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Sample records for deep venous thrombophlebitis

  1. Detection of deep venous thrombophlebitis by gallium 67 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Deep venous thrombophlebitis may escape clinical detection. Three cases are reported in which whole-body gallium 67 scintigraphy was used to detect unsuspected deep venous thrombophlebitis related to indwelling catheters in three children who were being evaluated for fevers of unknown origin. Two of these children had septicemia from Candida organisms secondary to these venous lines. Gallium 67 scintigraphy may be useful in the detection of complications of indwelling venous catheters.

  2. Deep venous thrombophlebitis following aortoiliac reconstructive surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, M.K.; McCabe, C.J.; Abbott, W.M.; Brewster, D.C.; Moncure, A.C.; Reidy, N.C.; Darling, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    One hundred patients undergoing elective aortic surgery were scanned prospectively for development of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The incidence of DVT in this population was 13%. Eleven patients showed only calf vein thrombosis on venography, whereas two had occlusive iliofemoral thrombus. The correlation between venous Doppler ultrasound and venography was 80%. More importantly, Doppler examination correctly identified both patients with occlusive thrombus. Fibrinogen scanning was associated with a false-positive rate of 31%. Only one patient suffered a nonfatal pulmonary embolus. Fibrinogen scanning has an unacceptably high false-positive rate; however, Doppler ultrasound will identify significant occlusive thrombus without a high false-positive rate. The low incidence of pulmonary emboli does not warrant such definitive measures as prophylactic vena caval interruption.

  3. Isolated superior mesenteric venous thrombophlebitis with acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Mohsen Mohamed; Abdalla, Mohaed Fahmy; Bedair, Said

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated superior mesentericveinous thrmbophlebitis is a rarely recognised condition associated with a high morbidity. It usually develops secondary to infection in the drainage area of the portal venous system, like appendix. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of neglected perforated acute appendicitis complicated by superior mesenteric venous pyelephlebitis patiant represented with a vague pain to right of umlicus, which is atypical this why cat scan was done and showed obstructed superiormesentric vein, portal vein was free with acute appendicitis. Appendicectomy and treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, anticoagulation, and platelets led to a full recovery. Follow-up imaging after one month revealed complete canalization of superior mesentric vein. DISCUSSION Abdominal pain if atypical like our case report need imaging diagnosis. Modern diagnostic imaging techniques help the early diagnosis of acute phase pylephlebitis. CT can detect primary source of infection, extent of pylephlebitis, CT scan is the most reliable initially. Ultrasound scan with color flow Doppler is also a sensitive test for confirming partial patency of the portal vein and portal vein thrombosis accidentally discovered complete obliteration of superior mesenteric vein with thrombosis which remained not propagated by serial Doppler ultrasound of liver. Appropriate treatment should be initiated as soon as possible. To avoid extension to portal vein. The principal treatment for pylephlebitis is to remove the source of infection as appendicectomy. Anticoagulants must be used. Regarding the treatment of portal thrombosis, post operative use of heparin has been advocated. CONCLUSION Cat scan play an important role in case of atypical abdominal pain. PMID:23500734

  4. Iliofemoral venous thrombosis following fascial excision of a deep burn of the lower extremity: case report.

    PubMed

    Gibran, N S; Heimbach, D M; Nicholls, S C

    1992-12-01

    Burned patients with deep venous thrombosis present a particularly perplexing challenge. They frequently require central venous catheters. Their altered skin integrity does not permit correlation with the typical changes described by the classic terminology for thrombophlebitis or its most severe forms, phlegmasia cerulea dolens or phlegmasia alba dolens. They are at risk of exsanguination or massive graft loss with lytic therapy or anticoagulation. Venous thrombectomy may be a necessary limb-saving surgical option.

  5. [Anti-PF4 antibodies and thrombophlebitis in a child with cerebral venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Desprez, Dominique; Desprez, Philippe; Tardy, Brigitte; Amiral, Jean; Droulle, Chantal; Ducassou, Stéphane; Mauvieux, Laurent; Grunebaum, Lélia

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 13-year-old girl, with a cerebral venous thrombosis treated initially by heparin. In front of this early thrombocytopenia, in spite of the absence of preliminary treatment by heparin, the "heparin-dependent" anti-PF4 antibodies ELISA assay was realized and turned out to be strongly positive. In spite of the negativity of the specific functional tests, the heparinotherapy was substituted by a treatment by danaparoïd of sodium, allowing a clinico-biological improvement. Because of the low score of HIT imputability, we realized a specific antibodies anti-PF4 alone assay which was strongly positive. This specific positivity probably explains the positivity of the antibodies anti PF4 "heparin-dependent" assay. The originality of this case lies in the young age of the patient and in the probably pathogenic character of these unusual antibodies, in addition markers of an auto-immune disease. PMID:21159583

  6. Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Mai, Cuc; Hunt, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis is less common than lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis. However, upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis is associated with similar adverse consequences and is becoming more common in patients with complex medical conditions requiring central venous catheters or wires. Although guidelines suggest that this disorder be managed using approaches similar to those for lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis, studies are refining the prognosis and management of upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis. Physicians should be familiar with the diagnostic and treatment considerations for this disease. This review will differentiate between primary and secondary upper-extremity deep venous thromboses; assess the risk factors and clinical sequelae associated with upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis, comparing these with lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis; and describe an approach to treatment and prevention of secondary upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis based on clinical evidence.

  7. The aetiology of deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Malone, P C; Agutter, P S

    2006-09-01

    Most ideas about the pathogenesis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are dominated by a 'consensus model' first articulated around 1962. This model invokes 'Virchow's triad' and attributes thrombogenesis in veins to some combination of 'hypercoagulability', 'stasis' and 'intimal injury'. This arose as a by-product of studies on the mechanisms of haemostasis and bleeding diatheses that were at best only indirectly relevant to thrombosis, and there are reasons for doubting the causal significance of 'hypercoagulability' and 'stasis' in the aetiology of DVT. Proponents of the consensus model make little reference to a substantial literature, mostly historical, that: (a) emphasizes the significance of the venous valve pockets (VVP) and blood rheology in DVT pathogenesis; and (b) describes morphological features specific to venous thrombi that a valid aetiological model must explain. This literature provides the basis for an alternative hypothesis of DVT aetiology, published some 30 years ago, which has been experimentally corroborated and is compatible with recent cell and molecular biological studies of the venous endothelium. We review this alternative hypothesis, considering its potential value for future research on DVT and embolism, and its significance for clinical practice.

  8. PLANTAR THROMBOPHLEBITIS: MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Frederico Celestino; Carneiro, Renato Duarte; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Rosemberg, Laércio Alberto; de Gusmão Funari, Marcelo Buarque

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in plantar thrombophlebitis. Methods: Retrospective review of twenty patients with pain in the plantar region of the foot, in which the MRI findings indicated plantar thrombophlebitis. Results: A total of fourteen men and six women, mean age 46.7 years were evaluated. Eight of these patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography, which confirmed the thrombophlebitis. The magnetic resonance images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal radiology (more than 10 years each), showing perivascular edema in all twenty patients (100%) and muscle edema in nineteen of the twenty patients (95%). All twenty patients had intraluminal intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted (100%) and venous ectasia was present in seventeen of the twenty cases (85%). Collateral veins were visualized in one of the twenty patients (5%). All fourteen cases (100%), in which intravenous contrast was administered, showed perivenular tissues enhancement and intraluminal filling defect. Venous ectasia, loss of compressibility and no flow on Doppler ultrasound were also observed in all eight cases examined by the method. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive in the evaluation of plant thrombophlebitis in patients with plantar foot pain. PMID:27047898

  9. Occult pulmonary embolism: a common occurrence in deep venous thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, G.S.; Cronan, J.J.; Tupper, T.B.; Messersmith, R.N.; Denny, D.F.; Lee, C.H.

    1987-02-01

    Ventilation-perfusion scans were used in a prospective study to determine the prevalence of occult pulmonary embolus in proven deep venous thrombosis. Fifty-eight patients without symptoms of pulmonary embolism, but with venographically proven deep venous thrombosis, were subjected to chest radiographs, /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated-albumin perfusion scans, and /sup 133/Xe ventilation scans. Of the 49 patients with deep venous thrombosis proximal to the calf veins, 17 (35%) had high-probability scans. Of all 58 patients, only 12 (21%) had normal scans. When the study population was compared with a group of 430 patients described in reports of pulmonary perfusion in asymptomatic persons, a significantly higher percentage of high-probability scans was found in the study population with deep venous thrombosis. Baseline ventilation-perfusion lung scanning is valuable for patients with proven above-knee deep venous thrombosis.

  10. [Ambulatory treatment of deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Metz, D; Hezard, N; Brasselet, C

    2001-11-01

    Conventional treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) has been based, until recently, on non-fractionated heparin by continuous intravenous infusion in hospital until effective anticoagulation could be obtained by oral anticoagulants introduced early. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) seems to be as effective and has a better bio-availability, which means that there are fewer adverse effects. This usage has logically led to the increase in the possibilities of treatment of DVT at home. However, certain precautions are necessary, especially the evaluation of the individual patient's risk with this strategy. This requires multidisciplinary collaboration and the respect of strict rules (precise diagnostic objective, hospital admission at the slightest doubt of pulmonary embolism) to demonstrate the value of ambulatory LMWH therapy which would improve patient comfort and allow early mobilisation. PMID:11794978

  11. Deep venous thrombosis and occult malignancy: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, M.; Lindblad, B.; Anderson, H.; Bergqvist, D.; Kjellström, T.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the risk of subsequent cancer in patients with deep venous thrombosis confirmed by venography. DESIGN--Follow up of all patients who had venography for suspected deep venous thrombosis during 1984-88. Patients were traced through a cancer registry up to 1 January 1991. SUBJECTS--4399 patients who had phlebography in one hospital. SETTING--General hospital in Malmö, Sweden, serving a population of 230,000. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Number of cancers recorded. RESULTS--4399 patients had venography for suspected deep venous thrombosis; 604 were known to have a malignancy at the time of venography and were excluded from further analysis. 1383 had deep venous thrombosis, 150 of whom subsequently developed cancer. 182 of the 2412 patients without thrombosis developed cancer. During the first six months after venography 66 patients with thrombosis developed malignancy compared with 37 patients without thrombosis (P < 0.0001). 38 of the cancers in the deep venous thrombosis group were detected by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. Three patients had postoperative or post-traumatic deep venous thromboses. Only two of the remaining patients would have benefited from early detection by extensive screening. After six months the incidence of cancer was identical in patients with and without thrombosis. CONCLUSION--Deep venous thrombosis is associated with a significantly higher frequency of malignancy during the first six months after diagnosis. Malignancies can be found with simple clinical and diagnostic methods and extensive screening is not required. PMID:8173368

  12. Postoperative deep venous thrombosis in Japan. Incidence and prophylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, K.; Shirai, N.; Hayashi, M.; Matsumoto, K.; Hirose, M.

    1983-06-01

    The incidence of postoperative deep venous thrombosis was investigated using the iodine-125-fibrinogen method in 256 patients undergoing major surgery. Deep venous thrombosis was found in 49 patients (15.3 percent), and nonfatal pulmonary embolism developed in one of seven patients in whom the thrombus extended to the popliteal vein. The same investigation was performed in 110 patients who wore a graduated compression stocking on one leg, with the other leg serving as a control. Deep venous thrombosis was found in 4 of 110 stockinged legs (3.6 percent) and in 16 of 110 control legs (14.5 percent). The incidence of deep venous thrombosis decreased significantly in patients who wore the stocking. An increase in femoral venous flow velocity was found in the stockinged legs by the Doppler method. The mean velocity of venous return by xenon-133 clearance was significantly greater in the stockinged legs than in the control legs. These findings were considered to support the efficacy of graduated compression stockings for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis.

  13. Deep venous thrombosis and postthrombotic syndrome: invasive management.

    PubMed

    Comerota, A J

    2015-03-01

    Invasive management of postthrombotic syndrome encompasses the two ends of the deep vein thrombosis spectrum, patients with acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis and those with chronic postthrombotic iliofemoral venous obstruction. Of all patients with acute deep vein thrombosis, those with involvement of the iliofemoral segments have the most severe chronic postthrombotic morbidity. Catheter-based techniques now permit percutaneous treatment to eliminate thrombus, restore patency, potentially maintain valvular function, and improve quality of life. Randomized trial data support an initial treatment strategy of thrombus removal. Failure to eliminate acute thrombus from the iliofemoral system leads to chronic postthrombotic obstruction of venous outflow. Debilitating chronic postthrombotic symptoms of the long-standing obstruction of venous outflow can be reduced by restoring unobstructed venous drainage from the profunda femoris vein to the vena cava.

  14. To what extent might deep venous thrombosis and chronic venous insufficiency share a common etiology?

    PubMed

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, P S

    2009-08-01

    According to the valve cusp hypoxia hypothesis (VCHH), deep venous thrombosis is caused by sustained non-pulsatile (streamline) venous blood flow. This leads to hypoxemia in the valve pockets; hypoxic injury to the inner (parietalis) endothelium of the cusp leaflets activates the elk-1/egr-1 pathway, leading to leukocyte and platelet swarming at the site of injury and, potentially, blood coagulation. Here, we propose an extension of the VCHH to account for chronic venous insufficiency. First, should the foregoing events not proceed to frank thrombogenesis, the valves may nevertheless be chronically injured and become incompetent. Serial incompetence in lower limb valves may then generate ''passive'' venous hypertension. Second, should ostial valve thrombosis obstruct venous return from muscles via tributaries draining into the femoral vein, as Virchow illustrated, ''active'' venous hypertension may supervene: muscle contraction would force the blood in the vessels behind the blocked ostial valves to re-route. Passive or active venous hypertension opposes return flow, leading to luminal hypoxemia and vein wall distension, which in turn may impair vasa venarum perfusion; the resulting mural endothelial hypoxia would lead to leukocyte invasion of the wall and remodelling of the media. We propose that varicose veins result if gross active hypertension stretches the valve ''rings'', rendering attached valves incompetent caudad to obstructed sites, replacing normal centripetal flow in perforating veins with centrifugal flow and over-distending those vessels. We also discuss how hypoxemia-related venous/capillary wall lesions may lead to accumulation of leukocytes, progressive blockage of capillary blood flow, lipodermosclerosis and skin ulceration. PMID:19648868

  15. To what extent might deep venous thrombosis and chronic venous insufficiency share a common etiology?

    PubMed

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, P S

    2009-08-01

    According to the valve cusp hypoxia hypothesis (VCHH), deep venous thrombosis is caused by sustained non-pulsatile (streamline) venous blood flow. This leads to hypoxemia in the valve pockets; hypoxic injury to the inner (parietalis) endothelium of the cusp leaflets activates the elk-1/egr-1 pathway, leading to leukocyte and platelet swarming at the site of injury and, potentially, blood coagulation. Here, we propose an extension of the VCHH to account for chronic venous insufficiency. First, should the foregoing events not proceed to frank thrombogenesis, the valves may nevertheless be chronically injured and become incompetent. Serial incompetence in lower limb valves may then generate ''passive'' venous hypertension. Second, should ostial valve thrombosis obstruct venous return from muscles via tributaries draining into the femoral vein, as Virchow illustrated, ''active'' venous hypertension may supervene: muscle contraction would force the blood in the vessels behind the blocked ostial valves to re-route. Passive or active venous hypertension opposes return flow, leading to luminal hypoxemia and vein wall distension, which in turn may impair vasa venarum perfusion; the resulting mural endothelial hypoxia would lead to leukocyte invasion of the wall and remodelling of the media. We propose that varicose veins result if gross active hypertension stretches the valve ''rings'', rendering attached valves incompetent caudad to obstructed sites, replacing normal centripetal flow in perforating veins with centrifugal flow and over-distending those vessels. We also discuss how hypoxemia-related venous/capillary wall lesions may lead to accumulation of leukocytes, progressive blockage of capillary blood flow, lipodermosclerosis and skin ulceration.

  16. Management of catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Liem, Timothy K; Moneta, Gregory L

    2016-07-01

    Central venous catheters or peripherally inserted central catheters are major risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT). The body and quality of literature evaluating catheter-associated (CA) UEDVT have increased, yet strong evidence on screening, diagnosis, prevention, and optimal treatment is limited. We herein review the current evidence of CA UEDVT that can be applied clinically. Principally, we review the anatomy and definition of CA UEDVT, identification of risk factors, utility of duplex ultrasound as the preferred diagnostic modality, preventive strategies, and an algorithm for management of CA UEDVT. PMID:27318061

  17. [Hemostatic status in subjects with deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Ferlito, S; Bonomo, T; Pitari, G; Puleo, R; Condorelli, M; Mazzone, D

    1996-12-01

    The authors report a study on the hemostatic status of a group of patients with deep venous thrombosis in order to highlight the possible pathogenetic responsibility of blood coagulative disorders in the genesis of thrombosis. The group consisted of 27 patients (14 males, 13 females, mean age 48 +/- 4 years) with deep venous thrombosis of the lower limbs (clinical symptoms were primary in 21 cases, secondary in 6 cases) diagnosed on the basis of clinical data and ultrasonographic instrumental findings. Fourteen normal subjects were also examined as a control group (12 males, 2 females, mean age 28 +/- 5 years). Venous blood was collected on fasting from patients and controls to examine the following parameters: fibrinogen (F), factor VII (F VII), antithrombin III (AT III), protein C (PC), protein S (PS) using coagulometric methods (IL), and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), fibrinopeptide A (FPA), betathromboglobulin (BTG) and dimer-D (D-D) using ELISA methods (Boehringer). Patients with deep venous thrombosis showed a significant increase in F, FVII, tPA and D-D levels compared to controls, whereas a significant reduction was observed in PAI-1. Nonsignificant variations were found for AT III, PC, PS and BTG. In the light of these results the authors affirm that: high fibrinogen and factor VII levels are highly prognostic for thrombosis in patients with deep venous thrombosis; the importance of the lack of inhibitory factors (AT III, PC, PS) is confined to individual genetically predisposed cases; there is an efficacious hyperfibrinolytic reactive response to the presence of thrombus (increase in tPA and D-D, reduction of PAI-1).

  18. Primary leiomyosarcoma of saphenous vein presenting as deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Fremed, Daniel I; Faries, Peter L; Schanzer, Harry R; Marin, Michael L; Ting, Windsor

    2014-12-01

    Only a small number of venous leiomyosarcomas have been previously reported. Of these tumors, those of saphenous origin comprise a minority of cases. A 59-year-old man presented with symptoms of deep vein thrombosis and was eventually diagnosed with primary leiomyosarcoma of great saphenous vein origin. The tumor was treated with primary resection and femoral vein reconstruction with autologous patch. Although extremely rare, saphenous leiomyosarcoma can present as deep vein thrombosis. Vascular tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis of atypical extremity swelling refractory to conventional deep vein thrombosis management.

  19. Diagnosis and Management of Spontaneous Lumbar Venous Retroperitoneal Hematoma in Setting of Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Case Report and Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Joseph; Chapman, Todd; Scott, Ryan; Kalinkin, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hematoma is rare and benefits from a systematic approach to prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of such bleeds is based upon patient stability, the cause (spontaneous or posttraumatic), and source (arterial or venous). Herein, the authors describe a diagnostic and management algorithm for retroperitoneal hemorrhage with an example of a rare lumbar venous bleed under the complicated clinical setting of deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27795865

  20. Detection of deep venous thrombosis by indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alonzo, W.A. Jr.; Alavi, A.

    1986-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte ((/sup 111/In)WBC) scintigraphy has been used successfully for detection of inflammation. Occasionally, noninflammatory collections of white blood cells such as hematomas or hemorrhage have been localized. We report a case in which unsuspected femoral deep venous thrombosis was diagnosed on an (/sup 111/In)WBC leukocyte scan performed for detection of osteomyelitis. Readers are advised to avoid interpreting all vascular (/sup 111/In)WBC localization as necessarily infectious. This may be of particular significance in patients with vascular grafts.

  1. Heterotopic bone formation (myositis ossificans) and lower-extremity swelling mimicking deep-venous disease

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Rudd, T.G.; Nelp, W.B.

    1984-10-01

    A quadriplegic patient with a swollen leg was suspected of having deep-venous thrombosis, and was studied with radionuclide venography (RNV) and contrast venography. Focal narrowing of the femoral vein, seen on RNV, was due to extrinsic compression. Although soft-tissue radiographs were normal, Tc-99m diphosphonate imaging established the diagnosis of early heterotopic bone formation (myositis ossificans), which was responsible for the venous compression. Clinically this inflammatory process can mimic deep-venous thrombosis, and should be considered in evaluating patients at risk for both heterotopic bone formation and deep-venous thrombosis.

  2. Deep venous thrombosis in a young woman with hypoplastic inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Lavens, Matthias; Moors, Boudewijn; Thomis, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    We present a 33-year-old woman with deep venous thrombosis of the left iliac vein and the left lower limb. A computed tomography scan of her abdomen revealed a hypoplastic inferior vena cava and agenesis of the right kidney. Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava are uncommon and are sometimes an unrecognized cause of deep venous thrombosis.

  3. [Epidemiology and management of isolated distal deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Galanaud, J-P; Kahn, S R; Khau Van Kien, A; Laroche, J-P; Quéré, I

    2012-12-01

    Isolated distal deep-vein thromboses (DVT) are infra-popliteal DVT without involvement of proximal veins or pulmonary embolism (PE). They can affect deep calf (tibial anterior, tibial posterior, or peroneal) or muscular (gastrocnemius or soleal) veins. They represent half of all lower limbs DVT. Proximal and distal DVTs differ in terms of risk factor profile, proximal DVT being more frequently associated with chronic risk factors and distal DVT with transient ones. Their natural history (rate of spontaneous proximal extension) is debated leading to uncertainties on the need to diagnose and treat them with anticoagulant drugs. In the long term, the risk of venous thromboembolic recurrence is lower than that of proximal DVT and their absolute risk of post-thrombotic syndrome is unknown. French national guidelines suggest treating with anticoagulants for 6 weeks a first episode of isolated distal DVT provoked by a transient risk factor and treating for at least 3 months unprovoked or recurrent or active cancer-related distal DVT. The use of compression stockings use is suggested in case of deep calf vein thrombosis. Ongoing therapeutic trials should provide important data necessary to establish an evidence-based mode of care, especially about the need to treat distal DVT at low risk of extension with anticoagulants.

  4. Isolated deep venous thrombosis--case series, literature review and long term follow up.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ayeesha K; Itrat, Ahmed; Shoukat, Sana; Khealani, Asumal; Kamal, Kamran

    2006-11-01

    Cerebral Venous Sinus thrombosis may rarely be isolated to a cortical vein or to the deep venous system. When the deep venous system is involved, prognosis is generally poor. In addition, long term follow up is not reported. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients admitted to a major tertiary care center, with the diagnosis of isolated deep venous thrombosis. Two patients were identified with isolated involvement of the deep venous system, they are reviewed in detail with long term follow up. Two young South Asian women in their thirties with rapid onset of neurologic signs and symptoms are reported. Even when one patient required intubation and mechanical ventilation for stupor, both had excellent neurologic recovery. Over 6 years of follow up there has been no recurrence. In spite of stupor at presentation, complete recovery is possible without long term recurrence.

  5. Factor V Leiden Is Associated with Higher Risk of Deep Venous Thrombosis of Large Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Arsov, Todor; Miladinova, Daniela; Spiroski, Mirko

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation in patients with different presentation of venous thromboembolic disease and healthy individuals in the Republic of Macedonia. Methods The retrospective case-control study involved 190 patients with venous thromboembolic disease and 200 healthy individuals, who were screened for the presence of factor V Leiden mutation, using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The prevalence of factor V Leiden was analyzed according to the localization of thrombosis, presence of risk factors, and family history of thrombosis. The odds of deep venous thrombosis were calculated with respect to the presence of factor V Leiden mutation. Results The prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation among patients with venous thromboembolic disease was 21.1%, compared with 5.5% in the healthy individuals. Factor V Leiden positive patients had the first episode of deep venous thrombosis at a younger age, and the prevalence of the mutation was the highest among patients with a positive family history of thrombosis (33.9%, P = 0.003) and in patients with deep venous thrombosis affecting a large blood vessel (37.7%, P = 0.001). The prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation was lower in patients with calf deep venous thrombosis and primary thromboembolism (13.3% and 13.1%, respectively; P>0.05). The odds ratio for iliofemoral or femoral deep venous thrombosis in factor V Leiden carriers was 10.4 (95% confidence interval, 4.7-23.1). Conclusion The prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation was high in patients with venous thromboembolic disease and healthy individuals in the Republic of Macedonia. Factor V Leiden carriers have the highest odds of developing deep venous thrombosis affecting a large venous blood vessel. PMID:16758522

  6. Deep venous thromboses in patients with hematological malignancies after peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ha; Arellano, Martha; Chamsuddin, Abbas; Flowers, Christopher; Heffner, Leonard T; Langston, Amelia; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Tindol, Allen; Waller, Edmund; Winton, Elliott F; Khoury, Hanna J

    2010-08-01

    The incidence of deep venous thromboses (DVTs) associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in patients with hematological malignancies is not well described. We sought to determine the incidence, characteristics, and outcomes of PICC-related DVTs in this patient population. Retrospective, single center cohort analysis of patients with hematological malignancies with upper extremity PICCs and symptomatic upper extremity DVTs were identified by electronic medical record databases search. Between April 2001 and February 2006, 899 PICCs were placed in 498 patients, and ultrasound documented DVTs were observed in 39 (7.8%) a median of 26 days after PICC placement. Twenty-three (59%) had a new diagnosis of hematological malignancy at the time of PICC placement. DVT management included PICC removal (71%), thrombectomy/thrombolysis (13%), and 3-month anticoagulation. No pulmonary emboli or hemorrhages were observed. A change to centrally inserted tunneled internal jugular (IJ) catheters was instituted February 2006, and the incidence of DVTs was 0.4% among 843 tunneled IJ catheters placed in a subsequent cohort of 667 patients with hematological malignancies. Patients with hematological malignancies have a high incidence of PICC-associated DVTs. Internal jugular vein tunneled PICCs are associated with a very low incidence of DVTs in this patient population.

  7. Primary Iliac Venous Leiomyosarcoma: A Rare Cause of Deep Vein Thrombosis in a Young Patient

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Nelson; Dias, Emanuel; Lima, Ricardo; Oliveira, Fernando; Cássio, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Primary venous tumours are a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis. The authors present a case where the definitive diagnosis was delayed by inconclusive complementary imaging. Clinical Case. A thirty-seven-year-old female presented with an iliofemoral venous thrombosis of the right lower limb. The patient had presented with an episode of femoral-popliteal vein thrombosis five months before and was currently under anticoagulation. Phlegmasia alba dolens installed progressively, as thrombus rapidly extended to the inferior vena cava despite systemic thrombolysis and anticoagulation. Diagnostic imaging failed to identify the underlying aetiology of the deep vein thrombosis. The definitive diagnosis of primary venous leiomyosarcoma was reached by a subcutaneous abdominal wall nodule biopsy. Conclusion. Primary venous leiomyosarcoma of the iliac vein is a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis, which must be considered in young patients with recurrent or refractory to treatment deep vein thrombosis. PMID:21738532

  8. Primary iliac venous leiomyosarcoma: a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis in a young patient.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Nelson; Dias, Emanuel; Lima, Ricardo; Oliveira, Fernando; Cássio, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Primary venous tumours are a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis. The authors present a case where the definitive diagnosis was delayed by inconclusive complementary imaging. Clinical Case. A thirty-seven-year-old female presented with an iliofemoral venous thrombosis of the right lower limb. The patient had presented with an episode of femoral-popliteal vein thrombosis five months before and was currently under anticoagulation. Phlegmasia alba dolens installed progressively, as thrombus rapidly extended to the inferior vena cava despite systemic thrombolysis and anticoagulation. Diagnostic imaging failed to identify the underlying aetiology of the deep vein thrombosis. The definitive diagnosis of primary venous leiomyosarcoma was reached by a subcutaneous abdominal wall nodule biopsy. Conclusion. Primary venous leiomyosarcoma of the iliac vein is a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis, which must be considered in young patients with recurrent or refractory to treatment deep vein thrombosis.

  9. Incidental Finding of Inferior Vena Cava Atresia Presenting with Deep Venous Thrombosis following Physical Exertion

    PubMed Central

    Koppisetty, Shalini; Smith, Alton G.; Dhillon, Ravneet K.

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava atresia (IVCA) is a rare but well described vascular anomaly. It is a rare risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), found in approximately 5% of cases of unprovoked lower extremity (LE) DVT in patients <30 years of age. Affected population is in the early thirties, predominantly male, often with a history of major physical exertion and presents with extensive or bilateral DVTs. Patients with IVC anomalies usually develop compensatory circulation through the collateral veins with enlarged azygous/hemizygous veins. Despite the compensatory circulation, the venous drainage of the lower limbs is often insufficient leading to venous stasis and thrombosis. We describe a case of extensive and bilateral deep venous thrombosis following physical exertion in a thirty-six-year-old male patient with incidental finding of IVCA on imaging. PMID:26640723

  10. Advanced management of acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis: emergency department and beyond.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Charles V

    2011-06-01

    Recent attention to the increasing incidence of venous thromboembolism has included a call to action from the surgeon general and new guidelines from various specialty organizations. The standard of care for treatment of deep venous thrombosis in the emergency department (ED), supported by the 2008 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines, involves initiation of anticoagulation with low-molecular-weight heparin, pentasaccharide, or unfractionated heparin. For selected appropriate patients with extensive acute proximal deep venous thrombosis, the ACCP guidelines now recommend thrombolysis in addition to anticoagulation to reduce not only the risk of pulmonary embolism but also the risk of subsequent postthrombotic syndrome and recurrent deep venous thrombosis. Postthrombotic syndrome is a potentially debilitating chronic cluster of lower-extremity symptoms occurring in 20% to 50% of deep venous thrombosis patients subsequent to the acute insult, sometimes not until years later. A strategy of early thrombus burden reduction or frank removal might reduce the incidence of postthrombotic syndrome, as per natural history studies, venous thrombectomy data, observations after systemic and catheter-directed thrombolysis, and the still-limited number of randomized trials of catheter-directed thrombolysis (with anticoagulation) versus anticoagulation alone. Contemporary invasive (endovascular) treatments mitigate the drawbacks historically associated with thrombolytic approaches by means of intrathrombus delivery of drugs with greater fibrin specificity and lower allergenicity, followed by mechanical dispersion to accelerate lysis and then aspiration of remaining drug and clot debris. With a 2016 target completion date, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute--sponsored Acute Venous Thrombosis: Thrombus Removal With Adjunctive Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis trial is comparing the safety and efficacy, in terms of both deep venous thrombosis and

  11. The causes of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis in the children with cranial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Wei; Jia, Ge; Li, Na; Jia, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and to explore its possible reasons in children patients who received neurosurgery operation. Clinical data of 4958 cases children patients with lower-extremity DVT and without the thrombosis after the neurosurgery operation from 2010 January to 2014 December in department of neurosurgery of Tian Tan hospital were collected and analyzed. 18 cases children were diagnosed with lower-extremity DVT. All of them had invasive operation of lower-extremity deep venous catheterization. The mainly primary diseases of thrombosis children were craniopharyngioma. They have longer operation time compared with those without thrombosis (P<0.05). Therefore, the causes of DVT in neurosurgical children involve not only deep venous catheter-related but also neurological primary disease and operation time. PMID:26885175

  12. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  13. Congenital agenesis of inferior vena cava: a rare cause of unprovoked deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Pouria; Lane, John S; Barleben, Andrew R; Owens, Erik L; Bandyk, Dennis

    2015-07-01

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC), although rare, are a risk factor for lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT). A 19-year-old male presented with a left flank and groin pain caused by iliofemoral venous thrombosis. Vascular imaging by computed tomography (CT) scanning and venography demonstrated agenesis of the IVC. Catheter-directed thrombolysis via a popliteal vein was attempted but did not alter the patency of the common femoral vein outflow collaterals into the retroperitoneal azygous venous system. The patient was anticoagulated using systemic heparin infusion and clinical symptoms resolved within 5 days. He was transitioned to oral Coumadin anticoagulation, and follow-up venous duplex testing demonstrated no infrainguinal DVT and phasic venous flow with respiration in the femoral vein indicating patent collateral veins. Anomalies of the IVC are present in 0.3-0.5% of otherwise healthy individuals. Agenesis of the IVC has an incidence of 0.0005-1% in the general population but is found in almost 5% of patients <30 years of age with unprovoked lower limb DVT. In adults, IVC agenesis anomaly can cause diagnostic problems in the paravertebral area because of the tumor-like appearance of the azygous venous collaterals on noncontrast CT imaging. In young adults presenting with unprovoked lower limb DVT, the presence of an IVC anomaly should be considered and evaluated for by venous duplex testing and if necessary CT venography.

  14. Endovascular treatment options in the management of lower limb deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed; Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sheraz; Uberoi, Raman

    2009-09-01

    Lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Systemic anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of conventional treatment instituted by most physicians for the management of DVT. This has proven efficacy in the prevention of thrombus extension and reduction in the incidence of pulmonary embolism and rethrombosis. Unfortunately, especially in patients with severe and extensive iliofemoral DVT, standard treatment may not be entirely adequate. This is because a considerable proportion of these patients eventually develops postthrombotic syndrome. This is characterized by chronic extremity pain and trophic skin changes, edema, ulceration, and venous claudication. Recent interest in endovascular technologies has led to the development of an assortment of minimally invasive, catheter-based strategies to deal with venous thrombus. These comprise catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices, adjuvant venous angioplasty and stenting, and inferior vena cava filters. This article reviews these technologies and discusses their current role as percutaneous treatment strategies for venous thrombotic conditions.

  15. Endovascular Treatment Options in the Management of Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sheraz; Uberoi, Raman

    2009-09-15

    Lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Systemic anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of conventional treatment instituted by most physicians for the management of DVT. This has proven efficacy in the prevention of thrombus extension and reduction in the incidence of pulmonary embolism and rethrombosis. Unfortunately, especially in patients with severe and extensive iliofemoral DVT, standard treatment may not be entirely adequate. This is because a considerable proportion of these patients eventually develops postthrombotic syndrome. This is characterized by chronic extremity pain and trophic skin changes, edema, ulceration, and venous claudication. Recent interest in endovascular technologies has led to the development of an assortment of minimally invasive, catheter-based strategies to deal with venous thrombus. These comprise catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices, adjuvant venous angioplasty and stenting, and inferior vena cava filters. This article reviews these technologies and discusses their current role as percutaneous treatment strategies for venous thrombotic conditions.

  16. Acquired and Heritable Thrombophilia in Indian Patients With Pediatric Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT).

    PubMed

    Pai, Navin; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2014-09-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in children is more often associated with underlying pathological conditions than with hereditary thrombophilia. The present study is a retrospective analysis of thrombophilia in 285 pediatric patients with venous thrombosis at different sites. Four common thrombophilia markers, that is protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, and factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, were analyzed. Thrombosis in hepatic and portal veins was more common in pediatric patients (73%) when compared to other sites (27%). Overall, hereditary thrombophilia accounted for 15.5% of the patients with venous thrombosis. The FVL mutation, which was the major causative factor in Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis cases in the adult group, was not a major contributing factor in pediatric group, that is, 1.8% of the patients. In conclusion, the risk factors for venous thrombosis vary in different age groups.

  17. A novel approach for assessing the progression of deep venous thrombosis by area of venous thrombus in ultrasonic elastography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yuhui; Chen, Ming

    2014-04-01

    Exact age determination of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is important for an appropriate treatment. The purpose of this present study is to assess the age of acute DVT with the area of venous thrombi in elasticity imaging during the thrombosis procession. The thrombus area is obtained from a specially designed program. It was applied to clot specimens induced in human great saphenous (n = 15) at selected time points following the initiation of thrombosis. The relative mean proportion of blood clots was 50.01% ± 12.44% at day 1; 69.94% ± 8.19% at day 3; 81.93% ± 6.15% at day 6; and 92.37% ± 4.06% at day 9. The results indicated that the thrombus area increased significantly over time, while the normalized strain values inside the thrombus changed only a little. The pathological analyses also showed the same results. Therefore, we conclude that the area of venous thrombi in elasticity imaging may be a novel function for acute DVT staging.

  18. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction.

  19. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27672574

  20. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Akhilesh K.; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26101920

  1. Deep venous thrombosis caused by congenital absence of inferior vena cava, combined with hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sang Seob; Kim, Ji Il; Kim, Kee Hwan; Sung, Gi Young; Lee, Do Sang; Kim, Jeong Soo; Moon, In Sung; Lim, Keun Woo; Koh, Young Bok

    2004-01-01

    We present a case of suprarenal and infrarenal absence of the inferior vena cava, combined with hyperhomocysteinemia in a 39-year-old woman who presented with symptoms of deep venous thrombosis. The patient also had a homozygous mutation of C677T methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. Deep vein thrombosis has a multifactorial etiology involving both genetic and acquired factors. Absence of the inferior vena cava is a rare congenital anomaly, but recently it was confirmed as an important risk factor for the development of deep vein thrombosis, especially in young persons. Hypercoagulability due to hyperhomocysteinemia with a tendency toward venous stasis, mediated by congenital absence of the inferior vena cava is thought to have caused deep vein thrombosis in our patient. To our knowledge, this association has not yet been reported. The clinical features and prognosis of the entity are discussed. PMID:15043024

  2. Role of Color Flow Ultrasound in Detection of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Shelan Hakeem; AL-Najjar, Salwa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of lower limbs is one of the most causes for the majority of death caused by pulmonary embolism. Many medical and surgical disorders are complicated by DVT. Most venous thrombi are clinically silent. B-mode and color Doppler imaging is needed for early diagnosis of DVT to prevent complications and squeal of…

  3. Deep venous thrombosis as a cause of stump swelling in two lower extremity amputee patients.

    PubMed

    Chong, D K; Panju, A

    1993-09-01

    Two patients who were initially treated for an infection as a cause for their swollen stump were subsequently found to have deep venous thrombosis. The diagnosis was made noninvasively by compressive ultrasound (CU) scanning. DVT should be considered in the different diagnosis of stump swelling in the otherwise stable, post-rehabilitated lower extremity amputee patient.

  4. Deep Venous Thrombosis in Teen With Crouzon Syndrome Post-Le Fort III Osteotomy With Rigid External Distraction.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Lauren O; Myers, Rene P; Girotto, John A

    2015-11-01

    Venous thromboembolic events are rare in pediatric patients. Risk factors associated with the development of venous thromboembolic events in pediatric patients include the use of central venous catheters, hospitalization, cancer, sepsis, trauma, surgery, and congenital prothrombotic disorders.The authors present the case of a 14-year-old man with Crouzon syndrome who required Le Fort III osteotomy with rigid external distraction for significant midface hypoplasia who presented postoperatively with an extensive deep venous thrombosis. This is the first reported case of symptomatic venous thrombosis post-Le Fort III osteotomy and rigid external distraction. Although rare, surgeons should be aware of this potential complication.

  5. Deep Venous Thrombosis in Teen With Crouzon Syndrome Post-Le Fort III Osteotomy With Rigid External Distraction.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Lauren O; Myers, Rene P; Girotto, John A

    2015-11-01

    Venous thromboembolic events are rare in pediatric patients. Risk factors associated with the development of venous thromboembolic events in pediatric patients include the use of central venous catheters, hospitalization, cancer, sepsis, trauma, surgery, and congenital prothrombotic disorders.The authors present the case of a 14-year-old man with Crouzon syndrome who required Le Fort III osteotomy with rigid external distraction for significant midface hypoplasia who presented postoperatively with an extensive deep venous thrombosis. This is the first reported case of symptomatic venous thrombosis post-Le Fort III osteotomy and rigid external distraction. Although rare, surgeons should be aware of this potential complication. PMID:26595005

  6. Unprovoked deep venous thrombosis in a young adult associated with membranous obstruction of inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Epperla, Narendranath; Usoltseva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Unprovoked deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in young adults is an unusual phenomenon, but it is associated with significant morbidity. Developmental anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) should be considered as a possible aetiological factor, and appropriate investigations should be performed to determine the conclusive diagnosis and necessary treatment plan. We report a case of spontaneous thrombosis of the IVC and bilateral iliac venous system in a young man, associated with membranous obstruction of the IVC. He was diagnosed using several different investigational techniques, and successfully treated with mechanical thrombectomy, thrombolysis therapy and anticoagulation.

  7. Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Repair using deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in 44 consecutive infants.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, D F; Parimelazhagan, K M; Tweedie, M C; West, C R; Piccoli, G P; Musumeci, F; Hamilton, D I

    1982-01-01

    Forty-four consecutive infants aged from 3 days to 10 months underwent repair of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection using deep hypothermia with circulatory arrest. There were eight (18%) early hospital deaths. Using multivariate analysis no significant association could be shown between early mortality and age or weight at operation, preoperative pulmonary or systemic pressure, and preoperative condition for patients undergoing operation during the most recent five year period. Late pulmonary venous obstruction developed in four (11%) of the survivors and all of these patients died. PMID:7104117

  8. Unmasking a young adult migratory deep venous thrombosis--case report.

    PubMed

    Haliga, Raluca; Drug, V L; Negru, D; Ambarus, V; Neghina, Ionela; Sorodoc, L

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a known complication of cancer which impacts on patient mortality and quality of life. The primary site of cancer is an important risk factor, with highest rates observed in patients with brain, pancreas, gastric, kidney, ovary and lung cancers. The extent of metastatic spread further adds to the risk. In this article, we present the case of a young patient who was diagnosed with an aggressive form of pancreatic neoplasm with secondary determinations, without any previous digestive symptoms, with the occasion of a recurrent and migratory deep venous thrombosis (DVT).

  9. Septic Pelvic Thrombophlebitis Following Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Farhady, Parastoo; Lemyre, Madeleine

    2009-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis is frequently one of exclusion; a suspicion should arise when fever fails to respond to standard broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and defervesces within 48 hours of the addition of systemic anticoagulation. The risk of a thromboembolic event following minimally invasive surgery is not well defined. Case Report: We report the first case of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis following laparoscopic hysterectomy in a 51-year-old woman who developed fever on postoperative day 4. The fever workup was negative. The patient's temperature spikes were unresponsive to medical management. A clinical diagnosis of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis was made, and the patient responded excellently to anticoagulation in conjunction with antibiotic therapy. Conclusion: Although rare, septic pelvic thrombophlebitis should be suspected after laparoscopy in patients with appropriate risk factors and persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy. Considerable benefit will be derived from clinical trials that study and provide data on the risk and incidence of thromboembolism after laparoscopic procedures. PMID:19366549

  10. Hypoplasia of the inferior vena cava in a young man presenting with extensive deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Bryony Eloise Pfyffer; de Boisanger, James; Bottomley, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 34-year-old man with extensive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) who was found to have multiple abnormalities of venous anatomy, notably hypoplasia of the inferior vena cava with azygous continuation. DVT has an annual incidence of around 1 in 1000 people in the UK. Many cases will have readily identifiable risk factors, such as underlying malignancy, immobility or thrombophilia, but at times, these might not be so straightforward and unexpected contributing factors may be found. Although relatively uncommon in the general population, congenital venous abnormalities have been found at higher incidence in young adults presenting with spontaneous DVT and should therefore remain a consideration when classical risk factors are absent.

  11. Low-molecular-weight heparin in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hauer, K E

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally, acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is treated with intravenous heparin followed by oral anticoagulants. With the advent of the low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), this strategy is changing dramatically. LMWHs are compounds derived from standard unfractionated heparin that offer distinct clinical advantages over unfractionated heparin, including better bioavailability, longer half-life, and a more predictable anticoagulant response that obviates the need for laboratory monitoring. The common side effects of unfractionated heparin, including bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and osteoporosis, may be less common with LMWH. For the treatment of established venous thromboembolism, LMWH is at least as safe and effective as unfractionated heparin. Recent studies demonstrate that home therapy of DVT with LMWH, compared with inpatient therapy with unfractionated heparin, produces comparable clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction, with dramatic cost savings. With careful patient selection, home therapy of venous thromboembolism is quickly becoming the new standard of care. PMID:9795594

  12. Role of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Kanne, Jeffrey P; Lalani, Tasneem A

    2004-03-30

    During the 1990s, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging underwent extensive technological advancement and expanded clinical use in patients with venous thromboembolic disease, particularly with regard to evaluation of the pulmonary vasculature. In many institutions, helical (spiral) CT pulmonary angiography has become the initial imaging study of choice to evaluate patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, supplanting ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy. In addition, CT venography of the pelvis and lower extremities is often incorporated into the CT angiography protocol to identify or exclude concurrent deep venous thrombosis. MR pulmonary angiography and MR venography are second-line diagnostic tools because of their higher cost, limited availability, and other logistical constraints. As the technology improves and becomes more widely available, MR imaging may play a greater role in the evaluation of patients with venous thromboembolic disease.

  13. Role of Catheter-directed Thrombolysis in Management of Iliofemoral Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, James X; Sudheendra, Deepak; Stavropoulos, S William; Nadolski, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The treatment for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is challenging, as the use of anticoagulation alone can be insufficient for restoring venous patency and thus lead to prolongation of acute symptoms and an increased risk of chronic complications, including venous insufficiency and postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). In these cases, earlier and more complete thrombus removal can ameliorate acute symptoms and reduce long-term sequelae. Endovascular therapies involving the use of pharmacologic, mechanical, and combined pharmacomechanical modalities have been developed to achieve these goals. The most frequently used of these techniques, catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), involves the infusion of a thrombolytic agent through a multiple-side-hole catheter placed within the thrombosed vein to achieve high local doses and thereby break down the clot while minimizing systemic thrombolytic agent exposure. Randomized controlled trial results have indicated decreased PTS rates and improved venous patency rates in patients treated with CDT compared with these rates in patients treated with anticoagulation. The use of newer pharmacomechanical techniques, as compared with conventional CDT, reduces procedural times and thrombolytic agent doses and is the subject of ongoing investigations. Endovascular thrombus removal techniques offer a means to improve venous valvular function and decrease the risk of debilitating long-term complications such as PTS and are a promising option for treating patients with iliofemoral DVT. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618329

  14. Ultrasound Screening for Deep Venous Thrombosis Detection: A Prospective Evaluation of 200 Plastic Surgery Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our understanding of the pathophysiology of venous thromboembolism is largely based on the experience of orthopedic patients undergoing total joint replacement. Little is known regarding the natural history of venous thromboembolism in plastic surgery outpatients. Today, ultrasound screening, including compression and Doppler color flow imaging, represents the standard for detecting deep venous thromboses. Methods: Ultrasound screening was offered to 200 consecutive plastic surgery outpatients undergoing 205 operations. Patients were scanned before surgery, on the day after surgery, and approximately 1 week after surgery. No patient declined to participate (inclusion rate, 100%). Spontaneous breathing, Avoid gas, Face up, Extremities mobile anesthesia was used, with no chemoprophylaxis. Patient surveys were administered. Results: Six hundred ultrasound screening tests were performed. All scans performed the day after surgery were negative. Only one examination was positive, 8 days after a lipoabdominoplasty. Subsequent scans revealed complete resolution of the thrombosis with anticoagulation. Ninety percent of surveyed patients would choose to have ultrasound screening in the future. Conclusions: The natural history of thromboembolism in plastic surgery outpatients differs from orthopedic patients. The risk of a deep venous thrombosis in a patient treated with Spontaneous breathing, Avoid gas, Face up, Extremities mobile anesthesia is approximately 0.5%. Thromboses are unlikely to develop intraoperatively. In the single affected patient, the thrombosis was located distally, in a location that is less prone to embolism and highly susceptible to anticoagulation. Ultrasound screening is an effective and highly feasible method to identify affected patients for treatment. PMID:25878943

  15. Catheter-directed thrombolysis for double inferior vena cava with deep venous thrombosis: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Chen, Zhengxin; Cai, Qianrong

    2014-08-01

    Double inferior vena cava (DIVC) with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is rare, and there is only one reported case of DIVC with DVT treated by catheter-directed thrombolysis. We report a case of a 32-year-old man with an extensive venous clot involving the infrarenal segment of a double IVC who received filter implantation and catheter-directed thrombolysis.

  16. Catheter-directed thrombolysis in the treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J J; Zhang, Z H; Shan, Z; Wang, W J; Li, X X; Wang, S M; Li, Y-X; Cheng, G-S

    2014-07-24

    We performed a meta-analysis for systematic evaluation of the status quo of catheter thrombolysis for the treatment of acute lower limb deep vein thrombosis in China. We searched the China Biomedical bibliographic database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Weipu full-text electronic journals, Wanfang full-text database, and Medline (1990 through June 2011) for clinical randomized controlled trials of catheter-directed thrombolysis and superficial venous thrombolysis to compare their efficacies for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis. The results were analyzed by using the Cochrane-recommended RevMan 4.2 software package, and the odds ratio (OR) was used as the combined measure of efficacy. The search retrieved 8 randomized controlled trials, and meta-analysis using the total rate of effective treatment as the clinical observation index found that the combined OR for the catheter thrombolysis group versus the superficial venous thrombolysis group was significant (P < 0.01; OR = 11.78; 95% confidence interval = 6.99-19.87). In conclusion, the meta-analysis indicated that catheter thrombolysis was more effective than superficial venous thrombolysis for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis in the lower limb in Chinese individuals. However, the included trials were only of medium quality, so more rational and scientific clinical trials are needed to validate this conclusion.

  17. Deep venous thrombosis: The valve cusp hypoxia thesis and its incompatibility with modern orthodoxy.

    PubMed

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    The valve cusp hypoxia thesis (VCHT) of the aetiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was adumbrated in this journal in 1977 and fully articulated in 2008, the original hypothesis having been strongly corroborated by experiments published in 1981 and 1984. It presents a unitary account of the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis and embolism that is rooted in the pathophysiological tradition of Hunter, Virchow, Lister, Welch and Aschoff, a tradition traceable back to Harvey. In this paper we summarise the thesis in its mature form, consider its compatibility with recent advances in the DVT field, and ask why it has not yet been assimilated into the mainstream literature, which during the past half century has been dominated by a haematology-orientated 'consensus model'. We identify and discuss seven ways in which the VCHT is incompatible with these mainstream beliefs about the aetiology of venous thrombosis, drawing attention to: (1) the spurious nature of 'Virchow's triad'; (2) the crucial differences between 'venous thrombus' and 'clot'; the facts that (3) venous thrombi form in the valve pockets (VVPs), (4) DVT is not a primarily haematological condition, (5) the so-called 'thrombophilias' are not thrombogenic per se; (6) the conflict between the single unitary aetiology of DVT and the tacit assumption that the condition is 'multicausal'; (7) the inability of anticoagulants to prevent the initiation of venous thrombogenesis, though they do prevent the growth of thrombi to clinically significant size. In discussing point (7), we show that the VCHT indicates new approaches to mechanical prophylaxis against DVT. These approaches are then formulated as experimentally testable hypotheses, and we suggest methods for testing them preclinically using animal trials. PMID:26804599

  18. Deep venous thrombosis: The valve cusp hypoxia thesis and its incompatibility with modern orthodoxy.

    PubMed

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    The valve cusp hypoxia thesis (VCHT) of the aetiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was adumbrated in this journal in 1977 and fully articulated in 2008, the original hypothesis having been strongly corroborated by experiments published in 1981 and 1984. It presents a unitary account of the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis and embolism that is rooted in the pathophysiological tradition of Hunter, Virchow, Lister, Welch and Aschoff, a tradition traceable back to Harvey. In this paper we summarise the thesis in its mature form, consider its compatibility with recent advances in the DVT field, and ask why it has not yet been assimilated into the mainstream literature, which during the past half century has been dominated by a haematology-orientated 'consensus model'. We identify and discuss seven ways in which the VCHT is incompatible with these mainstream beliefs about the aetiology of venous thrombosis, drawing attention to: (1) the spurious nature of 'Virchow's triad'; (2) the crucial differences between 'venous thrombus' and 'clot'; the facts that (3) venous thrombi form in the valve pockets (VVPs), (4) DVT is not a primarily haematological condition, (5) the so-called 'thrombophilias' are not thrombogenic per se; (6) the conflict between the single unitary aetiology of DVT and the tacit assumption that the condition is 'multicausal'; (7) the inability of anticoagulants to prevent the initiation of venous thrombogenesis, though they do prevent the growth of thrombi to clinically significant size. In discussing point (7), we show that the VCHT indicates new approaches to mechanical prophylaxis against DVT. These approaches are then formulated as experimentally testable hypotheses, and we suggest methods for testing them preclinically using animal trials.

  19. A Rare Occurrence of Simultaneous Venous and Arterial Thromboembolic Events – Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Thromboembolism as Initial Presentation in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kutiyal, Aditya S.; Dharmshaktu, Pramila; Kataria, Babita; Garg, Abhilasha

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute myeloid leukemia has been attributed to various factors, including hereditary, radiation, drugs, and certain occupational exposures. The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolism events is well established. Here, we present a case of a 70-year-old Indian man who had presented with arterial and venous thrombosis, and the patient was later diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In our case, the patient presented with right lower limb deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism four months prior to the diagnosis of APL. Although thromboembolic event subsequent to the diagnosis of malignancy, and especially during the chemotherapy has been widely reported, this prior presentation with simultaneous occurrence of both venous and arterial thromboembolism has rarely been reported. We take this opportunity to state the significance of a complete medical evaluation in cases of recurrent or unusual thrombotic events. PMID:26949347

  20. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients with Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Delomez, Maxence; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Willoteaux, Serge; Bauchart, Jean-Jacques; D'Othee, Bertrand Janne; Asseman, Philippe; Perez, Nessim; Thery, Claude

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To report our experience with mechanical thrombectomy in proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT).Methods: Eighteen patients with a mean ({+-} SD) age of 37.6 {+-} 16.1 years who presented with DVT in the iliac and femoral vein (n = 3), inferior vena cava (n = 5), or inferior vena cava and iliac vein (n = 10), were treated with the Amplatz Thrombectomy Device after insertion of a temporary caval filter.Results: Successful recanalization was achieved in 15 of 18 patients (83%). Overall, the percentage of thrombus removed was 66 {+-} 29%: 73 {+-} 30% at caval level and 55 {+-} 36% at iliofemoral level. Complementary interventions (seven patients) were balloon angioplasty (n = 2), angioplasty and stenting (n = 2), thrombo-aspiration alone (n = 1), thrombo-aspiration, balloon angioplasty, and permanent filter (n = 1), and permanent filter alone (n = 1). There was one in-hospital death. Follow-up was obtained at a mean of 29.6 months; three patients had died (two cancers, one myocardial infarction); 10 had no or minimal sequelae; one had post-phlebitic limb.Conclusion: Mechanical thrombectomy is a potential therapeutic option in patients presenting with proximal DVT.

  1. Novel treatment techniques for recanalization of femoral-popliteal deep venous occlusion from chronic thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Elizabeth Brooke; Stratil, Peter; Mizones, Heidi

    2014-06-01

    Patients with postthrombotic syndrome due to previous femoral-popliteal deep venous thrombosis often experience lifestyle-limiting lower-extremity pain and swelling. Conservative treatment options include compression stockings and lymphedema massage, but in many cases these treatments only temporarily and partially improve symptoms. Ultrasound and venography in patients with postthrombotic syndrome often show only partial recanalization of the femoral vein with significant collateral vein formation. These abnormal veins are insufficient for adequate venous drainage from the lower extremity as evidenced by the patient's continued symptoms. Recanalization of the occluded or partially occluded femoral vein using prolonged venoplasty, with or without chemical thrombolysis, combined with optimizing anticoagulation and conservative treatment measures, results in lasting improvement in symptoms for a high percentage of patients.

  2. A vascular laboratory protocol for improving and managing after-hours suspected acute deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Angela H; Eckert, George; Lemmon, Gary W; Sawchuk, Alan; Dalsing, Michael C

    2014-04-01

    This study reviews the clinical and workforce impact of a suggested protocol designed for the management of suspected acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients seen after standard vascular laboratory business hours. The protocol included the use of Wells score, D-dimer and a single dose of therapeutic anticoagulant to defer venous duplex ultrasound (VDU) testing until routine business hours unless contraindicated. Information was collected on medical history, physical exam and the timing of any diagnostic studies and treatment provided. Over 15% of studies done after-hours were deemed unnecessary by our protocol and in every individual the results were negative for an acute DVT. There were no adverse events from a one-time dose of anticoagulant. Limiting emergency VDU coverage to evaluate for acute DVT based on a management protocol can eliminate unnecessary after-hours VDU testing without having a negative impact on patient care.

  3. Deep venous thrombosis was not detected after total knee arthroplasty in Japanese patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Takedani, H; Ohnuma, K; Hirose, J

    2015-09-01

    Combined thrombo-prophylaxis with mechanical and pharmacological methods is recommended in patients undergoing total knee or hip arthroplasty. As patients with 'untreated inherited bleeding disorders such as haemophilia' are at risk of bleeding, no prophylaxis has been prescribed for these patients. However, a retrospective study reported subclinical deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in 10% of patients with haemophilia undergoing major orthopaedic surgery. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the risk of DVT after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We examined 38 TKA in 33 Japanese patients with haemophilia using ultrasonography. We did not detect DVT. The risk of DVT in patients with haemophilia after TKA may be lower than that in the general population. However, as patients with haemophilia progress in age, venous thromboembolism should be considered as a potential problem.

  4. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-ran

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Material/Methods Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. Results The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). Conclusions Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  5. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-Ran

    2016-08-23

    BACKGROUND There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. RESULTS The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis.

  6. Nephrotic Syndrome Complicated with Deep Venous Thrombosis in the Upper Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Akira; Inoue, Makoto; Imai, Toshimi; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Kondo, Mariko; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the upper extremities is a rare but important clinical illness, which leads to severe complications such as pulmonary embolism. Unlike DVT in the lower extremities, which is mainly induced by a hypercoagulable state, DVT in the upper extremities is usually caused by mechanical obstruction or anatomical stenosis in the venous system. We herein report a case in which DVT developed in the left upper limb during treatment of nephrotic syndrome. This is the first case report of upper-extremity DVT in association with nephrotic syndrome in the literature. Our patient was a 56-year-old male with nephrotic syndrome due to idiopathic membranous nephropathy who was treated with 40 mg/day of prednisolone. During corticosteroid therapy, he developed a swelling of the left upper limb. Computed tomography revealed thrombi in the left internal jugular vein and the left subclavian vein without anatomical abnormalities in his venous system. Thus, he was diagnosed with DVT of the upper extremities. After the initiation of warfarin treatment and subsequent regression of nephrotic syndrome, the swelling disappeared and the thrombi significantly diminished. DVT should be considered when upper-extremity edema is observed in patients with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:25849667

  7. Diagnostic methods for deep vein thrombosis: venous Doppler examination, phleborheography, iodine-125 fibrinogen uptake, and phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Comerota, A.J.; White, J.V.; Katz, M.L.

    1985-10-08

    Since clinical diagnosis of DVT is often inaccurate, it has become accepted that an objective means of diagnosing clot in the deep venous system becomes critically important in the management of these patients. The venous Doppler examination monitors the velocity of blood flowing through a particular vein. Doppler probes in the 5 to 10 mHz range are routinely used. Respiratory variation is a normal finding due to a diminished flow signal during inspiration, followed by a progressive increase in flow signal during expiration. Characteristics of the spontaneous flow signals are the most important part of interpreting the venous Doppler examination. In addition, the response to distal or proximal compression (augmentation) adds important information to the interpretation; however, the response during any augmentation maneuver depends on the rapidity of compression, the force of compression, the quantity of blood in the veins at the time of compression, and the distance between the Doppler probe and the compression point. Phleborheography is a six-channel volumetric plethysmographic technique that monitors volume changes in the lower extremities associated with respiration and foot and calf compression.

  8. Placement of a Retrievable Guenther Tulip Filter in the Superior Vena Cava for Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nadkarni, Sanjay; Macdonald, Sumaira; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2002-12-15

    A retrievable Guenther Tulip caval filter(William Cook, Europe) was successfully placed and retrieved in the superior vena cava for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman. Bilateral subclavian and internal jugular venous thromboses thought secondary to placement of multiple central venous catheters were present. There have been reports of the use of permanent Greenfield filters and a single case report of a temporary filter in the superior vena cava. As far as we are aware this is the first reported placement and successful retrieval of a filter in these circumstances.

  9. Do not forget the distal lower limb veins in screening patients with spinal cord injuries for deep venous thromboses.

    PubMed

    Germing, Alfried; Schakrouf, Mahmud; Lindstaedt, Michael; Grewe, Peter; Meindl, Renate; Mügge, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this prospective study, we aimed to document the rate and localization of deep venous thromboses in patients with spinal cord injuries. Patients with paraplegia or tetraplegia were screened by a serial color duplex sonography protocol for deep venous thrombosis within the first 36 hours after admission, at day 7, and at day 21. Sonography was performed by a complete scan including the veins below the knee. A total of 139 patients were included (19-90 years, 63.5% male). Cumulative rate of deep venous thrombosis after 3 duplex scans was 45.3% (n = 63). In 71.4% (n = 45), thromboses were localized below the knee. Because of the relevant number of distal vein thromboses, inclusion of the calf veins during screening scans is suggested. Further studies are needed to analyze the clinical benefit of diagnosing and treating distal vein thromboses.

  10. Lower extremity deep venous thrombosis with fatal pulmonary thromboembolism caused by benign pelvic space-occupying lesions--an overview.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Hannah; Byard, Roger W

    2012-05-01

    Venous stasis predisposes to thrombosis. One hundred and sixty cases of fatal pulmonary thromboembolism were reviewed to determine how many cases had deep venous thromboses associated with venous blood flow reduction caused by external pressure from benign pelvic masses. Three cases were identified, representing 2% of cases overall (3/160): a 44-year-old woman with a large uterine leiomyoma (1048 g); a 74-year-old man with prostatomegaly and bladder distension (containing 1 L of urine); and a 70-year-old man with prostatomegaly and bladder distension (containing 3 L of urine). Although a rare cause of fatal deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, space-occupying pelvic lesions can lead to extrinsic pressure on adjacent veins reducing blood flow and causing stasis and thrombosis. Individuals with large pelvic masses may, therefore, be at increased risk of pulmonary thromboembolism from deep venous thrombosis, particularly in the presence of concurrent risk factors such as immobility, thrombophilias, malignancy, and significant cardiopulmonary disease.

  11. Active Ankle Movements Prevent Formation of Lower-Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis After Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Guan, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Rui; Li, Bin; Ning, Bo; Su, Wei; Sun, Tao; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the preventive value of active ankle movements in the formation of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), attempting to develop a new method for rehabilitation nursing after orthopedic surgery. Material/Methods We randomly assigned 193 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the lower limbs into a case group (n=96) and a control group (n=97). The control group received routine nursing while the case group performed active ankle movements in addition to receiving routine nursing. Maximum venous outflow (MVO), maximum venous capacity (MVC), and blood rheology were measured and the incidence of DVT was recorded. Results On the 11th and 14th days of the experiment, the case group had significantly higher MVO and MVC than the control group (all P<0.05). The whole-blood viscosity at high shear rate and the plasma viscosity were significantly lower in the case group than in the control group on the 14th day (both P<0.05). During the experiment, a significantly higher overall DVT incidence was recorded in the control group (8 with asymptomatic DVT) compared with the case group (1 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.034). During follow-up, the case group presented a significantly lower DVT incidence (1 with symptomatic DVT and 4 with asymptomatic DVT) than in the control group (5 with symptomatic DVT and 10 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.031). Conclusions Through increasing MVO and MVC and reducing blood rheology, active ankle movements may prevent the formation of lower-extremity DVT after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27600467

  12. Active Ankle Movements Prevent Formation of Lower-Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis After Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Guan, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Rui; Li, Bin; Ning, Bo; Su, Wei; Sun, Tao; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to assess the preventive value of active ankle movements in the formation of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), attempting to develop a new method for rehabilitation nursing after orthopedic surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS We randomly assigned 193 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the lower limbs into a case group (n=96) and a control group (n=97). The control group received routine nursing while the case group performed active ankle movements in addition to receiving routine nursing. Maximum venous outflow (MVO), maximum venous capacity (MVC), and blood rheology were measured and the incidence of DVT was recorded. RESULTS On the 11th and 14th days of the experiment, the case group had significantly higher MVO and MVC than the control group (all P<0.05). The whole-blood viscosity at high shear rate and the plasma viscosity were significantly lower in the case group than in the control group on the 14th day (both P<0.05). During the experiment, a significantly higher overall DVT incidence was recorded in the control group (8 with asymptomatic DVT) compared with the case group (1 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.034). During follow-up, the case group presented a significantly lower DVT incidence (1 with symptomatic DVT and 4 with asymptomatic DVT) than in the control group (5 with symptomatic DVT and 10 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.031). CONCLUSIONS Through increasing MVO and MVC and reducing blood rheology, active ankle movements may prevent the formation of lower-extremity DVT after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27600467

  13. Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolus after ovarian hyperstimulation.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Anne Catherine Miller; McLean, Anna Warszawa; Ahari, Jalil

    2016-01-01

    A healthy female presented with upper extremity (UE) swelling of several days duration. Admission laboratories were normal except for an elevated D-dimer. An UE ultrasound with Doppler revealed a thrombus in the right subclavian vein. A subsequent chest CT angiogram further characterised the subclavian vein thrombus and also identified a pulmonary embolus. A thorough history and laboratory evaluation showed that her only risk factors were long-time contraceptive pills and a recent cycle of ovarian hyperstimulation (OH) 7 weeks prior to presentation. Anticoagulation treatment was started and the patient's remaining outpatient work-up was negative for all other hereditary causes. A complete anatomic work-up showed bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). A review of the literature on the occurrence of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis suggests that these usually occur in the presence of a predisposing factor, including catheters, indwelling devices and active malignancies. OH has been shown to precipitate venous thromboembolism events; however, the diagnosis of bilateral TOS as a predisposing risk factor has not been described in a patient who had recently undergone recent OH and in one who was not actively pregnant. PMID:27530880

  14. Hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting with multiple organ infiltration and deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Su-jun; Wei, Wei; Chen, Jiang-tao; Tan, Ye-hui; Yu, Cheng-bao; Litzow, Mark Robert; Liu, Qiu-ju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) can be fatal, particularly when eosinophils infiltrate vital organs and/or if extensive thrombosis develops. However there are no standard recommendations for the use of anticoagulant therapy of HES in the setting of thrombosis. Methods: We herein present a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with marked peripheral eosinophilia with symptoms of multi-organ infiltration and extensive deep venous thrombosis (DVT). In this case, evaluation was carried out before the diagnosis was established, and timely standard-dose corticosteroids combined with a new oral anticoagulant (NOAC) therapy were carried out. Results: These measures resulted in a rapid response and long-term disease control. Conclusion: Although there are no data to support which anticoagulant is preferred in this setting, this case indicates that the new oral anticoagulants may play an important role in the treatment of thrombosis in HES. PMID:27583887

  15. The Role of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Deep Venous Thrombosis: Advanced Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Gerard J.

    2011-06-15

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is often managed with a health care pathway that funnels patients to anticoagulation therapy alone. This 'usual treatment' is designed to stop propagation and embolisation of venous thrombus but not remove it. Surgical thrombectomy was once the only option in severe cases in which limbs were threatened, but thrombus removal is no longer restricted to emergency cases. Interventional radiologists are now using advanced endovascular techniques to achieve thrombus removal in a minimally invasive manner in a very short treatment time, thereby quickly restoring patency, relieving acute symptoms, and potentially limiting the subsequent development of postthrombotic syndrome when followed with anticoagulation and compression regimens. This article provides an overview of the interventions available for treating DVT. One of the newer 'single-session' techniques is isolated pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, which is described here in detail with supporting cases.

  16. Deep venous thrombosis in a patient undergoing In-vitro fertilization with oocyte donation

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Nalini; Naidu, Padmaja; Gupta, Shalu; Rani, Kumkum

    2015-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) has been reported extensively following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome during in-vitro fertilization (IVF). Pregnancy per se increases the risk of DVT due to a hypercoagulable state. The long-term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is another critical factor associated with DVT in women. However, an association between the short-term use of HRT in oocyte donation (OD) cycles and DVT has not yet been reported. We present a case of 43-year-old woman who developed DVT after IVF-OD. DVT was diagnosed at 7 weeks of pregnancy and was managed with low-molecular-weight heparin. We suggest that even a short-term use of HRT should be considered a risk factor for DVT especially in the presence of additional risk factors such as obesity. The patient had an uneventful recovery and delivered three healthy though preterm babies. PMID:26538864

  17. Controversies in venous thromboembolism: the unique case of isolated distal deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Porfidia, Angelo; Carnicelli, Annamaria; Bonadia, Nicola; Pola, Roberto; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents the third leading cause of cardiovascular mortality, and it is the main cause of preventable mortality in hospitalized patients. Among VTE, there is the unique case of isolated distal deep vein thrombosis (IDDVT), which still lacks an agreement in terms of optimal therapeutic strategy. Although most IDDVTs are self-limiting and associated with a very low risk of embolic complications, still not all IDDVTs can be safely identified as stable. Lack of strong scientific evidence, fear of thromboembolic complications, and risk of bleeding upon initiation of anticoagulant treatment result in very heterogeneous therapeutic strategies among physicians. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the literature, highlight the many controversial issues regarding IDDVTs, and call for a consensus of experts aimed to shed new light on the gray areas of IDDVT management and therapy. PMID:27126683

  18. Association of deep venous thrombosis with calf vein diameter in acute hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Yasaka, Masahiro; Wakugawa, Yoshiyuki; Kitazono, Takanari; Okada, Yasushi

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the association between the development of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and calf vein diameter in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke. We measured the maximum diameter of paralytic side posttibial veins (PTVs) and peroneal veins (PVs) in 49 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage on admission and at 2 weeks after stroke onset by ultrasonography. We also examined for the presence or absence of DVT, and then analyzed the association of DVT with the maximum vein diameter. At 2 weeks after stroke, DVTs were detected in PTVs in 7 patients and in PVs in 6 patients. The maximum calf vein diameters at 2 weeks were significantly greater in patients with DVT compared with those without DVT (PTV, P = .033; PV, P = .015). Although calf vein diameter at admission did not influence the future incidence of DVT in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, the presence of DVT was associated with calf vein dilatation.

  19. Experimental Validation of Methods for Prophylaxis against Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Review and Proposal

    PubMed Central

    Agutter, Paul S.; Malone, P. Colm; Silver, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    The experimental procedure by which the valve cusp hypoxia (VCH) hypothesis of the etiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was confirmed lends itself to testing of methods of prophylaxis. Similar animal experiments could end the present exclusive reliance on statistical analysis of data from large patient cohorts to evaluate prophylactic regimes. The reduction of need for such (usually retrospective) analyses could enable rationally-based clinical trials of prophylactic methods to be conducted more rapidly, and the success of such trials would lead to decreased incidences of DVT-related mortality and morbidity. This paper reviews the VCH hypothesis (“VCH thesis”, following its corroboration) and its implications for understanding DVT and its sequelae, and outlines the experimental protocol for testing prophylactic methods. The advantages and limitations of the protocol are briefly discussed. PMID:22567254

  20. Experimental Validation of Methods for Prophylaxis against Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Review and Proposal.

    PubMed

    Agutter, Paul S; Malone, P Colm; Silver, Ian A

    2012-01-01

    The experimental procedure by which the valve cusp hypoxia (VCH) hypothesis of the etiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was confirmed lends itself to testing of methods of prophylaxis. Similar animal experiments could end the present exclusive reliance on statistical analysis of data from large patient cohorts to evaluate prophylactic regimes. The reduction of need for such (usually retrospective) analyses could enable rationally-based clinical trials of prophylactic methods to be conducted more rapidly, and the success of such trials would lead to decreased incidences of DVT-related mortality and morbidity. This paper reviews the VCH hypothesis ("VCH thesis", following its corroboration) and its implications for understanding DVT and its sequelae, and outlines the experimental protocol for testing prophylactic methods. The advantages and limitations of the protocol are briefly discussed.

  1. Tc-99m red blood cell venography in deep venous thrombosis of the lower limb. An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Derbekyan, V.; Novales-Diaz, J.A.; Rush, C.L.

    1985-03-01

    Tc-99m red blood cell venography is a simple and sensitive technique for the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis of the lower limb. The static high count blood pool images of the deep venous system of the leg are readily interpretable and show good correlation with contrast venography. The advantages and limitations of this technique in the clinical setting are discussed in detail in this review.

  2. Emergency Department Management of Suspected Calf-Vein Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Diagnostic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Levi; Lawrence, Matthew; Speicher, Matthew; Frumkin, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Unilateral leg swelling with suspicion of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common emergency department (ED) presentation. Proximal DVT (thrombus in the popliteal or femoral veins) can usually be diagnosed and treated at the initial ED encounter. When proximal DVT has been ruled out, isolated calf-vein deep venous thrombosis (IC-DVT) often remains a consideration. The current standard for the diagnosis of IC-DVT is whole-leg vascular duplex ultrasonography (WLUS), a test that is unavailable in many hospitals outside normal business hours. When WLUS is not available from the ED, recommendations for managing suspected IC-DVT vary. The objectives of the study is to use current evidence and recommendations to (1) propose a diagnostic algorithm for IC-DVT when definitive testing (WLUS) is unavailable; and (2) summarize the controversy surrounding IC-DVT treatment. Discussion The Figure combines D-dimer testing with serial CUS or a single deferred FLUS for the diagnosis of IC-DVT. Such an algorithm has the potential to safely direct the management of suspected IC-DVT when definitive testing is unavailable. Whether or not to treat diagnosed IC-DVT remains widely debated and awaiting further evidence. Conclusion When IC-DVT is not ruled out in the ED, the suggested algorithm, although not prospectively validated by a controlled study, offers an approach to diagnosis that is consistent with current data and recommendations. When IC-DVT is diagnosed, current references suggest that a decision between anticoagulation and continued follow-up outpatient testing can be based on shared decision-making. The risks of proximal progression and life-threatening embolization should be balanced against the generally more benign natural history of such thrombi, and an individual patient’s risk factors for both thrombus propagation and complications of anticoagulation. PMID:27429688

  3. [Postpartal ovarian thrombophlebitis. Value of Doppler ultrasonograph y].

    PubMed

    Renaud-Giono, A; Giraud, J R; Poulain, P; Proudhon, J F; Grall, J Y; Moquet, P Y; Darnault, J P

    1996-01-01

    Thrombophlebitis of the ovarian vein is a well recognized but uncommon complication during the postpartum period. We report a small series and emphasize the contribution of color Doppler and the basic therapeutic measures.

  4. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism caused by an intravascular synovial sarcoma of the common femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Schoneveld, J M; Debing, E; Verfaillie, G; Geers, C; Van den Brande, P

    2012-11-01

    Malignant tumors arising in deep veins of the lower extremities are very uncommon. To our best knowledge, this is the seventh case of a primary venous intravascular synovial sarcoma (SS) reported in literature. A 32-year-old woman was admitted with a second episode of deep venous thrombosis of the right lower limb and pulmonary embolism. Physical and radiological examinations showed besides the thrombosis a tumor arising from the right common femoral vein involving the bifurcation of the common femoral artery. At surgery, en block resection of the tumor including the deep femoral vein and arterial bifurcation was done with an arterial reconstruction using a synthetic graft. Histopathological examination revealed an intravascular SS of the common femoral vein. The mainstay of curative therapy is complete surgical resection of all tumor manifestations with negative histological margins.

  5. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis in the Upper Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Vik, Anders; Holme, Pal Andre; Singh, Kulbir; Dorenberg, Eric; Nordhus, Kare Christian; Kumar, Satish; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2009-09-15

    Traditional anticoagulant treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the upper extremities (UEDVT) is associated with a relatively high incidence of postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for UEDVT would provide efficient thrombolysis with less subsequent PTS than during traditional anticoagulation. Primary efficacy, complications, and long-term results after CDT are reported in a retrospective cohort (2002-2007) of patients (n = 30) with DVT in the upper extremities. PTS was assessed by a modified Villalta scale. UEDVT was unprovoked in 11 (37%) cases and effort related in 9 (30%) cases. The median duration of symptoms prior to CDT was 7.0 days (range, 1-30); median duration of thrombolysis treatment, 70 h (range, 24-264 h); and the median amount of rt-PA infused during CDT, 52 mg (range, 19-225 mg). Major bleeding was registered in three (9%) patients, and CDT was stopped prematurely in three patients due to local hematoma. No intracerebral bleeding, clinical pulmonary embolism, or deaths occurred during treatment. Grade II (>50%) or III (>90%) lysis was present in 29 patients (97%) at the end of CDT. Bleeding complications increased by each day of delay from the debut of symptoms to the start of treatment (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.42). At follow-up (n = 29; median, 21 months; range, 5-58 months), 11 (38%) patients had occluded veins, whereas 18 (62%) had patent veins. However, stenosis of varying severity was present in eight of those with a patent vein. No patients had severe PTS, whereas six (21%) experienced mild PTS. In conclusion, our retrospective cohort study of patients with UEDVT showed that treatment restored venous drainage, with a subsequent low frequency of mild PTS at follow-up. Early intervention with CDT prevented bleeding complications.

  6. The influence of meteorological variables on the development of deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Helen K; Simpson, A John; Murchison, John T

    2009-10-01

    The influence of weather on deep venous thrombosis (DVT) incidence remains controversial. We aimed to characterize the temporal association between DVT and meteorological variables including atmospheric pressure. Data relating to hospital admissions with DVT in Scotland were collected retrospectively for a 20 year period for which corresponding meteorological recordings were available. Weather variables were calculated as weighted daily averages to adjust for variations in population density. Seasonal variation in DVT and short-term effects of weather variables on the relative risk of developing DVT were assess using Poisson regression modelling. The models allowed for the identification of lag periods between variation in the weather and DVT presentation. A total of 37,336 cases of DVT were recorded. There was significant seasonal variation in DVT with a winter peak. Seasonal variation in wind speed and temperature were significantly associated with seasonal variation in DVT. When studying more immediate meteorological influences, low atmospheric pressure, high wind speed and high rainfall were significantly associated with an increased risk of DVT approximately 9-10 days later. The effect was most strikingly demonstrated for atmospheric pressure, every 10 millibar decrease in pressure being associated with a 2.1% increase in relative risk of DVT. Alterations in weather have a small but significant impact upon the incidence of DVT. DVT is particularly associated with reduction in atmospheric pressure giving weight to the hypothesis that reduced cabin pressure in long haul flights contributes to DVT. These findings have implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of DVT. PMID:19806252

  7. Squamous cell carcinoma lung: Presented with bilateral lower limb deep venous thrombosis with gangrene formation

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Kaushik; Sengupta, Amitabha; Patra, Anupam; Jash, Debraj

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral venous thrombosis due to underlying malignancy is a rare entity. It is worthy to search for malignancy in patients of bilateral venous gangrene. Our patient presented with severe bilateral leg pain as a result of venous gangrene. There was associated left sided massive pleural effusion with scalp nodule. Fine needle aspiration cytology of scalp nodule revealed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma and fiber optic bronchoscopy guided biopsy from growth at left upper lobe bronchus confirmed the case as squamous cell carcinoma lung. It was rare for squamous cell carcinoma lung to present as bilateral venous gangrene with anticardiolipin antibody negative. PMID:24455526

  8. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Part 1. Initial treatment: usually a low-molecular-weight heparin.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Patients with deep venous thrombosis are at a short-term risk of symptomatic or even life-threatening pulmonary embolism, and a long-term risk of post-thrombotic syndrome, characterised by lower-limb pain, varicose veins, oedema, and sometimes skin ulcers. What is the best choice of initial antithrombotic therapy following deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, in terms of mortality and short-term and long-term complications? How do the harm-benefit balances of the different options compare? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. Unfractionated heparin has documented efficacy in reducing mortality and recurrent thromboembolic events in patients with pulmonary embolism or symptomatic proximal (above-knee) deep venous thrombosis. The authors of a systematic review selected 23 trials of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) versus adjusted-dose unfractionated heparin in a total of 9587 patients. Deaths, recurrences and major bleeds were less frequent with LMWH than with unfractionated heparin. The results of other meta-analyses are similar, but all are undermined by a probable publication bias and methodological flaws. Compared to unfractionated heparin, LMWHs have the advantage of fixed-dose administration, once or twice daily, by subcutaneous injection. All available LMWHs seem to have similar efficacy. Those with the longest experience of use are enoxaparin, dalteparin and nadroparin. The harm-benefit balances of fondaparinux and rivaroxaban do not appear more favourable than that of an LMWH followed by an adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist. A meta-analysis included 12 trials comparing thrombolysis with anticoagulation alone in 700 patients with deep venous thrombosis. Adding a thrombolytic drug did not reduce mortality or the incidence of pulmonary embolism, whereas it increased the incidence of bleeding. A meta-analysis of 13 trials failed to show that adding a thrombolytic drug to initial

  9. [Thrombophlebitis profunda in patients after conventional and laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Krasinski, Z; Gabriel, M; Oszkinis, G; Dzieciuchowicz, L; Begier-Krasinska, B

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients undergoing uncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy and in whom conversion to laparotomy was required. Using the Duplex Doppler examination, we found higher incidence of DVT in patients who required conversion than in those who did not (47 vs 58%). Prolonged prophylaxis with low-molecular weight heparin should be considered in these patients. PMID:9931805

  10. Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis in Venous Aneurysm following Closure of the Chronic Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistulae of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Orrapin, Saranat; Arworn, Supapong; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) commonly results from an unrecognized vascular injury. In this report, there were two cases of chronic traumatic AVF of the legs with a long history of stab (case 1) and shotgun wounds (case 2). Both cases presented with varicose veins together with hyperpigmentation around the ankle of the affected leg. Angiograms showed a single large AVF in case 1, whereas, in case 2, there was a single large AVF together with multiple small AVFs. In both cases large venous aneurysm was found next to a large AVF. An open surgical AVF closure for the large AVF was performed in case 1 successfully, but patient developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in a large venous aneurysm. In the second case, in order to prevent DVT, only closure of the large AVF was performed, which preserved arterial flow into the venous aneurysm. Case 2 did not have acute DVT. This report raised the concern about acute DVTs in venous aneurysms following the closure of chronic traumatic AVF in terms of prevention. Also chronic traumatic AVF is commonly due to misdiagnosis in the initial treatment, so complete and serial physical examinations in penetrating vascular injury patients are of paramount importance. PMID:27293948

  11. Rates of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolus After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Campbell, Kirk A.; Fillingham, Yale A.; Harris, Joshua D.; Gupta, Anil K.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease is thought to be an uncommon but serious problem after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Rates of VTE after ACL reconstruction are not well documented. Objective: To determine the rates of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and symptomatic pulmonary emboli (PE) after ACL reconstruction. Data Sources: Five publicly available databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Scopus, Embase, and CINAHL Complete) were utilized. Study Selection: All studies that screened patients for DVT and reported rates of DVT and PE after ACL reconstruction were eligible for inclusion. Level 5 evidence, cadaver, biomechanical, and basic science studies; studies reporting only multiligament reconstruction outcomes; studies where rates of DVT and PE could not be separated out from patients undergoing other types of arthroscopic knee procedures; and classification studies were excluded. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Data Extraction: All study, subject, and surgical data were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results: Six studies met the inclusion criteria, with a mean Modified Colman Methodology Score of 30 ± 8.22. A total of 692 patients (488 men [70.5%]; mean age, 31.6 ± 2.82 years; mean follow-up, 7 ± 18.4 months) underwent ACL reconstruction using either semitendinosus-gracilis autograft (77.6%), bone–patellar tendon–bone (BTB) autograft (22%), or allograft (0.4%). No patient received postoperative pharmacological anticoagulation. Fifty-eight patients (8.4%) had a DVT (81% below knee and 19% above knee), while only 1 patient (0.2%) had a symptomatic PE. When reported, 27% of DVT episodes were symptomatic. Conclusion: The rate of DVT after ACL reconstruction in patients who did not receive postoperative pharmacological anticoagulation is 8.4%, while the rate of symptomatic PE is 0.2%. Of the DVT episodes that occurred, 73% were asymptomatic. PMID:26131305

  12. Radiolabeled tirofiban – a potential radiopharmaceutical for detection of deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Darkovska-Serafimovska, Marija; Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Djorgoski, Icko; Arsova-Sarafinovska, Zorica; Zdravkovska, Milka; Balkanov, Trajan; Ugresic, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using 99mtechnetium (99mTc)-labeled tirofiban (a reversible antagonist of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) for detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in rats without causing an antiplatelet effect. Methods The ability of in vitro tirofiban to inhibit adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was evaluated using optical aggregometer. Binding of 99mTc-tirofiban to platelets was evaluated. Serum levels of unlabeled (a validated high performance liquid chromatography method) and 99mTc-tirofiban after single intravenous injection were evaluated in male Wistar rats with or without induced DVT (femoral vein ligation model), and the rats were also subjected to whole body scintigraphy. Results Tirofiban in vitro inhibits ADP-induced aggregation of human platelets in a dose- and concentration-dependent manner (10 nM to 2 μM), but only if it is added before ADP and not after ADP. 99mTc labeling did not affect the ability of tirofiban to bind to either human or rat platelets, nor did it affect tirofiban pharmacokinetics in intact rats or in animals with induced DVT. When 99mTc-tirofiban was injected to rats after induction of DVT, at a molar dose lower than the one showing only a weak antiaggregatory effect in vitro, whole body scintigraphy indicated localization of 99mTc-tirofiban around the place of the induced DVT. Conclusion 99mTc labeling of tirofiban does not affect its ability to bind to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa or its in vivo pharmacokinetics in rats, either intact or with DVT. A low, nonantiaggregatory dose of 99mTc-tirofiban may be used to visualize DVT at an early stage. PMID:27713618

  13. Management of Venous Thromboembolisms: Part I. The Consensus for Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang-Ling; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Lee, Cheng-Han; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lin, Pao-Yen; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chiu, Kuan-Ming; Huang, Chien-Lung; Lee, Chung-Yi; Lin, Yen-Hung; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Yeh, Hung-I; Chiang, Chern-En; Lin, Shing-Jong; Yeh, San-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a potentially catastrophic condition because thrombosis, left untreated, can result in detrimental pulmonary embolism. Yet in the absence of thrombosis, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding. In the existing literature, knowledge about the epidemiology of DVT is primarily based on investigations among Caucasian populations. There has been little information available about the epidemiology of DVT in Taiwan, and it is generally believed that DVT is less common in Asian patients than in Caucasian patients. However, DVT is a multifactorial disease that represents the interaction between genetic and environmental factors, and the majority of patients with incident DVT have either inherited thrombophilia or acquired risk factors. Furthermore, DVT is often overlooked. Although symptomatic DVT commonly presents with lower extremity pain, swelling and tenderness, diagnosing DVT is a clinical challenge for physicians. Such a diagnosis of DVT requires a timely systematic assessment, including the use of the Wells score and a D-dimer test to exclude low-risk patients, and imaging modalities to confirm DVT. Compression ultrasound with high sensitivity and specificity is the front-line imaging modality in the diagnostic process for patients with suspected DVT in addition to conventional invasive contrast venography. Most patients require anticoagulation therapy, which typically consists of parenteral heparin bridged to a vitamin K antagonist, with variable duration. The development of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants has revolutionized the landscape of venous thromboembolism treatment, with 4 agents available,including rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban, and edoxaban. Presently, all 4 drugs have finished their large phase III clinical trial programs and come to the clinical uses in North America and Europe. It is encouraging to note that the published data to date regarding Asian patients indicates that such new therapies are safe and

  14. Indium 111 platelet imaging for the detection of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients without symptoms after surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Coleman, R.E.; Siegel, R.; Synan, I.S.; Petry, N.

    1985-07-01

    Indium 111 platelet imaging for the detection of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli was performed in 171 patients after abdominal and pelvic surgery. Fifteen patients were found to have inadequate circulating blood pools of indium 111 platelets, making the study nondiagnostic. Of 156 patients with technically satisfactory images, 46 (29.5%) had images consistent with deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary emboli. The incidence, time of occurrence, and location of thromboemboli was similar to those of other reports of postoperative patients groups studied by iodine 125 fibrinogen uptake testing. Eighty patients had normal indium 111 platelets and 30 patients had diffusely distributed indium 111 platelets found in the operative field, suggesting accumulation in a postoperative hematoma. None of these results was confused with a diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. When compared with another accurate diagnostic test in 23 patients, indium 111 platelet imaging was found to have a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90%. The technique of indium 111 platelet imaging is performed easily in patients after surgery with some limitations as to the use of donor platelets and the occasionally altered imaging of the operative site. This diagnostic technique enjoys the distinct advantage in that it allows surveillance of the legs, pelvis, abdomen, and chest by a single method, making it a near-ideal method of postoperative thromboembolism surveillance.

  15. Deep venous thrombosis in the antenatal period in a large cohort of pregnancies from western India

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Sonal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati; Salvi, Vinita; Satoskar, Purnima

    2007-01-01

    Background Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is an important complication in the peripartal and postpartal period. Methods We followed up prospectively the prevalence of DVT in 34720 prenatal mothers between June 2002 and July 2006 attending the antenatal clinics of two major hospitals in Mumbai, India. Thirty two women (0.1%) presented for the first time with symptomatic DVT i.e. 17 in the first trimester, 6 in the second and 9 in the third trimester of pregnancy. Nine had history of fetal loss while in the remaining twenty three there was no history of fetal loss. Results The evaluation of both acquired and heritable thrombophilia showed a conglomeration of thrombophilia in this group when compared to 100 normal pregnant women who have given birth to at least one healthy baby with no history of fetal death, DVT or other obstetrical complications. The relative risks for all the antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) studied i.e lupus anticoagulant (LA), IgG/IgM antibodies for cardiolipin (ACA), β2 glycoprotein 1 (β2 GP 1) and annexin V were significantly higher in women with pregnancy associated DVT (RR 7.4 95% CI 4.3–11.3 P < 0.05). Among the genetic thrombophilia markers studied, Protein S (PS) deficiency was the strongest risk factor (RR 5.00 95% CI 3.02–5.00 P < 0.05) followed by factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation (RR 4.57 95% CI 2.23–4.57 P < 0.05) and PAI 4G/4G homozygosity (RR 3.24 95% CI 1.85–5.12 P < 0.05). Protein C (PC) and endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) 23 bp insertion polymorphism was also increased in the patient group as compared to controls but the difference was not statistically significant. The MTHFR C677T, fibrinogen gene β448 Arg/Lys polymorphisms were not significantly different from the normal controls, while antithrombin III (AT III) deficiency and PT G20210A polymorphism were absent in both controls and patients. Two or more risk factors were present in 22 out of 32 cases (68.75%). Conclusion We conclude that the prevalence of DVT in

  16. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following cast immobilization of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Nesheiwat, F; Sergi, A R

    1996-01-01

    It is generally accepted that venous thrombosis in the lower extremity predisposes to pulmonary embolism. A case of pulmonary embolism after cast immobilization of the lower extremity, as well as a review of thromboembolic disease is presented. A high level of vigilance and close follow-up of even simple cast treatment is necessary to avoid this complication.

  17. Clinical Features and Developing Risks of Saphenous Vein Thrombophlebitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical features and the risks of 14 patients with 14 limbs affected by saphenous vein thrombophlebitis from April 2007 to May 2013 and compared the results with patients undergoing operative repair of varicose veins (127 patients, 193 limbs) during the study period. The frequency of patients with a body mass index over 25 (78.6% vs. 35.3%, p = 0.0018), varicose change in the saphenous vein (78.6% vs. 6.2%, p <0.0001), and concurrent thrombosis in another vein (50.0% vs. 7.1%, p <0.0001) were all significantly higher than those of the patients under operative repair for varicose veins. These patients with clinical features above may be at an elevated risk of thrombophlebitis of the saphenous trunk. (This article is a translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2014; 54: 151–157). PMID:27375800

  18. Treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis. A comparative trial between placebo, Hirudoid cream and piroxicam gel.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D; Brunkwall, J; Jensen, N; Persson, N H

    1990-01-01

    A prospective randomized trial on the treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis has been performed in 68 patients randomized to either Hirudoid cream, piroxicam gel or placebo. Both spontaneous and infusion thrombophlebitis were included. Treatment effect was evaluated using the status of thrombophlebitis, the thrombophlebitic area, pain intensity with a visual analogue scale, and side effects were registered. Both in the treatment groups and the placebo group there was a significant decrease of signs and symptoms during the treatment period. There was no statistical difference between the treatment groups and no difference between spontaneous and infusion thrombophlebitis. PMID:1696799

  19. [Pain in venous thrombosis of the leg].

    PubMed

    Henriet, J P

    1992-01-01

    According to D. Reinharez, pain and edema are the commonest presenting symptoms in phlebology. Pain is one of the most classical symptoms of an ordinary deep venous thrombosis, a valuable feature when present, in the form of deep tension, heaviness, swelling and a feeling of dead weight. It is often absent or slight. It may consist merely of a dull cramp, or of an "undefinable" (C. Bourde) odd, heavy leg. It generally affects the calf but may involve the sole of the foot, the heel, the thigh, the groin or even the true pelvis. This feeling, although "imprecise and variable" (P. Wallois, P. Griton) is highly suggestive. It increases on standing and walking in the form of unilateral uncomfortable tension, heaviness or painful swelling, which maybe a source of worry or even anxiety to the patient. Tenderness on palpation of venous tracts and their stretching is more suggestive. In the opinion of M. Duruble, Neuhof's sign (feeling of tender fullness of the calf) is more reliable than Homans' sign (pain in the calf caused by passive dorsiflexion of the foot, with the lower limb in extension) which essentially stretches only the posterior tibial venous system. The value of Sigg's sign (pain in the popliteal fossa on passive extension of the knee) is controversial. Far more rare is phlegmasia coerulea dolens or Grégoire's blue leg, complicating phlegmasia alba dolens or of sudden onset, with initial very severe or even "intolerable" pain (J.J. Pinot) in Scarpa's triangle, rapidly spreading to the limb. In varicose phlebitis (M. Perrin) or superficial thrombophlebitis or varico-phlebitis (A.A. Ramelet) or superficial venitis (J.P. Henriet), pain most often consists of moderate burning tension overlying the thrombosed vein(s), increased by palpation and mobilisation. Sometimes severe initially, it is exacerbated by the slightest touch. In total, pain, regardless of its characteristics, its site and/or its severity, is one of the most constant clinical features of venous

  20. [Recanalization of lower-limb deep veins as an index of efficacy of treatment for acute venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Sapelkin, S V; Boldin, B V; Leont'ev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A

    2016-01-01

    The authors analysed the results of examination and treatment of a total of 102 patients presenting with iliofemoral venous thrombosis. During treatment, ultrasonographic duplex scanning was used to determine the localization of the proximal margin of thrombotic masses, the time of appearing of the first signs of recanalization, its degree at various levels of the deep venous system, as well as alteration in velocity of the venous blood flow in the deep veins of the lower limbs. The dynamics of clinical symptoms was assessed by the visual analogue scale. Clinical and instrumental examination was performed on day 10, and then 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the beginning of treatment. The patients were subdivided into three groups. Group One comprised 38 patients receiving therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaprin) followed by switching to indirect anticoagulants (warfarin) combined with venotonics (original highly-purified diosmin 600 mg once daily). Group Two was composed of 33 patients receiving rivaroxaban at a dose of 15 mg twice daily for 3 weeks, followed by 20 mg once daily. Group Tree patients (n=31) were also given rivaroxaban according to the above-described standard regimen but in combination with venotonics (original highly-purified diosmin 600 mg once daily). The obtained findings showed that prescribing rivaroxaban to patients from the first day of the disease made it possible to considerably improve and accelerate the processes of restoration of patency of deep veins of lower extremities as compared with the patients taking vitamin K antagonists (warfarin). In patients receiving rivaroxaban, there were no cases of residual thrombotic occlusions of the major veins, and recanalization in three fourths of patients was assessed as good and in the remaining third as moderate. In the warfarin group, occlusion in the iliac veins was noted to persist persisted in 13% of patients, with good recanalization observed only in half of the patients. Addition

  1. [Recanalization of lower-limb deep veins as an index of efficacy of treatment for acute venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Sapelkin, S V; Boldin, B V; Leont'ev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A

    2016-01-01

    The authors analysed the results of examination and treatment of a total of 102 patients presenting with iliofemoral venous thrombosis. During treatment, ultrasonographic duplex scanning was used to determine the localization of the proximal margin of thrombotic masses, the time of appearing of the first signs of recanalization, its degree at various levels of the deep venous system, as well as alteration in velocity of the venous blood flow in the deep veins of the lower limbs. The dynamics of clinical symptoms was assessed by the visual analogue scale. Clinical and instrumental examination was performed on day 10, and then 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the beginning of treatment. The patients were subdivided into three groups. Group One comprised 38 patients receiving therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaprin) followed by switching to indirect anticoagulants (warfarin) combined with venotonics (original highly-purified diosmin 600 mg once daily). Group Two was composed of 33 patients receiving rivaroxaban at a dose of 15 mg twice daily for 3 weeks, followed by 20 mg once daily. Group Tree patients (n=31) were also given rivaroxaban according to the above-described standard regimen but in combination with venotonics (original highly-purified diosmin 600 mg once daily). The obtained findings showed that prescribing rivaroxaban to patients from the first day of the disease made it possible to considerably improve and accelerate the processes of restoration of patency of deep veins of lower extremities as compared with the patients taking vitamin K antagonists (warfarin). In patients receiving rivaroxaban, there were no cases of residual thrombotic occlusions of the major veins, and recanalization in three fourths of patients was assessed as good and in the remaining third as moderate. In the warfarin group, occlusion in the iliac veins was noted to persist persisted in 13% of patients, with good recanalization observed only in half of the patients. Addition

  2. Different characteristics and prognostic impact of deep-vein thrombosis / pulmonary embolism and intraabdominal venous thrombosis in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyoun; Lee, Keun-Wook; Bang, Soo-Mee; Kim, Sujung; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Doyeun; Lee, Jong Seok

    2011-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the incidence, risk factors, and prognostic implications of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Asian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Differences in clinical characteristics and prognostic impact between extremity venous thrombosis (or deep-vein thrombosis; DVT)/pulmonary embolism (PE) and intra-abdominal venous thrombosis (IVT) were also evaluated. For this study, consecutive CRC patients (N = 2,006) were enrolled and analyses were conducted retrospectively. VTEs were classified into two categories (DVT/PE and IVT). Significant predictors of developing VTEs were advanced stage and an increased number of co-morbidities. The two-year cumulative incidence of DVT/PE was 0.3%, 0.9% and 1.4% in stages 0~1, 2 and 3, respectively; this incidence range of DVT/PE in Asian patients with loco-regional CRC was lower than in Western patients. However, the two-year incidence (6.4%) of DVT/PE in Asian patients with distant metastases was not lower than in Western patients. Although 65.2% of patients with DVT/PE were symptomatic, only 15.7% of patients with IVT were symptomatic. During chemotherapy, DVT/PE developed more frequently than IVT. Only DVT/PE had a negative effect on survival; IVT had no prognostic significance. In conclusion, despite the low incidence of DVT/PE in Asian patients with loco-regional CRC, the protective effect of Asian ethnicity on VTE development disappears as tumour stage increases in patients with distant metastases. Considering different clinical characteristics and prognostic influences between DVT/PE and IVT, the treatment approach should be also different.

  3. Detection of lower limb deep venous thrombosis in asymptomatic high risk patients using a new radiolabelled thrombus specific agent

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, S.P.; Rahman, T.; Boyd S.J.

    1995-05-01

    Deep venous thrombosis is a serious consequence of major orthopaedic surgery and non invasive screening with either venous ultrasound or impedance plethysmography is unreliable for detecting or excluding DVT in this group. A new method of thrombus detection has been devised using Tc-99m labelled inhibited recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. The accuracy of scanning with this new radiopharmaceutical in asymptomatic high risk patients was evaluated using venography as the gold standard. 36 consecutive asymptomatic high risk patients (17 total hip, 19 total knee replacements) underwent both a contrast venogram on the operated leg and scintigraphic scan 7 days following operation. Scintigraphic imaging was performed at 4 hours post injection. For the purpose of this analysis, each venogram was divided into a proximal and a distal segment. Venograms were interpreted as being positive, negative or uninterpretable in each segment. Similar analysis of the scintigraphic scans was performed except that all segments were considered to be of diagnostic quality. 57 segments were able to be analysed. Of the 13 thrombosed segments (1 proximal, 12 calf), 12 had positive scans; in the 44 non thrombosed segments, 40 had negative scans. Thus in detecting lower limb thrombosis, scanning had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 91%. Scintigraphic scanning with this new radiopharmaceutical permits accurate detection of thrombus in high risk patients.

  4. Gunther Tulip Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement During Treatment for Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Kato, Takeharu; Iida, Shigeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gunther tulip retrievable vena cava filter (GTF) implantation to prevent pulmonary embolism during intravenously administered thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy and interventional radiological therapy for occlusive or nonocclusive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremity. Methods. We evaluated placement of 55 GTFs in 42 patients with lower extremity DVT who had undergone various treatments including those utilizing techniques of interventional radiology. Results. Worsening of pulmonary embolism in patients with existing pulmonary embolism or in those without pulmonary embolism at the time of GTF insertion was avoided in all patients. All attempts at implantation of the GTF were safely accomplished. Perforation and migration experienced by one patient was the only complication. Mean period of treatment for DVT under protection from pulmonary embolism by the GTF was 12.7 {+-} 8.3 days (mean {+-} SD, range 4-37 days). We attempted retrieval of GTFs in 18 patients in whom the venous thrombus had disappeared after therapy, and retrieval in one of these 18 cases failed. GTFs were left in the vena cava in 24 patients for permanent use when the DVT was refractory to treatment. Conclusion. The ability of the GTF to protect against pulmonary embolism during treatment of DVT was demonstrated. Safety in both placement and retrieval was clarified. Because replacement with a permanent filter was not required, use of the GTF was convenient when further protection from complicated pulmonary embolism was necessary.

  5. Improved external valvuloplasty, intravenous laser photocoagulation and local sclerotheraphy treatment of primary deep venous valvular insufficiency: long term result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-xi; Han, Li-na; Gu, Ying; Liang, Fa-qi; Zhang, Li; Liu, Hong-yi; Zhao, Wen-guang; Wang, Qi; Wang, Xiao-ling

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to report long-term follow-up of improved external vulvuloplasty, intravenous laser photocoagulation and local sclerotherapy treatment of primary deep venous valvular insufficiency in eight hundred and seventy-two patients from Nov. 2000 to May 2006. Patients were evaluated clinically and with duplex ultrasound at 1, 3, and 12 months, and yearly thereafter until the fifth year to assess treatment efficacy and adverse reactions. Successful occlusion of the great saphenous vein and absence of deep vein reflux on color Doppler imaging, were noted in 956 limbs of 852 cases( 1 month follow-up), 946 limbs of 842 cases (6 month to 1 year follow-up), 717 of 626 (1~2 year follow-up), 501 of 417 (2~3 year follow-up), 352 of 296 (3~5year follow-up), 142 of 106 (5 year follow-up) after initial treatment. The cumulative total number of recurrence of reflux was fifteen cases. The respective competence rate was 95.18%, 96.23%, 94.23%, 95.25%, 94.23% and 94.12%. Of note, all recurrence occurred before 9 months, with the majority noted before 3 months. Bruising was noted in 0.7% of patients, tightness along the course of treated vein in 1.0% of limbs. There have been no paresthesia of cases, skin burns and deep vein thrombosis.

  6. A Unique Case of Pulmonary Hyalinizing Granuloma Associated With FDG-avid PET Scan and Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Imran; Stone, Chad; Kvale, Paul

    2009-04-01

    An 83-year-old obese woman with a 60-pack-year smoking history was referred for evaluation of an abnormal chest radiograph [chest x-ray (CXR)]. Her past medical history was significant for recurrent deep venous thrombosis without any predisposing factors. CXR showed a large mass in the right mid lung and another nodule at the right apex, highly suspicious for a neoplastic process. These were not present on a CXR from 2 years earlier. An fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan revealed that all lesions were strongly FDG-avid. Six CT-guided core-needle lung biopsy specimens were obtained from the lung mass and all contained dense, lamellar, or "ropy" keloid-like collagen bundles arranged in a haphazard pattern. The biopsy specimens lacked significant necrosis and granulomas. Congo red stain with polarization was also negative for amyloid. The diagnosis of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) was made. A complete hypercoagulable workup was performed but no underlying abnormalities were found, including a negative lupus anticoagulant and malignancy workup. The patient was maintained on warfarin and followed with serial CT scans for 1 year, with spontaneous regression in the lung mass. The case is unique as it is the first case that reports an association of PHG with recurrent deep venous thrombosis in the absence of autoimmune or procoagulant factors and emphasizes the need for life-long anticoagulation in such scenarios. Also, we report the FDG-avid PET scan findings here that are novel for this disease in adults and add PHG to the list of diseases causing false-positive PET scans when malignancy is suspected. PMID:23168510

  7. [Comparison of ambulatory and inpatient treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis of the leg: subjective and economic aspects].

    PubMed

    Frank, D; Blättler, W

    1998-09-01

    The frequency of clinical recurrence and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute deep venous thrombosis is reduced to the same extent by hospital treatment (with unfractionated heparin) as by treatment at home (with low-molecular-weight heparin). Very few data on subjective parameters of effectiveness have been published. We performed a prospective randomized trial comparing outpatient with in-hospital treatment in 28 patients. Six clinical and quality-of-life related parameters of effectiveness were assessed quantitatively: clinical course (with a score system), pain of venous congestion of the calf muscles (with Lowenberg's test), subjective perception of pain and general well-being (with visual analogue scales), satisfaction with the care provided, and absence from work. Subjective effectiveness was compared with the costs of each form of treatment. Outpatient treatment was significantly more effective than in-hospital treatment with regard to the objective parameters. It was, however, associated with less well-being and more pain than in-hospital treatment. The discrepancy is explained by eventually insufficient adjuvant treatment measures (which consisted of external leg compression by stockings and forced walking) and by anxiety brought on by the information that potentially lethal pulmonary embolism could occur despite anticoagulant therapy. Outpatient treatment was less costly. On the average and per patient it was CHF 3944 less expensive than treatment in hospital. An estimation reveals that the Swiss health care system would save about CHF 25 million per year if the 85% of patients with deep-vein thrombosis suitable for home care were given this form of treatment. We conclude that outpatient management is subjectively cost-effective but should be optimised to eliminate certain drawbacks associated with it. PMID:9784675

  8. Roles of the Oxidative Stress and ADMA in the Development of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekim, Meral; Sekeroglu, M. Ramazan; Balahoroglu, Ragıp; Ozkol, Halil; Ekim, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism has multifactorial origin and occurs in the context of complex interactions between environmental and genetic predisposing factors. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the physiopathology of venous thrombosis. Current study examined the role of oxidative stress and asymmetric dimethylarginine in the development of DVT with the parameters such as serum malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase, ADMA, homocysteine, folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 levels. Serum MDA levels were found significantly (P < 0.005) high in patients with DVT compared with control group. Additionally, serum B6 levels were found significantly (P < 0.009) low in patients with DVT compared with healthy volunteers. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of the other parameters (P > 0.05). This study showed that patients with DVT have increased oxidative stress compared with the healthy volunteers whereas there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of serum ADMA levels. Thus serum ADMA levels seemed to be not related with development of DVT. PMID:24818025

  9. Comparison of efficacy and safety of low molecular weight heparins and unfractionated heparin in initial treatment of deep venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leizorovicz, A.; Simonneau, G.; Decousus, H.; Boissel, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the efficacy and safety of low molecular weight heparins and unfractionated heparin in the initial treatment of deep venous thrombosis for the reduction of recurrent thromboembolic events, death, extension of thrombus, and haemorrhages. DESIGN--Meta-analysis of results from 16 randomised controlled clinical studies. SUBJECTS--2045 patients with established deep venous thrombosis. INTERVENTION--Treatment with low molecular weight heparins or unfractionated heparin. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Incidences of thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, or both); major haemorrhages; total mortality; and extension of thrombus. RESULTS--A significant reduction in the incidence of thrombus extension (common odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.83; P = 0.006) in favour of low molecular weight heparin was observed. Non-significant trends also in favour of the low molecular weight heparins were observed for the recurrence of thromboembolic events (0.66, 0.41 to 1.07; P = 0.09), major haemorrhages (0.65, 0.36 to 1.16; P = 0.15), and total mortality (0.72, 0.46 to 1.4; P = 0.16). CONCLUSIONS--Low molecular weight heparins seem to have a higher benefit to risk ratio than unfractionated heparin in the treatment of venous thrombosis. These results, however, remain to be confirmed by using clinical outcomes in suitably powered clinical trials. PMID:8086867

  10. Behcet's disease without oral ulcers presenting with erythema nodosum and deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ajmani, Sajal; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    We present a young male with recurrent erythema nodosum and recent deep vein thrombosis with scrotal ulcers but no oral ulcers. He was diagnosed as having Behcet's disease (BD) and subsequently responded to immunosuppressants and anticoagulation. This case highlights that up to 2% patients with BD may not have oral ulcers. Timely institution of therapy in our patient resulted in a favorable outcome.

  11. Case report: upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 19-year-old baseball player.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sarah S; O'Brien, Micheal J O

    2014-05-01

    This report describes a case of a collegiate baseball player who presented with 3 weeks of worsening right shoulder pain and mild swelling and faint discoloration of the right arm and hand. He was found to have a nonocclusive clot on his brachial vein and was treated with anticoagulants. This was his second lifetime thrombosis. A hematologic workup revealed no evidence of a hereditary origin, and thrombosis was believed to be related to recent exertion (baseball throwing). Upper extremity deep vein thromboses are extremely uncommon. However, because they can have potentially life-threatening consequences, deep vein thromboses must be on the differential for any athlete who presents with increased pain, swelling, or discoloration of an extremity.

  12. Incidence and Risk Factors of Deep Venous Thrombosis in Asymptomatic Iliac Vein Compression: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-Kai; Luo, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Fu-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) may be associated with iliac vein compression. Up to now, the majority of data has come from a retrospective study about the correlation between DVT and iliac vein compression. This prospective study was to determine the incidence of DVT in individuals with iliac vein compression and identify risk factors predictive of DVT. Methods: A total of 500 volunteers without symptoms of venous diseases of lower extremities and overt risk factors of deep venous thrombosis between October 2011 and September 2012 in Shijitan Hospital were enrolled in this cohort study. All the participants underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) to evaluate iliac vein compression. Baseline demographic information and degree of iliac vein compression were collected. They were categorized into ≥50% or <50% iliac vein compression group. Ultrasound examination was performed to screen DVT at the time of CT examination and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the examination. Primary event was DVT of ipsilateral lower extremity. Correlation between DVT and iliac vein compression was estimated by multivariate Logistic regression after adjusting for age, gender, malignancy, surgery/immobilization, chemotherapy/hormonal therapy, and pregnancy. Results: In 500 volunteers, 8.8% (44) had ≥50% iliac vein compression and 91.2% (456) had <50% iliac vein compression. Ipsilateral DVT occurred in six volunteers including two in iliofemoral vein, two in popliteal vein, and two in calf vein within 1 year. Univariate analysis showed that the incidence of DVT was 6.8% in ≥50% compression group, significantly higher than that in <50% compression group (0.7%) (χ2 = 12.84, P = 0.01). Patients with malignancy had significantly higher incidence of DVT than those without malignancy (χ2 = 69.60, P < 0.01). Multivariate Logistic regression indicated that iliac vein compression and malignancy were independent risk factors of DVT. After adjustment for malignancy

  13. Jugular thrombophlebitis in horses: A review of fibrinolysis, thrombus formation, and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Deborah Penteado Martins; de Lacerda Neto, José Corrêa

    2013-01-01

    Thrombophlebitis of the jugular vein is commonly observed in horses, particularly during intensive care, and leads to local and systemic inflammatory responses as well as head and neck circulatory impairment. Thrombolytic therapy is widely used in human practice with the aim of thrombus dissolution and recanalization of the injured vessels. There are similarities between human and horse coagulation and fibrinolytic processes. This review examines the fibrinolytic system, thrombus formation, and the clinical management of jugular thrombophlebitis, including thrombolytic therapy. There is evidence that early regional thrombolytic therapy for jugular thrombophlebitis in horses may be effective to achieve sustained recanalization. PMID:23814304

  14. Central venous catheters and upper-extremity deep-vein thrombosis complicating immune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Aaron P; Cook, Deborah J; Sigouin, Christopher S; Warkentin, Theodore E

    2003-04-15

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a transient antibody-mediated hypercoagulability state strongly associated with lower-limb deep-vein thrombosis (DVT). Whether HIT is additionally associated with upper-limb DVT--either with or without central venous catheter (CVC) use--is unknown. We therefore studied 260 patients with antibody-positive HIT to determine the influence of CVC use on frequency and localization of upper-extremity DVT in comparison with 2 non-HIT control populations (postoperative orthopedic surgery and intensive-care unit patients). Compared with the control populations, both upper- and lower-extremity DVTs were found to be associated with HIT. Upper-extremity DVTs occurred more frequently in HIT patients with a CVC (14 of 145 [9.7%]) versus none of 115 (0%) patients without a CVC (P =.000 35). All upper-extremity DVTs occurred at the CVC site (right, 12; left, 2; kappa = 1.0; P =.011). We conclude that a localizing vascular injury (CVC use) and a systemic hypercoagulability disorder (HIT) interact to explain upper-extremity DVT complicating HIT.

  15. Low agreement for assessing the risk of postoperative deep venous thrombosis when deciding prophylaxis strategies: a study using clinical vignettes

    PubMed Central

    O'Flaherty, Martin; Lerum, Kaja; Martin, Paula; Grassi, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Background Several clinical practice guidelines (CPG) on antithrombotic prophylaxis in surgical patients help to decide about the prophylaxis strategy based on the patient risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). However, the physician risk estimates of DVT could have little inter-observer reproducibility, which could lead to different individual prophylaxis practices. Methods Physicians were asked to evaluate DVT risk in eight clinical vignettes, describing actual patients cared for in our hospital. The vignettes included all possible levels of DVT risk. Results The degree of prophylaxis strategies accuracy was 63% (95% CI 523–75%). Overall agreement was 0.32 (z = 7.61, p < 0.001) and for each level of risk kappa was 0.38 (z = 6.50, p < 0.001); 0.1 (z = 1.65, p < 0.049) and 0.5 (z = 8.45, p < 0.001) for small, moderate and high risk group respectively Conclusions Our results showed that there is poor agreement when physicians have to evaluate the risk for postoperative DVT, and in the cases of low and moderate risks of DVT there is the smallest agreement. In addition, the data also showed that the overall accuracy of DVT prophylaxis strategy was only moderate and the risk evaluation did not correlate to the selection of the strategy. The issue of inter-observers variability should be taken into account when CPG performance are analysed, especially when considering the risk-evaluation to choose the appropriate actions. PMID:12184817

  16. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, W W

    1977-01-01

    This review of the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism includes estimates of incidence and prevalence of venous thrombosis and its sequelae, a discussion geographical, annual and seasonal variations and data concerning possible risk factors. Selection of patients at increased risk for development of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism for specific diagnostic screening or for prophylactic therapy with low-dose heparin may be a more effective approach to lowering morbidity and mortality from this disease. PMID:329779

  17. Deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity five years experience at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Painter, T D; Karpf, M

    1984-11-01

    All patients with deep vein thrombosis of the arm seen at one University Hospital over a 5 year period were reviewed. The 17 cases could be divided into distinct patient groups. The first group (primary thrombosis) consisted of 7 patients primarily healthy young males (mean age 23) who had vocations or avocations which involved vigorous physical activity of the arms. The 10 patients with secondary thrombosis tended to be older (mean age 47.3) and to be ill or hospitalized at the time of onset of their illness. Followup information could be obtained in 9 of the cases and 7 of these patients had persistence in their symptoms consisting of residual discomfort and edema of the involved arm especially after exercise. None of the patients treated with anticoagulation were asymptomatic. The only patients who were symptomatic were one patient who received streptokinase and another who underwent thrombectomy. Three illustrative case studies are included.

  18. Compartment syndrome as a complication of ileofemoral deep venous thrombosis:a case presentation.

    PubMed

    Lamborn, David R; Schranz, Craig

    2014-02-01

    A 22-year-old morbidly obese, nonpregnant woman presented with left ileofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) presenting as low back pain and bilateral, left greater than right, leg swelling and pain for 2 days. While on heparin, she developed compartment syndrome in her left leg and had evidence of dead muscle tissue at the time of fasciotomy. Three options exist for treatment of ileofemoral DVT: catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), CDT plus pharmacomechanical thrombolysis or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, and surgical thrombectomy. Catheter-directed thrombolysis alone or in conjunction with pharmacomechanical thrombolysis in patients with low risk of bleeding has shown significant lysis of occlusion in 79% of patients with ileofemoral DVT with relatively low complication rates. Surgical thrombectomy and fasciotomy have not proven to be as effective but are appropriate alternatives if CDT is not available. Standard anticoagulation alone is likely not a sufficient treatment for ileofemoral DVT. Other therapies including CDT, CDT plus pharmacomechanical thrombolysis or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, or surgical thrombectomy to address lysis of the clot should be attempted first or in conjunction with anticoagulation for appropriate patients. Catheter-directed thrombolysis with or without pharmacomechanical thrombolysis is the preferred initial treatment.

  19. Deep venous thrombosis after total hip or knee arthroplasty in a "low-risk" Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Ko, P S; Chan, W F; Siu, T H; Khoo, J; Wu, W C; Lam, J J

    2003-02-01

    Scarcely any information has been published on deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in Chinese patients after total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, generally, no prophylaxis is given to patients who do not have conventional high-risk factors because they are believed to be at "low risk." We performed a prospective study on 80 such "low risk" patients undergoing THA or TKA (58 TKA and 22 THA) without prophylaxis and performed duplex ultrasonography on both lower limbs 6 to 8 days after surgery. A total of 22 patients (27.5%) showed ultrasonographic evidence of DVT. Eighteen (31%) TKAs and 4 (18.1%) THAs were complicated by DVT. Three patients showed bilateral involvement, all of whom underwent TKA. Two patients had symptomatic pulmonary embolism. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of the clinical examination was 27.2% and 31.6%, respectively. This study showed that patients who are labeled "low risk" for DVT actually had a significant risk and suggests that the current practice of providing prophylaxis to only patients deemed at "high risk" should be revised.

  20. Young's modulus reconstruction for elasticity imaging of deep venous thrombosis: animal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Xie, Hua; Kim, Kang; Rubin, Jonathan M.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wakefield, T. W.; Myers, D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2004-04-01

    Recently, it was suggested that ultrasound elasticity imaging can be used to age deep vein thrombosis (DVT) since blood clot hardness changes with fibrin content. The main components of ultrasound elasticity imaging are deformation of the object, speckle or internal boundary tracking and evaluation of tissue motion, measurement of strain tensor components, and reconstruction of the spatial distribution of elastic modulus using strain images. In this paper, we investigate a technique for Young's modulus reconstruction to quantify ultrasound elasticity imaging of DVT. In-vivo strain imaging experiments were performed using Sprague-Dawley rats with surgically induced clots in the inferior vena cavas (IVC). In this model, the clot matures from acute to chronic in less than 10 days. Therefore, nearly every 24 hours the strain imaging experiments were performed to reveal temporal transformation of the clot. The measured displacement and strain images were then converted into maps of elasticity using model-based elasticity reconstruction where the blood clot within an occluded vein was approximated as a layered elastic cylinder surrounded by incompressible tissue. Results of this study demonstrate that Young's modulus gradually increases with clot maturity and can be used to differentiate clots providing a desperately needed clinical tool of DVT staging.

  1. [Sequence of venous blood flow alterations in patients after recently endured acute thrombosis of lower-limb deep veins based on the findings of ultrasonographic duplex scanning].

    PubMed

    Tarkovskiĭ, A A; Zudin, A M; Aleksandrova, E S

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the sequence of alterations in the venous blood flow to have occurred within the time frame of one year after sustained acute thrombosis of the lower-limb deep veins, which was carried out using the standard technique of ultrasonographic duplex scanning. A total of thirty-two 24-to-62-year-old patients presenting with newly onset acute phlebothrombosis were followed up. All the patients were sequentially examined at 2 days, 3 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months after the manifestation of the initial clinical signs of the disease. Amongst the parameters to determine were the patency of the deep veins and the condition of the valvular apparatus of the deep, superficial and communicant veins. According to the obtained findings, it was as early as at the first stage of the phlebohaemodynamic alterations after the endured thrombosis, i. e., during the acute period of the disease, that seven (21.9%) patients were found to have developed valvular insufficiency of the communicant veins of the cms, manifesting itself in the formation of a horizontal veno-venous reflux, and 6 months later, these events were observed to have occurred in all the patients examined (100%). Afterwards, the second stage of the phlebohaemodynamic alterations was, simultaneously with the process of recanalization of the thrombotic masses in the deep veins, specifically characterized by the formation of valvular insufficiency of the latter, manifesting itself in the form of the development of a deep vertical veno-venous reflux, which was revealed at month six after the onset of the disease in 56.3% of the examined subjects, to be then observed after 12 months in 93.8% of the patients involved. Recanalization of thrombotic masses was noted to commence 3 months after the onset of thrombosis in twelve (37.5%) patients, and after 12 months it was seen to ensue in all the patients (100%), eventually ending in complete restoration of the patency of the affected

  2. Genetic variation in the fibrinogen gamma gene increases the risk for deep venous thrombosis by reducing plasma fibrinogen gamma' levels.

    PubMed

    Uitte de Willige, Shirley; de Visser, Marieke C H; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Rosendaal, Frits R; Vos, Hans L; Bertina, Rogier M

    2005-12-15

    We investigated the association between haplotypes of fibrinogen alpha (FGA), beta (FGB), and gamma (FGG), total fibrinogen levels, fibrinogen gamma' (gammaA/gamma' plus gamma'/gamma') levels, and risk for deep venous thrombosis. In a population-based case-control study, the Leiden Thrombophilia Study, we typed 15 haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs) in this gene cluster. None of these haplotypes was associated with total fibrinogen levels. In each gene, one haplotype increased the thrombosis risk approximately 2-fold. After adjustment for linkage disequilibrium between the genes, only FGG-H2 homozygosity remained associated with risk (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.5-3.9). FGG-H2 was also associated with reduced fibrinogen gamma' levels and reduced ratios of fibrinogen gamma' to total fibrinogen. Multivariate analysis showed that reduced fibrinogen gamma' levels and elevated total fibrinogen levels were both associated with an increased risk for thrombosis, even after adjustment for FGG-H2. A reduced fibrinogen gamma' to total fibrinogen ratio (less than 0.69) also increased the risk (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.7-3.5). We propose that FGG-H2 influences thrombosis risk through htSNP 10034C/T [rs2066865] by strengthening the consensus of a CstF site and thus favoring the formation of gammaA chain above that of gamma' chain. Fibrinogen gamma' contains a unique high-affinity, nonsubstrate binding site for thrombin, which seems critical for the expression of the antithrombin activity that develops during fibrin formation (antithrombin 1).

  3. The incidence of deep venous thrombosis in high-risk Indian neurosurgical patients: Need for early chemoprophylaxis?

    PubMed Central

    George, Ajith John; Nair, Shalini; Karthic, Jayanthi Chinnaiya; Joseph, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is thought to be less common in Asians than in Caucasian population. The incidence of DVT in high-risk groups, especially the neurosurgical (NS) patients, has not been well studied. This leaves no firm basis for the start of early prophylactic anticoagulation within first 5 postoperative days in Indian NS patients. This is a prospective observational study to determine the early occurrence of DVT in the NS patients. Patients and Methods: We screened 137 consecutive high-risk NS patients based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. The femoral veins were screened using Doppler ultrasound on day 1, 3, and 5 of admission into the NS Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at tertiary center from South India. Results: Among 2887 admissions to NICU 147 patients met inclusion criteria. One hundred thirty seven were screened for DVT. There was a 4.3% (6/137) incidence of DVT with none of the six patients having signs or symptoms of pulmonary embolism. Among the risk factors studied, there was a significant association with femoral catheterization and a probable association with weakness/paraparesis/paraplegia. The mortality in the study group was 10.8% with none attributable to DVT or pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: There is a low incidence of DVT among the high risk neurosurgical population evaluated within the first 5 days of admission to NICU, limiting the need for early chemical thrombo-prophylaxis in these patients. With strict protocols for mechanical prophylaxis with passive leg exercise, early mobilization and serial femoral Doppler screening, heparin anticoagulation can be restricted within the first 5 days of ICU admission in high risk patients. PMID:27555696

  4. Cause of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in young patients from India as compared with other ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Pai, Navin; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2012-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which consists of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism, is a potentially fatal disease. The existing Asian literature has shown a wide variation in the prevalence of VTE, with very limited data from India. In the present study, the risk factors for VTE in Indian patients were compared with Caucasians and Blacks. We used data prospectively collected from total of 1396 Indian patients (716 males, 680 females) enrolled over a decade and compared with White (n = 2002) and Black (n = 395) patients objectively diagnosed with VTE. When compared with females, males had significantly higher episodes of pulmonary embolism and VTE (P = 0.0001). Amongst the known thrombophilia markers, only homocysteine was found to be significantly higher in males as compared with females (P = 0.006). Males had a higher proportion of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and ischaemic heart disease (IHD) as compared with females. The prevalence of DVT amongst Indians was significantly higher as compared with Whites and Blacks. However, the rate of pulmonary embolism and VTE was lower in Indians as compared with both the races. Amongst the baseline characteristics identified as risk factors for VTE, Indians had a higher prevalence of infection as compared to both Whites and Blacks, but lower HIV infection as compared to Blacks. As compared to Whites, Indians had lower prevalence of idiopathic VTE (but similar to blacks) and had higher prevalence of idiopathic pulmonary embolism (P < 0.0001). This can be explained by different inherited and environment risk factors between these three populations.

  5. Predicted burden of venous disease.

    PubMed

    Onida, Sarah; Davies, Alun Huw

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition with clinical signs and symptoms ranging from spider veins, to varicose veins, to active venous ulceration. Both superficial and deep venous dysfunction may be implicated in the development of this disease. Socio-economic factors are shaping our population, with increasing age and body mass index resulting in significant pressure on healthcare systems worldwide. These risk factors also lead to an increased risk of developing superficial and/or deep venous insufficiency, increasing disease prevalence and morbidity. In this chapter, the authors review the current and future burden of chronic venous disease from an epidemiological, quality of life and economic perspective.

  6. Predicted burden of venous disease.

    PubMed

    Onida, Sarah; Davies, Alun Huw

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition with clinical signs and symptoms ranging from spider veins, to varicose veins, to active venous ulceration. Both superficial and deep venous dysfunction may be implicated in the development of this disease. Socio-economic factors are shaping our population, with increasing age and body mass index resulting in significant pressure on healthcare systems worldwide. These risk factors also lead to an increased risk of developing superficial and/or deep venous insufficiency, increasing disease prevalence and morbidity. In this chapter, the authors review the current and future burden of chronic venous disease from an epidemiological, quality of life and economic perspective. PMID:26916773

  7. Prevalence of JAK2V617F mutation in deep venous thrombosis patients and its clinical significance as a thrombophilic risk factor: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Sharma, Amit; Sazawal, Sudha; Ahuja, Ankur; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Saxena, Renu

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism is known to be a complex interaction of genetic and acquired factors leading to thrombosis. JAK2V617F mutation is believed to contribute to a thrombophilic phenotype, possibly through enhanced leukocyte-platelet interactions in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Several studies have focused on the importance of screening for JAK2V617F mutation in patients with splanchnic venous thrombosis (VT) for the detection of nonovert MPNs. The role of JAK2V617F mutation in VT outside the splanchnic region is still widely unsettled. The primary aim of this study was to find out the prevalence of JAK2V617F mutation in patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), its clinical significance as a prothrombotic risk factor, and its possible interactions with other genetic thrombophilic risk factors. A total of 148 patients with idiopathic, symptomatic DVT were evaluated. Median age of presentation was 32 years (range 15-71 years) with a sex ratio of 1.3:1. Overall, the most common genetic prothrombotic factor was factor V Leiden mutation, found in 10.8% (16 of 148) of patients who also showed strong association with increased risk of thrombosis (odds ratio 5.94, confidence interval 1.33-26.4, P = .019). Deficiencies in protein C, protein S, and antithrombin were seen in 8 (5.4%), 10 (6.7%), and 8 (5.4%) patients, respectively. It was observed that the frequency of JAK2V617F mutation was lower in Indian patients, and it also showed weaker association with risk of thrombosis, at least in cases of venous thrombosis outside the splanchnic region.

  8. Detection of thrombophlebitis with 111In-labeled anti-fibrin antibody: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; Gupta, N.; Palevsky, H.I.; Kelley, M.A.; Jatlow, A.D.; Byar, A.A.; Berger, H.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Deep venous thrombosis remains a major medical problem, affecting a large segment of the population and resulting in significant mortality and morbidity. Current techniques available for detecting deep venous thrombosis present limitations that may mitigate their potential benefit to the patient. Invasive techniques, such as ascending contrast venography, carry risks to the patient with regard to complications such as an allergic reaction to an iodine dye, adverse effects to renal functions, and clot formation in a normal vein. Noninvasive techniques, such as Doppler ultrasound and impedance plethysmography, evaluate only a limited segment of the venous bed. The need remains for a diagnostic technique that is safe, accurate, and widely accessible. A readily available noninvasive scintigraphic technique utilizing radiolabeled monoclonal anti-fibrin antibody may overcome some of these shortcomings. This imaging examination is quite effective in detecting clots in the lower extremities. Compared to contrast venography, {sup 111}In-labeled anti-fibrin antibody imaging appears to be as sensitive in identifying acute venous thrombosis. In addition, the preliminary data indicate that anticoagulation with heparin may interfere with adequate visualization of the clots with this technique.

  9. Developmental venous anomalies (DVA): the so-called venous angioma.

    PubMed

    Lasjaunias, P; Burrows, P; Planet, C

    1986-01-01

    Following a review of the literature it is possible to demonstrate the "normality" of the so called venous angiomas. They should be named Developmental Venous Anomaly (DVA). They illustrate in their two extreme types (superficial and deep) the hemodynamic equilibrium of the transcortical venous drainage in the periependymal zones. Venous ectasias and varices which can be encountered, associated with DVA constitute an acquired feature in relation to a venous outlet obstacle. The sinus pericranii represents an extracerebral DVA, but also corresponds to a normal variation. As any extreme anatomical variant, each DVA corresponds to a weak situation which may express itself clinically; only rare situations justify a radical treatment.

  10. Inferior vena cava filter insertion through the popliteal vein: enabling the percutaneous endovenous intervention of deep vein thrombosis with a single venous access approach in a single session

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kang, Yang Jun; Jung, Hye Doo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the efficiency of placing an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter through the same popliteal vein access site used for percutaneous endovenous intervention in patients with extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. METHODS This retrospective study included 21 patients who underwent IVC filter insertion through the popliteal vein over a three-year period. Patient medical records were reviewed for the location of the deep vein thrombosis, result of filter removal, and total number of endovascular procedures needed for filter insertion and recanalization of the lower extremity venous system. Follow-up lower extremity computed tomography (CT) venography was also reviewed in each patient to assess the degree of filter tilt in the IVC. RESULTS All patients had extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis involving the iliac vein and/or femoral vein. Seventeen patients showed deep vein thrombosis of the calf veins. In all patients, IVC filter insertion and the recanalization procedure were performed during a single procedure through the single popliteal vein access site. In the 17 patients undergoing follow-up CT, the mean tilt angle of the filter was 7.14°±4.48° in the coronal plane and 8.77°±5.49° in the sagittal plane. Filter retrieval was successful in 16 of 17 patients (94.1%) in whom filter retrieval was attempted. CONCLUSION Transpopliteal IVC filter insertion is an efficient technique that results in low rates of significant filter tilt and enables a single session procedure using a single venous access site for filter insertion and percutaneous endovenous intervention. PMID:27559713

  11. Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Leg, Associated with Agenesis of the Infrarenal Inferior Vena Cava and Hypoplastic Left Kidney (KILT Syndrome) in a 14-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Bami, Sakshi; Vazquez, Yarelis; Chorny, Valeriy; Amodio, John

    2015-01-01

    Agenesis of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is a rare anomaly which can be identified as incidental finding or can be associated with iliofemoral vein thrombosis. IVC agenesis has a known association with renal anomalies which are mainly confined to the right kidney. We describe a case of a 14-year-old male who presented with left leg swelling and pain. Ultrasonography confirmed the presence of left leg deep vein thrombosis (DVT). No underlying hematologic risk factors were identified. A CT scan was obtained which demonstrated absent infrarenal IVC and extensive thrombosis in the left deep venous system and development of collateral venous flow into the azygous/hemiazygous system, with extension of thrombus into paraspinal collaterals. An additional finding in the patient was an atrophic left kidney and stenosis of an accessory left renal artery. Agenesis of the IVC should be considered in a young patient presenting with lower extremity DVT, especially in patients with no risk factors for thrombosis. As agenesis of the IVC cannot be corrected, one should be aware that there is a lifelong risk of lower extremity DVT. PMID:25685585

  12. The use of indium-111 labeled platelet scanning for the detection of asymptomatic deep venous thrombosis in a high risk population

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.S.; Rae, J.L.; Ryan, N.L.; Edwards, C.; Fortune, W.P.; Lewis, R.J.; Reba, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Five hundred indium-111 labeled platelet imaging studies (387 donor and 113 autologous) were performed postoperatively in 473 patients who had undergone total hip replacement, total knee replacement, or internal fixation of a hip fracture to detect occult deep venous thrombosis. All patients had been anticoagulated prophylactically with aspirin, warfarin sodium (Coumadin), or dextran. Thirty-four possible cases of proximal deep venous thrombosis were identified in 28 asymptomatic patients. To verify the scan results, 31 venograms were performed in 25 patients (three refused). In 21 of 31 cases, totally occlusive thrombi were detected; in 5 cases, partially occlusive thrombi were detected; in 5 cases, no thrombus was seen. No patient who had a negative scan nor any patient who had a verified positive scan (and received appropriate heparin therapy) subsequently developed symptoms or signs of pulmonary embolism. One hundred forty-one indium study patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography/impedance plethysmography (Doppler/IPG) as a comparative non-invasive technique. In 137 cases, the results of the indium study and Doppler/IPG studies were congruent. The indium study had no false negative results that were detected by Doppler/IPG. No patient had any clinically evident toxicity. These results suggest that indium-111 labeled platelet scanning is a safe, noninvasive means for identifying DVT in high risk patients.

  13. Risk Factors for Deep Venous Thrombosis Following Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery: An Analysis of 56,000 patients

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Paul S.; White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A.; Greenberg, Sarah E.; VanHouten, Jacob P.; Avilucea, Frank R.; Obremskey, William T.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are recognized as major causes of morbidity and mortality in orthopaedic trauma patients. Despite the high incidence of these complications following orthopaedic trauma, there is a paucity of literature investigating the clinical risk factors for DVT in this specific population. As our healthcare system increasingly emphasizes quality measures, it is critical for orthopaedic surgeons to understand the clinical factors that increase the risk of DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Objectives: Utilizing the ACS-NSQIP database, we sought to determine the incidence and identify independent risk factors for DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Patients and Methods: Using current procedural terminology (CPT) codes for orthopaedic trauma procedures, we identified a prospective cohort of patients from the 2006 to 2013 ACS-NSQIP database. Using Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests where appropriate, patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative factors were compared between patients who developed a DVT within 30 days of surgery and those who did not. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and identify independent risk factors for DVT. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: 56,299 orthopaedic trauma patients were included in the analysis, of which 473 (0.84%) developed a DVT within 30 days. In univariate analysis, twenty-five variables were significantly associated with the development of a DVT, including age (P < 0.0001), BMI (P = 0.037), diabetes (P = 0.01), ASA score (P < 0.0001) and anatomic region injured (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified several independent risk factors for development of a DVT including use of a ventilator (OR = 43.67, P = 0.039), ascites (OR = 41.61, P = 0.0038), steroid use (OR = 4.00, P < 0.001), and alcohol use (OR = 2.98, P = 0.0370). Compared to patients with upper extremity trauma, those with lower

  14. Venous conditions associated with pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Skudder, P A; Farrington, D T

    1993-06-01

    Pregnancy is associated with several changes in venous physiology. These include relaxation of venous wall tone and increased lower extremity venous pressure. As a result of these changes, varicose veins, spider telangiectasias, purpura, and other superficial findings may develop. Treatment of these conditions is conservative during pregnancy. As the changes in venous hemodynamics resolve over several weeks after delivery, partial or complete regression may occur. In cases where persistent abnormality persists well after delivery, more definitive therapy may be considered. Pregnancy is also associated with a mild hypercoagulable state, and there may be trauma to venous endothelium associated with delivery. Coupled with the relative stasis resulting from pelvic venous compression by the uterus and from decreases in venous tone, these changes cause an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis in late pregnancy and the peripartum period. Anticoagulation with heparin is required as coumadin and fibrinolytic agents are considered to be hazardous.

  15. The use of a fixed high sensitivity to evaluate five D-dimer assays' ability to rule out deep venous thrombosis: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Scott M; Gregory Elliott, C; Woller, Scott C; Li, Liang; Bennett, Sterling T; Egger, Marlene; Snow, Gregory L

    2005-11-01

    Suspected deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is difficult to refute without complex diagnostic algorithms and expensive testing. We analysed five D-dimer assays' utility for exclusion of suspected DVT during a prospective clinical cohort trial, choosing a highly sensitive cut-off value at which to compare the assays. Assays were performed on 436 consecutive patients who were referred with symptoms that suggested a first episode of DVT. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) was defined as positive findings on comprehensive duplex ultrasonography or any episode, or complication of VTE detected during 3 months of clinical follow-up. All five assays were performed in 377 patients. At a highly sensitive cut-off value, all five assays reliably excluded DVT in the study population. While the choice of a highly sensitive cut-off value reduced the specificity of all the assays, the change in specificity differed between tests. Our findings suggest that a second-generation D-dimer assay could be used as a stand-alone test to rule out suspected DVT when a highly sensitive cut-off value is chosen. These findings should be subjected to a prospective management study, as a small reduction in sensitivity from our findings could result in a clinically relevant decrease in negative predictive value. PMID:16225654

  16. Pharmacomechanical thrombectomy and catheter-directed thrombolysis of acute lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 9-year-old boy with inferior vena cava atresia.

    PubMed

    Hamidian Jahromi, Alireza; Coulter, Amy H; Bass, Patrick; Zhang, Wayne W; Tan, Tze-Woei

    2015-04-01

    Lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is uncommon in the pediatric population, but it can be associated with severe symptoms and potential long-term morbidity secondary to post-thrombotic syndrome. Inferior vena cava (IVC) atresia can predispose a patient to the development of extremity DVT. There is no clear consensus on optimal management of extensive extremity DVT in pediatric patients, especially in patients with IVC anomalies. We report a case of iliofemoral DVT in a 9-year-old boy with IVC atresia and presumed protein S deficiency that was treated successfully using pharmacomechanical thrombectomy and catheter-directed thrombolysis. He was maintained on long-term anticoagulation and remained symptom free at 6 months' follow-up.

  17. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  18. Etiology of venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, F W; Smith, J G

    1993-10-01

    The etiology of venous ulceration is far more complex than Homans' theory of stagnation and hypo-oxygenation. Indeed, studies have shown that flow in lipodermatosclerotic limbs is actually faster than normal. We suggest, therefore, that the terms "stasis dermatitis" and "stasis ulcer" be dropped from medical parlance. The term "lipodermatosclerosis with ulceration" as used by the British, or simply "venous ulcer," would seem more appropriate. Venous hypertension, produced by incompetence of deep and communicating vein valves and thrombosis of segments of the deep system, is closely correlated with the development of venous ulcers. Precisely how this venous hypertension translates into ulceration is unclear. Burnand et al showed that fibrin cuffs are deposited around the capillaries in lipodermatosclerotic limbs. These cuffs may serve as barriers to the diffusion of oxygen, leading to local ischemia and epidermal necrosis. Others suggest that trapped leukocytes in the microcirculation alter capillary permeability by releasing various inflammatory mediators that hasten the flow of fibrinogen across the capillary membrane and promote the formation of fibrin cuffs. Proof of this hypothesis is still lacking, but may eventually come from using radioactive WBC tagging procedures. A synthesis of these two theories may in fact explain the etiology of venous ulceration. PMID:8211332

  19. Low-level laser therapy for the treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis after chemotherapy in breast cancer patients: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Woon Taek; Chung, Sin Ho; Kim, Hyunhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We report the case of a breast cancer patient with superficial thrombophlebitis treated with low-level laser therapy. [Case] The patient was a 66-year-old women who developed superficial thrombophlebitis in the left upper limb after chemotherapy. She was administered 6 sessions of low-level laser therapy. [Result] Her pain score decreased by 8 points. Her scores on the Patient and Observer scar Assessment Scale decreased by 18 points for the observer portion and by 26 points for the patient portion. [Conclusion] Low-level laser therapy is effective for the reduction of pain and the size of scar tissue in patients with superficial thrombophlebitis. PMID:26834384

  20. Low-level laser therapy for the treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis after chemotherapy in breast cancer patients: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Woon Taek; Chung, Sin Ho; Kim, Hyunhee

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] We report the case of a breast cancer patient with superficial thrombophlebitis treated with low-level laser therapy. [Case] The patient was a 66-year-old women who developed superficial thrombophlebitis in the left upper limb after chemotherapy. She was administered 6 sessions of low-level laser therapy. [Result] Her pain score decreased by 8 points. Her scores on the Patient and Observer scar Assessment Scale decreased by 18 points for the observer portion and by 26 points for the patient portion. [Conclusion] Low-level laser therapy is effective for the reduction of pain and the size of scar tissue in patients with superficial thrombophlebitis. PMID:26834384

  1. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  2. Atypical presentation of priapism in a patient with acute iliocaval deep venous thrombosis secondary to May-Thurner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alhalbouni, Saadi; Deem, Samuel; Abu-Halimah, Shadi; Sadek, Betro T; Mousa, Albeir

    2013-08-01

    We report on a 42-year-old male who presented with priapism, severe scrotal swelling, and left lower extremity pain and swelling. Initial management of priapism failed, and he was noted to have both cavernosal and glandular venous obstruction. Computed tomography (CT) was performed and identified extensive acute thrombosis involving the distal inferior vena cava and the left iliac veins. Pharmacomechanical thrombolysis (PMT) was started over the course of two days. At completion of thrombolysis, the culprit lesion in the left common iliac vein was treated with angioplasty and stenting. His postoperative course was uneventful, and his priapism as well as the scrotal and leg swelling improved. He was discharged home on full anticoagulation. To our knowledge, this is the first available description of this rare presentation along with a literature review of the underlying vascular etiology for priapism.

  3. Role of IVC Filters in Endovenous Therapy for Deep Venous Thrombosis: The FILTER-PEVI (Filter Implantation to Lower Thromboembolic Risk in Percutaneous Endovenous Intervention) Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, Mohsen; Bay, Curt; Skrocki, Laura; Lawson, David; Mazdeh, Shahnaz

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the necessity of and recommend indications for inferior vena cava (IVC) filter implantation during percutaneous endovenous intervention (PEVI) for deep venous thrombosis (DVT).BackgroundPEVI has emerged as a powerful tool in the management of acute proximal DVT. Instrumentation of extensive fresh thrombus is potentially associated with iatrogenic pulmonary embolism (PE). The true frequency of this complication has not been studied in a randomized fashion. We evaluated IVC filter implantation during PEVI for DVT. Methods: A total of 141 patients with symptomatic proximal DVT undergoing PEVI for symptomatic DVT were randomized to receive an IVC filter (70 patients) or no filter (71 patients; control group). The anticoagulation and PEVI regimen were similar between the two groups. Patients with development of symptoms suggestive of PE underwent objective testing for PE. Results: PE developed in 1 of the 14 symptomatic patients in the filter group and 8 of the 22 patients in the control group (P = 0.048). There was no mortality in any group. Three patients (4.2%) in the control group had transient hemodynamic instability necessitating resuscitory efforts. Predictors of iatrogenic PE were found to be PE at admission; involvement of two or more adjacent venous segments with acute thrombus; inflammatory form of DVT (severe erythema, edema, pain, and induration); and vein diameter of {>=}7 mm with preserved architecture. Conclusions: IVC filter implantation during PEVI reduces the risk of iatrogenic PE by eightfold without a mortality benefit. A selective approach may be exercised in filter implantation during PEVI.

  4. Prognostic significance of residual venous obstruction in patients with treated unprovoked deep vein thrombosis: a patient-level meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Donadini, Marco P; Ageno, Walter; Antonucci, Emilia; Cosmi, Benilde; Kovacs, Michael J; Le Gal, Grégoire; Ockelford, Paul; Poli, Daniela; Prandoni, Paolo; Rodger, Marc; Saccullo, Giorgia; Siragusa, Sergio; Young, Laura; Bonzini, Matteo; Caprioli, Monica; Dentali, Francesco; Iorio, Alfonso; Douketis, James D

    2014-01-01

    Residual venous obstruction (RVO) could improve the stratification of the risk of recurrence after unprovoked deep vein thrombosis (DVT), but results from clinical studies and study-level meta-analyses are conflicting. It was the objective of this analysis to determine if RVO is a valid predictor of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with a first unprovoked DVT who had received at least three months of anticoagulant therapy. Individual patient data were obtained from the datasets of original studies, after a systematic search of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library), supplemented by manual reviewing of the reference lists and contacting content experts. A multivariate, shared-frailty Cox model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for recurrent VTE, including, as covariates: RVO; age; sex; anticoagulation duration before RVO assessment; and anticoagulation continuation after RVO assessment. A total of 2,527 patients from 10 prospective studies were included. RVO was found in 1,380 patients (55.1%) after a median of six months from a first unprovoked DVT. Recurrent VTE occurred in 399 patients (15.8%) during a median follow-up of 23.3 months. After multivariate Cox analysis, RVO was independently associated with recurrent VTE (HR = 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.65). The association was stronger if RVO was detected early, i.e. at three months after DVT (HR = 2.17; 95% CI: 1.11-4.25), but non-significant if detected later, i.e. >6 months (HR = 1.19; 95% CI: 0.87-1.61). In conclusion, after a first unprovoked DVT, RVO is a weak overall predictor of recurrent VTE. The association is stronger if RVO is detected at an earlier time (3 months) after thrombosis.

  5. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  6. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  7. Risk factors associated with catheter-related upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in patients with peripherally inserted central venous catheters: a prospective observational cohort study: part 2.

    PubMed

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Clemence, Bonnie J

    2014-01-01

    This is the second part of a 2-part series that reports on the results of a prospective observational cohort study designed to examine risk factors associated with symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Part 1, published in the May/June 2014 issue of the Journal of Infusion Nursing, provided an extensive review and critique of the literature regarding risk factors associated with catheter-related UEDVT and identified 28 suspected risk factors. A study was undertaken to examine each of the risk factors among 203 acute care patients with PICCs, 13 of whom experienced a UEDVT, yielding an incidence of 6.4%. The most common reason for admission was infection (33.5%), and the primary reason for insertion of the PICC was venous access (58.6%). Hypertension (P = .022) and obesity (P = .008), defined as a body mass index ≥30, were associated with UEDVT. The clinical symptoms of edema (P < .001) and a 3-cm or more increase in arm circumference (P < .001) in the PICC arm after PICC placement were associated with UEDVT. All other variables were not statistically significant. The results suggest that patients who are obese and hypertensive may be at greater risk for the development of UEDVT and that the physical finding of edema and increased arm circumference in the PICC arm are possibly suggestive of UEDVT. PMID:24983259

  8. Cost effectiveness of non-invasive tests including duplex scanning for diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. A prospective study carried out on 511 patients.

    PubMed

    Bendayan, P; Boccalon, H

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have elucidated the cost-effectiveness of various diagnostic methods used to detect deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower limbs. These methods include Doppler, plethysmography and labelled fibrogen tests. However, duplex scanning has recently proven to be a more reliable examination. With a view to establishing a realistic appraisal of matters as they stand, the authors have carried out a prospective study to compare the relative cost-effectiveness of purely physical examination, duplex scanning associated with strain-gauge plethysmography, contrast venography indicated for each proximal DVT, and contrast venography as a first-choice examination. 511 consecutive patients suspected of DVT of the lower limbs were examined using the various non-invasive methods cited above. 185 of the patients underwent contrast venography. When compared with those of the non-invasive tests, the results of the latter examination provided for extrapolation to the total population of 511 patients so as to better evaluate costs. We are able to conclude that physical examination alone is neither cost-effective nor risk free. Non-invasive tests, which are more reliable, provide annual savings greater than 1,500,000 FF ($ 240,000) with respect to venography. Performing venography for each proximal DVT increases spending by little: savings are again greater than 1,200,000 FF ($ 192,000).

  9. Endothelial cell protein C receptor gene 6936A/G and 4678G/C polymorphisms as risk factors for deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zoheir, Naguib; Eldanasouri, Nabiel; Abdel-Aal, Asmaa A; Hosny, Karim Adel; Abdel-Ghany, Wafaa M

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) enhances the generation of activated protein C by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. A soluble form of EPCR (sEPCR) is present in plasma. Two polymorphisms in the EPCR gene (6936A/G and 4678G/C) have been reported to influence the risk of venous thromboembolism. We aimed to investigate the relation between EPCR gene polymorphisms (6936A/G and 4678C/G) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and their relations to sEPCR level. This study involved 90 patients with DVT and 90 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Plasma levels of sEPCR were measured in 45 cases of the primary DVT by ELISA. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used for detection of EPCR polymorphisms (6936A/G and 4678G/C). Regarding 6936A/G, our results demonstrated that mutant genotypes (AG, GG) were associated with an increased risk for DVT [P < 0.001, odds ratio (OR) 4.125, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.198-7.740] as well as its mutant allele G (P < 0.001, OR 2.549, 95% CI 1.601-4.061). The mutant genotypes were associated with increased levels of sEPCR. Although in 4678G/C, our results demonstrated that the mutant genotype (CC) was considered as a protective factor against DVT (P = 0.014, OR 0.289, 95% CI 0.108-0.776) as well as its mutant allele C (P = 0.02, OR 0.600, 95% CI 0.388-0.927), but it had no effect on sEPCR level. Our data suggest that 6936A/G polymorphism is a risk factor for DVT and is associated with elevated plasma levels of sEPCR, while 4678G/C polymorphism plays a role in protection against DVT. PMID:26340463

  10. Thrombophilia and chronic venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, A W; MacKenzie, R K; Burns, P; Fegan, C

    2002-08-01

    It is known that thrombophilia (TP) is a risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and that DVT predisposes to chronic venous ulceration (CVU). However, the relationship between TP and CVU has not been well studied. Review of the literature reveals that the prevalence of TP in CVU patients is high--similar to the prevalence found in patients with a history of DVT. This is despite many patients with CVU having no clear history, or duplex evidence of previous DVT. TP may predispose to CVU by leading to macro- or micro-vascular thrombosis. This association raises several issues regarding the investigation, prevention and management of patients with venous disease.

  11. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  12. Venous Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Caprini, J A; Partsch, H; Simman, R

    2012-09-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence.

  13. Streptococcus constellatus Causing Septic Thrombophlebitis of the Right Ovarian Vein with Extension into the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Abdallah; Haddad, Amy; Naqvi, Amir; Onyesoh, Ngozi U.; Malik, Rushdah; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcus constellatus collectively with Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius constitute the Streptococcus anginosus (formerly Streptococcus milleri) group. Though they are commonly associated with abscesses, bacteremia with subsequent septic thrombophlebitis is extremely rare, and resulting mortality is infrequent. Case Presentation. We report a case of a previously healthy 60-year-old African American female who presented with Streptococcus constellatus bacteremia associated with septic thrombophlebitis to the right ovarian vein extending into the inferior vena cava. She was urgently treated with antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusion. Septic thrombophlebitis has a clinical presentation that is often misleading. Therefore, a high clinical index of suspicion and the use of appropriate imaging modalities (computed tomography) are essential in recognizing and confirming this diagnosis. Prompt treatment is warranted. Surgical thrombectomies have been successfully replaced by a combination of antibiotics and anticoagulation therapy. PMID:26171262

  14. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic action of transdermal glyceryltrinitrate in the treatment of infusion-related thrombophlebitis.

    PubMed

    Berrazueta, J R; Poveda, J J; Ochoteco, J; Amado, J A; Puebla, F; Salas, E; Sarabia, M

    1993-01-01

    We have carried out a prospective double-blind randomized study in 40 patients with infusion-related thrombophlebitis. Twenty-two patients were included in the glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) ointment group and 18 patients in the control heparinoid group. Pain was assessed by an analogue scale. At 48 hours the analgesic index was 84.6 +/- 18 units with GTN and 49 +/- 45 units with heparinoid ointment (P < 0.01). Faster relief of oedema was also observed in the GTN-treated group. All signs of thrombophlebitis were relieved in less than 4 days in the GTN group compared with 9 days in the controls (P < 0.005). We conclude that transdermal GTN is useful therapy for infusion-related thrombophlebitis showing evidence of anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect.

  15. [Prospective study of the outcome of rheoplethysmographic parameters after deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities. Role in the decision to discontinue anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Ferrini, M; Blum, I; Tartulier, M; Aupetit, J F

    1987-01-01

    Forty-eight patients (25 M, 23 F) age range 25 to 83 years were admitted for treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of lower limbs confirmed by phlebocavography. Lesions were sural in 6 cases (Gr. 1), subcrural in 28 (Gr. 2) and supracrural in 13 (Gr. 3). Rheoplethysmography with venous occlusion (ORP) was performed and repeated every four months until (possible) recovery of normal emptying parameters (EI). Mean observation period was 25 +/- 8 months. In group 1, ORP indices were always restored to normal values within 4 months. In groups 2 and 3, normal values of IDV were observed in 23/38 patients within a median period of 10 months. Actuarial analysis of changes in EI values showed normalization in 65% of patients within 12 to 16 months with lack of significant differences between values for groups 2 and 3. Beyond this period of time any recovery of normal emptying indices is more aleatory, the residual obstructive syndrome appearing to be established definitely. Antivitamin K therapy (AVK) was instituted in 44 patients, and discontinuation was a function of normalization of EI. Good long-term results (clinical and ORP) were noted in 26/28 cases: one patient had recurrence of DVT with regional extension of thrombus and another a thrombosis on a Mobin-Uddin filter. Restoration of normal EI values during the 16 months following onset of DVT of lower limbs constitutes a valuable index for cessation of AVK therapy. After this period, recovery from the obstructive syndrome is more aleatory and decision to continue therapy must be based on other criteria.

  16. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    DVT - discharge; Blood clot in the legs - discharge; Thromboembolism - discharge; Venous thromboembolism - deep vein thrombosis; Post-phlebitic syndrome - discharge; Post-thrombotic syndrome - discharge

  17. A case of cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and meningitis as a complication in osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun Chul; Park, So Hyun; Kim, Eun Sook; Kim, Young Il; Lee, Sun Ho; Nam-Goong, Il Seong

    2014-08-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare genetic bone disease characterized by increased bone density but prone to breakage due to defective osteoclastic function. Among two primary types of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO), osteopetrosis type II is characterized by sclerosis of bones, predominantly involving the spine, the pelvis, and the skull base. Fragility of bones and dental abscess are leading complications. This report presents a case of osteopetrosis in a 52-years-old female, which was complicated by the development of cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and meningitis. She was suffered from multiple fractures since one year ago. Laboratory data revealed elevated serum levels of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) without carbonic anhydrase II DNA mutation. A thoracolumbar spine X-ray showed, typical findings of ADO type II (ADO II; Albers-Schönberg disease), prominent vertebral endplates so called the 'rugger jersey spine'. Her older sister also showed same typical spine appearance. We report a case of ADO II with cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and meningitis that was successfully treated with long-term antibiotics with right sphenoidotomy. PMID:25247162

  18. Management Of Fever And Suspected Infection In Pediatric Patients With Central Venous Catheters.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Courtney; Wang, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    The use of indwelling central venous catheters is essential for pediatric patients who require hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, or other medications. Fever is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, and fever in a patient with a central venous catheter may be related to a common cause of fever, or it may be due to a catheter-associated bloodstream infection. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections may also lead to additional complications such as sepsis, septic shock, or septic complications including suppurative thrombophlebitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic emboli, and abscesses. Early resuscitation as well as timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy have been shown to improve outcomes. This issue focuses on the approach to fever in pediatric patients with central venous catheters and the management and disposition of patients with possible catheter-associated bloodstream infections.

  19. Is There an Association between Component Separation and Venous Thromboembolism? Analysis of the NSQIP

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kuylhee; Mella, Juan Rodolfo; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Koolen, Pieter G. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients undergoing incisional/ventral hernia repair are at risk of developing several postoperative complications particularly venous thromboembolism (VTE), which is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess 30-day postoperative morbidity and mortality of patients undergoing incisional/ventral hernia repair and to determine the association between component separation and VTE. Methods: We reviewed the 2005–2011 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases to identify patients undergoing incisional/ventral hernia repair. Preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes were compared between a component separation group and a non–component separation group. The χ2 tests and Fisher’s exact test were used for categorical variables and t tests for continuous variables. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine preoperative predictors for complications in both groups. Results: Thirty-four thousand five hundred forty-one patients were included in our study; 501 patients underwent a component separation procedure. A higher rate of wound complications, minor/major morbidity, mortality, and return to the operating room occurred in the component separation group. However, there was no statistically significant difference in deep vein thrombosis/thrombophlebitis and pulmonary embolism rates between the 2 groups (P = 0.780 and P = 0.591, respectively). Several risk factors were significantly associated with postoperative complications in both groups. Conclusions: Component separation is used for large and complex incisional/ventral hernia repairs to achieve tension-free midline closure. Although component separation hernia repair is associated with higher incidence of wound complication, morbidity, and mortality, perhaps because of the complexity of the defects, it does not seem to be associated with increased VTE rates. PMID:26180730

  20. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed. PMID:26091450

  1. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis can affect any venous circulation. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep-vein thrombosis of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, pulmonary embolism. VTE is a fairly common disease, particularly in older age, and is associated with reduced survival, substantial health-care costs, and a high rate of recurrence. VTE is a complex (multifactorial) disease, involving interactions between acquired or inherited predispositions to thrombosis and various risk factors. Major risk factors for incident VTE include hospitalization for surgery or acute illness, active cancer, neurological disease with leg paresis, nursing-home confinement, trauma or fracture, superficial vein thrombosis, and—in women—pregnancy and puerperium, oral contraception, and hormone therapy. Although independent risk factors for incident VTE and predictors of VTE recurrence have been identified, and effective primary and secondary prophylaxis is available, the occurrence of VTE seems to be fairly constant, or even increasing. PMID:26076949

  2. [Endogenous venous thrombolysis].

    PubMed

    Porembskaya, O Ya; Khmelniker, S M; Shaidakov, E V

    2015-01-01

    Widely incorporated into vascular surgery pharmacological thrombolysis in treatment for deep vain thrombosis is fraught with a series of unsolved problems requiring further consideration. In spite of aggressive nature of treatment in a series of cases pharmacological thrombolysis sometimes turns out ineffective. Along with it, the results of experimental studies suggest a possibility of accelerating resorption of thrombotic masses and inhibiting remodelling of the venous wall by means of influencing effector cells of endogenous thrombolysis. A detailed study of the mechanisms of thrombolysis would make it possible to formulate strict criteria for carrying out pharmacological thrombolysis and to increase its efficacy. PMID:26355926

  3. Anatomy of the foot venous pump: physiology and influence on chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Uhl, J-F; Gillot, C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the location of the venous foot pump using an anatomical study. Four hundred cadaveric feet were injected with green neoprene latex followed by a dissection. A coloured segmentation of the venous system was achieved. The Lejars' concept of the venous sole of the foot is incorrect: the true blood venous reservoir of the foot is located deeply in the plantar veins, between the plantar muscles. The medial and mostly lateral plantar veins converge into the plexus shaped calcaneal crossroad, where the blood is ejected upwards into the two posterior tibial veins. In addition, the several medial perforators of the foot directly connect the deep system (medial plantar veins) to the superficial venous system (medial marginal vein). This forms a true 'medial functional unit' which is unique in the limb given its directional flow is from deep to superficial. In conclusion, the plantar veins play an important role in the physiology of the venous return since a venous reservoir of 25 mL of blood is mobilized upwards with each step during walking. Therefore, the impairment of the foot pump by a static foot disorder should be considered as an important risk factor for chronic venous disease, and should be evaluated and corrected in any patient with venous insufficiency.

  4. Congenital Absence of Inferior Vena Cava in a Young Patient with Iliofemoral Deep Venous Thrombosis Treated with Ultrasound-accelerated Catheter-directed Thrombolysis: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Reslan, Ossama M; Raffetto, Joseph D; Addis, Michael; Sundick, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Absence of the inferior vena cava (AIVC) is a rare congenital anomaly and result from aberrant development during embryogenesis. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a frequent finding in healthy young adults who are diagnosed with congenital AIVC. This condition is best diagnosed with color venous Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography angiography or magnetic resonance imaging, and managed using anticoagulation, mechanical catheter-directed thrombectomy, and thrombolysis. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by systemic anticoagulation and use of compression stockings appears safe and effective in the treatment of patients who present with acute DVT and AIVC. We present a case report of DVT with underlying AIVC treated successfully with CDT and will review the relevant English literature.

  5. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Glueck, Charles J.; Lee, Kevin; Prince, Marloe; Jetty, Vybhav; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: When exogenous testosterone or treatments to elevate testosterone (human chorionic gonadotropin [HCG] or Clomid) are prescribed for men who have antecedent thrombophilia, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism often occur and may recur despite adequate anticoagulation if testosterone therapy is continued. Case Presentation: A 55-year-old white male was referred to us because of 4 thrombotic events, 3 despite adequate anticoagulation over a 5-year period. We assessed interactions between thrombophilia, exogenous testosterone therapy, and recurrent thrombosis. In 2009, despite low-normal serum testosterone 334 ng/dL (lower normal limit [LNL] 300 ng/dL), he was given testosterone (TT) cypionate (50 mg/week) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG; 500 units/week) for presumed hypogonadism. Ten months later, with supranormal serum T (1385 ng/dL, upper normal limit [UNL] 827 ng/dL) and estradiol (E2) 45 pg/mL (UNL 41 pg/mL), he had a pulmonary embolus (PE) and was then anticoagulated for 2 years (enoxaparin, then warfarin). Four years later, on TT-HCG, he had his first deep venous thrombosis (DVT). TT was stopped and HCG continued; he was anticoagulated (enoxaparin, then warfarin, then apixaban, then fondaparinux). One year after his first DVT, on HCG, still on fondaparinux, he had a second DVT (5/315), was anticoagulated (enoxaparin + warfarin), with a Greenfield filter placed, but 8 days later had a second PE. Thrombophilia testing revealed the lupus anticoagulant. After stopping HCG, and maintained on warfarin, he has been free of further DVT-PE for 9 months. Conclusion: When DVT-PE occur on TT or HCG, in the presence of thrombophilia, TT-HCG should be stopped, lest DVT-PE reoccur despite concurrent anticoagulation. PMID:27536705

  6. [Venous thromboembolic disease: presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in its clinical spectrum includes both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, which is usually a complication of deep vein thrombosis. It is a relatively common disease with significant morbidity and requires an accurate diagnosis. They are numerous risk factors for venous thromboembolism, and there is evidence that the risk of thromboembolic disease increases proportionally to the number of predisposing risk factors present. The primary care physician should know the risk factors and suspect the presence of venous thromboembolic disease when there is a compatible clnical picture. The treatment for this pathology is anticoagulation. We report a patient with cardiovascular risk factors who was seen with pain in the right leg and shortness of breath and referred to the hospital with suspected venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation and pleural effusion.

  7. Venous thrombosis in athletes.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Gregory; Whiteside, William K; Kanwisher, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Because deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can occur following orthopaedic procedures, knowledge of hereditary and acquired risk factors for DVT is essential. Hereditary forms of thrombophilia include factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations, and deficiencies of antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S. Acquired risk factors include but are not limited to trauma, immobilization, and surgical procedures. In general, athletes have a low risk of venous thrombosis; however, this population is exposed to many acquired thrombogenic risk factors, including hemoconcentration, trauma, immobilization, long-distance travel, and the use of oral contraceptives. Thus, orthopaedic surgeons should consider screening athletes for thrombogenic risk factors, including history of venous thrombosis, hypercoagulable disorders, or high altitude exercise, during preparticipation physicals and preoperative examinations. If a patient is determined to be at high risk of DVT, preventive measures such as physical antithrombotic measures and/or low-molecular-weight heparin should be instituted. If an athlete develops a DVT, a risk factor assessment should be conducted along with anticoagulation treatment in accordance with the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines. PMID:23378374

  8. Developmental Venous Anomaly: Benign or Not Benign

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Rie; SRIVATANAKUL, Kittipong

    2016-01-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), previously called venous angiomas, are the most frequently encountered cerebral vascular malformations. However, DVA is considered to be rather an extreme developmental anatomical variation of medullary veins than true malformation. DVAs are composed of dilated medullary veins converging centripetally into a large collecting venous system that drains into the superficial or deep venous system. Their etiology and mechanism are generally accepted that DVAs result from the focal arrest of the normal parenchymal vein development or occlusion of the medullary veins as a compensatory venous system. DVAs per se are benign and asymptomatic except for under certain unusual conditions. The pathomechanisms of symptomatic DVAs are divided into mechanical, flow-related causes, and idiopathic. However, in cases of DVAs associated with hemorrhage, cavernous malformations (CMs) are most often the cause rather than DVAs themselves. The coexistence of CM and DVA is common. There are some possibilities that DVA affects the formation and clinical course of CM because CM related to DVA is generally located within the drainage territory of DVA and is more aggressive than isolated CM in the literature. Brain parenchymal abnormalities surrounding DVA and cerebral varix have also been reported. These phenomena are considered to be the result of venous hypertension associated with DVAs. With the advance of diagnostic imagings, perfusion study supports this hypothesis demonstrating that some DVAs have venous congestion pattern. Although DVAs should be considered benign and clinically silent, they can have potential venous hypertension and can be vulnerable to hemodynamic changes. PMID:27250700

  9. [The new guidelines for deep venous thromboembolic disease prophylaxis in elective hip and knee replacement surgery. Are we nearer or further away from a consensus?].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Iban, M A; Díaz-Heredia, J; Elías-Martín, M E; Martos-Rodríguez, L A; Cebreiro-Martínez del Val, I; Pascual-Martín-Gamero, F J

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism events (VTE) prophylaxis after elective hip or knee replacement surgery is a subject of controversy. Three sets of guidelines (NICE, ACCP and AAOS) on this topic have recently been updated. The guidelines have points in common: prophylaxis is necessary, it is recommended to combine mechanical and pharmacological prophylaxis in patients who have suffered a previous VTE, isolated mechanical measures and low molecular weight heparins are effective, the new oral anticoagulants and fondaparinux are effective drugs. There is some consensus in recommending regional anaesthesia, in advising against echography studies in asymptomatic patients, and in the promotion of early mobilisation of the patient. There is controversy over the most suitable pharmacological treatment and the time of starting, and the duration of this, as well as on vena cava filters, antiplatelet drugs, and VTE or bleeding risk factors.

  10. Overview of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Abad Rico, José Ignacio; Llau Pitarch, Juan Vicente; Rocha, Eduardo

    2010-12-14

    Thrombosis occurs at sites of injury to the vessel wall, by inflammatory processes leading to activation of platelets, platelet adherence to the vessel wall and the formation of a fibrin network. A thrombus that goes on to occlude a blood vessel is known as a thromboembolism. Venous thromboembolism begins with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which forms in the deep veins of the leg (calf) or pelvis. In some cases, the DVT becomes detached from the vein and is transported to the right-hand side of the heart, and from there to the pulmonary arteries, giving rise to a pulmonary embolism (PE). Certain factors predispose patients toward the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including surgery, trauma, hospitalization, immobilization, cancer, long-haul travel, increased age, obesity, major medical illness and previous VTE; in addition, there may also be a genetic component to VTE. VTE is responsible for a substantial number of deaths per annum in Europe. Anticoagulants are the mainstay of both VTE treatment and VTE prevention, and many professional organizations have published guidelines on the appropriate use of anticoagulant therapies for VTE. Treatment of VTE aims to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with the disease, and any long-term complications such as VTE recurrence or post-thrombotic syndrome. Generally, guidelines recommend the use of low molecular weight heparins (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH) or fondaparinux for the pharmacological prevention and treatment of VTE, with the duration of therapy varying according to the baseline characteristics and risk profile of the individual. Despite evidence showing that the use of anticoagulation prevents VTE, the availability of several convenient, effective anticoagulant therapies and the existence of clear guideline recommendations, thromboprophylaxis is underused, particularly in patients not undergoing surgery. Greater adherence to guideline-recommended therapies, such as LMWH, which can be

  11. The natural history of postoperative venous thromboemboli in gynecologic oncology: a prospective study of 382 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Synan, I.S.; Colemen, R.E.; Hinshaw, W.; Creasman, W.T.

    1984-04-15

    Three hundred eighty-two patients who underwent major operations for gynecologic malignancy were studied prospectively to determine the natural history of postoperative venous thromboemboli. Iodine 125-labeled fibrinogen leg counting, to diagnose deep venous thrombosis, was performed daily. Sixty-three patients (17%) developed postoperative venous thromboembolic complications. Deep venous thrombosis initially arose in the calf veins in 52 patients. Twenty-seven percent of these thrombi lysed spontaneously. Four percent of thrombi in the calf veins progressed to deep venous thrombosis in the femoral vein, and 4% resulted in pulmonary emboli. Nine other patients developed proximal deep venous thrombosis without prior thrombosis in the calf veins. One patient with proximal deep venous thrombosis also had a pulmonary embolus. Two patients with no evidence of deep venous thrombosis on prospective /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen leg counting developed pulmonary emboli, including one fatal pulmonary embolus that was found at autopsy to have arisen from the internal iliac veins. Fifty percent of all venous thromboemboli were detected within 48 hours of operation, although two patients developed significant deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary emboli after discharge from the hospital. These results add important information to our understanding of this disease process, and raise issues related to appropriate treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients after gynecologic operations.

  12. Matrix Metalloproteinases as Potential Targets in the Venous Dilation Associated with Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Kucukguven, Arda; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Varicose veins (VVs) are a common venous disease of the lower extremity characterized by incompetent valves, venous reflux, and dilated and tortuous veins. If untreated, VVs could lead to venous thrombosis, thrombophlebitis and chronic venous leg ulcers. Various genetic, hormonal and environmental factors may lead to structural changes in the vein valves and make them incompetent, leading to venous reflux, increased venous pressure and vein wall dilation. Prolonged increases in venous pressure and vein wall tension are thought to increase the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Members of the MMPs family include collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins, membrane-type MMPs and others. MMPs are known to degrade various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). MMPs may also affect the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle, causing changes in the vein relaxation and contraction mechanisms. ECs injury also triggers leukocyte infiltration, activation and inflammation, which lead to further vein wall damage. The vein wall dilation and valve dysfunction, and the MMP activation and superimposed inflammation and fibrosis would lead to progressive venous dilation and VVs formation. Surgical ablation is an effective treatment for VVs, but may be associated with high recurrence rate, and other less invasive approaches that target the cause of the disease are needed. MMP inhibitors including endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) and pharmacological inhibitors such as zinc chelators, doxycycline, batimastat and marimastat, have been used as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer, autoimmune and cardiovascular disease. However, MMP inhibitors may have side effects especially on the musculoskeletal system. With the advent of new genetic and pharmacological tools, specific MMP inhibitors with fewer undesirable effects could be useful to retard the progression and prevent the recurrence of VVs. PMID:23316963

  13. Matrix metalloproteinases as potential targets in the venous dilation associated with varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Kucukguven, Arda; Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-03-01

    Varicose veins (VVs) are a common venous disease of the lower extremity characterized by incompetent valves, venous reflux, and dilated and tortuous veins. If untreated, VVs could lead to venous thrombosis, thrombophlebitis and chronic venous leg ulcers. Various genetic, hormonal and environmental factors may lead to structural changes in the vein valves and make them incompetent, leading to venous reflux, increased venous pressure and vein wall dilation. Prolonged increases in venous pressure and vein wall tension are thought to increase the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Members of the MMPs family include collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins, membrane- type MMPs and others. MMPs are known to degrade various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). MMPs may also affect the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle, causing changes in the vein relaxation and contraction mechanisms. Endothelial cell injury also triggers leukocyte infiltration, activation and inflammation, which lead to further vein wall damage. The vein wall dilation and valve dysfunction, and the MMP activation and superimposed inflammation and fibrosis would lead to progressive venous dilation and VVs formation. Surgical ablation is an effective treatment for VVs, but may be associated with high recurrence rate, and other less invasive approaches that target the cause of the disease are needed. MMP inhibitors including endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) and pharmacological inhibitors such as zinc chelators, doxycycline, batimastat and marimastat, have been used as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer, autoimmune and cardiovascular disease. However, MMP inhibitors may have side effects especially on the musculoskeletal system. With the advent of new genetic and pharmacological tools, specific MMP inhibitors with fewer undesirable effects could be useful to retard the progression and prevent the recurrence of VVs.

  14. Anatomic considerations for central venous cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Michael P; Heller, Stephanie F; Rivera, Mariela

    2011-01-01

    Central venous cannulation is a commonly performed procedure which facilitates resuscitation, nutritional support, and long-term vascular access. Mechanical complications most often occur during insertion and are intimately related to the anatomic relationship of the central veins. Working knowledge of surface and deep anatomy minimizes complications. Use of surface anatomic landmarks to orient the deep course of cannulating needle tracts appropriately comprises the crux of complication avoidance. The authors describe use of surface landmarks to facilitate safe placement of internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral venous catheters. The role of real-time sonography as a safety-enhancing adjunct is reviewed. PMID:22312225

  15. Clinical aspects of venous thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Antonio; Fabris, Fabrizio; Girolami, Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Venous thrombophilia is the result of clotting changes namely of a hypercoagulable state together with blood flow and vessel wall changes. There is no need for all these components to be present in order for thrombosis to occur. As the matter of fact, thrombosis may occur even if only one of these conditions is present. In clinical practice a combination of factors is usualy seen. In comparison with arterial thrombophilia, clotting changes and blood flow seen to play a major role in venous thrombosis. Venous thrombophilia may remain asynptomatic or may result in a series of clinical syndromes. The commonest of these are: 1. Superficial vein thrombosis, 2. Deep vein thrombosis of legs, 3. Deep vein thrombosis of arms, 4. Caval veins thrombosis, 5. Portal vein thrombosis, 6. Hepatic veins thrombosis, 7. Renal vein thrombosis, 8. Cerebral sinuses thrombosis, 9. Right heart thrombosis, 10. Miscellaneous (ovarian, adrenal veins thrombosis, etc.). Since the first two are widely and easily recognized, these is no need for an extensive discussion. Deep vein thromboses of upper limbs are not as frequent as those of lower limbs or of superficial phlebitis but they can still be recognized on clinical grounds and non invasive techniques. The remaining 7 syndromes are less common and therefore less frequently suspected and recognized. Of particular interest, among these less common manifestations of venous thrombophilia are hepatic vein and renal vein thrombosis. Hepatic veins thrombosis, sometimes part of inferior vena cava thrombosis is most frequently due to an isolated occlusion of hepatic veins thereby causing a form of venocclusive disease. Occasionally diagnosis may be difficult because of slow onset of symptoms (hepatomegaly, right flank pain, fever, ascites etc.). The same is true for renal vein thrombosis which may also be of difficult diagnosis since it causes proteinuria and flank pain. The proteinuria is often interpreted as due to a nephrotic syndrome which

  16. Spontaneous multisystem deep venous thrombosis as an unusual presentation of Behçet's disease in a young Afro-Caribbean patient.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Anuja

    2015-07-23

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune mediated multisystem vasculitis. It is most prevalent in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean patients and considered rare in Afro-Caribbean populations. The disease phenotype in Afro-Caribbean patients is more severe with systemic involvement, in particular lesions affecting the vascular system known as angio-Behçet's. The archetypal triad of disease in Behçet's includes oral stomatitis, genital ulceration and ocular lesions, however, the variety of symptoms patients experience is recognised by the revised International Criteria for Behçet's disease and is reflected in the clinical scoring criteria. The authors report an unusual case of Behçet's disease in a young Afro-Caribbean patient presenting with spontaneous bilateral renal, cerebral and pulmonary venous thrombosis as first presentation. Physicians should be aware of the aggressive and atypical manner in which Behçet's can present in Afro-Caribbean patients in order to avoid diagnostic delay and remain vigilant for thromboembolic lesions in this population.

  17. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... Catheters are used when you need medical treatment over a long period of time. For example, you ...

  18. Aged venous thrombi: radioimmunoimaging with fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Rosebrough, S.F.; Grossman, Z.D.; McAfee, J.G.; Kudryk, B.J.; Subramanian, G.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.A.; Witanowski, L.S.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Urrutia, E.

    1987-02-01

    Radioimmunoimaging of fresh canine venous thrombi with a murine monoclonal antibody specific for human and dog fibrin has been reported. Successful imaging of canine deep venous thrombi 1, 3, and 5 days old at the time of antibody injection is reported. Images were positive in all dogs, and the uptake of fibrin-specific antibody was equivalent to that of fresh thrombi.

  19. The relationship of intracranial venous pressure to hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, H D; Branch, C; Castro, M E

    1994-01-01

    Little is known about intracranial venous pressure in hydrocephalus. Recently, we reported that naturally occurring hydrocephalus in Beagle dogs was associated with an elevation in cortical venous pressure. We proposed that the normal pathway for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption includes transcapillary or transvenular absorption of CSF from the interstitial space and that the increase in cortical venous pressure is an initial event resulting in decreased absorption and subsequent hydrocephalus. Further analysis, however, suggests that increased cortical venous pressure reflects the effect of the failure of transvillus absorption with increase in CSF pressure on the venous pressure gradient between ventricle and cortex. Normally, the cortical venous pressure is maintained above CSF pressure by the Starling resistor effect of the lateral lacunae. A similar mechanism is absent in the deep venous system, and thus the pressure in the deep veins is similar to that in the dural sinuses. Decreased CSF absorption causes an increase in CSF pressure followed by an increase in cortical venous pressure without a similar increase in periventricular venous pressure. The periventricular CSF to venous (transparenchymal) pressure (TPP) gradient increases. In contrast, cortical vein pressure remains greater than CSF pressure (negative TPP). The elevated periventricular TPP gradient causes ventricular dilatation and decreased periventricular cerebral blood flow (CBF), a condition that persists even if the CSF pressure returns to normal, particularly if tissue elastance is lessened by tissue damage. If deep CBF is to be maintained, periventricular venous pressure must increase. Since the veins are in a continuum, cortical venous pressure will further increase above the CSF pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8194060

  20. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zuurbier, Susanna M; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and 2010 (prospectively since July 2006). Hydrocephalus was defined as a bicaudate index larger than the 95th percentile for age, and/or a radial width of the temporal horn of ≥ 5 mm. We excluded patients in whom hydrocephalus was caused by a disease other than CVT or if it was iatrogenic. 20 out of 99 patients with CVT had hydrocephalus. 6 patients with hydrocephalus were excluded from the analysis. Patients with hydrocephalus more often had focal neurological deficits (86 vs. 49%, p = 0.02) and were more frequently comatose (43 vs. 16%, p = 0.06), as compared to patients without hydrocephalus. Deep cerebral venous thrombosis (64 vs. 9%, p < 0.001) and edema of the basal ganglia and thalami (64 vs. 4%, p < 0.001) were more common in patients with hydrocephalus. Intraventricular hemorrhage was present in 1 patient with hydrocephalus, compared to none among patients without hydrocephalus (7 vs. 0%, p = 0.15). Outcome at follow-up was worse in patients with hydrocephalus (mRS 0-1, 36 vs. 68%, p = 0.02; mortality 29 vs. 9%, p = 0.07). Hydrocephalus occurs more frequently in cerebral venous thrombosis than previously believed, especially in patients with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and edema of the basal ganglia. The presence of hydrocephalus is associated with a worse clinical outcome, but a direct causal relation is unlikely. Routine shunting procedures are not advisable.

  1. Evaluating the Use of a Negative D-Dimer and Modified Low Wells Score in Excluding above Knee Deep Venous Thrombosis in an Outpatient Population, Assessing Need for Diagnostic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Anshul; Prabhudesai, Shirish; Mcclinton, David; MacCallum, Peter; Platton, Sean; Friedman, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Aims. Colour doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) is widely used in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT); however, the number of scans positive for above knee DVT is low. The present study evaluates the reliability of the D-dimer test combined with a clinical probability score (Wells score) in ruling out an above knee DVT and identifying patients who do not need a CDUS. Materials and Method. This study is a retrospective audit and reaudit of a total of 816 outpatients presenting with suspected lower limb DVT from March 2009 to March 2010 and from September 2011 to February 2012. Following the initial audit, a revised clinical diagnostic pathway was implemented. Results. In our initial audit, seven patients (4.9%) with a negative D-dimer and a low Wells score had a DVT. On review, all seven had a risk factor identified that was not included in the Wells score. No patient with negative D-dimer and low Wells score with no extra clinical risk factor had a DVT on CDUS (negative predictive value 100%). A reaudit confirmed adherence to our revised clinical diagnostic pathway. Conclusions. A negative D-dimer together with a low Wells score and no risk factors effectively excludes a lower limb DVT and an ultrasound is unnecessary in these patients. PMID:24967296

  2. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed.

  3. Venous ulcers of the lower limb: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sasanka S.

    2012-01-01

    Venous ulcers are the most common ulcers of the lower limb. It has a high morbidity and results in economic strain both at a personal and at a state level. Chronic venous hypertension either due to primary or secondary venous disease with perforator paucity, destruction or incompetence resulting in reflux is the underlying pathology, but inflammatory reactions mediated through leucocytes, platelet adhesion, formation of pericapillary fibrin cuff, growth factors and macromolecules trapped in tissue result in tissue hypoxia, cell death and ulceration. Duplex scan with colour flow is the most useful investigation for venous disease supplying information about patency, reflux, effects of proximal and distal compression, Valsalva maneuver and effects of muscle contraction. Most venous disease can be managed conservatively by leg elevation and compression bandaging. Drugs of proven benefit in venous disease are pentoxifylline and aspirin, but they work best in conjunction with compression therapy. Once ulceration is chronic or the patient does not respond to or cannot maintain conservative regime, surgical intervention treating the underlying venous hypertension and cover for the ulcer is necessary. The different modalities like sclerotherapy, ligation and stripping of superficial varicose veins, endoscopic subfascial perforator ligation, endovenous laser or radiofrequency ablation have similar long-term results, although short-term recovery is best with radiofrequency and foam sclerotherapy. For deep venous reflux, surgical modalities include repair of incompetent venous valves or transplant or transposition of a competent vein segment with normal valves to replace a post-thrombotic destroyed portion of the deep vein. PMID:23162226

  4. Risk factors associated with catheter-related upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in patients with peripherally inserted central venous catheters: literature review: part 1.

    PubMed

    Clemence, Bonnie J; Maneval, Rhonda E

    2014-01-01

    This is part 1 of a 2-part series of articles that report on the results of a prospective observational cohort study designed to examine the risk factors associated with symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters. This article provides an extensive review and critique of the literature that serves to explicate what is currently known about risk factors associated with catheter-related UEDVT. Risk factors such as anticoagulant use, cancer, infection, hypertension, catheter tip placement, and catheter size were identified most frequently in the literature as being associated with UEDVT development. Other risk factors--such as obesity, smoking history, surgery, and presence of pain or edema--were examined in a limited number of studies and lacked consistent evidence of their impact on UEDVT development. The subsequent study that evolved from the review of the literature investigates the relationship between identified risk factors and UEDVT development. PMID:24694512

  5. Risk factors for peripheral venous disease resemble those for venous thrombosis: the San Diego Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, M; Callas, PW; Denenberg, JO; Bovill, EG; Criqui, MH

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinically silent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is common and may cause chronic venous disease that resembles post-thrombotic syndrome. Objective We evaluated whether peripheral venous disease in a general population shares risk factors with DVT. Methods In an established cohort of 2,404 men and women, the San Diego Population Study, peripheral venous disease was evaluated using physical exam, symptom assessment, and venous ultrasound. We performed a case control study including 308 cases in 4 hierarchical groups by severity, and 346 controls without venous abnormalities, frequency matched to cases by 10-year age group, race and sex. Cases and controls had no prior history of venous thrombosis. Hemostatic risk factors were measured in cases and controls. Results Accounting for age, obesity and family history of leg ulcer, ORs for elevated factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, D-dimer, and for factor V Leiden were 1.4 (95% CI 0.9–2.1), 1.5 (CI 1.0–2.3), 1.7 (CI 1.1–2.8), and 1.1 (CI 0.5–2.4), respectively. These associations were larger in the two most severe case groups; ORs 2.0 (CI 1.0–3.8), 1.7 (CI 0.9–3.3), 2.7 (CI 1.2–6.1) and 2.3 (CI 0.8–7.1). Each hemostatic factor was also associated with severity of venous disease, for example elevated D-dimer was associated with a 2.2-fold increased odds of being in one higher severity group. Prothrombin 20210A was not associated with venous disease. Conclusions DVT risk factors are associated with presence and severity of peripheral venous disease. Results support a hypothesis that peripheral venous disease may sometimes be post-thrombotic syndrome due to previous unrecognized DVT. PMID:20492466

  6. [The action of deep venous insufficiency at the popliteal level on the junction of the external saphenous vein and the gemellary veins].

    PubMed

    Brizzio, E; Desimone, J

    1992-01-01

    Duplex-ultrasound and colour-ultrasound have enabled successful close study of valve patency and function by the analysis of hemodynamic changes: direction, velocity, circulatory conditions. Direction by colours: red attributed to arriving flow and blue to outflow. Circulatory velocity by the intensity and brilliance of colours. Circulatory conditions by the colour green revealing the existence of a turbulent flow, with anterograde turbulent flow coloured yellow and retrograde turbulent flow turquoise. A so-called mosaic pattern occurs when turbulent flow has a high circulatory velocity. Investigation of the popliteal vein: patient in ventral horizontal and standing positions. Normal morphological characteristics: Course essentially straight. Valve system proximal to the junction of the small saphenous. Anteroposterior diameter: less than 1 cm in horizontal position, less than 1.5 cm standing. Totally compressible by external pressure and partially by hyperextension of the ring of soleus. Characteristics of popliteal insufficiency: increased calibre--positive compressibility--duplication of standing calibre--pulsed Doppler with a biphasic wave--colour--ultrasound with reflux red--turbulent conditions and mosaic pattern may be present. Investigation of the small saphenous vein: enables determination of morphological characteristics, the site of the junction, detection of reflux and measurement of its degree. Valve insufficiency of the popliteal vein may form part of a syndrome of overall insufficiency of the deep system, primary or secondary, depending upon one valve only, located proximal to the junction of the small saphenous. When this functions badly, special reflux circuits develop, with the outcome depending on the course which these circuits may take.

  7. Assessment of conventional criteria for the early diagnosis of thrombophlebitis with the 125I-fibrinogen uptake test.

    PubMed

    DeNardo, G L; DeNardo, S J; Barnett, C A; Newcomer, K A; Jansholt, A L; Carretta, R F; Rose, A W

    1977-12-01

    Analysis of 55 positive tests of a total of 300 tests by conventional criteria revealed that 125I-fibrinogen provides useful information early enough for clinical management. Of the tests which were ultimately interpreted as positive by conventional criteria, at least one was positive at 3-4 hours in 67% of the tests and 98% of the tests were positive at 24 hours after the administration of 125I-fibrinogen. A 20% difference between contralateral identical locations of the legs and a 20% difference between adjacent locations of the ipsilateral leg were found with almost equal frequency in the positive tests, whereas a 20% increase at the same location was less sensitive. The 125I-fibrogen uptake test is a simple and accurate technique for early diagnosis of active thrombophlebitis.

  8. Reoperative venous access.

    PubMed

    Juno, Russell J; Knott, Andrew W; Racadio, John; Warner, Brad W

    2003-05-01

    The maintenance of long-term venous access is critical to the livelihood of children in a variety of clinical situations, especially those who are dependent on parenteral nutrition. Whereas the traditional routes of either peripheral or central venous access are initially adequate, most of these sites eventually succumb to the pitfalls associated with long-term venous access. This review provides a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach to the management of reoperative venous access with regard to preoperative planning and imaging and specific techniques in interventional radiology and surgery.

  9. Venous insufficiency at work.

    PubMed

    Hobson, J

    1997-07-01

    Chronic venous disease of the lower limbs is one of the most common conditions affecting humankind. It has been postulated that certain workplace conditions may be risk factors for venous insufficiency and varicose veins in particular. This paper examines the evidence for a link between occupation and the prevalence of venous disease. It also reviews recent French research carried out to estimate the prevalence of chronic venous insufficiency in a working population; work and nonwork risk factor and the cost to industry from this condition are also examined. PMID:9242155

  10. ASSESSMENT OF VENOUS THROMBOSIS IN ANIMAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    SP, Grover; CE, Evans; AS, Patel; B, Modarai; P, Saha; A, Smith

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and common complications, including pulmonary embolism and post thrombotic syndrome, represent a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Experimental models of venous thrombosis have provided considerable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate thrombus formation and subsequent resolution. Here we critically appraise the ex vivo and in vivo techniques used to assess venous thrombosis in these models. Particular attention is paid to imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, micro computed tomography and high frequency ultrasound that facilitate longitudinal assessment of thrombus size and composition. PMID:26681755

  11. Assessment of Venous Thrombosis in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Grover, Steven P; Evans, Colin E; Patel, Ashish S; Modarai, Bijan; Saha, Prakash; Smith, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and common complications, including pulmonary embolism and post-thrombotic syndrome, represent a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Experimental models of venous thrombosis have provided considerable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate thrombus formation and subsequent resolution. Here, we critically appraise the ex vivo and in vivo techniques used to assess venous thrombosis in these models. Particular attention is paid to imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, micro-computed tomography, and high-frequency ultrasound that facilitate longitudinal assessment of thrombus size and composition.

  12. Reduction of venous thrombosis complicating phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Bettmann, M.A.; Salzman, E.W.; Rosenthal, D.; Clagett, P.; Davies, G.; Nebesar, R.; Rabinov, K.; Ploetz, J.; Skillman, J.

    1980-06-01

    Patients who underwent radiographic phlebography were studied to determine the frequency of postphlebographic venous thrombosis. In a group of 23 patients who had negative phlebograms performed with standard contrast agent (60% sodium methylglucamine diatrizoate), nine had positive /sup 125/I-fibrinogen leg scans. On repeat phlebography, three had confirmed deep vein thrombosis, six overall developed deep or superficial thrombosis, and three had positive scans without demonstrable thrombi. In a second group of 34 patients studied with the contrast material diluted to 45%, only three developed positive scans, one due to deep venous thrombosis and two to superficial thrombosis. There was also a reuction in the incidence of postphlebographic symptoms of pain, tenderness, and erythema, but no apparent sacrifice in diagnostic accuracy.

  13. Increase in Venous Complications Associated With Etomidate Use During a Propofol Shortage: An Example of Clinically Important Adverse Effects Related to Drug Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Kosarek, Logan; Hart, Stuart R.; Schultz, Lucy; DiGiovanni, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Etomidate is a widely used intravenous induction agent that is especially useful for patients at risk for hypotension during anesthesia induction. Side effects limiting its use include adrenocortical suppression, acidosis, myoclonus, venous irritation, and phlebitis. The osmolality of etomidate prepared in propylene glycol appears to play a crucial role in causing phlebitis. The increased use of etomidate during the recent propofol shortage correlated with an increase in reported incidences of postoperative phlebitis and thrombophlebitis at Ochsner Clinic Foundation from October 2009 through April 2010. Several methods aim to prevent such occurrences, including pretreatment with lidocaine (and possibly esmolol), lower doses of etomidate, and injection into larger veins. The most compelling evidence suggests that using a lipid formulation of etomidate instead of the traditional propylene glycol preparation may dramatically decrease venous sequelae. PMID:21734854

  14. [Venous vascularization of the lentiform nucleus].

    PubMed

    Wolfram-Gabel, R; Maillot, C

    The venous vascularization of the nucleus lentiformis in man is studied in 30 brains by injecting the vascular system with gelatinous Indian ink. The venous vascularization of the nucleus lentiformis is drained towards the deep venous system of the brain by two ways, one ascending, the other descending. The first one is formed by superior lenticular veins which drain into the thalamo-striate vein, principal tributary of the internal cerebral vein. The second one is formed by inferior lenticular veins which depend from the deep middle cerebral vein, another tributary of the internal cerebral vein. The veins of the nucleus lentiformis, especially the veins of the putamen, present many similarities with these one of the cerebral cortex. They form the center of venous units surrounded by an arterial ring formed by the branches of ramification of the central arteries. The principal vein of the unit is surrounded by a capillary-free space. This similarities may be explained by the common origin of the cerebral cortex and of the putamen, both belong to the neocortical system.

  15. [Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)].

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Simon, J

    2009-10-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is an important and frequent disease for dermatologists, phlebologists and general practitioners. There are various hypotheses for the ethiopathology in CVI, e. g. hormone receptors and impairments concerning the venous contraction or relaxation of the vessel wall and the venous valves might play an important role. At the moment, colour doppler-duplex sonography seems to be the diagnostic method of choice. Modern therapeutic options include compression systems alone or in combination with topical or systemic treatment including minimal invasive methods like endovenous laser or radiofrequency obliteration or foam sclerotherapy. PMID:19826982

  16. Outcome of venous stenting following catheter directed thrombolysis for acute proximal lower limb venous thrombosis: a prospective study with venous Doppler follow-up at 1-year.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, B C; Patra, Soumya; Reddy, Babu; Nagesh, C M; Agarwal, Naveen; Manjunath, C N

    2015-10-01

    Functional outcome of venous stent placement for the management of acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) following catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), remain undefined. The purpose of this study was to assess immediate and intermediate term outcomes among patients treated with venous stenting following CDT in patients with proximal lower limb DVT. Thirty consecutive patients aged between 20-70 years with proximal lower limb DVT formed the study group. The mean duration of CDT done with streptokinase was 4.5 ± 1.3 days. Patients with residual venous obstruction and/or large clot burden were treated further with venous angioplasty and/or stenting. Primary endpoint was to evaluate the safety, efficacy and patency of venous stenting in the management of incomplete result following CDT. After 12 months, post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) was assessed clinically using Villalta scale and deep venous patency was assessed through duplex ultrasound. We studied 8 (5 female and 3 male) patients with 9 (3 left and 6 right) limb involvement and 13 stent (4 balloon expandable and 9 self expandable) placement. All patients improved clinically immediately following venous stenting. Technical success was achieved in all patients. One patient developed pulmonary embolism during course of hospital stay. One patient had stent thrombosis and PTS and another patient died due to carcinoma breast during follow-up. Deep venous stenting is an effective mode of treatment in proximal acute lower limb DVT with high late patency rate up to 1-year.

  17. Mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hmoud, Bashar; Singal, Ashwani K; Kamath, Patrick S

    2014-09-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a cause of mesenteric ischemia. Acute thrombosis commonly presents with abdominal pain and chronic type with features of portal hypertension. Contrast enhanced CT scan of abdomen is quite accurate for diagnosing and differentiating two types of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Prothrombotic state, hematological malignancy, and local abdominal inflammatory conditions are common predisposing conditions. Over the last decade, JAK-2 (janus kinase 2) mutation has emerged as an accurate biomarker for diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm, an important cause for mesenteric venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation is the treatment of choice for acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. Thrombolysis using systemic or transcatheter route is another option. Patients with peritoneal signs or refractory to initial measures require surgical exploration. Increasing recognition of mesenteric venous thrombosis and use of anticoagulation for treatment has resulted in reduction in the need for surgery with improvement in survival.

  18. Venous disease: investigation and treatment, fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Scott, H. J.; McMullin, G. M.; Coleridge Smith, P. D.; Scurr, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    This review looks at some clinical and experimental methods and treatments used in venous disease, and attempts to dispel some myths which have been associated with it. Over the last century numerous techniques have been introduced to aid the understanding of the physiology of normal legs and the pathophysiology of those with venous disease. Tourniquet testing along with clinical examination remains the only method of venous assessment in most hospitals. Venous ulceration in the past has been associated with deep vein incompetence, but the newer, non-invasive techniques of Doppler ultrasound and duplex examination are now identifying patients with leg ulceration who have superficial venous insufficiency and therefore a surgically correctable condition. Perforating veins and their possible role in the aetiology of venous ulceration along with invasive and non-invasive methods for their detection is reviewed. Some of the conservative compression treatments and dressings available for the treatment of venous ulceration are discussed. It is concluded that adherence to sound surgical principles remains the mainstay of the successful management of patients with venous disease. PMID:2192676

  19. Deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Gargi; Roy, Subesha Basu; Haldar, Swaraj; Bhattacharya, Rabindra

    2010-12-01

    Occlusive clot formation in the veins causes venous thrombosis, the site most common in the deep veins of leg, called deep vein thrombosis. The clot can block blood flow and when it breaks off, called an embolism which in turn can damage the vital organs. Venous thrombosis occurs via three mechanisms ie, Virchow's triad. The mechanisms are decreased flow rate of blood, damage to the blood vessel wall and an increased tendency of the blood to clot. There are several factors which can increase a person's risk for deep vein thrombosis. The symptoms of deep vein thrombosis in the legs are pain, swelling and redness of the part. One variety of venous thrombosis is phlegmasia alba dolens where the leg becomes pale and cool. Investigations include Doppler ultrasound examination of the limb, D-dimer blood test, plethysmography of the legs, x-rays to show vein in the affected area (venography). Hospitalisation is necessary in some cases with some risk factors. The mainstream of treatment is with anticoagulants, mostly low molecular weight heparin for 6 months. Deep venous thrombosis is a rising problem. Early diagnosis and treatment is associated with a good prognosis.

  20. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  1. Ileofemoral venous thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Lindhagen, J; Haglund, M; Haglund, U; Holm, J; Scherstén, T

    1978-01-01

    Twentyeight patients with ileofemoral venous thrombosis were treated surgically. Five of the patients had moderate degree of venous congestion, 18 patients had phlegmasia alba dolens and five patients had phlegmasia coerulea dolens. The mean age was 54 years, range 15-80 years, and 15 were men and 13 were women. In all cases the thrombosis was verified by phlebography. Thrombectomy was performed with a Fogarty venous thrombectomy catheter. Peroperative phlebography was used in most cases to guarantee complete extraction of thrombotic material. No operative pulmonary embolism or mortality was encountered. Postoperative continuous heparin infusion in the thrombectomized segment was used for the first week followed by dicumarol treatment. The patients were followed from 6 months to 4 years postoperatively. In two patients thrombectomy was not possible to perform. One of these patients developed a pronounced postthrombotic syndrome, the other developed venous congestion of more moderate degree. Excellent long-term time results were obtained in 82% of the patients and satisfactory in 14%. Thrombectomy is an efficient treatment of ileofemoral venous thrombosis.

  2. [Neonatal cerebral venous thrombosis: diagnosis by magnetic resonance angiography].

    PubMed

    Puig, J; Pedraza, S; Méndez, J; Trujillo, A

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal cerebral venous thrombosis (NCVT) is a rare, severe neuropathology of multiple etiology and variable clinical presentation. We describe the case of a 25-day-old infant that presented with a tonic convulsion. Ultrasound examination showed tetraventricular hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed the presence of acute thrombosis of the deep and superficial venous systems associated to a hemorrhagic infarct of the left thalamus. Coagulation study revealed a deficit of protein C. Thrombosis of deep cerebral veins must be ruled out as a cause of a neonatal convulsive crisis. The presence of a hemorrhagic thalamic lesion supports the diagnosis of NCVT, which must in turn be confirmed by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA).

  3. Arterial and Venous Thrombosis in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blann, Andrew D.; Dunmore, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent ultimate cause of death is myocardial arrest. In many cases this is due to myocardial hypoxia, generally arising from failure of the coronary macro- and microcirculation to deliver enough oxygenated red cells to the cardiomyocytes. The principle reason for this is occlusive thrombosis, either by isolated circulating thrombi, or by rupture of upstream plaque. However, an additionally serious pathology causing potentially fatal stress to the heart is extra-cardiac disease, such as pulmonary hypertension. A primary cause of the latter is pulmonary embolus, considered to be a venous thromboembolism. Whilst the thrombotic scenario has for decades been the dominating paradigm in cardiovascular disease, these issues have, until recently, been infrequently considered in cancer. However, there is now a developing view that cancer is also a thrombotic disease, and notably a disease predominantly of the venous circulation, manifesting as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Indeed, for many, a venous thromboembolism is one of the first symptoms of a developing cancer. Furthermore, many of the standard chemotherapies in cancer are prothrombotic. Accordingly, thromboprophylaxis in cancer with heparins or oral anticoagulation (such as Warfarin), especially in high risk groups (such as those who are immobile and on high dose chemotherapy), may be an important therapy. The objective of this communication is to summarise current views on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of arterial and venous thrombosis in cancer. PMID:21403876

  4. [Prevention of venous thromboembolism in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Malý, R; Masopust, J; Konupcíková, K

    2006-03-01

    The hospitalized patients of the psychiatric wards represent a risk group for the development of venous thromboembolism. Apart from sedative administration, total movement reduction, bad life style and daily routine and increased body weight, there is negative impact of dehydration, prolonged hospitalization and sometimes immobilisation in consequence of mechanical restraints. A large amount of patients are treated with antipsychotics that have a series of adverse effects. Depending of the drug used, the most frequent of them are somnolence, fatigue, extrapyramidal syndrome, hypotension, hepatotoxicity, increased body weight, prolongation of the QT interval of the ECG with a risk of ventricular arrhythmias, hematopoietic disorders, lipid or glycide metabolism disorders or hyperprolactinemia. Another potential adverse effect of these drugs is the heightened risk of venous thromboembolism development (deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism). There is the risk of a pathological blood clotting event in psychiatric patients, especially those treated with antipsychotics. Although it is not high, it can have fatal consequences when combined with a relatively frequent pulmonary embolism and difficult diagnostics of thromboembolism. An algorithm for thromboembolism prevention has been developed. It involves important general risk factors of venous thrombosis (VTE history, immobilisation, malignancy, age over 75 years etc.) and also markers (physical restraints, dehydration, obesity, antipsychotics use) that can participate in the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis in the hospitalized psychiatric patients with limited motility. The authors believe that this prophylaxis is indicated, safe, effective and that it improves the quality of life at relatively low costs.

  5. Mesenteric venous thrombosis: clinical and therapeutical approach.

    PubMed

    Hotoleanu, C; Andercou, O; Andercou, A

    2008-12-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT), an unusual location of deep venous thrombosis, occurs especially on a predisposing terrain. Recently, hyperhomocysteinemia has been shown to be associated with venous thrombosis, often recurrent and located in an uncommon site. Hyperhomocysteinemia is mainly due to genetic causes (mutations 677C>T and 1298A>C of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) and vitamins B deficiencies. MVT may present as acute, subacute or chronic form. The clinical supposition of mesenteric thrombosis is based on the discrepancy between the abdominal pain and the physical examination. The nonspecific character of the pain, mimicking peptic ulceration in some cases, and the possibility of an initial normal clinical examination may delay the diagnosis. The occurrence of the fever, rebound tenderness and guarding suggests progression to bowel infarction. MVT leads to peritonitis in 1/3 to 2/3 of cases. Laboratory blood tests are not helpful in confirming the diagnosis of venous thrombosis. Leukocytosis and metabolic acidosis are considered to be the most specific laboratory findings in patients with mesenteric ischemia. Abdominal computed tomography is the test of choice for the diagnosis. However, most of the cases are diagnosed during laparotomy or autopsy. Anticoagulant therapy administrated early increases the survival rate. Surgery is indicated in cases with bowel infarction or peritonitis.

  6. Management of venous trauma.

    PubMed

    Rich, N M

    1988-08-01

    There has been considerable interest in the management of injured extremity veins since the American experience during the Vietnam War. Fortunately, there are an increasing number of reports from civilian experience in the United States that add valuable information. Although the controversy continues, it appears that there is merit in repair of many injured lower-extremity veins, particularly the popliteal vein when it is a single return conduit, assuming that the patient's general condition will permit, in an attempt to prevent acute venous hypertension initially and chronic venous hypertension subsequently. Figure 1 identifies the recovery potential that exists even if the initial venous repair fails. In contrast to thrombosis in the arterial system, recanalization is the rule in venous thrombosis. Patent valves can exist above and below the rather localized area of thrombosis. It appears that recanalization will prevent the problems of chronic venous insufficiency. It is obvious that many patients do well for years; however, the sequelae of acute venous hypertension may be more demonstrable after 10 or 15 years. There has not been similar evidence supporting a more aggressive approach in general in upper-extremity veins. However, it should be appreciated that a return pathway must remain patent, as noted in replantation of extremities. Obviously, there are differences in military and civilian wounds, with the former usually having more extensive soft-tissue destruction and obliteration of collateral veins and lymphatic channels. Unfortunately, many civilian gunshot wounds are being seen in the United States that are similar to the military type. We must not forget the lessons of the past, and we must continue to analyze our experience in the management of injured veins under a variety of conditions.

  7. Chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Wolinsky, Claire D; Waldorf, Heidi

    2009-11-01

    Identifying characteristic cutaneous findings is important in determining the appropriate management of certain venous diseases. The health care provider should be familiar with the classic description of patterns and distributions of skin manifestations, such as varicose veins, stasis dermatitis, palpable cord, petechiae, and telangiectasias. In addition to the gross appearance of the skin, a skin biopsy may help elucidate a diagnosis. General treatment and prevention of the underlying venous pathology is essential. Furthermore, specific management of skin findings should include therapy to ameliorate progression of disease and symptomatology when warranted.

  8. Intraoral venous malformation with phleboliths

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash S.; Dhillon, Manu; Gill, Navneet

    2011-01-01

    The most common type of vascular malformation is the venous malformation and these are occasionally associated with phleboliths. We report a case of a 45 year old woman with intraoral venous malformation with phleboliths. PMID:24151422

  9. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in HIV-infected patients: report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Mwita, Julius Chacha; Baliki, Kgomotso; Tema, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular disease; however Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) is rarely associated with HIV-related cerebrovascular events. We describe two cases of HIV-positive patients who, at the same time, presented to our hospital with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and stroke. PMID:24570775

  10. [Venous thrombosis of atypical location in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Campos Balea, Begoña; Sáenz de Miera Rodríguez, Andrea; Antolín Novoa, Silvia; Quindós Varela, María; Barón Duarte, Francisco; López López, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complication that frequently occurs in patients with neoplastic diseases. Several models have therefore been developed to identify patient subgroups diagnosed with cancer who are at increased risk of developing VTE. The most common forms of thromboembolic episodes are deep vein thrombosis in the lower limbs and pulmonary thromboembolism. However, venous thrombosis is also diagnosed in atypical locations. There are few revisions of unusual cases of venous thrombosis. In most cases, VTE occurs in the upper limbs and in the presence of central venous catheters, pacemakers and defibrillators. We present the case of a patient diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy who developed a thrombosis in the upper limbs (brachial and axillary).

  11. Successful Treatment of Dental Infection-Induced Chronic Cavernous Sinus Thrombophlebitis With Antibiotics and Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Zheng, Bo; Chen, Kangning; Gui, Li

    2015-08-01

    Two patients developed cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis from a tooth infection. A 36-year-old man experienced a severe headache with bilateral third and sixth cranial nerve palsies after extraction of his left upper third molar. Another 53-year-old diabetic man developed fever, headache, and bilateral complete ophthalmoplegia after a tooth infection. The brain magnetic resonance imaging scans of both patients showed bilateral cavernous sinus partial thrombosis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics plus low-molecular-weight heparin successfully resolved all symptoms. Both patients recovered fully without any recurrence at the 3-month follow-up visit.

  12. Successful Treatment of Dental Infection-Induced Chronic Cavernous Sinus Thrombophlebitis With Antibiotics and Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Zheng, Bo; Chen, Kangning; Gui, Li

    2015-08-01

    Two patients developed cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis from a tooth infection. A 36-year-old man experienced a severe headache with bilateral third and sixth cranial nerve palsies after extraction of his left upper third molar. Another 53-year-old diabetic man developed fever, headache, and bilateral complete ophthalmoplegia after a tooth infection. The brain magnetic resonance imaging scans of both patients showed bilateral cavernous sinus partial thrombosis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics plus low-molecular-weight heparin successfully resolved all symptoms. Both patients recovered fully without any recurrence at the 3-month follow-up visit. PMID:26173405

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis on the Right Side of the Neck with Internal Jugular Vein Thrombophlebitis and Septic Emboli: A Case of Lemierre’s-Like Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    NGUYEN, Dang; YAACOB, Yazmin; HAMID, Hamzaini; MUDA, Sobri

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre’s syndrome (LS) is a rare life-threatening infective condition typically starting with an oropharyngeal infection causing thrombophlebitis and metastatic abscesses. The most common aetiology of LS is Fusobacterium necrophorum; however, it can also occur after infection with other organisms. LS mainly affects young healthy adults. The initial infection site can be in the head and neck or in the abdomen. The morbidity rate of this disease is high despite aggressive treatments. In this article, we report a 63-year-old male patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, presenting with Klebsiella pneumoniae infection-induced necrotizing fasciitis on the right side of the neck, leading to LS. PMID:24643401

  14. Navigating venous access: a guide for hospitalists.

    PubMed

    Simonov, Michael; Pittiruti, Mauro; Rickard, Claire M; Chopra, Vineet

    2015-07-01

    Venous access is the foundation for safe and effective hospital-based care. Inpatient providers must have a deep knowledge of the different types of venous access devices (VADs), their relative indications, contraindications, and appropriateness. However, such knowledge is difficult to come by and usually only gleaned through years of clinical experience. To bridge this gap, we provide an in-depth summary of the relevant anatomical considerations, physical characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of VADs commonly used in the hospital setting. In doing so, we seek to improve the safety and share the science of vascular access with frontline clinicians. To aid decision-making, we conclude by operationalizing the available data through algorithms that outline appropriate vascular access for the hospitalized patient. PMID:25755150

  15. Mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Singal, Ashwani K; Kamath, Patrick S; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of mesenteric venous thrombosis has increased over the past 2 decades with the routine use of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in patients presenting with abdominal pain and those with portal hypertension. Concurrent with increasing recognition, routine and frequent use of anticoagulation has reduced the need for surgical intervention and improved outcome in these patients. Acute thrombosis often presents with abdominal pain, whereas chronic disease manifests either as an incidental finding on CT or with features of portal hypertension. Contrast-enhanced CT diagnoses about 90% of cases. The presence of collateral circulation and cavernoma around a chronically thrombosed vein differentiates chronic from acute disease. The superior mesenteric vein is often involved, whereas involvement of the inferior mesenteric vein is rare. Associated portal venous thrombosis can be seen if the disease originates in the major veins instead of the small vena rectae. Thrombophilia and local abdominal inflammatory conditions are common causes. Management is aimed at preventing bowel infarction and recurrent thrombosis. Anticoagulation, the mainstay of management, has also been safely used in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. This review discusses the pathogenesis of thrombosis of mesenteric veins, the diagnosis and differentiation from arterial ischemia, the emergence of the JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) sequence variation as a marker of thrombophilia and myelodysplastic neoplasms, and new anticoagulants. Algorithms for the management of acute and chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis are provided to help readers understand and remember the approach to the management of acute and chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis.

  16. Venous thrombosis - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Venous thrombosis can cause swelling and pain of the leg in which it forms. Large clots can also break free and travel to the heart and lungs, where they can cause cardiac arrest and sometimes death. This is called pulmonary embolism.

  17. Protected Iliofemoral Venous Thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Eugenio; Civeli, Letizia; Benvenuti, Antonio; Toscano, Thomas; Miraldi, Fabio; Capannini, Gianni; Muzzi, Luigi; Sassi, Carlo

    2002-01-01

    Although thromboembolism is uncommon during pregnancy and the postpartum period, physicians should be alert to the possibility because the complications, such as pulmonary embolism, are often life threatening. Pregnant women who present with thromboembolic occlusion are particularly difficult to treat because thrombolysis is hazardous to the fetus and surgical intervention by any of several approaches is controversial. A 22-year-old woman, in her 11th week of gestation, experienced an episode of pulmonary embolism and severe ischemic venous thrombosis of the left lower extremity. The cause was determined to be a severe protein S deficiency in combination with compression of the left iliac vein by the enlarged uterus. The patient underwent emergency insertion of a retrievable vena cava filter and surgical iliofemoral venous thrombectomy with concomitant creation of a temporary femoral arteriovenous fistula. The inferior vena cava filter was inserted before the venous thrombectomy to prevent pulmonary embolism from clots dislodged during thrombectomy. When the filter was removed, medium-sized clots were found trapped in its coils, indicating the effectiveness of this approach. The operation resolved the severe ischemic venous thrombosis of the left leg, and the patency of the iliac vein was maintained throughout the pregnancy without embolic recurrence. At full term, the woman spontaneously delivered an 8-lb, 6-oz, healthy male infant. (Tex Heart Inst J 2002;29:130–2) PMID:12075871

  18. Absence of venous valves in mice lacking Connexin37.

    PubMed

    Munger, Stephanie J; Kanady, John D; Simon, Alexander M

    2013-01-15

    Venous valves play a crucial role in blood circulation, promoting the one-way movement of blood from superficial and deep veins towards the heart. By preventing retrograde flow, venous valves spare capillaries and venules from being subjected to damaging elevations in pressure, especially during skeletal muscle contraction. Pathologically, valvular incompetence or absence of valves are common features of venous disorders such as chronic venous insufficiency and varicose veins. The underlying causes of these conditions are not well understood, but congenital venous valve aplasia or agenesis may play a role in some cases. Despite progress in the study of cardiac and lymphatic valve morphogenesis, the molecular mechanisms controlling the development and maintenance of venous valves remain poorly understood. Here, we show that in valved veins of the mouse, three gap junction proteins (Connexins, Cxs), Cx37, Cx43, and Cx47, are expressed exclusively in the valves in a highly polarized fashion, with Cx43 on the upstream side of the valve leaflet and Cx37 on the downstream side. Surprisingly, Cx43 expression is strongly induced in the non-valve venous endothelium in superficial veins following wounding of the overlying skin. Moreover, we show that in Cx37-deficient mice, venous valves are entirely absent. Thus, Cx37, a protein involved in cell-cell communication, is one of only a few proteins identified so far as critical for the development or maintenance of venous valves. Because Cxs are necessary for the development of valves in lymphatic vessels as well, our results support the notion of common molecular pathways controlling valve development in veins and lymphatic vessels.

  19. Discrepant ratios of arterial versus venous thrombosis in hemophilia A as compared with hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Antonio; Bertozzi, Irene; de Marinis, Giulia Berti; Tasinato, Valentina; Sambado, Luisa

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of thrombosis in patients with congenital bleeding disorders represents an exceptional event. Hemophilia A and hemophilia B patients have been showed to present both arterial and venous thrombosis (85 cases of arterial thrombosis and 34 cases of venous thrombosis). The great majority of arterial thrombosis are myocardial infarction or other acute coronary syndromes, whereas the majority of venous thrombosis are deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolisms. However there are discrepancies in the proportion of arterial and venous thrombosis seen in hemophilia A versus hemophilia B. The ratio of arterial versus venous thrombosis in hemophilia A is 3.72 whereas that for hemophilia B is 1.12. This indicates that arterial thrombosis is more frequent in hemophilia A as compared to hemophilia B and the opposite is true for venous thrombosis. The potential significance of this discrepancy is discussed.

  20. [Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Otero Candelera, Remedios; Grau Segura, Enric; Jiménez Castro, David; Uresandi Romero, Fernando; López Villalobos, José Luis; Calderón Sandubete, Enrique; Medrano Ortega, Francisco Javier; Cayuela Domínguez, Aurelio

    2008-03-01

    The recommendations on venous thromboprophylaxis have been updated on the basis of current evidence reviewed by a multidisciplinary team. The problem has been approached with regard to its relevance in both surgical and nonsurgical patients. It should be noted that these recommendations were drawn up for use in Spain and, therefore, should be implemented with the drugs and therapeutic practices authorized and generally accepted in this country.

  1. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate). This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE. PMID:27581829

  2. Doppler ultrasound study and venous mapping in chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    García Carriazo, M; Gómez de las Heras, C; Mármol Vázquez, P; Ramos Solís, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is very prevalent. In recent decades, Doppler ultrasound has become the method of choice to study this condition, and it is considered essential when surgery is indicated. This article aims to establish a method for the examination, including venous mapping and preoperative marking. To this end, we review the venous anatomy of the lower limbs and the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency and explain the basic hemodynamic concepts and the terminology required to elaborate a radiological report that will enable appropriate treatment planning and communication with other specialists. We briefly explain the CHIVA (the acronym for the French term "cure conservatrice et hémodynamique de l'insuffisance veineuse en ambulatoire"=conservative hemodynamic treatment for chronic venous insufficiency) strategy, a minimally invasive surgical strategy that aims to restore correct venous hemodynamics without resecting the saphenous vein.

  3. Insights from venous oxygen profiles: oxygen utilization and management in diving California sea lions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Birgitte I; Ponganis, Paul J

    2013-09-01

    The management and depletion of O2 stores underlie the aerobic dive capacities of marine mammals. The California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) presumably optimizes O2 store management during all dives, but approaches its physiological limits during deep dives to greater than 300 m depth. Blood O2 comprises the largest component of total body O2 stores in adult sea lions. Therefore, we investigated venous blood O2 depletion during dives of California sea lions during maternal foraging trips to sea by: (1) recording venous partial pressure of O2 (P(O2)) profiles during dives, (2) characterizing the O2-hemoglobin (Hb) dissociation curve of sea lion Hb and (3) converting the P(O2) profiles into percent Hb saturation (S(O2)) profiles using the dissociation curve. The O2-Hb dissociation curve was typical of other pinnipeds (P50=28±2 mmHg at pH 7.4). In 43% of dives, initial venous S(O2) values were greater than 78% (estimated resting venous S(O2)), indicative of arterialization of venous blood. Blood O2 was far from depleted during routine shallow dives, with minimum venous S(O2) values routinely greater than 50%. However, in deep dives greater than 4 min in duration, venous S(O2) reached minimum values below 5% prior to the end of the dive, but then increased during the last 30-60 s of ascent. These deep dive profiles were consistent with transient venous blood O2 depletion followed by partial restoration of venous O2 through pulmonary gas exchange and peripheral blood flow during ascent. These differences in venous O2 profiles between shallow and deep dives of sea lions reflect distinct strategies of O2 store management and suggest that underlying cardiovascular responses will also differ.

  4. [Management of venous thromboembolism: A 2015 update].

    PubMed

    Galanaud, J-P; Messas, E; Blanchet-Deverly, A; Quéré, I; Wahl, D; Pernod, G

    2015-11-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) constitute venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). Venous thromboembolic disease is a common, serious, and multifactorial disease, the incidence of which increases with age. Risk factors, whether transient (surgery, plaster immobilization, bed rest/hospitalization) or chronic/persistent (age, cancer, clinical or biological thrombophilia, etc.), modulate the duration of treatment. In the absence of pathognomonic clinical sign or symptom, diagnostic management relies in the evaluation of the clinical pre-test probability followed by a laboratory or an imaging testing. So far, compression ultrasound and multidetector computed tomography angiography are the best diagnostic tests to make a positive diagnosis of DVT or PE, respectively. Anticoagulants at therapeutic dose for at least 3months constitute the cornerstone of VTE management. Availability of new direct oral anticoagulants, which have recently been shown to be as effective and as safe as vitamin K antagonist in clinical trials, should facilitate ambulatory management of VTE and favour extended treatments for individuals with unprovoked VTE or VTE provoked by a chronic/persistent risk factor.

  5. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease: the UIP consensus according to scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung B; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth; Meissner, Mark; Kalodiki, Evi; Allegra, Claudio; Antignani, Pier L; Bækgaard, Niels; Beach, Kirk; Belcaro, Giovanni; Black, Stephen; Blomgren, Lena; Bouskela, Eliete; Cappelli, Massimo; Caprini, Joseph; Carpentier, Patrick; Cavezzi, Attilio; Chastanet, Sylvain; Christenson, Jan T; Christopoulos, Demetris; Clarke, Heather; Davies, Alun; Demaeseneer, Marianne; Eklöf, Bo; Ermini, Stefano; Fernández, Fidel; Franceschi, Claude; Gasparis, Antonios; Geroulakos, George; Sergio, Gianesini; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Gloviczki, Peter; Huang, Ying; Ibegbuna, Veronica; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kistner, Robert; Kölbel, Tilo; Kurstjens, Ralph L; Labropoulos, Nicos; Laredo, James; Lattimer, Christopher R; Lugli, Marzia; Lurie, Fedor; Maleti, Oscar; Markovic, Jovan; Mendoza, Erika; Monedero, Javier L; Moneta, Gregory; Moore, Hayley; Morrison, Nick; Mosti, Giovanni; Nelzén, Olle; Obermayer, Alfred; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Parsi, Kurosh; Partsch, Hugo; Passariello, Fausto; Perrin, Michel L; Pittaluga, Paul; Raju, Seshadri; Ricci, Stefano; Rosales, Antonio; Scuderi, Angelo; Slagsvold, Carl E; Thurin, Anders; Urbanek, Tomasz; M VAN Rij, Andre; Vasquez, Michael; Wittens, Cees H; Zamboni, Paolo; Zimmet, Steven; Ezpeleta, Santiago Z

    2016-06-01

    There are excellent guidelines for clinicians to manage venous diseases but few reviews to assess their hemodynamic background. Hemodynamic concepts that evolved in the past have largely remained unchallenged in recent decades, perhaps due to their often complicated nature and in part due to emergence of new diagnostic techniques. Duplex ultrasound scanning and other imaging techniques which evolved in the latter part of the 20th century have dominated investigation. They have greatly improved our understanding of the anatomical patterns of venous reflux and obstruction. However, they do not provide the physiological basis for understanding the hemodynamics of flow, pressure, compliance and resistance. Hemodynamic investigations appear to provide a better correlation with post-treatment clinical outcome and quality of life than ultrasound findings. There is a far better prospect for understanding the complete picture of the patient's disability and response to management by combining ultrasound with hemodynamic studies. Accordingly, at the instigation of Dr Angelo Scuderi, the Union Internationale de Phlebologie (UIP) executive board commissioned a large number of experts to assess all aspects of management for venous disease by evidence-based principles. These included experts from various member societies including the European Venous Forum (EVF), American Venous Forum (AVF), American College of Phlebology (ACP) and Cardiovascular Disease Educational and Research Trust (CDERT). Their aim was to confirm or dispel long-held hemodynamic principles and to provide a comprehensive review of venous hemodynamic concepts underlying the pathophysiology of lower limb venous disorders, their usefulness for investigating patients and the relevant hemodynamic changes associated with various forms of treatment. Chapter 1 is devoted to basic hemodynamic concepts and normal venous physiology. Chapter 2 presents the mechanism and magnitude of hemodynamic changes in acute deep vein

  6. Venous thromboembolic events in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Pedro T; Nick, Alpa M; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M

    2013-01-01

    The rate of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism among women undergoing gynecologic surgery is high, particularly for women with a gynecologic malignancy. Current guidelines recommend VTE thrombopropylaxis in the immediate postoperative period for patients undergoing open surgery. However, the VTE prophylaxis recommendations for women undergoing minimally invasive gynecologic surgery are not as well established. The risk of VTEs in patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery appears to be low based on retrospective analyses. To date, there are no established guidelines that specifically provide a standard of care for patients undergoing minimally invasive gynecologic surgery for benign or malignant disease.

  7. Massive superior mesenteric venous aneurysm with portal venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Starikov, Anna; Bartolotta, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    Portal venous aneurysm is a rare and sometimes dangerous vascular pathology, which can result in thrombosis or rupture. We present the computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and sonographic imaging of a 27-year-old man with superior mesenteric venous aneurysm and subsequent thrombosis following acute pancreatitis. This multimodality imaging approach can prove useful in the evaluation of these rare aneurysms.

  8. [Travel and venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Hallundbæk Mikkelsen, Kristian; Knudsen, Stine Ulrik; Nannestad Jørgensen, Lars

    2013-10-28

    A literature study on the association between travel and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is conducted. Studies examining the risk of travel-associated VTE, predisposing factors and prophylactic measures are presented. It is concluded that the absolute risk of travel-associated VTE is low and holds a 2-4 fold increase after travel. The risk increases with duration, presence of other risk factors for VTE and extremes of height. Stockings reduces the risk of asymptomatic VTE. Heparin is presumed to constitute protection whereas there is no evidence of a prophylactic effect of acetylsalicylic acid.

  9. Radionuclide plethysmography and Tc-99m red blood cell venography in venous thrombosis: comparison with contrast venography

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, I.; Royal, H.D.; Uren, R.F.; Waugh, R.C.; McLaughlin, A.F.; Bautovich, G.J.; Dyer, I.A.; Fulton, R.R.; Morris, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide plethysmography (RPG) is a new technique that uses Tc-99m labelled red blood cells to ascertain changes in venous volumes by detecting the change in counts in response to the inflation and deflation of proximal thigh cuffs. Diagnosis of ileofemoral venous occlusion is possible using this technique, which also provides kinetic data of venous outflow. A range of normal values was defined in 19 subjects for per cent change in venous capacitance and venous outflow. Twenty-one patients with suspected deep venous thrombosis were studied prospectively using RPG, radionuclide venography (RV), and contrast venography (CV) to establish the usefulness of RPG alone and in combination with RV in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. RPG proved to be a reliable technique for the diagnosis of ileofemoral venous thrombosis (sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 100%). RV was less sensitive (73%) and less specific (93%) in diagnosing that condition. When RPG is used as the criterion for the detection of ileofemoral vein thrombosis and RV is used as the criterion for the detection of calf vein thrombosis, the combined techniques show improved sensitivity (92%) and specificity (93%) for the detection of all deep venous thromboses.

  10. Peripheral venous contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Seward, J B; Tajik, A J; Hagler, D J; Ritter, D G

    1977-02-01

    Contrast echocardiography is the technique of injecting various echo-producing agents into the bloodstream and, with standard echocardiographic techniques, observing the blood flow patterns as revealed by the resulting cloud of echoes. These techniques have only recently been utilized to evaluate various cardiac defects. Two physical properties of these agents characterize their usefulness: (1) clouds of echoes can be observed downstream as well as at the injection site, and (2) the echo-producing quality of these agents is completely lost with a single transit through either the pulmonary or the systemic capillary bed. Thus, detection of resultant echoes in both the venous and the arterial blood pool is indicative of abnormal shunting. In 60 patients with a spectrum of cardiac defects and a wide range in age of presentation, studies were made of (1) the feasibility of performing contrast echocardiography with superficial peripheral venous injections, and (2) the clinical usefulness of this relatively noninvasive technique in detecting and localizing intracardiac right ot left shunting. Most superficial peripheral veins could be utilized, and the resultant contrast echograms were reproducible and similar in quality to those obtained more central (caval) injections. Right to left shunts could be localized in the atrial, ventricular or intrapulmonary level. Characteristic flow patterns were also recognized for tricuspid atresia and common ventricle.

  11. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  12. Pathophysiology of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D; Mannello, F

    2014-06-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a debilitating condition with a prevalence between 60-70%. The disease pathophysiology is complex and involves genetic susceptibility and environmental factors, with individuals developing visible telengiectasias, reticular veins, and varicose veins. Patient with significant lower extremity symptoms have pain, dermal irritation, swelling, skin changes, and are at risk of developing debilitating venous ulceration. The signature of CVD is an increase in venous pressure referred to as venous hypertension. The various symptoms presenting in CVD and the clinical signs that are observed indicate that there is inflammation, secondary to venous hypertension, and it leads to a number of inflammatory pathways that become activated. The endothelium and glycocalyx via specialized receptors are critical at sensing changes in shear stress, and expression of adhesion molecules allows the activation of leukocytes leading to endothelial attachment, diapedisis, and transmigration into the venous wall/valves resulting in venous wall injury and inflammatory cells in the interstitial tissues. There is a complex of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteases and proteinases, produced by activated leukocytes, that are expressed and unbalanced resulting in an environment of persistent inflammation with the clinical changes that are commonly seen, consisting of varicose veins to more advanced presentations of skin changes and venous ulceration. The structural integrity of protein and the extracellular matrix is altered, enhancing the progressive events of CVD. Work focusing on metabolic changes, miRNA regulation, inflammatory modulation and the glycocalyx will further our knowledge in the pathophysiology of CVD, and provide answers critical to treatment and prevention.

  13. Calf pump activity influencing venous hemodynamics in the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Recek, Cestmir

    2013-03-01

    Calf muscle pump is the motive force enhancing return of venous blood from the lower extremity to the heart. It causes displacement of venous blood in both vertical and horizontal directions, generates ambulatory pressure gradient between thigh and lower leg veins, and bidirectional streaming within calf perforators. Ambulatory pressure gradient triggers venous reflux in incompetent veins, which induces ambulatory venous hypertension in the lower leg and foot. Bidirectional flow in calf perforators enables quick pressure equalization between deep and superficial veins of the lower leg; the outward (into the superficial veins) oriented component of the bidirectional flow taking place during calf muscle contraction is no pathological reflux but a physiological centripetal flow streaming via great saphenous vein into the femoral vein. Calf perforators are communicating channels between both systems making them conjoined vessels; they are not involved in the generation of pathological hemodynamic situations, nor do they cause ambulatory venous hypertension. The real cause why recurrences develop has not as yet been cleared. Pressure gradient arising during calf pump activity between the femoral vein and the saphenous remnant after abolition of saphenous reflux triggers biophysical and biochemical events, which might induce recurrence. Thus, abolition of saphenous reflux removes the hemodynamic disturbance, but at the same time it generates precondition for reflux recurrence and for the comeback of the previous pathological situation; this chain of events has been called hemodynamic paradox. PMID:24436580

  14. Venous Thromboembolism in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, ZJ; Costa, KA; Novelli, EM; Smith, RE

    2014-01-01

    The cirrhosis population represents a unique subset of patients who are at risk for both bleeding and developing venous thrombotic embolic events (VTE). It has been commonly misunderstood that these patients are naturally protected from thrombosis by deficiencies in coagulation factors. As a result, the cirrhosis population is often falsely perceived to be ‘autoanticoagulated’. However, the concept of ‘autoanticoagulation’ conferring protection from thrombosis is a misnomer. While patients with cirrhosis may have a bleeding predisposition, not uncommonly they also experience thrombotic events. The concern for this increased bleeding risk often makes anticoagulation a difficult choice. Prophylactic and therapeutic management of VTE in patients with cirrhosis is a difficult clinical problem with the lack of clear established guidelines. The elucidation of laboratory and/or clinical predictors of VTE will be useful in this setting. This review serves to examine VTE, and the use of anticoagulation in the cirrhosis population. PMID:23076776

  15. Hyperhomocysteinaemia and chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Stefano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Longo, Paola; Buffone, Gianluca; Molinari, Vincenzo; Stillitano, Domenico M; Gallelli, Luca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic venous ulceration (CVU) is the major cause of chronic wounds of lower extremities, and is a part of the complex of chronic venous disease. Previous studies have hypothesised that several thrombophilic factors, such as hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), may be associated with chronic venous ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of HHcy in patients with venous leg ulcers and the effect of folic acid therapy on wound healing. Eighty-seven patients with venous leg ulcers were enrolled in this study to calculate the prevalence of HHcy in this population. All patients underwent basic treatment for venous ulcer (compression therapy ± surgical procedures). Patients with HHcy (group A) received basic treatment and administered folic acid (1·2 mg/day for 12 months) and patients without HHcy (group B) received only basic treatment. Healing was assessed by means of computerised planimetry analysis. The prevalence of HHcy among patients with chronic venous ulcer enrolled in this study was 62·06%. Healing rate was significantly higher (P < 0·05) in group A patients (78·75%) compared with group B patients (63·33%). This study suggests a close association, statistically significant, between HHcy and CVU. Homocysteine-lowering therapy with folic acid seems to expedite wound healing. Despite these aspects, the exact molecular mechanisms between homocysteine and CVU have not been clearly defined and further studies are needed.

  16. Palmar arch reconstruction using dorsal venous arch of foot for revascularisation of multiple digits

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, K. S.; Petkar, Kiran; Lateef, Sameer; Rasalkar, Jyoti; Arun, T. J.; Suresh, V.

    2014-01-01

    A case of trauma causing total loss of superficial and deep palmar arches of hand with ischemia of all the digits was managed using dorsal venous arch of the foot to reconstruct the palmar arch. The ends of the venous arch were anastomosed to radial and ulnar arteries and the tributaries to the arch were coapted to the cut ends of the common digital vessels and princeps pollicis. The surgery yielded gratifying results, successfully revascularising all the digits. PMID:24987216

  17. Inflammation in chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D

    2013-03-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVUs) occur in approximately 1% of the general population. Risk factors for chronic venous disease (CVD) include heredity, age, female sex and obesity. Although not restricted to the elderly, the prevalence of CVD, especially leg ulcers, increases with age. CVD has a considerable impact on health-care resources. It has been estimated that venous ulcers cause the loss of approximately two million working days and incur treatment costs of approximately $3 billion per year in the USA. Overall, CVD has been estimated to account for 1-3% of the total health-care budgets in countries with developed health-care systems. The pathophysiology of dermal abnormalities in CVU is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation, resulting in altered cellular function and delayed wound healing.

  18. Venous Thromboembolism and Marathon Athletes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Venous Thromboembolism and Marathon Athletes Claire M. Hull and Julia A. Harris ... general adult population are indisputable. However, for the marathon athlete who trains intensively and for long periods ...

  19. Understanding Guyton's venous return curves

    PubMed Central

    Feigl, Eric O.

    2011-01-01

    Based on observations that as cardiac output (as determined by an artificial pump) was experimentally increased the right atrial pressure decreased, Arthur Guyton and coworkers proposed an interpretation that right atrial pressure represents a back pressure restricting venous return (equal to cardiac output in steady state). The idea that right atrial pressure is a back pressure limiting cardiac output and the associated idea that “venous recoil” does work to produce flow have confused physiologists and clinicians for decades because Guyton's interpretation interchanges independent and dependent variables. Here Guyton's model and data are reanalyzed to clarify the role of arterial and right atrial pressures and cardiac output and to clearly delineate that cardiac output is the independent (causal) variable in the experiments. Guyton's original mathematical model is used with his data to show that a simultaneous increase in arterial pressure and decrease in right atrial pressure with increasing cardiac output is due to a blood volume shift into the systemic arterial circulation from the systemic venous circulation. This is because Guyton's model assumes a constant blood volume in the systemic circulation. The increase in right atrial pressure observed when cardiac output decreases in a closed circulation with constant resistance and capacitance is due to the redistribution of blood volume and not because right atrial pressure limits venous return. Because Guyton's venous return curves have generated much confusion and little clarity, we suggest that the concept and previous interpretations of venous return be removed from educational materials. PMID:21666119

  20. Systemic venous drainage: can we help Newton?

    PubMed

    Corno, Antonio F

    2007-06-01

    In recent years substantial progress occurred in the techniques of cardiopulmonary bypass, but the factor potentially limiting the flexibility of cardiopulmonary bypass remains the drainage of the systemic venous return. In the daily clinical practice of cardiac surgery, the amount of systemic venous return on cardiopulmonary bypass is directly correlated with the amount of the pump flow. As a consequence, the pump flow is limited by the amount of venous return that the pump is receiving. On cardiopulmonary bypass the amount of venous drainage depends upon the central venous pressure, the height differential between patient and inlet of the venous line into the venous reservoir, and the resistance in the venous cannula(s) and circuit. The factors determining the venous return to be taken into consideration in cardiac surgery are the following: (a) characteristics of the individual patient; (b) type of planned surgical procedure; (c) type of venous cannula(s); (d) type of circuit for cardiopulmonary bypass; (e) strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass; (f) use of accessory mechanical systems to increased the systemic venous return. The careful pre-operative evaluation of all the elements affecting the systemic venous drainage, including the characteristics of the individual patient and the type of required surgical procedure, the choice of the best strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass, and the use of the most advanced materials and tools, can provide a systemic venous drainage substantially better than what it would be allowed by the simple "Law of universal gravitation" by Isaac Newton.

  1. Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation frequency and antithrombin activity levels in 120 of deep venous thrombosis and 150 of cerebral infarction patients in a single center in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-sen; Tang, Yang-ming; Tang, Mei-qing; Qing, Zi-Ju; Shu, Chang; Tang, Xiang-qi; Deng, Ming-yang; Tan, Li-ming

    2010-09-01

    Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation shows a relatively high frequency in western population. Some studies suggest that the mutation is an independent genetic risk factor both for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and for arterial thrombosis, but whether the mutation has racial difference or has a general significance for thrombophilia remains unclear. In this study we performed an analysis of the prevalence of the mutation in Chinese southern population; Also, the antithrombin activity levels were evaluated in each investigated individual. The studies included 120 patients with DVT, 150 patients with cerebral infarction, and 110 controls. The mutation was detected using polymerase chain reaction/PvuII restrictive fragment length polymorphism procedures. Antithrombin activity assay was done using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that no antithrombin Cambridge II mutation was detected in all three groups (DVT, cerebral infarction and controls), the incidence was 0/380. Plasma antithrombin activity was 91.37% +/- 16.15% in the DVT patients and 102.68% +/- 13.10% in the controls; the antithrombin activity was significantly reduced in the DVT group (P < 0.0001). In DVT patients, eight cases were identified as primary antithrombin deficiency, accounting for an incidence of 6.7%. No significant difference was found for antithrombin activity between cerebral infarction group and controls. These results suggest that antithrombin Cambridge II mutation has a racial difference, and may not be a valuable risk factor of thrombophilia in Asian population, and antithrombin deficiency remains a major genetic risk factor for DVT patients in China.

  2. Pharmacological prophylaxis of venous thrombo-embolism.

    PubMed

    Flute, P T

    1976-02-01

    The pathogenesis of venous thrombosis is briefly discussed as a basis for the understanding of preventive measures used in this condition. Prophylaxis in venous thrombosis is then reviewed with emphasis on pharmacological treatment, and more particularly on heparin.

  3. Chronic venous disease in an ethnically diverse population: the San Diego Population Study.

    PubMed

    Criqui, Michael H; Jamosmos, Maritess; Fronek, Arnost; Denenberg, Julie O; Langer, Robert D; Bergan, John; Golomb, Beatrice A

    2003-09-01

    In a 1994-1998 cross-sectional study of a multiethnic sample of 2,211 men and women in San Diego, California, the authors estimated prevalence of the major manifestations of chronic venous disease: spider veins, varicose veins, trophic changes, and edema by visual inspection; superficial and deep functional disease (reflux or obstruction) by duplex ultrasonography; and venous thrombotic events based on history. Venous disease increased with age, and, compared with Hispanics, African Americans, and Asians, non-Hispanic Whites had more disease. Spider veins, varicose veins, superficial functional disease, and superficial thrombotic events were more common in women than men (odds ratio (OR) = 5.4, OR = 2.2, OR = 1.9, and OR = 1.9, respectively; p < 0.05), but trophic changes and deep functional disease were less common in women (OR = 0.7 for both; p < 0.05). Visible (varicose veins or trophic changes) and functional (superficial or deep) disease were closely linked; 92.0% of legs were concordant and 8.0% discordant. For legs evidencing both trophic changes and deep functional disease, the age-adjusted prevalences of edema, superficial events, and deep events were 48.2%, 11.3%, and 24.6%, respectively, compared with 1.7%, 0.6%, and 1.3% for legs visibly and functionally normal. However, visible disease did not invariably predict functional disease, or vice versa, and venous thrombotic events occurred in the absence of either.

  4. [Automatic regulator of venous pressure and venous outflow in the perfusion system].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, L M; Levinskiĭ, M M; Kharnas, S Sh; Cherniak, V A

    1976-01-01

    A scheme for automatic regulation of the venous pressure and venous blood outflow during extracorporeal circulation is proposed. The system consists of a photoelectric sensor placed on a tube led out of the major venous trunkline, a converter and an electromechanical eccentric clamp that compresses the venous trunkline, all of which secures stabilization of the controlled values.

  5. Unusual Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Patient with Ulcerative Colitis in Remission.

    PubMed

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Dalai, Siba Prasad; Panda, Sameer; Hui, Pankaj Kumar; Nayak, Sachidananda

    2016-05-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis along with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and arterial thrombosis have occasionally been reported as a complication in the active phase of UC being attributed to its pro-thrombotic state. This paper depicts a 38-year-old female with a history of UC in remission who developed sudden onset headache, blurring of vision and seizures. Subsequent diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis was made with MRI venography and treated with low molecular weight heparin with complete resolution of symptoms. The highlights of this case underscore the importance of evaluating cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as a cause of acute onset neurological deterioration in a setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It also emphasizes on the hypothesis that the risk of venous thrombosis or other hypercoagulable states have no direct relationship with the disease activity or flare-up. PMID:27437291

  6. Unusual Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Patient with Ulcerative Colitis in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Panda, Sameer; Hui, Pankaj Kumar; Nayak, Sachidananda

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis along with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and arterial thrombosis have occasionally been reported as a complication in the active phase of UC being attributed to its pro-thrombotic state. This paper depicts a 38-year-old female with a history of UC in remission who developed sudden onset headache, blurring of vision and seizures. Subsequent diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis was made with MRI venography and treated with low molecular weight heparin with complete resolution of symptoms. The highlights of this case underscore the importance of evaluating cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as a cause of acute onset neurological deterioration in a setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It also emphasizes on the hypothesis that the risk of venous thrombosis or other hypercoagulable states have no direct relationship with the disease activity or flare-up. PMID:27437291

  7. Treatment of Pelvic Venous Spur (May-Thurner Syndrome) with Self-Expanding Metallic Endoprostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Schoch, Eric; Stuckmann, Gerd; Largiader, Jon; Wigger, Pius; Schoepke, Wolfdietrich; Zollikofer, Christoph L.

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: The application of self-expanding metallic endoprostheses (stents) to treat symptomatic pelvic venous spurs as an alternative to surgery. Methods: Wallstents with a diameter from 14 to 16 mm and one Cragg stent were placed in the left common iliac vein of eight patients (seven women, one man; mean age 42 years) with a symptomatic pelvic venous spur (left deep venous thrombosis or post-thrombotic leg swelling). Four patients had surgical thrombectomy prior to stent placement. Results: Technical success with immediate reduction of left leg circumference was achieved in all eight patients. A primary patency rate of 100% was observed during an average follow-up of 3 years (range 10-121 months). There were no procedural or stent-related complications. Conclusion: The percutaneous transfemoral placement of self-expanding metallic stents is an effective minimally invasive alternative to surgery in the treatment of symptomatic pelvic venous spur.

  8. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Plastic Surgery: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Sergio; Valdes, Jorge; Salama, Moises

    2016-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major health concern because it increases morbidity and mortality after a surgical procedure. A number of well-defined, evidence-based guidelines are available delineating suitable use of prophylaxis to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Despite the available literature, there are clear gaps between recommendations and clinical practice, affecting the incidence of VTE. Plastic surgeons underuse the substantiated literature and risk stratification tools that are available to decrease the incidence of VTE in the office-based surgical setting because of fear of bleeding or hematoma complications postoperatively. Venous thromboembolism creates an economic burden on both the patient and the healthcare system. The intent of this literature review is to determine existing VTE risk using assessment models available to aid in the implementation of protocols for VTE prevention, specifically for high-risk cosmetic surgical patients in office-based settings.

  9. Venous Thromboembolism – Current Diagnostic and Treatment Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Bosevski, Marijan; Srbinovska-Kostovska, Elizabeta

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis, known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), are associated with a high proportion of morbidity and mortality. AIM: Aim of this review is to emphasise current diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for VTE. RESULTS: No differences have been noticed in European and American guidelines in diagnostic approach of this disorder. Today there is enough clinical information for the use of heparin (either, unfractionated or low molecular) and vitamin K antagonists in the treatment of acute and chronic phases of VTE. Novel oral anticoagulants seem to have some advantages in the treatment of this disorder. Rivaroxaban has been approved widespread, for use as a single-drug approach of VTE. CONCLUSION: Both guidelines are almost similar and good basis for evidence-based treatment of this disorder. PMID:27703586

  10. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Plastic Surgery: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Sergio; Valdes, Jorge; Salama, Moises

    2016-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major health concern because it increases morbidity and mortality after a surgical procedure. A number of well-defined, evidence-based guidelines are available delineating suitable use of prophylaxis to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Despite the available literature, there are clear gaps between recommendations and clinical practice, affecting the incidence of VTE. Plastic surgeons underuse the substantiated literature and risk stratification tools that are available to decrease the incidence of VTE in the office-based surgical setting because of fear of bleeding or hematoma complications postoperatively. Venous thromboembolism creates an economic burden on both the patient and the healthcare system. The intent of this literature review is to determine existing VTE risk using assessment models available to aid in the implementation of protocols for VTE prevention, specifically for high-risk cosmetic surgical patients in office-based settings. PMID:27501651

  11. Air travel and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Shanthi; Yach, Derek; Alwan, Ala

    2002-01-01

    There has recently been increased publicity on the risk of venous thrombosis after long-haul flights. This paper reviews the evidence base related to the association between air travel and venous thromboembolism. The evidence consists only of case reports, clinical case-control studies and observational studies involving the use of intermediate end-points, or expert opinion. Some studies have suggested that there is no clear association, whereas others have indicated a strong relationship. On the whole it appears that there is probably a link between air travel and venous thrombosis. However, the link is likely to be weak, mainly affecting passengers with additional risk factors for venous thromboembolism. The available evidence is not adequate to allow quantification of the risk. There are insufficient scientific data on which to base specific recommendations for prevention, other than that leg exercise should be taken during travel. Further studies are urgently needed in order to identify prospectively the incidence of the condition and those at risk. PMID:12077617

  12. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  13. [THERAPEUTIC GUIDE IN VENOUS ULCERS].

    PubMed

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; García Jábega, Rosa Ma; García Carmona, Francisco Javier; Villalta García, Pedro; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of venous ulcers and wounds in general, is a complex and important public health problem, with personal effects, family and health, without addressing the economic impact includes assistance, care of patients with ulcerative lesions. The increase in life expectancy, driven by improved socio-sanitary conditions that this aging population, facilitates the emergence of chronic diseases may be complicated by the presence of skin ulcers. There is no doubt that the best way to treat a skin ulcer is avoiding to occur, hence the importance of early diagnosis and risk factors act alone them. In relation to venous ulcers is crucial, provide local treatment, act on the cause, because if not, relapse is the norm in this type of injury. Currently, the moist wound healing, is an important step in solving earlier of these chronic wounds. This has meant that the pharmaceutical industry has been involved in researching and creating different types of dressings, having specific activity at different stages of venous ulcer healing, ie inflammatory phase, proliferative and remodeling. The proliferation of these products has been increasing over the years, not surprisingly, are described therapeutic 12 families that are applied in the management, care of these injuries. The fact of existing therapeutic options highlights the ineffectiveness of these products individually. Therefore, the nurse will not forget that the optimal treatment of venous ulcers, necessarily involves choosing the right product for every type and stage of the lesion. In this decision process, strongly influenced by the specific characteristics of each patient and injury, the nurse will take into account a lot of factors when choosing the product, not forgetting that an ulcer is not cured with a single therapeutic element, several products being used throughout the process to evolutionary venous ulcer until complete resolution.

  14. Radionuclide plethysmography and Tc-99m red blood cell venography in venous thrombosis: comparison with contrast venography

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, I.; Royal, H.D.; Uren, R.F.; Waugh, R.C.; McLaughlin, A.F.; Bautoviovich, G.J.; Dyer, I.A.; Fulton, R.R.; Morris, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide plethysmography (RPG) is a new technique that uses Tc-99m labelled red blood cells to ascertain changes in venous volumes by detecting the change in counts in response to the inflation and deflation of proximal thigh cuffs. Diagnosis of ileofemoral venous occlusion is possible using this technique, which also provides kinetic data of venous outflow. Twenty-one patients with suspected deep venous thrombosis were studied prospectively using RPG, radionuclide venography (RV), and contrast venography (CV) to establish the usefulness of RPG alone and in combination wth RV in the diagnosis of ileofemoral venous thrombosis (sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 100%). RV was less sensitive (73%) and less specific (93%) in diagnosing that condition.

  15. Case of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Unusual Venous Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Susheel Kumar; Pasupaleti, Bhimeswarao; Juluri, Naganarasimharaju

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a relatively rare condition when compared with vascular accidents of arterial origin representing 0.5-1% of all strokes. Unlike arterial infarcts parenchymal changes are seldom present and when present most of the times are reversible. We present a case report of 28-year-old female with thrombosis of internal cerebral veins and straight sinus and hemorrhagic infarcts in bilateral basal ganglia and bilateral thalami .The findings of bilateral symmetrical hyper intensities in basal ganglia and thalami on MRI may be due to various causes of diverse etiology and cerebral venous thrombosis remains an important cause. Early recognition and prompt anticoagulation therapy helps to reduce the mortality to a great extent. The MRI imaging features of straight sinus thrombosis and other imaging differentials are discussed. PMID:26023623

  16. A new option for endovascular treatment of leg ulcers caused by venous insufficiency with fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rybak, Zbigniew; Jargiello, Tomasz; Łokaj, Marek; Czapla, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ulcers of lower legs are the most bothersome complication of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Aim To assess the effectiveness of endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy for the treatment of venous ulcers. Material and methods Thirty-eight limbs in 35 patients with crural venous ulcers were treated with guided sclerotherapy under the control of fluoroscopy. Patients with non-healing ulcers in the course of chronic venous insufficiency, with and without features of past deep vein thrombosis, were qualified for the study. Doppler ultrasound and dynamic venography with mapping of venous flow were performed. Ambulatory venous pressure measurements, leg circumference and varicography were performed just before and following the procedure. Results In 84% of cases, ulcers were treated successfully and healed. Patients with post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 17) healed in 13 (76.5%) cases, whereas patients without post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 21) healed in 19 (90.5%) cases. The mean time of healing of an ulcer for all patients was 83 days (in the first group it was 121 days and in the second group 67 days). Recurrence of an ulcer was observed in 10 limbs: 6 cases in the first group and 4 cases in the second group. Occurrence of deep vein thrombosis associated with the procedure was not observed. Temporary complications were reported but none giving a serious clinical outcome. Conclusions Endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy can be an alternative method of treatment of venous ulcers, especially in situations when surgical procedures or other options of treatment are impossible. PMID:26649090

  17. Use of a Trellis Device for Endovascular Treatment of Venous Thrombosis Involving a Duplicated Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Saettele, Megan R.; Morelli, John N.; Chesis, Paul; Wible, Brandt C.

    2013-12-15

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are increasingly recognized with CT and venography techniques. Although many patients with IVC anomalies are asymptomatic, recent studies have suggested an association with venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with extensive venous clot involving the infrarenal segment of a duplicated left IVC who underwent pharmacomechanical thrombectomy and tissue plasminogen activator catheter-directed thrombolysis with complete deep venous thrombosis resolution. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the English literature of the use of a Trellis thrombectomy catheter in the setting of duplicated IVC.

  18. Sepsis, venous return, and teleology.

    PubMed

    McNeilly, R G

    2014-11-01

    An understanding of heart-circulation interaction is crucial to our ability to guide our patients through an episode of septic shock. Our knowledge has advanced greatly in the last one hundred years. There are, however, certain empirical phenomena that may lead us to question the wisdom of our prevailing treatment algorithm. Three extreme but iatrogenically possible haemodynamic states exist. Firstly, inappropriately low venous return; secondly, overzealous arteriolar constriction; and finally, misguided inotropy and chronotropy. Following an unsuccessful fluid challenge, it would be logical to first set the venous tone, then set the cardiac rate and contractility, and finally set the peripheral vascular resistance. It is hypothesized that a combination of dihydroergotamine, milrinone and esmolol should be superior to a combination of noradrenaline and dobutamine for surviving sepsis. PMID:25245463

  19. Association Between Venous Angioarchitectural Features of Sporadic Brain Arteriovenous Malformations and Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Matthew D.; Cooke, Daniel L.; Nelson, Jeffrey; Guo, Diana E.; Dowd, Christopher F.; Higashida, Randall T.; Halbach, Van V.; Lawton, Michael T.; Kim, Helen; Hetts, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intracranial hemorrhage is the most serious outcome for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This study examines associations between venous characteristics of these lesions and intracranial hemorrhage. Materials and Methods Statistical analysis was performed on a prospectively maintained database of brain AVMs evaluated at an academic medical center. DSA, CT, and MRI studies were evaluated to classify lesion side, drainage pattern, venous stenosis, number of draining veins, venous ectasia, and venous reflux. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify association of these angiographic features with intracranial hemorrhage of any age at initial presentation. Results Exclusively deep drainage (OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.87–6.26, p<0.001) and a single draining vein (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.26–3.08, p=0.002) were associated with hemorrhage, whereas venous ectasia (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.34–0.78, p=0.002) was inversely associated with hemorrhage. Conclusion Analysis of venous characteristics of brain AVMs may help determine their prognosis and thereby identify lesions most appropriate for treatment. PMID:25634722

  20. [Clinical, structural-functional and haemodynamic correlates of cerebral venous blood circulation disturbances].

    PubMed

    Todua, F I; Verulashvili, I V; Kortushvili, M G; Gachechiladze, D G

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties of liquor circulation as a result of cerebrospinal fluid absorption and venous drainage of the entire intracranial space, in particular in the presence of venous system abnormalities in the forms of hypoplasia or aplasia of venous sinuses, play an essentiale role in cerebral venous dyscirculation. The symmetric character of hydrocephaly in chronic insufficiency of cerebral blood circulation and strong dependence of chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency on passive congestion suggest that the latter is characteristic of the blood supply system in whole. The MPI analysis of 120 patients revealed signs of cerebral ischemic lesions in 72% of cases, i.e. dilatation of liquor-containing spaces, multiple lacunar infarctions, especially in deep brain regions, diffusive changes of the periventricular white matter etc. Low indices of the blood flow increase during antiorthostatic loading, a trend towards decreasing of PI parameters and difficulty of blood flow in conditional insonation of intracranial veins in cases of "pseudotumorous syndrome" in patients with clinical signs of passive congestion. Venous dilatation of convexital brain areas and intensification of contrasting of direct sinus and vein of Galen were observed in venous infarctions.

  1. Cosmetic leg veins: evaluation using duplex venous imaging.

    PubMed

    Thibault, P; Bray, A; Wlodarczyk, J; Lewis, W

    1990-07-01

    The records of 305 consecutive patients who had presented with cosmetic symptoms related to varicose and/or spider veins over a 12-month period were studied. Following clinical assessment, 250 (82%) patients were referred for duplex venous imaging. A total of 500 lower limbs were evaluated; 236 (47%) were documented to have incompetence in the superficial venous system (long or short saphenous veins). Only 6 (1%) limbs had deep venous incompetence and 45 (9%) limbs were found to have perforator incompetence. Short saphenous vein incompetence was found in 59 (12%) limbs. In the long saphenous vein there was a consistent pattern of an increasing incidence of incompetence from the saphenofemoral junction down to the below-knee segment. The duplex imaging findings were applied to determine the optimal treatment, ie, whether surgery, sclerotherapy, or a combination of both would provide the best short- and long-term results. The possible etiology and pathophysiology of spider and varicose veins are discussed in relation to these results.

  2. Guidelines for the treatment of head and neck venous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia Wei; Mai, Hua Ming; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yan An; Fan, Xin Dong; Su, Li Xin; Qin, Zhong Ping; Yang, Yao Wu; Jiang, Yin Hua; Zhao, Yi Fang; Suen, James Y

    2013-01-01

    Venous malformation is one of the most common benign vascular lesions, with approximately 40% of cases appearing in the head and neck. They can affect a patient’s appearance and functionality and even cause life-threatening bleeding or respiratory tract obstruction. The current methods of treatment include surgery, laser therapy, sclerotherapy, or a combined. The treatment of small and superficial venous malformations is relatively simple and effective; however, the treatment of deep and extensive lesions involving multiple anatomical sites remains a challenge for the physicians. For complex cases, the outcomes achieved with one single treatment approach are poor; therefore, individualized treatment modalities must be formulated based on the patient’s condition and the techniques available. Comprehensive multidisciplinary treatments have been adapted to achieve the most effective results. In this paper, based on the national and international literature, we formulated the treatment guidelines for head and neck venous malformations to standardize clinical practice. The guideline will be renewed and updated in a timely manner to reflect cutting-edge knowledge and to provide the best treatment modalities for patients. PMID:23724158

  3. Venous thromboembolism in the ICU: main characteristics, diagnosis and thromboprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Minet, Clémence; Potton, Leila; Bonadona, Agnès; Hamidfar-Roy, Rébecca; Somohano, Claire Ara; Lugosi, Maxime; Cartier, Jean-Charles; Ferretti, Gilbert; Schwebel, Carole; Timsit, Jean-François

    2015-08-18

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT), is a common and severe complication of critical illness. Although well documented in the general population, the prevalence of PE is less known in the ICU, where it is more difficult to diagnose and to treat. Critically ill patients are at high risk of VTE because they combine both general risk factors together with specific ICU risk factors of VTE, like sedation, immobilization, vasopressors or central venous catheter. Compression ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) scan are the primary tools to diagnose DVT and PE, respectively, in the ICU. CT scan, as well as transesophageal echography, are good for evaluating the severity of PE. Thromboprophylaxis is needed in all ICU patients, mainly with low molecular weight heparin, such as fragmine, which can be used even in cases of non-severe renal failure. Mechanical thromboprophylaxis has to be used if anticoagulation is not possible. Nevertheless, VTE can occur despite well-conducted thromboprophylaxis.

  4. Venous thrombosis. Lifting the clouds of misunderstanding.

    PubMed

    Stephen, J M; Feied, C F

    1995-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is often occult and difficult to recognize clinically. The diagnostic approach should begin with color-flow (duplex) ultrasound, noninvasive functional tests such as plethysmography, or both. Because these tests are not 100% sensitive, contrast venography or magnetic resonance imaging may be necessary in a patient with unexplained symptoms. A baseline ventilation-perfusion scan should be considered for any patient with DVT, because there is a high incidence of clinically inapparent pulmonary embolism. In the absence of contraindications, systemic or regional thrombolytic therapy should be considered for every patient with acute DVT. Surgical thrombectomy may be indicated for patients with a large, obstructive proximal thrombus. At a minimum, routine treatment should start with heparin and proceed to oral warfarin (Coumadin, Panwarfin, Sofarin), which should be continued for 3 months. Recurrent DVT after cessation of therapy warrants lifetime use of anticoagulants. A filter should be placed in the inferior vena cava whenever a large, poorly adherent thrombus is identified or when there is progression of thrombosis despite an anticoagulant regimen.

  5. Starling curves and central venous pressure.

    PubMed

    Berlin, David A; Bakker, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies challenge the utility of central venous pressure monitoring as a surrogate for cardiac preload. Starting with Starling's original studies on the regulation of cardiac output, this review traces the history of the experiments that elucidated the role of central venous pressure in circulatory physiology. Central venous pressure is an important physiologic parameter, but it is not an independent variable that determines cardiac output. PMID:25880040

  6. Venous ulcers of the lower limbs due to congenital thalidomide-related valve defect.

    PubMed

    Rubegni, Pietro; Poggiali, Sara; Bilenchi, Roberta; Diana, Agnese; Risulo, Massimiliano; Civeli, Letizia; Fimiani, Michele

    2007-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman with fetal thalidomide syndrome and congenital pseudoainhum of the left big toe had a 5-year history of painful nonhealing ulcers in the left malleolar region. Venous Doppler ultrasonography showed hypoagenesis of the valve flaps of the deep and superficial venous circuit. To our knowledge, this is the first description of congenital pseudoainhum associated with fetal thalidomide syndrome. The coexistence of cutaneous ulcers in our case might be coincidental but may be related to a congenital valve defect (hypoagenesis) caused by thalidomide.

  7. Venous thromboembolism in Latin America: a review and guide to diagnosis and treatment for primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ceresetto, Jose Manuel

    2016-01-01

    There are various region-specific challenges to the diagnosis and effective treatment of venous thromboembolism in Latin America. Clear guidance for physicians and patient education could improve adherence to existing guidelines. This review examines available information on the burden of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis in Latin America and the regional issues surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Potential barriers to appropriate care, as well as treatment options and limitations on their use, are discussed. Finally, an algorithmic approach to the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism in ambulatory patients is proposed and care pathways for patients with pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis are outlined for primary care providers in Latin America. PMID:26872082

  8. Venous thromboembolism in Latin America: a review and guide to diagnosis and treatment for primary care.

    PubMed

    Ceresetto, Jose Manuel

    2016-01-01

    There are various region-specific challenges to the diagnosis and effective treatment of venous thromboembolism in Latin America. Clear guidance for physicians and patient education could improve adherence to existing guidelines. This review examines available information on the burden of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis in Latin America and the regional issues surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Potential barriers to appropriate care, as well as treatment options and limitations on their use, are discussed. Finally, an algorithmic approach to the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism in ambulatory patients is proposed and care pathways for patients with pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis are outlined for primary care providers in Latin America.

  9. Prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin-tao; Ma, Bao-tong

    2006-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which is manifested as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), represents a significant cause of death, disability, and discomfort. They are frequent complications of various surgical procedures. The aging population and the survival of more severely injured patients may suggest an increasing risk of thromboembolism in the trauma patients. Expanded understanding of the population at risk challenges physicians to carefully examine risk factors for VTE to identify high-risk patients who can benefit from prophylaxis. An accurate knowledge of evidence-based risk factors is important in predicting and preventing postoperative DVT, and can be incorporated into a decision support system for appropriate thromboprophylaxis use. Standard use of DVT prophylaxis in a high-risk trauma population leads to a low incidence of DVT. The incidence of VTE is common in Asia. The evaluation includes laboratory tests, Doppler test and phlebography. Screening Doppler sonography should be performed for surveillance on all critically injured patients to identify DVT. D-Dimer is a useful marker to monitor prophylaxis in trauma surgery patients. The optimal time to start prophylaxis is between 2 hours before and 10 hours after surgery, but the risk of PE continues for several weeks. Thromboprophylaxis includes graduated compression stockings and anticoagulants for prophylaxis. Anticoagulants include Warfarin, which belongs to Vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparins, factor Xa indirect inhibitor Fondaparinux, and the oral IIa inhibitor Melagatran and ximelagatran. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin is a new and highly effective antithrombotic agent. Prophylactic placement of vena caval filters in selected trauma patients may decrease the incidence of PE. The indications for prophylactic inferior vena cava filter insertion include prolonged immobilization with multiple injuries, closed head injury, pelvic

  10. Transhepatic Venous Approach for Balloon-assisted Cervical Collateral Venous Access

    SciTech Connect

    Eyheremendy, Eduardo P.; Malizia, Patricio; Sierre, Sergio

    2011-12-15

    Central venous catheter placement is indicated in many situations, and an increasing number of patients require temporary and long-term central catheters. Frequently, patients who have undergone multiple central veins catheterizations develop complete and diffuse venous occlusion, and this constitutes a difficult-to-manage clinical problem. We report a case of a 20-year-old patient who was referred to our department for central venous line placement who manifested bilateral femoral, jugular, and subclavian veins occlusion. A central venous catheter was implanted through a cervical collateral vein, targeting on and puncturing an angioplasty balloon, and advanced into the collateral vein through a transhepatic venous access.

  11. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  12. Acroangiodermatitis secondary to chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Benjamin; Xia, Yang; Cho, Sunghun; Lewis, Felisa S; Lewis, Felicia S

    2010-11-01

    Acroangiodermatitis (AAD) is a benign uncommon vasoproliferative disorder that affects the lower extremities. It appears to be a reactive phenomenon related to severe chronic Venous insufficiency and stasis of the lower extremities. The clinical presentation of this condition often is similar to Kaposi sarcoma. We report a case of AAD in a patient with severe hypertension and chronic venous insufficiency. PMID:21214123

  13. Stent Placement on Fresh Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schuermann, Karl

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report on the efficacy of fixing fresh venous thrombus to the venous wall by stent placement. Methods: Seven patients underwent stenting to treat acute venous thrombosis. In two patients, the hemodialysis fistula was thrombosed with the thrombus extending into the brachial veins. In three patients, the hemodialysis fistula was patent but massive swelling of the ipsilateral arm was caused by proximal venous thrombosis. Two patients presented with iliac venous thrombosis within stented pelvic veins. Stent placement was preceded by other mechanical thrombectomy methods in all cases. Results: Attachment of thrombus to the venous wall was successful in all cases treated. Acute rethrombosis did not occur. Follow-up patency in dialysis patients was 7.2 {+-} 2.1 months. One patient had rethrombosis of the dialysis graft 3 months after primary treatment. Three patients developed restenosis within a mean period of 7.7 months. One shunt remained patent for 10 months with no event of reobstruction during follow-up. In both patients with iliac stent placement, the vein remained patent over a follow-up period of 8 and 12 months respectively. Conclusion: Stenting fresh venous thrombus can achieve immediate venous patency. It may be used as an alternative approach when all other percutaneous methods fail. Frequent restenosis within stented veins limits its use to very selected cases.

  14. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  15. Venous Thromboembolism in Patients with Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lionaki, Sophia; Derebail, Vimal K.; Hogan, Susan L.; Barbour, Sean; Lee, Taewoo; Hladunewich, Michelle; Greenwald, Allen; Hu, Yichun; Jennette, Caroline E.; Jennette, J. Charles; Falk, Ronald J.; Cattran, Daniel C.; Nachman, Patrick H.; Reich, Heather N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of venous thromboembolic events in a large cohort of patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy and to identify predisposing risk factors. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We studied patients with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy from the Glomerular Disease Collaborative Network (n=412) and the Toronto Glomerulonephritis Registry (n=486) inception cohorts. The cohorts were pooled after establishing similar baseline characteristics (total n=898). Clinically apparent and radiologically confirmed venous thromboembolic events were identified. Potential risk factors were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression models. Results Sixty-five (7.2%) subjects had at least one venous thromboembolic event, and this rate did not differ significantly between registries. Most venous thromboembolic events occurred within 2 years of first clinical assessment (median time to VTE = 3.8 months). After adjusting for age, sex, proteinuria, and immunosuppressive therapy, hypoalbuminemia at diagnosis was the only independent predictor of a venous thromboembolic event. Each 1.0 g/dl reduction in serum albumin was associated with a 2.13-fold increased risk of VTE. An albumin level <2.8 g/dl was the threshold below which risk for a venous thromboembolic event was greatest. Conclusions We conclude that clinically apparent venous thromboembolic events occur in about 7% of patients with membranous nephropathy. Hypoalbuminemia, particularly <2.8 g/dl, is the most significant independent predictor of venous thrombotic risk. PMID:22076873

  16. Venous pressure in man during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, K. A.; Roecker, L.; Gauer, O. H.; Krause, R.; Wicke, H. J.; Leach, C.; Landry, R.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether the body fluid shift from the lower limbs toward the head that occurs during spaceflight leads to lasting increases of venous pressure in the upper body, venous pressure and hematocrit measurements were made on four astronauts before flight and 1 and 12 hours after recovery and compared with measurements in space. During the mission the hematocrit was elevated and the venous pressure lowered by 1 to 8 centimeters of water as compared with the preflight data. One hour after landing the hematocrit decreased, indicating a hemodilution, venous pressures were unexpectedly high, and a body weight loss of 4 to 5 percent was observed. Twelve hours later the venous pressures were the lowest recorded during the study. The fluid shift apparently takes place during the first several hours of spaceflight. Thereafter, the pressure in the peripheral veins and the central circulation is lower than that measured before flight.

  17. Venous angioarchitecture of the tunica muscularis in the esophagogastric transition segment in man.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, I; Ferraz de Carvalho, C A

    1977-01-01

    With the purpose of studying the venous angioarchitecture of the esophagogastric transition segment (EGTS), 30 speciments were obtained from bodies a few hours after death. These specimens were injected with a 25% aqueous solution of india ink (drop-by-drop continuous infusion) through the left gastric vein and the splenic vein. The specimens thus prepared underwent three types of methods: (1) clarification by the Spalteholz method for a panoramic stereoscopic observation of the venous angioarchitecture; (2) thick sections in a series from 100 to 150 micrometer, stained by the Azan method, and (3) in 10-micrometer serial sections stained by the method of Masson, the perimeter of the veins having been measured in order to ascertain the venous density. The result of this investigation allows the conclusion that there are three venous nets in the muscular layer of the EGTS (perimuscular, intermuscular and submuscular). These three nets, especially the intermuscular and the perimuscular, converge at the extremities of the EGTS, most markedly in the cranial part, to large confluent trunks, going out of the organ from there through perforating trunks principally to the affluents of the portal vein. It thus constitutes a more or less independent segment under the venous point of view, depending essentially on the system of that vein. A marked predominance of perforating vasa of the false type in zone 3, especially at its intermediate part exactly at the stretch where most part of the veins of the mucous-submucous system lie at a deeper site, together with other peculiarities of venous distribution of this region, allows the morphofunctional deduction that, at this point, the muscular layer be a barrier between the deep and the peripheral venous circulation of the esophagus.

  18. Four-compartment fasciotomy and venous calf-pump function: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Ris, H B; Furrer, M; Stronsky, S; Walpoth, B; Nachbur, B

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-one patients who underwent a four-compartment fasciotomy between January 1, 1986, and December 31, 1987, were revisited with respect to venous calf-pump function 32 to 56 months (mean, 46.2 months) after fasciotomy. Enrollment criteria consisted of an intact motor innervation, palpable pedal pulses, the absence of venous hypertension, and deep venous thrombosis before and during the treatment requiring fasciotomy and unimpaired ankle and knee joint function. None of the patients showed signs of chronic venous hypertension at assessment. Ambulatory strain-gauge plethysmography revealed no significant difference in recovery time and refilling volume values between the two limbs of each patient (p > 0.1) and between limbs in which fasciotomy was performed and those of normal subjects (p > 0.1). Color flow duplex scanning revealed patent popliteal veins with normal respiration-induced phasic flow pattern and absent reflux in all patients. All visible calf veins were patent, compressible, and without morphologic alterations. The fasciotomy wound was closed by delayed skin suture (the fascia remaining divided) in 48% and by skin grafts of the lateral incision in 52% of the patients, without significant difference in recovery time and refilling volume values (p > 0.1) at assessment. Fasciotomy does not lead to venous calf-pump dysfunction, irrespective of whether the wound is closed by delayed suture or skin grafts.

  19. Histological and Biomechanical Changes in a Mouse Model of Venous Thrombus Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y.-U.; Lee, A.Y.; Humphrey, J.D.; Rausch, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Deep vein thrombosis and the risk of pulmonary embolism are significant causes of morbidity and mortality. Much remains unclear, however, about the mechanisms by which a venous thrombus initiates, progresses, or resolves. In particular, there is a pressing need to characterize the evolving mechanical properties of a venous thrombus for its mechanical integrity is fundamental to many disease sequelae. OBJECTIVE The primary goal of the present study was to initiate a correlation between evolving histological changes and biomechanical properties of venous thrombus. METHODS We employed an inferior vena cava ligation model in mice to obtain cylindrical samples of thrombus that were well suited for mechanical testing and that could be explanted at multiple times following surgery. Using uniaxial micro-mechanical testing, we collected stress-stretch data that were then fit with a microstructurally-inspired material model before submitting the samples to immunohistological examination. RESULTS We found that venous thrombus underwent a radially inward directed replacement of fibrin with collagen between 2 weeks and 4 weeks of development, which was accompanied by the infiltration of inflammatory and mesenchymal cells. These histological changes correlated with a marked increase in material stiffness. CONCLUSIONS We demonstrated that 2 to 4 week old venous thrombus undergoes drastic remodeling from a fibrin-dominated mesh to a collagen-dominated microstructure and that these changes are accompanied by dramatic changes in biomechanical behavior. PMID:26444224

  20. [News on venous thromboembolic disease].

    PubMed

    Arcelus, J I; García-Bragado, F; Jiménez, D; Lozano Sánchez, F S; Lecumberri, R; Román Sánchez, P

    2012-09-01

    This paper brings together the latest developments that have occurred in different aspects of venous thromboembolism (VTE): VTE prophylaxis in high-risk orthopedic surgery and acutely ill hospitalized medical patients; therapeutic advances in pulmonary embolism and superficial vein thrombosis and VTE future prospects. It summarizes the reviews that five speakers made in-depth for the Second Day in New Anticoagulant Treatment, held in Madrid on November 18, 2011, organized by the Foundation for the Study of Thromboembolic Disease in Spain and endorsed by the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery, Spanish Society of Cardiology, Spanish Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis and the Spanish Society of Angiology and Vascular Surgery.

  1. The impact of obesity on venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Seidel, A C; Belczak, C E Q; Campos, M B; Campos, R B; Harada, D S

    2015-08-01

    Association between chronic venous disease and obesity has recently been studied, with indications that it may worsen in obese patients. The aim of study was to correlate clinical classes of chronic venous disease according to Clinical Etiology Anatomy Pathophysiology (CEAP) classification and body mass index, as well as to compare the severity of chronic venous disease in obese and nonobese patients. This retrospective cross-sectional prevalence study was conducted at the Maringá State University and Belczak Vascular Center along a period of 2 years, consisting of a random sample of 482 patients with complaints compatible with chronic venous disease. Data obtained from patient's files included gender, age, weight and height (for calculating body mass index), and clinical class (C) of chronic venous disease according to CEAP classification. Statistical analysis included Spearman's correlation coefficient, Chi-square test (for comparing frequencies), and Student's t-test (for comparing means). Significant positive correlation between body mass index and clinical classes was established for women (0.43), but not for men (0.07). Obesity (body mass index  : ≥  : 30.0) was significantly more frequent in patients with chronic venous disease in clinical classes 3 (p < 0.001) and 4 (p = 0.002) and less frequent in patients with chronic venous disease in clinical class 1 (p < 0.001). This study evidenced significant correlation between body mass index and clinical classes of chronic venous disease in women, but not in men. It also corroborated the negative impact of obesity on the clinical severity of chronic venous disease.

  2. Upper Body Venous Compliance Exceeds Lower Body Venous Compliance in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.

    1996-01-01

    Human venous compliance hypothetically decreases from upper to lower body as a mechanism for maintenance of the hydrostatic indifference level 'headward' in the body, near the heart. This maintains cardiac filling pressure, and thus cardiac output and cerebral perfusion, during orthostasis. This project entailed four steps. First, acute whole-body tilting was employed to alter human calf and neck venous volumes. Subjects were tilted on a tilt table equipped with a footplate as follows: 90 deg, 53 deg, 30 deg, 12 deg, O deg, -6 deg, -12 deg, -6 deg, O deg, 12 deg, 30 deg, 53 deg, and 90 deg. Tilt angles were held for 30 sec each, with 10 sec transitions between angles. Neck volume increased and calf volume decreased during head-down tilting, and the opposite occurred during head-up tilt. Second, I sought to cross-validate Katkov and Chestukhin's (1980) measurements of human leg and neck venous pressures during whole-body tilting, so that those data could be used with volume data from the present study to calculate calf and neck venous compliance (compliance = (Delta)volume/(Delta)pressure). Direct measurements of venous pressures during postural chances and whole-body tilting confirmed that the local changes in venous pressures seen by Katkov and Chestukhin (1980) are valid. The present data also confirmed that gravitational changes in calf venous pressure substantially exceed those changes in upper body venous pressure. Third, the volume and pressure data above were used to find that human neck venous compliance exceeds calf venous compliance by a factor of 6, thereby upholding the primary hypothesis. Also, calf and neck venous compliance correlated significantly with each other (r(exp 2) = 0.56). Fourth, I wished to determine whether human calf muscle activation during head-up tilt reduces calf venous compliance. Findings from tilting and from supine assessments of relaxed calf venous compliance were similar, indicating that tilt-induced muscle activation is

  3. Current opinion on iliofemoral venous thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Stephens, G L

    1976-02-01

    Iliofemoral venous thrombosis is discussed and a technique of iliofemoral venous thrombectomy is presented. Operative phlebography is recommended. The personal recommendations of leading American vascular surgeons in treating the patient with acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis are presented. I recommend thrombectomy for phlegmasia cerulea dolens, and in previously healthy, young ambulatory patients with phlegmasia alba dolens who are seen within 48 hours following thrombosis and have failed to show clinical improvement after a trial of bed rest, elevation of the lower extremities, and intravenous heparin. The majority of patients seen with phlegmasia alba dolens will best be served with nonoperative treatment.

  4. Measurement of venous compliance (8-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirsk, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    The prime objective of this International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) investigation is to measure the bulk compliance (distensibility) of the veins in the lower leg before, during, and after spaceflight. It is of particular interest whether venous compliance over the range of both positive and negative transmural pressures (various states of venous distention and collapse) changes throughout the duration of spaceflight. Information concerning the occurrence and character of compliance changes could have implications for the design of improved antigravity suits and further the understanding of inflight and postflight venous hemodynamics.

  5. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access].

    PubMed

    Fuzier, Régis; Rougé, Pierre; Pierre, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    International guidelines advocate the use of first-line ultrasound for central venous catheter, particularly for the internal jugular vein. The role of ultrasound in peripheral venous access remains questionable. In some specific situations, such as pediatrics, obesity and patients with poor venous network, problems to cannulate peripheral vein may occur. Success rate of peripheral intravenous access increases with the diameter of the vein and for a depth of the vein between 0.3 and 1.5 cm. The type of puncture (long-axis or short-axis) and the type of catheters have little influence on the success rate. Specific considerations have to be taken concerning infection control.

  6. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. Quality of life in patients with venous stasis ulcers and others with advanced venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tracz, Edyta; Zamojska, Ewa; Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Zaborski, Daniel; Grzesiak, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life (QoL) in patients with advanced venous insufficiency (including venous stasis ulcers, skin discoloration, stasis eczema, and lipodermatosclerosis) assessed using the Clinical Etiological Anatomical Pathophysiological (CEAP) and Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) classifications is presented. Also, disease features such as: intensity of pain, edema and inflammatory response that exerted the most profound effect on different domains of QoL are reported. The global QoL in patients with lower leg venous ulcerations was relatively similar to that observed in other patients with chronic venous insufficiency. The presence of venous ulcerations was associated with lower QoL in a Physical domain. Significant correlations were found between pain intensity and the values of Physical, Physiological, Level of Independence and Environmental domains, between edema intensity and Social domain as well as between the intensity of inflammatory response and Physical and Spiritual domains.

  10. Venous disease: the missing link in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Madyoon, Hooman; Lepor, Norman E

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, medical literature and the practice of vascular medicine focused on the cosmetic aspects of venous disease and the advanced stages of venous insufficiency such as painful varicose veins and venous ulcers. The systemic effects of venous insufficiency resulting from a reduction of venous return and increased transit time of blood from the lower extremities that can mimic heart failure are only recently being recognized. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment options for the patients with venous insufficiency, and increases awareness about the systemic effects of venous disease and its role in the practice of cardiovascular medicine. PMID:23651983

  11. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  12. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Baytinger, V. F. Kurochkina, O. S. Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  13. Circulating venous bubbles in children after diving.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Carturan, Daniel; Tourney-Chollet, Claire; Gardette, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Doppler ultrasonic detection of circulating venous bubbles after a scuba dive is a useful index of decompression safety in adults, since a relationship between bubbles and the risk of decompression sickness has been documented. No study, however, has investigated circulating venous bubbles in young recreational divers after their usual dives. The aim of this study was to determine whether these bubbles would be detected in children who performed a single dive without any modification in their diving habits. Ten young recreational divers (13.1 +/- 2.3 years) performed their usual air dive. They were Doppler-monitored 20 min before the dive (12 +/- 3 m for 26 +/- 7 min) and for 60 min after surfacing, at 20-min intervals. No circulating venous bubbles were detected after the children surfaced. The results showed that during a usual shallow diving session, venous bubbles were not detected in children.

  14. Intraneural Venous Malformations of the Median Nerve

    PubMed Central

    González Rodríguez, Alba; Midón Míguez, José

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformations arising from the peripheral nerve are a rare type of vascular malformation. We present the first case of an intraneural venous malformation of the median nerve to be reported in a child and review the previous two cases of median nerve compression due to a venous malformation that have been reported. These cases presented with painless masses in the volar aspect of the wrist or with symptoms suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome. Clinical suspicion should lead to the use of Doppler ultrasonography as the first-line diagnostic tool. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology can confirm the diagnosis, as phleboliths are pathognomonic of venous malformations. Surgical treatment appears to be the only modality capable of successfully controlling the growth of an intraneural malformation. Sclerotherapy and radiotherapy have never been used to treat this type of malformation. PMID:27462571

  15. Pathophysiology of spontaneous venous gas embolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Albertine, K. H.; Pisarello, J. B.; Flores, N. D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of controllable degrees and durations of continuous isobaric counterdiffusion venous gas embolism to investigate effects of venous gas embolism upon blood, cardiovascular, and respiratory gas exchange function, as well as pathological effects upon the lung and its microcirculation is discussed. Use of N2O/He counterdiffusion permitted performance of the pathophysiologic and pulmonary microstructural effects at one ATA without hyperbaric or hypobaric exposures.

  16. Venous air embolism during radical perineal prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Jolliffe, M P; Lyew, M A; Berger, I H; Grimaldi, T

    1996-12-01

    An abrupt decrease in end-tidal carbon dioxide (CO2) occurred in an anesthetized male who was placed in the head down position during radical perineal prostatectomy. The end-tidal CO2 was restored after insertion of a wet pack into the operative site, which strongly indicated venous air embolism as the cause. Predisposing factors, detection, and treatment of venous air embolism in this setting are discussed.

  17. CDC Grand Rounds: preventing hospital-associated venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Streiff, Michael B; Brady, Jeffrey P; Grant, Althea M; Grosse, Scott D; Wong, Betty; Popovic, Tanja

    2014-03-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a blood clot in a large vein, usually in the leg or pelvis. Sometimes a DVT detaches from the site of formation and becomes mobile in the blood stream. If the circulating clot moves through the heart to the lungs it can block an artery supplying blood to the lungs. This condition is called pulmonary embolism. The disease process that includes DVT and/or pulmonary embolism is called venous thromboembolism (VTE). Each year in the United States, an estimated 350,000-900,000 persons develop incident VTE, of whom approximately 100,000 die, mostly as sudden deaths, the cause of which often goes unrecognized. In addition, 30%-50% of persons with lower-extremity DVT develop postthrombotic syndrome (a long-term complication that causes swelling, pain, discoloration, and, in severe cases, ulcers in the affected limb). Finally, 10%-30% of persons who survive the first occurrence of VTE develop another VTE within 5 years. PMID:24598595

  18. The chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, P; Galeotti, R

    2010-12-01

    Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a syndrome characterized by stenosies of the internal jugular and/or azygous veins (IJVs-AZ) with opening of collaterals and insufficient drainage proved by reduced cerebral blood flow and increased mean transit time in cerebral MRI perfusional study. The present review is aimed to give a comprehensive overview of the actual status of the art of the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. As far as the origin of venous narrowing is concerned, phlebographic studies of the IJVs and AZ systems demonstrated that venous stenoses were likely to be truncular venous malformations; mostly, they are intraluminal defects such as malformed valve, septa webs. CCSVI condition has been found to be strongly associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), a disabling neurodegenerative and demyelinating disease considered autoimmune in nature. In several epidemiological observations performed at different latitudes on patients with different genetic backgrounds, the prevalence of CCSVI in MS ranges from 56% to 100%. To the contrary, by using venous MR and/or different Doppler protocols, CCSVI was not detected with the same prevalence. Two pilot studies demonstrated the safety and feasibility in Day Surgery of the endovascular treatment of CCSVI by means of balloon angioplasty (PTA). It determines a significant reduction of postoperative venous pressure. Restenosis rate was found out elevated in the IJVs, but negligible in the AZ. However, PTA seems to positively influence clinical and QoL parameters of the associated MS and warrants further randomized control trials.

  19. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kasatkin, A. A. Nigmatullina, A. R.; Urakov, A. L.

    2015-11-17

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient’s exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  20. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatkin, A. A.; Urakov, A. L.; Nigmatullina, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient's exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  1. New anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Caio Julio Cesar dos Santos; Júnior, José Leonidas Alves; Gavilanes, Francisca; Prada, Luis Felipe; Morinaga, Luciana Kato; Souza, Rogerio

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, venous thromboembolism (VTE) is among the leading causes of death from cardiovascular disease, surpassed only by acute myocardial infarction and stroke. The spectrum of VTE presentations ranges, by degree of severity, from deep vein thrombosis to acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Treatment is based on full anticoagulation of the patients. For many decades, it has been known that anticoagulation directly affects the mortality associated with VTE. Until the beginning of this century, anticoagulant therapy was based on the use of unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists, warfarin in particular. Over the past decades, new classes of anticoagulants have been developed, such as factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors, which significantly changed the therapeutic arsenal against VTE, due to their efficacy and safety when compared with the conventional treatment. The focus of this review was on evaluating the role of these new anticoagulants in this clinical context. PMID:27167437

  2. Quality of life in venous disease.

    PubMed

    van Korlaar, Inez; Vossen, Carla; Rosendaal, Frits; Cameron, Linda; Bovill, Edwin; Kaptein, Adrian

    2003-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) can be defined as the functional effect of an illness and its consequent therapy upon a patient, as perceived by the patient. Studies on the impact of chronic venous disease on quality of life are scarce compared to quality of life research in other diseases. The purpose of this paper was to describe instruments that assess the quality of life in patients with chronic venous disease and to review the literature on this topic. A computer search of the MedLine database was performed to identify papers; the bibliographies of relevant articles were reviewed to obtain additional papers. Papers were included if they described the development or use of a quality of life instrument for patients with chronic venous disease. A total of 25 papers were identified that fit the inclusion criteria. The studies described in the papers used six different generic instruments and ten disease-specific instruments. Quality of life in chronic venous disease was assessed in 12 studies. Six studies compared different types of treatment for chronic venous disease where QOL was an outcome measure. Despite the wide variety of measures used, results indicate that the quality of life of patients with chronic venous disease is affected in the physical domain mostly with regard to pain, physical functioning and mobility, and that they suffer from negative emotional reactions and social isolation. We feel that QOL should be a standard measure in future studies in patients with chronic venous disease, preferably with a combination of generic and disease-specific measures.

  3. Quality of life in venous disease.

    PubMed

    van Korlaar, Inez; Vossen, Carla; Rosendaal, Frits; Cameron, Linda; Bovill, Edwin; Kaptein, Adrian

    2003-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) can be defined as the functional effect of an illness and its consequent therapy upon a patient, as perceived by the patient. Studies on the impact of chronic venous disease on quality of life are scarce compared to quality of life research in other diseases. The purpose of this paper was to describe instruments that assess the quality of life in patients with chronic venous disease and to review the literature on this topic. A computer search of the MedLine database was performed to identify papers; the bibliographies of relevant articles were reviewed to obtain additional papers. Papers were included if they described the development or use of a quality of life instrument for patients with chronic venous disease. A total of 25 papers were identified that fit the inclusion criteria. The studies described in the papers used six different generic instruments and ten disease-specific instruments. Quality of life in chronic venous disease was assessed in 12 studies. Six studies compared different types of treatment for chronic venous disease where QOL was an outcome measure. Despite the wide variety of measures used, results indicate that the quality of life of patients with chronic venous disease is affected in the physical domain mostly with regard to pain, physical functioning and mobility, and that they suffer from negative emotional reactions and social isolation. We feel that QOL should be a standard measure in future studies in patients with chronic venous disease, preferably with a combination of generic and disease-specific measures. PMID:12876622

  4. Observations on Tc-99m-erythrocyte venography in normal subjects and in patients with deep vein thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Leger, J.; Stern, J.; Derbekyan, V.; Skinner, B.

    1981-07-01

    Blood pool imaging of the lower limbs with Tc-99m-erythrocytes demonstrates the deep venous channels of the leg. The radionuclide image of deep vein thrombosis, by this method, appears sufficiently distinctive to suggest that Tc-99m-erythrocyte venography may be a useful screening examination for deep vein patency.

  5. Deep dorsal vein arterialisation in vascular impotence.

    PubMed

    Wespes, E; Corbusier, A; Delcour, C; Vandenbosch, G; Struyven, J; Schulman, C C

    1989-11-01

    A series of 12 patients with vasculogenic impotence (4 arterial lesions; 8 arterial and venous lesions) underwent deep dorsal vein arterialisation after pre-operative assessment by a multidisciplinary approach. Cumulative graft patency was 58% (7 of 12 patients) up to 21 months but only 4 patients developed almost normal erections. Digital angiography, with and without the intracavernous injection of papaverine, was performed during follow-up to determine the vascular physiological status. At flaccidity, the corpora cavernosa were never opacified in the absence of a venocorporeal shunt. The penile glans was always visualised. Opacification of the deep dorsal vein and the circumflex system decreased with penile rigidity, resulting from their compression between Buck's fascia and the tunica albuginea. Intracavernous pressure recorded before and after the surgical procedure showed a marked increase when a caverno-venous shunt was performed. Hypervascularisation of the glans occurred in 2 cases. The relevance of this new surgical technique and its functional mechanism are discussed.

  6. Venous waterfalls in coronary circulation.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, R E; Kaplow, S M

    1991-03-21

    Several studies of flow through collapsible tubing deformed by external pressures have led to a concept known as the "vascular waterfall". One hallmark of this state is a positive zero-flow pressure intercept (Pe) in flow-pressure curves. This intercept is commonly observed in the coronary circulation, but in blood-perfused beating hearts a vascular waterfall is not the only putative cause. To restrict the possibilities, we have measured flow-pressure curves in excised non-beating rabbit hearts in which the coronary arteries were perfused in a non-pulsatile way with a newtonian fluid (Ringers solution) containing potent vasodilator drugs. Under these circumstances, vascular waterfalls are believed to be the only tenable explanation for Pe. In physical terms the waterfall is a region where the vessel is in a state of partial collapse with a stabilized intraluminal fluid pressure (Pw). It is argued that the most probable site of this collapse was the intramural veins just before they reached the epicardial surface. In accord with the waterfall hypothesis, Pe increased as the heart became more edematous, but flow-pressure curves also became flatter, implying multiple waterfalls with differing Pws, leading to complete collapse of some of the venous channels. The principal compressive force is believed to have been the interstitial fluid pressure as registered through a needle (Pn) implanted in the left ventricular wall, but a small additional force (Ps) was probably due to swelling of interstitial gels. A method is presented for estimating Ps and Pw. Unlike rubber tubing, blood vessels are both collapsible and porous. Apparently because of increased capillary filtration, Pn was found to increase linearly with the perfusion pressure. Thus, Pw was not the same at all points on the flow-pressure curve. This finding has interesting implications with respect to the concept of coronary resistance. PMID:2062096

  7. Venous waterfalls in coronary circulation.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, R E; Kaplow, S M

    1991-03-21

    Several studies of flow through collapsible tubing deformed by external pressures have led to a concept known as the "vascular waterfall". One hallmark of this state is a positive zero-flow pressure intercept (Pe) in flow-pressure curves. This intercept is commonly observed in the coronary circulation, but in blood-perfused beating hearts a vascular waterfall is not the only putative cause. To restrict the possibilities, we have measured flow-pressure curves in excised non-beating rabbit hearts in which the coronary arteries were perfused in a non-pulsatile way with a newtonian fluid (Ringers solution) containing potent vasodilator drugs. Under these circumstances, vascular waterfalls are believed to be the only tenable explanation for Pe. In physical terms the waterfall is a region where the vessel is in a state of partial collapse with a stabilized intraluminal fluid pressure (Pw). It is argued that the most probable site of this collapse was the intramural veins just before they reached the epicardial surface. In accord with the waterfall hypothesis, Pe increased as the heart became more edematous, but flow-pressure curves also became flatter, implying multiple waterfalls with differing Pws, leading to complete collapse of some of the venous channels. The principal compressive force is believed to have been the interstitial fluid pressure as registered through a needle (Pn) implanted in the left ventricular wall, but a small additional force (Ps) was probably due to swelling of interstitial gels. A method is presented for estimating Ps and Pw. Unlike rubber tubing, blood vessels are both collapsible and porous. Apparently because of increased capillary filtration, Pn was found to increase linearly with the perfusion pressure. Thus, Pw was not the same at all points on the flow-pressure curve. This finding has interesting implications with respect to the concept of coronary resistance.

  8. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) and glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Mandel, Jacob J; Wu, Jimin; Yuan, Ying; Webre, Courtney; Pawar, Tushar A; Lhadha, Harshad S; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-08-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is high for patients with brain tumors (11-20 %). Glioblastoma (GBM) patients, in particular, have the highest risk of VTE (24-30 %). The Khorana scale is the most commonly used clinical scale to evaluate the risk of VTE in cancer patients but its efficacy in patients with GBM remains unclear. The aim of this study is to estimate the frequency of VTE in GBM patients and identify potential risk factors for the development of VTE during adjuvant chemotherapy. Furthermore, we intend to examine whether the Khorana scale accurately predicts the risk of VTE in GBM patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of GBM patients treated at MD Anderson during the years 2005-2011. The study cohort included 440 patients of which 64 (14.5 %) developed VTE after the start of adjuvant treatment. The median time to develop VTE was 6.5 months from the start of adjuvant treatment. On multivariate analysis male sex, BMI ≥ 35, KPS ≤ 80, history of VTE and steroid therapy were significantly associated with the development of VTE. The Khorana scale was found to be an invalid VTE predictive model in GBM patients due to poor specificity. Of the 64 patients who developed a VTE, 36 were treated with anticoagulation, 2 with an IVC filter, and 21 with both. Complications (intracranial hemorrhage, bleeding in other organs and thrombocytopenia) secondary to anticoagulation were reported in 16 % (n = 10). VTE is common in patients with GBM. Our results did not validate the Khorana scale in GBM patients. Additional studies identifying which GBM patients are at highest risk for VTE are needed to enable further evaluation of VTE preventive measures in this selected group.

  9. Manual Aspiration Thrombectomy with Stent Placement: Rapid and Effective Treatment for Phlegmasia Cerulea Dolens with Impending Venous Gangrene

    SciTech Connect

    Oguzkurt, Levent Tercan, Fahri; Ozkan, Ugur

    2008-01-15

    Phlegmasia cerulea dolens is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of acute deep vein thrombosis. It is an emergency and delay in treatment may cause death or loss of the patient's limb. Surgical thrombectomy is the recommended treatment in venous gangrene. Catheter-directed intrathrombus thrombolysis has been reported as successful, but it may require a lengthy infusion. Manual aspiration thrombectomy may clear the entire thrombus with no need for thrombolytic administration and provide rapid and effective treatment for patients with phlegmasia cerulea dolens with impending venous gangrene.

  10. The care of patients with varicose veins and associated chronic venous diseases: clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum.

    PubMed

    Gloviczki, Peter; Comerota, Anthony J; Dalsing, Michael C; Eklof, Bo G; Gillespie, David L; Gloviczki, Monika L; Lohr, Joann M; McLafferty, Robert B; Meissner, Mark H; Murad, M Hassan; Padberg, Frank T; Pappas, Peter J; Passman, Marc A; Raffetto, Joseph D; Vasquez, Michael A; Wakefield, Thomas W

    2011-05-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) have developed clinical practice guidelines for the care of patients with varicose veins of the lower limbs and pelvis. The document also includes recommendations on the management of superficial and perforating vein incompetence in patients with associated, more advanced chronic venous diseases (CVDs), including edema, skin changes, or venous ulcers. Recommendations of the Venous Guideline Committee are based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as strong (GRADE 1) if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks, burden, and costs. The suggestions are weak (GRADE 2) if the benefits are closely balanced with risks and burden. The level of available evidence to support the evaluation or treatment can be of high (A), medium (B), or low or very low (C) quality. The key recommendations of these guidelines are: We recommend that in patients with varicose veins or more severe CVD, a complete history and detailed physical examination are complemented by duplex ultrasound scanning of the deep and superficial veins (GRADE 1A). We recommend that the CEAP classification is used for patients with CVD (GRADE 1A) and that the revised Venous Clinical Severity Score is used to assess treatment outcome (GRADE 1B). We suggest compression therapy for patients with symptomatic varicose veins (GRADE 2C) but recommend against compression therapy as the primary treatment if the patient is a candidate for saphenous vein ablation (GRADE 1B). We recommend compression therapy as the primary treatment to aid healing of venous ulceration (GRADE 1B). To decrease the recurrence of venous ulcers, we recommend ablation of the incompetent superficial veins in addition to compression therapy (GRADE 1A). For treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein (GSV), we recommend endovenous thermal ablation (radiofrequency or laser) rather than high ligation and inversion stripping

  11. Venous gangrene of the upper extremity.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, B M; Shield, G W; Riddell, D H; Snell, J D

    1985-01-01

    Gangrene of the hand associated with acute upper extremity venous insufficiency has been seen in four limbs in three patients treated at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. All three patients had life-threatening illnesses associated with diminished tissue perfusion, hypercoagulability, and venous injury. One patient progressed to above-elbow amputation, but venous thrombectomy in one limb and thrombolytic therapy in two others were successful in preventing major tissue loss. All three patients eventually died from their underlying illness. Thirteen previously reported patients with "venous gangrene" of the upper extremity have been analyzed. An underlying life-threatening illness was present in the majority of these patients (7/13, 54%) and, like the Vanderbilt series, amputations were frequent (7/13, 54%) and mortality (5/13, 38%) was high. This unusual form of ischemia appears to be produced by permutations of global circulatory stasis, subclavian or axillary vein occlusion, and peripheral venous thrombosis. Early, aggressive restoration of adequate cardiac output and thrombectomy and/or thrombolytic therapy may provide the best chance for tissue salvage and survival in this group of patients. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. FIG. 3. FIG. 4. FIG. 5. FIGS. 6A and B. FIGS. 7A and B. FIG. 8. PMID:3977453

  12. Venous Malformation: update on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis & management

    PubMed Central

    Dompmartin, Anne; Vikkula, Miikka; Boon, Laurence M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current knowledge on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic management of venous malformations. Venous malformations (VMs) are slow-flow vascular anomalies. They are simple, sporadic or familial (cutaneo-mucosal venous malformation or glomuvenous malformations), combined (e.g. capillaro-venous, capillaro-lymphaticovenous malformations) or syndromic (Klippel-Trenaunay, Blue Rubber Bleb Naevus and Maffucci). Genetic studies have identified causes of familial forms and of 40% of sporadic VMs. Another diagnostic advancement is the identification of elevated D-dimer level as the first biomarker of venous malformations within vascular anomalies. Those associated with pain are often responsive to Low Molecular Weight Heparin which should also be used to avoid disseminated intravascular coagulopathy secondary to intervention, especially if fibrinogen level is low. Finally, development of a modified sclerosing agent, ethylcellulose–ethanol, has improved therapy. It is efficient and safe, and widens indications for sclerotherapy to sensitive and dangerous areas such as hands, feet and periocular area. PMID:20870869

  13. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee arthroplasty: a survey of Canadian orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Michael; Anderson, David R.; Nagpal, Seema; O’Brien, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacologic and physical modalities used by orthopedic surgeons in Canada to prevent venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Design Mail survey sent to all members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association. Setting A nation-wide study. Methods A total of 828 questionnaires, designed to identify the type and frequency of prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism that were used after hip and knee arthroplasty were mailed to orthopedic surgeons. Outcome measures Demographic data and the frequency and type of thromboprophylaxis. Results Of the 828 surveys mailed 445 (54%) were returned, and 397 were included in this analysis. Of the respondents, 97% used prophylaxis routinely for patients who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty. Three of the 397 (0.8%) did not use any method of prophylaxis. Warfarin was the most common agent used (46%), followed by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (36%). Combination therapy with both mechanical and pharmacologic methods were used in 39% of patients. Objective screening tests were not frequently performed before discharge. Extended prophylaxis beyond the duration of hospitalization was used by 36% of physicians. Conclusion Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism with warfarin or LMWH has become standard care after total hip or knee arthroplasty in Canada. PMID:10593248

  14. Endovascular occlusion of a ruptured transitional aneurysm associated with a developmental venous anomaly. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ducruet, Andrew F; Kellner, Christopher P; Connolly, E Sander; Meyers, Philip M

    2009-05-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) represent a rare cause of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. This case demonstrates an unusual DVA associated with venous hypertension, arteriovenous shunting, and a ruptured transitional aneurysm. The authors describe the first use of embolization as a treatment method for an unstable ruptured transitional aneurysm associated with a DVA. This 33-year-old man suffered acute onset of headache, gait ataxia, and left hemiparesis. Computed tomography brain scans demonstrated a deep paramedian right frontal intraparenchymal hemorrhage. No cavernous malformation was apparent on MR imaging. Diagnostic angiography revealed arteriovenous shunting from the right anterior and middle cerebral arteries to a large DVA with an associated arteriovenous fistula, with a 3-mm aneurysm in the transition from pericallosal artery to the collecting vein. Both surgical and endovascular treatment options were considered. The patient underwent repeat angiography on hospital Day 7, at which time the aneurysm had increased to 5 mm, and endovascular treatment was selected. Acrylic occlusion of the aneurysm was performed and confirmed angiographically. The patient's neurological symptoms resolved throughout the hospital stay, and he remains symptom free in the 10 months since treatment. Developmental venous anomalies are not usually associated with arteriovenous shunting and aneurysms as a source of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Endovascular occlusion of the aneurysm without blockage of physiologically necessary venous structures is a possible method of treatment for this complex mixed vascular lesion, and has proven safe and effective in this patient. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first presentation of this situation in the literature.

  15. Comparison of Oseltamivir and Oseltamivir Carboxylate Concentrations in Venous Plasma, Venous Blood, and Capillary Blood in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Instiaty, Insti; Lindegardh, Niklas; Jittmala, Podjanee; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Blessborn, Daniel; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; White, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate concentrations were measured in venous plasma, venous blood, and capillary blood taken simultaneously from 24 healthy volunteers. Median (range) venous-blood-to-plasma ratios were 1.42 (0.920 to 1.97) for oseltamivir and 0.673 (0.564 to 0.814) for oseltamivir carboxylate. Capillary blood/venous plasma ratios were 1.32 (0.737 to 3.16) for oseltamivir and 0.685 (0.502 to 1.34) for oseltamivir carboxylate. Oseltamivir concentrations in venous and capillary blood were similar. Oseltamivir carboxylate showed a time-dependent distribution between venous and capillary blood. PMID:23507284

  16. [Cerebral venous thrombosis during tuberculous meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Guenifi, W; Boukhrissa, H; Gasmi, A; Rais, M; Ouyahia, A; Hachani, A; Diab, N; Mechakra, S; Lacheheb, A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare disease characterized by its clinical polymorphism and multiplicity of risk factors. Infections represent less than 10% of etiologies. Tuberculosis is not a common etiology, only a few observations are published in the literature. Between January 2005 and March 2015, 61 patients were hospitalized for neuro-meningeal tuberculosis. Among them, three young women had presented one or more cerebral venous sinus thromboses. No clinical feature was observed in these patients; vascular localizations were varied: sagittal sinus (2 cases), lateral sinus (2 cases) and transverse sinus (1 case). With anticoagulant and antituberculosis drugs, the outcome was favorable in all cases. During neuro-meningeal tuberculosis, the existence of consciousness disorders or neurological focal signs is not always the translation of encephalitis, hydrocephalus, tuberculoma or ischemic stroke; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be the cause and therefore should be sought. PMID:27090100

  17. Infections associated with the central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Drasković, Biljana; Fabri, Izabella; Benka, Anna Uram; Rakić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheters are of an essential importance to critically ill patients who require long-term venous access for various purposes. Their use made the treatment much easier, but still they are not harmless and are prone to numerous complications. Catheter infections represent the most significant complication in their use. The frequency of infections varies in different patient care settings, but their appearance mostly depends on the patient's health condition, catheter insertion time, localization of the catheter and type of the used catheter. Since they are one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and related to significant number of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units, it is very important that maximal aseptic precautions are taken during the insertion and the maintenance period. Prevention of infection of the central venous catheters demands several measures that should be applied routinely.

  18. Noninvasive measurement of central venous pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. G.; Mastenbrook, S. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A technique for the noninvasive measurement of CVP in man was developed. The method involves monitoring venous velocity at a point in the periphery with a transcutaneous Doppler ultrasonic velocity meter while the patient performs a forced expiratory maneuver. The idea is the CVP is related to the value of pressure measured at the mouth which just stops the flow in the vein. Two improvements were made over the original procedure. First, the site of venous velocity measurement was shifted from a vein at the antecubital fossa (elbow) to the right external jugular vein in the neck. This allows for sensing more readily events occurring in the central veins. Secondly, and perhaps most significantly, a procedure for obtaining a curve of relative mean venous velocity vs mouth pressure was developed.

  19. Prevalence of detectable venous pressure drops expected with venous needle dislodgement.

    PubMed

    Ribitsch, Werner; Schilcher, Gernot; Hafner-Giessauf, Hildegard; Krisper, Peter; Horina, Jörg H; Rosenkranz, Alexander R; Schneditz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Venous needle dislodgement (VND) is a potentially fatal complication during hemodialysis (HD) treatment and the venous pressure monitor is the most widely used device for its detection. VND can only be detected by the venous sensor if the resulting pressure drop exceeds the difference between the actual venous pressure and the lower alarm limit. In clinical practice, the lower alarm limit is usually set 30-40 mmHg below the actual venous pressure to avoid a disproportionate high number of nuisance alarms. The aim of this study was to quantify the number of fistulas and grafts in a group of HD patients where venous pressure monitoring can be expected to detect VND. We determined intra-access pressures in 99 chronic HD patients. Sixty-five (65.7%) had a fistula and 34 (34.3%) had a prosthetic graft as a vascular access. Mean intra-access pressure (Pa ) in fistulas was 32.6 ± 23.5 mmHg, whereas in grafts mean Pa was 60.9 ± 19.5 mmHg. Nineteen (29.2%) of the fistulas and 32 (94.1%) of the grafts exhibited an intra-access pressure above 40 mmHg. Therefore, in our study nearly all grafts but only 29% of fistulas would fulfill the requirement for venous pressure monitoring to detect VND. PMID:24341865

  20. [A case of retroperitoneal venous aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Maeda, S; Tamaki, M; Yamamoto, N; Takeda, A; Kuriyama, M; Kawada, Y; Mizoguchi, Y; Kasahara, M

    1991-01-01

    Venous aneurysm is a rare entity and the disease occurring in the retroperitoneal space has been reported in only 4 cases. Therefore, the fifth case of retroperitoneal venous aneurysm on the literature was described. A 59-year-old male was referred to our clinic because of painless large mass in the left abdomen. Computed tomography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic mass at the perinephric space. The resected cyst contained yellow-grayish fluid. The cyst wall was microscopically formed of 4 layers; blood and cholesterin, hyaline, muscle and collagen from the inner to outer side. He is well without any trouble after the operation.

  1. Prospective screening for deep vein thrombosis in high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R W

    1977-08-01

    In 257 patients undergoing total hip replacement, gastric bypass for morbid obesity, major abdominal surgery, and major leg amputation, Doppler ultrasonic screening revealed only five instances of deep vein thrombosis. The present study suggests that Doppler screening of high risk patients is a useful alternative to routine anticoagulant prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic disease.

  2. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF POSTPARTUM ILIOFEMORAL DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS--CASE REPORTS.

    PubMed

    Cazan, I; Strobescu, Cristina; Baroi, Genoveva; Cazan, Simona; Lefter, G; Popa, R F

    2016-01-01

    The writing committee for Antithrombotic Therapy for Venous Thromboembolic Disease of the 2008 ACCP guidelines made the following recommendations for thrombus removal strategies in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT): open surgical thrombectomy is recommended in patients with acute iliofemoral DVT to reduce symptoms and post-thrombotic morbidity; whenever available, catheter-directed thrombolysis is preferred to surgical venous thrombectomy, the risk of hemorrhage being diminished; surgical venous thrombectomy is recognized to be efficient in cases where catheter-directed thrombolysis is unavailable or the patients are not suitable candidates for such a procedure. Randomized studies comparing surgical thrombectomy and anticoagulant therapy in patients with iliofemoral DVT (IFDVT) showed that at 6 months, 5 years, and 10 years the patients in the thrombectomy group presented increased permeability, lower venous pressure, less edema, and fewer postthrombotic symptoms compared to the patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. In this article we present 3 cases of IFDVT in postpartum patients diagnosed by Doppler ultrasound of the deep venous system. The 3 patients received anticoagulant therapy prior to surgery. Surgery consisted in thrombectomy of the common, superficial and deep femoral veins, external and internal iliac veins, and femoral-saphenous arteriovenous fistula. The patients received postoperative antithrombotic therapy and were followed-up at 3, 6 and 9 months by Doppler ultrasound of the deep venous system. PMID:27483722

  3. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF POSTPARTUM ILIOFEMORAL DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS--CASE REPORTS.

    PubMed

    Cazan, I; Strobescu, Cristina; Baroi, Genoveva; Cazan, Simona; Lefter, G; Popa, R F

    2016-01-01

    The writing committee for Antithrombotic Therapy for Venous Thromboembolic Disease of the 2008 ACCP guidelines made the following recommendations for thrombus removal strategies in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT): open surgical thrombectomy is recommended in patients with acute iliofemoral DVT to reduce symptoms and post-thrombotic morbidity; whenever available, catheter-directed thrombolysis is preferred to surgical venous thrombectomy, the risk of hemorrhage being diminished; surgical venous thrombectomy is recognized to be efficient in cases where catheter-directed thrombolysis is unavailable or the patients are not suitable candidates for such a procedure. Randomized studies comparing surgical thrombectomy and anticoagulant therapy in patients with iliofemoral DVT (IFDVT) showed that at 6 months, 5 years, and 10 years the patients in the thrombectomy group presented increased permeability, lower venous pressure, less edema, and fewer postthrombotic symptoms compared to the patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. In this article we present 3 cases of IFDVT in postpartum patients diagnosed by Doppler ultrasound of the deep venous system. The 3 patients received anticoagulant therapy prior to surgery. Surgery consisted in thrombectomy of the common, superficial and deep femoral veins, external and internal iliac veins, and femoral-saphenous arteriovenous fistula. The patients received postoperative antithrombotic therapy and were followed-up at 3, 6 and 9 months by Doppler ultrasound of the deep venous system.

  4. The value of combined strain gauge plethysmography and radioactive iodine fibrinogen scan of the leg in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    AbuRahma, A.F.; Lawton, W.E. Jr.; Osborne, L.

    1983-05-01

    The fallibility of the clinical diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis has led to a variety of noninvasive diagnostic methods, for example, Doppler ultrasound, plethysmography, /sup 125/I fibrinogen and radionuclide phlebography. This study was undertaken to analyze the value of combined strain gauge plethysmography and /sup 125/I fibrinogen scan of the leg in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. The study was carried out upon 368 patients with suggestive findings of venous thrombosis. Four hundred and fifty strain gauge plethysmograms were reviewed. Venograms were done upon 106 limbs and /sup 125/I fibrinogen leg scans, on 136 limbs. Of the 64 limbs with normal strain gauge plethysmograms which had venograms, 58 were normal, five had incompetent perforators and one limb had deep venous thrombosis. Of the 42 legs with abnormal strain gauge plethysmograms which had venograms, 25 had deep venous thrombosis, 15 had incompetent perforators and two were normal. Twenty-three of 24 legs having both abnormal strain gauge plethysmograms and leg scans were confirmed to have deep venous thrombosis at venography. Fourteen of 18 legs with abnormal strain gauge plethysmograms but normal scans were found to have incompetent perforators. We conclude, that the strain gauge plethysmogram is a reliable test in excluding deep venous thrombosis and, when combined with the fibrinogen leg scan, is reliable in its diagnosis.

  5. [Duration of anticoagulant therapy in venous thromboembolic complications].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Leontyev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A; Tolstikhin, V Yu; Khotinskiy, A A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate anticoagulant therapy is a general approach to treatment of deep vein thrombosis. However, the duration of anticoagulant therapy is not strictly specified in everyday clinical practice. The present article deals with various approaches to selecting the duration of therapy with anticoagulants based on the findings of studies, national and foreign clinical guidelines. The minimal duration of therapy for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism amounts to 3 months in accordance with the national and American recommendations. For some cohorts of patients, continuation of therapy above 3 months is considered: patients with idiopathic thrombosis (the recommended duration of therapy of not less than 6 months), patients having persisting risk factor for relapse of thrombosis on termination of the main therapeutic course, oncological patients (6 month therapy followed by assessing the risk and benefit of continuing therapy with anticoagulants). Prolonged therapy of venous thromboembolism using unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin followed by changing over to vitamin K antagonists is associated with decreased risk for thrombosis relapse approximately by 90%, however increasing the risk of haemorrhage. Currently, as an alternative, it is possible to consider administration of novel oral anticoagulants (rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban) which beside high efficacy are associated with less risk of bleeding. The route of administration, no necessity to control the INR, and the minimal number of drug and food interactions make administration of new oral anticoagulants an attractive alternative to therapy with heparins and vitamin K antagonists.

  6. [Duration of anticoagulant therapy in venous thromboembolic complications].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Leontyev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A; Tolstikhin, V Yu; Khotinskiy, A A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate anticoagulant therapy is a general approach to treatment of deep vein thrombosis. However, the duration of anticoagulant therapy is not strictly specified in everyday clinical practice. The present article deals with various approaches to selecting the duration of therapy with anticoagulants based on the findings of studies, national and foreign clinical guidelines. The minimal duration of therapy for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism amounts to 3 months in accordance with the national and American recommendations. For some cohorts of patients, continuation of therapy above 3 months is considered: patients with idiopathic thrombosis (the recommended duration of therapy of not less than 6 months), patients having persisting risk factor for relapse of thrombosis on termination of the main therapeutic course, oncological patients (6 month therapy followed by assessing the risk and benefit of continuing therapy with anticoagulants). Prolonged therapy of venous thromboembolism using unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin followed by changing over to vitamin K antagonists is associated with decreased risk for thrombosis relapse approximately by 90%, however increasing the risk of haemorrhage. Currently, as an alternative, it is possible to consider administration of novel oral anticoagulants (rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban) which beside high efficacy are associated with less risk of bleeding. The route of administration, no necessity to control the INR, and the minimal number of drug and food interactions make administration of new oral anticoagulants an attractive alternative to therapy with heparins and vitamin K antagonists. PMID:27100556

  7. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1140 Venous...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1140 Venous blood pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a...

  9. Impact of anatomical location of lower limb venous thrombus on the risk of subsequent cancer.

    PubMed

    Galanaud, J-P; Arnoult, A C; Sevestre, M-A; Genty, C; Bonaldi, M; Guyard, A; Giordana, P; Pichot, O; Colonna, M; Quéré, I; Bosson, J-L

    2014-12-01

    After a proximal deep-vein thrombosis (P-DVT), the risk of diagnosis of a previously unsuspected cancer is high. Isolated distal DVT (iD-DVT; i.e. infra-popliteal DVT without pulmonary embolism [PE]) and isolated superficial-vein thrombosis (iSVT; i.e. without concomitant DVT and PE) are at least as frequent as P-DVT but their association with subsequent cancer is uncertain. We exploited data from the OPTIMEV prospective, observational, multicentre study to i) compare the risk of subsequent cancer three years after a first objectively confirmed iSVT, iD-DVT and iP-DVT in patients without a prior history of cancer or of venous thromboembolism, ii) assess predictors of subsequent cancer in cases of iD-DVT. The overall cumulative rates of cancer among the 304 patients with iSVT, 536 patients with iD-DVT, and 327 patients with iP-DVT were similar (3.4% 95% confidence interval [1.8-6.2], 3.9% [2.5-5.9] and 3.9% [2.3-6.8], respectively), regardless of whether the index venous thromboembolic event was unprovoked or associated with a major transient risk factor. Neither anatomical (muscular vs deep-calf DVT) nor ultrasound scan characteristics (number of thrombosed veins, clot diameter under compression) seemed strongly associated with the risk of cancer in cases of iD-DVT. In patients managed in routine practice, all the different clinical expressions of lower limb venous thromboembolism are associated with a similar risk of subsequent cancer. From a clinical practice point of view, this suggests that cancer screening, without discussing the necessity, or not, of such screening, should not differ between a deep-proximal, deep-distal or superficial location of thrombosis. PMID:25104514

  10. Venous Thoracic Outlet Compression and the Paget-Schroetter Syndrome: A Review and Recommendations for Management

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J. F. Winterborn, R. J.; Bays, S.; White, H.; Kinsella, D. C.; Watkinson, A. F.

    2011-10-15

    Paget Schroetter syndrome, or effort thrombosis of the axillosubclavian venous system, is distinct from other forms of upper limb deep vein thrombosis. It occurs in younger patients and often is secondary to competitive sport, music, or strenuous occupation. If untreated, there is a higher incidence of disabling venous hypertension than was previously appreciated. Anticoagulation alone or in combination with thrombolysis leads to a high rate of rethrombosis. We have established a multidisciplinary protocol over 15 years, based on careful patient selection and a combination of lysis, decompressive surgery, and postoperative percutaneous venoplasty. During the past 10 years, a total of 232 decompression procedures have been performed. This article reviews the literature and presents the Exeter Protocol along with practical recommendations for management.

  11. Use of technetium-99m sulfur colloid as a marker for experimental venous thrombosis: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Bardfeld, P.A.; Rand, J.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1981-07-01

    The binding of technetium-99m sulfur colloid to in vivo thrombi was studied in a rat model of deep vein thrombosis. After thrombosis was induced by mechanical traumatization of a right femoral vein segment, technetium-99m sulfur colloid was injected into the peripheral veins of different experimental groups at intervals of 30 min and 1-7 days. Ratios of mean activity in traumatized right femoral vein segment to activity in control segments of left femoral vein (R/L ratios) ranged form 2.97-11.0 for all in situ venous thrombi studied. There was no relation between clot size and R/L ratios. The significant uptake ratios observed by us for venous thrombi up to 1 wk in age suggest that in vivo thrombus detection may be feasible by imaging with a gamma camera after technetium-99m sulfur colloid injection in a peripheral vein.

  12. Use of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid as a marker for experimental venous thrombosis: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Bardfeld, P.A.; Rand, J.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1981-07-01

    The binding of technetium-99m sulfur colloid to in vivo thrombi was studied in a rat model of deep vein thrombosis. After thrombosis was induced by mechanical traumatization of a right femoral vein segment, technetium-99m sulfur colloid was injected into the peripheral veins of different experimental groups at intervals of 30 min and 1 to 7 days. Ratios of mean activity in traumatized right femoral vein segment to activity in control segments of left femoral vein (R/L ratios) ranged from 2.97 to 11.0 for all in situ venous thrombi studied. There was no relation between clot size and R/L ratios. The significant uptake ratios observed by us for venous thrombi up to 1 wk in age suggest that in vivo thrombus detection may be feasible by imaging with a gamma camera after technetium-99m sulfur colloid injection in a peripheral vein.

  13. Venous thromboembolism risk associated with protracted work- and computer-related seated immobility: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Bridget; Cameron, Laird; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between venous thromboembolism and prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility. Design A case-control study. Participants and setting Cases were 200 patients attending venous thromboembolism clinics with a history of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism in the past six months, and controls were 200 patients treated in fracture clinic for an upper limb injury in the past six months. Main outcome measures Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between venous thromboembolism and prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility in the 28 days before the index event. Prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility was defined firstly as a categorical variable with at least 10 h seated in a 24-h period, including at least 2 h without getting up; and secondly as the actual time spent seated in a 24-h period. Results Prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility (categorical variable) was present in 36 (18%) cases and 31 (15.5%) controls. In multivariate analysis, there was no significant association between prolonged seated immobility and venous thromboembolism, odds ratio 1.18 (95% CI 0.56 to 2.48), P = 0.67. For the mean and maximum number of hours seated in a 24-h period, the odds ratios for the association per additional hour seated with venous thromboembolism were 1.08 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.6), P = 0.02 and 1.04 (95% CI 0.99 to 1.09), P = 0.08, respectively. Conclusion This study found a weak association between venous thromboembolism and prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility, with increasing mean hours seated associated with a higher risk of venous thromboembolism. PMID:27540486

  14. Nonclinical aspects of venous thrombosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Struble, Evi; Harrouk, Wafa; DeFelice, Albert; Tesfamariam, Belay

    2015-09-01

    Pregnancy is a hypercoagulable state which carries an excess risk of maternal venous thrombosis. Endothelial injury, alterations in blood flow and activation of the coagulation pathway are proposed to contribute to the hypercoagulability. The risk for thrombosis may be accentuated by certain drugs and device implants that directly or indirectly affect the coagulation pathway. To help ensure that these interventions do not result in adverse maternal or fetal outcomes during pregnancy, gravid experimental animals can be exposed to such treatments at various stages of gestation and over a dosage range that would identify hazards and inform risk assessment. Circulating soluble biomarkers can also be evaluated for enhancing the assessment of any increased risk of venous thrombosis during pregnancy. In addition to traditional in vivo animal testing, efforts are under way to incorporate reliable non-animal methods in the assessment of embryofetal toxicity and thrombogenic effects. This review summarizes hemostatic balance during pregnancy in animal species, embryofetal development, biomarkers of venous thrombosis, and alterations caused by drug-induced venous thrombosis.

  15. [Arterial and venous microanastomoses in the rat].

    PubMed

    Gianaroli, L; Bufferli, M; Livani, M F

    1980-11-15

    Arterial and venous microvascular surgery for diameters smaller than 2 mm are shown with particular care. Some technical devices are put in evidence. Besides their statistical data the Authors present immediate and long term post-operative controls which are usually applied. The most frequent causes of failure are discussed. PMID:7213480

  16. PROPHYLAXIS OF VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM IN ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Leme, Luiz Eugênio Garcez; Sguizzatto, Guilherme Turolla

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism and its complications in orthopedic surgery is increasingly significant. This review discusses the pathophysiology of thrombus formation in general and orthopedic surgery, its incidence, predisposing factors and complications. It also presents an updated presentation and critique of prophylaxis currently available in our environment. PMID:27047885

  17. Transplantation of cryopreserved canine venous allografts.

    PubMed

    Bank, H L; Schmehl, M K; Warner, R; Pratt, M F; Albernaz, M S; Metcalf, J S; Darcy, M

    1991-01-01

    Local vascular reconstructions frequently require the use of vein grafts to bridge arterial or venous defects. Most previous studies on the use of cryopreserved veins have used relatively large caliber vessels. There have been few studies on the effectiveness of cryopreserved micro- or small-venous allografts. Here, we tested two types of cryopreserved venous allografts: (1) 1.5- to 1.9-mm diameter microvenous grafts (MVG); and (2) 4- to 5-mm diameter small venous grafts (SVG). Cryopreserved MVG allografts were placed into saphenous arteries of six experimental dogs and SVG cryopreserved allografts were placed into femoral arteries of six experimental dogs for 3 to 6 weeks. Two fresh MVG autografts were also transplanted into experimental dogs as controls and autografts were transferred to the contralateral side in SVG dogs as controls. None of the six cryopreserved MVG grafts retained patency but three/six cryopreserved SVG allografts were patent at harvest. Histological examination of grfts revealed control autografts were undergoing arterialization with an intact intima. Experimental cryopreserved allografts showed extensive medial fibrosis, significant lymphocytic infiltrates, and sporadic areas of intact intima for both patent and nonpatent grafts.

  18. [A case of retroperitoneal venous aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, A; Nishimura, K; Matsumiya, K; Oka, T; Takaha, M; Arima, R; Kurata, A

    1992-09-01

    A case of retroperitoneal venous aneurysm is reported. A 73-year-old woman was referred to us with the chief complaint of left abdominal mass. A giant abdominal mass was palpable and diagnostic imaging examination including ultrasound tomography, excretory pyelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed a giant cystic mass encircled by calcification in the left retroperitoneal space. Operation for this cystic mass was performed under the preoperative diagnosis of a giant left renal cyst. During operation the mass was located between the left kidney and the left adrenal gland. Because it was difficult to separate the mass from the left kidney the mass was removed with the left kidney. The extirpated tumor measured 15.5 x 15.0 x 9.5 cm and contained old blood clots and red-yellow colored fluid. A histological examination revealed that the tumor wall was composed of smooth muscle and elastic fibers. Therefore, pathological diagnosis was retroperitoneal venous aneurysm. Retroperitoneal venous aneurysm is very rare. To our knowledge, this is the 8th case of retroperitoneal venous aneurysm reported in Japan.

  19. Arterialized Venous Bone Flaps: An Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Borumandi, Farzad; Higgins, James P.; Buerger, Heinz; Vasilyeva, Anna; Benlidayi, Memmet Emre; Sencar, Leman; Gaggl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In arterialized venous flaps (AVFs) the venous network is used to revascularize the flap. While the feasibility of AVFs in soft tissues has been reported there is no study on osseous AVFs. In this study we aim to assess the flap survival of osseous AVFs in a pig model. Medial femoral condyle flaps were elevated in 18 pigs. Three groups were created: AVF (n = 6), conventional arterial flap (cAF, n = 6) and bone graft (BG, n = 6). The AVFs were created by anastomosis of genicular artery with one vena comitans while leaving one efferent vein for drainage. After 6 months the specimens were harvested. The histology and histomorphometry of of the bone in cAF and AVF was significantly superior to bone grafts with a higher bone volume in AVFs (p = 0.01). This study demonstrates that osseous free flaps may be supported and survive using the technique of arterialization of the venous network. The concept of AVFs in osseous flaps may be feasible for revascularization of free flaps with an inadequate artery but well developed veins. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to assess the feasibility of clinical use of arterialized venous bone flaps. PMID:27558705

  20. [Venous thrombosis associated with central venous catheter use in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Iglesias Rey, Leticia; Fernández Pérez, Isaura; Barbagelata López, Cristina; Rivera Gallego, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters for various applications (administration of chemotherapy, blood products and others) in patients with cancer is increasingly frequent. The association between thrombosis and catheter use has been fully established but aspects such as its causes, diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment have not. We describe a case of thrombosis in a patient with cancer treated with chemotherapy who carried a central venous catheter. We also perform a review of the risk factors, the role of the prophylaxis and the treatment.

  1. Emergency imaging assessment of deep neck space infections.

    PubMed

    Maroldi, Roberto; Farina, Davide; Ravanelli, Marco; Lombardi, Davide; Nicolai, Piero

    2012-10-01

    Deep neck space infection may lead to severe and potentially life-threatening complications, such as airway obstruction, mediastinitis, septic embolization, dural sinus thrombosis, and intracranial abscess. The clinical presentation is widely variable, and often early symptoms do not reflect the disease severity. The complication risk depends on the extent and anatomical site: diseases that transgress fascial boundaries and spread along vertically oriented spaces (parapharyngeal, retropharyngeal, and paravertebral space) have a higher risk of complications and require a more aggressive treatment compared with those confined within a nonvertically oriented space (peritonsillar, sublingual, submandibular, parotid, and masticator space). Imaging has 5 crucial roles: (1) confirm the suspected clinical diagnosis, (2) define the precise extent of the disease, (3) identify complications, (4) distinguish between drainable abscesses and cellulitis, and (5) monitor deep neck space infection progression. Ultrasonography is the gold standard to differentiate abscesses from cellulitis, for the diagnosis of lymphadenitis. and to identify internal jugular thrombophlebitis in the infrahyoid neck. However, field-of-view limitation and poor anatomical information confine the use of ultrasonography to the evaluation of superficial lesions and to image-guided aspiration or drainage. Computed tomography (CT) combines fast image acquisition and precise anatomical information without field-of-view limitations. For these reasons, it is the most reliable technique for the evaluation of deep and multicompartment lesions and for the identification of mediastinal and intracranial complications. Contrast agent administration enhances the capability to differentiate fluid collections from cellulitis and allows the detection of vascular complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is more time-consuming than CT, limiting its use to selected indications. It is the technique of choice for assessing

  2. Functional morphology of venous structures associated with the male and female reproductive systems in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Rommel, S A; Pabst, D A; McLellan, W A

    2001-12-01

    The reproductive organs of Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are surrounded by thermogenic locomotory muscles and insulating fat. Manatees are reported to maintain core body temperatures of 35.6 degrees -36.4 degrees C, temperatures known to interfere with production and maturation of viable sperm in terrestrial mammals. We describe two novel venous plexuses associated with the manatee epididymis. Each epididymis is located in a hypogastric fossa at the caudolateral extremity of the abdominal cavity. Each hypogastric fossa is lined by an inguinal venous plexus that receives cooled blood from a superficial thoracocaudal plexus. We conclude that male manatees may prevent hyperthermic insult to their reproductive tissues by feeding cooled superficial blood to venous plexuses deep within their bodies. Female manatees also possess hypogastric fossae and venous structures similar to those found in male manatees. The ovaries, uterine tubes, and distal tips of the uterine horns are located in the hypogastric fossae. We suggest that the thermovascular structures we describe also prevent hypothermic insult to female manatee reproductive tissues. The venous structures in manatees are functionally similar to structures associated with reproductive thermoregulation in cetaceans and phocid seals. Thus, these thermovascular structures appear to be convergent morphological adaptations that occur in three clades of diving mammals with independent evolutionary histories.

  3. Venous Thromboembolism After Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Tanaka, Osamu; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Miura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of new or recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) after retrieval of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters and risk factors associated with such recurrence. Between March 2001 and September 2008, at our institution, implanted retrievable vena cava filters were retrieved in 76 patients. The incidence of new or recurrent VTE after retrieval was reviewed and numerous variables were analyzed to assess risk factors for redevelopment of VTE after filter retrieval. In 5 (6.6%) of the 76 patients, redevelopment or worsening of VTE was seen after retrieval of the filter. Three patients (4.0%) had recurrent deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the lower extremities and 2 (2.6%) had development of pulmonary embolism, resulting in death. Although there was no significant difference in the incidence of new or recurrent VTE related to any risk factor investigated, a tendency for development of VTE after filter retrieval was higher in patients in whom DVT in the lower extremities had been so severe during filter implantation that interventional radiological therapies in addition to traditional anticoagulation therapies were required (40% in patients with recurrent VTE vs. 23% in those without VTE; p = 0.5866 according to Fisher's exact probability test) and in patients in whom DVT remained at the time of filter retrieval (60% in patients with recurrent VTE vs. 37% in those without VTE; p = 0.3637). In conclusion, new or recurrent VTE was rare after retrieval of IVC filters but was most likely to occur in patients who had severe DVT during filter implantation and/or in patients with a DVT that remained at the time of filter retrieval. We must point out that the fatality rate from PE after filter removal was high (2.6%).

  4. Clinical study of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and puerperium.

    PubMed

    Adachi, T; Hashiguchi, K; Arai, Y; Ohta, H

    2001-01-01

    We encountered 16 cases of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in women during pregnancy and/or puerperium over the past 15 years at our perinatal center, representing 0.14% of all patients who delivered babies. The present study was undertaken to analyze the risk factors, clinical course and outcomes in these 16 cases. The ages of the patients varied from 29 to 39 years. Four women had pulmonary embolism (PE), 3 of which after caesarean section (C/S) at 35 to 40 weeks, and one case after ovarian cystectomy at 13 weeks of gestation. Twelve cases had deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 4 of which during pregnancy, and the remaining 8 cases after C/S. Four patients who had DVT during a normal course of pregnancy had severe thrombophilia: antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, a history of thrombosis and antithrombin (AT) deficiency. They were treated with heparin with or without AT and had healthy babies via successful vaginal deliveries. The common risk factors in 3 cases of PE with C/S was prolonged bed rest due to threatened premature delivery with total placenta previa, uterine myoma and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Other risk factors were massive bleeding, and positive lupus anticoagulant. However, the case of the ovarian cystectomy had only one risk factor, which was obesity. This patient died but the remaining patients recovered with treatment. Because of the low incidence of thrombosis in the Japanese population, prophylactic anticoagulant therapy has not routinely been given to patients undergoing obstetrical operations. However, proper management including prophylactic anticoagulant therapy might be considered for risk patients, depending on the risk factors.

  5. Partial Aortic Occlusion and Cerebral Venous Steal: Venous Effects of Arterial Manipulation in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Liebeskind, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke therapy emphasizes early arterial clot lysis or removal. Partial aortic occlusion has recently emerged as an alternative hemodynamic approach to augment cerebral perfusion in acute ischemic stroke. The exact mechanism of cerebral flow augmentation with partial aortic occlusion remains unclear and may involve more than simple diversion of arterial blood flow from the lower body to cerebral collateral circulation. The cerebral venous steal hypothesis suggests that even a small increase in tissue pressure in the ischemic area will divert blood flow to surrounding regions with lesser tissue pressures. This may cause no-reflow (absence of flow after restoration of arterial patency) in the ischemic core and “luxury perfusion” in the surrounding regions. Such maldistribution may be reversed with increased venous pressure titrated to avoid changes in intracranial pressure. We propose that partial aortic occlusion enhances perfusion in the brain by offsetting cerebral venous steal. Partial aortic occlusion redistributes blood volume into the upper part of the body, manifest by an increase in central venous pressure. Increased venous pressure recruits the collapsed vascular network and, by eliminating cerebral venous steal, corrects perifocal perfusion maldistribution, analogous to positive end expiratory pressure recruitment of collapsed airways to decrease ventilation/perfusion mismatch in the lungs. PMID:21441149

  6. [Venous thromboembolism's risk assessment: rationale, objectives, and methodology--the ARTE study].

    PubMed

    França, Ana; De Sousa, Joaquim Abreu; Felicíssimo, Paulo; Ferreira, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a frequent clinical condition with high impact on both morbidity and mortality. Venous thromboembolism risk is particularly high in hospitalized patients as well as in oncologic patients, being a factor of poor prognosis for the oncologic disease. Several clinical studies have shown the need to develop effective hospital strategies using a systematic and individualized assessment of venous thromboembolism risk, and additionally to optimize the institution of prophylaxis treatment and its proper use in the context of in-hospital and outpatient management. The ARTE national study is a non-interventional, multicentre, prospective study which is divided in two phases. In the first phase patients are followed in the hospital; in the second phase patients are followed in ambulatory context for a period of 6 months after discharge. Four thousand patients will be included, equally distributed over medical, surgical, oncologic and orthopaedic patients. Data will be collected from the patient's clinical files and through direct clinical evaluation of risk factors for venous thromboembolism, in the departments of medicine, oncology, surgery, and orthopaedics of the participating centres. The main objectives of the study are to assess the risk profile of venous thromboembolism of the study population using a risk assessment model adapted from the Caprini and Khorana et al models, and the validation of the score for the Portuguese population. Simultaneously, the secondary objectives are as follows: to determine the proportion of patients with venous thromboembolism risk, according to the risk assessment model, that are doing prophylaxis; to determine the duration of prophylaxis during the hospitalization; to determine the proportion of patients doing long-term prophylaxis, at the moment of the discharge; to determine the incidence of thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis; stroke; pulmonary thromboembolism; transient ischemic attack

  7. [Venous thromboembolism's risk assessment: rationale, objectives, and methodology--the ARTE study].

    PubMed

    França, Ana; De Sousa, Joaquim Abreu; Felicíssimo, Paulo; Ferreira, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a frequent clinical condition with high impact on both morbidity and mortality. Venous thromboembolism risk is particularly high in hospitalized patients as well as in oncologic patients, being a factor of poor prognosis for the oncologic disease. Several clinical studies have shown the need to develop effective hospital strategies using a systematic and individualized assessment of venous thromboembolism risk, and additionally to optimize the institution of prophylaxis treatment and its proper use in the context of in-hospital and outpatient management. The ARTE national study is a non-interventional, multicentre, prospective study which is divided in two phases. In the first phase patients are followed in the hospital; in the second phase patients are followed in ambulatory context for a period of 6 months after discharge. Four thousand patients will be included, equally distributed over medical, surgical, oncologic and orthopaedic patients. Data will be collected from the patient's clinical files and through direct clinical evaluation of risk factors for venous thromboembolism, in the departments of medicine, oncology, surgery, and orthopaedics of the participating centres. The main objectives of the study are to assess the risk profile of venous thromboembolism of the study population using a risk assessment model adapted from the Caprini and Khorana et al models, and the validation of the score for the Portuguese population. Simultaneously, the secondary objectives are as follows: to determine the proportion of patients with venous thromboembolism risk, according to the risk assessment model, that are doing prophylaxis; to determine the duration of prophylaxis during the hospitalization; to determine the proportion of patients doing long-term prophylaxis, at the moment of the discharge; to determine the incidence of thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis; stroke; pulmonary thromboembolism; transient ischemic attack

  8. Lessons from French National Guidelines on the treatment of venous thrombosis and central venous catheter thrombosis in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Farge, Dominique; Durant, Cecile; Villiers, Stéphane; Long, Anne; Mahr, Alfred; Marty, Michel; Debourdeau, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Increased prevalence of Venous thromboembolism (VTE), as defined by deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), central venous catheter (CVC) related thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (PE) in cancer patients has become a major therapeutic issue. Considering the epidemiology and each national recommendations on the treatment of VTE in cancer patients, we analysed guidelines implementation in clinical practice. Thrombosis is the second-leading cause of death in cancer patients and cancer is a major risk factor of VTE, due to activation of coagulation, use of long-term CVC, the thrombogenic effects of chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic drugs. Three pivotal trials (CANTHANOX, LITE and CLOT) and several meta-analysis led to recommend the long term (3 to 6 months) use of LMWH during for treating VTE in cancer patients with a high level of evidence. The Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the French "Institut National du Cancer" (INCa), the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCCP) have published specific guidelines for health care providers regarding the prevention and treatment of cancer-associated VTE. Critical appraisal of these guidelines, difficulties in implementation of prophylaxis regimen, tolerance and cost effectiveness of long term use of LMWH may account for large heterogenity in daily clinical practice. Homogenization of these guidelines in international consensus using an adapted independent methodological approach followed by educational and active implementation strategies at each national level would be very valuable to improve the care of VTE in cancer patients. PMID:20433988

  9. Inferior Vena Cava Filter-Related Thrombus/Deep Vein Thrombosis: Data and Management.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Jessica M; Thornburg, Bartley G; Hickey, Ryan M

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent deep venous thrombosis and inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis are well-described complications following IVC filter placement. IVC thrombosis ranges in severity of clinical presentation, but can lead to significant morbidity and mortality with incidence rates depending on patient population and type of filter used. Endovascular therapies such as catheter-directed thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, balloon venoplasty, and stenting are safe and effective in restoration of venous patency. PMID:27247478

  10. Venous Myocardial Infarction in an Infant with Obstructed Totally Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Drainage and Coronary Sinus Ostial Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Deepa; Strainic, James P.; Pandya, Khyati; Kouretas, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare causal association between obstructed supracardiac totally anomalous pulmonary venous drainage and coronary sinus ostial atresia. Our 12-week-old patient developed venous myocardial infarction secondary to coronary venous hypertension because her sole route of coronary venous drainage was obstructed. She recovered after the obstruction was relieved by balloon dilation. Surgical repair then included anastomosis of the pulmonary venous confluence to the left atrium, ligation of the vertical vein, and unroofing of the coronary sinus. Coronary sinus ostial atresia is rarely diagnosed before autopsy. PMID:27777530

  11. Risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in asthma.

    PubMed

    Majoor, Christof J; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Ten Brinke, Anneke; Amelink, Marijke; Rijssenbeek-Nouwens, Lucia; Sterk, Peter J; Büller, Harry R; Bel, Elisabeth H

    2013-09-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that patients with asthma have activated coagulation within the airways. Whether this leads to an increase in venous thromboembolic events is unknown. We therefore assessed the incidence of venous thromboembolic events in patients with mild-to-moderate and severe asthma as compared with an age- and sex-matched reference population. 648 patients with asthma (283 with severe and 365 patients with mild-to-moderate asthma) visiting three Dutch outpatient asthma clinics were studied. All patients completed a questionnaire about a diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in the past, their risk factors, history of asthma and medication use. All venous thromboembolic events were objectively verified. In total, 35 venous thromboembolic events (16 deep vein thrombosis and 19 pulmonary embolism) occurred at a median age of 39 (range 20-63) years. The incidence of pulmonary embolism in patients with severe asthma was 0.93 (95% CI 0.42-1.44) per 1000 person-years, 0.33 (95% CI 0.07-0.60) in mild-to-moderate asthma and 0.18 (95% CI 0.03-0.33) in the general population, respectively. Severe asthma and oral corticosteroid use were independent risk factors of pulmonary embolism (hazard ratios 3.33 (1.16-9.93) and 2.82 (1.09-7.30), respectively). Asthma was not associated with deep vein thrombosis. Severe asthma greatly enhances the risk of pulmonary embolism, particularly if chronic corticosteroids are used.

  12. Multiple simultaneous venous and arterial thromboses in a patient with factor V Leiden disorder: Detection by multislice computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Bige; Durakoğlugil, Tuğba; Akmangit, İlkay; Vural, Murat; Elverici, Eda

    2015-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis is extremely rare in patients with factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation. Recent advances in multislice computed tomography (MSCT) technology facilitated diagnosis of thromboembolic events accurately without delay. We report a patient with FVL mutation and acute bilateral lower extremity deep venous thromboses, pulmonary thromboembolism, and acute left anterior descending artery thrombosis, all diagnosed by MSCT. MSCT has been utilized for prompt diagnosis of the concomitant thrombotic pathologies simultaneously. PMID:25838926

  13. Venous thromboembolism in women taking hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Molina, Angeles; Monreal, Manuel

    2010-02-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are a popular method of contraception, but their use has been associated with an increased risk for venous thromboembolism. In order to reduce such risk, these compounds have been changed in their dosage, chemical composition and route of administration. The absolute risk of death from pulmonary embolism in contraceptive users has been estimated to be 10.5 (95% CI: 6.2-16.6) per million woman-years. The safest option is an oral contraceptive containing levonorgestrel combined with a low dose of estrogen. Identifying women at increased risk for venous thromboembolism is difficult, and greater use of thromboprophylaxis during immobility or minor surgery should be warranted. Several authors have called for all women to be screened for thrombophilia before prescription of hormonal contraceptives, but its cost-effectiveness remains uncertain.

  14. [Paraspinal arteriovenous malformations with perimedullary venous drainage].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C; Lonjon, J; Costalat, V; Menjot De Champfleur, N; Seris, C; Brunel, H; Bourbotte, G; Bouillot, P; Teissier, J-M; Martinat, P; Bonafe, A

    2008-07-01

    Symptoms of chronic myelopathy in cases of paraspinal arteriovenous malformations are most often related to perimedullary venous drainage. Here, we report on three cases of such malformations that have unique epidural venous drainage. These thoracolumbar lesions manifested as isolated back pain (in two cases) and S1 lumboradicular pain (in one case). MRI presented evidence to suggest a diagnosis of these rare conditions, based on signs of vertebral erosion, signal loss (flow void) on T1- and T2-weighted imaging, and partial enhancement after gadolinium injection, with no signs of congestive myelopathy. Spinal angiography confirmed the presence of a paraspinal fistula and, at the same time, allowed treatment by intra-arterial onyx injection.

  15. Aneurysmal portosystemic venous shunt: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bodner, G; Glück, A; Springer, P; König, P; Perkmann, R

    1999-10-01

    A case of an aneurysmal portosystemic venous shunt detected by colour Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) is presented. A young female patient complained of postprandial fatigue and had paroxysmal tachycardia. A direct vascular communication between right portal vein and right hepatic vein was found at CDUS and confirmed by direct portal angiogram. Using detachable coils a complete occlusion of the intrahepatic shunt was obtained. Reports from the literature regarding portovenous aneurysms are reviewed.

  16. [Venous drainage of Littler's neurovascular pedicle flap].

    PubMed

    Lebreton, E; Assouline, A

    1988-01-01

    The antegrade transosseous injection of the digital veins, followed by dissection enables the authors to analyse the role of various networks in drainage of the pulp. The satellite veins of the digital artery in the finger are probably not involved. The venous return of the pulp is constituted by an anatomical continuity between the superficial palmar network and the common digital veins. A narrow anastomotic channel is demonstrated in the commissure between these two systems.

  17. [Implantable venous access ports, nursing practices].

    PubMed

    Ourliac, Maryse; Dijols-Lécuyer, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    Following the publication of national recommendations regarding the handling of implantable venous access ports, an observation audit was carried out in a hospital in 2013. This enabled an assessment of the existing system to be performed, current practices to be compared with the hospital's protocol and adapted corrective measures to be put in place. A further audit carried out in 2015 was particularly encouraging. PMID:27157553

  18. What's new: Management of venous leg ulcers: Approach to venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Phillips, Tania J; Miller, O Fred; Margolis, David J; Marston, William; Woo, Kevin; Romanelli, Marco; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Leg ulcerations are a common problem, with an estimated prevalence of 1% to 2% in the adult population. Venous leg ulcers are primarily treated in outpatient settings and often are managed by dermatologists. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of leg ulcers combined with available evidence-based data will provide an update on this topic. A systematized approach and the judicious use of expensive advanced therapeutics are critical. Specialized arterial and venous studies are most commonly noninvasive. The ankle brachial pressure index can be performed with a handheld Doppler unit at the bedside by most clinicians. The vascular laboratory results and duplex Doppler findings are used to identify segmental defects and potential operative candidates. Studies of the venous system can also predict a subset of patients who may benefit from surgery. Successful leg ulcer management requires an interdisciplinary team to make the correct diagnosis, assess the vascular supply, and identify other modifiable factors to optimize healing. The aim of this continuing medical education article is to provide an update on the management of venous leg ulcers. Part I is focused on the approach to venous ulcer diagnostic testing.

  19. Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thromboses: The Bowler and the Barista

    PubMed Central

    du Breuil, Anne L.; Close, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Effort thrombosis of the upper extremity refers to a deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity resulting from repetitive activity of the upper limb. Most cases of effort thrombosis occur in young elite athletes with strenuous upper extremity activity. This article reports two cases who both developed upper extremity deep vein thromboses, the first being a 67-year-old bowler and the second a 25-year-old barista, and illustrates that effort thrombosis should be included in the differential diagnosis in any patient with symptoms concerning DVT associated with repetitive activity. A literature review explores the recommended therapies for upper extremity deep vein thromboses. PMID:27800207

  20. Transpulmonary passage of venous air emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Hills, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-seven paralyzed anesthetized dogs were embolized with venous air to determine the effectiveness of the pulmonary vasculature for bubble filtration or trapping. Air doses ranged from 0.05 to 0.40 ml/kg min in 0.05-ml increments with ultrasonic Doppler monitors placed over arterial vessels to detect any microbubbles that crossed the lungs. Pulmonary vascular filtration of the venous air infusions was complete for the lower air doses ranging from 0.05 to 0.30 ml/kg min. When the air doses were increased to 0.35 ml/kg min, the filtration threshold was exceeded with arterial spillover of bubbles occurring in 50 percent of the animals and reaching 71 percent for 0.40 ml/kg min. Significant elevations were observed in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Systemic blood pressure and cardiac output decreased, whereas left ventricular end-diastolic pressure remained unchanged. The results indicate that the filtration of venous bubbles by the pulmonary vasculature was complete when the air infusion rates were kept below a threshold value of 0.30 ml/kg min.

  1. Fluid dynamics of venous valve closure.

    PubMed

    Qui, Y; Quijano, R C; Wang, S K; Hwang, N H

    1995-01-01

    In vitro experiment was performed on a stented bovine jugular vein valve (VV, 14 mm I.D. x 2 cm long) and a stentless bovine jugular vein valve conduit (10 mm I.D. x 6 cm long) in a hydraulic flow loop with a downstream oscillatory pressure source to mimic respiratory changes. Simultaneous measurements were made on the valve opening area, conduit and sinus diameter changes using a specially designed laser optic system. Visualization of flow fields both proximal and distal to the venous valve, and the valve opening area were simultaneously recorded by using two video cameras. Laser Doppler anemometer surveys were made at three cross sections: the valve inlet, the valve exist, and 2 cm downstream of the venous valve to quantity flow reflux at valve closure. The experiment confirmed that the VV is a pressure-operated rather than a flow-driven device and that little or no reflux is needed to close the valve completely. The experiment further demonstrated that the VV sinus expands rapidly against back pressure, a critical character to consider in venous prosthesis design. PMID:8572425

  2. Porto-spleno-mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Battistelli, S; Coratti, F; Gori, T

    2011-02-01

    Porto-spleno-mesenteric (PSM) venous thrombosis is a rare clinical condition that, while being mostly unrecognized, is nonetheless often severe with a high morbidity and mortality. PSM venous thrombosis is the cause of as many as 5-10% of all abdominal ischemic events, and it presents with a highly variable and non-specific pattern of abdominal symptoms. Such complex and non-specific presentation can delay diagnosis, determining the poor clinical outcome of this condition. This review article discusses the information available on the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and general management of PSM venous thrombosis, with a focus on a number of some clinical issues that remain unaddressed. In particular, the current understanding of the predisposing factors and the heterogeneous clinical manifestations of this condition are described in detail. The recent advances in imaging techniques, which are leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy and facilitate an early diagnosis are also presented. Further, the indications and limits of both pharmacological and surgical treatment options are discussed.

  3. [Outpatient treatment of venous thromboembolic disease].

    PubMed

    Malý, Radovan; Malý, Jaroslav

    2015-05-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease which includes both venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a frequent and potentially fatal disease. Based on the introduction of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) into practice it has been proved that outpatient treatment of venous thrombosis is effective and safe for a large number of patients with VTE. The growing volume of data on LMWH outpatient treatment in recent years shows that up to 50 % of patients with clinically stable pulmonary embolism can be treated at home. In spite of these facts home treatment of pulmonary embolism has not been established as part of common practice as yet. If we were to summarize the conditions for home treatment, we would consider outpatient care for patients at low risk based on auxiliary criteria, free from hemodynamic instability (primarily without a shock state), free from right ventricular failure, prior chronic heart or lung disease, serious comorbidities (gastrointestinal tract disease, kidney disease, blood diseases, advanced cancers), at low risk of early thromboembolism recurrence, free from other indications for hospitalization (pain requiring parenteral analgesics, infections etc.), at low risk of bleeding and with guaranteed patients cooperation and well-organized home care. PMID:26075852

  4. Mesenteric venous thrombosis: diagnosis and noninvasive imaging.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Michelle S; Kavanagh, Peter V; Bechtold, Robert E; Chen, Michael Y; Ott, David J; Regan, John D; Weber, Therese M

    2002-01-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is an uncommon but potentially lethal cause of bowel ischemia. Several imaging methods are available for diagnosis, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. Doppler ultrasonography allows direct evaluation of the mesenteric and portal veins, provides semiquantitative flow information, and allows Doppler waveform analysis of the visceral vessels; however, it is operator dependent and is often limited by overlying bowel gas. Conventional contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) allows sensitive detection of venous thrombosis within the central large vessels of the portomesenteric circulation and any associated secondary findings; however, it is limited by respiratory misregistration, motion artifact, and substantially decreased longitudinal spatial resolution. Helical CT and CT angiography, especially when performed with multi-detector row scanners, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, particularly gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography, enable volumetric acquisitions in a single breath hold, eliminating motion artifact and suppressing respiratory misregistration. Helical CT angiography and three-dimensional gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography should be considered the primary diagnostic modalities for patients with a high clinical suspicion of mesenteric ischemia. Conventional angiography is reserved for equivocal cases at noninvasive imaging and is also used in conjunction with transcatheter therapeutic techniques in management of symptomatic portal and mesenteric venous thrombosis.

  5. Clinical significance of intracranial developmental venous anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Topper, R.; Jurgens, E.; Reul, J.; Thron, A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Venous angiomas, or developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), represent the most often occurring cerebral vascular malformation. The clinical significance of a DVA is, however, at present unclear.
METHODS—A retrospective analysis was carried out on two series of consecutive cranial MRIs performed between January 1990 and August 1996 in a university department of neuroradiology and in a large radiological private practice. The medical records of all patients in whom a DVA was diagnosed were screened to identify the specific complaint which necessitated the imaging procedure.
RESULTS—A total of 67 patients with DVA could be identified. In 12 patients an associated cavernoma was found. The main reason for performing the MRI was the evaluation of seizures or of headaches. In all patients with DVA in whom an intracerebral haemorrhage was diagnosed an associated cavernoma was present at the site of the haemorrhage. None of the 67 patients showed an association between the complaints that led to the MRI and the location of the DVA.
CONCLUSIONS—DVAs do not seem to be associated with a specific clinical presentation. In a significant percentage of cases, however, coexisting cavernomas are found which have a defined bleeding potential and should be treated independently of the DVA. This study supports the hypothesis that DVAs are a congenital abnormality of venous drainage without clinical significance.

 PMID:10407000

  6. Warfarin-induced venous limb ischemia/gangrene complicating cancer: a novel and clinically distinct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Cook, Richard J; Sarode, Ravi; Sloane, Debi A; Crowther, Mark A

    2015-07-23

    Venous limb gangrene (VLG) can occur in cancer patients, but the clinical picture and pathogenesis remain uncertain. We identified 10 patients with metastatic cancer (7 pathologically proven) who developed severe venous limb ischemia (phlegmasia/VLG) after initiating treatment of deep-vein thrombosis (DVT); in 8 patients, cancer was not known or suspected at presentation. The patients exhibited a novel, clinically distinct syndrome: warfarin-associated supratherapeutic international normalized ratio (INR; median, 6.5) at onset of limb ischemia, rising platelet count during heparin anticoagulation, and platelet fall after stopping heparin. Despite supratherapeutic INRs, patient plasma contained markedly elevated thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex levels (indicating uncontrolled thrombin generation) and protein C (PC) depletion; this profile resembles the greatly elevated TAT/PC activity ratios reported in patients with warfarin-associated VLG complicating heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Analyses of vitamin K-dependent factors in 6 cancer patients with available serial plasma samples showed that variations in the INR corresponded most closely with changes in factor VII, with a highly collinear relationship between VII and PC. We conclude that venous limb ischemia/gangrene is explained in some cancer patients by profoundly disturbed procoagulant-anticoagulant balance, whereby warfarin fails to block cancer-associated hypercoagulability while nonetheless contributing to severe PC depletion, manifest as a characteristic supratherapeutic INR caused by parallel severe factor VII depletion. PMID:25979950

  7. The Association of Active Cancer With Venous Thromboembolism Location: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Tafur, Alfonso J.; Kalsi, Henna; Wysokinski, Waldemar E.; McBane, Robert D.; Ashrani, Aneel A.; Marks, Randolph S.; Crusan, Daniel J.; Petterson, Tanya M.; Bailey, Kent R.; Heit, John A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test active cancer for an association with venous thromboembolism (VTE) location. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using the resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, we identified all Olmsted County, MN, residents with incident VTE during the 35-year period 1966-2000 (N=3385). We restricted analyses to residents with objectively diagnosed VTE during the 17-year period from January 1, 1984, to December 31, 2000 (N=1599). For each patient, we reviewed the complete medical records in the community for patient age, gender, and most recent body mass index at VTE onset; VTE event type and location; and previously identified independent VTE risk factors (ie, surgery, hospitalization for acute medical illness, active cancer, leg paresis, superficial venous thrombosis, and varicose veins). Using logistic regression we tested active cancer for an association with each of 4 symptomatic VTE locations (arm or intra-abdominal deep venous thrombosis [DVT], intra-abdominal DVT, pulmonary embolism, and bilateral leg DVT), adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, and other VTE risk factors. RESULTS: In multivariate analyses, active cancer was independently associated with arm or intra-abdominal DVT (odds ratio [OR], 1.76; P=.01), intra-abdominal DVT (OR, 2.22; P=.004), and bilateral leg DVT (OR, 2.09; P=.02), but not pulmonary embolism (OR, 0.93). CONCLUSION: Active cancer is associated with VTE location. Location of VTE may be useful in decision making regarding cancer screening. PMID:21193652

  8. Incidence of upper limb venous thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC).

    PubMed

    Abdullah, B J J; Mohammad, N; Sangkar, J V; Abd Aziz, Y F; Gan, G G; Goh, K Y; Benedict, I

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to prospectively determine the incidence of venous thrombosis (VT) in the upper limbs in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). We prospectively investigated the incidence of VT in the upper limbs of 26 patients who had PICC inserted. The inclusion criteria were all patients who had a PICC inserted, whilst the exclusion criterion was the inability to perform a venogram (allergies, previous contrast medium reaction and inability of gaining venous access). Both valved and non-valved catheters were evaluated. Prior to removal of the PICC, an upper limb venogram was performed. The number of segments involved with VT were determined. The duration of central venous catheterization was classified as; less than 6 days, between 6 days and 14 days and more than 14 days. VT was confirmed in 38.5% (10/26) of the patients. The majority 85.7% (12/14) were complete occlusive thrombi and the majority of VT only involved one segment. There was no statistical correlation between the site of insertion of the PICC and the location of VT. Neither was there any observed correlation between the occurrence of VT with the patient's history of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiac insufficiency, smoking or cancer. There was also no statistical correlation with the size of the catheter. In conclusion, PICCs are associated with a significant risk of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEVT).

  9. Factor V-Leiden Mutation: A Common Risk Factor for Venous Thrombosis among Lebanese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kreidy, Raghid

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Lebanon exhibits one of the highest prevalences of factor V-Leiden (FVL) in the world (14.4%). The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of FVL mutation among Lebanese patients with lower extremity venous thrombosis. Material and Methods. From January 2003 to January 2011, 283 consecutive Lebanese patients, diagnosed with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) by duplex scan, were retrospectively reviewed. FVL mutation was tested among patients with conditions highly suggestive of hypercoagulation states (65 patients). Results. FVL mutation was detected among 56.9% of patients, 68.6% of patients younger than 50 years, and 43.4% of patients older than 50 years (P = 0.041). FVL mutation was commonly reported in young adults, in patients with pregnancy, estrogen drugs, recurrent DVT, and resistance to anticoagulation. Conclusion. The high rate of FVL mutation observed among Lebanese patients with venous thrombosis is related to the high prevalence of this mutation in the Lebanese population. Thrombophilia screening should be tailored to accommodate a population's risk factor. In countries with high prevalence of FVL, this mutation should be screened among patients younger than 50 years and patients with situations highly suggestive of hypercoagulation states. PMID:22737581

  10. Extra- and transcranial echo colour Doppler in the diagnosis of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Van den Berg, P J; Visser, L H

    2012-03-01

    A new venous disorder, chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), has been proposed in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It is a vascular condition characterized by an impaired cerebrospinal venous drainage due to obstructions in the main extracranial cerebrovenous outflow routes (i.e. internal jugular veins [IJV] and/or azygos veins). In this review, the studies which assessed the prevalence of CCSVI in MS by echo colour Doppler (ECD) will be discussed. The technical aspects of determination of the five CCSVI criteria: (1) reflux in the IJV and/or vertebral veins in supine and upright position, (2) reflux in the deep cerebral veins, (3) high-resolution B-mode proximal IJV stenosis, (4) flow not Doppler detectable in IJVs and/or vertebral veins (VVs) and (5) reverted postural control of the main cerebrovenous outflow pathway are described in detail. We conclude that so far there are many studies with contradictory results, and as yet a strong scientific base to support the evidence for a causative relationship of CCSVI and MS is lacking. Recent studies call into question the validity of using ECD as a proper and reliable test for the diagnosis of CCSVI. One explanation for the variety in interpretation of the individual CCSVI criteria, with the wide-ranging percentages CCSVI, could be the different methods by using ECD to determine various criteria.

  11. Fragment E/sub 1/ labeled with I-123 in the detection of venous thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, L.C.; Maurer, A.H.; Robbins, P.S.; Malmud, L.S.; Budzynski, A.Z.

    1985-08-01

    Fragment E/sub 1/, which has been shown to have specific binding affinity for thrombi in an animal model, was investigated in humans for its safety and ability to bind to venous thrombi. Human fragment E/sub 1/ was labeled with I-123 and administered intravenously to patients with proved or suspected deep vein thrombosis. The vascular distribution of radioactivity was documented by obtaining gamma camera images of the patients' legs for 30 minutes following administration of I-123-Fragment E/sub 1/. All patients (n = 5) with documented venous thrombi had rapid localization of labeled Fragment E/sub 1/ in the area of thrombus. Analysis of blood samples in four patients indicated that disappearance of Fragment E/sub 1/ from the circulation was more rapid in individuals with thrombosis than in individuals without thrombosis. These early results suggest that radiolabeled Fragment E/sub 1/ is a safe and potentially valuable agent for the rapid detection of venous thrombosis.

  12. Fragment E1 labeled with I-123 in the detection of venous thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, L.C.; Maurer, A.H.; Robbins, P.S.; Malmud, L.S.; Budzynski, A.Z.

    1985-08-01

    Fragment E1, which has been shown to have specific binding affinity for thrombi in an animal model, was investigated in humans for its safety and ability to bind to venous thrombi. Human Fragment E1 was labeled with I-123 and administered intravenously to patients with proved or suspected deep vein thrombosis. The vascular distribution of radioactivity was documented by obtaining gamma camera images of the patients' legs for 30 minutes following administration of I-123-Fragment E1. All patients (n = 5) with documented venous thrombi had rapid localization of labeled Fragment E1 in the area of thrombus. Patients without evidence of thrombi (n = 5) showed no focal localization, although two of these patients showed diffuse uptake along the length of the veins, due to superficial phlebitis. Analysis of blood samples in four patients indicated that disappearance of Fragment E1 from the circulation was more rapid in individuals with thrombosis (t 1/2 = 20 min) than in individuals without thrombosis (t 1/2 = 90 min), and a radiolabeled species of high molecular weight was found in patients with thrombosis but was absent from patients without thrombosis. These early results suggest that radiolabeled Fragment E1 is a safe and potentially valuable agent for the rapid detection of venous thrombosis.

  13. O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides systemic and local treatment in chronic venous disease and microangiopathy: an independent prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, Gianni; Rosaria Cesarone, Maria; Ledda, Andrea; Cacchio, Marisa; Ruffini, Irma; Ricci, Andrea; Ippolito, Edmondo; Di Renzo, Andrea; Dugall, Mark; Corsi, Marcello; Marino Santarelli, Anna Rita; Grossi, Maria Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides (HR) is used to treat chronic venous disease and signs and symptoms of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), varicose veins, and deep venous disease. This independent prospective controlled trial (a registry study) evaluates how the efficacy of HR at the local level (perimalleolar region) can be increased by the administration of a topical HR gel. The study is based on evaluation of microcirculatory variables in patients with severe CVI (ambulatory venous pressure, > 56 mm Hg) and venous microangiopathy. Patients are treated using 1 of the following 3 regimens: oral treatment with 1 g sachets of HR (2 g/d total) plus topical HR 2% gel applied 3 times daily at the internal perimalleolar region; oral treatment only (same dosage), or light elastic compression stockings. Laser Doppler skin flux at rest, skin flux at the perimalleolar region, and transcutaneous PO2 and PCO2 are measured at baseline and at the end of the treatment period. A comparable group of healthy individuals without treatment is observed for 8 weeks. In the treatment groups, flux is increased, PO2 is decreased, and PCO2 is increased compared with normal skin. At 4 and 8 weeks, the improvement in skin flux (which is decreased by all measurements), the increase in PO2, and the decrease in PCO2 (indicating microcirculatory improvement) are statistically significantly greater in the combined oral plus topical treatment group (P < .05). No adverse effects, tolerability problems, or compliance issues are noted. These results indicate an important role of HR in the treatment and control of CVI and venous microangiopathy.

  14. Venous ulcers of the lower extremity: Definition, epidemiology, and economic and social burdens.

    PubMed

    Lal, Brajesh K

    2015-03-01

    Venous ulcer is a common vascular condition affecting 1% of the population, and a prevalence that increases with age. Venous ulcer is defined by the American Venous Forum as "a full-thickness defect of skin, most frequently in the ankle region, that fails to heal spontaneously and is sustained by chronic venous disease, based on venous duplex ultrasound testing." The economic and social burden of this condition is significant to both the affected individual and the health care system. The recurrent nature of venous ulcers underscore the need for treatment of the underlying pathophysiology, that is, ambulatory venous hypertension produced by venous valve reflux alone or in conjunction with venous obstruction.

  15. Clinical features of venous insufficiency and the risk of venous thrombosis in older people.

    PubMed

    Engbers, Marissa J; Karasu, Alev; Blom, Jeanet W; Cushman, Mary; Rosendaal, Frits R; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    Venous thrombosis is common in older age, with an incidence of 0·5-1% per year in those aged >70 years. Stasis of blood flow is an important contributor to the development of thrombosis and may be due to venous insufficiency in the legs. The risk of thrombosis associated with clinical features of venous insufficiency, i.e., varicose veins, leg ulcers and leg oedema, obtained with a standardized interview was assessed in the Age and Thrombosis Acquired and Genetic risk factors in the Elderly (AT-AGE) study. The AT-AGE study is a case-control study in individuals aged 70 years and older (401 cases with a first-time venous thrombosis and 431 control subjects). We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age, sex and study centre. Varicose veins and leg ulcer were associated with a 1·6-fold (95% CI 1·2-2·3) and 3·3-fold increased risk of thrombosis (95% CI 1·6-6·7), respectively, while the risk was increased 3·0-fold (95% CI 2·1-4·5) in the presence of leg oedema. The risk of thrombosis was highest when all three risk factors occurred simultaneously (OR: 10·5; 95% CI 1·3-86·1). In conclusion, clinical features of venous insufficiency, i.e., varicose veins, leg ulcers and leg oedema, are risk factors for venous thrombosis in older people.

  16. Deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  17. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  18. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech. PMID:26017442

  19. Core content for training in venous and lymphatic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Min, Robert J; Comerota, Anthony J; Meissner, Mark H; Carman, Teresa L; Rathbun, Suman W; Jaff, Michael R; Wakefield, Thomas W; Feied, Craig F

    2014-01-01

    The major venous societies in the United States share a common mission to improve the standards of medical practitioners, the educational goals for teaching and training programs in venous disease, and the quality of patient care related to the treatment of venous disorders. With these important goals in mind, a task force made up of experts from the specialties of dermatology, interventional radiology, phlebology, vascular medicine, and vascular surgery was formed to develop a consensus document describing the Core Content for venous and lymphatic medicine and to develop a core educational content outline for training. This outline describes the areas of knowledge considered essential for practice in the field, which encompasses the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with acute and chronic venous and lymphatic disorders. The American Venous Forum and the American College of Phlebology have endorsed the Core Content. PMID:25059735

  20. [Myelopathies in impairment of extravertebral venous blood circulation].

    PubMed

    Tsuladze, I I; Dreval', O N; Kornienko, V N

    2009-01-01

    Development of myelopathies of venous genesis is based on venous hypertension inside vertebral canal which was initially described by J. Aboulker. According to anatomical and functional features of epidural venous system, two factors contribute in development of venous congestion: decreased outflow and increased inflow. Clinical manifestation is presented by spastic movement disorders. Morphological study performed in 18 cadavers allowed to discover so called 'narrow areas' which cause impaired circulation through large feeders of caval veins, which can be discovered by selective phlebography. Main phlebographic features include stenosis, compression, atresia, thrombosis and retrograde flow towards epidural venous plexus. We examined 58 patients with spastic para- and tetraparesis of unknown nature. Phlebographic signs of venous dyscirculation were revealed in 34 cases. 28 surgical operations were performed: 24 on feeders of vena cava superior and 4 on feeders of vena cava inferior. In 18 cases we obtained satisfactory results. This investigation should be continued.

  1. Venous Return and Clinical Hemodynamics: How the Body Works during Acute Hemorrhage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Tao; Baker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Venous return is a major determinant of cardiac output. Adjustments within the venous system are critical for maintaining venous pressure during loss in circulating volume. This article reviews two factors that are thought to enable the venous system to compensate during acute hemorrhage: 1) changes in venous elastance and 2) mobilization of…

  2. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stacy A; Eleazer, G Paul; Rondina, Matthew T

    2016-09-01

    Older adults have a significantly greater risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, than younger adults. The cause of this greater risk is thought to be multifactorial, including age-related changes in hemostatic factors and greater comorbid conditions and hospitalizations, but is not completely understood. Moreover, VTE remains underrecognized in older adults and may present atypically. Thus, a low index of clinical suspicion is essential when evaluating older adults with possible VTE. Despite this underrecognition in older adults, the diagnostic approach remains similar for all age groups and includes estimation of pretest probability, measurement of the D-dimer, and imaging. Antithrombotic agents are the mainstay of VTE treatment and, when used appropriately, substantially reduce VTE recurrence and complications. The approval of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, provide clinicians with new therapeutic options. In some individuals, NOACs may offer advantages over warfarin, including fewer drug interactions, more-predictable anticoagulation, and lower risk of bleeding. Nevertheless, anticoagulation of VTE in older adults should always be performed cautiously, because age is a risk factor for bleeding complications. Identifying modifiable bleeding risk factors and balancing the risks of VTE recurrence with hemorrhage are important considerations when using anticoagulants in older adults. PMID:27556937

  3. Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism With New Anticoagulant Agents.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Cecilia; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2016-04-26

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common disease associated with high risk for recurrences, death, and late sequelae, accounting for substantial health care costs. Anticoagulant agents are the mainstay of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The recent availability of oral anticoagulant agents that can be administered in fixed doses, without laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment, is a landmark change in the treatment of VTE. In Phase III trials, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban (antifactor Xa agents), and dabigatran (an antithrombin agent) were noninferior and probably safer than conventional anticoagulation therapy (low-molecular-weight heparin followed by vitamin K antagonists). These favorable results were confirmed in specific patient subgroups, such as the elderly and fragile. However, some patients, such as those with cancer or with intermediate- to high-risk pulmonary embolism, were underrepresented in the Phase III trials. Further clinical research is required before new oral anticoagulant agents can be considered standard of care for the full spectrum of patients with VTE. PMID:27102510

  4. Arterio-venous fistula following a lumbar disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Mulaudzi, Thanyani V; Sikhosana, Mbokeleng H

    2011-11-01

    Vascular complications during posterior lumbar disc surgery are rare and its presentation with varicose veins is even rarer. A 23 year-old male patient presented with large varicose veins in right lower limb. He underwent a posterior lumbar spine discectomy surgery. He noticed mild swelling of the distal third right lower limb 3 months after index surgery and reported 6 months later when he developed varicose veins. Duplex Doppler confirmed varicose veins of the long saphenous vein and its tributaries with a patent deep venous system. A digital subtraction angiogram demonstrated a large right common iliac artery (CIA) false aneurysm with an arteriovenous fistula between right common iliac vessels. He had a right CIA covered stent insertion with good results. Varicose veins were later managed with sapheno-femoral junction ligation and a below knee long saphenous vein stripping. At six month follow-up the lower limb swelling had completely recovered and duplex ultrasound did not show any recurrence of varicose veins. PMID:22144752

  5. [Venous thrombosis associated with central venous catheter use in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Iglesias Rey, Leticia; Fernández Pérez, Isaura; Barbagelata López, Cristina; Rivera Gallego, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters for various applications (administration of chemotherapy, blood products and others) in patients with cancer is increasingly frequent. The association between thrombosis and catheter use has been fully established but aspects such as its causes, diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment have not. We describe a case of thrombosis in a patient with cancer treated with chemotherapy who carried a central venous catheter. We also perform a review of the risk factors, the role of the prophylaxis and the treatment. PMID:25771092

  6. Neoplastic zebras of venous thrombosis: Diagnostic challenges in vascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, A; Lekah, A; Kurklinsky, A K

    2015-12-01

    Venous thrombosis is a common medical problem. Imaging differentiation of neoplasms and venous clots may prove challenging. We report three cases of "mistaken identities" of venous thrombi and neoplasms on the basis of clinical findings and different imaging modalities: ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging studies are not always reliable and consideration of clinical features, including pretest probability, is necessary for correct diagnosis. A combination of imaging modalities and biopsies is needed for correct diagnosis in some cases.

  7. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism Secondary to Mesenteric Infarction.

    PubMed

    Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Tamura, Aileen; Matsuda, Brent; Leo, Qi Jie Nicholas; Sung, Hiro

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare, yet potentially fatal condition. We present a case of retrograde cerebral venous air emboli arising from the hepatic portal venous system, secondary to a mesenteric infarction. A 69-year-old man with a history of gastrointestinal amyloidosis presented with fever and lethargy. Computed tomography of the brain detected multiple foci of air in the right frontal, fronto-parietal, and left lateral frontal sulci consistent with cerebral venous air emboli. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed moderate thickening and dilatation of the small bowel with diffuse scattered intestinal pneumatosis suggestive of mesenteric infarction with resultant extensive intrahepatic portal venous air. The patient was deemed a poor candidate for surgical intervention and died as a result of septic shock. We believe the cerebral venous air emboli was a result of retrograde flow of air arising from the hepatic venous air ascending via the inferior and superior vena cava to the cerebral venous system. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of retrograde cerebral venous air embolism arising from hepatic portal venous system secondary to mesenteric infarction. The clinical significance and prognosis in this setting requires further investigation. PMID:27239392

  8. Deep Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  9. Deep Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popke, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how the safety-related ruling by the National Federation of State High School Associations to eliminate the option of using 18-inch starting platforms in pools less than 4 feet deep may affect operators of swimming pools and the swim teams who use them. (EV)

  10. Incidence of clinically significant venous thromboembolic events in Asian patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty without anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Soon, Ang Teng; Dhanaraj, Ian Dominic; Tan, Andrew Hwee Chye

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of clinically significant venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in Asian patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) without anticoagulation. All patients who underwent TKA by a single surgeon from 2006 to 2010 in Singapore General Hospital were reviewed. Only symptomatic patients were referred for ultrasonography. Of the 531 patients reviewed, 3 patients developed symptoms of deep vein thrombosis with subsequent ultrasonographic confirmation, whereas 1 patient developed fatal pulmonary embolism without any clinical or radiologic evidence of deep vein thrombosis. Hence, the incidence of clinically significant VTE was 0.75%. Given the low incidence of clinically significant VTE, there is a need to review the current practice of routine chemoprophylaxis in Asian patients undergoing TKA.

  11. Treating venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Piatek, Caroline; O’Connell, Casey L; Liebman, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with cancer. Although much is known about the factors that contribute to VTE risk, pre-emptive therapy in high-risk populations is clearly indicated in only a few clinical situations. Low-molecular-weight heparin is still the recommended class of anticoagulants for cancer-associated VTE. Management of VTE in patients with renal failure, hemorrhagic brain metastases, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy remains challenging with few safe and effective alternatives. Novel oral agents are currently being investigated and may play a role in the future in the treatment of cancer-associated VTE. PMID:22475288

  12. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Meppiel, Elodie; Crassard, Isabelle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; de Guibert, Sophie; Terriou, Louis; Chabriat, Hugues; Socié, Gérard; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired disorder of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by hemolytic anemia, marrow failure, and a high incidence of life-threatening venous thrombosis. Cerebral venous system is the second most frequent location of thrombosis after hepatic veins. However, data about PNH-related cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are very scarce because of the rarity of both the disorders. We report a French study about PNH patients with CVT. Patients were recruited retrospectively, from the Société Française d’Hématologie (SFH) registry of 465 patients with PNH; the Lariboisière registry of 399 patients with CVT; and a direct contact with 26 French Hematology Units. We review cases reported since 1938 in the English and French language literature. We then compared patients of our series with cases from the literature, with non-PNH-related CVT cases from Lariboisière registry, and with PNH patients without CVT from SFH registry. Fifteen patients were included between 1990 and 2012. Most patients were women (12/15) and half of them presented associated hormonal venous thrombosis risk factors. Three patients had concomitant hepatic vein thrombosis. CVT was the first manifestation of PNH in 4 patients. No major difference in CVT characteristics was found compared with non-PNH-related CVT cases, except for a younger age at diagnosis in PNH patients (P < 0.001). All patients were treated with anticoagulation therapy. One death occurred in acute stage. All surviving patients were independent 1 year after. Median survival time was 9 years. Recurrent thrombosis rate was 50% at 6 years, occurring in patients that did not have bone marrow transplantation or eculizumab therapy. Cases of death were mainly related to hepatic vein thrombosis. Prognosis of CVT was good in our series. However, these patients have a poor long-term prognosis due to PNH disease by itself. PNH treatment should be proposed as soon as possible to

  13. Diet as prophylaxis and treatment for venous thromboembolism?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Both prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE: deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary emboli (PE)) with anticoagulants are associated with significant risks of major and fatal hemorrhage. Anticoagulation treatment of VTE has been the standard of care in the USA since before 1962 when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began requiring randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) showing efficacy, so efficacy trials were never required for FDA approval. In clinical trials of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients before the 1980s, anticoagulant prophylaxis was clearly beneficial (fatal pulmonary emboli (FPE) without anticoagulants = 0.99%, FPE with anticoagulants = 0.31%). However, observational studies and RCTs of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients from the 1980s until 2010 show that FPE deaths without anticoagulants are about one-fourth the rate that occurs during prophylaxis with anticoagulants (FPE without anticoagulants = 0.023%, FPE while receiving anticoagulant prophylaxis = 0.10%). Additionally, an FPE rate of about 0.012% (35/28,400) in patients receiving prophylactic anticoagulants can be attributed to 'rebound hypercoagulation' in the two months after stopping anticoagulants. Alternatives to anticoagulant prophylaxis should be explored. Methods and Findings The literature concerning dietary influences on VTE incidence was reviewed. Hypotheses concerning the etiology of VTE were critiqued in relationship to the rationale for dietary versus anticoagulant approaches to prophylaxis and treatment. Epidemiological evidence suggests that a diet with ample fruits and vegetables and little meat may substantially reduce the risk of VTE; vegetarian, vegan, or Mediterranean diets favorably affect serum markers of hemostasis and inflammation. The valve cusp hypoxia hypothesis of DVT/VTE etiology is consistent with the development of VTE being affected directly or indirectly by diet. However, it is less consistent with the rationale of using

  14. STUDIES OF OXYGEN IN THE VENOUS BLOOD

    PubMed Central

    Lundsgaard, Christen

    1918-01-01

    1. Thirty-one determinations of the total oxygen-combining power and the oxygen in the venous blood from vena mediana cubiti of sixteen resting patients are reported. 2. The difference between the total oxygen capacity of the hemoglobin and the oxygen in the venous blood, the oxygen unsaturation, is calculated. 3. In twelve patients with compensated heart lesions the unsaturation was found within normal limits, between 2.5 and 8 volume per cent. 4. In four patients with incompensated heart disease the values for the unsaturation were all above the normal limit, from 9.7 to 15.2 volume per cent. 5. A general discussion of the problem of interpreting the results is given. 6. A comparison is drawn between the oxygen consumption calculated from direct determination of the blood flow on a normal subject (the writer) and the oxygen unsaturation determined 4 years later on the same subject. A close agreement between the two series of values exists. PMID:19868200

  15. Immunological aspects of chronic venous disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grudzińska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a very common health problem concerning up to 1/3 of the society. Although venous hypertension and valvular incompetence have been long known to be crucial for development of the illness, its exact aetiology remains unclear. Recent findings indicate that inflammatory processes may be crucial for development of incompetent valves and vein wall remodelling. One of the most interesting theories describes “leucocyte trapping” as the mechanism responsible for elevated vein wall permeability and oxidative stress in the veins. At the same time, the cytokine profile of the blood in incompetent veins has not been thoroughly examined. Popular anti-inflammatory drugs relieve some symptoms but do not have much proved effects in prevention and treatment. We intend to summarize the existing knowledge of the immunological aspects of CVD in order to emphasize its importance for understanding the aetiology of this illness. We also wish to indicate some aspects that remain to be studied in more detail. PMID:26155174

  16. Menopausal hormone therapy and venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is the most effective method of treating vasomotor symptoms and other climacteric symptoms related to estrogen deficiency in peri- and postmenopausal period. In addition to estrogen replacement, women with preserved uterus require the addition of progestagen in order to ensure endometrial safety. One of rare but severe complications of MHT is venous thromboembolism (VTE). The incidence of VTE rises in parallel to women's age and body weight. The condition is also linked to hereditary and acquired risk factors. Oral estrogens increase the risk of venous thromboembolic complications to varying extents, probably depending on their type and dose used. Observational studies have not found an association between an increased risk of VTE and transdermal estrogen treatment regardless of women's age and body mass index (BMI). Micronized progesterone and pregnanes, including dydrogesterone, have no effect on the risk of VTE, whereas norpregnane progestagens cause an additional increase in risk. Among hormonal preparations which are commercially available in Poland, the combination of transdermal estradiol with oral dydrogesterone appears to be the optimum choice, as it does not elevate the risk of VTE (compared to patients not using MHT), and dydrogesterone seems to be the progestagen of choice. PMID:26327865

  17. [Drug Treatment of Chronic Venous Diesease].

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Miloš D

    2016-06-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) affects at least 15-25 % of the general population incurring not only high morbidity but also considerable economical burden. The mainstay of modern treatment of CVD are endovenous therapeutic procedures and compression therapy. As far as the pathogenesis of CVD is being gradually unraveled the interest in drugs able to impact the process is growing. Here we have presented an overview of a majority of oral preparations used so far to treat CVD including venous leg ulcers. After several decades of clinical use a few flavonoid preparations, in the first place micronized purified flavonoid fraction, collected enough evidence to recommend them as a short-term adjunct treatment of CVD. However, other compounds are also promising in this regards. Yet, we need more larger and longer-term clinical trials to more precisely define effects, cost-effectiveness and, above all, capacity for prophylactic application of the drugs. Learning more about basis of CVD will help design new drugs directed at specific aspects of the disease process. PMID:27379855

  18. The cerebral venous system and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Imray, Christopher H E

    2016-01-15

    Most hypobaric hypoxia studies have focused on oxygen delivery and therefore cerebral blood inflow. Few have studied venous outflow. However, the volume of blood entering and leaving the skull (∼700 ml/min) is considerably greater than cerebrospinal fluid production (0.35 ml/min) or edema formation rates and slight imbalances of in- and outflow have considerable effects on intracranial pressure. This dynamic phenomenon is not necessarily appreciated in the currently taught static "Monro-Kellie" doctrine, which forms the basis of the "Tight-Fit" hypothesis thought to underlie high altitude headache, acute mountain sickness, and high altitude cerebral edema. Investigating both sides of the cerebral circulation was an integral part of the 2007 Xtreme Everest Expedition. The results of the relevant studies performed as part of and subsequent to this expedition are reviewed here. The evidence from recent studies suggests a relative venous outflow insufficiency is an early step in the pathogenesis of high altitude headache. Translation of knowledge gained from high altitude studies is important. Many patients in a critical care environment develop hypoxemia akin to that of high altitude exposure. An inability to drain the hypoxemic induced increase in cerebral blood flow could be an underappreciated regulatory mechanism of intracranial pressure.

  19. Heparin for 5 days as compared with 10 days in the initial treatment of proximal venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hull, R D; Raskob, G E; Rosenbloom, D; Panju, A A; Brill-Edwards, P; Ginsberg, J S; Hirsh, J; Martin, G J; Green, D

    1990-05-01

    It is common practice to begin anticoagulant treatment of deep-vein thrombosis with a 10-day course of intravenous heparin, with warfarin added on day 5 to 10 and continued for several months. We performed a randomized, double-blind trial comparing a shorter course of continuous intravenous heparin (5 days, with warfarin sodium begun on the first day) with the conventional 10-day course of heparin (with warfarin sodium begun on the fifth day) in the initial treatment of 199 patients with acute proximal venous thrombosis documented by venography. The frequency of objectively documented recurrent venous thromboembolism was low and essentially the same in the two groups (7.1 percent in the short-course group vs. 7.0 percent in the long-course group). Because the observed difference between the groups was 0.1 percent in favor of the long-course group, it is unlikely (P less than 0.05) that a true difference in favor of this group would be greater than 7.5 percent; the difference could be as much as 7.3 percent in favor of the short-course group. Major bleeding episodes were infrequent, and the rate was similar in both groups. We conclude that a five-day course of heparin is as effective as a 10-day course in treating deep venous thrombosis. Furthermore, using the shorter course would permit earlier discharge from the hospital and thus offer substantial cost savings.

  20. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE. PMID:24576517

  1. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with acute leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Mohren, M; Markmann, I; Jentsch-Ullrich, K; Koenigsmann, M; Lutze, G; Franke, A

    2006-01-01

    Patients with malignancies have an increased risk for venous thromboembolisms (VTE), but data on patients with acute leukaemia are very limited so far. We found VTE in 12% of 455 patients with acute leukaemia, half of which occurred in association with central venous catheters, with equal risk of ALL and AML. PMID:16421591

  2. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Peritoneo-venous shunt. 876.5955 Section 876.5955 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5955 Peritoneo-venous shunt....

  3. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Peritoneo-venous shunt. 876.5955 Section 876.5955 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5955 Peritoneo-venous shunt....

  4. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Peritoneo-venous shunt. 876.5955 Section 876.5955 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5955 Peritoneo-venous shunt....

  5. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peritoneo-venous shunt. 876.5955 Section 876.5955 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5955 Peritoneo-venous shunt....

  6. CEREBRAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS AND TURNER SYNDROME: A RARE REPORTED ASSOCIATION.

    PubMed

    Guler, A; Alpaydin, S; Bademkiran, F; Sirin, H; Celebisoy, N

    2015-01-01

    Turner Syndrome is the only known viable chromosomal monosomy, characterised by the complete or partial absence of an X chromosome. It's the most common chromosomal abnormality in females. Apart from the well known dysmorphic features of the syndrome, it has been associated with a number of vascular pathologies; mainly involving the cardiovascular, renovascular, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular system. It seems striking that thromboembolism is not considered as a feature of the syndrome. Most of the thromboembolism cases are related to the arterial vascular system; except for some rare reported portal venous thrombosis cases, peripheral venous thrombosis cases and to the best of our knowledge a single case of cerebral venous thrombosis with Dandy Walker malformation and polymicrogyria. We herein report a cerebral venous thrombosis case with Turner Syndrome. With no other found underlying etiology, we want to highlight that Turner Syndrome, itself, may have a relationship not only with the cerebral arterial vascular system pathologies but also with the cerebral venous thrombosis.

  7. Venous return curves obtained from graded series of valsalva maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastenbrook, S. M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The effects were studied of a graded series of valsalva-like maneuvers on the venous return, which was measured transcutaneously in the jugular vein of an anesthetized dog, with the animal serving as its own control. At each of five different levels of central venous pressure, the airway pressure which just stopped venous return during each series of maneuvers was determined. It was found that this end-point airway pressure is not a good estimator of the animal's resting central venous pressure prior to the simulated valsalva maneuver. It was further found that the measured change in right atrial pressure during a valsalva maneuver is less than the change in airway pressure during the same maneuver, instead of being equal, as had been expected. Relative venous return curves were constructed from the data obtained during the graded series of valsalva maneuvers.

  8. Unilateral Loss of Spontaneous Venous Pulsations in an Astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mader, Thomas H.; Gibson, C. Robert; Lee, Andrew G.; Patel, Nimesh; Hart, Steven; Pettit, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous venous pulsations seen on the optic nerve head (optic disc) are presumed to be caused by fluctuations in the pressure gradient between the intraocular and retrolaminar venous systems. The disappearance of previously documented spontaneous venous pulsations is a well-recognized clinical sign usually associated with a rise in intracranial pressure and a concomitant bilateral elevation of pressure in the subarachnoid space surrounding the optic nerves. In this correspondence we report the unilateral loss of spontaneous venous pulsations in an astronaut 5 months into a long duration space flight. We documented a normal lumbar puncture opening pressure 8 days post mission. The spontaneous venous pulsations were also documented to be absent 21 months following return to Earth.. We hypothesize that these changes may have resulted from a chronic unilateral rise in optic nerve sheath pressure caused by a microgravity-induced optic nerve sheath compartment syndrome.

  9. [Cerebral venous thrombosis and hereditary protein C deficiency].

    PubMed

    Massons, J; Arboix, A; Oliveres, M; Besses, C; Muñoz, C; Titus, F

    1992-01-01

    Protein C together with its plasmatic cofactor protein S and antithrombin III probably represent the most important plasmatic inhibitor in coagulation. Protein C deficiency constitutes a high risk factor for venous thrombosis. Cerebral venous thrombosis is a manifestation which is scarcely referred to in protein C deficiency. The case of a 32 year old patient with protein C deficiency is presented. The patient was admitted for an endocraneal hypertension syndrome. CT and MR demonstrated multiple hemorrhagic cerebral infarctions. Arteriography confirmed vertebral venous thrombosis. Only six cases sufficiently documenting cerebral venous thrombosis due to protein C deficiency were found in the literature. In most cases coadjuvant factors exist predisposing thromboembolic disease. The present clinical case demonstrates the importance of considering protein C deficiency in the diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis in young adults.

  10. Vegetables intake and venous thromboembolism: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Franchini, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    A higher intake of vegetables has been convincingly associated with a decreased risk of arterial thrombotic disorders, so that a similar association may be expected with venous thromboembolism. An electronic search was conducted in Medline, Web of Science and Scopus to identify epidemiological studies that investigated the independent association between intake of vegetables and risk of venous thrombosis. Our systematic literature search allowed to identify four prospective and one case-control studies. Although a lower risk of venous thromboembolism was reported in one prospective and one case-control studies, no significant association was found between larger intake of vegetables and risk of venous thrombosis in the remaining three large prospective studies. Taken together, the epidemiological data available in the current scientific literature do not support the notion that higher consumption of vegetables may have a significant impact on the risk of venous thrombosis. PMID:27023878

  11. An anatomical study of the laterotrigeminal venous system.

    PubMed

    Simões, S

    1993-04-01

    The middle cranial fossa of 100 cadavers were dissected under stereoscopic loupe in order to identify and systematize the venous vessels located along the lateral margin of the trigeminal cave. The author found that at the sensitive root and trigeminal ganglion level a dural venous canal was present in most individuals examined and that the upper side of this canal communicated with the superior petrosal sinus. However, at the level of the lateral border of the intracranial segment of the mandibular nerve, venous lacunae were found to prevail, and these lacunae communicated with several other venous formations in the peritrigeminal region. The author concludes that the venous vascularization of this area constitutes a major risk in surgical interventions made in the middle cranial fossa. In addition, it is a relevant factor in the hemodynamics of the intracranial circulation.

  12. Improvements of venous tone with pycnogenol in chronic venous insufficiency: an ex vivo study on venous segments.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, Gianni; Dugall, Mark; Luzzi, Roberta; Hosoi, M; Corsi, Marcello

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the stretching and dilatation of venous segments ex vivo in subjects with primary varicose veins in comparison with comparable segments from subjects that used the supplement Pycnogenol (150 mg/d) for 3 months before surgery. Subjects with varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency voluntarily used Pycnogenol for a period of at least 3 months. The segments of veins removed with surgery (in 30 subjects that had used Pycnogenol and in 10 comparable control subjects that had not used the supplement) were compared with normal, unused vein segments harvested for bypass grafting. The segments were suspended and a weight was attached to the distal part of the veins for 3 minutes and dilated with pressurized water. Digital images were recorded; the veins were measured before and after stretching to evaluate elongation. The manipulation of the vein segment was minimal. Tests were completed within 20 minutes after harvesting the veins. All segments were 4 cm long. The stretching test indicated a significantly higher level of passive elongation in control, varicose segments (2.29; 0.65 mm) in comparison with 1.39; 0.2 mm in vein segments from Pycnogenol-using patients. The dilation test showed an average higher dilation (2.19; 0.3 mm) in control varicose veins in comparison with varicose veins from Pycnogenol-using patients (1.32; 0.7 mm) (p < 0.05). Stretching and dilatation were lower in veins from Pycnogenol-using subjects (p < 0.05). The measurement of destretching and the recovery after dilatation indicated a better tone and recovery of the original size/shape in varicose segments from patients using Pycnogenol. Varicose segments had a more significant persistent dilatation and elongation in comparison with normal vein segments. Pycnogenol seems to decrease passive dilatation and stretching and gives vein walls a greater tonic recovery and elasticity that allows the vein to recover its original shape after dynamic stresses.

  13. Rerouting surgery of cardiac type total anomalous pulmonary venous return in a premature newborn with very low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Wu, En-Ting; Huang, Shu-Chien; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Chang, Chung-I

    2007-02-01

    Intracardiac repair for complex congenital heart defects in premature neonates with very low birth weight (VLBW) is still a challenge to pediatric cardiac surgeons. We report the successful rerouting of cardiac type total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) in a premature newborn (36th gestational week) with VLBW (1250 g). She had severe hypoxemia and low cardiac output despite medical treatment. Rerouting surgery of TAPVR was performed under deep hypothermia circulatory arrest at the age of 20 days. The sternum was left open and approximated 2 days later. Follow-up echocardiography showed good ventricular function without pulmonary venous obstruction. The endotracheal tube was removed 7 days postoperatively. She was then discharged without complication. In conclusion, with improved cardiopulmonary bypass technique and perioperative care, open heart surgery can be performed in premature newborns with VLBW.

  14. Some observations on the pharmacology of 'deep-heat', a topical rubifacient.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, A J; Notarianni, L J; Ring, E F; Seed, M P

    1984-01-01

    A topically applied rubifacient delivered by aerosol (Deep-Heat) was studied. After spray application to the forearms of volunteers, without massage, the erythema produced was measured by thermography and correlated with the concentration of 2 salicylate components of the mixture found in local and systemic venous blood. Maximum erythema occurred at about 30 minutes, while blood salicylate levels were maximal between 20 and 30 minutes after application. Methyl salicylate was absorbed before ethyl salicylate. Over the time period of the erythematous response oxygen levels in local venous blood were raised. Finally, platelets collected from venous blood draining from the sprayed site, when induced to clump by the addition of arachidonic acid in an aggregometer, showed increased resistance to clumping when compared with control cells. The mechanism of these observed phenomena and the mode of action of the constituents of Deep-Heat are discussed. PMID:6547585

  15. Venous outflow reconstruction in living donor liver transplantation: Dealing with venous anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Long-Bin; Thorat, Ashok; Yang, Horng-Ren; Li, Ping-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of the vascular outflow tract of partial liver grafts has received considerable attention in the past, especially in the setting of right liver grafts with undrained segments. Hepatic venous outflow reconstruction is an important factor for successful living donor liver transplantation outcome. However, in presence of undrained anterior sector and presence of multiple short hepatic veins that drain substantial portions of liver, outflow reconstruction without backtable venoplasty may lead to severe graft congestion and subsequent graft dysfunction. Various backtable venoplasty techniques in presence of multiple hepatic veins that can be used in either right- or left-lobe liver transplantation are devised to ensure a single, wide outflow channel. In this overview, various techniques to overcome the hepatic venous variations of liver allograft and outflow reconstruction are discussed. PMID:26722643

  16. Deep-vein thrombosis following hip surgery for fracture of the proximal femur.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A K; Khoo, T K; Ngan, C C

    1989-12-01

    This is a prospective study involving seventy-two consecutive admissions of patients with fractures of the proximal femur over a period of eleven months. It reviews the incidence, pattern and clinical course of deep vein thrombosis in this group of patients. The method of detection of deep vein thrombosis was that of ascending phlebography of the injured limb. Results show that the incidence of deep vein thrombosis is low and complications of thromboembolism and local complications secondary to venous stasis are nil. It appears that prophylaxis and active treatment of deep vein thrombosis in this group of patients may not be essential.

  17. [Central venous infusion of dopamine. Changes in dose during central venous pressure measurement].

    PubMed

    Guiglio, C; Haro, D; Muchada, R

    1993-01-01

    The changes in the doses of dopamine administered at a steady rate which occur during central venous pressure (CVP) measurement were studied. A workbench model with a single lumen central venous catheter was devised with which a mathematical model was constructed to calculate the alterations due to changes in different variables: central venous pressure, dopamine dose, collateral infusions. The average time for CVP measurement was 2 min. The volume of 5% glucose solution filling the manometer was 2.3 ml. The dopamine bolus generated by CVP measurement was equivalent to a dose of 85 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1. The delay required for a return to the initial dose was 2 h 42 min. Changes in CVP led to inversely proportional changes in dopamine dose. These also depended on the level to which the measuring tube was filled before carrying out the measurement. High initial rates of dopamine infusion required shorter times for a return to initial dopamine doses. The bolus and time for recovery were also inversely proportional to the volume of infusion fluids given at a steady rate on the same venous line. This model was tested in a patient suffering from bacterial pneumonia and septic shock (60 years, 55 kg). CVP measurement resulted in a bolus dose of 17 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1, leading to a 43% decrease in aortic flow rate and 60% in the ejection volume. After about 25 min, heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure had returned to their initial values, although aortic flow rate remained 30% below initial values. This problem is also met with other drugs, such as heparin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8338258

  18. Sex Differences in Patients Receiving Anticoagulant Therapy for Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Molina, Angeles; Enea, Iolanda; Gadelha, Telma; Tufano, Antonella; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Bounameaux, Henri; González, José; Villalta, Jaume; Monreal, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE), the outcome during the course of anticoagulant therapy may differ according to the patient’s sex. We used the RIETE (Registro Informatizado Enfermedad TromboEmbólica) database to compare the rate of VTE recurrences, major bleeding, and mortality due to these events according to sex. As of August 2013, 47,499 patients were enrolled in RIETE, of whom 24,280 (51%) were women. Women were older, more likely presented with pulmonary embolism (PE), and were more likely to have recent immobilization but less likely to have cancer than men. During the course of anticoagulation (mean duration: 253 d), 659 patients developed recurrent deep vein thrombosis (DVT), 576 recurrent PE, 1368 bled, and 4506 died. Compared with men, women had a lower rate of DVT recurrences (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.67–0.91), a similar rate of PE recurrences (HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.83–1.15), a higher rate of major bleeding (HR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09–1.35), and higher mortality due to PE (HR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.04–1.47). On multivariable analysis, any influence of sex on the risk for recurrent DVT (HR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.75–1.03), major bleeding (HR: 1.10; 95% CI: 0.98–1.24), or fatal PE (HR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.84–1.22) was no longer statistically significant. In conclusion, women had fewer DVT recurrences and more bleeds than men during the course of anticoagulation. These differences were not due to sex, but very likely to other patient characteristics more common in female patients and differences in treatment choice. PMID:25398066

  19. Dabigatran for the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Schellong, Sebastian M

    2015-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and individuals with a first VTE are at risk of recurrent VTE. VTE treatment is divided into three phases: a first short phase of acute (traditionally parenteral) anticoagulation, followed by a second maintenance phase with an oral anticoagulant, which may be continued into a third extended maintenance phase in patients considered to be at increased risk of recurrent VTE. Vitamin K antagonists are effective oral anticoagulants but have well-known limitations; non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants including dabigatran etexilate (DE) were therefore developed. DE was approved for VTE treatment on the basis of an extensive clinical trial program that evaluated DE during both the maintenance phase and the extended maintenance phase of VTE treatment. This article provides a comprehensive overview of DE in VTE treatment, from its preclinical characteristics and pharmacokinetic properties to its efficacy and safety in major clinical trials.

  20. Role of surgery in iliofemoral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, R B

    1986-05-01

    Thrombectomy has a limited but definite role in the clinical management of patients with iliofemoral venous thrombosis. It is best applied selectively to achieve specific goals in two different groups of patients at either end of the disease spectrum. In relatively active healthy young patients with phlegmasia alba dolens operated on relatively soon after thrombosis, better protection against the late postthrombotic sequelae can be achieved. Patients with malignancy, underlying coagulopathy, or those who are inactive or have a limited life expectancy due to age or concurrent disease should not be operated on for bland thrombosis. At the other extreme, when phlegmasia cerulea dolens causes painful tense swelling, increases compartmental or decreases ankle pressures, and threatens limb viability in spite of heparinization and leg elevation, thrombectomy should be performed.

  1. Management of varicose veins and venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Allen

    2012-12-26

    Chronic venous disease, reviewed herein, is manifested by a spectrum of signs and symptoms, including cosmetic spider veins, asymptomatic varicosities, large painful varicose veins, edema, hyperpigmentation and lipodermatosclerosis of skin, and ulceration. However, there is no definitive stepwise progression from spider veins to ulcers and, in fact, severe skin complications of varicose veins, even when extensive, are not guaranteed. Treatment options range from conservative (eg, medications, compression stockings, lifestyle changes) to minimally invasive (eg, sclerotherapy or endoluminal ablation), invasive (surgical techniques), and hybrid (combination of ≥1 therapies). Ms L, a 68-year-old woman with varicose veins, is presented. She has had vein problems over the course of her life. Her varicose veins recurred after initial treatment, and she is now seeking guidance regarding her current treatment options.

  2. Hepatic portal venous gas in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Georgina; Cameron, Georgina; De Cruz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is a rare finding that has only been reported previously among 25 patients with Crohn's disease in the English literature. We present a case of a 27-year-old woman with Crohn's disease who presented with fever, abdominal pain and per rectal bleeding and was found to have HPVG at the time of presentation most likely due to an enterovenous fistula. She was managed with intravenous antibiotics, corticosteroids and infliximab and subsequently made a full recovery. HPVG is most likely a manifestation of penetrating Crohn's disease, is overall associated with a low mortality rate and can be managed conservatively in the majority of cases associated with Crohn's disease. Although surgery has been suggested for cases of enterovenous fistulae in the past, this is the first case to suggest that use of antitumour necrosis factor therapy may arrest associated gastrointestinal bleeding and avoid the need for surgery. PMID:25260428

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Venous Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of acute and chronic iliac vein occlusions has proven to be safe and effective. Recanalization of chronic occlusions with balloon angioplasty and stenting can re-establish normal venous flow in the iliac veins and the IVC and relieve symptoms in the majority of treated patients. CDT with recanalization and stenting of underlying chronically obstructed iliofemoral segments is becoming the treatment of choice for patients with acute iliofemoral thrombosis, as anticoagulation and compression therapy alone are not satisfactory in preventing PTS. The new treatment modalities offer stimulating options for a patient group that is not adequately treated, neither by medical nor open surgical therapy. The substantial effort and additional costs of endovascular treatment appear to be justified by the encouraging mid-term results both for patients with acute and chronic occlusive iliofemoral disease. However, multi-center randomized prospective studies are required to further validate the role of these techniques. PMID:23555345

  4. Systemic Venous Inflow to the Liver Allograft to Overcome Diffuse Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lupascu, Cristian; Darius, Tom; Goffette, Pierre; Lerut, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse splanchnic venous thrombosis (DSVT), formerly defined as contraindication for liver transplantation (LT), is a serious challenge to the liver transplant surgeon. Portal vein arterialisation, cavoportal hemitransposition and renoportal anastomosis, and finally combined liver and small bowel transplantation are all possible alternatives to deal with this condition. Five patients with preoperatively confirmed extensive splanchnic venous thrombosis were transplanted using cavoportal hemitransposition (4x) and renoportal anastomosis (1x). Median follow-up was 58 months (range: 0,5 to 130 months). Two patients with previous radiation-induced peritoneal injury died, respectively, 18 days and 2 months after transplantation. The three other patients had excellent long-term survival, despite the fact that two of them needed a surgical reintervention for severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Extensive splanchnic venous thrombosis is no longer an absolute contraindication to liver transplantation. Although cavoportal hemitransposition and renoportal anastomosis undoubtedly are life-saving procedures allowing for ensuring adequate allograft portal flow, careful follow-up of these patients remains necessary as both methods are unable to completely eliminate the complications of (segmental) portal hypertension. PMID:26539214

  5. Provisional Matrix Deposition in Hemostasis and Venous Insufficiency: Tissue Preconditioning for Nonhealing Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Tony J.; Broadbent, James A.; McGovern, Jacqui A.; Broszczak, Daniel A.; Parker, Christina N.; Upton, Zee

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds represent a major burden on global healthcare systems and reduce the quality of life of those affected. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the biochemistry of wound healing progression. However, knowledge regarding the specific molecular processes influencing chronic wound formation and persistence remains limited. Recent Advances: Generally, healing of acute wounds begins with hemostasis and the deposition of a plasma-derived provisional matrix into the wound. The deposition of plasma matrix proteins is known to occur around the microvasculature of the lower limb as a result of venous insufficiency. This appears to alter limb cutaneous tissue physiology and consequently drives the tissue into a ‘preconditioned’ state that negatively influences the response to wounding. Critical Issues: Processes, such as oxygen and nutrient suppression, edema, inflammatory cell trapping/extravasation, diffuse inflammation, and tissue necrosis are thought to contribute to the advent of a chronic wound. Healing of the wound then becomes difficult in the context of an internally injured limb. Thus, interventions and therapies for promoting healing of the limb is a growing area of interest. For venous ulcers, treatment using compression bandaging encourages venous return and improves healing processes within the limb, critically however, once treatment concludes ulcers often reoccur. Future Directions: Improved understanding of the composition and role of pericapillary matrix deposits in facilitating internal limb injury and subsequent development of chronic wounds will be critical for informing and enhancing current best practice therapies and preventative action in the wound care field. PMID:25785239

  6. Management of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Paydar, Shahram; Sabetian, Golnar; Khalili, Hosseinali; Fallahi, Javad; Tahami, Mohammad; Ziaian, Bizhan; Abbasi, Hamid Reza; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Ghahramani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PTE) are known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). DVT occurs when a thrombus (a blood clot) forms in deep veins of the body, usually in the lower extremities. It can cause swelling or leg pain, but sometimes may occur with no symptoms. Awareness of DVT is the best way to prevent the VTE. Patients with trauma are at increased risk of DVT and subsequent PE because of coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, DVT prophylaxis is essential but the VTE prophylaxis strategy is controversial for the trauma patients. The risk factors for VTE includes pelvic and lower extremity fractures, and head injury. PMID:27162921

  7. Retinal venous pressure: the role of endothelin.

    PubMed

    Flammer, Josef; Konieczka, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The retinal venous pressure (RVP) can be measured non-invasively. While RVP is equal to or slightly above intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy people, it is often markedly increased in patients with eye or systemic diseases. Beside a mechanical obstruction, the main cause of such an elevation is a local dysregulation of a retinal vein, particularly a constriction induced by endothelin-1 (ET-1). A local increase of ET-1 can result from a high plasma level, as ET-1 can diffuse from the fenestrated capillaries of the choroid into the optic nerve head (ONH), bypassing the blood retinal barrier. A local increase can also result from increased local production either by a sick neighboring artery or retinal tissue. Generally, the main factors increasing ET-1 are inflammations and hypoxia, either locally or in a remote organ. RVP is known to be increased in patients with glaucoma, retinal vein occlusion (RVO), diabetic retinopathy, high mountain disease, and primary vascular dysregulation (PVD). PVD is the major vascular component of Flammer syndrome (FS). An increase of RVP decreases perfusion pressure, which heightens the risk for hypoxia. An increase of RVP also elevates transmural pressure, which in turn heightens the risk for retinal edema. In patients with RVO, a high level of RVP may not only be a consequence but also a potential cause of the occlusion; therefore, it risks causing a vicious circle. Narrow retinal arteries and particularly dilated retinal veins are known risk indicators for future cardiovascular events. As the major cause for such a retinal venous dilatation is an increased RVP, RVP may likely turn out to be an even stronger predictor. PMID:26504500

  8. Adverse pacemaker hemodynamics evaluated by pulmonary venous flow monitoring.

    PubMed

    Stierle, U; Krüger, D; Mitusch, R; Potratz, J; Taubert, G; Sheikhzadeh, A

    1995-11-01

    The pacemaker syndrome refers to symptoms and signs in the pacemaker patient caused by an inadequate timing of atrial and ventricular contractions. The lack of normal atrioventricular synchrony may result in a decreased cardiac output and venous cannon A waves. The objective of this study was to define the left atrial and pulmonary venous flow response to ventricular pacing in a group of 14 unselected consecutive patients with total heart block and sinus rhythm. Pulmonary venous flow was assessed by transesophageal pulsed Doppler echocardiography in the VVI and DDD pacing modes. An inappropriate atrial timing caused a marked augmentation of the normally small pulmonary venous z wave in all patients ("negative atrial kick," peak z wave in DDD pacing 14.5 +/- 4.6 cm/s, VVI pacing 51.8 +/- 15.0 cm/s). Restoration of AV synchrony (DDD pacing, AV interval 100 ms) abolished these "cannon z waves" in all patients, and a normal pattern of pulmonary venous flow was achieved. Abnormal pulmonary venous flow characteristics were observed in 2 of 14 patients during DDD pacing with short AV intervals (100 ms). The Doppler pattern was similar to the findings seen in VVI pacing. Assessment of pulmonary venous flow by transesophageal pulsed Doppler echocardiography may provide a simple, sensitive, and relatively noninvasive technique to evaluate patients with suspected pacing induced adverse hemodynamics.

  9. Cardiovascular Pressures with Venous Gas Embolism and Decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Robinson, R.; Sutton, T.; Kemper, G. B.

    1995-01-01

    Venous gas embolism (VGE) is reported with decompression to a decreased ambient pressure. With severe decompression, or in cases where an intracardiac septal defect (patent foramen ovale) exists, the venous bubbles can become arterialized and cause neurological decompression illness. Incidence rates of patent foramen ovale in the general population range from 25-34% and yet aviators, astronauts, and deepsea divers who have decompression-induced venous bubbles do not demonstrate neurological symptoms at these high rates. This apparent disparity may be attributable to the normal pressure gradient across the atria of the heart that must be reversed for there to be flow potency. We evaluated the effects of: venous gas embolism (0.025, 0.05 and 0.15 ml/ kg min for 180 min.) hyperbaric decompression; and hypobaric decompression on the pressure gradient across the left and right atria in anesthetized dogs with intact atrial septa. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was used as a measure of left atrial pressure. In a total of 92 experimental evaluations in 22 dogs, there were no reported reversals in the mean pressure gradient across the atria; a total of 3 transient reversals occurred during the peak pressure gradient changes. The reasons that decompression-induced venous bubbles do not consistently cause serious symptoms of decompression illness may be that the amount of venous gas does not always cause sufficient pressure reversal across a patent foramen ovale to cause arterialization of the venous bubbles.

  10. [Tactics of the patients management in continuing acute thrombosis of deep veins].

    PubMed

    Prasol, V A; Mishenina, E V; Okley, D V

    2015-03-01

    Experience of active tactics of treatment application in 18 patients, suffering an acute thrombosis in system of lower vena cava, is presented. Possibilities were estimated and efficacy of active surgical tactics proved in continuing deep vein thrombosis on early stage were estimated. Active tactics, using catheter--governed thrombolysis, permits to escape pulmonary thromboembolism and to reduce a severity of further chronic venous insufficiency.

  11. Deep vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    DVT; Blood clot in the legs; Thromboembolism; Post-phlebitic syndrome; Post-thrombotic syndrome; Venous - DVT ... of blood clots Fractures in the pelvis or legs Giving birth within the last 6 months Pregnancy ...

  12. Mechanism of action of isoproterenol on venous return.

    PubMed

    Green, J F

    1977-02-01

    The systemic vascular effects of isoproterenol infused in a dose of 1 mug-kg-1-min-1 was studied in 10 anesthetized dogs. A right heart bypass preparation allowed the separation of venous return into splanchnic and extrasplanchnic flows. Each channel was drained by gravity into an external reservoir. Venous return was then pumped into the pulmonary artery. During the infusion of isoproterenol, the pump was set at sufficient speed to maintain a constant level of blood in the external reservoir. Venous resistances and compliances of both channels were calculated from transient and steady-state volume shifts that occurred after rapid drops in splanchnic and then extrasplanchnic venous pressures. Isoproterenol affected both arterial and venous systems. Venous return increased from 1.62+/-0.11 to 2.40+/-0.19 liter/min (P less than 0.001) while arterial pressure fell from 97.5+/-3.8 to 70.2+/-5.9 mmHg (P less than 0.01). The compliances of the splanchnic and extrasplanchnic channels did not change significantly from their control values of 0.025+/-0.004 and 0.024+/-0.002 liter/mmHg. The venous resistance of the extrasplanchnic channel also did not change from its control value of 5.0 mmHg-liter-1-min-1; however, the splanchnic venous resistance decreased from 16.3+/-3.2 to 9.4+/-2.8 mmHg-liter-1-min-1 (P less than 0.001). The effective splanchnic back pressure, estimated by measuring the level to which hepatic venous pressure had to be raised to cause a change in portal pressure, decreased from 3.9 to 3.0 mmHg (P less than 0.01).

  13. Up close and personal with deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Laura K S

    2006-03-01

    Deep vein thrombosis - the formation of clots in one of the body's deep veins (usually in the lower extremities) - develops as a result of vascular damage to the vein wall, venous stasis, and hypercoagulability (Virchow's triad). Among the many problems it can cause, the condition can escalate the challenge of healing a chronic wound. If a patient presents with pain, swelling, warmth, muscle cramps, and/or redness, the clinician should consider deep vein thrombosis, even if the patient does not initially appear to be at risk. Because approximately 2 million Americans have deep vein thrombosis every year (including otherwise healthy adults, the elderly, and persons with and without a history of venous insufficiency), prompt attention to symptoms is warranted. Diagnosis takes into consideration risk factors such as hypercoagulability, estrogen contraception, and Factor V Leiden mutation and is confirmed via compression ultrasonography and duplex ultrasound. Management includes anticoagulation therapy and thrombolytic therapy; prevention focuses on avoiding long periods of sitting, wearing compression hose when necessary and, for persons at risk, prophylactic anticoagulant therapy. Prescribed bedrest as a result of deep vein thrombosis provided one clinician/patient who did not consider herself to be at risk the opportunity to explore the condition in depth. PMID:16565527

  14. Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection to the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Wyttenbach, Marina; Carrel, Thierry; Schuepbach, Peter; Tschaeppeler, Heinz; Triller, Juergen

    1996-03-15

    Anomalous pulmonary venous return represents a rare congenital anomaly with wide anatomic and physiologic variability. We report a case of a newborn with a rare form of total infracardiac anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC). The pulmonary veins draining both lungs formed two vertical veins, which joined to a common pulmonary trunk below the diaphragm. This venous channel connected to the portal vein through the esophageal hiatus. The diagnosis was suggested by color Doppler sonography and confirmed by intravenous digital subtraction angiography, which allowed definition of the anatomy.

  15. Vertebral venous channels: CT appearance and differential considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.; Guerra, J. Jr.

    1985-06-01

    A comprehensive study of the anatomy, radiologic images, and pathology of venous channels in the thoracic and lumbar vertebral bodies was performed using cadavers and patients. These structures may be mistaken for fractures, lytic lesions, or other abnormalities on high-resolution axial computed tomographic (CT) scans of the spine. A distinct osseous wall, absence of extension over multiple contiguous levels, lack of displacement, and predominant localization in the mid-axial plane of the vertebral body are characteristic features of venous channels. An understanding of the normal intraosseous venous anatomy should prevent misinterpretation of clinical CT studies in most instances.

  16. Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis with a vaginal contraceptive ring.

    PubMed

    Eilbert, Wesley; Hecht, Benjamin; Zuiderveld, Loren

    2014-07-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring.

  17. Double connections in total anomalous pulmonary venous connection.

    PubMed

    Arciprete, P; McKay, R; Watson, G H; Hamilton, D I; Wilkinson, J L; Arnold, R M

    1986-07-01

    Three infants who underwent operation for total anomalous pulmonary venous connection had unobstructed drainage of all the pulmonary veins to both the coronary sinus and left vertical vein. In one patient the anatomy was demonstrated preoperatively and complete correction accomplished without difficulty, but in two patients the second connection was discovered only at postoperative reinvestigation. Arbitrary classification of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection into cardiac, supracardiac, infracardiac, and mixed types does not lend itself to description of such lesions and may obscure their clinical importance. For these less common variants of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, a more detailed and precise definition of morphology facilitates accurate surgical repair.

  18. Submandibular venous hemangioma: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Adam N; Vyhmeister, Ross; Kamran, Mudassar; Teefey, Sharlene A

    2015-10-01

    Hemangiomas of the submandibular space are very rare. Only 11 cases have been reported in the English literature, all of which were cavernous hemangiomas. In this report, we describe the case of a venous hemangioma in a 70-year-old woman. Ultrasound examination revealed a lobulated, homogeneous, hypoechoic mass, and minimal flow was detected on power Doppler evaluation. The mass and the submandibular gland were surgically excised, and the endothelium was found to be positive for CD31 and D2-40 markers, consistent with venous hemangioma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a venous hemangioma in the submandibular space.

  19. Extensive portal venous gas: Unlikely etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Tiffany P; Nassif, Mohammed O; Farma, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Portal venous gas or hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) found on imaging portends grave outcomes for patients suffering from ischemic bowel disease or mesenteric ischemia. HPVG is more rarely seen with severe but treatable abdominal infection as well as multiple benign conditions, and therefore must be aggressively evaluated. We report a 70-year old female who developed extensive intra- and extra-hepatic portal venous gas, pneumatosis intestinalis and free air associated with a perforation of the jejunojejunostomy after a gastrectomy for gastric carcinoma.

  20. Venous ulcer: late complication of a traumatic arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Young, Calvin J; Dardik, Alan; Sumpio, Bauer; Indes, Jeff; Muhs, Bart; Ochoa Chaar, Cassius I

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistula (AVF) formation after penetrating trauma is a well-described phenomenon. However, diagnosis of traumatic AVF is frequently delayed as patients often do not have hard signs of vascular injury at the initial presentation. Late complications of traumatic AVF include arterial and venous dilatation, distal ischemia, venous congestion, and congestive heart failure. This case report describes a traumatic femoral AVF causing distal venous ulceration 3 years after the injury. The AVF was treated with open repair. In the operating room, the Nicoladoni-Branham sign was elicited. The ulcer healed at 1 month and has not recurred at 1-year follow-up.

  1. Venous gas embolism - Time course of residual pulmonary intravascular bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Luehr, S.; Katz, J.

    1989-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the time course of residual pulmonary intravascular bubbles after embolization with known amounts of venous air, using an N2O challenge technique. Attention was also given to the length of time that the venous gas emboli remained as discrete bubbles in the lungs with 100 percent oxygen ventilation. The data indicate that venous gas emboli can remain in the pulmonary vasculature as discrete bubbles for periods lasting up to 43 + or - 10.8 min in dogs ventilated with oxygen and nitrogen. With 100 percent oxygen ventilation, these values are reduced significantly to 19 + or - 2.5 min.

  2. [Treatment by danaparoid sodium for portal venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Shudo, Ryushi; Yazaki, Yasuyuki; Sugawara, Kenji; Honda, Mitsunori

    2007-02-01

    We report a case of hepatitis B type liver cirrhosis with portal venous thrombosis in which danaparoid sodium was very effective. The portal venous thrombosis in this case disappeared 2 weeks commencing after administration of danaparoid sodium. The patient had not adverse effects or complications such as hemorrhage, and the clinical course was good. We consider that danaparoid sodium is an anticoagulant unlikely to cause adverse effects such as hemorrhage, and that it might be effective for treatment of portal venous thrombosis. We intend to examine the indications of treatment with danaparoid sodium, clarify the best administration method, and establishment of maintenance therapy by investigating more cases. PMID:17283415

  3. [Current status of the management of venous thromboembolism in Japan].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mashio

    2014-07-01

    In the past, unfractionated heparin and warfarin have been used as anticoagulants for treatment of venous thromboembolism in Japan. Although it has been effective anticoagulants, these uses are accompanied by several pitfalls, which have led to research and the discovery of new additional groups of anticoagulants: parenteral factor Xa inhibitors, such as fondaparinux, and oral direct factor Xa inhibitors, such as rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban. These new anticoagulants are fast-acting, noninferior to heparin and warfarin in preventing recurrence of venous thromboembolism, and do not require monitoring. These new anticoagulants show promise for improvement of long-term outcome for venous thromboembolism.

  4. Deep blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    From southern New Mexico to the Great Slave Lake of Canada, scientists from the United States and Canada recently detonated 10 underground chemical explosions to generate a clearer picture of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. Called Project Deep Probe, the experiment is designed to see through the crust and into the upper mantle to a depth of 300 miles.In the United States, Earth scientists from Rice University, Purdue University, and the University of Oregon are participating in the project. “Researchers hope to get a picture of the upper mantle beneath the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado Plateau, to understand the role the mantle played in formation and uplift,” says Alan Levander of Rice. To enhance that “picture,” 750 portable seismographs were placed along a roughly north-south line extending from Crownpoint, New Mexico to Edmonton, Alberta. The seismic recordings will be used to enhance weak seismic waves that penetrated the upper mantle.

  5. Assisted venous drainage, venous air, and gaseous microemboli transmission into the arterial line: an in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rider, S P; Simon, L V; Rice, B J; Poulton, C C

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the interaction of cardiopulmonary bypass venous air with assisted venous drainage, focusing on its production of gaseous microemboli in the arterial line. An in-vitro recirculating cardiopulmonary bypass circuit containing fresh whole bovine blood was monitored with a pulsed-doppler microbubble detector. Air of specific amounts was injected into the venous line and gaseous microemboli counts were obtained distal to the arterial filter. Data was recorded for unassisted drainage, vacuum-assisted drainage, and centrifugal pump-assisted drainage. Centrifugal pump-assisted drainage produced over 300 microbubbles in one minute distal to the arterial filter when venous air was introduced into the circuit. Of these, 220 were greater than 80 microns in size. Vacuum-assisted drainage produced no microbubbles when the same amount of venous air was introduced into the circuit. However, vacuum-assisted drainage did produce some microbubbles in the arterial line when a stopcock was left open on the venous line for 30 seconds. Unassisted drainage produced no microbubbles at all levels of venous air entrainment. Air becomes entrained in the venous line from a variety of sources. In a typical gravity-drained situation, the air remains whole and is dissipated in the venous reservoir by buoyancy and filtration. In an assisted-drainage situation, the air is subjected to additional forces. The air is subjected to a greater degree of negative pressure and, with centrifugal pump assisted drainage, is subjected to kinetic energy imparted by the cones or vanes of the pump. The kinetic energy from the centrifugal pump appears to break the air into small bubbles which become suspended in the blood, passing through the reservoir, oxygenator, and arterial filter. In a clinical setting, these bubbles would be passed into a patient's arterial system.

  6. Prevalence rate for inherited thrombophilia in patients with chronic and recurrent venous leg ulceration.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Adam; Bykowska, Ksenia; Bilski, Radoslaw; Jaśkowiak, Wojciech; Proniewski, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence rate for inherited thrombophilia (IT) in patients with chronic (CVU) and recurrent venous leg ulceration. We also investigated and evaluated the severity of the clinical pattern of CVU in patients with and without IT. We examined 110 patients with CVU (the study group) and 110 healthy subjects (the control group). We prepared a questionnaire to be completed by each study participant. Ultrasound Doppler color imaging or/and duplex ultrasonography was performed to evaluate the efficiency of the venous system. The ankle-brachial index was calculated to determine the efficiency of the arterial system. We examined both groups for the presence of IT. IT was diagnosed in 30% of study group and in 1.8% of control group. Our diagnoses of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) were based on medical interviews, physical examinations, and an ultrasonography of the venous system and concerned 64 study group patients (58.2%), 35 of whom (31.8%) experienced recurrent DVT. Proximal and/or distal DVT was determined in an interview and/or by an ultrasonography performed for all patients with CVU and IT. In 94% of these patients, DVT was recurrent, and in 88% of patients with CVU and IT, we observed recurrent DVT and CVU. It recurred more often and persisted longer when compared to patients with CVU and no IT, despite similar management. No differences were observed in ulcer size, localization, or pain level related to ulceration between patients with CVU and IT and those with CVU and no IT.

  7. Multiple Venous Thromboses Presenting as Mechanical Low Back Pain in an 18-Year-Old Woman

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Andrée-Anne; Boucher, Jean-Alexandre; O’Shaughnessy, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who presented with acute musculoskeletal symptoms but was later diagnosed with multiple deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Clinical Features An 18-year-old female presented to a chiropractic clinic with left lumbosacral pain with referral into the posterior left thigh. A provisional diagnosis was made of acute myofascial syndrome of the left piriformis and gluteus medius muscles. The patient received 3 chiropractic treatments over 1 week resulting in 80% improvement in pain intensity. Two days later, a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain caused the patient to seek urgent medical attention. A diagnostic ultrasound of the abdomen and pelvis were performed and interpreted as normal. Following this, the patient reported increased pain in her left leg. Evaluation revealed edema of the left calf and decreased left lower limb sensation. A venous Doppler ultrasound was ordered. Intervention and Outcomes Doppler ultrasound revealed reduction of the venous flow in the femoral vein area. An additional ultrasonography evaluation revealed an extensive DVTs affecting the left femoral vein and iliac axis extending towards the vena cava. Upon follow-up with a hematologist, the potential diagnosis of May-Thurner syndrome was considered based on the absence of blood dyscrasias and sustained anatomical changes found in the left common iliac vein at its junction with the right common iliac artery. A week following discharge, she presented with chest pain and was diagnosed with venous thromboembolism. The patient was successfully treated with anticoagulation therapy and insertion of a vena cava filter. Conclusion Although DVTs are common in the general population, presence in low-risk individuals may be overlooked. In the presence of subtle initial clinical signs such as those described in this case report, clinicians should keep a high index of suspicion for a DVT. Rapid identification of such clinical signs in association

  8. Arterio-venous anastomoses in the human skin and their role in temperature control

    PubMed Central

    Walløe, Lars

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arterio-venous anastomoses (AVAs) are direct connections between small arteries and small veins. In humans they are numerous in the glabrous skin of the hands and feet. The AVAs are short vessel segments with a large inner diameter and a very thick muscular wall. They are densely innervated by adrenergic axons. When they are open, they provide a low-resistance connection between arteries and veins, shunting blood directly into the venous plexuses of the limbs. The AVAs play an important role in temperature regulation in humans in their thermoneutral zone, which for a naked resting human is about 26°C to 36°C, but lower when active and clothed. From the temperature control center in the hypothalamus, bursts of nerve impulses are sent simultaneously to all AVAs. The AVAs are all closed near the lower end and all open near the upper end of the thermoneutral zone. The small veins in the skin of the arms and legs are also contracted near the lower end of the thermoneutral zone and relax to a wider cross section as the ambient temperature rises. At the cold end of the thermoneutral range, the blood returns to the heart through the deep veins and cools the arterial blood through a countercurrent mechanism. As the ambient temperature rises, more blood is returned through the superficial venous plexuses and veins and heats the skin surface of the full length of the 4 limbs. This skin surface is responsible for a large part of the loss of heat from the body toward the upper end of the thermoneutral zone. PMID:27227081

  9. The Mean Platelet Volume Is Decreased in Patients Diagnosed with Venous Thromboembolism in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Buonocore, Ruggero; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2016-09-01

    Platelets are small corpuscular elements, which play an essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis. As active players in the thrombotic process, hyperactive platelets are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders. Nevertheless, the role of platelet size, as a biological marker of platelet activation, remains debated in the setting of venous thrombosis. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective case-control study to clarify the potential association between mean platelet volume (MPV) and newly diagnosed venous thromboembolism (VTE) by reviewing data of all consecutive patients receiving a diagnosis of VTE at the emergency department (ED) of the University Hospital of Parma (Italy) between January and December, 2014. The control population was represented by outpatients undergoing routine laboratory testing for health checkup at the phlebotomy center of the same University Hospital during the same period. MPV was found to be comparatively decreased in the entire cohort of patients with VTE compared with the outpatient population, as well as in those with isolated deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE). A decreased MPV value (i.e., < 10.8 fL) was found to be associated with an increased risk of diagnosing VTE (relative risk, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09-1.28; p < 0.001), as well as of diagnosing isolated DVT (relative risk, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.07-1.31; p = 0.001) and isolated PE (relative risk, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.04-1.30; p = 0.007). A decreased MPV value in active cancer patients was associated with the highest risk of diagnosing thrombosis (relative risk, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.10-1.51; p = 0.002). These results support an inverse association between MPV and the risk of venous thrombosis at diagnosis. PMID:27074441

  10. Arterio-venous anastomoses in the human skin and their role in temperature control.

    PubMed

    Walløe, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Arterio-venous anastomoses (AVAs) are direct connections between small arteries and small veins. In humans they are numerous in the glabrous skin of the hands and feet. The AVAs are short vessel segments with a large inner diameter and a very thick muscular wall. They are densely innervated by adrenergic axons. When they are open, they provide a low-resistance connection between arteries and veins, shunting blood directly into the venous plexuses of the limbs. The AVAs play an important role in temperature regulation in humans in their thermoneutral zone, which for a naked resting human is about 26°C to 36°C, but lower when active and clothed. From the temperature control center in the hypothalamus, bursts of nerve impulses are sent simultaneously to all AVAs. The AVAs are all closed near the lower end and all open near the upper end of the thermoneutral zone. The small veins in the skin of the arms and legs are also contracted near the lower end of the thermoneutral zone and relax to a wider cross section as the ambient temperature rises. At the cold end of the thermoneutral range, the blood returns to the heart through the deep veins and cools the arterial blood through a countercurrent mechanism. As the ambient temperature rises, more blood is returned through the superficial venous plexuses and veins and heats the skin surface of the full length of the 4 limbs. This skin surface is responsible for a large part of the loss of heat from the body toward the upper end of the thermoneutral zone. PMID:27227081

  11. Hyperhomocysteinemia and venous thromboembolism: a risk factor more prevalent in the elderly and in idiopathic cases.

    PubMed

    Hainaut, Philippe; Jaumotte, Carine; Verhelst, David; Wallemacq, Pierre; Gala, Jean-Luc; Lavenne, Edith; Heusterspreute, Michel; Zech, Francis; Moriau, Maurice

    2002-04-15

    Fasting plasma homocysteine level and the related clinical findings were analysed in 240 consecutive patients with venous thromboembolism. Hyperhomocysteinemia, defined as a plasma level above 20 micromol/l (corresponding to the percentile 95th in the controls), was present in 11.2% of the patients. Plasma homocysteine level was similar in patients presenting with either deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or both conditions. It was significantly higher in patients with primary (unprovoked) VTE than in patients with secondary disease (associated with at least one risk factor): 12.3 vs. 9.55 micromol/l (p < 0.005). Mean homocysteine was higher in male than in female patients (14.51 vs. 12.9 micromol/l, p < 0.05) and increased significantly with age. Hyperhomocysteinemia was more frequent in patients with relapsing disease (14 of 76, 18.4%) than in those presenting with a single episode (13 of 164, 7.9%) (p = 0.034). Furthermore, hyperhomocysteinemia was correlated with reduced protein C level (p = 0.013). In a multivariate analysis, two factors were significantly associated with hyperhomocysteinemia: older age (p < 0.0001) and idiopathic occurrence (p < 0.02). Since the frequency of homozygous MTHFR thermolabile variant was rather similar in patients and controls, testing for C677T mutation was not helpful in screening VTE patients. However, the homozygous mutation was significantly more prevalent among hyperhomocysteinemia patients, confirming its role in the genesis of hyperhomocysteinemia. According to its prevalence, to the putative role in venous and arterial disease and the availability of an effective and low-cost corrective therapy, hyperhomocysteinemia deserves interest, especially in the elderly and in the patients with idiopathic VTE disease. PMID:12182910

  12. Venous outflow of the brain after bilateral complete jugular ligation.

    PubMed

    Ensari, Serdar; Kaptanoğlu, Erkan; Tun, Kağan; Gün, Taylan; Beşkonakli, Etem; Celikkanat, Serdar; Dere, Hüseyin; Cekirge, Saruhan

    2008-01-01

    A case of a patient with bilateral internal, external, posterior external and anterior jugular vein ligations and excisions performed in the neck due to a larynx tumor is presented. Radical neck dissection is a standard otorhinolaryngological procedure in the management of head and neck cancer patients with bilateral lymph node metastasis to the neck. Sacrifice of both internal and external jugular veins bilaterally has been recognized as a dangerous approach leading to intracranial hypertension with subsequent neurological sequela and death. In this report, we aimed to demonstrate how venous outflow from the brain diverts after jugular venous system obliteration. After bilateral jugular vein ligations, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) showed that the venous drainage route of the brain had been diverted from the jugular veins to the vertebral venous plexus. PMID:18382980

  13. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in a large vein. This device enables ascitic fluid in the peritoneal cavity to flow into the venous...

  14. Chronic kidney disease and venous thromboembolism: epidemiology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wattanakit, Keattiyoat; Cushman, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review An estimated 13% of Americans have kidney disease. We sought to describe the association of kidney disease with risk of venous thromboembolism and discuss possible mechanisms explaining this association. Recent findings All severities of kidney disease appear to increase the risk of venous thromboembolism. In the general population the risk associated with mild to moderate kidney disease is 1.3–2-fold increased, and present even for microalbuminuria, although stage 1 chronic kidney disease itself has not been studied. End-stage renal disease is also associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk, compared to the general population. Although data are limited, risk increases after kidney transplant and with nephrotic syndrome as well. Summary Rates of kidney disease are increasing rapidly in the population and kidney disease is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. An improved understanding of mechanisms linking kidney disease with venous thromboembolism will allow further study of best prevention efforts. PMID:19561505

  15. Incidence of Venous Thromboembolic Events Among Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Josephine P; Shaheen, Wassim H; Truong, Son V; Brown, Edward F; Beasley, Brent W; Gajewski, Byron J

    2003-01-01

    Chronic care facility stay has been shown to be an independent risk factor for venous thromboembolism. Review of the literature, however, reveals a paucity of data addressing the issue of venous thromboembolism in nursing home residents. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of venous thromboembolic events among nursing home residents. A retrospective cohort study was derived from data compiled in the State of Kansas Minimum Data Set (MDS) for nursing home residents from July 1, 1997 to July 1, 1998. A total of 18,661 residents (median age, 85 years, 74% female, 95% white) satisfied the study criteria. The outcome measures of the primary endpoint—development of a venous thromboembolic event (VTE)—were obtained from the MDS quarterly health assessments and the Medicare ICD-9 codes. We determined the incidence of VTE among nursing home residents as 1.30 events per 100 person-years of observation. PMID:14687280

  16. Facts and fiction surrounding the discovery of the venous valves.

    PubMed

    Scultetus, A H; Villavicencio, J L; Rich, N M

    2001-02-01

    Venous valves are delicate structures, the integrity of which is crucial for the normal function of the venous system. Their abnormalities lead to widespread disorders, ranging from chronic venous insufficiency to life-threatening thromboembolic phenomena. The discovery of the venous valves, however, has been the subject of hot controversy. Even though Fabricius ab Aquapendente is credited with the discovery by most historians, we demonstrate in this paper that other anatomists described them many years before Fabricius ab Aquapendente publicly demonstrated them in Padua in 1579. A thorough review of the historical literature surrounding the discovery of the venous valves was carried out from 1545 to the present under the supervision of the Medical History Department of our institution. Research was performed at the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine and through MEDLINE access to the medical literature. The Parisian Charles Estienne first mentioned the venous valves in his 1545 publication when he described "apophyses membranarum" in the veins of the liver. Lusitanus and Canano publicly demonstrated them in the azygos vein during cadaver dissections performed in Ferrera, Italy. The Parisian Jacques Sylvius described valves in the veins of the extremities in 1555. The work of these anatomists, however, could not achieve full recognition, because Andreas Vesalius, the leading anatomist at that time, was unable to confirm their findings and strongly denied the existence of venous valves. Vesalius's influence was so powerful that research on the subject was idle until 1579, when Fabricius ab Aquapendente "discovered" the venous valves. About the same time, the German Salomon Alberti published the first drawings of a venous valve (in 1585). William Harvey, a disciple of Fabricius ab Aquapendente, finally postulated the function of the venous valves, providing anatomical support for one of the greatest discoveries in medicine: the blood

  17. The up-to-date management of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Anob M

    2015-08-01

    There have been a number of developments in the management of venous thromboembolism over the past few years. Old questions, such as thrombolysis, have been revisited in recent trials. New initiatives, such as ambulatory care pathways, are being established across the country. This conference brought together doctors from the UK, USA, Spain and Australia to review the up-to-date management of venous thromboembolism.

  18. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  19. Venous obstruction in permanent pacemaker patients: an isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Pauletti, M.; Di Ricco, G.; Solfanelli, S.; Marini, C.; Contini, C.; Giuntini, C.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope venography was used to study the venous circulation proximal to the superior vena cava in two groups of pacemaker patients, one with a single endocavitary electrode and the other with multiple pacing catheters. A control group of patients without pacemakers was also studied. Numerous abnormalities were found, especially in the group with multiple electrodes. These findings suggest that venous obstruction is a common complication of endocardial pacing.

  20. Novel Biomarkers of Arterial and Venous Ischemia in Microvascular Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Gerard K.; Monahan, John F. W.; Davis, Gabrielle B.; Lee, Yong Suk; Ragina, Neli P.; Wang, Charles; Zhou, Zhao Y.; Hong, Young Kwon; Spivak, Ryan M.; Wong, Alex K.

    2013-01-01

    The field of reconstructive microsurgery is experiencing tremendous growth, as evidenced by recent advances in face and hand transplantation, lower limb salvage after trauma, and breast reconstruction. Common to all of these procedures is the creation of a nutrient vascular supply by microsurgical anastomosis between a single artery and vein. Complications related to occluded arterial inflow and obstructed venous outflow are not uncommon, and can result in irreversible tissue injury, necrosis, and flap loss. At times, these complications are challenging to clinically determine. Since early intervention with return to the operating room to re-establish arterial inflow or venous outflow is key to flap salvage, the accurate diagnosis of early stage complications is essential. To date, there are no biochemical markers or serum assays that can predict these complications. In this study, we utilized a rat model of flap ischemia in order to identify the transcriptional signatures of venous congestion and arterial ischemia. We found that the critical ischemia time for the superficial inferior epigastric fasciocutaneus flap was four hours and therefore performed detailed analyses at this time point. Histolgical analysis confirmed significant differences between arterial and venous ischemia. The transcriptome of ischemic, congested, and control flap tissues was deciphered by performing Affymetrix microarray analysis and verified by qRT-PCR. Principal component analysis revealed that arterial ischemia and venous congestion were characterized by distinct transcriptomes. Arterial ischemia and venous congestion was characterized by 408 and 1536>2-fold differentially expressed genes, respectively. qRT-PCR was used to identify five candidate genes Prol1, Muc1, Fcnb, Il1b, and Vcsa1 to serve as biomarkers for flap failure in both arterial ischemia and venous congestion. Our data suggests that Prol1 and Vcsa1 may be specific indicators of venous congestion and allow clinicians to

  1. Simple handling of venous air embolism during abdominal myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Betül; Basaran, Ahmet; Kozanhan, Betül; Özmen, Sadık; Basaran, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of venous air embolism during abdominal myomectomy. Although true incidence of venous air embolism is not known, in literature most of reported cases are belongs to sitting position craniotomies. Many of those are subclinical, and diagnostic methods have varying degrees of sensitivity and specificity. At time of suspicion, prevention of any subsequent air emboli is the cornerstone of treatment. PMID:27591473

  2. Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism in a Patient with Heterozygous Factor V Leiden Mutation

    PubMed Central

    White, C. Whitney; Prince, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To report a patient case identifying risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation. Case Summary: A 54-year-old Caucasian male was diagnosed with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation in 2008 after experiencing a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and bilateral pulmonary embolism. The patient was treated appropriately and started on anticoagulation therapy with warfarin through an anticoagulation management clinic. After approximately 17 months of warfarin therapy without incident, warfarin was discontinued. Within 2 months after discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy, the patient experienced his second DVT and left pulmonary artery embolus. Discussion: The risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation is documented as an approximate 1.4-fold increase compared to patients without thrombophilia. However, the risk increases dramatically when nonreversible (age) or reversible risk factors (obesity, smoking, and long air flights) are present in this population. Conclusion: Based on recent literature, heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation exponentially increases the risk of recurrent VTE, especially in the presence of other risk factors. Health care providers should complete a comprehensive review of the patients’ other risk factors when deciding on duration of anticoagulation therapy for patients with positive heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation. PMID:25477600

  3. Report of an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations in a cadaveric upper limb.

    PubMed

    Troupis, Theodore G; Michalinos, Adamantios; Manou, Vasiliki; Vlastos, Dimitrios; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Demesticha, Theano; Skandalakis, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    In this study an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations discovered during dissection of cervical, axillary and brachial area of a cadaver is described. Variations are thoroughly described and literature is briefly reviewed. Lateral cord of brachial plexus was not formed; Eight Cervical root divided into anterior and posterior division before uniting with First Thoracic root and Upper Trunk was unusually short. Axillary artery gave origin to a superficial brachial artery and then continued as deep brachial artery. Multiple variations in typical axillary artery branches were present including existence of inferior pectoral artery. Cephalic vein was absent. A variety of interventions, from relative simple as central venous catheter placement to most complicated as brachial plexus injury repair demand thorough knowledge of area's regional anatomy. Familiarity with anatomic variations allows more precise and careful interventions. Research on these variations is valuable for anatomists and embryologists but also for clinicians because it may provide useful information for non - typical cases but also helps in raising a high level of suspicion.

  4. Report of an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations in a cadaveric upper limb

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations discovered during dissection of cervical, axillary and brachial area of a cadaver is described. Variations are thoroughly described and literature is briefly reviewed. Lateral cord of brachial plexus was not formed; Eight Cervical root divided into anterior and posterior division before uniting with First Thoracic root and Upper Trunk was unusually short. Axillary artery gave origin to a superficial brachial artery and then continued as deep brachial artery. Multiple variations in typical axillary artery branches were present including existence of inferior pectoral artery. Cephalic vein was absent. A variety of interventions, from relative simple as central venous catheter placement to most complicated as brachial plexus injury repair demand thorough knowledge of area’s regional anatomy. Familiarity with anatomic variations allows more precise and careful interventions. Research on these variations is valuable for anatomists and embryologists but also for clinicians because it may provide useful information for non - typical cases but also helps in raising a high level of suspicion. PMID:24495850

  5. Evaluation of venous return in lower limb by passive ankle exercise performed by PHARAD.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Teru; Nomura, Kenta; Onodera, Takayuki; Ichimura, Shiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Takemura, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents evaluation of venous return, i.e., blood flow volume of vein (BF), in the lower limb after passive exercise performed by our developed "parallel link type human ankle rehabilitation assistive device (PHARAD)". The PHARAD can perform complex passive exercises (plantar flexion/dorsiflexion, inversion/eversion, adduction/abduction, and combination of these motions) by reproducing input motions of a foot plate that is attached to a sole of foot. The passive exercise can be performed for not only rehabilitation but also prevention of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In this study, we measured the concentration of Total hemoglobin (Total-Hb) using multi-channel near infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS)-based tissue oximeters and calculated a gradient of Total-Hb during a venous occlusion. We defined the gradient as BF and evaluated BF after 3 min passive exercise performed by the PHARAD comparing to BF of resting. Seven healthy young adult people were recruited for the experiment and we assessed passive exercise, active exercise, and walking. Experimental results show that BF after the passive exercises significantly increases compare to BF of resting and this indicates that passive exercises performed by the PHARAD increases BF and has a potential to prevent DVT. PMID:26737067

  6. A rare association of major aorto-pulmonary collaterals with right isomerism and totally anomalous pulmonary venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Ansari, Junaid; Weerasena, Nihal

    2005-12-01

    A female neonate, born at term, presented with complex cardiac anatomy dominated by right isomerism and infra-diaphragmatic totally anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Surgical repair was performed using circulatory arrest under deep hypothermia. In the postoperative period, the patient could not be weaned off mechanical ventilation, and underwent cardiac catheterization. This revealed major aortopulmonary collateral arteries, which were occluded with coils. We review the literature with specific focus on the occurrence of this unusual combination and its implication in the management during the postoperative period.

  7. Simultaneous bilateral upper extremity venous thrombosis in a factor V Leiden heterozygote: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, V V; Wolk, S W; Whitehouse, W M

    2001-01-01

    Primary upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), or effort thrombosis, typically occurs in young, healthy individuals with a history of repetitive upper extremity movement while secondary upper extremity DVT is associated with a number of predisposing factors. The role of factors such as hypercoagulability in the development of effort thrombosis is less well described. This report describes a previously healthy 21-year-old man who presented with simultaneous bilateral upper extremity DVT after hours of pushing and lifting a heavy wheelbarrow. Treatment included thrombolytic therapy followed by delayed venolysis and vein patch angioplasty. Hypercoagulable screening revealed factor V Leiden heterozygous characteristics. PMID:11565040

  8. Development and structures of the venous pole of the heart.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert H; Brown, Nigel A; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2006-01-01

    In the past, our interpretations of cardiac development depended on analysis of serially sectioned embryos, supported by three-dimensional reconstructions. It was not possible, using these techniques, to trace the fate of the various embryonic building blocks. This has all changed with the advent of the new techniques in molecular biology. Combining our experience with these new techniques and our previous studies using the classic approach, we have reviewed how the recent advances clarify controversies that still exist concerning the development of the venous pole. The arguments devolve on whether the pulmonary vein is itself a new development or whether its primordium is derived from the systemic venous tributaries, the so-called sinus venosus. The new techniques show that, rather than developing in the form of a segmented tube, the heart is built up by addition of material to both its arterial and venous poles. At no stage is it possible to recognize a discrete part of the tube that can be identified as the sinus venosus. The confluence of the systemic venous tributaries does not become recognizable as a discrete anatomic entity until compartmented into the newly formed right atrium concomitant with formation of the venous valves. The new molecular techniques show that the pulmonary vein is a new structure, anatomically and developmentally, that is derived from mediastinal myocardium. It gains its connection to the morphologically left atrium between the right- and left-sided systemic venous tributaries. PMID:16193508

  9. Glycosaminoglycan sulodexide modulates inflammatory pathways in chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Mannello, F; Ligi, D; Raffetto, J D

    2014-06-01

    Inflammation represents an important epiphenomenon in the etiopathogenesis of chronic venous disease, a worldwide debilitating condition affecting millions of subjects. The pathophysiology of chronic venous disease (CVD) is based on the hemodynamic abnormalities in conjunction to alterations in cellular and extracellular matrix biocompounds. The endothelial dysfunction results from early perturbation in the endothelium linked to glycocalyx injury and promoted by inflammatory cells and mediators (such as matrix metalloproteinases and interleukins), which lead to progressive dilation of the vein resulting in chronic venous insufficiency. Activated leukocytes during the inflammatory process release enzymes, free radicals, chemokines and inflammatory cytokines in the vessel microenvironment, which are responsible for the changes of the venous wall and venous valve, reflux and venous hypertension, and the development/progression of tissue destruction and skin changes. Sulodexide, a highly purified mixture of glycosaminoglycans composed by 80% fast moving heparin and 20% of dermatan sulphate, exhibits anti-thrombotic and profibrinolytic properties, restoring also the essential endothelial glycocalyx. Glycosaminoglycan sulodexide has been also characterized to reduce the release of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and to inhibit the matrix metalloproteinases-related proteolytic cascades, counteracting endothelial dysfunctions. The pleiotropic effects of sulodexide set the basis for a very promising agent in treating the spectrum of CVD.

  10. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases resistance to venous return in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.W.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C.

    1987-05-01

    To examine mechanisms by which administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) decreases venous return, the authors compared the hemodynamic effects of ANP furosemide (FU), and hexamethonium (HEX) with those of vehicle (VE) in anesthetized rats. Compared with VE, ANP reduced mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and cardiac index and increased calculated resistance to venous return. /sup 141/Ce-labeled microspheres were used to determine cardiac output. Mean circulatory filling pressure, distribution of blood flow between splanchnic organs and skeletal muscles, and total peripheral resistance remained unchanged. FU increased urine output similar to that of ANP, yet produced no hemodynamic changes, dissociating diuresis, and decreased cardiac output. HEX lowered arterial pressure through a reduction in total peripheral resistance without altering cardiac output or resistance to venous return. The results confirm previous findings that ANP decreases cardiac output through a reduction in venous return and suggest that this results partly from increased resistance to venous return and not from venodilation or distribution of blood flow.

  11. Development of venous-venous extracorporeal blood purification circuits in rodents for sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhi-Yong; Rimmelé, Thomas; Zhou, Feihu; Chuasuwan, Anan; Kellum, John A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unlike pharmacological interventions in sepsis, extracorporeal blood purification which is widely used in septic patients is not typically studied in experimental rodents. Most of the previous studies have performed extracorporeal blood purification in larger animals and typically use artery-venous (AV) vascular access. We developed a venous-venous (VV) purification model in the rat as a treatment for sepsis. METHODS Using adult male Sprague Dawley rats we cannulated the femoral artery or vein and the jugular vein with P50 tubing and created a VV or AV circuit. Blood flow was determined by arterial pressure in the AV circuit while in the VV circuit the blood flow was regulated using a rotary pump. The safety of this circuit was evaluated using the changes of blood interleukin-6 (IL-6), rectal temperature and seven-day survival with sham extracorporeal circulation (circuit connection without treatment) to the control (without circuit). The main side effects of this V-V circuit with A–V circuit were compared. RESULTS The difference of IL-6, body temperature and cumulative survival were no statistically significant after extracorporeal circulation. The main side effects of extracorporeal circulation occurred less often with VV compared to AV therapy: massive bleeding (2.5% vs. 15%, p=0.04), clot formation (2.5% vs. 15%, p=0.04). This VV circuit has been successfully used in different septic rodent models with different techniques (hemoadsorption and hemofiltration). CONCLUSIONS VV blood purification in a rodent model appears to be effective and is safer than AV circuit. PMID:23953896

  12. Imaging Diagnosis of Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, S.; Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) is a broad term that includes Budd-Chiari syndrome and occlusion of veins that constitute the portal venous system. Due to the common risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of these clinically distinct disorders, concurrent involvement of two different regions is quite common. In acute and subacute SVT, the symptoms may overlap with a variety of other abdominal emergencies while in chronic SVT, the extent of portal hypertension and its attendant complications determine the clinical course. As a result, clinical diagnosis is often difficult and is frequently reliant on imaging. Tremendous improvements in vascular imaging in recent years have ensured that this once rare entity is being increasingly detected. Treatment of acute SVT requires immediate anticoagulation. Transcatheter thrombolysis or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is used in the event of clinical deterioration. In cases with peritonitis, immediate laparotomy and bowel resection may be required for irreversible bowel ischemia. In chronic SVT, the underlying cause should be identified and treated. The imaging manifestations of the clinical syndromes resulting from SVT are comprehensively discussed here along with a brief review of the relevant clinical features and therapeutic approach. PMID:26600801

  13. Serum albumin and risk of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Folsom, Aaron. R.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Cushman, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Summary The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increased in patients with albuminuria. However, whether a low serum albumin concentration is associated with increased risk of VTE has been a matter of controversy. We determined the association of serum albumin with VTE incidence in two large, prospective, population-based cohorts: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (n = 15,300) and the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) (n = 5,400). Validated VTE occurrence (n=462 in ARIC and n=174 in CHS) was ascertained during follow-up. In both studies, after adjustment for age, sex, race, use of hormone replacement therapy, estimated GFR, history of cancer, and diabetes, serum albumin tended to be associated inversely with VTE. The adjusted hazard ratio per standard deviation lower albumin was 1.18 (95% CI = 1.08, 1.31) in ARIC and 1.10 (95% CI = 0.94, 1.29) in CHS. The hazard ratio for albumin below (versus above) the fifth percentile was 1.28 (95% CI = 0.90, 1.84) in ARIC and 1.80 (95% CI = 1.11, 2.93) in CHS. In conclusion, low serum albumin was a modest marker of increased VTE risk. The observed association likely does not reflect cause and effect, but rather that low serum albumin reflects a hyperinflammatory or hypercoagulable state. Whether this association has clinical relevance warrants further study. PMID:20390234

  14. Venous Drainage Patterns in Carotid Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Aralasmak, Ayse; Karaali, Kamil; Senol, Utku; Ozdemir, Huseyin; Alkan, Alpay

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal arteriovenous communication and its drainage pathways may affect the clinic presentation and change treatment approach. We evaluated drainage patterns of CCFs by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and categorized drainage pathways according to their types and etiology. Materials and Methods. Venous drainage patterns of 13 CCFs from 10 subjects were studied and categorized as anterior, posterior, superior, inferior, and contralateral on DSA. Drainage patterns were correlated to types and etiology of CCFs. Diagnosis of CCFs was first made by noninvasive imaging techniques. Results. On DSA, traumatic CCFs were usually high flow, direct type while spontaneous CCFs were usually slow flow, indirect type. Bilaterality and mixed types were observed among the indirect spontaneous CCFs. In all CCFs, anterior and inferior drainages were the most common. Contrary to the literature, posterior and superior drainages were noted only in high flow and long standing direct fistulas. Contralateral drainage was not observed in all, supporting plausible compartmentalization of cavernous sinuses. Conclusion. Types, etiology, and duration of the CCFs may affect their drainage patterns. DSA is valuable for categorization of CCFs and verification of drainage patterns. Drainage pathways may affect the clinic presentation and also change treatment approach. PMID:24967298

  15. Forty-five-degree two-stage venous cannula: advantages over standard two-stage venous cannulation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, D R; Desai, J B

    1997-01-01

    We present a 45-degree two-stage venous cannula that confers advantage to the surgeon using cardiopulmonary bypass. This cannula exits the mediastinum under the transverse bar of the sternal retractor, leaving the rostral end of the sternal incision free of apparatus. It allows for lifting of the heart with minimal effect on venous return and does not interfere with the radially laid out sutures of an aortic valve replacement using an interrupted suture technique.

  16. Low risk of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events during growth factor administration for PBSC mobilization.

    PubMed

    Naina, H V; Pruthi, R K; Inwards, D J; Dingli, D; Litzow, M R; Ansell, S M; William, H J; Dispenzieri, A; Buadi, F K; Elliott, M A; Gastineau, D A; Gertz, M A; Hayman, S R; Johnston, P B; Lacy, M Q; Micallef, I N; Porrata, L F; Kumar, S

    2011-02-01

    The use of erythropoietic agents has been associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs), especially in patients with underlying malignancies. However, it is not known whether there is an increased risk of VTE associated with granulocyte growth factors. We reviewed 621 patients undergoing PBSC mobilization using granulocyte growth factors, alone or in combination with CY. Patients with a diagnosis of AL amyloidosis (AL: 114; 18%), multiple myeloma (MM: 278; 44%) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL: 20; 3%) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL: 209; 33%) were included. Symptomatic VTE occurred in six (0.97%) patients: two AL, two MM and two NHL. Of the six patients, two had pulmonary embolism, one developed deep vein thrombosis and three developed symptomatic catheter related thrombosis. Two patients with AL had heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. We found a low incidence of VTE among patients undergoing PBSC mobilization.

  17. Massive mesenteric and portal venous thrombosis secondary to hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Watt, D G; Shapter, O; Mittapalli, D; Murray, W G

    2013-11-01

    Hormone replacement therapy increases risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) mainly in the extremities and lungs. There are reports of mesenteric ischemia secondary to oral contraceptive pills but no reports on hormone replacement therapy and mesenteric thrombosis. The authors present a case of a 44-year-old obese (BMI 32) woman, on long-term hormone replacement therapy, presented with thrombosis of portal, splenic and superior mesenteric veins. She underwent surgical resection of ischemic bowel and planned re-look laparotomies with further resections and jejuno-ileal anastomosis at final laparotomy. Thorough haematological investigations were normal. The authors conclude that hormone replacement therapy in obese patients with no other risk factors can cause a catastrophic mesenteric thrombosis. Aggressive surgical resection with re-look laparotomies and further resections can be lifesaving.

  18. Preventing Venous Thromboembolism with Use of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression after Total Hip Arthroplasty in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent Pneumatic Compression (IPC) device has been used to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study investigated the effectiveness of IPC device. We evaluated incidences of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients after use of IPC device, and compared with historical incidences from our institution. We applied IPC device in 741 patients who underwent 870 elective primary THAs from January 2010 to December 2013, DVT was detected in 3 patients (0.3%) by sonography, and one (0.1%) of them was symptomatic. Symptomatic PE occurred in 1 patient (0.1%) and there were no cases of fatal PE. The incidence of symptomatic DVT was significantly lower than the historical control (P = 0.042). The IPC is a safe and effective prophylaxis of VTE after primary THA in Korea. PMID:27478345

  19. Massive mesenteric and portal venous thrombosis secondary to hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Watt, D G; Shapter, O; Mittapalli, D; Murray, W G

    2013-11-01

    Hormone replacement therapy increases risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) mainly in the extremities and lungs. There are reports of mesenteric ischemia secondary to oral contraceptive pills but no reports on hormone replacement therapy and mesenteric thrombosis. The authors present a case of a 44-year-old obese (BMI 32) woman, on long-term hormone replacement therapy, presented with thrombosis of portal, splenic and superior mesenteric veins. She underwent surgical resection of ischemic bowel and planned re-look laparotomies with further resections and jejuno-ileal anastomosis at final laparotomy. Thorough haematological investigations were normal. The authors conclude that hormone replacement therapy in obese patients with no other risk factors can cause a catastrophic mesenteric thrombosis. Aggressive surgical resection with re-look laparotomies and further resections can be lifesaving. PMID:24215058

  20. Hospital-associated venous thromboembolism in pediatrics: a systematic review and meta-analysis of risk factors and risk-assessment models

    PubMed Central

    Mahajerin, Arash; Branchford, Brian R.; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Raffini, Leslie; Chalmers, Elizabeth; van Ommen, C. Heleen; Goldenberg, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-associated venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is increasing in pediatric centers. The objective of this work was to systematically review literature on pediatric hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism risk factors and risk-assessment models, to inform future prevention research. We conducted a literature search on pediatric venous thromboembolism risk via PubMed (1946–2014) and Embase (1980–2014). Data on risk factors and risk-assessment models were extracted from case-control studies, while prevalence data on clinical characteristics were obtained from registries, large (n>40) retrospective case series, and cohort studies. Meta-analyses were conducted for risk factors or clinical characteristics reported in at least three studies. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed with the Cochran Q test and quantified by the I2 statistic. From 394 initial articles, 60 met the final inclusion criteria (20 case-control studies and 40 registries/large case series/cohort studies). Significant risk factors among case-control studies were: intensive care unit stay (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.97–2.32); central venous catheter (OR: 2.12, 95% CI: 2.00–2.25); mechanical ventilation (OR: 1.56, 95%CI: 1.42–1.72); and length of stay in hospital (per each additional day, OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.03–1.03). Three studies developed/applied risk-assessment models from a combination of these risk factors. Fourteen significant clinical characteristics were identified through non-case-control studies. This meta-analysis confirms central venous catheter, intensive care unit stay, mechanical ventilation, and length of stay as risk factors. A few pediatric hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism risk scores have emerged employing these factors. Prospective validation is necessary to inform risk-stratified prevention trials. PMID:26001789

  1. Hospital-associated venous thromboembolism in pediatrics: a systematic review and meta-analysis of risk factors and risk-assessment models.

    PubMed

    Mahajerin, Arash; Branchford, Brian R; Amankwah, Ernest K; Raffini, Leslie; Chalmers, Elizabeth; van Ommen, C Heleen; Goldenberg, Neil A

    2015-08-01

    Hospital-associated venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is increasing in pediatric centers. The objective of this work was to systematically review literature on pediatric hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism risk factors and risk-assessment models, to inform future prevention research. We conducted a literature search on pediatric venous thromboembolism risk via PubMed (1946-2014) and Embase (1980-2014). Data on risk factors and risk-assessment models were extracted from case-control studies, while prevalence data on clinical characteristics were obtained from registries, large (n>40) retrospective case series, and cohort studies. Meta-analyses were conducted for risk factors or clinical characteristics reported in at least three studies. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed with the Cochran Q test and quantified by the I(2) statistic. From 394 initial articles, 60 met the final inclusion criteria (20 case-control studies and 40 registries/large case series/cohort studies). Significant risk factors among case-control studies were: intensive care unit stay (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.97-2.32); central venous catheter (OR: 2.12, 95% CI: 2.00-2.25); mechanical ventilation (OR: 1.56, 95%CI: 1.42-1.72); and length of stay in hospital (per each additional day, OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.03-1.03). Three studies developed/applied risk-assessment models from a combination of these risk factors. Fourteen significant clinical characteristics were identified through non-case-control studies. This meta-analysis confirms central venous catheter, intensive care unit stay, mechanical ventilation, and length of stay as risk factors. A few pediatric hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism risk scores have emerged employing these factors. Prospective validation is necessary to inform risk-stratified prevention trials.

  2. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Commentary on the Treatment of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, J. A.; Lee, M. J.; Belli, A. M.; Barkhof, F.

    2011-02-15

    Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a putative new theory that has been suggested by some to have a direct causative relation with the symptomatology associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). The core foundation of this theory is that there is abnormal venous drainage from the brain due to outflow obstruction in the draining jugular vein and/or azygos veins. This abnormal venous drainage, which is characterised by special ultrasound criteria, called the 'venous hemodynamic insufficiency severity score' (VHISS), is said to cause intracerebral flow disturbance or outflow problems that lead to periventricular deposits. In the CCSVI theory, these deposits have a great similarity to the iron deposits seen around the veins in the legs in patients with chronic deep vein thrombosis. Zamboni, who first described this new theory, has promoted balloon dilatation to treat the outflow problems, thereby curing CCSVI and by the same token alleviating MS complaints. However, this theory does not fit into the existing bulk of scientific data concerning the pathophysiology of MS. In contrast, there is increasing worldwide acceptance of CCSVI and the associated balloon dilatation treatment, even though there is no supporting scientific evidence. Furthermore, most of the information we have comes from one source only. The treatment is called 'liberation treatment,' and the results of the treatment can be watched on YouTube. There are well-documented testimonies by MS patients who have gained improvement in their personal quality of life (QOL) after treatment. However, there are no data available from patients who underwent unsuccessful treatments with which to obtain a more balanced view. The current forum for the reporting of success in treating CCSVI and thus MS seems to be the Internet. At the CIRCE office and the MS Centre in Amsterdam, we receive approximately 10 to 20 inquiries a month about this treatment. In addition, many interventional radiologists, who are

  3. Recanalization and flow regulate venous thrombus resolution and Matrix metalloproteinases expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chabasse, Christine; Siefert, Suzanne A.; Chaudry, Mohammed; Hoofnagle, Mark H.; Lal, Brajesh K.; Sarkar, Rajabrata

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined the role of thrombus recanalization and ongoing blood flow in the process of thrombus resolution by comparing two murine in vivo models of deep venous thrombosis. Design of study In CD1 mice, we performed surgical inferior vena cava (IVC) ligation (stasis thrombosis), stenosis (thrombosis with recanalization) or sham procedure. We analyzed thrombus weight over time as a measure of thrombus resolution, and quantified the mRNA and protein levels of Membrane-Type Matrix Metalloproteinases (MT-MMPs) as well as effectors of the plasmin complex at day 4, 8 and 12 post-surgery. Results Despite similar initial thrombus size, the presence of ongoing blood flow (stenosis model) was associated with a 45.91% subsequent improvement in thrombus resolution at day 8, and 12.57% at day 12, as compared with stasis thrombosis (ligation model). Immunoblot and real-time PCR demonstrated a difference in MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity at day 8 between the two models (P=.03 and P=.006 respectively), as well as a difference in MT2-MMP gene expression at day 8 (P=.044) and day 12 (P=0.03) and MT1-MMP protein expression at day 4 (P=.021). Histological analyses revealed distinct areas of recanalization in the thrombi of the stenosis model compared to the ligation model, as well as the recruitment of inflammatory cells, especially macrophages, and a focal pattern of localized expression of MT1-MMP and MT3-MMP proteins surrounding the areas of recanalization in the stenosis model. Conclusions Recanalization and ongoing blood flow accelerate deep venous thrombus resolution in vivo, and are associated with distinct patterns of MT1- and MT3-MMP expression and macrophages localization in areas of intra-thrombus recanalization. PMID:26993683

  4. Dural Venous System in the Cavernous Sinus: A Literature Review and Embryological, Functional, and Endovascular Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    MITSUHASHI, Yutaka; HAYASAKI, Koji; KAWAKAMI, Taichiro; NAGATA, Takashi; KANESHIRO, Yuta; UMABA, Ryoko; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The cavernous sinus (CS) is one of the cranial dural venous sinuses. It differs from other dural sinuses due to its many afferent and efferent venous connections with adjacent structures. It is important to know well about its complex venous anatomy to conduct safe and effective endovascular interventions for the CS. Thus, we reviewed previous literatures concerning the morphological and functional venous anatomy and the embryology of the CS. The CS is a complex of venous channels from embryologically different origins. These venous channels have more or less retained their distinct original roles of venous drainage, even after alterations through the embryological developmental process, and can be categorized into three longitudinal venous axes based on their topological and functional features. Venous channels medial to the internal carotid artery “medial venous axis” carry venous drainage from the skull base, chondrocranium and the hypophysis, with no direct participation in cerebral drainage. Venous channels lateral to the cranial nerves “lateral venous axis” are exclusively for cerebral venous drainage. Venous channels between the internal carotid artery and cranial nerves “intermediate venous axis” contribute to all the venous drainage from adjacent structures, directly from the orbit and membranous skull, indirectly through medial and lateral venous axes from the chondrocranium, the hypophysis, and the brain. This concept of longitudinal venous axes in the CS may be useful during endovascular interventions for the CS considering our better understandings of its functions in venous drainage. PMID:27063146

  5. The Typical Presentation Spectrum of Deep Vein Thrombosis Associated with Inferior Vena Cava Malformations

    PubMed Central

    El Lakis, Mustapha A.; Chamieh, Jad

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare and underreported. They can be a risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) as a result of inadequate venous drainage of the lower extremities through collateral circulation. The significant number of cases reported in the literature highlights their importance, warranting investigating their existence in younger individuals with idiopathic DVT of the lower extremities and pelvic veins. In this systematic review, we depict the typical presentation of IVC malformations, their management, and the management of their associated DVT. PMID:27478635

  6. Effect of Statins on Venous Thromboembolic Events: A Meta-analysis of Published and Unpublished Evidence from Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Kazem; Bhala, Neeraj; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Emberson, Jonathan; Biere-Rafi, Sara; Krane, Vera; Robertson, Michele; Wikstrand, John; McMurray, John

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that statins substantially reduce the risk of venous thromboembolic events. We sought to test this hypothesis by performing a meta-analysis of both published and unpublished results from randomised trials of statins. Methods and Findings We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL up to March 2012 for randomised controlled trials comparing statin with no statin, or comparing high dose versus standard dose statin, with 100 or more randomised participants and at least 6 months' follow-up. Investigators were contacted for unpublished information about venous thromboembolic events during follow-up. Twenty-two trials of statin versus control (105,759 participants) and seven trials of an intensive versus a standard dose statin regimen (40,594 participants) were included. In trials of statin versus control, allocation to statin therapy did not significantly reduce the risk of venous thromboembolic events (465 [0.9%] statin versus 521 [1.0%] control, odds ratio [OR] = 0.89, 95% CI 0.78–1.01, p = 0.08) with no evidence of heterogeneity between effects on deep vein thrombosis (266 versus 311, OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.72–1.01) and effects on pulmonary embolism (205 versus 222, OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.76–1.12). Exclusion of the trial result that provided the motivation for our meta-analysis (JUPITER) had little impact on the findings for venous thromboembolic events (431 [0.9%] versus 461 [1.0%], OR = 0.93 [95% CI 0.82–1.07], p = 0.32 among the other 21 trials). There was no evidence that higher dose statin therapy reduced the risk of venous thromboembolic events compared with standard dose statin therapy (198 [1.0%] versus 202 [1.0%], OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.80–1.20, p = 0.87). Risk of bias overall was small but a certain degree of effect underestimation due to random error cannot be ruled out. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary. Conclusions The findings from this meta-analysis do not support the

  7. Living-Engineered Valves for Transcatheter Venous Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Benedikt; Robert, Jérôme; Ksiazek, Agnieszka; Wyss, Yves; Frese, Laura; Slamecka, Jaroslav; Kehl, Debora; Modregger, Peter; Peter, Silvia; Stampanoni, Marco; Proulx, Steven; Falk, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) represents a major global health problem with increasing prevalence and morbidity. CVI is due to an incompetence of the venous valves, which causes venous reflux and distal venous hypertension. Several studies have focused on the replacement of diseased venous valves using xeno- and allogenic transplants, so far with moderate success due to immunologic and thromboembolic complications. Autologous cell-derived tissue-engineered venous valves (TEVVs) based on fully biodegradable scaffolds could overcome these limitations by providing non-immunogenic, non-thrombogenic constructs with remodeling and growth potential. Methods: Tri- and bicuspid venous valves (n=27) based on polyglycolic acid–poly-4-hydroxybutyrate composite scaffolds, integrated into self-expandable nitinol stents, were engineered from autologous ovine bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and endothelialized. After in vitro conditioning in a (flow) pulse duplicator system, the TEVVs were crimped (n=18) and experimentally delivered (n=7). The effects of crimping on the tissue-engineered constructs were investigated using histology, immunohistochemistry, scanning electron microscopy, grating interferometry (GI), and planar fluorescence reflectance imaging. Results: The generated TEVVs showed layered tissue formation with increasing collagen and glycosaminoglycan levels dependent on the duration of in vitro conditioning. After crimping no effects were found on the MSC level in scanning electron microscopy analysis, GI, histology, and extracellular matrix analysis. However, substantial endothelial cell loss was detected after the crimping procedure, which could be reduced by increasing the static conditioning phase. Conclusions: Autologous living small-diameter TEVVs can be successfully fabricated from ovine BM-MSCs using a (flow) pulse duplicator conditioning approach. These constructs hold the potential to overcome the limitations of

  8. Computer-assisted venous thrombosis volume quantification.

    PubMed

    Puentes, John; Dhibi, Mounir; Bressollette, Luc; Guias, Bruno; Solaiman, Basel

    2009-03-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) volume assessment, by verifying its risk of progression when anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapies are prescribed, is often necessary to screen life-threatening complications. Commonly, VT volume estimation is done by manual delineation of few contours in the ultrasound (US) image sequence, assuming that the VT has a regular shape and constant radius, thus producing significant errors. This paper presents and evaluates a comprehensive functional approach based on the combination of robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contours to calculate VT volume in a more accurate manner when applied to freehand 2-D US image sequences. Robust anisotropic filtering reduces image speckle noise without generating incoherent edge discontinuities. Prior knowledge of the VT shape allows initializing the deformable contour, which is then guided by the noise-filtering outcome. Segmented contours are subsequently used to calculate VT volume. The proposed approach is integrated into a system prototype compatible with existing clinical US machines that additionally tracks the acquired images 3-D position and provides a dense Delaunay triangulation required for volume calculation. A predefined robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contour parameter set enhances the system usability. Experimental results pertinence is assessed by comparison with manual and tetrahedron-based volume computations, using images acquired by two medical experts of eight plastic phantoms and eight in vitro VTs, whose independently measured volume is the reference ground truth. Results show a mean difference between 16 and 35 mm(3) for volumes that vary from 655 to 2826 mm(3). Two in vivo VT volumes are also calculated to illustrate how this approach could be applied in clinical conditions when the real value is unknown. Comparative results for the two experts differ from 1.2% to 10.08% of the smallest estimated value when the image acquisition cadences are similar.

  9. Iliocaval Confluence Stenting for Chronic Venous Obstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, Rick de; Wolf, Mark de; Sailer, Anna M.; Laanen, Jorinde van Wittens, Cees; Jalaie, Houman

    2015-10-15

    PurposeDifferent techniques have been described for stenting of venous obstructions. We report our experience with two different confluence stenting techniques to treat chronic bi-iliocaval obstructions.Materials and MethodsBetween 11/2009 and 08/2014 we treated 40 patients for chronic total bi-iliocaval obstructions. Pre-operative magnetic resonance venography showed bilateral extensive post-thrombotic scarring in common and external iliac veins as well as obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Stenting of the IVC was performed with large self-expandable stents down to the level of the iliocaval confluence. To bridge the confluence, either self-expandable stents were placed inside the IVC stent (24 patients, SECS group) or high radial force balloon-expandable stents were placed at the same level (16 patients, BECS group). In both cases, bilateral iliac extensions were performed using nitinol stents.ResultsRecanalization was achieved for all patients. In 15 (38 %) patients, a hybrid procedure with endophlebectomy and arteriovenous fistula creation needed to be performed because of significant involvement of inflow vessels below the inguinal ligament. Mean follow-up was 443 ± 438 days (range 7–1683 days). For all patients, primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency rate at 36 months were 70, 73, and 78 %, respectively. Twelve-month patency rates in the SECS group were 85, 85, and 95 % for primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency. In the BECS group, primary patency was 100 % during a mean follow-up period of 134 ± 118 (range 29–337) days.ConclusionStenting of chronic bi-iliocaval obstruction shows relatively high patency rates at medium follow-up. Short-term patency seems to favor confluence stenting with balloon-expandable stents.

  10. The pathogenesis of thrombosis in venous prostheses.

    PubMed

    Itoh, T; Shiba, E; Kambayashi, J; Watase, M; Kawasaki, T; Sakon, M; Mori, T

    1990-12-01

    To evaluate the pathogenesis of thrombosis formation in synthetic venous grafts, the inferior vena cava of rabbits were replaced by woven Tetron (polyethylene terephtalate) grafts. Six animals were assigned as controls without medication (Group A), and 48 animals were randomly assigned to experimental groups as follows: ticlopidine hydrochloride (100 mg/kg/day) was administered orally from 5 days prior to operation to the end of the experiment (Group B); warfarin sodium (0.33 mg/kg/day) was given orally for the same period (Group C); and a combination of ticlopidine hydrochloride (50 mg/kg/day) and warfarin sodium (0.16 mg/kg/day) was administered for the same period (Group D). All the grafts in group A occluded within 3 h. All grafts harvested from groups B and D remained patent at least until the twenty-eighth day after grafting but the lumen was narrowed by intimal hyperplasia. Although the grafts from group C were patent at the seventh day, all grafts occluded with intimal hyperplasia on day 14 and day 28. The dry weight of thrombus in the graft in group B and group D was 39 +/- 3 mg and 30 +/- 2 mg, respectively on day 28. These figures were significantly lower than that of the control group 59 +/- 9 mg at 5 h after the initial heparinisation. Ultrastructural studies with scanning electron microscopy showed that the thrombus in the graft of the control group was composed of platelet aggregates anchored to synthetic fibres and of erythrocytes entrapped in the fibrin network. By day 7, in the groups modified with drugs, sheets of endothelial-like cells extended across both suture lines from the host stumps and extended to the middle of the graft thereafter. Light microscopy revealed that the initimal hyperplasia in groups B, C and D on day 28 were mainly composed of fibroblasts, myoblasts, collagenous fibres and micro-capillaries.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2279573

  11. SP-05VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM AND GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Mandel, Jacob; Ying, Yuan; Wu, Jimin; Courtney, C.; Ladha, Harshad; Pawar, Tushar; Gilbert, Mark; Armstrong, Terri

    2014-01-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is very high for patients with brain tumors; Glioblastoma (GB) specifically is one of the most at risk cancers. The aim of this study is to estimate the frequency and identify potential risk factors of GB patients developing VTE during adjuvant chemotherapy and to test if the Khorana scale accurately predicts the risk of VTE among this patient population. We retrospectively reviewed patients with GB treated at MD Anderson during the years 2005-2011. The target population of our study was patients who developed VTE after starting adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients were excluded if they did not start treatment with the established standard of care, had less than 6 months follow up or if they developed VTE before starting adjuvant treatment. The study sample included 440 patients. 64 (14.5%) of them developed VTE. The median time to develop VTE was 6.5 months. On multivariate analysis male sex, BMI≥ 35, KPS ≤80, history of VTE and steroid therapy were significantly associated with the development of VTE. We also found that in this patient sample, the Khorana scale was not a valid predictive model in GB patients due to very poor specificity. Of the 64 patients who developed a VTE, 36 were treated with anticoagulation, 2 with an IVC filter, and 21 with both. Complications secondary to anticoagulation were reported in 16% (n = 10) of patients. The complications included intracranial hemorrhage, bleeding to other organs and thrombocytopenia. VTE is very common in patients with GB. Currently, we are lacking a scale that accurately predicts the risk of VTE among GB patients. Predictive scales used for other cancers do not seem valid for GB due to the unique nature of the disease. Future studies are needed to create an accurate predictive model for VTE in GB patients.

  12. Platelet count and outcome in patients with acute venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Ruiz-Giménez, Nuria; Nieto, José Antonio; Aujesky, Drahomir; del Molino, Fátima; Valle, Reina; Barrón, Manuel; Maestre, Ana; Monreal, Manuel

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between platelet count and outcome in patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been consistently explored. RIETE is an ongoing registry of consecutive patients with acute VTE. We categorised patients as having very low- (<80,000/µl), low- (80,000/µl to 150,000/µl), normal- (150,000/µl to 300,000/µl), high- (300,000/µl to 450,000/µl), or very high (>450,000/µl) platelet count at baseline, and compared their three-month outcome. As of October 2012, 43,078 patients had been enrolled in RIETE: 21,319 presenting with pulmonary embolism and 21,759 with deep-vein thrombosis. In all, 502 patients (1.2%) had very low-; 5,472 (13%) low-; 28,386 (66%) normal-; 7,157 (17%) high-; and 1,561 (3.6%) very high platelet count. During the three-month study period, the recurrence rate was: 2.8%, 2.2%, 1.8%, 2.1% and 2.2%, respectively; the rate of major bleeding: 5.8%, 2.6%, 1.7%, 2.3% and 4.6%, respectively; the rate of fatal bleeding: 2.0%, 0.9%, 0.3%, 0.5% and 1.2%, respectively; and the mortality rate: 29%, 11%, 6.5%, 8.8% and 14%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, patients with very low-, low-, high- or very high platelet count had an increased risk for major bleeding (odds ratio [OR]: 2.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.85-3.95; 1.43 [1.18-1.72]; 1.23 [1.03-1.47]; and 2.13 [1.65-2.75]) and fatal bleeding (OR: 3.70 [1.92-7.16], 2.10 [1.48-2.97], 1.29 [0.88-1.90] and 2.49 [1.49-4.15]) compared with those with normal count. In conclusion, we found a U-shaped relationship between platelet count and the three-month rate of major bleeding and fatal bleeding in patients with VTE.

  13. Use of Percutaneous Aspiration Thrombectomy vs. Anticoagulation Therapy to Treat Acute Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis: 1-year Follow-up Results of a Randomised, Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Volkan; Gulcu, Aytac; Akay, Emrah; Capar, Ahmet E.; Gencpinar, Tugra; Kucuk, Banu; Karabay, Ozalp; Goktay, A. Yigit

    2014-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) followed by standard anticoagulant therapy, with anticoagulation therapy alone, for the treatment of acute proximal lower extremity deep vein thrombosis.MethodsIn this randomised, prospective study, 42 patients with acute proximal iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis documented via Doppler ultrasound examination, were separated into an interventional treatment group (16 males, 5 females, average age 51 years) and a medical treatment group (13 males, 8 females, average age 59 years). In the interventional group, PAT with large-lumen 9-F diameter catheterisation was applied, after initiation of standard anticoagulant therapy. Balloon angioplasty (n 19) and stent implementation (n: 14) were used to treat patients with residual stenosis (>50 %) after PAT. Prophylactic IVC filters were placed in two patients. The thrombus clearance status of the venous system was evaluated by venography. In both the medical and interventional groups, venous patency rates and clinical symptom scores were evaluated at months 1, 3, and 12 after treatment.ResultsDeep venous systems became totally cleared of thrombi in 12 patients treated with PAT. The venous patency rates in month 12 were 57.1 and 4.76 % in the interventional and medical treatment groups, respectively. A statistically significant improvement was observed in clinical symptom scores of the interventional group (PAT) with or without stenting (4.23 ± 0.51 before treatment; 0.81 ± 0.92 at month 12) compared with the medical treatment group (4.00 ± 0.63 before treatment; 2.43 ± 0.67 at month 12). During follow-up, four patients in the medical treatment and one in the interventional group developed pulmonary embolisms.ConclusionsFor treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis, PAT with or without stenting is superior to anticoagulant therapy alone in terms of both ensuring venous patency and improving clinical

  14. Deep Vein Thrombosis Provoked by Inferior Vena Cava Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Raad A; Saadaldin, Mazin; Kumar, Binay; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava agenesis (IVCA) is a rare congenital anomaly that can be asymptomatic or present with vague, nonspecific symptoms, such as abdominal or lower back pain, or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Here, we present a 55-year-old male who came with painless swelling and redness of his left lower limb. On examination, swelling and redness were noted extending from the left foot to the upper thigh; it was also warm compared to his right lower limb. Venous Doppler ultrasound was done which showed DVT extending up to the common femoral vein. Subsequently, computed-tomography (CT) of the chest and abdomen was done to exclude malignancy or venous flow obstruction; it revealed congenital absence (agenesis) of the infrarenal inferior vena cava (IVC). PMID:26788400

  15. The Current Role of Venous Sampling in the Localization of Endocrine Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Jeshen H. G. Drake, William; Matson, Matthew

    2007-07-15

    Endocrine venous sampling plays a specific role in the diagnosis of endocrine disorders. In this article, we cover inferior petrosal sinus sampling, selective parathyroid venous sampling, hepatic venous sampling with arterial stimulation, adrenal venous sampling, and ovarian venous sampling. We review their indications and the scientific evidence justifying these indications in the diagnosis and management of Cushing's syndrome, hyperparathyroidism, pancreatic endocrine tumors, Conn's syndrome, primary hyperaldosteronism, pheochromocytomas, and androgen-secreting ovarian tumors. For each sampling technique, we compare its diagnostic accuracy with that of other imaging techniques and, where possible, look at how it impacts patient management. Finally, we incorporate venous sampling into diagnostic algorithms used at our institution.

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma developed on chronic venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Sîrbi, Adelina Gabriela; Florea, Marius; Pătraşcu, Virgil; Rotaru, Maria; Mogoş, Dan Gabriel; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Mărgăritescu, Nicolae Dragoş

    2015-01-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLU), especially long-lasting non-healing ulcers, are among the risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Malignant transformation of a VLU is a rare finding and the relative risk of carcinomatous transformation is quite low (about 5.8). SCC arising in the context of a VLU has a particularly aggressive behavior. A 76-year-old male patient with no relevant medical familial history, with chronic venous insufficiency CEAP C6 for 10 years [recurrent leg ulcers with favorable outcome (healing) after specific local and systemic treatment], showing for about three years one ulcerated lesion located on the anterior upper third of the right calf non-responsive to specific treatment, which subsequently increased their size and merged. Biopsy sample was taken. Histopathology showed epidermal acanthosis, papillomatosis, intense parakeratosis, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, dysplasia and moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with areas of acantholysis. Immunohistochemistry (Ki67, EMA, cytokeratin 34βE12 and p63) was performed and all types of immunostaining were moderately to intense positive. Above-knee leg amputation and specific oncologic treatment were proposed as possible curative solutions but the patient refused. Ten months after diagnosis and discharge form the Department of Dermatology, the patient died. Patients with chronic venous leg ulcers and clinically suspicious lesions should be evaluated for malignant transformation of the venous lesion. When diagnosed, malignancy complicating a chronic venous leg ulcer requires a resolute treatment as it may be fatal.

  17. Air pollution and venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Qing-Yun; Cheng, Zhi-Peng; Hu, Bei; Liu, Jing-Di; Hu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. However, the effect of air pollution on venous thrombotic disorders is uncertain. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between air pollution and venous thrombosis. PubMed, Embase, EBM Reviews, Healthstar, Global Health, Nursing Database, and Web of Science were searched for citations on air pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulate matters) and venous thrombosis. Using a random-effects model, overall risk estimates were derived for each increment of 10 μg/m3 of pollutant concentration. Of the 485 in-depth reviewed studies, 8 citations, involving approximately 700,000 events, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the main air pollutants analyzed were not associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis (OR = 1.005, 95% CI = 0.998–1.012 for PM2.5; OR = 0.995, 95% CI = 0.984–1.007 for PM10; OR = 1.006, 95% CI = 0.994–1.019 for NO2). Based on exposure period and thrombosis location, additional subgroup analyses provided results comparable with those of the overall analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias. Therefore, this meta analysis does not suggest the possible role of air pollution as risk factor for venous thrombosis in general population. PMID:27600652

  18. Preliminary clinical investigations of a new noninvasive venous pulse oximeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Daniel; Smith, Peter R.; Caine, Michael P.; Spyt, Tomasz; Boehm, Maria; Machin, David

    2003-10-01

    For decades, the monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation, SvO2 has been performed invasively using fibre-optic catheters. This procedure is not without risk as complications may arise from catheterisation. The group has devised a new non-invasive venous oximetry method which involves inducing regular modulations of the venous blood volume and associated measurement of those modulations using optical means. A clinical investigation was conducted in Glenfield Hospital, UK to evaluate the sensitivity of the new technique to haemodynamic changes such as Cardiac Output (CO) in intraoperative and postoperative cardiac patients. Preliminary trials on patients recovering from cardiac surgery yielded an average correlation of r = 0.72 between CO at different Intra Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP) augmentation levels and SvO2 measured by the new venous oximeter. In intraoperative patients undergoing off-pump cardiac surgery, SvO2 recorded by the new technique responded to unplanned events such as a cardiac arrest. CONCLUSION: The new venous oximetry technique is a promising technique which responds to haemodynamic changes such as CO and with further development might offer an alternative means of monitoring SvO2 non-invasively.

  19. Communication between lymphatic and venous systems in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lenan; Takeda, Kazu; Kato, Shigeki; Mori, Shiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    The lymphatic system in mice consists of lymphatic vessels and 22 types of lymph nodes. Metastatic tumor cells in the lymphatic system spread to distant organs through the venous system. However, the communication routes between the lymphatic and venous systems have not been fully elucidated. Here, we identify the communication routes between the lymphatic and venous systems in the axillary and subiliac regions of MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr inbred mice, which develop systemic swelling of lymph nodes up to 10mm in diameter, allowing investigation of the topography of the lymph nodes and lymphatic vessels. Using a gross anatomy dissection approach, the efferent lymphatic vessels of the proper axillary lymph node were shown to communicate with the subclavian vein. Furthermore, we found that the thoracoepigastric vein, which connects the subclavian vein and inferior vena cava, runs adjacent to the subiliac and proper axillary lymph nodes, and receives venous blood from these lymph nodes routed through small branches. The direction of blood flow in the thoracoepigastric vein occurred in two directions in the intermediate region between the proper axillary lymph node and subiliac lymph node; one to the subclavian vein, the other to the inferior vena cava. This paper reveals the anatomy of the communication between the lymphatic and venous systems in the axillary and subiliac regions of the mouse, and provides new insights relevant to the investigation of the mechanisms of lymph node metastasis and cancer immunology, and the development of diagnostic and treatment methods for lymph node metastasis, including drug delivery systems.

  20. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bever, Katherine M.; Masha, Luke I.; Sun, Fangui; Stern, Lauren; Havasi, Andrea; Berk, John L.; Sanchorawala, Vaishali; Seldin, David C.; Sloan, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis are at risk for both thrombotic and bleeding complications. While the hemostatic defects have been extensively studied, less is known about thrombotic complications in this disease. This retrospective study examined the frequency of venous thromboembolism in 929 patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis presenting to a single referral center, correlated risk of venous thromboembolism with clinical and laboratory factors, and examined complications of anticoagulation in this population. Sixty-five patients (7%) were documented as having at least one venous thromboembolic event. Eighty percent of these patients had events within one year prior to or following diagnosis. Lower serum albumin was associated with increased risk of VTE, with a hazard ratio of 4.30 (CI 1.60–11.55; P=0.0038) for serum albumin less than 3 g/dL compared to serum albumin greater than 4 g/dL. Severe bleeding complications were observed in 5 out of 57 patients with venous thromboembolism undergoing treatment with anticoagulation. Prospective investigation should be undertaken to better risk stratify these patients and to determine the optimal strategies for prophylaxis against and management of venous thromboembolism. PMID:26452981