanat sequences to explore and expand our understanding of the molecular evolution of aanat in fish. Our results confirm that two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) led to the existence of three fish isoforms of aanat, i.e., aanat1a, aanat1b, and aanat2; in addition, gene loss led to the absence of some forms from certain special fish species. Furthermore, we suggest the different roles of two aanat1s in amphibious mudskippers, and speculate that the loss of aanat1a, may be related to terrestrial vision change. Several important sites of AANAT proteins and regulatory elements of aanat genes were analyzed for structural comparison and functional forecasting, respectively, which provides insights into the molecular evolution of the differences between AANAT1 and AANAT2.

  6. The transition from Alboran to Algerian basins (Western Mediterranean Sea): Chronostratigraphy, deep crustal structure and tectonic evolution at the rear of a narrow slab rollback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medaouri, Mourad; Déverchère, Jacques; Graindorge, David; Bracene, Rabah; Badji, Rabie; Ouabadi, Aziouz; Yelles-Chaouche, Karim; Bendiab, Fethi

    2014-07-01

    The eastern Alboran basin and its transition to the Algerian basin is a key area in the Mediterranean realm where controversial kinematic and geodynamical models are proposed. Models imply striking differences regarding the nature of the crust, the prevalence of brittle faulting and ductile shear, the origin of magmatism, the style of Miocene deformation and the driving mechanisms of the Alboran plate kinematics. Combining a new chronostratigraphic chart of the Alboran and Algerian basins based on the Habibas (HBB-1) core drill, deep seismic sections striking WSW-ENE and SSE-NNW, and potential field data, we re-assess the tectonic evolution that controlled the sedimentation and basement deformation of the westernmost limit of the Algerian basin and its transition with the Alboran domain. A WSW-directed extensional tectonic phase has shaped a stretched continental crust with typical tilted blocks along ∼100 km from Burdigalian to Tortonian times, which is assumed to result from the WSW-directed migration of the Alboran block driven by a narrow slab rollback. In the Algerian basin, this event was followed by the emplacement of an oceanic-type crust. Potential field signatures of the deep basin as well as geometrical correlations with onland outcrops of inner zones suggest a minimum WSW-directed displacement of the Alboran terrane of ∼200 km. At the southern foot of the Algerian basin, the continent-ocean transition is sharp and may result from the westward propagation of a slab tear at depth, forming two segments of STEP (Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator) margins. Our results support models of intense shear tractions at the base of an overriding plate governed by slab rollback-induced mantle flow. Finally, Messinian salt tectonics affected overlying deposits until today. A late Tortonian to Quaternary dominantly transpressive tectonic episode linked to the Africa-Iberia convergence post-dates previous events, deforming the whole margin.

  7. History of Soil Survey and Evolution of the Brazilian Soil Classification System - SiBCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha dos Anjos, Lúcia Helena; Csekö Nolasco de Carvalho, Claudia; Homem Antunes, Mauro Antonio; Muggler, Cristine Carole

    2014-05-01

    In Brazil soil surveys started around 1940 and the first map with soil information of São Paulo State was published in 1943. The Committee of Soils of the National Service for Agronomic Research was created in 1947 by the Agriculture Ministry and became an historical landmark for soil survey in Brazil. In 1953, the National Program of soil survey was approved and the first soil map and report of Rio de Janeiro State was released in 1958, followed by São Paulo State in 1960. This is also the origin of Embrapa Soil Research institution. Other milestones were the soil surveys published by the Agronomic Institute of Campinas (IAC) and the natural resources studies published within the RADAMBRASIL Project, initially planned for the Amazon region and later covering the whole country. Many soil studies followed and a comprehensive knowledge of tropical soils was achieved resulting in successful technologies for agriculture production, in lands considered by many as of "low fertility and acid soils with limited or no agricultural potential". However, detailed soil surveys are still lacking; only 5% of the country soils are mapped in 1:25.000 scales, and 15-20% in 1:100.000. In the first soil survey reports of Rio de Janeiro (1958) and São Paulo (1960), soil classes were defined according to Baldwin, Kellog & Thorp (Yearbook of Agriculture for 1938), and Thorp & Smith (Soil Science, 67, 1949) publications. It was already clear that the existing classification systems were not adequate to represent the highly weathered tropical soils of the large old landscapes in the cerrado (savanna like) region, or the soils formed on recent hydromorphic conditions at the Amazon Basin and Pantanal region. A national classification system to embody the country's large territory and environmental variation from tropical to subtropical and semiarid conditions, as well as the diversity of soil forming processes in old and new landscapes had to be developed. In 1964, the first attempt of a

  8. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L.; Rebull, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  9. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Assef, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars.We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks.We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  10. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  11. The evolution of policy issues in stem cell research: an international survey.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Timothy; Rachul, Christen; Zarzeczny, Amy

    2012-12-01

    Stem cell research remains a tremendously promising yet controversial field of study. It continues to attract considerable public interest and generate discussion and debate. However, while the high profile of this field has endured, the tone and nature of the discourse that drives this profile appears to be changing. In order to get a better sense of how these potential shifts are perceived by individuals directly embedded in the field, we conducted an international internet survey of members of the stem cell research community. Our participants included individuals publishing on both scientific and ethical, legal and social issues topics. We explored the degree to which participants perceived that key policy issues were becoming more or less contentious over time. We queried views regarding the effect of regulatory frameworks on emerging stem cell research technologies and the extent to which participants experience pressure related to clinical translation. We also explored participants' relationships with industry, experience with patents and perceptions regarding the emphasis placed on the potential economic benefits of stem cell research. Our results suggest that while traditional debates such as those surrounding the moral status of the embryo remain, other issues more closely associated with clinical translation and commercialization are perceived as becoming increasingly contentious. This survey provides useful insight into the perspectives of a sample of active researchers working in countries around the world as well as an opportunity to reflect on the likely direction of future stem cell policy debates.

  12. Preliminary results of the Deep Freeze 85 marine geologic and geophysical survey of the Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf and South Orkney Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.B.; Bartek, L.; Griffith, T.; Herron, M.; Kennedy, D.; Singer, J.; Smith, M.

    1985-01-01

    Seismic profiles from the South Orkney Plateau show a relatively thick (>0.7 seconds), laminated sequence resting on block faulted acoustic basement and deformed strata. This represents the rifting of the plateau from the Antarctic Peninsula and subsequent pelagic sedimentation. A glacial erosional surface and associated glacial trough were identified on the platform, and possible basal till collected in at least one piston core. Seismic lines from the continental shelf north of the South Shetland Plateau show gently folded reflectors that have been truncated by a widespread erosional unconformity and probable moraines situated near the shelf edge. A line across the Bransfield Strait, a modern back-arc basin, shows the structural features of the basin and thick (>1.0 second) laminated sediments within the center of the basin. One of several deep channels which dissect the shelf was surveyed, but the origin of these features remains uncertain. Geophysical data and piston cores were acquired in several of the bays and fjords of the peninsula region. This is the first detailed survey of Antarctic bays and fjords. The preliminary results show striking differences in sedimentation between Antarctic fjords and those of Arctic and Subarctic regions, the most important difference being the limited role of meltwater runoff in the supply of sediment to Antarctic fjords.

  13. Bacteria as part of bioluminescence emission at the deep ANTARES station (North-Western Mediterranean Sea) during a one-year survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, S.; Michotey, V.; Casalot, L.; Bonin, P.; Guasco, S.; Garel, M.; Tamburini, C.

    2016-10-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria have been studied during a one-year survey in 2011 at the deep ANTARES site (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, 2000 m depth). The neutrino underwater telescope ANTARES, located at this station, has been used to record the bioluminescence at the same depth. Together with these data, environmental variables (potential temperature, salinity, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon and oxygen) have been characterized in water samples. The year 2011 was characterized by relatively stable conditions, as revealed by minor variability in the monitored oceanographic variables, by low bioluminescence and low current speed. This suggests weak eukaryote participation and mainly non-stimulated light emission. Hence, no processes of dense water have affected the ANTARES station during this survey. Abundance of bioluminescent bacteria belonging to Photobacterium genus, measured by qPCR of the luxF gene, ranged from 1.4×102 to 7.2×102 genes mL-1. Their effective activity was confirmed through mRNA luxF quantification. Our results reveal that bioluminescent bacteria appeared more active than the total counterpart of bacteria, suggesting an ecological benefit of this feature such as favoring interaction with macro-organisms. Moreover, these results show that part of the bioluminescence, recorded at 2000 m depth over one year, could be due to bioluminescent bacteria in stable hydrological conditions.

  14. SPLAT: Using Spectral Indices to Identify and Characterize Ultracool Stars, Brown Dwarfs and Exoplanets in Deep Surveys and as Companions to Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganze, Christian; Burgasser, Adam J.; Martin, Eduardo; Konopacky, Quinn; Masters, Daniel C.

    2016-06-01

    The majority of ultracool dwarf stars and brown dwarfs currently known were identified in wide-field red optical and infrared surveys, enabling measures of the local, typically isolated, population in a relatively shallow (<100 pc radius) volume. Constraining the properties of the wider Galactic population (scale height, radial distribution, Population II sources), and close brown dwarf and exoplanet companions to nearby stars, requires specialized instrumentation, such as high-contrast, coronagraphic spectrometers (e.g., Gemini/GPI, VLT/Sphere, Project 1640); and deep spectral surveys (e.g., HST/WFC3 parallel fields, Euclid). We present a set of quantitative methodologies to identify and robustly characterize sources for these specific populations, based on templates and tools developed as part of the SpeX Prism Library Analysis Toolkit. In particular, we define and characterize specifically-tuned sets spectral indices that optimize selection of cool dwarfs and distinguish rare populations (subdwarfs, young planetary-mass objects) based on low-resolution, limited-wavelength-coverage spectral data; and present a template-matching classification method for these instruments. We apply these techniques to HST/WFC3 parallel fields data in the WISPS and HST-3D programs, where our spectral index set allows high completeness and low contamination for searches of late M, L and T dwarfs to distances out to ~3 kpc.The material presented here is based on work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX15AI75G.

  15. A deep x ray survey in the Lockman hole and the soft x ray log N - log S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasinger, G.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Hartner, G.; Schmidt, M.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

    1992-01-01

    The longest pointed observation (152 ksec) with the Rosat position sensitive proportional counter in the direction of the absolutely lowest neutral hydrogen column density is discussed. 26 shallower fields from the Rosat medium sensivity survey are analyzed. 1176 X-ray sources were detected in at least one Rosat energy band in these fields covering a total solid angle of 9.3 deg; 661 of these sources constitute a statistically complete sample detected in the hard band with 0.5 to 2 keV fluxes greater than 2.5 times 10 to the power of minus 15 erg/sq cm s. The faintest limiting flux of the survey is analyzed. Detailed simulations show that confusion effects and other selection biases are relatively small and can be corrected for in the sample. From an analysis in the Lockman field, a best fit slope of approximately 1.8 is found for the extrapolation of the differential X-ray counts below 2.5 times 10 to the power of minus 15 erg/sq cm s. On the basis of this analysis an upper limit of approximately 25% can be found for a truly diffuse background component in the Rosat hard band.

  16. A tale of two sutures: COCORP's deep seismic surveys of the Grenville province in the eastern U.S. midcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culotta, Raymond C.; Pratt, T.; Oliver, J.

    1990-07-01

    A pair of oppositely dipping, crustal-scale shear zones imaged within Grenville basement beneath the Paleozoic cover of Ohio can be correlated, via geopotential lineaments, with similarly oriented geologic and seismically imaged structures hundreds of kilometres to the northeast and southwest, suggesting a relatively simple structural framework for the eastern midcontinent region. An east-dipping zone extending from Lake Huron through western Ohio, and possibly farther southwest, marks the western edge of the Grenville province. Perhaps of greater consequence to an understanding of Grenville tectonics is the discovery of a west-dipping zone underlying the Appalachian basin from northern Alabama to New York within the Grenville province. Correlation of this feature with the seismogenic Clarendon-Linden fault in western New York and a boundary between terranes containing magmatic-arc rocks exposed in Canada suggests that it could mark the site of an intra-Grenville province suture zone. Implications of this interpretation are that the Precambrian foundation of the eastern U.S. midcontinent comprises a relatively simple assemblage of laterally extensive terranes or belts of coeval terranes accreted by familiar plate tectonic processes, and that deep seismic profiling is an effective tool for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of these terranes.

  17. The LABOCA survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South - radio and mid-infrared counterparts to submillimetre galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, A. D.; Ivison, R. J.; Ibar, E.; Wardlow, J. L.; Dannerbauer, H.; Smail, Ian; Walter, F.; Weiß, A.; Chapman, S. C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; De Breuck, C.; Dickinson, M.; Knudsen, K. K.; Mainieri, V.; Menten, K.; Papovich, C.

    2011-06-01

    We present radio and infrared (3.6-24 μm) counterparts to submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) detected in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South with the Large APEX Bolometer Camera (LABOCA) 870-μm bolometer camera on the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment. Using the Very Large Array at 1.4 GHz and Spitzer, we have identified secure counterparts to 79 of the 126 SMGs [signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 3.7, S870 > 4.4 mJy] in the field, 62 via their radio and/or 24-μm emission, the remainder using a colour-flux cut on Infrared Array Camera 3.6- and 5.8-μm sources chosen to maximize the number of secure, coincident radio and 24-μm counterparts. In constructing our radio catalogue, we have corrected for the effects of 'flux boosting', then used the corrected flux densities to estimate the redshifts of the SMGs based on the radio/submm spectral indices. The effect of the boosting correction is to increase the median redshift by 0.2 resulting in a value of ? (1σ errors) for the secure radio counterparts, in agreement with other studies, both spectroscopic and photometric.

  18. Absolute magnetization of the seafloor at a basalt-hosted hydrothermal site: Insights from a deep-sea submersible survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, Florent; Dyment, Jérôme; Fouquet, Yves; Choi, Yujin; Honsho, Chie

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of high-resolution vector magnetic data acquired by deep-sea submersibles (DSSs) requires the development of specific approaches adapted to their uneven tracks. We present a method that takes advantage of (1) the varying altitude of the DSS above the seafloor and (2) high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data acquired separately, at higher altitude, by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, to estimate the absolute magnetization intensity and the magnetic polarity of the shallow subseafloor along the DSS path. We apply this method to data collected by DSS Nautile on a small active basalt-hosted hydrothermal site. The site is associated with a lack of magnetization, in agreement with previous findings at the same kind of sites: the contrast between nonmagnetic sulfide deposits/stockwork zone and strongly magnetized basalt is sufficient to explain the magnetic signal observed at such a low altitude. Both normal and reversed polarities are observed in the lava flows surrounding the site, suggesting complex history of accumulating volcanic flows.

  19. Barcoding Beetles: A Regional Survey of 1872 Species Reveals High Identification Success and Unusually Deep Interspecific Divergences

    PubMed Central

    Pentinsaari, Mikko; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Mutanen, Marko

    2014-01-01

    With 400 K described species, beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) represent the most diverse order in the animal kingdom. Although the study of their diversity currently represents a major challenge, DNA barcodes may provide a functional, standardized tool for their identification. To evaluate this possibility, we performed the first comprehensive test of the effectiveness of DNA barcodes as a tool for beetle identification by sequencing the COI barcode region from 1872 North European species. We examined intraspecific divergences, identification success and the effects of sample size on variation observed within and between species. A high proportion (98.3%) of these species possessed distinctive barcode sequence arrays. Moreover, the sequence divergences between nearest neighbor species were considerably higher than those reported for the only other insect order, Lepidoptera, which has seen intensive analysis (11.99% vs up to 5.80% mean NN divergence). Although maximum intraspecific divergence increased and average divergence between nearest neighbors decreased with increasing sampling effort, these trends rarely hampered identification by DNA barcodes due to deep sequence divergences between most species. The Barcode Index Number system in BOLD coincided strongly with known species boundaries with perfect matches between species and BINs in 92.1% of all cases. In addition, DNA barcode analysis revealed the likely occurrence of about 20 overlooked species. The current results indicate that DNA barcodes distinguish species of beetles remarkably well, establishing their potential to provide an effective identification tool for this order and to accelerate the discovery of new beetle species. PMID:25255319

  20. A tale of two sutures: COCORP's deep seismic surveys of the Grenville province in the eastern U. S. midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Culotta, R.C.; Oliver, J.; Pratt, T. )

    1990-07-01

    A pair of oppositely dipping, crustal-scale shear zones imaged within Grenville basement beneath the Paleozoic cover of Ohio can be correlated, via geopotential lineaments, with similarly oriented geologic and seismically imaged structures hundreds of kilometres to the northeast and southwest, suggesting a relatively simple structural framework for the eastern midcontinent region. An east-dipping zone extending from Lake Huron through western Ohio, and possibly farther southwest, marks the western edge of the Grenville province. Perhaps of greater consequence to an understanding of Grenville tectonics is the discovery of a west-dipping zone underlying the Appalachian basin from northern Alabama to New York within the Grenville province. Correlation of this feature with the seismogenic Clarendon-Linden fault in western New York and a boundary between terranes containing magmatic-arc rocks exposed in Canada suggests that it could mark the site of an intra-Grenville province suture zone. Implications of this interpretation are that the Precambrian foundation of the eastern U.S. midcontinent comprises a relatively simple assemblage of laterally extensive terranes or belts of coeval terranes accreted by familiar plate tectonic processes, and that deep seismic profiling is an effective tool for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of these terranes.

  1. Ediacaran paleomagnetic field records from Laurentia: Insights into the evolution of the diversity of life and Earth's deep interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, R. K.; Tarduno, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Ediacaran to early Cambrian interval (~635-530 Ma) marks a tremendous increase in biotic diversity known as the Cambrian explosion. The magnitude of the biotic evolution has motivated hypotheses evoking a role for abiotic/environmental causal factors. For example, a rotation of the entire solid Earth by 90°, in what has been called an inertial interchange true polar wander (IITPW) event, has been linked to these events. One of the primary data sets motivating IITPW has been the report of nearly orthogonal directions from the Sept-Îles (ca. 565 Ma) intrusion (Quebec, Canada) on the basis of whole rock paleomagnetic analyses. We have found that only one direction (shallow) from our sampling of the Sept-Îles intrusion is carried by single domain magnetic grains and thus can be considered primary (Bono and Tarduno, Geology, 2015). Moreover, we find that the geomagnetic field was reversing during cooling of the intrusion; the small spatial scales on which we see antipodal directions suggest a very rapid reversal rate. Preliminary total-TRM paleointensity results from the Sept-Îles intrusion suggest a low field strength. The high geomagnetic reversal rate and low geomagnetic field intensity that characterize a portion of the Jurassic (ca. 165 Ma) may be an analog for field behavior during the Ediacaran to early Cambrian. This model may provide insight into the development of Earth's interior; if high thermal core conductivity values are correct, the onset of inner core growth is predicted to have an age similar to that of our directional and paleointensity data. To test these linkages, we investigate dated localities of the Grenville dikes (ca. 590 Ma) from which classic paleomagnetic results on whole rocks (Murthy, 1971) have long figured into debates over the paleolatitude history of Laurentia. New rock- and paleo-magnetic experiments testing single crystal feldspars from Laurentian Ediacaran intrusive units will be discussed, along with new estimates of

  2. Genome Sequence of the Deep-Rooted Yersinia pestis Strain Angola Reveals New Insights into the Evolution and Pangenome of the Plague Bacterium▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Eppinger, Mark; Worsham, Patricia L.; Nikolich, Mikeljon P.; Riley, David R.; Sebastian, Yinong; Mou, Sherry; Achtman, Mark; Lindler, Luther E.; Ravel, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    To gain insights into the origin and genome evolution of the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis, we have sequenced the deep-rooted strain Angola, a virulent Pestoides isolate. Its ancient nature makes this atypical isolate of particular importance in understanding the evolution of plague pathogenicity. Its chromosome features a unique genetic make-up intermediate between modern Y. pestis isolates and its evolutionary ancestor, Y. pseudotuberculosis. Our genotypic and phenotypic analyses led us to conclude that Angola belongs to one of the most ancient Y. pestis lineages thus far sequenced. The mobilome carries the first reported chimeric plasmid combining the two species-specific virulence plasmids. Genomic findings were validated in virulence assays demonstrating that its pathogenic potential is distinct from modern Y. pestis isolates. Human infection with this particular isolate would not be diagnosed by the standard clinical tests, as Angola lacks the plasmid-borne capsule, and a possible emergence of this genotype raises major public health concerns. To assess the genomic plasticity in Y. pestis, we investigated the global gene reservoir and estimated the pangenome at 4,844 unique protein-coding genes. As shown by the genomic analysis of this evolutionary key isolate, we found that the genomic plasticity within Y. pestis clearly was not as limited as previously thought, which is strengthened by the detection of the largest number of isolate-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) currently reported in the species. This study identified numerous novel genetic signatures, some of which seem to be intimately associated with plague virulence. These markers are valuable in the development of a robust typing system critical for forensic, diagnostic, and epidemiological studies. PMID:20061468

  3. Information system evolution at the French National Network of Seismic Survey (BCSF-RENASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, F.; Grunberg, M.

    2013-12-01

    The aging information system of the French National Network of Seismic Survey (BCSF-RENASS), located in Strasbourg (EOST), needed to be updated to satisfy new practices from Computer science world. The latter means to evolve our system at different levels : development method, datamining solutions, system administration. The new system had to provide more agility for incoming projects. The main difficulty was to maintain old system and the new one in parallel the time to validate new solutions with a restricted team. Solutions adopted here are coming from standards used by the seismological community and inspired by the state of the art of devops community. The new system is easier to maintain and take advantage of large community to find support. This poster introduces the new system and choosen solutions like Puppet, Fabric, MongoDB and FDSN Webservices.

  4. Wide-angle seismic constraints on the evolution of the deep San Andreas plate boundary by Mendocino triple junction migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hole, J.A.; Beaudoin, B.C.; Henstock, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Recent wide-angle seismic observations that constrain the existence and structure of a mafic layer in the lower crust place strong constraints on the evolution of the San Andreas plate boundary system in northern and central California. Northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction and the subducted Juan de Fuca lithospheric slab creates a gap under the continent in the new strike-slip system. This gap must be filled by either asthenospheric upwelling or a northward migrating slab attached to the Pacific plate. Both processes emplace a mafic layer, either magmatic underplating or oceanic crust, beneath the California Coast Ranges. A slab of oceanic lithosphere attached to the Pacific plate is inconsistent with the seismic observation that the strike-slip faults cut through the mafic layer to the mantle, detaching the layer from the Pacific plate. The layer could only be attached to the Pacific plate if large vertical offsets and other complex structures observed beneath several strike-slip faults are original oceanic structures that are not caused by the faults. Otherwise, if oceanic slabs exist beneath California, they do not migrate north to fill the growing slab gap. The extreme heat pulse created by asthenospheric upwelling is inconsistent with several constraints from the seismic data, including a shallower depth to the slab gap than is predicted by heat flow models, seismic velocity and structure that are inconsistent with melting or metamorphism of the overlying silicic crust, and a high seismic velocity in the upper mantle. Yet either the Pacific slab model or the asthenospheric upwelling model must be correct. While the mafic material in the lower crust could have been emplaced prior to triple junction migration, the deeper slab gap must still be filled. A preexisting mafic layer does not reduce the inconsistencies of the Pacific slab model. Such material could, however, compensate for the decrease in mafic magma that would be produced if

  5. Spatial-temporal evolution of topography of the central Andes and implications for deep tectonic processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzione, C. N.; Auerbach, D. J.; Bershaw, J. T.; Kar, N.; Smith, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Resolving the spatial and temporal evolution of changes in the elevation of mountain belts provides constraints on the geodynamic mechanisms that caused surface uplift of these regions. Several recent studies in the Central Andean plateau (between 13°S and 28°S) have used multiple climate proxies to demonstrate punctuated (several myr) changes in the composition of meteoric water and surface temperature inferred to reflect significant (≥1000 m) surface uplift. These studies suggest that different regions experienced surface uplift at different times. In comparison with crustal thickening histories derived from reconstructions of crustal shortening, it is also clear that crustal thickening and surface uplift are temporally decoupled, with significant crustal thickening preceding punctuated surface uplift events by several tens of millions of years. Here we compile results from paleoclimate studies of the Central Andean plateau to infer regional patterns of surface uplift. Limited paleoclimate data and geologic evidence indicate that the Eastern Cordillera experienced an earlier pulse of surface uplift than the Altiplano zone, associated with an eastward sweep of magmatism that marks the current limits of the plateau. Within the Altiplano zone, the southern Altiplano appears to have risen beginning in middle Miocene time and continuing through late Miocene time. During this time, the north-central Altiplano remained low and experienced increasing rates of sedimentation. In late Miocene time, sedimentation rates slowed dramatically at the same time that climate proxy data suggest rapid surface uplift of the north-central Altiplano. The northernmost Altiplano of Peru experienced a pulse of surface uplift in middle Miocene to early Pliocene time, with the exact timing unconstrained as of yet. Crustal shortening reconstructions from the southern through the north-central plateau (between 17°S and 24°S) yield upper estimates that range between 300×20 km, sufficient

  6. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Sodium and aluminium abundances in giants and dwarfs. Implications for stellar and Galactic chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiljanic, R.; Romano, D.; Bragaglia, A.; Donati, P.; Magrini, L.; Friel, E.; Jacobson, H.; Randich, S.; Ventura, P.; Lind, K.; Bergemann, M.; Nordlander, T.; Morel, T.; Pancino, E.; Tautvaišienė, G.; Adibekyan, V.; Tosi, M.; Vallenari, A.; Gilmore, G.; Bensby, T.; François, P.; Koposov, S.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Franciosini, E.; Heiter, U.; Hill, V.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Lewis, J.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Sbordone, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Stellar evolution models predict that internal mixing should cause some sodium overabundance at the surface of red giants more massive than ~1.5-2.0 M⊙. The surface aluminium abundance should not be affected. Nevertheless, observational results disagree about the presence and/or the degree of Na and Al overabundances. In addition, Galactic chemical evolution models adopting different stellar yields lead to very different predictions for the behavior of [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe] versus [Fe/H]. Overall, the observed trends of these abundances with metallicity are not well reproduced. Aims: We readdress both issues, using new Na and Al abundances determined within the Gaia-ESO Survey. Our aim is to obtain better observational constraints on the behavior of these elements using two samples: i) more than 600 dwarfs of the solar neighborhood and of open clusters and ii) low- and intermediate-mass clump giants in six open clusters. Methods: Abundances were determined using high-resolution UVES spectra. The individual Na abundances were corrected for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium effects. For the Al abundances, the order of magnitude of the corrections was estimated for a few representative cases. For giants, the abundance trends with stellar mass are compared to stellar evolution models. For dwarfs, the abundance trends with metallicity and age are compared to detailed chemical evolution models. Results: Abundances of Na in stars with mass below ~2.0 M⊙, and of Al in stars below ~3.0 M⊙, seem to be unaffected by internal mixing processes. For more massive stars, the Na overabundance increases with stellar mass. This trend agrees well with predictions of stellar evolutionary models. For Al, our only cluster with giants more massive than 3.0 M⊙, NGC 6705, is Al enriched. However, this might be related to the environment where the cluster was formed. Chemical evolution models that well fit the observed [Na/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] trend in solar neighborhood dwarfs

  7. The XMM deep survey in the CDF-S. IX. An X-ray outflow in a luminous obscured quasar at z ≈ 1.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignali, C.; Iwasawa, K.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Lanzuisi, G.; Ranalli, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Mainieri, V.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Carrera, F. J.; Fritz, J.; Brusa, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Bauer, F. E.; Fiore, F.; Tombesi, F.

    2015-11-01

    In active galactic nuclei (AGN)-galaxy co-evolution models, AGN winds and outflows are often invoked to explain why super-massive black holes and galaxies stop growing efficiently at a certain phase of their lives. They are commonly referred to as the leading actors of feedback processes. Evidence of ultra-fast (v ≳ 0.05c) outflows in the innermost regions of AGN has been collected in the past decade by sensitive X-ray observations for sizable samples of AGN, mostly at low redshift. Here we present ultra-deep XMM-Newton and Chandra spectral data of an obscured (NH≈ 2 × 1023 cm-2), intrinsically luminous (L2-10 keV≈ 4 × 1044 erg s-1) quasar (named PID352) at z ≈ 1.6 (derived from the X-ray spectral analysis) in the Chandra Deep Field-South. The source is characterized by an iron emission and absorption line complex at observed energies of E ≈ 2-3 keV. While the emission line is interpreted as being due to neutral iron (consistent with the presence of cold absorption), the absorption feature is due to highly ionized iron transitions (FeXXV, FeXXVI) with an outflowing velocity of , as derived from photoionization models. The mass outflow rate - ~2 M⊙ yr-1 - is similar to the source accretion rate, and the derived mechanical energy rate is ~9.5 × 1044 erg s-1, corresponding to 9% of the source bolometric luminosity. PID352 represents one of the few cases where indications of X-ray outflowing gas have been observed at high redshift thus far. This wind is powerful enough to provide feedback on the host galaxy.

  8. Direct whole-genome deep-sequencing of human respiratory syncytial virus A and B from Vietnamese children identifies distinct patterns of inter- and intra-host evolution.

    PubMed

    Do, Lien Anh Ha; Wilm, Andreas; Van Doorn, H Rogier; Lam, Ha Minh; Sim, Shuzhen; Sukumaran, Rashmi; Tran, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Bach Hue; Tran, Thi Thu Loan; Tran, Quynh Huong; Vo, Quoc Bao; Dac, Nguyen Anh Tran; Trinh, Hong Nhien; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hai; Binh, Bao Tinh Le; Le, Khanh; Nguyen, Minh Tien; Thai, Quang Tung; Vo, Thanh Vu; Ngo, Ngoc Quang Minh; Dang, Thi Kim Huyen; Cao, Ngoc Huong; Tran, Thu Van; Ho, Lu Viet; Farrar, Jeremy; Jong, Menno de; Chen, Swaine; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Bryant, Juliet E; Hibberd, Martin L

    2015-12-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children ,2 years of age. Little is known about RSV intra-host genetic diversity over the course of infection or about the immune pressures that drive RSV molecular evolution. We performed whole-genome deep-sequencing on 53 RSV-positive samples (37 RSV subgroup A and 16 RSV subgroup B) collected from the upper airways of hospitalized children in southern Vietnam over two consecutive seasons. RSV A NA1 and RSV B BA9 were the predominant genotypes found in our samples, consistent with other reports on global RSV circulation during the same period. For both RSV A and B, the M gene was the most conserved, confirming its potential as a target for novel therapeutics. The G gene was the most variable and was the only gene under detectable positive selection. Further, positively selected sites inG were found in close proximity to and in some cases overlapped with predicted glycosylation motifs, suggesting that selection on amino acid glycosylation may drive viral genetic diversity. We further identified hotspots and coldspots of intra-host genetic diversity in the RSV genome, some of which may highlight previously unknown regions of functional importance.

  9. Endpoints of stellar evolution - X-ray surveys of the Local Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The galaxies of the Local Group offer a variety of settings in which to study galactic source populations unhampered by local interstellar-absorption and distance ambiguities. A review of the subject of Local Group X-ray astronomy from the first discovery of a source in the Large Magellanic Cloud 15 years ago to the most recent analysis of the Einstein Observatory data (in which over 200 X-ray sources were detected in Local Group members) is presented. Following a detailed presentation of the latest results, two examples of the constraints these data impose on stellar and galactic evolution are discussed: study of the distribution of properties for the 30 detected supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and a comparison of the populations of classical X-ray binaries in M31, M33, the Magellanic Clouds, and the Galaxy. A prospectus for future research, including a discussion of the contributions which could be made by the next generation of X-ray observatories, is provided.

  10. AN ALMA SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: NEAR-INFRARED MORPHOLOGIES AND STELLAR SIZES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Simpson, J. M.; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Edge, A. C.; Biggs, A. D.; Ivison, R. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Chapman, S. C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Dannerbauer, H.; Greve, T. R.; Karim, A.; Menten, Karl M.; Schinnerer, E.; Walter, F.; Wardlow, J. L.; and others

    2015-02-01

    We analyze Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/H {sub 160}-band observations of a sample of 48 Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array detected submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South field, to study their stellar morphologies and sizes. We detect 79% ± 17% of the SMGs in the H {sub 160}-band imaging with a median sensitivity of 27.8 mag, and most (80%) of the nondetections are SMGs with 870 μm fluxes of S {sub 870} < 3 mJy. With a surface brightness limit of μ {sub H} ∼ 26 mag arcsec{sup –2}, we find that 82% ± 9% of the H {sub 160}-band-detected SMGs at z = 1-3 appear to have disturbed morphologies, meaning they are visually classified as either irregulars or interacting systems, or both. By determining a Sérsic fit to the H {sub 160} surface brightness profiles, we derive a median Sérsic index of n = 1.2 ± 0.3 and a median half-light radius of r{sub e} = 4.4{sub −0.5}{sup +1.1} kpc for our SMGs at z = 1-3. We also find significant displacements between the positions of the H {sub 160} component and 870 μm emission in these systems, suggesting that the dusty starburst regions and less-obscured stellar distribution are not colocated. We find significant differences in the sizes and the Sérsic index between our z = 2-3 SMGs and z ∼ 2 quiescent galaxies, suggesting that a major transformation of the stellar light profile is needed in the quenching processes if SMGs are progenitors of the red-and-dead z ∼ 2 galaxies. Given the short-lived nature of SMGs, we postulate that the majority of the z = 2-3 SMGs with S {sub 870} ≳ 2 mJy are early/mid-stage major mergers.

  11. The Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS Redshift Survey of Galaxy Evolution since z = 1.5. I. Description and Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, Daniel D.; Williams, Rik J.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Mulchaey, John S.; Villanueva, Edward V.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Quadri, Ryan F.

    2014-03-01

    We describe the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) Survey, a wide-field, near-IR selected spectrophotometric redshift survey with the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) on Magellan-Baade. By defining a flux-limited sample of galaxies in Spitzer Infrared Array Camera 3.6 μm imaging of SWIRE fields, the CSI Survey efficiently traces the stellar mass of average galaxies to z ~ 1.5. This first paper provides an overview of the survey selection, observations, processing of the photometry and spectrophotometry. We also describe the processing of the data: new methods of fitting synthetic templates of spectral energy distributions are used to derive redshifts, stellar masses, emission line luminosities, and coarse information on recent star formation. Our unique methodology for analyzing low-dispersion spectra taken with multilayer prisms in IMACS, combined with panchromatic photometry from the ultraviolet to the IR, has yielded high-quality redshifts for 43,347 galaxies in our first 5.3 deg2 of the SWIRE XMM-LSS field. We use three different approaches to estimate our redshift errors and find robust agreement. Over the full range of 3.6 μm fluxes of our selection, we find typical redshift uncertainties of σ z /(1 + z) <~ 0.015. In comparisons with previously published spectroscopic redshifts we find scatters of σ z /(1 + z) = 0.011 for galaxies at 0.7 <= z <= 0.9, and σ z /(1 + z) = 0.014 for galaxies at 0.9 <= z <= 1.2. For galaxies brighter and fainter than i = 23 mag, we find σ z /(1 + z) = 0.008 and σ z /(1 + z) = 0.022, respectively. Notably, our low-dispersion spectroscopy and analysis yields comparable redshift uncertainties and success rates for both red and blue galaxies, largely eliminating color-based systematics that can seriously bias observed dependencies of galaxy evolution on environment. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  12. Catalogues of hot white dwarfs in the Milky Way from GALEX's ultraviolet sky surveys: constraining stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana; Efremova, Boryana; Herald, James; Girardi, Léo; Zabot, Alexandre; Marigo, Paola; Martin, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    We present comprehensive catalogues of hot star candidates in the Milky Way (MW), selected from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) far-UV (FUV; 1344-1786 Å) and near-UV (NUV; 1771-2831 Å) imaging. The FUV and NUV photometry allows us to extract the hottest stellar objects, in particular hot white dwarfs (WD), which are elusive at other wavelengths because of their high temperatures and faint optical luminosities. We generated catalogues of UV sources from two GALEX's surveys: All-Sky Imaging Survey (AIS; depth AB magnitude ˜19.9/20.8 in FUV/NUV) and Medium-depth Imaging Survey (MIS; depth ˜22.6/22.7 mag). The two catalogues (from GALEX fifth data release) contain 65.3/12.6 million (AIS/MIS) unique UV sources with errorNUV≤ 0.5 mag, over 21 435/1579 deg2. We also constructed subcatalogues of the UV sources with matched optical photometry from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; seventh data release): these contain 0.6/0.9 million (AIS/MIS) sources with errors ≤0.3 mag in both FUV and NUV, excluding sources with multiple optical counterparts, over an area of 7325/1103 deg2. All catalogues are available online. We then selected 28 319 (AIS)/9028 (MIS) matched sources with FUV - NUV < -0.13; this colour cut corresponds to stellar Teff hotter than ˜18 000 K (the exact value varying with gravity). An additional colour cut of NUV-r > 0.1 isolates binaries with largely differing Teffs, and some intruding quasi-stellar objects (QSOs; more numerous at faint magnitudes). Available spectroscopy for a subsample indicates that hot-star candidates with NUV-r < 0.1 (mostly 'single' hot stars) have negligible contamination by non-stellar objects. We discuss the distribution of sources in the catalogues, and the effects of error and colour cuts on the samples. The density of hot-star candidates increases from high to low Galactic latitudes, but drops on the MW plane due to dust extinction. Our hot-star counts at all latitudes are better matched by MW models computed with an

  13. The Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS redshift survey of galaxy evolution since z = 1.5. I. Description and methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Kelson, Daniel D.; Williams, Rik J.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Mulchaey, John S.; Villanueva, Edward V.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Quadri, Ryan F.

    2014-03-10

    We describe the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) Survey, a wide-field, near-IR selected spectrophotometric redshift survey with the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) on Magellan-Baade. By defining a flux-limited sample of galaxies in Spitzer Infrared Array Camera 3.6 μm imaging of SWIRE fields, the CSI Survey efficiently traces the stellar mass of average galaxies to z ∼ 1.5. This first paper provides an overview of the survey selection, observations, processing of the photometry and spectrophotometry. We also describe the processing of the data: new methods of fitting synthetic templates of spectral energy distributions are used to derive redshifts, stellar masses, emission line luminosities, and coarse information on recent star formation. Our unique methodology for analyzing low-dispersion spectra taken with multilayer prisms in IMACS, combined with panchromatic photometry from the ultraviolet to the IR, has yielded high-quality redshifts for 43,347 galaxies in our first 5.3 deg{sup 2} of the SWIRE XMM-LSS field. We use three different approaches to estimate our redshift errors and find robust agreement. Over the full range of 3.6 μm fluxes of our selection, we find typical redshift uncertainties of σ {sub z}/(1 + z) ≲ 0.015. In comparisons with previously published spectroscopic redshifts we find scatters of σ {sub z}/(1 + z) = 0.011 for galaxies at 0.7 ≤ z ≤ 0.9, and σ {sub z}/(1 + z) = 0.014 for galaxies at 0.9 ≤ z ≤ 1.2. For galaxies brighter and fainter than i = 23 mag, we find σ {sub z}/(1 + z) = 0.008 and σ {sub z}/(1 + z) = 0.022, respectively. Notably, our low-dispersion spectroscopy and analysis yields comparable redshift uncertainties and success rates for both red and blue galaxies, largely eliminating color-based systematics that can seriously bias observed dependencies of galaxy evolution on environment.

  14. COMOVING SPACE DENSITY AND OBSCURED FRACTION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE SUBARU/XMM-NEWTON DEEP SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroi, Kazuo; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Watson, Mike G.

    2012-10-10

    We study the comoving space density of X-ray-selected luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the obscured AGN fraction at high redshifts (3 < z < 5) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey field. From an X-ray source catalog with high completeness of optical identification thanks to deep optical images, we select a sample of 30 AGNs at z > 3 with intrinsic (de-absorbed and rest-frame 2-10 keV) luminosities of L{sub X} = 10{sup 44-45} erg s{sup -1} detected in the 0.5-2 keV band, consisting of 20 and 10 objects with spectroscopic and photometric redshifts, respectively. Utilizing the 1/V{sub max} method, we confirm that the comoving space density of luminous AGNs decreases with redshift above z > 3. When combined with the Chandra-COSMOS result of Civano et al., the density decline of AGNs with L{sub X} = 10{sup 44-45} erg s{sup -1} is well represented by a power law of (1 + z){sup -6.2{+-}0.9}. We also determine the fraction of X-ray obscured AGNs with N{sub H} > 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} in the Compton-thin population to be 0.54{sup +0.17}{sub -0.19}, by carefully taking into account observational biases including the effects of photon statistics for each source. This result is consistent with an independent determination of the type-2 AGN fraction based on optical properties, for which the fraction is found to be 0.59 {+-} 0.09. Comparing our result with that obtained in the local universe, we conclude that the obscured fraction of luminous AGNs increases significantly from z = 0 to z > 3 by a factor of 2.5 {+-} 1.1.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Medium Deep Survey. 2: Deconvolution of Wide Field Camera field galaxy images in the 13 hour + 43 deg field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, R. A.; Schmidtke, P. C.; Pascarelle, S. M.; Gordon, J. M.; Griffiths, R. E.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G.; Glazebrook, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present isophotal profiles of six faint field galaxies from some of the first deep images taken for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey (MDS). These have redshifts in the range z = 0.126 to 0.402. The images were taken with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) in `parallel mode' and deconvolved with the Lucy method using as the point-spread function nearby stars in the image stack. The WFC deconvolutions have a dynamic range of 16 to 20 dB (4 to 5 mag) and an effective resolution approximately less than 0.2 sec (FWHM). The multiorbit HST images allow us to trace the morphology, light profiles, and color gradients of faint field galaxies down to V approximately equal to 22 to 23 mag at sub-kpc resolution, since the redshift range covered is z = 0.1 to 0.4. The goals of the MDS are to study the sub-kpc scale morphology, light profiles, and color gradients for a large samole of faint field galaxies down to V approximately equal to 23 mag, and to tr