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Sample records for deep venous thrombophlebitis

  1. Detection of deep venous thrombophlebitis by Gallium 67 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Deep venous thrombophlebitis may escape clinical detection. Three cases are reported in which whole-body gallium 67 scintigraphy was used to detect unsuspected deep venous thrombophlebitis related to indwelling catheters in three children who were being evaluated for fevers of unknown origin. Two of these children had septicemia from Candida organisms secondary to these venous lines. Gallium 67 scintigraphy may be useful in the detection of complications of indwelling venous catheters.

  2. Detection of deep venous thrombophlebitis by gallium 67 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Deep venous thrombophlebitis may escape clinical detection. Three cases are reported in which whole-body gallium 67 scintigraphy was used to detect unsuspected deep venous thrombophlebitis related to indwelling catheters in three children who were being evaluated for fevers of unknown origin. Two of these children had septicemia from Candida organisms secondary to these venous lines. Gallium 67 scintigraphy may be useful in the detection of complications of indwelling venous catheters.

  3. Deep venous thrombophlebitis following aortoiliac reconstructive surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, M.K.; McCabe, C.J.; Abbott, W.M.; Brewster, D.C.; Moncure, A.C.; Reidy, N.C.; Darling, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    One hundred patients undergoing elective aortic surgery were scanned prospectively for development of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The incidence of DVT in this population was 13%. Eleven patients showed only calf vein thrombosis on venography, whereas two had occlusive iliofemoral thrombus. The correlation between venous Doppler ultrasound and venography was 80%. More importantly, Doppler examination correctly identified both patients with occlusive thrombus. Fibrinogen scanning was associated with a false-positive rate of 31%. Only one patient suffered a nonfatal pulmonary embolus. Fibrinogen scanning has an unacceptably high false-positive rate; however, Doppler ultrasound will identify significant occlusive thrombus without a high false-positive rate. The low incidence of pulmonary emboli does not warrant such definitive measures as prophylactic vena caval interruption.

  4. Thrombophlebitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clots from forming, most often only prescribed when deep veins are involved Medicines such as ibuprofen to ... prescribe medicine to prevent thrombophlebitis. Alternative Names Phlebitis; Deep vein thrombosis - thrombophlebitis Images Deep venous thrombosis, iliofemoral ...

  5. Pitfalls in establishing the diagnosis of deep venous thrombophlebitis by indium-111 platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Seabold, J.E.; Conrad, G.R.; Kimball, D.A.; Ponto, J.A.; Bricker, J.A.

    1988-07-01

    Forty-seven /sup 111/In-platelet scintigraphs (In-PS) were analyzed retrospectively to identify sources of diagnostic error and to optimize the diagnostic criteria for active deep venous thrombophlebitis (DVT). The results of In-PS were compared with contrast venography, additional diagnostic studies, and clinical outcome. Three patterns of platelet localization emerged as the best predictors of active DVT: (a) focal or (b) linear 4-hr localization, or (c) an asymmetric blood-pool pattern on 4-hr imaging that evolved into a focal or linear pattern by 16 to 24 hr. All false-positive studies had abnormal patterns confined to the inguinal region at 24 hr. All patients with false-negative studies had received heparin between 4 and 24 hr. The potential pitfalls encountered in the evaluation of the iliac, femoral, and popliteal veins are reviewed and the importance of delayed imaging in selected cases is emphasized.

  6. Deep venous thrombophlebitis: detection with 4-hour versus 24-hour platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Seabold, J.E.; Conrad, G.R.; Ponto, J.A.; Kimball, D.A.; Frey, E.E.; Ahmed, F.; Coughlan, J.D.; Jensen, K.C.

    1987-11-01

    Thirty-one nonheparinized patients with suspected deep venous thrombophlebitis (DVT) underwent contrast venography and indium-111 platelet scintigraphy (In-111 PS). Venography permitted identification of acute DVT in 12 of 31 cases (39%). One additional patient was considered to have acute DVT despite nonconclusive venography results. In-111 PS results were positive at 4 hours in nine of 13 cases (69%) and at 24 hours in 12 of 13 cases (92%). Two of four patients with false-negative 4-hour In-111 PS studies had received warfarin. Thus, the sensitivity of 4-hour In-111 PS in patients not receiving anticoagulants was 82%. Venography results were negative for acute DVT in 18 cases, and 4-hour In-111 PS studies were negative or equivocal in each. In-111 PS is an alternative to contrast venography for detecting acute DVT. If 4-hour In-111 PS results are positive, anticoagulation can be initiated. Delayed images are necessary if the 4-hour images are negative or equivocal.

  7. Thrombophlebitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the surface of your skin (superficial thrombophlebitis) or deep within a muscle (deep vein thrombosis, or DVT). Causes include trauma, surgery ... pain in the affected area Redness and swelling Deep vein thrombosis signs and symptoms include: Pain Swelling ...

  8. [Suppurative thrombophlebitis central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Ramos Martínez, A; Sánchez Romero, I; Saura Lorente, P A; Parajón Díaz, A

    2008-06-01

    Suppurative thrombophlebitisis a very infrequent complication of the central venous catheterization. The majority of the cases are produced by species of staphylococci. A 22-year-old colombian-woman, student, without toxic habits was admitted because of temporary left astrocytoma (grade II). Nine days after implementing a catheter in the right subclavian vein she presented high fever (39.5 degrees C), shivers, progressive right side neck swelling and odinofagia. She had leukocytosis (26,300 cells/microl) and normal cerebrospinal fluid. After withdrawing the catheter, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in the tip of the catheter and in four bottles of blood cultures. A neck CT demonstrated expansion and absence of contrast in the right internal jugular vein. The patient evolved satisfactorily with cloxacillin, gentamycin and low molecular weight heparin.

  9. Initial management and outcomes after superficial thrombophlebitis: The Cardiovascular Research Network Venous Thromboembolism study.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Bethany; Go, Alan S; Sung, Sue Hee; Fan, Dongjie; Fang, Margaret C

    2016-06-01

    Although superficial thrombophlebitis (SVTE) is generally considered a benign, self-limited disease, accumulating evidence suggests that it often leads to more serious forms of venous thromboembolism. We reviewed the medical charts of 329 subjects with SVTE from the Cardiovascular Research Network Venous Thromboembolism cohort study to collect information on the acute treatment of SVTE and subsequent diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis within 1 year. All participants received care within Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large, integrated healthcare delivery system. Fourteen (4.3%) subjects with SVTE received anticoagulants, 148 (45.0%) were recommended antiplatelet agents or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and in 167 (50.8%) there was no documented antithrombotic therapy. In the year after SVTE diagnosis, 19 (5.8%) patients had a subsequent diagnosis of a deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. In conclusion, clinically significant venous thrombosis within a year after SVTE was uncommon in our study despite infrequent use of antithrombotic therapy. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:432-434. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  10. Superficial thrombophlebitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risks for thrombophlebitis include: Cancer or liver disease Deep vein thrombosis Disorders that involve increased blood clotting ( ... Possible problems may include the following: Infections ( cellulitis ) Deep vein thrombosis When to Contact a Medical Professional ...

  11. Clinically silent deep vein thrombosis in patients with superficial thrombophlebitis and varicose veins at legs.

    PubMed

    Jerkic, Zoran; Karic, Alen; Karic, Amela

    2009-01-01

    Although superficial thrombophlebitis is a common disorder until recently it was considered as benign disorder. Also it is associated with varicose vein at legs and it was treated effectively with conservative methods, walking and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Aims of our investigation were: determine frequency of clinically silent deep vein thrombosis at legs in patient with and without superficial thrombophlebitis, determine correlation between superficial thrombophlebitis and deep vein thrombosis regardless of localization of superficial thrombophlebitis in superficial veins of legs and determine adequacy and safety vein phlebography in early diagnosis clinically silent deep vein thrombosis in patients with superficial thrombophlebitis. Using flebography in prospective study was evaluated incidence of clinically silent deep vein thrombosis in 92 patients with varicose veins at legs. By phlebograpy in patients with varicose veins at legs and superficial thrombophlebitis at legs and without clinical signs of DVT at legs of the 49 patients we detected DVT in 12 patients (24, 48%), in three male and nine female. We detected localization of DVT in ilijacofemoral junction in 4,08% patients, although localization of DVT in femoropopliteal region was observed in 6, 12% patients and localization in crural region was in 14.28% patients. Localization of DVT at legs was detected in iliac vein in 16.66% patients, in femoral vein in 25% patients, popliteal vein 8.33% patients, anterior tibial vein 16.66%, posterior tibial vein in 25% and crural veins 8.33% patients. Also we deduced significant difference between two group of patients (chi2 = 10, 76). Such result proves thesis that in most patients with superficial thrombophlebitis and varicose veins is possibility of developing of DVT.

  12. Diagnosing Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, D. Lynn

    1992-01-01

    Patients often present with unexplained lower limb pain and swelling. It is important to exclude deep venous thrombosis in the diagnosis because of the threat of sudden death. Simple clinical diagnosis is unacceptable, and noninvasive tests should be used initially. Serial testing detects proximal extension of isolated calf thrombi. Multiple diagnostic modalities are employed to diagnose a new deep venous thrombosis in patients with postphlebitic syndrome. PMID:21221369

  13. TREATMENT OF THROMBOPHLEBITIS

    PubMed Central

    Kirtland, Howard B.; Brown, Roland G.; McDonald, Richard T.

    1960-01-01

    Venous stasis, injury or alteration of the intima and alterations in the coagulability of the blood are the three most common etiologic factors in thrombophlebitis. Usually at least two of these factors must be present before the clinical manifestations of the disease develop. A plan of treatment based on correcting these three factors has been used in over 250 cases of thrombophlebitis, and it is believed that a significant decrease was brought about in the acute and long term disability and in the occurrence of complications. The program consists of absolute bed rest in a hospital for about a week, elevation of the foot of the bed, administration of anticoagulants and adenosine-5-monophosphate for at least six weeks, progressive ambulation after the fourth day of treatment, with avoidance of prolonged standing and sitting, and adequate elastic support. Treatment must be continued until the patient has returned to full, normal activity and all signs of phlebitis have disappeared. PMID:14409404

  14. Prevalence of Isolated Asymptomatic Deep Vein Thrombosis in Varicose Vein Patients with Superficial Thrombophlebitis: A Single Center Experience in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Sadaaki; Shirato, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Toshimitsu; Ono, Hisako; Yabuki, Shiho; Jojima, Kumiko; Niimi, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Prevalence of asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with primary varicose veins remains unclear. Materials and Methods: Here, we conducted a retrospective study to clarify the incidence of asymptomatic DVT in patients with varicose veins, especially focusing on those with superficial thrombophlebitis (STP). Results: Among 431 patients with primary varicose veins with saphenous vein incompetence, 20 (4.64%) had asymptomatic DVT. The presence of STP was a significant risk factor for asymptomatic DVT as 10 of the 24 (41.7%) patients with STP had asymptomatic DVT, and all cases having calf muscle vein thrombosis. In contrast, of the patients with primary varicose veins without STP only 2.46% had asymptomatic DVT. Conclusions: In patients with primary varicose veins with STP, significant risk factors for DVT were being over C3 on the clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathophysiological (CEAP) classification. (This article is a translation of Jpn J Phlebol 2014; 25: 13–19.) PMID:27087866

  15. Efficacy of noninvasive modalities of diagnosis of thrombophlebitis

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, R.W.; Klatte, E.C.; Park, H.M.; Siddiqui, A.R.; Bendick, P.J.; Dilley, R.S.; Glover, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    In a blind prospective study of 158 limbs, Doppler ultrasound, pneumoplethysmography, and radionuclide venography (RNV) using /sup 99/mTc-MAA were compared to phlebography as methods of detecting thrombophlebitis. All three noninvasive modalities were very insensitive to isolated thrombus below the knee. In patients with extension of thrombus above the knee and isolated thrombus in the deep veins of the upper limb, Doppler ultrasound had a sensitivity of 81% and RNV had a sensitivity of 77%. All of the noninvasive modalities were found to be dependent on venous occlusion. Overall, pneumoplethysmography had a sensitivity of 28% and specificity of 96%, compared with 56% and 91%, respectively, for Doppler ultrasound and 51% and 84% for RNV. Based on these findings, phlebography would still seem to be the modality of choice in the diagnosis of thrombophlebitis.

  16. A review of the birth control pill and its relationship to thrombophlebitis.

    PubMed

    Julsrud, M E

    1979-06-01

    A perspective study by the Royal College of General Practitioners reported that the risk of developing deep venous thrombosis of the legs in women taking oral contraceptives was 5.66 times higher than women not on medication. Estrogen-progestogen compounds are highly potent hormones that produce alterations in metabolic and endocrine functions. Clinical examination of the leg is the most reliable method of determining the earliest indication of thrombophlebitis even with the latest diagnostic tools of venography. The key to diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism, which often occurs with patients with thrombophlebitis, is a patient's complaint of leg pains. Those who have undergone surgery, especially abdominal and pelvic, are bedridden, and those who are taking oral contraceptives are at risk of thrombophlebitis. Deep thrombophlebitis of the leg is not recognized clinically in 50-80% of those with venographically documented thrombophlebitis because the signs and symptoms are so protean. Treatment with heparin and leg bandages is most common. Heparin is often followed with coumarin therapy. Some methods of diagnosis are calf tenderness, edema, skin temperature, Homan's Sign, Lowenberg's Sign, Pratt's Sign, cyanosis, systemic signs, and contrast venogram.

  17. Management of superficial vein thrombosis and thrombophlebitis: status and expert opinion document.

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Belcaro, G; Agus, G; Georgiev, M; Errichi, B M; Marinucci, R; Errichi, S; Filippini, A; Pellegrini, L; Ledda, A; Vinciguerra, G; Ricci, A; Cipollone, G; Lania, M; Gizzi, G; Ippolito, E; Bavera, P; Fano, F; Dugall, M; Adovasio, R; Gallione, L; Del Boccio, G; Cornelli, U; Steigerwalt, R; Acerbi, G; Cacchio, M; Di Renzo, A; Hosoi, M; Stuard, S; Corsi, M; Di Ciano, L; Simeone, E; Collevecchio, G; Grossi, M G; Di Giambattista, F; Carestia, F; Zukowski, A

    2007-01-01

    Superficial vein thrombosis is characterized by clotting of superficial veins (ie, following direct trauma) with minimal inflammatory components. Superficial thrombophlebitis is a minimally thrombotic process of superficial veins associated with inflammatory changes and/or infection. Treatments generally include analgesics, elastic compression, anti-inflammatory agents, exercise and ambulation, and, in some cases, local or systemic anticoagulants. It is better to avoid bed rest and reduced mobility. Topical analgesia with nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory creams applied locally to the superficial vein thrombosis/superficial thrombophlebitis area controls symptoms. Hirudoid cream (heparinoid) shortens the duration of signs/symptoms. Locally acting anticoagulants/antithrombotics (Viatromb, Lipohep, spray Na-heparin) have positive effects on pain and on the reduction in thrombus size. Intravenous catheters should be changed every 24 to 48 hours (depending on venous flow and clinical parameters) to prevent superficial vein thrombosis/superficial thrombophlebitis and removed in case of events. Low molecular weight heparin prophylaxis and nitroglycerin patches distal to peripheral lines may reduce the incidence of superficial vein thrombosis/superficial thrombophlebitis in patients with vein catheters. In case of superficial vein thrombosis/superficial thrombophlebitis, vein lines should be removed. In neoplastic diseases and hematological disorders, anticoagulants may be necessary. Exercise reduces pain and the possibility of deep vein thrombosis. Only in cases in which pain is very severe is bed rest necessary. Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis should be established in patients with reduced mobility. Antibiotics usually do not have a place in superficial vein thrombosis/superficial thrombophlebitis unless there are documented infections. Prevention of superficial vein thrombosis should be considered on the basis of patient's history and clinical evaluation.

  18. [Deep venous thrombosis related to cranioencephalic injury].

    PubMed

    Yáñez Baña, R M; Rossi López, R E; Romero López, J; Pareja Grande, J A; González-Elipe, J

    1989-09-01

    The clinical onset of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is very variable and the causes that may lead to its development are also quite numerous. Although characteristic CT diagnostic signs have been described, in most cases only nonspecific findings are present and angiography is required to confirm the diagnosis. The prognosis is variable. Classically, the mortality is high when the deep venous system is involved. We report a male with CVT involving Galen's vein and its major tributary vessels, who had a favorable outcome with heparin therapy and drugs for cerebral edema. We discuss the etiologic factors in this patient, the characteristic neuroradiologic findings, and their evolution during the course of therapy.

  19. Variability in the Management of Superficial Venous Thrombophlebitis across Practitioners Based in North America and the Global Community

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Jennifer A.; Desai, Sapan S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to compare management patterns of patients with SVT among healthcare practitioners based in North America versus those in the global community. Methods. A 17-question, multiple choice survey with questions regarding SVT diagnosis and management strategies was provided to practitioners who attended the American Venous Forum (AVF) meeting in 2011. Results. There were 487 practitioners surveyed with 365 classified as North American (US or Canada) and 122 (56 Europe, 25 Asia, 11 South America, and 7 Africa) representing the global community. The key difference seen between the groups was in the initial imaging study used in patients presenting with SVT (P = 0.046) and physicians in the US ordered fewer bilateral duplex ultrasounds and more unilateral duplex ultrasounds (49.6% versus 58.2%, 39.7% versus 34.4%). In the US cohort, phlebologists and vascular surgeons constituted 82% (n = 300) of the specialties surveyed. In the global community, SVT was managed by phlebologists or vascular surgeons 44% (n = 54) of the time. Surgical management was highly variable between groups. Conclusion. There is currently no consensus between or among practitioners in North America or globally as to the surgical management of SVT, duration of follow-up, and anticoagulation parameters. PMID:25371819

  20. Deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Stephens, M B

    1997-02-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the upper extremity is a relatively uncommon but important cause of morbidity, especially in young active persons. The causes of upper extremity DVT may be categorized as catheter-related, spontaneous (effort-related) and miscellaneous (e.g., trauma, intravenous drug use). Diagnosis is based on clinical history and confirmed by either duplex ultrasonography or contrast venography. Significant controversy surrounds the optimal management of upper extremity DVT. Treatment options include conservative therapy, anticoagulation, catheter-directed thrombolysis and surgical intervention to remove intravascular clot or revise the anatomy of the costoclavicular space. Early aggressive treatment of active young patients may decrease long-term morbidity.

  1. [Acute superficial thrombophlebitis--modern diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Marković, M D; Lotina, S I; Davidović, L B; Vojnović, B R; Kostić, D M; Cinara, I S; Svetković, S D

    1997-01-01

    Acute superficial thrombophlebitis of the lower extremities is one of the most common vascular diseases affecting the population. Although it is generally considered as a benign disease, it can be extended to the deep venous system and pulmonary embolism. We examined 50 patients (22 males and 28 females), mean age 52.5 years. These patients were surgically treated due to acute superficial thrombophlebitis of the lower limbs that affected great saphenous vein above the knee. The diagnosis was made by palpable subcutaneous cords in the course of great saphenous vein or its tributaries in association with tenderness, erythema and oedema. Of these 50 patients, 26 were examined by duplex ultrasonography before the operation. In 20 patients duplex scanning confirmed that the process was greater than we supposed after clinical examination (77%) and in 6 patients there were no differences (23%) (Figures 1 and 2). The operation included crossectomy, ligation and resection of the proximal part of the great saphenous vein. Intraoperative findings in 38 patients showed that the level of the phlebitic process was higher than the clinical level (76%). There was no difference in 12 patients (24%). Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism were noted in 14 patients (28%) (Tables 1 and 2). Both complications were found in two patients, and 12 had one of these complications. Generally, there were 12 patients with deep venous thrombosis and 4 patients with pulmonary embolism. Only in one patient deep venous thrombosis appeared postoperatively, while all other complications occurred before surgical intervention (Scheme 1 and Table 3). The most common risk factor was the presence of varicose veins (86%). Obesity, age over 60 years, cigarette smoking are listed in decreasing order of frequency. Patients under 60 years were more likely to have complications while older patients usually followed a benign clinical course (Tables 4 and 5). There was no intrahospital mortality. Average

  2. Occult pulmonary embolism: a common occurrence in deep venous thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, G.S.; Cronan, J.J.; Tupper, T.B.; Messersmith, R.N.; Denny, D.F.; Lee, C.H.

    1987-02-01

    Ventilation-perfusion scans were used in a prospective study to determine the prevalence of occult pulmonary embolus in proven deep venous thrombosis. Fifty-eight patients without symptoms of pulmonary embolism, but with venographically proven deep venous thrombosis, were subjected to chest radiographs, /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated-albumin perfusion scans, and /sup 133/Xe ventilation scans. Of the 49 patients with deep venous thrombosis proximal to the calf veins, 17 (35%) had high-probability scans. Of all 58 patients, only 12 (21%) had normal scans. When the study population was compared with a group of 430 patients described in reports of pulmonary perfusion in asymptomatic persons, a significantly higher percentage of high-probability scans was found in the study population with deep venous thrombosis. Baseline ventilation-perfusion lung scanning is valuable for patients with proven above-knee deep venous thrombosis.

  3. Deep Venous Thrombosis: An Interventionalist's Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, J. Stephen; Michael, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremity has traditionally been anatomically categorized into proximal DVT (thrombosis involving the popliteal vein and above) and distal DVT (isolated calf vein thrombosis). Proximal DVT involving the common femoral and/or iliac veins, referred to as iliofemoral DVT (IFDVT), represents a disease process with a worse prognosis and higher risk for poor clinical outcomes compared to proximal DVT not involving the common femoral or iliac draining veins. Methods This review discusses therapeutic options for treatment of lower extremity IFDVT, including adjuvant anticoagulation and catheter-based invasive therapies; literature supporting current acute interventional techniques; and the recommendations from the recently published American Heart Association guidelines. Results Patients with IFDVT represent an opportune subset of patients for acute interventional management with currently available techniques. This subset of patients with proximal DVT has a worse prognosis, is less well studied, and benefits more from acute intervention compared to patients with proximal DVT or distal DVT. Conclusion Invasive catheter-based therapies that remove thrombus and correct venous outflow obstructions improve outcomes and morbidity in patients with IFDVT. Future trials that address IFDVT specifically will improve our understanding and the proper management of this higher-risk subset of patients with DVT. PMID:25598728

  4. [Deep venous thrombosis in an amputation stump].

    PubMed

    Baars, E C T; Ettema, H B; Fritschy, W M

    2007-09-15

    A 34-year-old patient underwent a knee exarticulation amputation and developed symptoms of pain, redness and swelling of the stump in combination with a feeling of tightness in the chest. These symptoms were first attributed to muscle pain and exertion but further examination revealed deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the stump and a pulmonary embolism for which he was treated with nadroparine and acenocoumarol. Shortly after treatment he could resume the use of the prosthesis. A DVT in the amputation stump is not frequently encountered, but is a serious complication that can, together with a pulmonary embolism, be life threatening. The literature mentions an incidence ranging from 0-12%. Physical examination is often not conclusive and further examination of the patient with duplex scanning is necessary, with a ventilation-perfusion scan if a pulmonary embolism is suspected. Patients with a lower extremity amputation have a higher risk of developing a DVT because of immobility and increased venous pooling in the residual limb. Symptoms of a red, swollen, warm and painful stump should trigger the physician to suspect a DVT.

  5. Venous ulcer: epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbade, Luciana P Fernandes; Lastória, Sidnei

    2005-06-01

    This review discusses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and current therapeutic options for venous ulcer. Venous ulcer is a severe clinical manifestation of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). It is responsible for about 70% of chronic ulcers of the lower limbs. The high prevalence of venous ulcer has a significant socioeconomic impact in terms of medical care, days off work and reduced quality of life. Long-term therapeutics are needed to heal venous ulcers and recurrence is quite common, ranging from 54 to 78%. Thrombophlebitis and trauma with long-term immobilization predisposing to deep venous thrombosis are important risk factors for CVI and venous ulcer. The most recent theories about pathogenesis of venous ulcer have associated it with microcirculatory abnormalities and generation of an inflammatory response. Management of venous leg ulcers is based on understanding the pathogenesis. In recent years novel therapeutic approaches for venous ulcers have offered valuable tools for the management of patients with this disorder.

  6. Pulmonary embolism without deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tim; Hingorani, Anil; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Jung, Daniel; Jimenez, Robert; Jacob, Theresa

    2012-10-01

    To identify patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) without deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and to compare them with those with an identifiable source on upper (UED) and lower-extremity venous duplex scans (LED). We performed a retrospective review of 2700 computed tomography angiograms of the chest between January 2008 and September 2010 and identified 230 patients with PE. We then evaluated the results of UED and LED and divided the patients into four groups based on the results of their duplex studies. We compared patients with PE and DVT with those with PE and no DVT in terms of age, gender, size and location of PE, critical illness, malignancy, and in-hospital mortality. We identified 152 women and 78 men (mean age, 68 years) with PE. One hundred thirty-one patients had a documented source of PE (group 1). Fifty-three patients had negative LED results, but did not undergo UED (group 2). Thirty-one patients did not undergo either LED or UED (group 3). Seven men and eight women had no documented source of PE on UED and LED (group 4). Ten of 15 patients in group 4 had a documented malignancy listed as one of their diagnoses. Because patients in groups 2 and 3 did not undergo complete duplex studies, we excluded them from our analysis. We then reviewed the discharge summaries of patients in groups 1 and 4. There was no statistically significant difference in age and gender distribution, size and location of PE, critical illness, smoking status, cardiovascular disease, trauma, and in-hospital mortality between patients in group 1 and 4. Patients in group 4 had a statistically significant increased prevalence of malignancy (67% vs. 40%, P = 0.046). Patients in group 4 also had a higher percentage of active cancer than those in group 1 (47% vs. 24%, P = 0.084), although not statistically significant. We defined active cancer as either a metastatic disease or a malignancy diagnosed shortly before or after the diagnosis of PE. Patients who were undergoing treatment for

  7. Management of deep venous thrombosis in the pregnant female.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, J C; Estrada, F P; Orr, R M

    1990-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities is an uncommon but dreaded complication of pregnancy which can present diagnostic and therapeutic problems to the treating physician. From January 1, 1985, to December 31, 1988, 7867 deliveries were performed at St. Luke's Hospital. Five of these patients were pregnant women who were treated for deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities. The women were either in their second or third trimester of pregnancy. The clinical diagnosis in each case was confirmed with duplex ultrasonography. Each patient was treated with 7 to 10 days of intravenous heparin therapy and then discharged on subcutaneous heparin therapy. There were no bleeding complications related to the heparin therapy. No patient developed a pulmonary embolism. Each patient delivered a normal child. The only complication was a heparin induced rash in one patient which resolved when a different preparation of heparin was used. The management of deep venous thrombosis in pregnancy is discussed.

  8. Primary leiomyosarcoma of saphenous vein presenting as deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Fremed, Daniel I; Faries, Peter L; Schanzer, Harry R; Marin, Michael L; Ting, Windsor

    2014-12-01

    Only a small number of venous leiomyosarcomas have been previously reported. Of these tumors, those of saphenous origin comprise a minority of cases. A 59-year-old man presented with symptoms of deep vein thrombosis and was eventually diagnosed with primary leiomyosarcoma of great saphenous vein origin. The tumor was treated with primary resection and femoral vein reconstruction with autologous patch. Although extremely rare, saphenous leiomyosarcoma can present as deep vein thrombosis. Vascular tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis of atypical extremity swelling refractory to conventional deep vein thrombosis management. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Deep venous reflux definitions and associated clinical and physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kah Heng; Hill, Gerry; Tarr, Greg; van Rij, Andre

    2013-10-01

    Deep venous reflux (DVR) is often a poorly defined clinical entity. The extent of DVR that must occur for it to be clinically and hemodynamically important is not clear and is usually confounded by the presence of superficial venous reflux. This study aims to investigate the effect of the extent of DVR on clinical and hemodynamic parameters while controlling for the presence of superficial reflux. We performed a cross-sectional study, using a prospectively designed data set obtained from patients presenting to a vascular laboratory for lower limb venous assessment. Age, gender, duplex ultrasound assessment of the deep and superficial systems, CEAP clinical class, and venous filling index (VFI) measurements were obtained. A classification of axial DVR is described, based on the level of continuous reflux occurring in the vertical axis as detected by duplex ultrasound: axial 0 (no deep reflux), axial 1 (common femoral vein only), axial 2 (to any level of the femoral vein), axial 3 (to the level of the popliteal vein), and axial 4 (into the calf veins) A subset of segmental reflux is also defined. This study included 3122 limbs from 2349 subjects. Limbs with increasing axial level were more likely to have CEAP 4-6 (axial 0: 294 [37.2%]; axial 1: 520 [41.6%]; axial 2: 82 [41.2%]; axial 3: 92 [59.7%]; axial 4: 148 [64.9%], P value for trend <.0001). This relationship remained highly significant following adjustment for superficial reflux and demographic variables. Compared with limbs with no DVR, the adjusted odds ratio for having CEAP 4-6 was 2.10 (1.25-3.51; P < .0048) for limbs with axial level 3 and 3.07 (1.94-4.88, P < .0001) for limbs with axial level 4. Similarly after adjustment, predicted mL/s increases in VFI were significant (P < .0001) for level 1 (1.19 [1.08-1.31]), level 3 (1.53 [1.31-1.78]), and level 4 (1.74 [1.51-1.95]). Segmental reflux, when extensive, also contributed to the risk of more severe disease. Deep axial reflux to the level of the

  10. Radiological evaluation of the chronic venous stasis syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Train, J.S.; Schanzer, H.; Peirce, E.C. II; Dan, S.J.; Mitty, H.A.

    1987-08-21

    Chronic venous stasis is an extremely complex clinical syndrome of pain and changes in the skin that can involve the superficial, deep, and perforating veins. This syndrome is commonly referred to as the postphlebitic syndrome, implying that thrombophlebitis is its sole etiology. To test this hypothesis, the authors performed ascending venography on 51 limbs of patients with the chromic venous stasis syndrome and demonstrated that 32 had no radiological evidence of recent or old thrombophlebitis. Instead, they had normal-appearing veins, suggesting primary incompetence of the deep and/or perforating venous valves rather than thrombophlebitis as the etiology. Since various operations have recently been proposed to correct or bypass malfunctioning valves, precise demonstration of pathological change is required to choose the appropriate procedure and to evaluate results. Descending venograms were combined with the ascending studies in 42 limbs for this purpose. In addition to outlining the abnormalities responsible for chronic venous stasis syndrome in individual cases, interesting conclusions regarding the syndrome itself were reached.

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Spontaneous Lumbar Venous Retroperitoneal Hematoma in Setting of Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Case Report and Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Joseph; Chapman, Todd; Scott, Ryan; Kalinkin, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hematoma is rare and benefits from a systematic approach to prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of such bleeds is based upon patient stability, the cause (spontaneous or posttraumatic), and source (arterial or venous). Herein, the authors describe a diagnostic and management algorithm for retroperitoneal hemorrhage with an example of a rare lumbar venous bleed under the complicated clinical setting of deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27795865

  12. Management of Cavoatrial Deep Venous Thrombosis: Incorporating New Strategies.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Mohamed A; De Silva, Gayan S; Ramaswamy, Raja S; Sanchez, Luis A

    2017-03-01

    Cavoatrial deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is diagnosed with increasing prevalence. It can be managed medically with anticoagulation or with directed interventions aimed to efficiently reduce the thrombus burden within the target venous segment. The type of management chosen depends greatly on the etiology and chronicity of the thrombosis, existing patient comorbidities, and the patient's tolerance to anticoagulants and thrombolytic agents. In addition to traditional percutaneous catheter-based pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, other catheter-based suction thrombectomy techniques have emerged in recent years. Each therapeutic modality requires operator expertise and a coordinated care paradigm to facilitate successful outcomes. Open surgical thrombectomy is alternatively reserved for specific patient conditions, including intolerance of anticoagulation, failed catheter-based interventions, or acute emergencies.

  13. Deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity. A review.

    PubMed

    Klitfod, L; Broholm, R; Baekgaard, N

    2013-10-01

    Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) occurs either spontaneously, as a consequence of strenuous upper limb activity (also known as the Paget-Schroetter syndrome) or secondary to an underlying cause. Primary and secondary UEDVT differs in long-term sequelae and mortality. This review will focus on the clinical presentation, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment strategies of UEDVT. In the period from January to October 2012 an electronic literature search was performed in the PubMed/MEDLINE database, and 27 publications were included. swelling, pain and functional impairment are typical symptoms of UEDVT, although completely asymptomatic cases have been described. However life-threatening, massive pulmonary embolism (PE) can also be a sign of UEDVT. for the primary condition anatomical abnormalities (Thoracic Outlet Syndrome, TOS) may dispose to the condition. Malignancy and therapeutic interventions are major risk factors for the secondary deep vein thrombosis in combination with the patient's characteristics, comorbidities and prior history of deep vein thrombosis. recurrent deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and Post Thrombotic Syndrome (PTS) are the major complications after UEDVT. PTS is a chronic condition leading to significant functional disability and impaired quality of life. compression ultrasonography is noninvasive and the most frequently used objective test with a high accuracy in experienced hands. Treatment modalities and strategies: the treatment modalities include anticoagulation therapy, catheter-directed thrombolysis, surgical decompression, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting and they may be combined. However, the optimal treatment and timing of treatment remains controversial. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent PTS in primary UEDVT; however, there is no consensus on which treatment is the best. Anticoagulation is still considered the treatment of choice for at least 3-6 months, until

  14. Return to training and competition after deep venous calf thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W O; Christie, D M

    1992-01-01

    A 25-yr-old female triathlete presented with 4 d of increasing left calf pain that started 1 d after an elective termination of pregnancy during the eighth week of gestation. She had been training with running, bicycling, and swimming but did not recall any injury to the calf muscle. Deep venous thrombosis of the calf and popliteal veins was diagnosed, and she was treated with intravenous heparin and oral warfarin anticoagulation. Her major concern was return to training and competition. A protocol was developed based on experience with less active patients and animal studies to allow a progressive return to training activities over 5 wk, followed by running in the sixth week. After release from the hospital, she accelerated the return-to-training protocol and progressed to running within 3 wk. She developed the post-phlebitic syndrome that resolved within 2 yr. The diagnosis and treatment of deep venous thrombosis are reviewed, with specific attention to the needs of athletic patients.

  15. [Grenade splinter injury simulating thrombophlebitis].

    PubMed

    Gaber, Y

    2003-02-01

    Two patients with a grenade-splinter injury with clinical symptoms of a thrombophlebitis and periphlebitis are presented. Unexpectedly, the supposed thrombus proved to be metallic fragments. Both patients recalled to be wounded in the second world war in 1944/1945 by grenades. The splinters were not extracted. Both patients experienced more than 5 decades without any symptoms. As an after-effect caused by movement of the splinters, significant superficial inflammation could be seen now.

  16. Technetium-99m red blood cell venography in upper extremity deep venous thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, A.M.; Turbiner, E.H.

    1987-06-01

    The efficacy of Tc-99m RBC venography has been demonstrated with respect to the study of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. A case is presented where Tc-99m RBC venography was used to study the upper as well as lower extremities in a patient with upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) who was found to have pulmonary embolism.

  17. Calf volume changes with venous occlusion air plethysmography in assessment of patients after deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lattimer, Christopher R; Geroulakos, George; Kalodiki, Evi

    2014-10-01

    This is an analysis of the hemodynamic response of post-thrombotic legs to a sustained thigh compression and quick-release maneuver. This is an integral part of the investigation of venous occlusion plethysmography that has been promoted as a way of assessing the venous return. The aim was to quantify the venous volume changes in patients after deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and to determine whether refluxing legs differed from obstructed legs. The inflow and outflow air plethysmography tracings of 332 of 519 legs were examined retrospectively. These tracings from 192 patients were performed between 1989 and 1999. The median age was 51 (17-89) years; 65% of the patients were men, and 52% were left legs. The retrospective clinical class distribution (%) by the Clinical, Etiologic, Anatomic, and Pathologic (CEAP) classification was as follows: C0 = 5.4, C2 = 3.3, C3 = 68.4, C4 = 13, C5 = 3.6, C6 = 6.3. Inclusion criteria were a history of DVT and a duplex ultrasound examination documenting the site and type of deep venous disease. Ascending phlebography was performed in 28% of patients to complement duplex ultrasound in assessing the site of disease. Reflux was defined as reverse flow (>1 second) and obstruction as luminal narrowing, wall irregularity, or luminal echogenic material. Air plethysmography was performed in the supine position. After calibration with 100 mL of air, a thigh cuff was inflated to 80 mm Hg, and the resulting increase in calf volume was recorded by the sensor calf cuff with an ink trace on graphic paper. At the volume plateau, the thigh cuff was deflated suddenly to record the decrease in calf volume. Reflux alone was identified in 19.6% of limbs and obstruction alone in 42.2%. Iliofemoral involvement was identified in 56.6%. The thigh compression/release maneuver caused a significant median (interquartile range) net reduction in calf volume by 9 (5-15) mL (P < .0005, Wilcoxon). The outflow volume was significantly greater than the

  18. Incidence of deep venous thrombosis in patients undergoing obesity surgery.

    PubMed

    Westling, Agneta; Bergqvist, David; Boström, Annika; Karacagil, Sadettin; Gustavsson, Sven

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) after surgery for morbid obesity. The series comprised 116 consecutive patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The median age and body mass index were 35 years (range 19-59 years) and 42 kg/m2 (range 32-68 kg/m2), respectively. The patients were examined with duplex ultrasonography pre- and postoperatively. No patient had any symptoms or signs of DVT postoperatively, and ultrasonography showed no signs of thrombosis in iliac, femoral, and popliteal veins in any of the patients. Two patients (1.7%) had a thrombus in the peroneal vein of one leg. Repeated ultrasonographic investigation after 1 week showed complete resolution of both. One patient with a previously unknown activated protein C resistance had an angiographically confirmed minor pulmonary embolus. The incidence of venous thromboembolism after obesity surgery seems to be low, and obesity as a risk factor for thromboembolic disease might have been overestimated in the past.

  19. Facial vein thrombophlebitis: an uncommon complication of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Cotes, Claudia; Riascos, Roy; Swischuk, Leonard E

    2015-07-01

    Facial vein thrombophlebitis is an uncommon complication of sinusitis. In cases where periorbital swelling complicating sinusitis is diagnosed, clinical findings of swelling and erythema extending beyond the orbital region into the cheek should alert the physician about this unusual complication and the need for further contrast-enhanced imaging and venography. The radiologist must be particularly careful in the evaluation of vascular structures of the face and neck in these children. CT and MRI with contrast material and MR venography are studies that clearly demonstrate the vascular anatomy and possible complications. However, MR venography confirms flow abnormalities within the venous system with the advantage of avoiding radiation exposure to the pediatric patient.

  20. Factor V Leiden Is Associated with Higher Risk of Deep Venous Thrombosis of Large Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Arsov, Todor; Miladinova, Daniela; Spiroski, Mirko

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation in patients with different presentation of venous thromboembolic disease and healthy individuals in the Republic of Macedonia. Methods The retrospective case-control study involved 190 patients with venous thromboembolic disease and 200 healthy individuals, who were screened for the presence of factor V Leiden mutation, using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The prevalence of factor V Leiden was analyzed according to the localization of thrombosis, presence of risk factors, and family history of thrombosis. The odds of deep venous thrombosis were calculated with respect to the presence of factor V Leiden mutation. Results The prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation among patients with venous thromboembolic disease was 21.1%, compared with 5.5% in the healthy individuals. Factor V Leiden positive patients had the first episode of deep venous thrombosis at a younger age, and the prevalence of the mutation was the highest among patients with a positive family history of thrombosis (33.9%, P = 0.003) and in patients with deep venous thrombosis affecting a large blood vessel (37.7%, P = 0.001). The prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation was lower in patients with calf deep venous thrombosis and primary thromboembolism (13.3% and 13.1%, respectively; P>0.05). The odds ratio for iliofemoral or femoral deep venous thrombosis in factor V Leiden carriers was 10.4 (95% confidence interval, 4.7-23.1). Conclusion The prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation was high in patients with venous thromboembolic disease and healthy individuals in the Republic of Macedonia. Factor V Leiden carriers have the highest odds of developing deep venous thrombosis affecting a large venous blood vessel. PMID:16758522

  1. The relationship between increased body mass index and primary venous disease severity and concomitant deep primary venous reflux.

    PubMed

    Vines, Larissa; Gemayel, Gino; Christenson, Jan T

    2013-07-01

    The role of overweight in chronic venous disease is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of overweight and obesity in chronic primary venous disease in relation to disease severity, using the CEAP and the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) as well as well as body weight on the presence of concomitant primary deep venous reflux. Between October 2005 and September 2010, 1445 consecutive patients (2023 limbs) presenting with duplex ultrasound-confirmed chronic primary venous disease and planned for intervention were evaluated from a database. The patients were classified according to CEAP, the VCSS, and body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)), using the World Health Organization definition. Concomitant primary deep venous reflux was evaluated and re-examined following eradication of the superficial reflux. There were 636 normal weight patients (890 limbs; BMI <25), 526 overweight patients (740 limbs; BMI 25 to 29.9), and 283 obese patients (393 limbs; BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)). Overweight patients had more incompetent perforators (P < .001), hypertension (P < .001), and diabetes (P = .019) than normal weight patients and higher C class (CEAP classification) and VCSS (P < .001). Obese patients had more incompetent perforators (P < .001), hypertension (P < .001), diabetes (P = .004), and primary deep insufficiency (P < .001) than overweight patients as well as higher C class and VCSS (P < .001). Correlation between the C class and the VCSS was found excellent (r = 0.80). Obese patients had more axial reflux than the two other groups. There was no relationship between disease duration, body weight, and severity within each group. After eradication of superficial reflux, abolition of the deep reflux was lowest among obese patients (13.7%) compared with overweight patients (22.5%). There was a close relation between body weight and clinical severity of primary venous disease. Both overweight and obesity appear to be a separate risk factor

  2. Effectiveness of mesoglycan in patients with previous deep venous thrombosis and chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, G M

    2007-12-01

    Retrospective analysis of mesoglycan therapeutic activity in venous disorders. The clinical data have been selected from the outpatient database of the Chair of Angiology of the University of Catania (from 1988 to 1997) through a cross survey between the prescription commercial name of mesoglycan and the key words varicose veins, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), venous thrombosis, venous ulcer. Patients have been selected on the basis of definite data relative to principal diagnosis, clinical history, clinical and instrumental objective phlebological picture, posology and duration of treatment, follow-up visits in the first three years following the first observation. Group 1: 56 patients with first episode DVT; Group 2: 27 patients with recurrent DVT; Group 3: 182 patients with CVI (107 with primitive CVI and 75 with secondary CVI). The selected patients data have been included in new databases. DVT patients were evaluated for recurrence prevalence during the follow-up period (6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months). In Group 2 the recurrence prevalence in the normal follow-up period was evaluated and, in addition, the clinical chronology of the recurrence previous to observation was drawn, in order to find out the recurrence prevalence of the thrombotic episode preceding our observation. The two prevalence trends ( mesoglycan treatment and episode preceding our observation) have been compared with the Student t test. CVI patients (Group 3) were classified according to CEAP classification criteria. The effectiveness of treatment was assessed according to the changes in the scores of venous dysfunction of CEAP classification (disability score; pain; oedema; skin color change; cutaneous ulcer). The mean and standard deviation of the considered scores have been evaluated with the Student t test comparing each series with the immediately previous series and with the T0 series. The mean dose of mesoglycan was 50

  3. Contrast agent-induced thrombophlebitis following leg phlebography: meglumine loxaglate versus meglumine lothalamate

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.L.; Briggs, G.M.; Kuan, B.B.

    1983-05-01

    A comparison was made of the incidence of venous thrombophlebitis resulting from the use of a high-osmolality contrast medium (Conray 60%, meglumine ioxaglate) and a low-osmolality contrast medium (Hexabrix 59%, meglumine iothalamate). In 30 patients with varicose veins, Conray was injected into one leg and Hexabrix into the other. The incidence of thrombophlebitis was then determined using the iodine-125 fibrinogen uptake test in a prospective, randomized, double-blind study. There was significantly less thrombophlebitis with Hexabrix than with Conray and the authors conclude that Hexabrix is safer for phlebography. Hexabrix is also stable in solution, only slightly more expensive than Conray, and one fifth the cost of metrizamide.

  4. [Superficial venous thrombosis. A state of art].

    PubMed

    Sándor, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    For a long time superficial thrombophlebitis has been thought to be a rather benign condition. Recently, when duplex ultrasound technique is used for the diagnosis more and more often, the disease is proved to be more dangerous than anticipated. Thrombosis propagates to the deep veins in 6-44% and pulmonary embolism was observed on the patients in 1,5-33%. We can calculate venous thromboembolic complications on every fourth patient. Diagnosis is clinical, but duplex ultrasound examination is mandatory, for estimation of the thrombus extent, for exclusion of the deep venous thrombosis and for follow up. Both legs should be checked with ultrasound, because simultaneous deep venous thrombosis can develop on the contralateral limb. Two different forms can be distinguished: superficial venous thrombosis with, or without varicose veins. In cases of spontaneous, non varicous form, especially when the process is migrating or recurrent, a careful clinical examination is necessery for exclusion of malignant diseases and thrombophilia. The treatment options are summarised on the basis of recent international consensus statements. The American and German guidelines are similar. Compression and mobilisation are cornerstones of the therapy. For a short segment thrombosis non steroidal antiinflammatory drugs are effective. For longer segments low molecular-weight heparins are preferred. Information on the effect of the novel oral anticoagulants for the therapy is lacking but they may appear to be effective in the future for this indication. When thrombus is close to the sapheno-femoral or sapheno-popliteal junction crossectomy (high ligation), or low molecular-weight heparin in therapeutic doses are indicated. The term superficial thrombophlebitis should be discouraged, because inflammation and infection is not the primary pathology. It should be called correctly superficial venous thrombosis in order to avoid the unnecessary administration of antibiotics and the misconception

  5. Chronic Stress Facilitates the Development of Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Yang, Fei; Sun, Pei-Wen; Zhu, Chen-Jie; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Guo-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The increasing pressure of modern social life intensifies the impact of stress on the development of cardiovascular diseases, which include deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Renal sympathetic denervation has been applied as one of the clinical approaches for the treatment of drug-resistant hypertension. In addition, the close relationship between oxidative stress and cardiovascular diseases has been well documented. The present study is designed to explore the mechanism by which the renal sympathetic nerve system and the oxidative stress affect the blood coagulation system in the development of DVT. Chronic foot shock model in rats was applied to mimic a state of physiological stress similar to humans. Our results showed that chronic foot shock procedure could promote DVT which may be through the activation of platelets aggregation. The aggravation of DVT and activation of platelets were alleviated by renal sympathetic denervation or antioxidant (Tempol) treatment. Concurrently, the denervation treatment could also reduce the levels of circulating oxidation factors in rats. These results demonstrate that both the renal sympathetic nerve system and the oxidative stress contribute to the development of DVT in response to chronic stress, which may provide novel strategy for treatment of clinic DVT patients.

  6. Incidence of Thrombophlebitis in Humans with the Diazepam Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, Roger Brown; Blanton, Patricia L.; Thrash, William J.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-one adult males volunteered for a study designed to investigate the thrombogenicity of the Valium® vehicle. Utilizing a standardized protocol, each subject received a sedative dose of Injectable Valium® in the antecubital fossa of one arm and an equivalent volume of vehicle in the contralateral arm. Both were administered with a continuous infusion drip of 5 per cent dextrose in water. Post-operative evaluation extended over 10 weeks and included clinical observation and palpation. Ultrasonic tests for occluded or impaired blood flow were performed with a Doppler Flowmeter. Five subjects (12.2 percent) had venous sequelae with the Valium® and two (4.8 percent) developed sequelae with the vehicle. The incidence of venous sequelae reported in the present study was considerably lower than in previous investigations (66.6 per cent and 37.5 per cent) utilizing the same protocol. The present study indicates that time of continuous infusion appears to contribute to thrombophlebitis subsequent to intravenous injection of Valium®. It also appears that the diazepam vehicle is not the major factor in the occurrence of thrombophlebitis. PMID:6960743

  7. Septic thrombophlebitis: percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy and thrombolytic therapies.

    PubMed

    Kar, Subrata; Webel, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Suppurative thrombophlebitis (Lemierre's syndrome) of the internal jugular vein is a rare and sometimes fatal complication. It commonly occurs from oropharyngeal infections, peripheral lines, complications from dental procedures, gingivitis, or central venous catheterizations. Empiric antibiotics are the initial treatment of choice followed by thrombolytics or surgical thrombectomy in refractory cases. We present a case of septic thrombophlebitis of the right internal jugular vein from a peripherally inserted central venous catheter. We also review the current percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy and thrombolytics therapies for such a rare disorder. Mechanical thrombectomy includes rotational thrombectomy or rheolytic therapies. Devices include the Amplatz thrombectomy device (Microvena), the Arrow-Trerotola Percutaneous thrombolytic device (Arrow), and the Cragg-Casteneda thrombolytic brush (Microtherapeutics). Rheolytic therapies include Angiojet, the Hydrolyzer, and the Oasis Thrombectomy System. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy techniques include rotational fragmentation, aspiration or suction thrombectomy, and hydrodynamic thrombectomy. AngioJet catheters may be used for percutaneous embolectomy in conjunction with pulse spray techniques, which instill thrombolytics locally. Thrombolytics include streptokinase, urokinase, and recombinant-tissue plasminogen activator. Mechanical thrombectomy combined with thrombolytics provide optimal treatment results secondary to their complementary effects. Therefore, patients who are refractory to standard medical therapy and considered poor surgical candidates may benefit from combined percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy with thrombolytics to achieve superior results if no contraindications exist for thrombolytics.

  8. Longitudinal Volume Quantification of Deep Medullary Veins in Patients with Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis : Venous Volume Assessment in Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Using SWI.

    PubMed

    Dempfle, A K; Harloff, A; Schuchardt, F; Bäuerle, J; Yang, S; Urbach, H; Egger, K

    2017-06-06

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) visualizes small cerebral veins with high sensitivity and could, thus, enable quantification of hemodynamics of deep medullary veins. We aimed to evaluate volume changes of deep medullary veins in patients with acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) over time in comparison to healthy controls. All magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments were executed at 3 T using a 32-channel head coil. Based on SWI and semiautomatic postprocessing (statistical parametric mapping [SPM8] and ANTs), the volume of deep medullary veins was quantified in 14 patients with acute CVST at baseline and the 6‑month follow-up, as well as in 13 healthy controls undergoing repeated MRI examination with an interscan interval of at least 1 month. Deep medullary venous volume change over time was significantly different between healthy controls and patient groups (p < 0.001). Patients with superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) showed a significant decline from baseline to follow-up measurements (9.8 ± 4.9 ml versus 7.5 ± 4.2 ml; p = 0.02), whereas in patients with transverse sinus thrombosis (TST) and healthy controls no significant volume changes were observable. Venous volume quantification was feasible and reproducible both in healthy volunteers and in patients. The decrease of venous volume in patients over time represents improvement of venous drainage, reduction of congestion, and normalization of microcirculation due to treatment. Thus, quantification of venous microcirculation could be valuable for estimation of prognosis and guidance of CVST therapy in the future.

  9. Late deep venous thrombosis and delayed weightbearing after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Buehler, K O; D'Lima, D D; Petersilge, W J; Colwell, C W; Walker, R H

    1999-04-01

    One hundred ninety-nine patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty and used in hospital pneumatic compression stockings and aspirin as thromboembolic prophylaxis were screened for deep venous thrombosis using duplex ultrasonography on the fourth postoperative day. Of the initial 98 patients, 21 underwent noncemented arthroplasty, maintained touchdown weightbearing for 6 weeks after surgery, and then began progressive partial weightbearing. Of the subsequent 101 patients, 28 underwent noncemented arthroplasty and began progressive weightbearing immediately after surgery. All other patients underwent hybrid arthroplasty and began weightbearing to tolerance immediately after surgery. After duplex screening examination, patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis were given anticoagulation therapy, and patients with negative study results were observed clinically. The relative risk of proximal deep venous thrombosis after noncemented arthroplasty using delayed weightbearing was compared with that after noncemented arthroplasty using immediate progressive weightbearing. Of patients with noncemented arthroplasty, the prevalence of proximal deep venous thrombosis was significantly lower in those using progressive weightbearing immediately after surgery (none) than in those using delayed weightbearing rehabilitation (19%). This study showed that patients undergoing noncemented total hip arthroplasty with delayed weightbearing rehabilitation risk greater potential for deep venous thrombosis after hospital discharge. This study suggests consideration for continued thromboembolic prophylaxis or routine deep venous thrombosis surveillance, or both measures, after hospital discharge, unless more rapid progression of weightbearing is allowed.

  10. [Surgical therapy of acute and embolizing deep venous thrombosis--indication, technical principle, results].

    PubMed

    Kniemeyer, H W; Merckle, R; Stühmeier, K; Sandmann, W

    1990-12-17

    Between 1977 and 1986, 185 patients with deep venous thrombosis (117 with acute occlusive and 68 with embolizing deep venous thrombosis) underwent venous thrombectomy with arterio-venous fistula. The early patency rate was 96%, and the perioperative mortality rate, 3.8%. Of the 157 patients in whom extremities were involved, 147 were examined 12-118 months postoperatively (mean 43 +/- 23 months) clinically, by Doppler ultrasound and by light reflexion rheography (LRR). In 49% of the patients, various kinds of swelling or oedema of the involved extremities were present. There were no hemodynamical disturbances in 53% (LRR-examination); competent venous valves were found in 44%. According to the severity of symptoms and hemodynamical findings, postthrombotic syndrome was absent in 47%, mild in 20%, moderate in 28%, and severe in 5% (7 patients, 4 with venous ulcers). Six of the 7 patients with severe postthrombotic syndrome belonged to the group operated for embolizing thrombosis, where no selection of cases was performed. The best long-term results were achieved in patients operated for acute occlusive thrombosis of the iliac and iliofemoral veins. Venous thrombectomy with av fistula can achieve sufficient early and long-term results in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis, provided strict selection of patients and a meticulous technique are practised.

  11. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Sista, Akhilesh K; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A; Madoff, David C

    2015-07-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  12. Non-compressibility ratio of sonography in deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Jian-Hsiung; Tseng, Chia-Ying; Chuang, Jui-Ling; Chen, Yen-Chia; Huang, Hsien-Hao; Chou, Yi-Hong; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Yen, David Hung-Tsang

    2010-11-01

    The risk of post-thrombotic syndrome and pulmonary embolism can be increased if there is failure to diagnose deep venous thrombosis (DVT) promptly. Emergency physicians (EPs) need a quick and readily available test to diagnose, treat and help them decide whether to discharge or admit DVT patients in a timely manner. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of the non-compressibility ratio of thrombosed veins in DVT patients, and give EPs an objective value to aid them in their decision-making with regard to DVT patients in the emergency department. We reviewed 34 adult patients with DVT diagnosed by sonography in an emergency department. Medical records including demographic data and sonography results were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Mean age was 72.9 ± 16.5 years. Group I comprised 14 patients (41.2%) who had DVT in the popliteal and femoral veins. Group II comprised 8 patients (23.5%) who had DVT isolated to the popliteal vein and 12 patients (35.3%) who had DVT isolated to the femoral vein. Group I had a significantly higher non-compressibility ratio than Group II (93.4 ± 6.2% vs. 80.1 ± 19.2%, p < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the non-compressibility ratio between discriminating groups was 0.711 (95% confidence interval, 0.527-0.854; p < 0.05). The clinical prognostic score of Group I was significantly higher than that of Group II (6.2 ± 1.8 vs. 4.1 ± 2.6, p < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the non-compressibility ratio of the thrombosed vein and the clinical prognostic score (p = 0.001). The non-compressibility ratio of the thrombosed vein provides EPs with an objective test to evaluate the severity of DVT and to admit patients for consideration of adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Possible Association of Diindolylmethane with Pulmonary Embolism and Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Moualla, Maan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. 3,3′-Diindolylmethane is available as a supplement in the United States for “cancer prevention” and “augmentation of physical fitness.” A derivative of indole-3-carbinol found in plants, diindolylmethane, binds to receptors associated with the sex steroid pathways and has unclear effects on estrogen and androgen physiology. We present a patient who had been taking diindolylmethane and developed right lower extremity deep venous thrombosis and bilateral pulmonary embolism. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old man presented with swelling, erythema, and warmth of his right lower extremity for three to four weeks. He had been taking diindolylmethane one tablet daily for three to four months. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism included tobacco use, personal history of possible pulmonary embolism, body mass index, and age. Imaging studies found extensive deep venous thrombosis in his right lower extremity and bilateral pulmonary embolism with probable right middle lobe infarction. Follow-up imaging showed chronic deep venous thrombosis in his right lower extremity. Discussion. As suggested in this single case, patients who take diindolylmethane may be at greater risk for venous thromboembolism. Further reports and studies are necessary in order to elucidate this possible association. Clinicians should question patients about supplements in the setting of venous thromboembolism. PMID:28050169

  14. The causes of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis in the children with cranial diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Wei; Jia, Ge; Li, Na; Jia, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and to explore its possible reasons in children patients who received neurosurgery operation. Clinical data of 4958 cases children patients with lower-extremity DVT and without the thrombosis after the neurosurgery operation from 2010 January to 2014 December in department of neurosurgery of Tian Tan hospital were collected and analyzed. 18 cases children were diagnosed with lower-extremity DVT. All of them had invasive operation of lower-extremity deep venous catheterization. The mainly primary diseases of thrombosis children were craniopharyngioma. They have longer operation time compared with those without thrombosis (P<0.05). Therefore, the causes of DVT in neurosurgical children involve not only deep venous catheter-related but also neurological primary disease and operation time.

  15. Chronic deep venous obstruction: definition, prevalence, diagnosis, management.

    PubMed

    Neglén, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ilio-caval venous obstruction has an important role in the expression of symptomatic chronic venous disease regardless of aetiology. The presence of obstruction has been more or less previously ignored and emphasis placed on reflux alone. Stenting of the ilio-femoral veins guided by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can now be performed with low morbidity and mortality using appropriate technique. Current diagnostic modalities do not allow a definitive assessment of haemodynamically critical venous obstruction, which hampers selection of limbs for treatment. The diagnosis must be based on morphological studies (preferably IVUS) in patient selected with specific history, signs and symptoms. A high index of suspicion and generous use of morphological investigations are critical in the initial recognition of venous outflow obstruction. Stenting of the ilio-femoral vein appears to be durable with a substantial improvement in limb pain and swelling, high rate of ulcer healing, enhanced quality of life and decreased disability. The beneficial clinical outcome occurs regardless of the presence of remaining reflux, adjunct saphenous procedures or aetiology of obstruction.

  16. Simple, hybrid deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ward, W G; Olin, M D

    1999-01-01

    A 7.1% deep venous thrombosis rate followed total hip arthroplasty in 56 patients using a hybrid prophylactic regimen against deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolus. There were no bleeding complications, no symptomatic pulmonary emboli, and no unexplained deaths. The regimen consisted of an initial loading dose of warfarin, usually 10 mg, the night of surgery followed by 2.5 mg/day for 3 weeks, with dosage adjustments only in cases of over-anticoagulation. This regimen was combined with elevated sling suspension of the operative leg, bilateral pedal intermittent pneumatic compression devices, and early mobilization. This prophylactic regimen is simple, inexpensive, efficacious, and compatible with an early hospital discharge.

  17. Thrombophlebitis and upper respiratory tract virus infection.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Walter

    2006-11-01

    During an episode of thrombophlebitis, the 72-year-old correspondent came down with a common cold presumably, but not provenly, due to infection by one of the rhinoviruses. During the 96 hr period of coryza, all symptoms of thrombophlebitis vanished completely. There is experimental evidence that rhinovirus infections elicit cytokine production [Stöckl et al. (1999): J Clin Invest 104: 957-965], and that IL-10 can assuage thrombosis in rats [Downing et al. (1998): J Immunol 161: 1471-1476].

  18. Cerebral venous infarction: a potentially avoidable complication of deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Takashi; Okun, Michael S; Burdick, Adam; Jacobson, Charles E; Foote, Kelly D

    2013-01-01

    Despite numerous reports on the morbidity and mortality of deep brain stimulation (DBS), cerebral venous infarction has rarely been reported. We present four cases of venous infarct secondary to DBS surgery. The diagnosis of venous infarction was based on 1) delayed onset of new neurologic deficits on postoperative day 1 or 2; 2) significant edema surrounding the superficial aspect of the implanted lead, with or without subcortical hemorrhage on CT scan. Four cases (0.8% per lead, 1.3% per patient) of symptomatic cerebral venous infarction were identified out of 500 DBS lead implantation procedures between July 2002 and August 2009. All four patients had Parkinson's disease. Their DBS leads were implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (n = 2), and the globus pallidus internus (n = 2). Retrospective review of the targeting confirmed that the planned trajectory passed within 3 mm of a cortical vein in two cases for which contrast-enhanced preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was available. In the other two cases, contrasted targeting images were not obtained preoperatively. Cerebral venous infarction is a potentially avoidable, but serious complication. To minimize its incidence, we propose the use of high-resolution, contrast-enhanced, T1-weighted MR images to delineate cerebral venous anatomy, along with careful stereotactic planning of the lead trajectory to avoid injury to venous structures. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  19. Acquired and Heritable Thrombophilia in Indian Patients With Pediatric Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT).

    PubMed

    Pai, Navin; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2014-09-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in children is more often associated with underlying pathological conditions than with hereditary thrombophilia. The present study is a retrospective analysis of thrombophilia in 285 pediatric patients with venous thrombosis at different sites. Four common thrombophilia markers, that is protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, and factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, were analyzed. Thrombosis in hepatic and portal veins was more common in pediatric patients (73%) when compared to other sites (27%). Overall, hereditary thrombophilia accounted for 15.5% of the patients with venous thrombosis. The FVL mutation, which was the major causative factor in Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis cases in the adult group, was not a major contributing factor in pediatric group, that is, 1.8% of the patients. In conclusion, the risk factors for venous thrombosis vary in different age groups.

  20. Endovascular Treatment Options in the Management of Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sheraz; Uberoi, Raman

    2009-09-15

    Lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Systemic anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of conventional treatment instituted by most physicians for the management of DVT. This has proven efficacy in the prevention of thrombus extension and reduction in the incidence of pulmonary embolism and rethrombosis. Unfortunately, especially in patients with severe and extensive iliofemoral DVT, standard treatment may not be entirely adequate. This is because a considerable proportion of these patients eventually develops postthrombotic syndrome. This is characterized by chronic extremity pain and trophic skin changes, edema, ulceration, and venous claudication. Recent interest in endovascular technologies has led to the development of an assortment of minimally invasive, catheter-based strategies to deal with venous thrombus. These comprise catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices, adjuvant venous angioplasty and stenting, and inferior vena cava filters. This article reviews these technologies and discusses their current role as percutaneous treatment strategies for venous thrombotic conditions.

  1. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Akhilesh K.; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26101920

  2. [Risk of deep venous thrombosis during an air flight: prevention and counselling at the counter].

    PubMed

    Zawieja, P; Orecchioni, A-M; Métais, P; Touze, J-É

    2011-09-01

    Worldwide air traffic reaches about 2.3 billion passengers per year. The increasing number of persons at thrombo-embolic risk, together with potentially severe or fatal complications of deep venous thrombosis, suggests community pharmacists can give basic preventive advice to persons identified as at risk.

  3. Role of Color Flow Ultrasound in Detection of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Shelan Hakeem; AL-Najjar, Salwa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of lower limbs is one of the most causes for the majority of death caused by pulmonary embolism. Many medical and surgical disorders are complicated by DVT. Most venous thrombi are clinically silent. B-mode and color Doppler imaging is needed for early diagnosis of DVT to prevent complications and squeal of…

  4. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27672574

  5. Deep Venous Thrombosis in Teen With Crouzon Syndrome Post-Le Fort III Osteotomy With Rigid External Distraction.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Lauren O; Myers, Rene P; Girotto, John A

    2015-11-01

    Venous thromboembolic events are rare in pediatric patients. Risk factors associated with the development of venous thromboembolic events in pediatric patients include the use of central venous catheters, hospitalization, cancer, sepsis, trauma, surgery, and congenital prothrombotic disorders.The authors present the case of a 14-year-old man with Crouzon syndrome who required Le Fort III osteotomy with rigid external distraction for significant midface hypoplasia who presented postoperatively with an extensive deep venous thrombosis. This is the first reported case of symptomatic venous thrombosis post-Le Fort III osteotomy and rigid external distraction. Although rare, surgeons should be aware of this potential complication.

  6. Popliteal cysts and deep venous thrombosis: Tc-99m red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohn, G.O.; Brand, C.A.; Ada, A.; Wong, C.

    1985-04-01

    Thirty-four patients who clinically were suspected of having deep venous thrombosis (DVT) underwent Tc-99m red blood cell (RBC) venography followed by contrast venography. The sensitivity (88%) and specificity (94%) of Tc-99m RBC venography of DVT confirmed findings of previous studies. Twenty-four patients who had proved popliteal cysts and swollen calves also were examined using Tc-99m RBC venography. Large cysts showed lack of DVT features, photon deficient cold areas in the popliteal fossa, and diversion of venous flow around the photon deficient area. These features were seen in 25% of the study population (six patients), and assisted in the distinction between the two conditions.

  7. Fatal Peripheral Candidal Suppurative Thrombophlebitis in a Postoperative Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Suk-Kyung; Nam, So-Hyun

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of fatal fungal peripheral suppurative thrombophlebitis, caused by Candida albicans, which was disseminated to the blood, lungs, eyes, and spine. Clinical suspicion and aggressive management are important in managing fungal peripheral suppurative thrombophlebitis. Early clinical suspicion is important in managing fungal peripheral suppurative thrombophlebitis, and radical excision of the affected veins, recognition of metastatic foci, and use of systemic antifungal agents are essential to avoid septic shock and death. PMID:19119456

  8. Deep venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing inguinal lymph node dissection for melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Arbeit, J.M.; Lowry, S.F.; Line, B.R.; Jones, D.C.; Brennan, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Deep venous thromboembolism (DVT) was studied in 44 patients with clinical Stage I, II, and III melanoma undergoing staging and therapeutic inguinal lymph node dissection. The ability of two noninvasive methods of surveillance, the phleborheograph (PRG) and the /sup 125/I fibrinogen scan to detect deep venous thrombosis was determined by comparison with prospective bilateral lower extremity venograms. In addition, the therapeutic impact, both beneficial and detrimental, of low dose heparin, 5000 units administered subcutaneously two hours prior to and every eight hours after operation was determined in a double blind study. The sensitivity of the PRG and /sup 125/I fibrinogen scan were both 20%. There were five deep venous thrombi, and two pulmonary emboli for a combined incidence of DVT of 13.6% for the entire patient population. However, there was no significant difference in the incidence of DVT between the two groups. The heparin-treated patients had an increased total volume (796 +/- 516 versus 388 +/- 208 ml; p less than 0.05), and duration of wound drainage (9 +/- 4 versus 13 +/- 6 days; p less than 0.05).

  9. Deep venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing inguinal lymph node dissection for melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Arbeit, J.M.; Lowry, S.F.; Line, B.R.

    1981-11-01

    Deep venous thromboembolism (DVT) was studied in 44 patients with clinical Stage I, II, and III melanoma undergoing staging and therapeutic inguinal lymph node dissection. The ability of two noninvasive methods of surveillance, the phleborheograph (PRG) and the /sup 125/I fibrinogen scan to detect deep venous thrombosis was determined by comparison with prospective bilateral lower extremity venograms. In addition, the therapeutic impact, both beneficial and detrimental, of low dose heparin, 5000 units administered subcutaneously two hours prior to and every eight hours after operation was determined in a double blind study. The sensitivity of the PRG and /sup 125/I fibrinogen scan were both 20%. There were five deep venous thrombi, and two pulmonary emboli for a combined incidence of DVT of 13.6% for the entire patient population. However, there was no significant difference in the incidence of DVT between the two groups. The heparin-treated patients had an increased total volume (796 +/- 516 versus 388 +/- 208 ml; p < 0.05), and duration of wound drainage (9 +/- 4 versus 13 +/- 6 days; p < 0.05).

  10. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients with Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Delomez, Maxence; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Willoteaux, Serge; Bauchart, Jean-Jacques; D'Othee, Bertrand Janne; Asseman, Philippe; Perez, Nessim; Thery, Claude

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To report our experience with mechanical thrombectomy in proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT).Methods: Eighteen patients with a mean ({+-} SD) age of 37.6 {+-} 16.1 years who presented with DVT in the iliac and femoral vein (n = 3), inferior vena cava (n = 5), or inferior vena cava and iliac vein (n = 10), were treated with the Amplatz Thrombectomy Device after insertion of a temporary caval filter.Results: Successful recanalization was achieved in 15 of 18 patients (83%). Overall, the percentage of thrombus removed was 66 {+-} 29%: 73 {+-} 30% at caval level and 55 {+-} 36% at iliofemoral level. Complementary interventions (seven patients) were balloon angioplasty (n = 2), angioplasty and stenting (n = 2), thrombo-aspiration alone (n = 1), thrombo-aspiration, balloon angioplasty, and permanent filter (n = 1), and permanent filter alone (n = 1). There was one in-hospital death. Follow-up was obtained at a mean of 29.6 months; three patients had died (two cancers, one myocardial infarction); 10 had no or minimal sequelae; one had post-phlebitic limb.Conclusion: Mechanical thrombectomy is a potential therapeutic option in patients presenting with proximal DVT.

  11. Deep venous thrombosis: The valve cusp hypoxia thesis and its incompatibility with modern orthodoxy.

    PubMed

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    The valve cusp hypoxia thesis (VCHT) of the aetiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was adumbrated in this journal in 1977 and fully articulated in 2008, the original hypothesis having been strongly corroborated by experiments published in 1981 and 1984. It presents a unitary account of the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis and embolism that is rooted in the pathophysiological tradition of Hunter, Virchow, Lister, Welch and Aschoff, a tradition traceable back to Harvey. In this paper we summarise the thesis in its mature form, consider its compatibility with recent advances in the DVT field, and ask why it has not yet been assimilated into the mainstream literature, which during the past half century has been dominated by a haematology-orientated 'consensus model'. We identify and discuss seven ways in which the VCHT is incompatible with these mainstream beliefs about the aetiology of venous thrombosis, drawing attention to: (1) the spurious nature of 'Virchow's triad'; (2) the crucial differences between 'venous thrombus' and 'clot'; the facts that (3) venous thrombi form in the valve pockets (VVPs), (4) DVT is not a primarily haematological condition, (5) the so-called 'thrombophilias' are not thrombogenic per se; (6) the conflict between the single unitary aetiology of DVT and the tacit assumption that the condition is 'multicausal'; (7) the inability of anticoagulants to prevent the initiation of venous thrombogenesis, though they do prevent the growth of thrombi to clinically significant size. In discussing point (7), we show that the VCHT indicates new approaches to mechanical prophylaxis against DVT. These approaches are then formulated as experimentally testable hypotheses, and we suggest methods for testing them preclinically using animal trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Compressive hematoma and deep arteriovenous malformation: Emergency endovascular occlusion via a venous approach with surgical evacuation of the hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Yves; Sachet, Marina; Cattet, Florian; Lonjon, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Compressive hematoma associated with deep arterio-venous malformation is a difficult surgery. Arterial presurgical embolization is often indicated but rarely effective. Endovascular occlusion via a venous approach is a technique that has recently been undertaken successfully to treat certain types of sub-pial vascular malformation. The venous endovascular approach has succeeded in a 20-year-old man of who presented with a compressive hematoma due to rupture of a deep arteriovenous malformation. By fully endovascular occlusion, the surgery consisted of surgical removal of the hematoma, with reduced cortical damage. PMID:26825136

  13. Compressive hematoma and deep arteriovenous malformation: Emergency endovascular occlusion via a venous approach with surgical evacuation of the hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sedat, Jacques; Chau, Yves; Sachet, Marina; Cattet, Florian; Lonjon, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Compressive hematoma associated with deep arterio-venous malformation is a difficult surgery. Arterial presurgical embolization is often indicated but rarely effective. Endovascular occlusion via a venous approach is a technique that has recently been undertaken successfully to treat certain types of sub-pial vascular malformation. The venous endovascular approach has succeeded in a 20-year-old man of who presented with a compressive hematoma due to rupture of a deep arteriovenous malformation. By fully endovascular occlusion, the surgery consisted of surgical removal of the hematoma, with reduced cortical damage.

  14. [Risk factors associated with the severity of pulmonary embolism in patients with acute deep venous thrombosis of lower extremities].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Fuxian; Zhang, Changming; Hu, Lu; Feng, Yaping; Liang, Gangzhu; Niu, Luyuan; Zhang, Huan; Cheng, Long; Qi, Haoshan

    2015-08-01

    To identify the risk factors associated with the severity of pulmonary embolism among patients with deep venous thrombosis of lower extremities. This prospective study enrolled 208 patients with acute deep venous thrombosis to screen for pulmonary embolism between July 2010 and July 2012 in Beijing Shijitan Hospital. There were 101 male and 107 female patients, with a mean age of (59 ± 16) years. Gender, age, extension, side of lower extremities of deep venous thrombosis was analyzed by χ² test. Ordinal Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors associated with severity of pulmonary embolism. There were 83 patients with iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis, 102 patients with femoropopliteal and 23 patients with calf deep venous thrombosis. Pulmonary embolism was detected in 70 patients with the incidence of 33.7%. Pulmonary embolism was significantly correlated with extension (χ² = 17.286, P = 0.004) and sides (χ² = 15.602, P = 0.008) of deep venous thrombosis, not with age (χ² = 7.099, P = 0.260), gender (χ² = 7.014, P = 0.067), thrombotic risk factors (χ² = 3.335, P = 0.345) in univariate analysis. Results of multivariate ordinal logistic regression showed that iliofemoral vein thrombosis (OR = 6.172, 95% CI: 1.590 to 23.975, P = 0.009) and bilateral venous thrombosis (OR = 7.140, 95% CI: 2.406 to 24.730, P = 0.001) are associated with more serious pulmonary embolism. Incidence of pulmonary embolism is still high in patients with deep venous thrombosis. Extensive iliofemoral and bilateral vein thrombosis may increase risk of severity of pulmonary embolism. Clinicians should pay more attention to these high-risk patients.

  15. A Rare Occurrence of Simultaneous Venous and Arterial Thromboembolic Events – Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Thromboembolism as Initial Presentation in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kutiyal, Aditya S.; Dharmshaktu, Pramila; Kataria, Babita; Garg, Abhilasha

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute myeloid leukemia has been attributed to various factors, including hereditary, radiation, drugs, and certain occupational exposures. The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolism events is well established. Here, we present a case of a 70-year-old Indian man who had presented with arterial and venous thrombosis, and the patient was later diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In our case, the patient presented with right lower limb deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism four months prior to the diagnosis of APL. Although thromboembolic event subsequent to the diagnosis of malignancy, and especially during the chemotherapy has been widely reported, this prior presentation with simultaneous occurrence of both venous and arterial thromboembolism has rarely been reported. We take this opportunity to state the significance of a complete medical evaluation in cases of recurrent or unusual thrombotic events. PMID:26949347

  16. Postpartum Ovarian Vein Thrombophlebitis with Staphylococcal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Parino, Eduardo; Mulinaris, Eric; Saccomano, Edgardo; Gallo, Juan Cruz; Kohan, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old female patient presented with fever and right flank pain ten days after uncomplicated vaginal delivery. CT examination revealed right ovarian vein thrombosis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated from blood cultures. No other source of bacteremia was found. Antibiotic therapy and anticoagulation with enoxaparin were instituted. Fourteen days after admission, she was discharged in good condition. Although a very uncommon complication after spontaneous vaginal delivery, septic ovarian vein thrombophlebitis should be suspected in cases of persistent puerperal fever when other diagnostic possibilities have been excluded. PMID:26221549

  17. The use of intravenous cannulae and the occurrence of thrombophlebitis.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, P J; de Herder-Swinkels, J M; Moffie, B G; van den Berg, W H; Hermans, J

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of thrombophlebitis in a coronary care unit was studied in relation to the use of short plastic intravenous cannulae. The incidence of thrombophlebitis was 51% in cases where cannulae were used for continuous infusion of glucose 5% and 13% for cannulae which were locked after the injection of heparin. Only one case of infectious thrombophlebitis was seen. The other cases of thrombophlebitis had a chemical or mechanical aetiology. Replacement of glucose 5% by a NaCl 0.9% solution for continuous infusion reduced the incidence of thrombophlebitis to 33%. Heparin-locked cannulae, to provide rapid access to the patient's circulation, proved to be a safe alternative to continuous infusion.

  18. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-ran

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Material/Methods Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. Results The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). Conclusions Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  19. Evidence for Extending the Duration of Chemoprophylaxis following Free Flap Harvest from the Lower Extremity: Prospective Screening for Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rau, Aline S; Harry, Brian L; Leem, Ted H; Song, John I; Deleyiannis, Frederic W-B

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic deep venous thrombosis in patients undergoing harvest of a free flap from the lower extremity who were receiving standard chemoprophylaxis while hospitalized. A retrospective review of 65 consecutive patients undergoing surgery between 2011 and 2013 was performed to determine the incidence of symptomatic deep venous thrombosis. These patients were screened for deep venous thrombosis based on development of symptoms. Prospective evaluation of a similar consecutive population of 37 patients between 2014 and 2015 was then performed to determine the incidence of asymptomatic deep venous thrombosis. These patients underwent routine duplex ultrasonography of both legs at postoperative weeks 1 and 4. Symptomatic deep venous thrombosis occurred in 2.9 percent of all patients. In the prospective cohort, 8.1 percent of the patients were found to have an acute deep venous thrombosis by postoperative week 1. At postoperative week 4, 16.7 percent of the patients developed a new, acute deep venous thrombosis. The estimated costs of screening and treating deep venous thrombosis in the retrospective group and the prospective group were $222 and $2259, respectively. The cost of routine chemoprophylaxis without duplex screening for an additional 14 days after discharge was $125 per patient. The rate of asymptomatic deep venous thrombosis may be much higher than previously appreciated in this population of very high-risk patients, especially during the 2 weeks after discharge. Extending the duration of chemoprophylaxis to 4 weeks after surgery may be warranted. Therapeutic, IV.

  20. Diagnostic methods for deep vein thrombosis: venous Doppler examination, phleborheography, iodine-125 fibrinogen uptake, and phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Comerota, A.J.; White, J.V.; Katz, M.L.

    1985-10-08

    Since clinical diagnosis of DVT is often inaccurate, it has become accepted that an objective means of diagnosing clot in the deep venous system becomes critically important in the management of these patients. The venous Doppler examination monitors the velocity of blood flowing through a particular vein. Doppler probes in the 5 to 10 mHz range are routinely used. Respiratory variation is a normal finding due to a diminished flow signal during inspiration, followed by a progressive increase in flow signal during expiration. Characteristics of the spontaneous flow signals are the most important part of interpreting the venous Doppler examination. In addition, the response to distal or proximal compression (augmentation) adds important information to the interpretation; however, the response during any augmentation maneuver depends on the rapidity of compression, the force of compression, the quantity of blood in the veins at the time of compression, and the distance between the Doppler probe and the compression point. Phleborheography is a six-channel volumetric plethysmographic technique that monitors volume changes in the lower extremities associated with respiration and foot and calf compression.

  1. Fibrin d-dimer concentration, deep vein thrombosis symptom duration, and venous thrombus volume.

    PubMed

    Kurklinsky, Andrew K; Kalsi, Henna; Wysokinski, Waldemar E; Mauck, Karen F; Bhagra, Anjali; Havyer, Rachel D; Thompson, Carrie A; Hayes, Sharonne N; McBane, Robert D

    2011-04-01

    To determine the relationship between fibrin D-dimer levels, symptom duration, and thrombus volume, consecutive patients with incident deep venous thrombosis (DVT) were evaluated. In a cross-sectional study design, patient symptom onset was determined by careful patient questioning. Venous thrombosis was confirmed by compression duplex ultrasonography. Thrombus volume was estimated based on patient's femur length using a forensic anthropology method. Fibrin D-dimer was measured by latex immunoassay. 72 consecutive patients with confirmed leg DVT agreed to participate. The median symptom duration at the time of diagnosis was 10 days. The median D-dimer concentration was 1050 ng/dL. The median thrombus volume was 12.92 cm(3). D-Dimer levels correlated with estimated thrombus volume (P < .0006 CI 0.12-0.41; R(2) (adjusted) = .15) but not symptom duration, patient's age, or gender. Despite varying symptom duration prior to diagnosis, fibrin D-dimer remains a sensitive measure of venous thrombosis and correlates with thrombus volume.

  2. Deep vein thrombosis after spine operation in prone position with subclavian venous catheterization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Kyung; Han, Jin Hee; Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Keon Sik

    2014-07-01

    We experienced a case of deep vein thrombosis after spine surgery in the prone position with a central venous catheter (CVC). Posterior lumbar interbody fusion was performed on a 73-year-old female patient who was diagnosed with spinal stenosis. Accordingly, in the operation room under general anesthesia, two-lumen CVC were inserted into the left subclavian vein. The surgery was performed in the prone position with a Wilson frame. On the next day, there was a sudden occurrence of severe edema in the patient's left arm. By ultrasonography and computed tomography scanning, extensive deep vein thrombosis was observed in the left subclavian vein. The existence of a factor affecting blood flow such as the prone position may increase the risk of thrombus formation. Therefore, careful perioperative evaluation should be implemented.

  3. Placement of a Retrievable Guenther Tulip Filter in the Superior Vena Cava for Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nadkarni, Sanjay; Macdonald, Sumaira; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2002-12-15

    A retrievable Guenther Tulip caval filter(William Cook, Europe) was successfully placed and retrieved in the superior vena cava for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman. Bilateral subclavian and internal jugular venous thromboses thought secondary to placement of multiple central venous catheters were present. There have been reports of the use of permanent Greenfield filters and a single case report of a temporary filter in the superior vena cava. As far as we are aware this is the first reported placement and successful retrieval of a filter in these circumstances.

  4. Intravenous pressure changes in patients with postthrombotic deep venous obstruction: results using a treadmill stress test.

    PubMed

    Kurstjens, R L M; de Wolf, M A F; Konijn, H W; Toonder, I M; Nelemans, P J; de Graaf, R; Wittens, C H A

    2016-06-01

    Essentials Little is known about the hemodynamic consequences of deep venous obstructive disease. We investigated pressure changes in 22 patients with unilateral postthrombotic obstruction. Common femoral vein pressure significantly increased after walking, compared to control limbs. Common femoral vein hypertension could explain the debilitating effect of venous claudication. Click to hear Dr Ten Cate's perspective on postthrombotic syndrome Background Little is known about the hemodynamic consequences of deep venous obstructive disease. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic effect of postthrombotic obstruction of the iliofemoral veins and to determine what pressure parameters differentiate best between limbs with post-thrombotic obstructive disease of the iliofemoral veins and those without obstruction. Methods Twenty-two participants with unilateral obstruction of the iliac and common femoral veins underwent a standardized treadmill test with simultaneous bilateral invasive pressure measurements in the common femoral vein and dorsal foot vein. Results Mean age was 42.8 ± 11.9 years and 86.4% of participants were female. Postthrombotic limbs showed a mean common femoral vein (CFV) pressure increase of 28.1 ± 21.0 mmHg after walking, compared with 2.1 ± 6.2 mmHg in control limbs (26.0 mmHg difference; 95% confidence interval [CI], 17.1-34.9). Less difference was observed in the dorsal foot vein (net drop of 36.8 ± 22.7 mmHg in affected limbs vs. 48.7 ± 23.1 mmHg in non-affected limbs, 11.9 mmHg difference; 95% CI, -1.3 to 25.0). Change in CFV pressure after walking yielded the best discrimination between affected and non-affected limbs (area under the receiver operated characteristic curve of 0.94 [95% CI, 0.85-1.00], compared with 0.57 [95% CI, 0.37-0.76] in the dorsal foot vein, P < 0.001). Conclusions Common femoral vein pressure significantly increases during ambulation in patients with iliofemoral

  5. The use of micro-/milli-fluidics to better understand the mechanisms behind deep venous thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Zoe; Alexiadis, Alessio; Brill, Alexander; Nash, Gerard; Vigolo, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a dangerous and painful condition in which blood clots form in deep veins (e.g., femoral vein). If these clots become unstable and detach from the thrombus they can be delivered to the lungs resulting in a life threatening complication called pulmonary embolism (PE). Mechanisms of clot development in veins remain unclear but researchers suspect that the specific flow patterns in veins, especially around the valve flaps, play a fundamental role. Here we show how it is now possible to mimic the current murine model by developing micro-/milli-fluidic experiments. We exploited a novel detection technique, ghost particle velocimetry (GPV), to analyse the velocity profiles for various geometries. These vary from regular microfluidics with a rectangular cross section with a range of geometries (mimicking the presence of side and back branches in veins, closed side branch and flexible valves) to a more accurate venous representation with a 3D cylindrical geometry obtained by 3D printing. In addition to the GPV experiments, we analysed the flow field developing in these geometries by using computational fluid dynamic simulations to develop a better understanding of the mechanisms behind DVT. ZS gratefully acknowledges financial support from the EPSRC through a studentship from the Sci-Phy-4-Health Centre for Doctoral Training (EP/L016346/1).

  6. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem in the lung, called a pulmonary embolism. Sitting still for a long time can make ...

  7. Lower extremity deep venous thrombosis with fatal pulmonary thromboembolism caused by benign pelvic space-occupying lesions--an overview.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Hannah; Byard, Roger W

    2012-05-01

    Venous stasis predisposes to thrombosis. One hundred and sixty cases of fatal pulmonary thromboembolism were reviewed to determine how many cases had deep venous thromboses associated with venous blood flow reduction caused by external pressure from benign pelvic masses. Three cases were identified, representing 2% of cases overall (3/160): a 44-year-old woman with a large uterine leiomyoma (1048 g); a 74-year-old man with prostatomegaly and bladder distension (containing 1 L of urine); and a 70-year-old man with prostatomegaly and bladder distension (containing 3 L of urine). Although a rare cause of fatal deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, space-occupying pelvic lesions can lead to extrinsic pressure on adjacent veins reducing blood flow and causing stasis and thrombosis. Individuals with large pelvic masses may, therefore, be at increased risk of pulmonary thromboembolism from deep venous thrombosis, particularly in the presence of concurrent risk factors such as immobility, thrombophilias, malignancy, and significant cardiopulmonary disease.

  8. Active Ankle Movements Prevent Formation of Lower-Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis After Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Guan, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Rui; Li, Bin; Ning, Bo; Su, Wei; Sun, Tao; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the preventive value of active ankle movements in the formation of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), attempting to develop a new method for rehabilitation nursing after orthopedic surgery. Material/Methods We randomly assigned 193 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the lower limbs into a case group (n=96) and a control group (n=97). The control group received routine nursing while the case group performed active ankle movements in addition to receiving routine nursing. Maximum venous outflow (MVO), maximum venous capacity (MVC), and blood rheology were measured and the incidence of DVT was recorded. Results On the 11th and 14th days of the experiment, the case group had significantly higher MVO and MVC than the control group (all P<0.05). The whole-blood viscosity at high shear rate and the plasma viscosity were significantly lower in the case group than in the control group on the 14th day (both P<0.05). During the experiment, a significantly higher overall DVT incidence was recorded in the control group (8 with asymptomatic DVT) compared with the case group (1 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.034). During follow-up, the case group presented a significantly lower DVT incidence (1 with symptomatic DVT and 4 with asymptomatic DVT) than in the control group (5 with symptomatic DVT and 10 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.031). Conclusions Through increasing MVO and MVC and reducing blood rheology, active ankle movements may prevent the formation of lower-extremity DVT after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27600467

  9. Sonographic and Clinical Features of Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis in Critical Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blaivas, Michael; Stefanidis, Konstantinos; Nanas, Serafim; Poularas, John; Wachtel, Mitchell; Cohen, Rubin; Karakitsos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Background-Aim. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) is an increasingly recognized problem in the critically ill. We sought to identify the prevalence of and risk factors for UEDVT, and to characterize sonographically detected thrombi in the critical care setting. Patients and Methods. Three hundred and twenty patients receiving a subclavian or internal jugular central venous catheter (CVC) were included. When an UEDVT was detected, therapeutic anticoagulation was started. Additionally, a standardized ultrasound scan was performed to detect the extent of the thrombus. Images were interpreted offline by two independent readers. Results. Thirty-six (11.25%) patients had UEDVT and a complete scan was performed. One (2.7%) of these patients died, and 2 had pulmonary embolism (5.5%). Risk factors associated with UEDVT were presence of CVC [(odds ratio (OR) 2.716, P = 0.007)], malignancy (OR 1.483, P = 0.036), total parenteral nutrition (OR 1.399, P = 0.035), hypercoagulable state (OR 1.284, P = 0.045), and obesity (OR 1.191, P = 0.049). Eight thrombi were chronic, and 28 were acute. We describe a new sonographic sign which characterized acute thrombosis: a double hyperechoic line at the interface between the thrombus and the venous wall; but its clinical significance remains to be defined. Conclusion. Presence of CVC was a strong predictor for the development of UEDVT in a cohort of critical care patients; however, the rate of subsequent PE and related mortality was low. PMID:22655181

  10. Effects of walking in deep venous thrombosis: a new integrated solid and fluid mechanics model.

    PubMed

    López, Josep M; Fortuny, Gerard; Puigjaner, Dolors; Herrero, Joan; Marimon, Francesc; Garcia-Bennett, Josep

    2016-08-09

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common disease. Large thrombi in venous vessels cause bad blood circulation and pain; and when a blood clot detaches from a vein wall, it causes an embolism whose consequences range from mild to fatal. Walking is recommended to DVT patients as a therapeutical complement. In this study the mechanical effects of walking on a specific patient of DVT were simulated by means of an unprecedented integration of 3 elements: a real geometry, a biomechanical model of body tissues, and a computational fluid dynamics study. A set of computed tomography images of a patient's leg with a thrombus in the popliteal vein was employed to reconstruct a geometry model. Then a biomechanical model was used to compute the new deformed geometry of the vein as a function of the fiber stretch level of the semimembranosus muscle. Finally, a computational fluid dynamics study was performed to compute the blood flow and the wall shear stress (WSS) at the vein and thrombus walls. Calculations showed that either a lengthening or shortening of the semimembranosus muscle led to a decrease of WSS levels up to 10%. Notwithstanding, changes in blood viscosity properties or blood flow rate may easily have a greater impact in WSS.

  11. Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolus after ovarian hyperstimulation.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Anne Catherine Miller; McLean, Anna Warszawa; Ahari, Jalil

    2016-08-16

    A healthy female presented with upper extremity (UE) swelling of several days duration. Admission laboratories were normal except for an elevated D-dimer. An UE ultrasound with Doppler revealed a thrombus in the right subclavian vein. A subsequent chest CT angiogram further characterised the subclavian vein thrombus and also identified a pulmonary embolus. A thorough history and laboratory evaluation showed that her only risk factors were long-time contraceptive pills and a recent cycle of ovarian hyperstimulation (OH) 7 weeks prior to presentation. Anticoagulation treatment was started and the patient's remaining outpatient work-up was negative for all other hereditary causes. A complete anatomic work-up showed bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). A review of the literature on the occurrence of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis suggests that these usually occur in the presence of a predisposing factor, including catheters, indwelling devices and active malignancies. OH has been shown to precipitate venous thromboembolism events; however, the diagnosis of bilateral TOS as a predisposing risk factor has not been described in a patient who had recently undergone recent OH and in one who was not actively pregnant. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Quantitative ultrasound venous valve movement: early diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhd Suberi, Anis Azwani; Wan Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani; Tomari, Razali; Ibrahim, Nabilah

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an in-depth analysis of computer aided system for the early diagnosis of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). Normally, patients are diagnosed with DVT through ultrasound examination after they have a serious complication. Thus, this study proposes a new approach to reduce the risk of recurrent DVT by tracking the venous valve movement behaviour. Inspired by image processing technology, several image processing methods namely, image enhancement, segmentation and morphological have been implemented to improve the image quality for further tracking procedure. In segmentation, Otsu thresholding provides a significant result in segmenting valve structure. Subsequently, morphological dilation method is able to enhance the region shape of the valve distinctly and precisely. Lastly, image subtraction method is presented and evaluated to track the valve movement. Based on the experimental results the normal range of valve velocity lies within the range of blood flow velocity (Vb) and occasionally may result in higher values.

  13. Decision-theoretic refinement planning in medical decision making: management of acute deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Haddawy, P; Doan, A; Kahn, C E

    1996-01-01

    Decision-theoretic refinement planning is a new technique for finding optimal courses of action. The authors sought to determine whether this technique could identify optimal strategies for medical diagnosis and therapy. An existing model of acute deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities was encoded for analysis by the decision-theoretic refinement planning system (DRIPS). The encoding represented 6,206 possible plans. The DRIPS planner used artificial intelligence techniques to eliminate 5,150 plans (83%) from consideration without examining them explicitly. The DRIPS system identified the five strategies that minimized cost and mortality. The authors conclude that decision-theoretic planning is useful for examining large medical-decision problems.

  14. Hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting with multiple organ infiltration and deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Su-jun; Wei, Wei; Chen, Jiang-tao; Tan, Ye-hui; Yu, Cheng-bao; Litzow, Mark Robert; Liu, Qiu-ju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) can be fatal, particularly when eosinophils infiltrate vital organs and/or if extensive thrombosis develops. However there are no standard recommendations for the use of anticoagulant therapy of HES in the setting of thrombosis. Methods: We herein present a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with marked peripheral eosinophilia with symptoms of multi-organ infiltration and extensive deep venous thrombosis (DVT). In this case, evaluation was carried out before the diagnosis was established, and timely standard-dose corticosteroids combined with a new oral anticoagulant (NOAC) therapy were carried out. Results: These measures resulted in a rapid response and long-term disease control. Conclusion: Although there are no data to support which anticoagulant is preferred in this setting, this case indicates that the new oral anticoagulants may play an important role in the treatment of thrombosis in HES. PMID:27583887

  15. The Role of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Deep Venous Thrombosis: Advanced Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Gerard J.

    2011-06-15

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is often managed with a health care pathway that funnels patients to anticoagulation therapy alone. This 'usual treatment' is designed to stop propagation and embolisation of venous thrombus but not remove it. Surgical thrombectomy was once the only option in severe cases in which limbs were threatened, but thrombus removal is no longer restricted to emergency cases. Interventional radiologists are now using advanced endovascular techniques to achieve thrombus removal in a minimally invasive manner in a very short treatment time, thereby quickly restoring patency, relieving acute symptoms, and potentially limiting the subsequent development of postthrombotic syndrome when followed with anticoagulation and compression regimens. This article provides an overview of the interventions available for treating DVT. One of the newer 'single-session' techniques is isolated pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, which is described here in detail with supporting cases.

  16. Emergency Department Management of Suspected Calf-Vein Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Diagnostic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Levi; Lawrence, Matthew; Speicher, Matthew; Frumkin, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Unilateral leg swelling with suspicion of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common emergency department (ED) presentation. Proximal DVT (thrombus in the popliteal or femoral veins) can usually be diagnosed and treated at the initial ED encounter. When proximal DVT has been ruled out, isolated calf-vein deep venous thrombosis (IC-DVT) often remains a consideration. The current standard for the diagnosis of IC-DVT is whole-leg vascular duplex ultrasonography (WLUS), a test that is unavailable in many hospitals outside normal business hours. When WLUS is not available from the ED, recommendations for managing suspected IC-DVT vary. The objectives of the study is to use current evidence and recommendations to (1) propose a diagnostic algorithm for IC-DVT when definitive testing (WLUS) is unavailable; and (2) summarize the controversy surrounding IC-DVT treatment. Discussion The Figure combines D-dimer testing with serial CUS or a single deferred FLUS for the diagnosis of IC-DVT. Such an algorithm has the potential to safely direct the management of suspected IC-DVT when definitive testing is unavailable. Whether or not to treat diagnosed IC-DVT remains widely debated and awaiting further evidence. Conclusion When IC-DVT is not ruled out in the ED, the suggested algorithm, although not prospectively validated by a controlled study, offers an approach to diagnosis that is consistent with current data and recommendations. When IC-DVT is diagnosed, current references suggest that a decision between anticoagulation and continued follow-up outpatient testing can be based on shared decision-making. The risks of proximal progression and life-threatening embolization should be balanced against the generally more benign natural history of such thrombi, and an individual patient’s risk factors for both thrombus propagation and complications of anticoagulation. PMID:27429688

  17. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging of deep venous flow during muscular exercise—preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Voit, Dirk; Dahm, Johannes; Frahm, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate assessment of peripheral venous flow is important for the early diagnosis and treatment of disorders such as deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) which is a major cause of post-thrombotic syndrome or even death due to pulmonary embolism. The aim of this work is to quantitatively determine blood flow in deep veins during rest and muscular exercise using a novel real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for velocity-encoded phase-contrast (PC) MRI at high spatiotemporal resolution. Methods Real-time PC MRI of eight healthy volunteers and one patient was performed at 3 Tesla (Prisma fit, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a flexible 16-channel receive coil (Variety, NORAS, Hoechberg, Germany). Acquisitions were based on a highly undersampled radial FLASH sequence with image reconstruction by regularized nonlinear inversion at 0.5×0.5×6 mm3 spatial resolution and 100 ms temporal resolution. Flow was assessed in two cross-sections of the lower leg at the level of the calf muscle and knee using a protocol of 10 s rest, 20 s flexion and extension of the foot, and 10 s rest. Quantitative analyses included through-plane flow in the right posterior tibial, right peroneal and popliteal vein (PC maps) as well as signal intensity changes due to flow and muscle movements (corresponding magnitude images). Results Real-time PC MRI successfully monitored the dynamics of venous flow at high spatiotemporal resolution and clearly demonstrated increased flow in deep veins in response to flexion and extension of the foot. In normal subjects, the maximum velocity (averaged across vessel lumen) during exercise was 9.4±5.7 cm·s−1 for the right peroneal vein, 8.5±4.6 cm·s−1 for the right posterior tibial vein and 17.8±5.8 cm·s−1 for the popliteal vein. The integrated flow volume per exercise (20 s) was 1.9, 1.6 and 50 mL (mean across subjects) for right peroneal, right posterior tibial and popliteal vein, respectively. A patient with DVT presented with

  18. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging of deep venous flow during muscular exercise-preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Arun Antony; Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Voit, Dirk; Dahm, Johannes; Frahm, Jens

    2016-12-01

    The accurate assessment of peripheral venous flow is important for the early diagnosis and treatment of disorders such as deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) which is a major cause of post-thrombotic syndrome or even death due to pulmonary embolism. The aim of this work is to quantitatively determine blood flow in deep veins during rest and muscular exercise using a novel real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for velocity-encoded phase-contrast (PC) MRI at high spatiotemporal resolution. Real-time PC MRI of eight healthy volunteers and one patient was performed at 3 Tesla (Prisma fit, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a flexible 16-channel receive coil (Variety, NORAS, Hoechberg, Germany). Acquisitions were based on a highly undersampled radial FLASH sequence with image reconstruction by regularized nonlinear inversion at 0.5×0.5×6 mm(3) spatial resolution and 100 ms temporal resolution. Flow was assessed in two cross-sections of the lower leg at the level of the calf muscle and knee using a protocol of 10 s rest, 20 s flexion and extension of the foot, and 10 s rest. Quantitative analyses included through-plane flow in the right posterior tibial, right peroneal and popliteal vein (PC maps) as well as signal intensity changes due to flow and muscle movements (corresponding magnitude images). Real-time PC MRI successfully monitored the dynamics of venous flow at high spatiotemporal resolution and clearly demonstrated increased flow in deep veins in response to flexion and extension of the foot. In normal subjects, the maximum velocity (averaged across vessel lumen) during exercise was 9.4±5.7 cm·s(-1) for the right peroneal vein, 8.5±4.6 cm·s(-1) for the right posterior tibial vein and 17.8±5.8 cm·s(-1) for the popliteal vein. The integrated flow volume per exercise (20 s) was 1.9, 1.6 and 50 mL (mean across subjects) for right peroneal, right posterior tibial and popliteal vein, respectively. A patient with DVT presented with peak flow velocities of only

  19. Leiomyosarcoma of the deep femoral vein. A rare cause of venous obstruction in lower limbs and an alternative diagnosis to chronic venous thrombus.

    PubMed

    Gil-Sales, Jose; Vicente, Sandra; Martínez, Nuria; Doblas, Manuel; Orgaz, Antonio; Flores, Angel; Leal, Jose Ignacio; Rodríguez, Rubén; Fontcuberta, Juan; Peinado, Francisco Javier

    2012-10-01

    Primary venous leiomyosarcoma of the extremities is an uncommon, but aggressive, tumoral entity with a high rate of local recurrence and early hematogenous metastasis. In the present article, we report a case of leiomyosarcoma of the vena profunda femoris. This pathology causes deep venous thrombosis-like symptoms. No improvement in lower limb status and a significant and progressive increase in the diameter of the vein as seen using ultrasonography could indicate tumor disease. Particular care must be taken to avoid biopsies due to the possible dissemination. We must complete the medical study with imaging techniques, and the tumor must be removed as soon as possible for histopathological diagnosis. After a follow-up of 12 months, there was no evidence of local or metastatic recurrence in our patient. Copyright © 2012 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Long-term sequelae of deep venous thrombosis of the legs. Experience with mesoglycan].

    PubMed

    Prandoni, P; Cattelan, A M; Carta, M

    1989-01-01

    Ninety consecutive patients, affected by venographically proven deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower limbs, were given full-dose heparin followed by oral anticoagulants for 12 weeks, and then selected randomly to receive, for one year, either mesoglycan (72 mg/day orally) or placebo with a double-blind protocol. All patients wore elastic graduated compression stockings, and were prospectively followed for a period ranging from 5 to 48 months. In each scheduled examination programmed every three months for one year and then twice per year, an accurate clinical evaluation was performed and a predetermined objective score was applied. Furthermore, impedance plethysmography and Doppler ultrasound tests were executed serially to assess the persistence of venous obstruction and/or the development of valve incompetence. After a mean follow-up of 3 years, 80% of the patients were totally asymptomatic, and severe post-thrombotic sequelae (ulcer and/or edema associated with skin induration) were recorded in only 6 patients (6.6%). We failed to identify any correlation between post-thrombotic sequelae and persistence of venous obstruction (as shown by impedance plethysmography) or development of valve incompetence (as shown by Doppler ultrasound test). The behaviour of patients treated with mesoglycan did not differ from that of patients treated with placebo. However, objectively documented recurrences of DVT and/or pulmonary embolism were less frequent in patients treated with mesoglycan (6.6 vs 11.1%, non-significant difference), and the only two deaths attributable to pulmonary embolism occurred among the patients treated with placebo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Analysis of noncatheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis from the RIETE registry.

    PubMed

    Newton, Daniel H; Monreal Bosch, Manuel; Amendola, Michael; Wolfe, Luke; Perez Ductor, Cristina; Lecumberri, Ramón; Levy, Mark M

    2017-01-01

    We sought to determine the risk factors for subsequent bleeding and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) events following isolated noncatheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (non-CA-UEDVT) to better inform future treatment decisions for this group of patients. The RIETE registry (Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica [Computerized Registry of Patients with Venous Thromboembolism]) is a prospective international registry of patients with objectively confirmed symptomatic VTE. Patients with a symptomatic, isolated, proximal UEDVT from March 2001 through March 2015 were analyzed. Any patient with an indwelling catheter or pacemaker lead at the DVT site and at the time of thrombosis was considered to have a CA-UEDVT and was excluded. Patient and treatment characteristics such as age, gender, comorbidities, VTE risk factors, treatment drug, and duration were collected. Outcomes examined included recurrent DVT, subsequent pulmonary embolism (PE), and hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis was performed using stepwise logistic regression. Of the 1100 patients who met the study criteria, 580 (53%) were male. The mean age of the patients was 50 ± 20 years, and overall patient survival at 1 year was 85%. Recurrent VTE occurred in 59 patients (5.4%). Of these, 46 patients (4%) had recurrent DVT, 10 (0.9%) had a PE following UEDVT diagnosis, and 3 (0.3%) had both. PE was fatal in three patients (0.3%). Bleeding occurred in 50 patients (4.5%), major bleeding in 19 patients (1.7%), and fatal bleeding in 6 patients (0.5%). On multivariate analysis, malignant disease was associated with VTE recurrence (odds ratio [OR], 2.00; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-3.45; P < .04), whereas hemorrhage was associated with age (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05; P = .002) and malignant disease (OR, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.34-4.76; P < .005). Hemorrhage and recurrent VTE were also significantly associated (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.16-6.76; P < .03). PE following non

  2. D-dimer screening for deep venous thrombosis in traumatic cervical spinal injuries.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Muneaki; Ueta, Takayoshi; Shiba, Keiichiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-11-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients is a life-threatening comorbidity. Despite its seriousness, prophylaxis and screening for DVT in SCI patients are still not sophisticated. This study aimed to define the epidemiology and incidence of DVT in acute traumatic cervical SCI in a Japanese population, determine the best timing for DVT screening, and determine the optimal D-dimer threshold level for use as an easy and minimally invasive screening tool. This is a prospective clinical study. The patient sample included acute traumatic cervical SCI patients who were admitted to our facility within 2 weeks after injury. Multivariate logistic regression was performed for outcome measure. We enrolled 268 patients (223 men and 45 women), from April 2007 to December 2012. After excluding early drop-out patients, 211 patients remained. Assessment for neurological status and blood chemistry, especially blood coagulation levels (prothrombin time, prothrombin time-international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, and serum D-dimer), was performed every week until 1 month after injury. Ultrasonography was performed for DVT detection every 2 weeks. Deep venous thromboses were detected in 22 patients (10.4% of patients studied). All DVT-positive patients demonstrated severe paralysis classified as C or greater on the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale. Multivariate logistic regression of clinical and laboratory parameters revealed that only the D-dimer level at 2 weeks after injury was an accurate predictor of DVT formation. The optimal threshold of D-dimer for prediction was determined to be 16 μg/dL. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting DVT were 77.3% and 69.2%, respectively. D-dimer levels may be used to predict the likelihood of DVT development in patients with acute cervical SCI. Furthermore, the optimal timing for screening test by D-dimer is 2 weeks after injury, and optimal threshold level for

  3. Predicting venous insufficiency in flaps raised on the deep inferior epigastric system using computed tomography (CT) angiography.

    PubMed

    Wagels, M; Pillay, R; Saylor, A; Vrtik, L; Senewiratne, S

    2015-12-01

    Computed Tomography Angiogram (CTA) has become a routine part of pre-operative assessment of vascular anatomy and design in perforator flaps. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of flap raised on the deep inferior epigastric system (DIES) at our institution in order to identify CTA signs that might predict venous congestion in these flaps. 98 consecutive patients who had 124 DIES flaps raised from 2008 to 2012 were studied. Of these 124 flaps, four (3.2%) developed venous congestion. Our results showed that a Superficial Inferior Epigastric Vein (SIEV) that is larger than the DIEV at origin is highly predictive of congestion (5.2 vs 3.5 mm, p = 0.007). The findings of an axial non-arborising superficial system (96.7% vs 0, p < 0.001), without connection to deep system perforators (38.1 vs 88.8%, p < 0.001) and a type I pedicle were also predictive (75 vs 64.2%, p = 0.22). These results show the importance of CTAs as a pre-operative study for the identification of risk factors for venous compromise, and their use should prompt a robust discussion of the risk of flap failure with patients, and contingency planning to augment venous drainage with the superficial system if required. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anatomic and functional outcomes of pharmacomechanical and catheter-directed thrombolysis of iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hager, Eric; Yuo, Theodore; Avgerinos, Efthymios; Naddaf, Abdullah; Jeyabalan, Geetha; Marone, Luke; Chaer, Rabih

    2014-07-01

    Pharmacomechanical thrombolysis (PMT) and catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) are commonly used for the treatment of iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The purpose of this study was to examine the short- and long-term venous patency and venous valvular function as well as clinical outcomes of patients treated for iliofemoral DVT by PMT and CDT. A retrospective review of all patients with symptomatic DVT treated between 2006 and 2011 with PMT or CDT was performed. All patients were treated by local tissue plasminogen activator delivered with PMT or CDT. Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of initial treatment modality: patients treated by PMT alone (group 1), and those who underwent PMT and CDT or CDT alone (group 2). Group comorbidities, initial presenting symptoms, and Clinical, Etiologic, Anatomic, and Pathologic (CEAP) classification scores were compared. Postprocedural duplex ultrasound was used to assess valve function and treated vein patency rates. At all visits, Villalta and CEAP scores were recorded and compared. Group demographic and procedural results were analyzed by Fisher exact test for dichotomous variables and Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test for the ordinal and continuous data. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates were used to assess preserved valve function as well as primary and secondary patency rates. There were 79 patients with 102 limbs treated for extensive iliofemoral DVT (median age, 51.5 years; range, 16.6-83.8 years). There were 18 patients in group 1 and 61 patients in group 2 (PMT + CDT [n = 54] or CDT alone [n = 7]). There were no differences in demographics or comorbidities between groups aside from malignant disease, which was more common in group 1 (35.3% vs 11.5%; P = .03). A total of 102 limbs were analyzed, 24 in group 1 and 78 in group 2. Patients in group 1 had a shorter symptom duration compared with group 2 (7 days vs 16 days; P = .011). The median number of procedures in group 1

  5. Ultrasound-guided deep-arm veins insertion of long peripheral catheters in patients with difficult venous access after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Adam; Dreas, Lorella; Sanson, Gianfranco

    To analyze success rate, dwell-time, and complications of long peripheral venous catheters (L-PVCs) inserted under ultrasound guidance. In difficult venous access (DVA) patients, L-PVC can represent an alternative to central or midline catheters. Prospective observational study. L-PVCs were positioned in DVA patients. The outcome of the cannulation procedure and the times and reasons for catheters removal were analyzed. A 100% placement success rate was documented. The catheter dwell-time was 14.7 ± 11.1 days. Most catheters were removed at end-use in the absence of complications. The rate of catheters appropriately or inappropriately removed before completing the intravenous therapies was 27.7/1000 catheter-days. Two thrombophlebitis (1.91/1000 catheter-days) and 1 catheter-related bloodstream infection (0.96/1000 catheter-days) occurred. L-PVC could be a viable solution in DVA patients, as it may reduce the need for multiple vein punctures, patients' discomfort, and nursing workload. A better adherence to catheter management recommendations should further reduce complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnosis and management of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Monagle, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Neonates and children represent a specific population that can suffer from deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). In considering how the diagnosis and management of DVT/PE in neonates and children differs from adults, one has to consider the fundamental differences in the general characteristics of the patient population, the specific differences in the disease entity, the differences in sensitivity or specificity of diagnostic strategies and risk/benefit profile of therapeutic options available, and then finally the practical applications of therapies, using an evidence-based approach. This review will articulate the key differences in the patient population, disease entity, diagnostic strategies, and drug therapies that must be understood to apply a rigorous evidence-based approach to diagnosis and management of DVT and PE in neonates and children. Finally, there will be a brief discussion of the latest American College of Chest Physician guidelines for antithrombotic treatment in neonates and children. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Incidence of cannula associated deep vein thrombosis after veno-venous ECMO.

    PubMed

    Menaker, Jay; Tabatabai, Ali; Rector, Raymond; Dolly, Katelyn; Kufera, Joseph; Lee, Eugenia; Kon, Zachary; Sanchez, Pablo; Pham, Si; Herr, Daniel L; Mazzeffi, Michael; Rabinowitz, Ronald P; OʼConnor, James V; Stein, Deborah M; Scalea, Thomas M

    2017-02-13

    Limited literature regarding the incidence of cannula associated deep vein thrombosis (CaDVT) following veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) exists. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of post decannulation CaDVT and identify any associated risk factors. Forty eight patients were admitted between August 2014 and January 2016 to the Lung Rescue Unit were included in the study. Protocolized anticoagulation levels (partial thromboplastin time 45-55 second) and routine post decannulation DVT screening were in place during the study period. Forty-one (85.4%) patients had CaDVT. Of those with CaDVT, 31 (76%) patients were treated with full anti-coagulation therapy. 34 (76%) patients with right internal jugular cannulation had CaDVT at cannula site. Twenty-five (61%) patients had CaDVT in the lower extremity. (18 associated right femoral vein cannulation; 7 left femoral vein cannulation) 18 (44%) patients had both upper and lower extremity CaDVT. Overall, patients with CaDVT tended to be older, have a higher body mass index (BMI) and on ECMO longer (p=NS). Mean PTT during time on ECMO between patients that did and did not have CaDVT did not differ. No clinical evidence of pulmonary embolism was seen.

  8. Comparison of duplex ultrasonography and venography in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D C; Grasty, M S; Stebbings, W S; Nockler, I B; Lewars, M D; Levison, R A; Wood, R F

    1991-05-01

    Sixty-five patients with suspected deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in 68 limbs were entered consecutively into a study to compare venography with duplex ultrasonography scanning. Both tests were performed on 64 limbs, venography being contraindicated in four. Overall, duplex scanning correctly identified 86 per cent of DVTs diagnosed on venography and correctly excluded 80 per cent with negative venograms. Nearly all errors arose in the diagnosis of calf DVT. In the femoral vein duplex scanning had a specificity of 100 per cent and a sensitivity of 95 per cent. In addition, duplex scanning provided data on the limb not undergoing venography. Of 55 limbs that underwent bilateral duplex scanning, five had thrombus in the femoropopliteal segment and a negative contralateral venogram. In addition, three Baker's cysts were diagnosed. Duplex scanning can be used in patients in whom venography is contraindicated and may also provide information about the contralateral limb. We regard femoropopliteal duplex scanning as sufficiently accurate that treatment can be initiated on the basis of the scan. Duplex scanning should replace venography as the standard method of diagnosing femoropopliteal DVT; radiographic studies should now be required only when the scan result is in doubt.

  9. Design of a HIFU array for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Petr; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-08-01

    Deep venous thrombosis of the iliofemoral veins is a common and morbid disease, with the recommended interventional treatment carrying a high risk of hemorrhaging and complications. High intensity focused ultrasound delivered with a single element transducer has been shown to successfully precipitate thrombolysis non-invasively in vitro and in vivo. However, in all previous studies damage to the veins or surrounding tissue has been observed. Using a simulation model of the human thigh, this study investigated whether a phased array device could overcome the large focal region limitations faced by single transducer treatment devices. Effects of the size, shape and frequency of the array on its focal region were considered. It was found that a λ/2 spaced array of 7680 elements operating at 500 kHz could consistently focus to a region fully contained within the femoral vein. Furthermore, it is possible to reduce the number of elements required by building arrays operating at lower frequencies. The results suggest that phased transducer arrays hold potential for developing a safe, non-invasive treatment of thrombolysis.

  10. Deep venous thrombosis in lap band surgery: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kavin G; Rajan, Derry; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Molmenti, Ernesto P; Coppa, Gene

    2012-04-01

    Bariatric surgery has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for morbid obesity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the incidence of pre- and post-operative deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in Lap-Band surgical patients. This study group comprised 56 consecutive patients who underwent Lap-Band surgery. Mean age and body mass index were 38 years (range: 18-64 years) and 50.9 kg/m(2) (range: 53-74 kg/m(2)), respectively. All the patients were screened with duplex ultrasonography pre- and post-operatively. There were no iliac, femoral, or popliteal vein thromboses detected at any given point of time. No patient had any clinical signs or symptoms of DVT post-operatively. There were no observable differences attributable to DVT prophylaxis. This data suggest that in the setting of chemical and mechanical prophylaxis, the incidence of DVT in patients undergoing Lap-Band surgery at an established bariatric centre is minimal.

  11. Literature search parameters marginally improved the pooled estimate accuracy for ultrasound in detecting deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kassaï, Behrouz; Sonié, Sandrine; Shah, Nirav R; Boissel, Jean-Pierre

    2006-07-01

    Data collection remains of utmost importance to avoid publication bias in systematic reviews. Our objectives were to compare search strategies with and without methodological terms in Medline, to find out how other databases complement Medline, and how these strategies affect the pooled estimates of the accuracy. A study was eligible if it prospectively compared ultrasound to venography for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis in the lower limbs. All relevant articles found with all databases, searched from 1966 through 2003, constitute the reference standard. Sensitivity was defined as the proportion of relevant studies found by Medline searches divided by the total number of articles in the reference standard. Of a total of 1,473 citations, 237 abstracts were included. The sensitivity of strategies without methodological terms was higher (96%) than those with (95%, 76%, and 95%). Searches of multiple databases found seven articles not found with Medline. Searches of congress proceedings (International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis) found three abstracts not published in full. The diagnostic odds ratio OR was 5.66 (95% confidence interval CI = 4.84-6.48) when multiple databases were searched and 5.57 (95% CI = 3.49-7.65) when only English-language articles in Medline were identified. Medline searches combining free text and MeSH terms were more sensitive. Single Medline search affects only marginally the pooled estimate accuracy.

  12. Risk factors for deep venous thrombosis of lower limbs in postoperative neurosurgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Yu, Zongxue; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Jinjun; Jiang, Guixi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To detect the risk factors for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients after neurosurgery. Methods: Three hundred and seventy-six patients treated in the department of neurosurgery of our hospital from February 2013 to November 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. The clinical data including age, gender, hospital stay, operation time, occupation type, hypertension, coronary heart disease, diabetes, smoking status, drinking status, postoperative exercises, malignant tumor, and postoperative hormone or dehydrating agent were collected. Results: In this study, 52 patients were included in the DVT group and 295 patients in the Non-DVT group. There was significant difference in age, hypertension, occupation type, malignant tumors, operation time, smoking status, and postoperative exercises between the two groups (p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in gender, drinking status, coronary heart disease, diabetes, hospital stay, and postoperative hormone or dehydrating agent (p>0.05). In multivariate analysis, age, malignant tumor, hypertension were independent risk factors, while physical labour and postoperative exercises were protective factor for DVT. Conclusion: The postoperative patients with older age, malignant tumor or hypertension should be paid high attention to prevent DVT, and postoperative exercises should be selected as precautionary measures. PMID:27882003

  13. The influence of meteorological variables on the development of deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Helen K; Simpson, A John; Murchison, John T

    2009-10-01

    The influence of weather on deep venous thrombosis (DVT) incidence remains controversial. We aimed to characterize the temporal association between DVT and meteorological variables including atmospheric pressure. Data relating to hospital admissions with DVT in Scotland were collected retrospectively for a 20 year period for which corresponding meteorological recordings were available. Weather variables were calculated as weighted daily averages to adjust for variations in population density. Seasonal variation in DVT and short-term effects of weather variables on the relative risk of developing DVT were assess using Poisson regression modelling. The models allowed for the identification of lag periods between variation in the weather and DVT presentation. A total of 37,336 cases of DVT were recorded. There was significant seasonal variation in DVT with a winter peak. Seasonal variation in wind speed and temperature were significantly associated with seasonal variation in DVT. When studying more immediate meteorological influences, low atmospheric pressure, high wind speed and high rainfall were significantly associated with an increased risk of DVT approximately 9-10 days later. The effect was most strikingly demonstrated for atmospheric pressure, every 10 millibar decrease in pressure being associated with a 2.1% increase in relative risk of DVT. Alterations in weather have a small but significant impact upon the incidence of DVT. DVT is particularly associated with reduction in atmospheric pressure giving weight to the hypothesis that reduced cabin pressure in long haul flights contributes to DVT. These findings have implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of DVT.

  14. Endovascular Thrombolysis Using Monteplase for Non-chronic Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Yoshimatsu, Rika Tanaka, Osamu Miura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of endovascular thrombolysis using monteplase for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Between December 2005 and October 2009, at our institution nine endovascular thrombolysis treatments with monteplase were performed for symptomatic DVT in eight patients (6 women, 2 men; mean age, 56 (range, 15-80) years). In all, systemic anticoagulation administered by the peripheral intravenous route with heparin and/or thrombolysis with urokinase followed by anticoagulation with orally administered warfarin had been performed, and subsequently six endovascular treatments without monteplase were administered. However, DVT persisted, and endovascular treatments with monteplase were tried. In six (67%) of the nine procedures, DVT completely or almost completely disappeared after endovascular thrombolysis with monteplase. Mean dose of monteplase used was 2,170,000 IU. There was only one procedure-related complication. In one patient, just after thrombolysis with monteplase, bleeding at the puncture site and gingival bleeding occurred. Bleeding was stopped by manual astriction only. Endovascular thrombolysis with monteplase may be an effective treatment for DVT, even in cases resistant to traditional systemic anticoagulation and thrombolysis and endovascular procedures without monteplase.

  15. Desmoid Fibromatosis Presenting as Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Case Report and Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Lisa M.; Neuhaus, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 40 Final Diagnosis: Desmoid fibromatosis Symptoms: Discomfort Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgery and radiotherapy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE), comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a common, serious cardiovascular event. Predisposing factors include genetic disorders, immobility, and underlying malignancy. Soft tissue tumors are by contrast rare, but should be included in the differential etiology of DVT, especially when the patient is young and has few thrombotic risk factors. Case Report: We present a 40-year-old patient whose initial diagnosis was spontaneous DVT of the lower leg, treated conventionally. Subsequently, he developed progressive calf swelling, which was diagnosed as multifocal desmoid fibromatosis, a rare and complex soft tissue tumor. Conclusions: DVT is common but soft tissue tumors are rare. The disparity in incidence of these very distinct pathologies may contribute to late diagnosis of occult soft tissue pathology. We discuss the incidence, etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and best management of both desmoid fibromatosis and DVT, which may co-exist in a causative way. PMID:27994217

  16. A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin to prevent deep venous thrombosis after elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Steve; Waddell, James P.; Cardella, Piera; Morton, Jane

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a short course of low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin) in the prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after elective total hip replacement. Design A prospective cohort study. Follow-up was a minimum of 3 months. Setting An acute-care hospital with a large-volume practice of elective total joint replacement. Patients A prospective group of 150 patients who required primary total hip arthroplasty and a historic control group of 150 patients. All patients were treated with compression stockings, indomethacin and early mobilization. The treatment group received low-molecular-weight heparin, 30 mg every 12 hours for 5 days postoperatively; the control group received no specific anticoagulant therapy. Interventions Total hip replacement. Doppler venography on postoperative day 5 and 2 to 5 days later if required. Main outcome measures Presence or absence of deep venous thrombosis. Wound hemorrhage, transfusion rate, number of units of blood transfused and changes in the hemoglobin level. Results The incidence of proximal deep venous thrombosis (popliteal vein to common iliac vein) was 0% in the treatment group versus 4% in the control group. There was no difference in bleeding or number of transfusions required. There was, however, a significant (p = 0.005) drop in hemoglobin level in the treatment group. Conclusions A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin provides effective protection against proximal deep venous thrombosis without significantly increasing the risk to the patient. The treatment is compatible with early patient discharge and the pharmacologic prevention of heterotopic ossification after total joint replacement. PMID:9126125

  17. Deep venous thrombosis: a new task for primary health care. A randomised economic study of outpatient and inpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Bäckman, Karin; Carlsson, Per; Kentson, Magnus; Hansen, Sören; Engquist, Leif; Hallert, Claes

    2004-03-01

    A health economic evaluation of two alternative treatment settings, inpatient care and outpatient care, for acute deep venous thrombosis. A randomised multicentre trial in a defined population in regular clinical practice. Hospitals and related health care centres in the Jönköping county council in Sweden. Patients were randomised to either an inpatient strategy (n = 66) or an outpatient strategy (n = 65) using low-molecular-weight heparin, dalteparin, administered subcutaneously once daily and adjusted for body weight. Of 224 eligible patients, 131 entered the trial and 124 completed the economic part of the study. Direct medical and direct non-medical costs during a 3-month period. Total direct costs were higher for those in the inpatient strategy group, i.e. Swedish Crowns (SEK) 16400 per patient (Euro 1899) compared to SEK 12100 per patient (Euro 1405) in the outpatient strategy group (p < 0.001). More patients in the outpatient group received assistance when they returned home. Few patients in either group reported sick leave. There was no difference in total number of days between the two groups. Total direct costs were significantly lower for the outpatient treatment strategy for deep venous thrombosis compared to the inpatient treatment strategy. No significant difference in health impact could be detected. Deep venous thrombosis can to a greater extent than previously be treated in primary care, safely, at a lower cost, and in accordance with patient preferences.

  18. Posterolateral thigh perforator varicosities in 12 patients: a normal deep venous system and successful treatment with ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    van Neer, Pierre; Veraart, Joep C J M; Neumann, Hamartino

    2006-11-01

    To determine whether in patients with posterolateral thigh perforator (PLTP) varicosities ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy (USGS) is successful and to determine any deep venous anomaly. Twelve consecutive patients with PLTP varicosities were investigated and treated. In this prospective intervention study USGS of the PLTP with polidocanol microfoam 1-2% was performed with a maximal number of three treatments. Clinical pictures and Duplex imaging were performed before and after treatment. Ascending phlebography was performed in 9 patients. Ten patients showed a marked success, defined as no PLTP varicosities visible and no reflux detectable. In 2 patients there was moderate success. The mean number of treatments was 1.58, the mean diameter of the PLTP vein was reduced from 4.06 (range, 2.2-6.1) to 1.97 (range, 0-3.3) mm (p=0.003, Wilcoxon signed rank test). No serious side effects were noted. No deep venous anomaly was found in the phlebographic study. In patients with PLTP varicosities, USGS is very successful, with very few side effects. No deep venous anomalies were found in our study, which conforms to the literature.

  19. Association of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR-677 and MTHFR-1298) Genetic Polymorphisms with Occlusive Artery Disease and Deep Venous Thrombosis in Macedonians

    PubMed Central

    Spiroski, Igor; Kedev, Sashko; Antov, Slobodan; Arsov, Todor; Krstevska, Marija; Dzhekova-Stojkova, Sloboda; Kostovska, Stojanka; Trajkov, Dejan; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Strezova, Ana; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Spiroski, Mirko

    2008-01-01

    Aim To analyze the association of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms (MTHFR-677 and MTHFR-1298) with occlusive artery disease and deep venous thrombosis in Macedonians. Methods We examined 83 healthy respondents, 76 patients with occlusive artery disease, and 67 patients with deep venous thrombosis. Blood samples were collected and DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes. Identification of MTHFR mutations was done with CVD StripAssay (ViennaLab, Labordiagnostika GmbH, Vienna, Austria) and the population genetics analysis package, PyPop, was used for the analysis. Pearson P values, crude odds ratio, and Wald’s 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results The frequency of C alleles of MTHFR-677 was 0.575 in patients with deep venous thrombosis, 0.612 in patients with occlusive artery disease, and 0.645 in healthy participants. The frequency of T allele of MTHFR-677 was lower in healthy participants (0.355) than in patients with occlusive artery disease (0.388) and deep venous thrombosis (0.425). The frequency of A allele for MTHFR-1298 was 0.729 in healthy participants, 0.770 in patients with occlusive artery disease, and 0.746 in patients with deep venous thrombosis. The frequency of C allele of MTHFR-1298 was 0.271 in healthy participants, 0.230 in patients with occlusive artery disease, and 0.425 in patients with deep venous thrombosis. No association of MTHFR-677 and MTHFR-1289 polymorphisms with occlusive artery disease and deep venous thrombosis was found, except for the protective effect of MTHFR/CA:CC diplotype for occlusive artery disease. Conclusion We could not confirm a significant association of MTHFR-677 and MTHFR-1289 polymorphisms with occlusive artery disease or deep venous thrombosis in Macedonians, except for the protective effect of MTHFR/CA:CC diplotype against occlusive artery disease. PMID:18293456

  20. [Risk factors for infection in total knee artrhoplasty, including previously unreported intraoperative fracture and deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    de Dios, M; Cordero-Ampuero, J

    2015-01-01

    To carry out a statistical analysis on the significant risk factors for deep late infection (prosthetic joint infection, PJI) in patients with a knee arthroplasty (TKA). A retrospective observational case-control study was conducted on a case series of 32 consecutive knee infections, using an analysis of all the risk factors reported in the literature. A control series of 100 randomly selected patients operated in the same Department of a University General Hospital during the same period of time, with no sign of deep infection in their knee arthroplasty during follow-up. Statistical comparisons were made using Pearson for qualitative and ANOVA for quantitative variables. The significant (p>0.05) factors found in the series were: Preoperative previous knee surgery, glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, inflammatory arthritis. prolonged surgical time, inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis, intraoperative fractures. Postoperative secretion of the wound longer than 10 days, deep palpable haematoma, need for a new surgery, and deep venous thrombosis in lower limbs. Distant infections cutaneous, generalized sepsis, urinary tract, pneumonia, abdominal. This is the first report of intraoperative fractures and deep venous thrombosis as significantly more frequent factors in infected TKAs. Other previously described risk factors for TKA PJI are also confirmed. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Air travel-related symptomatic deep venous thrombosis in cruise ship passengers.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyk, Wojciech S

    2016-01-01

    Long air travel is a risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The aim of the study was to report the occurrence of symptomatic DVT cases in cruise ship passengers after long haul flights and to discuss applied diagnostic methods. A retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients diagnosed with DVT in medical facility of the passenger ship was performed. On the basis of clinical examinations, B-mode ultrasound scans of the lower extremity venous systems, international normalised ratio (INR) tests, working diagnoses of DVT were established. The Wells score was used for stratification. Within 4-48 h of the diagnosis, D-dimer tests in blood, ultrasound Duplex examinations and specialists' consultations of DVT suspected patients were performed ashore. A study showed 3 (0.15%) patients suspected of DVT of a total number of 2,007 passengers who have completed a flight > 8 h in the analysed period. The medial time from the embarkation to the onset of symptoms was 68.7 h. Based on the Wells DVT score, in 2 (0.1%) patients the probability of DVT was determined to be likely. Both the ultrasound examinations and D-dimer tests were positive. Those patients were diagnosed by shore specialists as DVT. One (0.05%) patient determined as DVT unlikely according to the Wells scale, her INR indicated hypercoagulable state, but Duplex scan as well D-dimer test were negative and DVT suspicion was excluded. A clinical suspicion of DVT among passengers who joined the ship after their long haul flights could be an important diagnostic problem for ship's doctors. The Wells scale allows to stratify the risk, but to rule out suspicion of DVT, a negative result of D-dimer test must be demonstrated. A portable ultrasound device helps in onboard clinical evaluation of DVT suspected patients. Due to possible fatal complications of DVT which can lead to pulmonary embolism and cause medico-legal issues, a definitive diagnosis should only be obtained in cooperation with land

  2. Comparison of skin and muscle biopsies before and after pentoxifylline treatment in patients with leg ulcers due to deep venous incompetence.

    PubMed

    Angelides, N S; von der Ahe, C W; Themistocleus, P

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the possible mechanisms by which deep venous insufficiency and venous hypertension are associated with trophic skin changes and ulceration and to explain the therapeutic effect of Pentoxifylline in patients with leg ulcers due to deep venous incompetence. Twenty patients were included in this pilot study. They were graded into two groups: group 1, included 10 patients (5 F and 5 M) with deep venous incompetence and normal arteries; group 2, included 10 patients (1 F and 9 M) with deep venous incompetence and moderate arterial disease. Skin and muscle biopsies were carried out before and after the oral administration of 1,200 mg of Pentoxifylline daily (400 mg t.d.s). The following parameters were investigated by means of light microscopy and immunofluorescence tests: engorgement of venous stroma; decrease of intimal elastica; hyaline degeneration; floccular degeneration; pericapillary fibrin deposits and fibrin degradation products; inflammation and fat necrosis; myofibril degeneration; fibrous scar; regeneration and reconstitution of muscle fibres. The results indicated that local inflammation at the ulcer's area cause accumulation of white blood cells in the capillaries and the interstitial fluid, where there is also accumulation of fibrinogen. These changes may lead to chronic tissue ischaemia and ulceration. The known favourable effect of Pentoxifylline on red cells and leucocyte function as well as its lowering effect on plasma fibrinogen level, may be responsible for the observed therapeutic effect of Pentoxifylline on venous leg ulcers.

  3. Radiolabeled tirofiban – a potential radiopharmaceutical for detection of deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Darkovska-Serafimovska, Marija; Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Djorgoski, Icko; Arsova-Sarafinovska, Zorica; Zdravkovska, Milka; Balkanov, Trajan; Ugresic, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using 99mtechnetium (99mTc)-labeled tirofiban (a reversible antagonist of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) for detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in rats without causing an antiplatelet effect. Methods The ability of in vitro tirofiban to inhibit adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was evaluated using optical aggregometer. Binding of 99mTc-tirofiban to platelets was evaluated. Serum levels of unlabeled (a validated high performance liquid chromatography method) and 99mTc-tirofiban after single intravenous injection were evaluated in male Wistar rats with or without induced DVT (femoral vein ligation model), and the rats were also subjected to whole body scintigraphy. Results Tirofiban in vitro inhibits ADP-induced aggregation of human platelets in a dose- and concentration-dependent manner (10 nM to 2 μM), but only if it is added before ADP and not after ADP. 99mTc labeling did not affect the ability of tirofiban to bind to either human or rat platelets, nor did it affect tirofiban pharmacokinetics in intact rats or in animals with induced DVT. When 99mTc-tirofiban was injected to rats after induction of DVT, at a molar dose lower than the one showing only a weak antiaggregatory effect in vitro, whole body scintigraphy indicated localization of 99mTc-tirofiban around the place of the induced DVT. Conclusion 99mTc labeling of tirofiban does not affect its ability to bind to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa or its in vivo pharmacokinetics in rats, either intact or with DVT. A low, nonantiaggregatory dose of 99mTc-tirofiban may be used to visualize DVT at an early stage. PMID:27713618

  4. Management of Venous Thromboembolisms: Part I. The Consensus for Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang-Ling; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Lee, Cheng-Han; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lin, Pao-Yen; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chiu, Kuan-Ming; Huang, Chien-Lung; Lee, Chung-Yi; Lin, Yen-Hung; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Yeh, Hung-I; Chiang, Chern-En; Lin, Shing-Jong; Yeh, San-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a potentially catastrophic condition because thrombosis, left untreated, can result in detrimental pulmonary embolism. Yet in the absence of thrombosis, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding. In the existing literature, knowledge about the epidemiology of DVT is primarily based on investigations among Caucasian populations. There has been little information available about the epidemiology of DVT in Taiwan, and it is generally believed that DVT is less common in Asian patients than in Caucasian patients. However, DVT is a multifactorial disease that represents the interaction between genetic and environmental factors, and the majority of patients with incident DVT have either inherited thrombophilia or acquired risk factors. Furthermore, DVT is often overlooked. Although symptomatic DVT commonly presents with lower extremity pain, swelling and tenderness, diagnosing DVT is a clinical challenge for physicians. Such a diagnosis of DVT requires a timely systematic assessment, including the use of the Wells score and a D-dimer test to exclude low-risk patients, and imaging modalities to confirm DVT. Compression ultrasound with high sensitivity and specificity is the front-line imaging modality in the diagnostic process for patients with suspected DVT in addition to conventional invasive contrast venography. Most patients require anticoagulation therapy, which typically consists of parenteral heparin bridged to a vitamin K antagonist, with variable duration. The development of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants has revolutionized the landscape of venous thromboembolism treatment, with 4 agents available,including rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban, and edoxaban. Presently, all 4 drugs have finished their large phase III clinical trial programs and come to the clinical uses in North America and Europe. It is encouraging to note that the published data to date regarding Asian patients indicates that such new therapies are safe and

  5. An outpatient program to treat deep venous thrombosis with low-molecular-weight heparin.

    PubMed

    Pearson, S D; Blair, R; Halpert, A; Eddy, E; Mckean, S

    1999-01-01

    Although recent trials have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of low-molecular-weight (LMW) heparin, clinicians may need help incorporating this drug into routine practice. To describe the development, implementation, and early results of an outpatient LMW heparin program for acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Before-after study. Eight health centers of Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, a multispecialty group practice in Boston. Patients with confirmed acute, lower-extremity DVT before (40 patients given a diagnosis from January to August 1996) and after (67 patients given a diagnosis from September 1996 to April 1997) implementation of the LMW heparin program. A centrally coordinated outpatient LMW heparin program. Hospital and HMO financial databases; electronic patient medical records. Costs of care for 2-week episodes and short-term clinical outcomes. The proportion of patients with DVT treated in the hospital decreased from 90% to 46% after the introduction of the LMW heparin program. The mean cost of treatment for all patients with DVT decreased from $5465 to $3719 per patient. For the subset of patients actually treated in the outpatient program, the average cost was $1402 per patient. There were no deaths, no clinically recognized pulmonary emboli, and no cases of significant bleeding among patients treated in the program, although 3 patients were subsequently hospitalized for worsening leg pain. The cost of caring for patients with DVT decreased after introduction of the outpatient LMW heparin program. Given explicit selection criteria, short-term clinical outcomes after outpatient management have been excellent. This program may serve as a model for physicians and health plans interested in establishing a program for treating acute DVT in the outpatient setting.

  6. Long-term prognostic analysis of early interventional therapy for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Yu, Zongxue; Wang, Jinjun; Chen, Xiao; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the long-term prognostic value of early interventional therapy for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (LDVT). In total, 85 patients diagnosed with LDVT for the first time were consecutively selected (identified course of disease was <3 months), and were divided into the control group with 43 cases and the observation group with 42 cases according to different therapeutic methods. The control group received anticoagulation therapy and thrombolysis, or integrated surgical thrombectomy, a conventional open operation, while the observation group received comprehensive treatment, combining endovascular catheter-directed thrombolysis and thrombectomy. The therapeutic effects were compared. After treatment, the differences in circumference of the thigh and shank between the affected and unaffected extremities, and vein dysfunction score of the two groups were decreased compared with before treatment. In addition, the above indexes of the observation group were significantly lower than in the control group (P<0.05). The clinical effective rate and effective extent of the observation group were higher than those of the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The occurrence rate of post-thrombotic syndrome in the observation group was lower than that of the control group, and there was no difference in comparison of grading. The recurrence rate and restenosis rate of the observation group were lower than in the control group, while the patency rate of the observation group was higher than that of the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, early catheter-directed invention of thrombolysis with thrombectomy for LDVT has good clinical effect in the short-term and long-term. PMID:28105087

  7. CT venography for deep venous thrombosis: continuous images versus reformatted discontinuous images using PIOPED II data.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Lawrence R; Stein, Paul D; Beemath, Afzal; Sostman, H Dirk; Wakefield, Thomas W; Woodard, Pamela K; Yankelevitz, David F

    2007-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether discontinuous CT of the lower extremities for the detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) yields results similar to those of complete helical imaging using cases from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis II (PIOPED II). In PIOPED II, CT venography followed CT angiography (CTA) to detect pulmonary embolus, using 7.5-mm continuous helical imaging from the iliac crest to the tibial plateau. DVT was detected in 105 of 737 patients (14.2%). We randomly chose 54 positive cases and 96 negative cases for our study. The continuous helical images were reformatted as 7.5-mm images and two of every three images were deleted. These images (7.5 mm; skip = 15 mm) were then sent--without identifying information--to the original reviewers. From 1 to 3.5 years had elapsed since the original interpretations. The results of the new interpretations were compared with the original CT venography consensus interpretations of PIOPED II. There was agreement for the presence of DVT in at least one leg (same leg) or for the absence of DVT in both legs in 133 of the 150 study patients (89%). The kappa statistic showed substantial agreement between the consensus interpretations and the test interpretations (kappa = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.64-0.86) per patient. There was good--but not perfect--agreement between continuous helical and discontinuous axial imaging for the detection of DVT. Given the vagaries of interobserver and intraobserver variation, there appears to be little difference between the two approaches. Adopting discontinuous imaging and other dose-reduction strategies can reduce pelvic radiation by more than 75%.

  8. Venous Thromboembolism—Incidence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Tertiary Care Experience in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naeem Sultan; Nawaz, Ahmad; Junaid, Montasir; Kazi, Maliha; Akhtar, Shabbir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although venous thromboembolism (VTE) is seen with morbidity and mortality in various surgical specialties, scarce data are available in the head and neck surgery domain. Objective We aim to determine the incidence of VTE in patients receiving surgery for head and neck cancer. Methods Four hundred thirteen patients who underwent head and neck surgery procedures between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients with head and neck surgery had received thromboprophylaxis (i.e., compression stockings and subcutaneous heparin). Patient demographics, operating time, and length of hospital stay were analyzed. The incidence of symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) during the initial postoperative hospitalization was assessed. Results Twelve patients were identified who developed VTE. Three patients developed DVT, and nine developed PE. The incidence of DVT and PE was 0.72 and 2.17%, respectively. Interestingly, all of these patients had undergone excision of extensive head and neck cancers accompanied by a reconstructive procedure. Patients who developed PE had a longer hospital stay compared with those who only had DVT. There were overall three mortalities in the nine patients who developed PE. Conclusion Although VTE has a low incidence, it is a known complication of extensive head and neck surgeries with life-threatening outcomes. We recommend early mobilization and physiotherapy with the possible aid from appropriate mechanical and pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. PMID:26157492

  9. [Cancer and deep venous thrombosis: the purpose of the CATCH clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Araújo, António

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has the potential to induce hypercoagulable states. On the other hand, venous thromboembolism may be the harbinger of an occult cancer, may represent a complication of known malignant disease or complicate hospitalization, surgery or various systemic treatments. The importance of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer is often underestimated resulting in under-diagnosis, which may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. However, many cancer patients do not receive prophylaxis and suitable treatment for venous thromboembolism. The author make some considerations on this disease by addressing the interest and the objectives of the clinical trial CATCH and use of sodium tinzaparin.

  10. [A mathematical analysis of strain-gauge curves in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Vega Gómez, M E; Ley Pozo, J; Aldama Figueroa, A; Alvarez Sánchez, J A; Charles-Edouard Otrante, D; Fernández Boloña, A; Gutierrez Jiménez, O

    1991-01-01

    The plethysmographic strain gauge venous outflow curves were studied by means of an exponential function. The parameters analyzed made possible the establishment of differences between patients with and without DVT.

  11. Inferior vena cava filter placement during thrombolysis for acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Hager, Eric S; Jeyabalan, Geetha; Marone, Luke; Makaroun, Michel S; Chaer, Rabih A

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the need for inferior vena cava (IVC) filters and to identify anatomic and patient-specific risk factors associated with embolization in patients undergoing thrombolysis for acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Consecutive patients who underwent catheter-directed thrombolysis or pharmacomechanical thrombolysis (PMT) for iliofemoral DVT from May 2007 to March 2012 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Patients were categorized in two groups, depending on the status of IVC filtration during the lysis procedures: patients with an IVC filter protection (group A) and patients without an IVC filter protection (group B). The primary outcome was perioperative clinically significant pulmonary embolism (PE) or intraprocedural IVC filter clot capture. Eighty patients (mean age, 50 ± 16 years; 39 women) with symptoms averaging 12 ± 10 days were treated. A perioperative IVC filter was placed in 32 patients, and nine patients had an indwelling patent filter (group A, n = 41). Twenty patients received no filter, and 19 patients had an indwelling thrombosed filter (group B, n = 39). There were no clinically significant PE in either group. In group A, nine patients (22%) had documented embolic clot within the filter nest. The clot volume was deemed clinically significant in only two patients (5%). Factors related to embolization included female gender (odds ratio [OR], 5.833; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.038-32.797; P = .032) and preoperative clinical PE (OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.043-30.081; P = .054). A trend for increased embolization was seen with a higher average number of DVT risk factors (1.44 vs 1; P = .065) and when PMT was used as a single treatment (OR, 4.32; 95% CI, 0.851-21.929; P = .087). IVC filters during thrombolysis should be used selectively in patients with preoperative clinical PE, in women and potentially in patients with multiple risk factors for DVT, or when stand

  12. Endovascular intervention for deep venous thrombosis in patients with inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Karageorgiou, John; Fowler, Kathryn; Vedantham, Suresh; Saad, Nael

    2016-10-01

    Patients with inferior vena cava (IVC) filter-associated deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are a challenging subset of patients for endovascular intervention. Given the lack of available data pertaining to this clinical scenario, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the authors' experience with the use of endovascular treatment for DVT in patients with IVC filters. Primary aims included assessing the technical and clinical success, complications, and clinical patency in these patients. This was a retrospective single-center review of adult patients with IVC filters undergoing endovascular treatment of DVT between 1/2005 and 4/2014. Patient electronic medical records were reviewed for demographic data, anticoagulation status, symptoms, symptomatic extremities, extent of thrombosis, therapies received, technical and clinical success, and complications. Query yielded 82 patients (mean 53 years, range 18-96; 66% male), all of whom were included in our analysis. The majority of patients presented with lower extremity pain and swelling, with extensive clot burden despite the use of anticoagulant medication. Treatment elements utilized included pharmacologic lysis in 92%, mechanical thrombectomy in 77%, angioplasty in 63% and stent placement in 50% of patients. Interventions were technically successful in restoring flow in 87% of patients, and clinically successful in improving presenting symptoms in 79% of patients. By SIR criteria, 24% of patients experienced complications (categorized as 10% minor and 14% major). There were two deaths from intracranial hemorrhage. The probability of thrombosis-free survival at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months was 0.85 (CI 0.74-0.93), 0.81 (CI 0.69-0.89), 0.74 (CI 0.62-0.83), 0.70 (CI 0.57-0.8) and 0.70 (CI 0.57-0.8), respectively. Endovascular interventions are usually effective in relieving symptoms in patients with DVT and pre-existing IVC filters. However, these outcomes are achieved with significant complication rates that may exceed those

  13. Angiokeratoma circumscriptum naeviforme with soft tissue hypertrophy and deep venous malformation: A variant of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome?

    PubMed

    Wankhade, Vaishali; Singh, Rajesh; Sadhwani, Venus; Kodate, Purnima; Disawal, Amit

    2014-12-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a cutaneous capillary malformation on a limb in association with soft tissue swelling with or without bony hypertrophy and atypical varicosity. The capillary malformation associated with KTS is port wine stain. Angiokeratoma circumscriptum naeviforme (ACN) is a congenital variant of angiokeratoma commonly present on the lower limb as a hyperkeratotic plaque. ACN is rarely associated with KTS. We report a case of ACN with soft tissue hypertrophy and deep venous malformation (possibly a variant of Klippel-Trenaunay) in a 4-year-old male child.

  14. Angiokeratoma circumscriptum naeviforme with soft tissue hypertrophy and deep venous malformation: A variant of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Wankhade, Vaishali; Singh, Rajesh; Sadhwani, Venus; Kodate, Purnima; Disawal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a cutaneous capillary malformation on a limb in association with soft tissue swelling with or without bony hypertrophy and atypical varicosity. The capillary malformation associated with KTS is port wine stain. Angiokeratoma circumscriptum naeviforme (ACN) is a congenital variant of angiokeratoma commonly present on the lower limb as a hyperkeratotic plaque. ACN is rarely associated with KTS. We report a case of ACN with soft tissue hypertrophy and deep venous malformation (possibly a variant of Klippel-Trenaunay) in a 4-year-old male child. PMID:25593797

  15. Deep venous thrombosis and inferior vena cava agenesis causing double crush sciatic neuropathy in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kara, Murat; Ozçakar, Levent; Eken, Güneş; Ozen, Gülsen; Kiraz, Sedat

    2008-12-01

    We report here the case of a 18-year-old young man with Behçet's disease who had suffered deep venous thrombosis of the right femoral and popliteal veins. Consequently, right sciatic nerve injury, drop foot and tightness of the achilles tendon also ensued. The clinical scenario was further challenged by demonstration of the agenetic inferior vena cava and epidural vein dilatations compressing the lumbar nerve roots. To the best notice of the authors, this is the first patient encompassing all these complications in the literature concerning Behçet's disease.

  16. Efficacy of prophylactic inferior vena caval filters in prevention of pulmonary embolism in the absence of deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark G; Hart, Joseph P; El-Sayed, Hosam F

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing use of inferior vena caval filters (IVCFs) as prophylactic activity in the absence of a deep venous thrombosis (DVT) to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) in high-risk patients. These devices are effective in preventing PE in the presence of lower extremity DVT, when anticoagulation is contraindicated or has failed. An electronic databases search of MEDLINE, PubMed, The Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar for relevant articles listed between January 2000 and December 2014 was performed. The review was confined to patients without a history of previous venous thromboembolism and no evidence of changes on venous duplex imaging suggestive of previous DVT. At present, the use of prophylactic IVCF is predominantly in the trauma, orthopedic, and bariatric surgical populations. Currently, no class I studies exist to support insertion of an IVCF in a patient without an established DVT or PE. However, there is a body of class II and class III evidence that would support the use of IVCFs in certain "high-risk" patients who do not have a documented DVT or the occurrence of a PE. Widespread use of prophylactic IVCFs is not supported by evidence and should be discouraged. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis. A comparative trial between placebo, Hirudoid cream and piroxicam gel.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D; Brunkwall, J; Jensen, N; Persson, N H

    1990-01-01

    A prospective randomized trial on the treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis has been performed in 68 patients randomized to either Hirudoid cream, piroxicam gel or placebo. Both spontaneous and infusion thrombophlebitis were included. Treatment effect was evaluated using the status of thrombophlebitis, the thrombophlebitic area, pain intensity with a visual analogue scale, and side effects were registered. Both in the treatment groups and the placebo group there was a significant decrease of signs and symptoms during the treatment period. There was no statistical difference between the treatment groups and no difference between spontaneous and infusion thrombophlebitis.

  18. Clinical analysis of preoperative risk factors for the incidence of deep venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingchao; Li, Wenyi; Pei, Yueying; Shen, Yong; Li, Jia

    2016-06-13

    The purpose of this study aimed to assess preoperative risk factors for the incidence of deep venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The diagnosis of preoperative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography. To examine the preoperative risk factors for DVT admitted for PLIF, comparative analysis of the DVT-positive and DVT-negative groups was done. DVT was detected in 9.4 % (269/2861) patients, including 17 proximal DVT patients (6.3 %) and 252 the distal DVT patients (93.7 %). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, the age, preoperative D-dimer, and history of rheumatoid arthritis were significant risk factors relative to the onset of DVT after posterior lumbar surgery. According to the result of our study, age, positive preoperative plasma D-dimer level, and rheumatoid arthritis had the influential impact on the incidence of DVT admitted for PLIF.

  19. [Diagnosing venous and venous/arterial ulcers].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    A venous ulcer can be diagnosed on the basis of elements arising from the questioning and the clinical examination of the patient. A venous Doppler ultrasound can specify the type of reverse flow (superficial and/or deep). Measuring the ankle brachial pressure index helps to eliminate or confirm any arterial involvement. Depending on the systolic pressure index, the ulcer will be considered as purely venous, mixed (arterial-venous) or predominantly arterial.

  20. Septic ankle with purulence tracking up the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath leading to deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism and compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waryasz, Gregory R; McClure, Philip; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-06-01

    The differential diagnosis for lower extremity swelling and ankle pain is broad and can have overlapping and related diagnoses. If there is concern for more than one diagnosis, the practitioner should perform a thorough physical examination, order the appropriate studies, and perform the correct procedures to completely diagnose and treat the patient. This article presents the case of a 19-year-old male who presented with 5 days of left ankle pain, fevers, and swelling without any known trauma to the area. Physical examination was concerning for a septic ankle joint, cellulitis, deep venous thrombosis, and compartment syndrome. Duplex venous ultrasound confirmed a deep venous thrombosis in the popliteal vein. Joint aspiration of the ankle had gross purulence with the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was taken emergently to the operating room where he was found to have gross purulence in the deep posterior compartment, medial and lateral soft tissues of the ankle, and gross purulence in the ankle joint. The deep posterior compartment also had significant muscle necrosis and evidence of compartment syndrome. This case presents the possibility of a septic ankle leading to compartment syndrome and deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism due to the intra-articular nature of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. Case report, Level IV. © 2014 The Author(s).

  1. [Deep venous thrombosis in pregnancy: risk factors and possibilities for prevention].

    PubMed

    Heilmann, L; Hojnacki, B; Fischer, W M

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-two cases of acute venous thrombosis in pregnancy (0.64%) were studied. Concomitant pulmonary embolism was documented in 0.23%. Prophylactic heparinization was performed in 32 gravidae. In the acute thrombosis group therapy was instituted in the 26th week, and in the prophylaxis group in the 20th week of pregnancy. Recurrent thromboses after cesarean section occurred in 4.5% of the patients with acute venous thrombosis and in 5.6% of those in the prophylaxis group. Reduced red blood cell deformability, low antithrombin III and high leukocyte count were identified as risk factors. Heparinization did not prevent increased red blood cell aggregation and plasma viscosity at birth. Rheologic factors played only a secondary role in the prophylaxis group. Prophylactic heparinization in pregnancy is currently the only means of reducing the thrombosis recurrence rate in patients with a history of thromboembolism.

  2. Does prescription of medical compression prevent development of post-thrombotic syndrome after proximal deep venous thrombosis?

    PubMed

    Perrin, Michel; Eklöf, Bo

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this review is to try to explain the controversy by critical analysis of previously published randomized controlled trials on the value of elastic compression stockings in the treatment of acute proximal deep vein thrombosis in prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome, which forms the scientific basis for our present management. A research was made through Medline and Embase databases to identify relevant original articles, not abstracts, with the following keywords: post-thrombotic syndrome, deep venous thrombosis, venous thromboembolism, compression stockings, prevention and compliance. We identified five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) before the SOX trial including 798 patients with acute proximal deep vein thrombosis. Brandjes (1997): at two years' follow-up, elastic compression stockings reduced post-thrombotic syndrome by 50%;Ginsberg (2001): no difference in post-thrombotic syndrome with or without elastic compression stockings after more than two years' follow-up;Partsch (2004): elastic compression stockings with routine above knee and early ambulation reduced the incidence and severity of post-thrombotic syndrome after two years' follow-up;Prandoni (2004) showed significantly less post-thrombotic syndrome after elastic compression stockings for two years with a five-year follow-up;Aschwanden (2008) showed no difference with elastic compression stockings after three years' follow-up. Prescription of elastic compression stockings for the prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome is now in doubt. Immediate compression after diagnosis of acute deep vein thrombosis to prevent swelling and reduce pain, permitting early ambulation in combination with adequate anticoagulation has proven benefit, although a secondary analysis of the SOX trial refutes this belief. Continued long-term compression treatment is questioned. Two major questions remain:Is the lack of positive outcome on the development of post-thrombotic syndrome after proximal deep vein

  3. Achromobacter causing a thrombophlebitis and osteomyelitis combination: a rare cause.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Gizem; Aygun, Deniz; Barut, Kenan; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2015-09-07

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacillus, present in normal human flora of the skin and gastrointestinal tract. Infections due to Achromobacter are infrequent and have mostly been reported in immunocompromised patients. Rarely, however, the microorganism can cause soft tissue infections even in healthy subjects with a history of trauma. We report thrombophlebitis complicated with osteomyelitis secondary to Achromobacter in a 15-year-old girl with a history of purulent discharge from the ankle due to local trauma caused by tight fitting shoes. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Different characteristics and prognostic impact of deep-vein thrombosis / pulmonary embolism and intraabdominal venous thrombosis in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyoun; Lee, Keun-Wook; Bang, Soo-Mee; Kim, Sujung; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Doyeun; Lee, Jong Seok

    2011-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the incidence, risk factors, and prognostic implications of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Asian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Differences in clinical characteristics and prognostic impact between extremity venous thrombosis (or deep-vein thrombosis; DVT)/pulmonary embolism (PE) and intra-abdominal venous thrombosis (IVT) were also evaluated. For this study, consecutive CRC patients (N = 2,006) were enrolled and analyses were conducted retrospectively. VTEs were classified into two categories (DVT/PE and IVT). Significant predictors of developing VTEs were advanced stage and an increased number of co-morbidities. The two-year cumulative incidence of DVT/PE was 0.3%, 0.9% and 1.4% in stages 0~1, 2 and 3, respectively; this incidence range of DVT/PE in Asian patients with loco-regional CRC was lower than in Western patients. However, the two-year incidence (6.4%) of DVT/PE in Asian patients with distant metastases was not lower than in Western patients. Although 65.2% of patients with DVT/PE were symptomatic, only 15.7% of patients with IVT were symptomatic. During chemotherapy, DVT/PE developed more frequently than IVT. Only DVT/PE had a negative effect on survival; IVT had no prognostic significance. In conclusion, despite the low incidence of DVT/PE in Asian patients with loco-regional CRC, the protective effect of Asian ethnicity on VTE development disappears as tumour stage increases in patients with distant metastases. Considering different clinical characteristics and prognostic influences between DVT/PE and IVT, the treatment approach should be also different.

  5. Improved external valvuloplasty, intravenous laser photocoagulation and local sclerotheraphy treatment of primary deep venous valvular insufficiency: long term result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-xi; Han, Li-na; Gu, Ying; Liang, Fa-qi; Zhang, Li; Liu, Hong-yi; Zhao, Wen-guang; Wang, Qi; Wang, Xiao-ling

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to report long-term follow-up of improved external vulvuloplasty, intravenous laser photocoagulation and local sclerotherapy treatment of primary deep venous valvular insufficiency in eight hundred and seventy-two patients from Nov. 2000 to May 2006. Patients were evaluated clinically and with duplex ultrasound at 1, 3, and 12 months, and yearly thereafter until the fifth year to assess treatment efficacy and adverse reactions. Successful occlusion of the great saphenous vein and absence of deep vein reflux on color Doppler imaging, were noted in 956 limbs of 852 cases( 1 month follow-up), 946 limbs of 842 cases (6 month to 1 year follow-up), 717 of 626 (1~2 year follow-up), 501 of 417 (2~3 year follow-up), 352 of 296 (3~5year follow-up), 142 of 106 (5 year follow-up) after initial treatment. The cumulative total number of recurrence of reflux was fifteen cases. The respective competence rate was 95.18%, 96.23%, 94.23%, 95.25%, 94.23% and 94.12%. Of note, all recurrence occurred before 9 months, with the majority noted before 3 months. Bruising was noted in 0.7% of patients, tightness along the course of treated vein in 1.0% of limbs. There have been no paresthesia of cases, skin burns and deep vein thrombosis.

  6. Is real-time elastography helpful to differentiate acute from subacute deep venous thrombosis? A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Ahmet; Barutca, Hakan; Ayaz, Ercan; Aslan, Mine; Kocaaslan, Cemal; Inan, Ibrahim; Sahin, Sinan; Yıkılmaz, Ali

    2017-09-22

    To detect and characterize changes in stiffness of thrombus in patients with acute and subacute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) by using real-time elastography (RTE). Fifty-eight patients with acute or subacute DVT were prospectively evaluated by B-mode sonography (US), color Doppler US (CDUS), and RTE. Two radiologists evaluated the thrombus echogenicity, compressibility, and recanalization of the affected vein, and thrombus stiffness in consensus. The thrombi were classified into 3 groups as soft, intermediate, and hard on RTE images. The final study group consisted of 30 patients with acute DVT, among whom 10 were women (33%), and 19 patients with subacute DVT, among whom 6 were women (32%). The presence of hypoechoic thrombus, incompressible vein, and absence of recanalization on US and CDUS were significantly associated with acute DVT (P < .001 for all variables). The differences in elasticity pattern of the thrombi between acute and subacute DVT were not significant (P = .202). Venous thrombus hardens with age; however, elastography pattern on RTE, in its present form, may not be able to differentiate acute DVT from subacute DVT. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Gunther Tulip Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement During Treatment for Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Kato, Takeharu; Iida, Shigeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gunther tulip retrievable vena cava filter (GTF) implantation to prevent pulmonary embolism during intravenously administered thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy and interventional radiological therapy for occlusive or nonocclusive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremity. Methods. We evaluated placement of 55 GTFs in 42 patients with lower extremity DVT who had undergone various treatments including those utilizing techniques of interventional radiology. Results. Worsening of pulmonary embolism in patients with existing pulmonary embolism or in those without pulmonary embolism at the time of GTF insertion was avoided in all patients. All attempts at implantation of the GTF were safely accomplished. Perforation and migration experienced by one patient was the only complication. Mean period of treatment for DVT under protection from pulmonary embolism by the GTF was 12.7 {+-} 8.3 days (mean {+-} SD, range 4-37 days). We attempted retrieval of GTFs in 18 patients in whom the venous thrombus had disappeared after therapy, and retrieval in one of these 18 cases failed. GTFs were left in the vena cava in 24 patients for permanent use when the DVT was refractory to treatment. Conclusion. The ability of the GTF to protect against pulmonary embolism during treatment of DVT was demonstrated. Safety in both placement and retrieval was clarified. Because replacement with a permanent filter was not required, use of the GTF was convenient when further protection from complicated pulmonary embolism was necessary.

  8. Retrograde microvascular augmentation (turbocharging) of a single-pedicle TRAM flap through a deep inferior epigastric arterial and venous loop.

    PubMed

    Semple, J L

    1994-01-01

    Modern trends in breast reconstruction with the TRAM flap have promoted adequate blood supply to the flap while minimizing the donor-site defect in the anterior abdominal wall. Preservation of the rectus abdominis muscle (both unipedicled and bipedicled), supercharging, delayed, and free-flap techniques all have promoted these principles. A new technique is presented utilizing the single pedicle with a transmidline retrograde microvascular loop anastomosis of the deep inferior epigastric artery and vein. The turbocharging allows increased blood flow to the remote areas of the flap as well as augmented venous outflow. In addition, the abdominal-wall donor site is similar to that of a single pedicle. This technique is ideal for reconstruction where the entire flap is required, a lower abdominal scar is present, or the recipient vessels for the free flap are absent or damaged.

  9. Deep venous thrombosis among disaster shelter inhabitants following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Shibata, M; Hanzawa, K; Ueda, S; Yambe, T

    2014-05-01

    A retrospective analysis of data collected during subject screening following Japan's March 2011 earthquake and tsunami was performed. We aimed to determine the incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) among screened subjects and to identify risk factors associated with the development of DVT as independent variables. Calf ultrasonography was undertaken in 269 subjects living in 21 shelters in Miyagi prefecture during the one-month period immediately following the March 2011 disaster. Information regarding the health and risk factors of subjects was collected by questionnaire and assessment of physical signs. Of the 269 evacuees screened, 65 (24%) met the criteria for calf DVT. We found lower limb trauma, reduced frequency of urination and sleeping in a vehicle to be independent positive predictors of DVT. Evacuees had an increased risk of developing DVT, associated with tsunami-related lower limb injury, immobility and dehydration.

  10. Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava associated with deep venous thrombosis and a partial Protein C deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tribe, Howard; Borgstein, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava is rare but it is being increasingly diagnosed by cross-sectional imaging techniques. Patients are usually asymptomatic with abnormalities detected incidentally. An 11 year old boy presented with a 10 day history of fever, vomiting and abdominal pain, which progressed to his back and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging, computerised tomography and Doppler ultrasonography showed the absence of a suprarenal inferior vena cava with bilateral superficial femoral vein thrombi extending cranially to the end of the aberrant inferior vena cava. Haematological testing revealed a partial Protein C deficiency. The presenting clinical picture in this case is unique within the English literature and highlights that deep venous thrombosis associated with inferior vena cava dysgenesis may not present with typical symptoms in children. Early use of advanced imaging modalities would expedite diagnosis and subsequent treatment. PMID:24421930

  11. Predictors for the development of post-thrombotic syndrome in patients with primary lower limb deep venous thrombosis: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Nadeem A; Sophie, Ziad; Zafar, Farhan; Soares, Delvene; Naz, Iram

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Post-thrombotic syndrome is a common and debilitating sequelae of lower limb deep venous thrombosis. Very little awareness is present about the risk factors and about the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of this condition. Objective The objective of this study is to identify the predictors of post-thrombotic syndrome after lower limb deep venous thrombosis. Materials and methods A case-control study was conducted on all adult patients who were admitted with lower limb deep venous thrombosis at our institution from January 2005 to June 2012. These patients were scheduled for a research clinic visit, which included informed consent, data collection, and physical examination. Patients found to have post-thrombotic syndrome served as cases and those without post-thrombotic syndrome served as controls. Villalta scoring system was used to diagnose the post-thrombotic syndrome and then to assess the severity of the condition in both the groups. Cox regression risk factor analysis was performed to identify the predictors of post-thrombotic syndrome. Results Out of the 125 patients examined, 49 were found to have post-thrombotic syndrome. Risk factors found to be significant were body mass index of more than 35 kg/m(2) ( n = 13, p = 0.003), history of immobilization ( n = 19, p = 0.003), one or more hypercoagable disorders ( n = 32, p = 0.02), iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis ( n = 18, p = 0.001), complete obstruction on ultrasound ( n = 26, p = 0.016), unstable range of international normalized ratio ( n = 23, p = 0.041) and non-compliance for the use of compressions stockings ( n = 14, p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, one or more hypercoagable disorder, iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis, and non-compliance to the use of compression stockings were found to be independent risk factors for the development of post-thrombotic syndrome. Conclusion One or more hypercoagable disorders, iliofemoral

  12. [Therapy and prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in gynecology and obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Vucić, Niksa; Cala, Kresimir; Rancić, Iva; Pticar, Romana

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the latest developments in therapy and prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis in gynecology and obstetrics. The data presented in the paper have been extracted from the Current Contents database. In the introduction, the coagulation cascade is described, and certain coagulation abnormalities caused by deficiency or decreased activity of coagulation factors are highlighted. The most prominent signs of deep vein thrombosis in pregnant women are swelling and tenderness of the affected leg, sometimes accompanied with fever and leucocytosis. In pelvic thrombosis, swelling of the leg is often absent and such a condition may be mistaken for other abdominal emergencies. The diagnostic algorithm for deep vein thrombosis starts with the clinical Wells criteria. To confirm the diagnosis it is necessary to visualize the thrombus by one of the imaging methods. The value of D-dimer is limited by its low positive predictive value, particularly in pregnant women. Low weight molecular heparin's have lately almost replaced standard heparin in the treatment of the deep vein thrombosis in pregnant women for providing advantages of subcutaneous application, no need of laboratory control of coagulation parameters, lower risk of bleeding, and lower incidence of osteoporosis and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. We list the recommendations of the American College of Chest Physicians published in 1991, which stratify pregnant women with deep vein thrombosis according to their medical history and laboratory parameters. We have specified the proposed approach according to: history of deep vein thrombosis due to transient risk factors; previous idiopathic deep vein thrombosis without anticoagulant therapy; previous deep vein thrombosis with thrombophylia; previous idiopathic deep vein thrombosis on anticoagulant therapy; laboratory-proven thrombophilia with no history of deep vein thrombosis; and recurrent deep vein thrombosis. Pregnant women with artificial

  13. The effect of graduated compression stockings on blood velocity in the deep venous system of the lower limb in the postnatal period.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, R; Calderwood, C J; Greer, I A

    2007-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the leading cause of maternal mortality in the UK and is also a major cause of long-term morbidity. Recent UK national guidelines recommend thromboprophylaxis, which includes the use of graduated compression stockings (GCS), for high-risk women to reduce the risk of VTE in both the antenatal and postpartum period. This study of 17 women examined the effects of GCS on the deep venous system in the immediate postpartum period and found a statistically significant reduction in the diameter of the common femoral vein (CFV) (pre- versus post stocking diameter: mean 10.39 mm [SD 2.09] versus mean 9.69 mm [SD 1.99]) and an increase in the rate of blood velocity in the CFV (pre- versus post stocking velocity: mean 10.0 cm/s [SD 2.7] versus 13.9 cm/s [SD 4.2]) 30 minutes after application of thigh length GCS in women 1 or 2 days following a singleton vaginal delivery at term. This confirms reduction in venous stasis in the deep venous system in the immediate postpartum woman by the use of GCS, supporting their use in improving venous function in this context.

  14. Mesenteric-portal axis thrombosis and deep venous thrombosis in a patient with inferior vena cava agenesis.

    PubMed

    Lluis Pons, Laia; Chahri Vizcarro, Nadia; Llaverias Borrell, Silvia; Miquel Abbad, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    Splenoportal axis thrombosis not associated with cirrhosis or neoplasms has a prevalence lower than 5 per 10,000 people. An etiologic factor responsible for portal thrombosis is finally identified in most cases, usually systemic thrombogenic factors or predisposing local factors. However, despite a detailed study of all etiologic factors, up to 30% of cases are eventually considered as idiopathic in origin. We report the case of a 41-year-old patient who presented with abdominal pain and lower extremity edema. The patient was diagnosed with portal and mesenteric-portal confluence thrombosis, bilateral deep venous thrombosis and right lumbar vein thrombosis based on an abdominal CT scan. This was associated with a likely congenital inferior vena cava agenesis. This malformation is present in approximately 5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis even though it represents a rare cause of portal thrombosis. The fact that several thromboses developed simultaneously makes this a unique and isolated case in the current literature as no similar cases have been reported thus far.

  15. Vasculo-Behçet's Disease that Began with Femoral Arterial Pseudoaneurysm Followed by Deep Venous Thrombosis: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Tomohiro; Miyasaka, Shigeto; Maeta, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    Vasculo-Behçet's disease mainly affects the venous system and central or peripheral arteries. It is often difficult to diagnosis this due to the complexity of symptoms and the rarity. A 35-year-old man with refractory inguinal lymphadenitis was admitted to our hospital. He was diagnosed with left femoral arterial pseudoaneurysm by enhanced CT scan of the lower legs, and we performed an emergency operation. Seven months postoperatively, he suddenly developed deep venous thrombosis, and then, symptoms such as aphthous stomatitis and pudendal ulcer started to develop progressively, complicating his uveitis. Finally, he was diagnosed with vasculo-Behçet's disease.

  16. Jugular thrombophlebitis in horses: A review of fibrinolysis, thrombus formation, and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Deborah Penteado Martins; de Lacerda Neto, José Corrêa

    2013-01-01

    Thrombophlebitis of the jugular vein is commonly observed in horses, particularly during intensive care, and leads to local and systemic inflammatory responses as well as head and neck circulatory impairment. Thrombolytic therapy is widely used in human practice with the aim of thrombus dissolution and recanalization of the injured vessels. There are similarities between human and horse coagulation and fibrinolytic processes. This review examines the fibrinolytic system, thrombus formation, and the clinical management of jugular thrombophlebitis, including thrombolytic therapy. There is evidence that early regional thrombolytic therapy for jugular thrombophlebitis in horses may be effective to achieve sustained recanalization. PMID:23814304

  17. Value of serial platelet indices measurements for the prediction of pulmonary embolism in patients with deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Sevuk, Utkan; Bahadir, Mehmet Veysi; Altindag, Rojhat; Baysal, Erkan; Yaylak, Baris; Ay, Nurettin; Ayaz, Firat; Demirtas, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, no validated biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity have been established for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). There is a need to develop simple and reliable noninvasive tests that can accurately identify patients with PE, even in small hospitals or clinics. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) for predicting occurrence of PE in patients with DVT. Methods Records of acute DVT patients were reviewed retrospectively. Group 1 consisted of 50 patients with acute DVT and group 2 consisted of 50 patients with acute DVT who developed PE during follow-up. The control group consisted of patients with uncomplicated primary varicose veins of the lower limbs. Venous peripheral blood samples for measurement of MPV, PDW, and platelet count were drawn on admission, before the treatment, and at the time of PE diagnosis. Results MPV and PDW levels at the time of PE diagnosis were higher in group 2 than group 1 (P<0.001 and P=0.026, respectively). Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed that a 5.2% increase in admission PDW during follow-up provided 70% sensitivity and 82% specificity (area under the curve, 0.80), and a 6.6% increase in admission MPV during follow-up provided 74% sensitivity and 83% specificity (area under the curve, 0.84) for prediction of PE occurrence in patients with DVT. PDW and MPV levels at the time of PE diagnosis were found to be independent risk factors for the occurrence of PE in patients with DVT. Conclusion Serial measurements of MPV and PDW, and percent change in MPV and PDW appears to be a useful marker for predicting occurrence of acute PE in patients with a first episode of acute proximal DVT. PMID:26316769

  18. Hybrid operative thrombectomy is noninferior to percutaneous techniques for the treatment of acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Limael E; Aboukheir-Aboukheir, Aihab; Figueroa-Vicente, Ricardo; Soler-Bernardini, Hiram; Bolanos-Avila, Guillermo; Torruella-Bartolomei, Luis J; Comerota, Anthony J; Martinez-Trabal, Jorge L

    2017-03-01

    Hybrid operative thrombectomy (HOT) is a novel technique for the treatment of acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (IFDVT) and is an alternative to percutaneous techniques (PTs) that use thrombolytics. In this study, we compare perioperative and intermediate outcomes of HOT vs PT as interventions for early thrombus removal. From July 2008 to May 2015, there were 71 consecutive patients who were treated with either PT (n = 31) or HOT (n = 40) for acute or subacute single-limb IFDVT. HOT consisted of surgical thrombectomy with balloon angioplasty with or without stenting by a single incision and fluoroscopically guided retrograde valve manipulation to extract the thrombus. PT included catheter-directed thrombolysis with or without pharmacomechanical thrombectomy using the Trellis-8 system (Bacchus Vascular, Santa Clara, Calif). Patients who presented with bilateral DVT (n = 4), inferior vena cava involvement (n = 8), or venous gangrene (n = 1) were excluded. Perioperative outcomes, quality measures, and thrombus resolution were compared between the two treatment groups. Clinical, Etiology, Anatomy, and Pathophysiology (CEAP) classification, Villalta score, and venous duplex ultrasound at intermediate follow-up were also analyzed. The left limb was the most common site of the IFDVT overall. Technical success (≥50% resolution) was 100% for both groups, and >80% resolution was achieved in all patients treated with HOT. There were eight major bleeding events in the PT group compared with three in the HOT group (P = .04). PT patients had a significantly longer length of stay (13 vs 10 days; P = .028) compared with HOT. At 2-year duplex ultrasound examination, there was no difference between HOT and PT in mean reflux times at the femoral-popliteal segment. At 2 years, 85% and 87% of the patients (HOT vs PT, respectively) had not developed post-thrombotic syndrome, and there was no difference between the groups for mean Villalta score (2.1 ± 1.9 vs 2.3 ± 2

  19. YouTube as a potential source of information on deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bademci, Mehmet Ş; Yazman, Serkan; Güneş, Tevfik; Ocakoglu, Gokhan; Tayfur, Kaptanderya; Gokalp, Orhan

    2017-09-01

    Background No work has been reported on the use of video websites to learn about deep vein thrombosis and the value of education using them. We examined the characteristics and scientific accuracy of videos related to deep vein thrombosis on YouTube. Methods YouTube was surveyed using no filter and the key words 'deep vein thrombosis' and 'leg vein clot' in June 2016. The videos evaluated were divided into three groups in terms of their scientific content, accuracy, and currency: useful, partly useful, and useless. Results Of the 1200 videos watched, 715 (59.58%) were excluded with the exclusion criteria. Although most of the videos uploaded (22.9%, n = 111) were created by physicians, the number of views for website-based videos was significantly higher (p = 0.002). When the uploaded videos were assessed in terms of their usefulness, videos from physicians and hospitals were statistically more useful than other videos (p < 0.001). Conclusions For videos created by medical professionals to be of higher quality, we believe they should be more up-to-date and comprehensive, and contain animations about treatment modalities and early diagnosis in particular.

  20. Incidence and Risk Factors of Deep Venous Thrombosis in Asymptomatic Iliac Vein Compression: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-Kai; Luo, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Fu-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) may be associated with iliac vein compression. Up to now, the majority of data has come from a retrospective study about the correlation between DVT and iliac vein compression. This prospective study was to determine the incidence of DVT in individuals with iliac vein compression and identify risk factors predictive of DVT. Methods: A total of 500 volunteers without symptoms of venous diseases of lower extremities and overt risk factors of deep venous thrombosis between October 2011 and September 2012 in Shijitan Hospital were enrolled in this cohort study. All the participants underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) to evaluate iliac vein compression. Baseline demographic information and degree of iliac vein compression were collected. They were categorized into ≥50% or <50% iliac vein compression group. Ultrasound examination was performed to screen DVT at the time of CT examination and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the examination. Primary event was DVT of ipsilateral lower extremity. Correlation between DVT and iliac vein compression was estimated by multivariate Logistic regression after adjusting for age, gender, malignancy, surgery/immobilization, chemotherapy/hormonal therapy, and pregnancy. Results: In 500 volunteers, 8.8% (44) had ≥50% iliac vein compression and 91.2% (456) had <50% iliac vein compression. Ipsilateral DVT occurred in six volunteers including two in iliofemoral vein, two in popliteal vein, and two in calf vein within 1 year. Univariate analysis showed that the incidence of DVT was 6.8% in ≥50% compression group, significantly higher than that in <50% compression group (0.7%) (χ2 = 12.84, P = 0.01). Patients with malignancy had significantly higher incidence of DVT than those without malignancy (χ2 = 69.60, P < 0.01). Multivariate Logistic regression indicated that iliac vein compression and malignancy were independent risk factors of DVT. After adjustment for malignancy

  1. Clinical application of sonoelastography in thyroid, prostate, kidney, pancreas, and deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Arash; Barr, Richard G; Dhyani, Manish; Samir, Anthony E

    2015-04-01

    This article reviews the clinical applications of current ultrasound elastography methods in non-hepatic conditions including thyroid nodules, prostate cancer, chronic kidney disease, solid renal lesions, pancreatic lesions, and deep vein thrombosis. Pathophysiology alters tissue mechanical properties via ultrastructural changes including fibrosis, increased cellularity, bleeding, and necrosis, creating a target biomarker, which can be imaged qualitatively or quantitatively with US elastography. US elastography methods can add information to conventional US methods and improve the diagnostic performance of conventional US in a range of disease processes.

  2. [Thrombophlebitis in an Elderly Japanese Woman Treated with Tamoxifen for Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Hiroyuki; Hayami, Ryosuke; Tsuneizumi, Michiko; Nakagami, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we report the rare case of an elderly woman who developed thrombophlebitis after being treated with tamoxifen for breast cancer. She visited our department with a lump in her left breast. She underwent core needle biopsy, and she was diagnosed with breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma, ER- and PgR-positive, HER2-negative). We chose hormonal therapy because surgical treatment was deemed too invasive considering her general status. She was administered tamoxifen (20 mg/day) instead of an aromatase inhibitor in consideration of her osteoporosis. Six months after initiating tamoxifen therapy, she exhibited swelling in her left leg. Computed tomography and ultrasound revealed thrombophlebitis in her left femoral vein. She stopped taking tamoxifen and started warfarin potassium as thrombolytic therapy, after which thrombophlebitis was relieved. Advanced age may be a risk factor for thrombophlebitis associated with tamoxifen treatment; therefore, precautions should be taken accordingly.

  3. High rate of Candida deep-seated infection in patients under chronic hemodialysis with extended central venous catheter use.

    PubMed

    Ourives, Ana Paula Jafet; Gonçalves, Sarah Santos; Siqueira, Ricardo Andreotti; Souza, Ana Carolina Remondi; Canziani, Maria Eugenia F; Manfredi, Silvia Regina; Correa, Luci; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Hemodialysis has been described as an important risk factor for the development of candidemia in patients suffering from chronic renal failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of candidemia in outpatients with renal replacement therapy (RRT) by hemodialysis where the fungemia clearly represents a healthcare-associated infection. We retrospectively collected clinical and laboratory data from patients undergoing at least 3 months of RRT by hemodialysis who developed candidemia within 48h of hospital admission. We identified 14 patients with candidemia with central venous catheters (CVC) in place for 11-277 days before developing fungemia. Deep-seated infection was documented in 6 out of 14 candidiasis cases (43%), including 5 cases of endocarditis (36%). CVC in patients under RRT should be promptly replaced by fistulas and grafts to avoid bloodstream infections. Facing a case of candidemia, adequate source control and prompt initiation of antifungal therapy are mandatory to avoid morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Testosterone therapy, thrombophilia, and hospitalization for deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary embolus, an exploratory, hypothesis-generating study.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Friedman, Joel; Hafeez, Ahsan; Hassan, Atif; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Our hypothesis was that testosterone therapy (TT) interacts with previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis, leading to hospitalization for deep venous thrombosis (DVT)-pulmonary emboli (PE). We determined the prevalence of DVT-PE associated with TT 147 men hospitalized in the last 12 months for DVT-PE. Of the 147 men, 2 (1.4%) had TT before and at the time of their DVT-PE. Neither had risk factors for thrombosis. Neither smoked. Case #1 (intramuscular T 50mg/week) had 2 PE, 6 and 24 months after starting TT. DVT-PE in case #2 (T gel 100mg/day) occurred 24 months after starting T. Both men were found to have previously undiagnosed familial thrombophilia (protein S deficiency, homocysteinemia, high Factor VIII). In case #2, on 100mg T gel/day, serum estradiol was high, 51 pg/ml (upper normal limit 42.6 pg/ml). At least 1.4% of men hospitalized for DVT-PE were on TT and had previously undiagnosed thrombophilia, suggesting a thrombotic interaction between exogenous T and thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Given the increasing use of TT, our preliminary findings should facilitate design of a much-needed, multi-center, prospective study of pro-thrombotic interactions between T therapy and thrombophilia for subsequent thrombotic events including DVT-PE.

  5. Low agreement for assessing the risk of postoperative deep venous thrombosis when deciding prophylaxis strategies: a study using clinical vignettes

    PubMed Central

    O'Flaherty, Martin; Lerum, Kaja; Martin, Paula; Grassi, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Background Several clinical practice guidelines (CPG) on antithrombotic prophylaxis in surgical patients help to decide about the prophylaxis strategy based on the patient risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). However, the physician risk estimates of DVT could have little inter-observer reproducibility, which could lead to different individual prophylaxis practices. Methods Physicians were asked to evaluate DVT risk in eight clinical vignettes, describing actual patients cared for in our hospital. The vignettes included all possible levels of DVT risk. Results The degree of prophylaxis strategies accuracy was 63% (95% CI 523–75%). Overall agreement was 0.32 (z = 7.61, p < 0.001) and for each level of risk kappa was 0.38 (z = 6.50, p < 0.001); 0.1 (z = 1.65, p < 0.049) and 0.5 (z = 8.45, p < 0.001) for small, moderate and high risk group respectively Conclusions Our results showed that there is poor agreement when physicians have to evaluate the risk for postoperative DVT, and in the cases of low and moderate risks of DVT there is the smallest agreement. In addition, the data also showed that the overall accuracy of DVT prophylaxis strategy was only moderate and the risk evaluation did not correlate to the selection of the strategy. The issue of inter-observers variability should be taken into account when CPG performance are analysed, especially when considering the risk-evaluation to choose the appropriate actions. PMID:12184817

  6. Platelet adhesiveness and fibrinolysis after recent cerebro-vascular accidents and their relationship with subsequent deep venous thrombosis of the legs.

    PubMed

    Warlow, C P; Rennie, J A; Ogston, D; Douglas, A S

    1976-08-31

    In fifteen patients with a cerebro-vascular accident resulting in an acute hemiplegia there was a subsequent rise in the platelet count and plasma fibrinogen level. There were no significant alterations in platelet adhesiveness, plasminogen activator, plasminogen, FR-antigen and haematocrit. Patients diagnosed as developing deep venous thrombosis with the 125I-fibrinogen technique had a significantly lower platelet adhesiveness and plasminogen level than those who were not.

  7. Increased soluble P-selectin levels following deep venous thrombosis: cause or effect?

    PubMed

    Blann, A D; Noteboom, W M; Rosendaal, F R

    2000-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is associated with coagulation abnormalities, but evidence of excess platelet activity is scant. Soluble P-selectin is a marker of platelet activity, with high levels being found in patients with thrombotic disease. We measured soluble P-selectin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in plasma from 89 patients with objectively confirmed DVT and in 126 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects, and found higher levels in the patients (P = 0.011). Taking the risk of DVT with a level of soluble P-selectin < 238 ng/ml to be 1, the relative risk of DVT with a soluble P-selectin level >238 ng/ml was 2.1 (95% CI 1. 2-3.6). These high levels may be a reflection of a generalized hypercoagulable state that, with factors such as the presence of persistent thrombin generation, could be responsible for excess platelet activation.

  8. Young's modulus reconstruction for elasticity imaging of deep venous thrombosis: animal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Xie, Hua; Kim, Kang; Rubin, Jonathan M.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wakefield, T. W.; Myers, D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2004-04-01

    Recently, it was suggested that ultrasound elasticity imaging can be used to age deep vein thrombosis (DVT) since blood clot hardness changes with fibrin content. The main components of ultrasound elasticity imaging are deformation of the object, speckle or internal boundary tracking and evaluation of tissue motion, measurement of strain tensor components, and reconstruction of the spatial distribution of elastic modulus using strain images. In this paper, we investigate a technique for Young's modulus reconstruction to quantify ultrasound elasticity imaging of DVT. In-vivo strain imaging experiments were performed using Sprague-Dawley rats with surgically induced clots in the inferior vena cavas (IVC). In this model, the clot matures from acute to chronic in less than 10 days. Therefore, nearly every 24 hours the strain imaging experiments were performed to reveal temporal transformation of the clot. The measured displacement and strain images were then converted into maps of elasticity using model-based elasticity reconstruction where the blood clot within an occluded vein was approximated as a layered elastic cylinder surrounded by incompressible tissue. Results of this study demonstrate that Young's modulus gradually increases with clot maturity and can be used to differentiate clots providing a desperately needed clinical tool of DVT staging.

  9. Search for occult malignancy in patients with deep venous thrombosis. Results of a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ronsdorf, Anke; Perruchoud, André P; Schoenenberger, Ronald A

    2003-11-01

    The association of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and cancer is well established. It is controversial how large the association is and how extensive the evaluation for an underlying cancer should be. 485 patients without a known cancer and a proven DVT formed the cohort of a retrospective study. Newly diagnosed (prevalent) cancers in patients with idiopathic (IDVT) and secondary (SDVT) during the index hospitalisation were compared and the contribution of the steps in an institutional tumour search program was analysed. The incidence of cancer in 204 patients with IDVT and 230 patients with SDVT during follow-up was determined. During the index hospitalisation routine evaluation revealed eleven cancers in 236 patients (4.7% [95%-CI: 2.0-7.3]) with IDVT and five cancers in 249 patients (2.0% [95%-CI: 0.3-3.7]) with SDVT. Combining patient history, clinical examination, routine laboratory tests and chest x-ray showed a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 79% for the diagnosis of cancer. Abdominal ultrasound did not significantly increase the yield. 93% of the patients were followed for up to 5 years (mean 32 months). Sixteen cancers occurred in 204 patients (7.8% [95%-CI: 4.0-11.5]) with IDVT and ten in 230 patients (4.35% [95%-CI: 1.7-7.0]) with SVDT (p<0.001). Prevalence and incidence of cancer were higher in IDVT patients compared to those with SDVT. Combining patient history, clinical examination, simple laboratory tests, and a routine chest x-ray is an appropriate strategy to detect underlying cancer in patients with IDVT. Routine abdominal ultrasound can safely be omitted.

  10. D-dimer for the diagnosis of upper extremity deep and superficial venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Michelangelo; Migliaccio, Ludovica; Favaretto, Elisabetta; Cini, Michela; Legnani, Cristina; Palareti, Gualtiero; Cosmi, Benilde

    2015-04-01

    D-dimer role is well established in the diagnostic work-up for lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT), however it has not been formally tested for clinically suspected upper extremity DVT and/or superficial vein thrombosis (SVT). To ascertain D-dimer diagnostic accuracy for upper extremity DVT and/or SVT. We performed a single centre management study in outpatients referred by emergency or primary care physicians for clinically suspected upper extremity DVT. All patients underwent D-dimer testing (cut-off value: ≤500 ng/mL), and a B-mode and color Doppler ultrasonography examination. In case of either technical problems or anatomical barriers, ultrasonography was repeated after 5-7 days. All patients were followed up for three months for the occurrence of symptomatic DVT and/or SVT and/or pulmonary embolism. We enrolled 239 patients (F: 63.6%; mean±SD age: 58.3±16.8). At the initial diagnostic work-up, DVT was detected in 24 (10%) patients while SVT in 35 (14.6%) patients. During follow-up, one upper extremity DVT was found. D-dimer levels were higher in patients with DVT than in those without. Sensitivity and specificity of D-dimer for DVT were 92% (95%CI: 73-99%) and 60% (95%CI: 52-67%) respectively, with a negative predictive value of 98% (95%CI: 93-100%), whereas for SVT they were 77% (95%CI: 59-89%) and 60% (95%CI: 52-67%) respectively, with a negative predictive value of 93% (95%CI: 86-97%). D-dimer has a negative predictive value ≥93% for excluding DVT in symptomatic outpatients and it can be a useful test in the diagnostic work-up of suspected upper extremity DVT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased Levels of NF-kB-Dependent Markers in Cancer-Associated Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Malaponte, Grazia; Signorelli, Salvatore S; Bevelacqua, Valentina; Polesel, Jerry; Taborelli, Martina; Guarneri, Claudio; Fenga, Concettina; Umezawa, Kazou; Libra, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies highlight the role of inflammatory markers in thrombosis as well as in cancer. However, their combined role in cancer-associated deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and the molecular mechanisms, involved in its pathophysiology, needs further investigations. In the present study, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1β), matrix metalloproteases-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue factor (TF), fibrinogen and soluble P-selectin, were analyzed in plasma and in monocyte samples from 385 cancer patients, of whom 64 were concomitantly affected by DVT (+). All these markers were higher in cancer patients DVT+ than in those DVT-. Accordingly, significantly higher NF-kB activity was observed in cancer patients DVT+ than DVT-. Significant correlation between data obtained in plasma and monocyte samples was observed. NF-kB inhibition was associated with decreased levels of all molecules in both cancer DVT+ and DVT-. To further demonstrate the involvement of NF-kB activation by the above mentioned molecules, we treated monocyte derived from healthy donors with a pool of sera from cancer patients with and without DVT. These set of experiments further suggest the significant role played by some molecules, regulated by NF-kB, and detected in cancer patients with DVT. Our data support the notion that NF-kB may be considered as a therapeutic target for cancer patients, especially those complicated by DVT. Treatment with NF-kB inhibitors may represent a possible strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of DVT in cancer patients.

  12. [Sequence of venous blood flow alterations in patients after recently endured acute thrombosis of lower-limb deep veins based on the findings of ultrasonographic duplex scanning].

    PubMed

    Tarkovskiĭ, A A; Zudin, A M; Aleksandrova, E S

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the sequence of alterations in the venous blood flow to have occurred within the time frame of one year after sustained acute thrombosis of the lower-limb deep veins, which was carried out using the standard technique of ultrasonographic duplex scanning. A total of thirty-two 24-to-62-year-old patients presenting with newly onset acute phlebothrombosis were followed up. All the patients were sequentially examined at 2 days, 3 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months after the manifestation of the initial clinical signs of the disease. Amongst the parameters to determine were the patency of the deep veins and the condition of the valvular apparatus of the deep, superficial and communicant veins. According to the obtained findings, it was as early as at the first stage of the phlebohaemodynamic alterations after the endured thrombosis, i. e., during the acute period of the disease, that seven (21.9%) patients were found to have developed valvular insufficiency of the communicant veins of the cms, manifesting itself in the formation of a horizontal veno-venous reflux, and 6 months later, these events were observed to have occurred in all the patients examined (100%). Afterwards, the second stage of the phlebohaemodynamic alterations was, simultaneously with the process of recanalization of the thrombotic masses in the deep veins, specifically characterized by the formation of valvular insufficiency of the latter, manifesting itself in the form of the development of a deep vertical veno-venous reflux, which was revealed at month six after the onset of the disease in 56.3% of the examined subjects, to be then observed after 12 months in 93.8% of the patients involved. Recanalization of thrombotic masses was noted to commence 3 months after the onset of thrombosis in twelve (37.5%) patients, and after 12 months it was seen to ensue in all the patients (100%), eventually ending in complete restoration of the patency of the affected

  13. Prevention of recurrent deep venous thrombosis with sulodexide: the SanVal registry.

    PubMed

    Errichi, B M; Cesarone, M R; Belcaro, G; Marinucci, R; Ricci, A; Ippolito, A; Brandolini, R; Vinciguerra, G; Dugall, M; Felicita, A; Pellegrini, L; Gizzi, G; Ruffini, M; Acerbi, G; Bavera, P; Renzo, A Di; Corsi, M; Scoccianti, M; Hosoi, M; Lania, M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevention of recurrent deep vein thrombosis (R-DVT) with an oral antithrombotic agent (sulodexide) in moderate to high-risk subjects. A group of 405 patients was included into the multicenter registry. Both compression and an exercise program were used as well as a risk-factors control plan. After diagnosis of DVT, patients were treated with oral anticoagulants for 6 months. At the end of this period a coagulation study was made and patients started treatment with oral sulodexide capsules for a period of 24 months. The femoral, popliteal, tibial, and superficial veins were scanned with high-resolution ultrasound at inclusion;scans were repeated at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Of the 405 subjects included into the registry 178 in the control group (mean age 52.2; SD 11; M:F=90:88) and 189 in the treatment group (mean age 53.2; SD 10.3; M:F=93:96) completed the analysis period of 24 months. At 6 and 12 months the incidence of R-DVT was lower (p<0.05) in the treatment group. At 24 months the global incidence of R-DVT was 17.9% in the control group and 7.4% in the sulodexide group (p<0.05), 2.42 times lower than in controls. The 2 groups were comparable for age and sex distribution and for the localization of the thrombi at inclusion. Also the 2 groups of dropouts were comparable. In the control group there were 32 recurrent DVTs and 24 subjects lost to follow-up (total of 56) of 202 included subjects (27.7%) in comparison with 28 failures (14 recurrent DVTs and 14 lost subjects) of 203 subjects (13.8%) in the treatment group. This difference was statistically significant. In this analysis the incidence of DVT in controls was 2.07 times higher than in the treatment group subjects. In conclusion sulodexide was effective in reducing recurrent thrombotic events in high-risk subjects.

  14. Derivation and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Scale for Isolated Distal Deep Venous Thrombosis in Patients after Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Yun; Feng, Liang; Xiao, Mei-Juan; Chen, Si-Yan; He, Jin-Cai; Wang, Zhen

    2017-10-01

    Isolated distal deep venous thrombosis (IDDVT) is a common complication after ischemic stroke. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the clinical features and risk factors of IDDVT in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This study aimed to establish and validate a clinical prediction scale of IDDVT at an early stage of ischemic stroke development. We retrospectively studied consecutive patients with stroke admitted to our neurology department between January and December 2016. Selected clinical variables were assessed by multivariable logistic regression to determine the independent risk factors for IDDVT. A prediction scale was developed and verified by the receiver operating characteristic curve. A total of 671 patients with ischemic stroke were included in the study, with 450 patients allocated into the derivation group and 221 patients into the validation group. A substantial proportion (22.1%) of patients developed IDDVT. A 16-point prediction scale (female gender = 2, older age [≥60 years] = 3, atrial fibrillation = 2, acute infection = 2, active cancer = 5, and higher [≥2.6 mmol/L] level of low-density lipoprotein = 2) derived from a multivariable logistic regression model was highly predictive of 10-day risk of IDDVT in both the validation group (c statistic = .70, 95% confidence interval [CI], .63-0.78, P < .0001) and the derivation group (c statistic = .68, 95% CI, .63-0.74, P < .0001). This prediction scale may help to identify patients with ischemic stroke who are at a higher risk of developing IDDVT. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The incidence of deep venous thrombosis before arthroscopy among patients suffering from high-energy knee trauma.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zhen; Yao, Yao; Chen, Dongyang; Song, Kai; Zheng, Minghao; Jiang, Qing

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse the incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) before knee arthroscopy in patients who had sustained high-energy knee injuries. This study included 64 patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery as a result of injury from a traffic accident or a high fall. Venography was performed on the injured leg of each patient before arthroscopy. The patients were divided into two groups based on whether they had DVT. Correlation analysis was performed to determine the factors associated with DVT. A total of 32 (50 %) of the 64 patients had venographic evidence of DVT. Of these DVTs, seven were proximal (10.9 %). The D-dimer (DD) level was significantly higher in the DVT group, especially among the patients whose symptoms had persisted for more than 10 days. DVT is difficult to diagnose solely based on clinical symptoms, as some patients are symptomatic while others exhibit symptoms that could be attributed to trauma. The incidence of DVT before knee arthroscopy in patients with high-energy knee injuries was 50 %, and the prevalence of proximal DVT was 10.9 %. DD is a sensitive marker for DVT. No patient developed DVT with a DD level lower than 0.8 mg/L, but those with DD level higher than 1.5 mg/L had a much higher incidence of DVT developing in patients who had been injured for more than 10 days. A routine examination to exclude DVT in these patients should be performed before arthroscopy. IV.

  16. Incidence of Postoperative Deep Venous Thrombosis Is Higher among Cardiac and Vascular Surgery Patients as Compared with General Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Faisal; Patel, Mayank; Ortenzi, Gail; Reed, Amy B

    2015-01-01

    Unlike general surgery patients, most of vascular and cardiac surgery patients receive therapeutic anticoagulation during operations. The purpose of this study was to report the incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) among cardiac and vascular surgery patients, compared with general surgery. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried for all patients who underwent surgical procedures from 2005 to 2010. Patients who developed DVT within 30 days of an operation were identified. The incidence of DVT was compared among vascular, general, and cardiac surgery patients. Risk factors for developing postoperative DVT were identified and compared among these patients. Of total 2,669,772 patients underwent surgical operations in the period between 2005 and 2010. Of all the patients, 18,670 patients (0.69%) developed DVT. The incidence of DVT among different surgical specialties was cardiac surgery (2%), vascular surgery (0.99%), and general surgery (0.66%). The odds ratio for developing DVT was 1.5 for vascular surgery patients and 3 for cardiac surgery patients, when compared with general surgery patients (P < 0.001). The odds ratio for developing DVT after cardiac surgery was 2, when compared with vascular surgery (P < 0.001). The incidence of DVT is higher among vascular and cardiac surgery patients as compared with that of general surgery patients. Intraoperative anticoagulation does not prevent the occurrence of DVT in the postoperative period. These patients should receive DVT prophylaxis in the perioperative period, similar to other surgical patients according to evidence-based guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, W W

    1977-01-01

    This review of the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism includes estimates of incidence and prevalence of venous thrombosis and its sequelae, a discussion geographical, annual and seasonal variations and data concerning possible risk factors. Selection of patients at increased risk for development of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism for specific diagnostic screening or for prophylactic therapy with low-dose heparin may be a more effective approach to lowering morbidity and mortality from this disease. PMID:329779

  18. Incidence and distribution of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis at indirect computed tomography venography in patients suspected of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Nchimi, Alain; Ghaye, Benoît; Noukoua, Charlemagne T; Dondelinger, Robert F

    2007-04-01

    Indirect computed tomography (CT) venography reportedly provides high accuracy for detection of venous thrombosis in patients suspected of pulmonary embolism (PE). Nevertheless, the extent of the scanning range for lower limb and abdominal veins remains to be determined. It was the objective of this study to investigate the distribution of venous thrombosis in order to identify the most appropriate extent of scanning range when using CT venography. We reviewed 1,408 combined CT pulmonary angiographies (CTPA) and indirect CT venographies of the lower limbs, performed in patients suspected of PE. Percentage of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes PE and/or venous thrombosis was calculated. Location and the upper end of clots were recorded in 37 venous segments per patient from calf to diaphragm. PE, venous thrombosis and VTE, were found respectively in 272 (19.3%), 259 (18.4%) and 329 (23.4%) patients. Addition of CT venography to CTPA increased depiction of VTE in 17.3%. The upper end of venous thrombosis was located below the knee in 48%, between knee and inguinal ligament in 36% of the patients, and above the inguinal ligament in 15%. Ninety-six patients had thrombosis in a single vein, of which none occurred above the iliac crests in a patient without PE at CTPA. In conclusion, when added to CTPA, optimal scanning of CT venography should extent from calves to the iliac crests in patients suspected of VTE.

  19. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G genotype and residual venous occlusion following acute unprovoked deep vein thrombosis of the lower limb: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Giurgea, Georgiana-Aura; Brunner-Ziegler, Sophie; Jilma, Bernd; Sunder-Plassmann, Raute; Koppensteiner, Renate; Gremmel, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    A recent study suggested that the plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 4G/5G genotype may play a role in the resolution of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) after surgery. In the present study, we investigated the association between PAI-1 4G/5G genotype and the persistence of venous occlusion after acute idiopathic DVT of the lower limb. The PAI-1 4G/5G genotype was determined by real-Time PCR in 43 patients with unprovoked DVT of the lower limb. Residual venous occlusion was assessed by duplex sonography 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24months after the acute event. The PAI-1 Activity was determined by ELISA. Ten patients (23%) were homozygous for 4G (4G/4G), 27 patients (63%) were heterozygous 4G/5G and 6 patients (14%) were homozygous for 5G (5G/5G). Residual venous occlusion (RVO) was found in 77%, 65%, 58%, 56% and 37% of the overall study population, at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24months after acute DVT, respectively. The presence of residual venous occlusion at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24months after acute unprovoked DVT did not differ significantly between genotypes, but age was associated with RVO. Plasma levels of PAI-1 activity correlated with body mass index but was not associated with genotypes in our study. The PAI-1 4G/5G genotype was not a relevant predictor of persistent residual venous occlusion after idiopathic DVT, which however was associated with age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Incidence and Outcomes of Inferior Vena Cava Filter Thrombus during Catheter-directed Thrombolysis for Proximal Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianguang; Tu, Jianfei; Jia, Zhongzhi; Chen, Jiezhong; Cao, Haitao; Meng, Qingli; Fuller, Tyler A; Tian, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence and outcomes of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter thrombus during catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for acute proximal deep venous thrombosis (DVT). From October 2006 to June 2015, patients diagnosed with acute proximal DVT and received CDT after a retrievable IVC filter was placed were included. The incidence, treatment, and outcomes of IVC filter thrombus during CDT were recorded and analyzed. A total of 189 patients (91 women, 98 men; mean age, 57.6 ± 9.8 years; range, 24-85 years) were included in this study. Among the 189 cases, the DVTs involved popliteal iliofemoral veins in 54 patients, iliofemoral veins in 113 patients, and iliac veins in 22 patients, of which 18 patients had thrombus extended into the IVC. Of the 189 patients, a total of 8 (4.2%, 8 of 189) patients were identified with IVC filter thrombus during CDT. The IVC filter thrombus was detected on a median of 2 days (range, 2-4 days) of CDT therapy, including small-size (n = 6) and large-size (n = 2) filter thrombus. Of the 8 patients, CDTs were performed with a mean 7.6 ± 1.1 days (range, 6-11 days) after the presence of symptoms for the treatment of proximal DVT, and all the IVC filter thrombi were lysed during CDT for the proximal DVT. All the IVC filters were removed successfully with a mean of 12.8 ± 0.93 days from placement. There were no procedure- or thrombolysis-related major complications, and no symptomatic pulmonary embolism breakthrough was seen in any of the patients after the filter placement. IVC filter thrombus during CDT for the acute proximal DVT is uncommon, and all of them did not need any additional treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of ambient temperature and atmospheric evaporation on the incidence of acute deep venous thrombosis in the northeast of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yeni; Ji, Chao; Ju, Hao; Han, Yanshuo

    2017-06-01

    Meteorological variables have been reported to be associated with increased morbidity; however, fewer studies have study the correlations between the occurrences of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and meteorological variables. Data relating to hospital admissions with DVT in Shenyang were collected retrospectively for a ten year period for which corresponding meteorological recordings were available. Using a time-series design and distributed lag nonlinear models (DLNM), we estimated the relative risk (RR) of DVT presentation associated with mean daily temperatures, including cumulative RR for a 28-day period, and RR for individual daily lags through 28 days. We found significant seasonal variation in DVT with a winter peak. A significant correlation was found between the ambient temperature and the number of hospital admissions for DVT. The lower the average, minimal, and maximal ambient temperature, the higher the incidence of DVT (P=0.001, P=0.002, and P<0.001). Furthermore, high evaporation (P=0.026) and high vapor pressure (P=0.003) on the date of admission was associated with an increase in the rate of presenting with DVT. Based on a time-series analysis, this study showed that the associations between mean daily temperature and DVT presentation were not monotonic. Compared to centered temperature at 8 °C, the cumulative 28-day (lag 0 to lag 27) RR was significantly elevated at -16 °C, -15 °C, -14 °C, and -13°C for DVT (P<0.05). To the extreme low temperature (-17.7 °C) in Shenyang, the RR of cumulative 8-day (lag 0 to 7 days) was remarkably increased for DVT (RRlag8-day=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05). For the extreme high temperature, nevertheless, no particular finding was detected regarding acute and prolonged effects for DVT. In general, low ambient temperature was significantly associated with DVT presentations in comparison with that of high temperature. The effects of cold were delayed by one week. DVT is particularly associated with high

  2. Anti-Xa-guided enoxaparin thromboprophylaxis reduces rate of deep venous thromboembolism in high-risk trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Singer, George A; Riggi, Gina; Karcutskie, Charles A; Vaghaiwalla, Tanaz M; Lieberman, Howard M; Ginzburg, Enrique; Namias, Nicholas; Lineen, Edward B

    2016-12-01

    Appropriate prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains undefined. This study evaluated an anti-Xa-guided enoxaparin thromboprophylaxis (TPX) protocol on the incidence of VTE in high-risk trauma patients based on Greenfield's Risk Assessment Profile (RAP) score. This is a retrospective observational study of patients admitted to a trauma intensive care unit over a 12-month period. Patients were included if they received anti-Xa-guided enoxaparin TPX. Dosage was adjusted to a prophylactic peak anti-Xa level of 0.2 to 0.4 IU/mL. Subgroup analysis was performed on high-risk patients (RAP score ≥10) who received lower-extremity duplex ultrasound surveillance for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Data are expressed as mean ± SD. Significance was assessed at p < 0.05. One hundred thirty-one patients received anti-Xa-guided enoxaparin TPX. Four patients were excluded for age or acute VTE on admission. Fifty-six patients with RAP score of ≥10 and surveillance duplex evaluations were included in the subgroup analysis with mean age 43 ± 20 years, Injury Severity Score of 25 ± 10, and RAP score of 16 ± 4. Prophylactic anti-Xa levels were initially achieved in 34.6% of patients. An additional 25.2% required 40 to 60 mg twice daily to reach prophylactic levels; 39.4% never reached prophylactic levels. Weight, body mass index, ISS, and RAP score were significantly higher with subprophylactic anti-Xa levels. One patient developed bleeding complications (0.8%). No patient developed intracerebral bleeding or heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.Nine VTE events occurred in the high-risk subgroup, including four DVT (7.1%), all asymptomatic, and five pulmonary emboli (8.9%). The historical rate of DVT in similar patients (ISS 31 ± 12 and RAP score 16 ± 5) was 20.5%, a significant decrease (p = 0.031). Mean chest Abbreviated Injury Scale scores were significantly higher for patients developing pulmonary emboli than DVT, 3.0 ± 1.1 vs. 0.0 (p < 0.001). Mean chest

  3. Iliac Vein Compression as Risk Factor for Left- versus Right-Sided Deep Venous Thrombosis: Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Eng, John; Carmi, Lemore; McGrane, Siobhan; Ahmed, Muneeb; Sharrett, A. Richey; Streiff, Michael; Coresh, Josef; Powe, Neil; Hong, Kelvin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if compression of the left common iliac vein (LCIV) by the right common iliac artery is associated with left-sided deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Materials and Methods: This institutional review board–approved case-control study was performed in a cohort of 230 consecutive patients (94 men, 136 women; mean age, 57.5 years; range, 10–94 years) at one institution who had undergone contrast material–enhanced computed tomography of the pelvis prior to a diagnosis of unilateral DVT. Demographic data and information on risk factors were collected. Two board-certified radiologists determined iliac vein compression by using quantitative measures of percentage compression {[1 minus (LCIV diameter at point of maximal compression/distal right common iliac vein diameter)] times 100%}, as well as qualitative measures (none, mild, moderate, severe), with estimates of measurement variability. Logistic regression analysis was performed (independent variable, left vs right DVT; dependent variable, iliac vein compression). Cutpoints of relevant compression were evaluated by using splines. Means (with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) and odds ratios (ORs) (and 95% CIs) of left DVT per 1% increase in percentage compression were calculated. Results: Patients with right DVT were more likely than those with left DVT to have a history of pulmonary embolism. Overall, in all study patients, mean percentage compression was 36.6%, 66 (29.7%) of 222 had greater than 50% compression, and 16 (7.2%) had greater than 70% compression. At most levels of compression, increasing compression was not associated with left DVT (adjusted ORs, 1.00, 0.99, 1.02) but above 70%, LCIV compression may be associated with left DVT (adjusted ORs, 3.03, 0.91, 10.15). Conclusion: Increasing levels of percentage compression were not associated with left-sided DVT up to 70%; however, greater than 70% compression may be associated with left DVT. ©RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http

  4. Predicted burden of venous disease.

    PubMed

    Onida, Sarah; Davies, Alun Huw

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition with clinical signs and symptoms ranging from spider veins, to varicose veins, to active venous ulceration. Both superficial and deep venous dysfunction may be implicated in the development of this disease. Socio-economic factors are shaping our population, with increasing age and body mass index resulting in significant pressure on healthcare systems worldwide. These risk factors also lead to an increased risk of developing superficial and/or deep venous insufficiency, increasing disease prevalence and morbidity. In this chapter, the authors review the current and future burden of chronic venous disease from an epidemiological, quality of life and economic perspective.

  5. Saline flush: a simple method of reducing diazepam-induced thrombophlebitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, M K; Thompson, R P

    1982-01-01

    Five hundred outpatients undergoing endoscopy were admitted into a controlled trial comparing the incidence of thrombophlebitis following intravenous diazepam administered in the way, with the effects of either a saline flush following the diazepam or diluting the drug with the patient's own blood before injection ('barbotage'). The results were assessed using a questionnaire completed by patients two weeks after endoscopy; 80% replied. A saline flush reduced the incidence of side effects, particularly pain (P less than 0.05). 'Barbotage' gave the highest incidence of side effects. Saline flush is therefore recommended as a means of reducing the thrombophlebitis which may follow intravenous diazepam. PMID:7040657

  6. [Internal jugular thrombophlebitis: complications of the cervical oncological surgery. A case report].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Marcos, C A; Noval Menéndez, J; Alfonso Megido, J; Domínguez Iglesias, F; Hevia Llama, R; Ramos Barriga, M A

    1995-01-01

    Internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis is an infrequent complications, associated in the past to pharyngeal and amygdaline infections but related today to the use of catheters and intravenous drugs. The present paper reports the case of a patient who underwent total laryngectomy and functional neck dissection, developing recurrent neumonias and sepsis in the postoperative period which were secondary to an homolateral jugular thrombophlebitis. A physical exploration with no findings and the poor resolution of CT scan and ultrasound due to postsurgical alterations, lead to a late diagnosis and fatal evolution, in spite of the medical and surgical treatment.

  7. Dorsal spinal venous occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Arizala, A; Mora, R J; Madsen, P W; Green, B A; Hayashi, N

    1995-04-01

    Occlusion of the major components of the spinal venous system is usually associated with spinal arteriovenous malformations or systemic thrombophlebitis. Although spinal venous system dysfunction has been implicated in compressive cord syndromes, myelopathies from decompression sickness, and spinal cord trauma, its pathophysiology remains unclear. To characterize disorders associated with spinal venous occlusion, we developed a model in the rat produced by focally coagulating the dorsal spinal vein transdurally at the T7 and T10 vertebral levels. Following such occlusion, venous stasis, sludging and perivascular hemorrhages in the small venous branches were observed. By 1 week postocclusion, animals developed hindlimb paralysis from which they partially recovered over time. Histologic examination in the acute phase disclosed tissue necrosis, edema, and hemorrhages predominantly in the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord. This was gradually replaced by an intense macrophagic infiltration and the partial formation of a cystic cavity by 1 month. These findings indicate that dorsal spinal vein occlusion in the rat causes significant neurologic and pathologic alterations. We conclude that this procedure produces a relevant animal model for the study of the pathophysiology of spinal venous occlusion, and it allows the characterization of its effects on spinal cord blood flow, the blood-spinal cord barrier, and the development of edema independent of cord compression. Our findings in this model provide an insight into one of the mechanisms of injury extension in spinal cord trauma and other disorders associated with spinal venous dysfunction.

  8. Prevalence of JAK2V617F mutation in deep venous thrombosis patients and its clinical significance as a thrombophilic risk factor: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Sharma, Amit; Sazawal, Sudha; Ahuja, Ankur; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Saxena, Renu

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism is known to be a complex interaction of genetic and acquired factors leading to thrombosis. JAK2V617F mutation is believed to contribute to a thrombophilic phenotype, possibly through enhanced leukocyte-platelet interactions in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Several studies have focused on the importance of screening for JAK2V617F mutation in patients with splanchnic venous thrombosis (VT) for the detection of nonovert MPNs. The role of JAK2V617F mutation in VT outside the splanchnic region is still widely unsettled. The primary aim of this study was to find out the prevalence of JAK2V617F mutation in patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), its clinical significance as a prothrombotic risk factor, and its possible interactions with other genetic thrombophilic risk factors. A total of 148 patients with idiopathic, symptomatic DVT were evaluated. Median age of presentation was 32 years (range 15-71 years) with a sex ratio of 1.3:1. Overall, the most common genetic prothrombotic factor was factor V Leiden mutation, found in 10.8% (16 of 148) of patients who also showed strong association with increased risk of thrombosis (odds ratio 5.94, confidence interval 1.33-26.4, P = .019). Deficiencies in protein C, protein S, and antithrombin were seen in 8 (5.4%), 10 (6.7%), and 8 (5.4%) patients, respectively. It was observed that the frequency of JAK2V617F mutation was lower in Indian patients, and it also showed weaker association with risk of thrombosis, at least in cases of venous thrombosis outside the splanchnic region.

  9. Inferior vena cava filter insertion through the popliteal vein: enabling the percutaneous endovenous intervention of deep vein thrombosis with a single venous access approach in a single session

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kang, Yang Jun; Jung, Hye Doo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the efficiency of placing an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter through the same popliteal vein access site used for percutaneous endovenous intervention in patients with extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. METHODS This retrospective study included 21 patients who underwent IVC filter insertion through the popliteal vein over a three-year period. Patient medical records were reviewed for the location of the deep vein thrombosis, result of filter removal, and total number of endovascular procedures needed for filter insertion and recanalization of the lower extremity venous system. Follow-up lower extremity computed tomography (CT) venography was also reviewed in each patient to assess the degree of filter tilt in the IVC. RESULTS All patients had extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis involving the iliac vein and/or femoral vein. Seventeen patients showed deep vein thrombosis of the calf veins. In all patients, IVC filter insertion and the recanalization procedure were performed during a single procedure through the single popliteal vein access site. In the 17 patients undergoing follow-up CT, the mean tilt angle of the filter was 7.14°±4.48° in the coronal plane and 8.77°±5.49° in the sagittal plane. Filter retrieval was successful in 16 of 17 patients (94.1%) in whom filter retrieval was attempted. CONCLUSION Transpopliteal IVC filter insertion is an efficient technique that results in low rates of significant filter tilt and enables a single session procedure using a single venous access site for filter insertion and percutaneous endovenous intervention. PMID:27559713

  10. Inferior vena cava filter insertion through the popliteal vein: enabling the percutaneous endovenous intervention of deep vein thrombosis with a single venous access approach in a single session.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kang, Yang Jun; Jung, Hye Doo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficiency of placing an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter through the same popliteal vein access site used for percutaneous endovenous intervention in patients with extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. This retrospective study included 21 patients who underwent IVC filter insertion through the popliteal vein over a three-year period. Patient medical records were reviewed for the location of the deep vein thrombosis, result of filter removal, and total number of endovascular procedures needed for filter insertion and recanalization of the lower extremity venous system. Follow-up lower extremity computed tomography (CT) venography was also reviewed in each patient to assess the degree of filter tilt in the IVC. All patients had extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis involving the iliac vein and/or femoral vein. Seventeen patients showed deep vein thrombosis of the calf veins. In all patients, IVC filter insertion and the recanalization procedure were performed during a single procedure through the single popliteal vein access site. In the 17 patients undergoing follow-up CT, the mean tilt angle of the filter was 7.14°±4.48° in the coronal plane and 8.77°±5.49° in the sagittal plane. Filter retrieval was successful in 16 of 17 patients (94.1%) in whom filter retrieval was attempted. Transpopliteal IVC filter insertion is an efficient technique that results in low rates of significant filter tilt and enables a single session procedure using a single venous access site for filter insertion and percutaneous endovenous intervention.

  11. The use of indium-111 labeled platelet scanning for the detection of asymptomatic deep venous thrombosis in a high risk population

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.S.; Rae, J.L.; Ryan, N.L.; Edwards, C.; Fortune, W.P.; Lewis, R.J.; Reba, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Five hundred indium-111 labeled platelet imaging studies (387 donor and 113 autologous) were performed postoperatively in 473 patients who had undergone total hip replacement, total knee replacement, or internal fixation of a hip fracture to detect occult deep venous thrombosis. All patients had been anticoagulated prophylactically with aspirin, warfarin sodium (Coumadin), or dextran. Thirty-four possible cases of proximal deep venous thrombosis were identified in 28 asymptomatic patients. To verify the scan results, 31 venograms were performed in 25 patients (three refused). In 21 of 31 cases, totally occlusive thrombi were detected; in 5 cases, partially occlusive thrombi were detected; in 5 cases, no thrombus was seen. No patient who had a negative scan nor any patient who had a verified positive scan (and received appropriate heparin therapy) subsequently developed symptoms or signs of pulmonary embolism. One hundred forty-one indium study patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography/impedance plethysmography (Doppler/IPG) as a comparative non-invasive technique. In 137 cases, the results of the indium study and Doppler/IPG studies were congruent. The indium study had no false negative results that were detected by Doppler/IPG. No patient had any clinically evident toxicity. These results suggest that indium-111 labeled platelet scanning is a safe, noninvasive means for identifying DVT in high risk patients.

  12. Risk Factors for Deep Venous Thrombosis Following Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery: An Analysis of 56,000 patients

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Paul S.; White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A.; Greenberg, Sarah E.; VanHouten, Jacob P.; Avilucea, Frank R.; Obremskey, William T.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are recognized as major causes of morbidity and mortality in orthopaedic trauma patients. Despite the high incidence of these complications following orthopaedic trauma, there is a paucity of literature investigating the clinical risk factors for DVT in this specific population. As our healthcare system increasingly emphasizes quality measures, it is critical for orthopaedic surgeons to understand the clinical factors that increase the risk of DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Objectives: Utilizing the ACS-NSQIP database, we sought to determine the incidence and identify independent risk factors for DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Patients and Methods: Using current procedural terminology (CPT) codes for orthopaedic trauma procedures, we identified a prospective cohort of patients from the 2006 to 2013 ACS-NSQIP database. Using Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests where appropriate, patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative factors were compared between patients who developed a DVT within 30 days of surgery and those who did not. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and identify independent risk factors for DVT. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: 56,299 orthopaedic trauma patients were included in the analysis, of which 473 (0.84%) developed a DVT within 30 days. In univariate analysis, twenty-five variables were significantly associated with the development of a DVT, including age (P < 0.0001), BMI (P = 0.037), diabetes (P = 0.01), ASA score (P < 0.0001) and anatomic region injured (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified several independent risk factors for development of a DVT including use of a ventilator (OR = 43.67, P = 0.039), ascites (OR = 41.61, P = 0.0038), steroid use (OR = 4.00, P < 0.001), and alcohol use (OR = 2.98, P = 0.0370). Compared to patients with upper extremity trauma, those with lower

  13. The Influence of a Pfannenstiel Scar on Venous Anatomy of the Lower Abdominal Wall and Implications for Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Young; Lee, Kyeong-Tae; Mun, Goo-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    A Pfannenstiel incision involves the obstruction of superficial venous pathways and functional diversion of flow through alternative pathways and adjacent vessels. This study investigated the effect of a prior Pfannenstiel incision on venous anatomy of the lower abdominal wall; specifically, the superficial inferior epigastric vein (SIEV), using computed tomographic angiography. A case-control study was performed of 50 patients with Pfannenstiel scars and 50 age-matched, body mass index-matched control patients without Pfannenstiel scars. The authors compared the number of direct/indirect and total communications between the SIEV and deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) venae comitantes, midline crossover, and other SIEV-related anatomical changes by using computed tomographic angiography. Flap-related clinical outcomes and donor-site-related complications were also assessed. The median number of direct and total communications between the SIEV and DIEP venae comitantes in the study group was greater than in the control group. The percentage of SIEVs having more than two branching patterns per hemiabdomen was significantly higher in the study group than in the control group. The study group also showed a significantly lower rate of fat necrosis compared with the control group (p = 0.03). The rate of donor-site seroma was significantly higher in the study group. This study suggests that the presence of a Pfannenstiel scar may promote the development of direct and total communications between the SIEV and DIEP venae comitantes and branching within the SIEV in the lower abdominal wall, which may facilitate venous drainage of adipose tissue in DIEP flap breast reconstruction. Risk, II.

  14. Deep venous thrombosis of the neck and pulmonary embolism in patients with a central venous catheter admitted to cardiac rehabilitation after cardiac surgery: a prospective study of 815 patients.

    PubMed

    Frizzelli, Rino; Tortelli, Ornella; Di Comite, Vincenzo; Ghirardi, Redenta; Pinzi, Claudio; Scarduelli, Cleante

    2008-12-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are widely used for therapeutic purposes and to measure hemodynamic variables that cannot be recorded from a peripheral vein. However, the method can involve complications. In cardiac surgery, CVCs are electively placed in the right internal jugular vein but there is little information on deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in catheterized veins (CVC-related DVT) or on secondary pulmonary embolism (PE). The impact of CVC-related DVT and PE in cardiac surgery and measures to prevent PE were assessed. We used ultrasonography (US) to check the point of insertion of CVC in 815 patients in the intensive cardiac rehabilitation unit after heart surgery. In this series, 386 patients (48%) had CVC-related DVT; those already receiving anticoagulant, and considered at low risk, continued that therapy, while those taking an antiplatelet agent (aspirin 100 mg daily) but deemed at high risk of PE from the US findings were given an anticoagulant instead. Only patients with CVC-related DVT at low risk of PE continued taking aspirin. At 3 months, there were no cases of PE among patients receiving an anticoagulant, but six on antiplatelet had non-fatal PE. The prevalence of PE in the whole series of 815 patients was 0.7%. CVC-related DVT is a frequent complication of heart surgery. Anticoagulant therapy started early does not prevent thrombus formation but probably prevents PE, whereas antiplatelet gives no such protection. Sonographic screening of the CVC removal in intensive care unit may be useful for avoiding PE after CVC-related DVT.

  15. Supermicrosurgical deep lymphatic vessel-to-venous anastomosis for a breast cancer-related arm lymphedema with severe sclerosis of superficial lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Yamamoto, Nana; Hayashi, Akitatsu; Koshima, Isao

    2017-02-01

    Lymphatic supermicrosurgery or supermicrosurgical lymphaticovenular anastomosis (LVA) is becoming popular for the treatment of compression-refractory upper extremity lymphedema (UEL) with its effectiveness and minimally invasiveness. In conventional LVA, superficial lymphatic vessels are used for anastomosis, but its treatment efficacy would be minimum when superficial lymphatic vessels are severely sclerotic. Theoretically, deep lymphatic vessels can be used for LVA, but no clinical case has been reported regarding deep lymphatic vessel-to-venous anastomosis (D-LVA). We report a breast cancer-related UEL case treated with D-LVA, in which a less-sclerotic deep lymphatic vessel was useful for anastomosis but superficial lymphatic vessels were not due to severe sclerosis. A 62-year-old female suffered from an 18-year history of compression-refractory right UEL after right breast cancer treatments, and underwent LVA under local infiltration anesthesia. Because superficial lymphatic vessels found in surgical fields were all severely sclerotic, a deep lymphatic vessel was dissected at the cubital fossa. A 0.50-mm deep lymphatic vessel running along the brachial artery was supermicrosurgically anastomosed to a nearby 0.40-mm vein. At postoperative 12 months, her right UEL index decreased from 134 to 118, and she could reduce compression frequency from every day to 1-2 days per week to maintain the reduced lymphedematous volume. D-LVA may be a useful option for the treatment of compression-refractory UEL, when superficial lymphatic vessels are severely sclerotic. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 37:156-159, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. D-dimer is not elevated in asymptomatic high altitude climbers after descent to 5340 m: the Mount Everest Deep Venous Thrombosis Study (Ev-DVT).

    PubMed

    Zafren, Ken; Feldman, Joanne; Becker, Robert J; Williams, Sarah R; Weiss, Eric A; Deloughery, Tom

    2011-01-01

    We performed this study to determine the prevalence of elevated D-dimer, a marker for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), in asymptomatic high altitude climbers. On-site personnel enrolled a convenience sample of climbers at Mt. Everest Base Camp (Nepal), elevation 5340 m (17,500 ft), during a single spring climbing season. Subjects were enrolled after descent to base camp from higher elevation. The subjects completed a questionnaire to evaluate their risk factors for DVT. We then performed a D-dimer test in asymptomatic individuals. If the D-dimer test was negative, DVT was considered ruled out. Ultrasound was available to perform lower-extremity compression ultrasounds to evaluate for DVT in case the D-dimer was positive. We enrolled 76 high altitude climbers. None had a positive D-dimer test. The absence of positive D-dimer tests suggests a low prevalence of DVT in asymptomatic high altitude climbers.

  17. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  18. [Factor V Leiden (G1691A) and prothrombin-G20210A alleles among patients with deep venous thrombosis and in the general population from Spain].

    PubMed

    Francès, Francesc; Portolès, Olga; Gabriel, Francisco; Corella, Dolores; Sorlí, José Vicente; Sabater, Antonio; Alfonso, José L; Guillén, Marisa

    2006-01-01

    Factor V leiden and the -G20210A variant of prothrombin gene are associated to a higher risk of deep venous thrombosis. To assess the frequency of factor V Leiden (G1691A) and prothrombin -G20210A alleles in patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and in the general population from Spain. Factor V Leiden (g1691a) and prothrombin-g20210a alleles were genotyped in 493 individuals from the Spanish general populations and in 131 patients with DVT. The presence of DVT was confirmed by phlebography. Allelic frequencies and the DVT risk associated with these variants were estimated. Allelic frequencies for the factor V Leiden (G1691A) allele were 0.019 in patients with DVT and 0.010 in the general population (p=0.235). The frequencies for the prothrombin-G20210A allele were 0.027 and 0.026 (p=0.975). After adjustment for age and gender, the odds ratio for DVT, associated with the presence of G1691A allele was 2.41, but not statistically significant (95% confidence intervals 0.63-9.19). Prothrombin-G20210A allele was more prevelant than factor V Leiden (G1691A) allele in the Spanish population. However, the magnitude of the association between the G20210A and DVT risk is very low. On the contrary, the G1691A allele is associated by itself with a two fold increase in DVT risk in this population although without reaching statistical significance due to its low frequency.

  19. The use of natural language processing on pediatric diagnostic radiology reports in the electronic health record to identify deep venous thrombosis in children.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Jorge A; Pappas, Janine M; Ahumada, Luis; Martin, John N; Simpao, Allan F; Rehman, Mohamed A; Witmer, Char

    2017-08-16

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially life-threatening condition that includes both deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism. We sought to improve detection and reporting of children with a new diagnosis of VTE by applying natural language processing (NLP) tools to radiologists' reports. We validated an NLP tool, Reveal NLP (Health Fidelity Inc, San Mateo, CA) and inference rules engine's performance in identifying reports with deep venous thrombosis using a curated set of ultrasound reports. We then configured the NLP tool to scan all available radiology reports on a daily basis for studies that met criteria for VTE between July 1, 2015, and March 31, 2016. The NLP tool and inference rules engine correctly identified 140 out of 144 reports with positive DVT findings and 98 out of 106 negative reports in the validation set. The tool's sensitivity was 97.2% (95% CI 93-99.2%), specificity was 92.5% (95% CI 85.7-96.7%). Subsequently, the NLP tool and inference rules engine processed 6373 radiology reports from 3371 hospital encounters. The NLP tool and inference rules engine identified 178 positive reports and 3193 negative reports with a sensitivity of 82.9% (95% CI 74.8-89.2) and specificity of 97.5% (95% CI 96.9-98). The system functions well as a safety net to screen patients for HA-VTE on a daily basis and offers value as an automated, redundant system. To our knowledge, this is the first pediatric study to apply NLP technology in a prospective manner for HA-VTE identification.

  20. Application of colour Doppler in encircling constriction of the superficial femoral vein in primary deep venous insufficiency of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Wang, Ling; Yi, Jun; Yao, Qing; Chen, Jiang-Hao; Yuan, Shi-Fang; Zhang, Ju-Liang; Yun, Jun; Han, Zeng-Hui; Ren, Jun; Ling, Rui

    2011-12-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical value of colour Doppler application in encircling constriction of the superficial femoral vein in deep vein insufficiency. 2. A total of 87 patients with primary deep venous insufficiency (PDVI) using ascending venography were randomly divided into group A (44 patients) and group B (43 patients). All patients underwent encircling constriction of the superficial femoral vein, high ligation and ablation of the great saphenous vein and perforator vein. The duration of venous reflux at operation was monitored with colour Doppler in group A (but not group B) to evaluate the immediate effects. Clinical grading and scoring of the clinical, etiological, anatomical, pathophysiological (CEAP) classification system were used to evaluate the follow-up curative effect. 3. In four cases from group A, completely destroyed valves were identified at the time of operation and autografting of the vein segment with a valve was carried out. The intraoperative examination of colour Doppler in group A showed a much shorter duration of vein reflux after the encircling constriction procedure than the presurgery condition. According to the results of CEAP grading, the success rate of group A (95.0%, 38/40) was significantly higher than that of group B (76.7%, 33/43). Postoperative clinical scores were markedly lower than preoperative scores in both groups A and B. 4. In conclusion, our data suggest that application of colour Doppler in encircling constriction of superficial femoral vein might enhance surgical pertinence and improve surgical effect for PDVI. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Post-thrombotic syndrome 3 years after deep venous thrombosis in the Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism in Out-Patients (TULIPA) PLUS Registry.

    PubMed

    Hach-Wunderle, Viola; Bauersachs, Rupert; Gerlach, Horst-Eberhard; Eberle, Sonja; Schellong, Sebastian; Riess, Hanno; Carnarius, Heike; Rabe, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    Reported post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) rates may be confounded by including patients with a history of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) before the index event, varicose veins, or chronic venous insufficiency independent of PTS. We were interested in assessing PTS incidence rates of patients without these pre-existing disease conditions. A prospective registry with a 3-year follow-up after an initial DVT was assessed. Available for analysis were 135 ambulatory patients without a history of DVT (before the index DVT), signs of varicose veins, or chronic venous insufficiency affecting the ipsilateral or contralateral leg, and Villalta score. PTS was detected in 24.5% of patients, with 17.0% having mild (Villalta score, 5-9), 6.0% moderate (score, 10-14), and 1.5% severe PTS (score ≥15) after a first DVT. Of these, 52.6% had proximal and 47.4% distal DVT; 63.7% were provoked and 35.6% unprovoked (one patient missing). Patients with proximal DVT (32.4%) significantly more often developed any PTS compared with patients with distal DVT (15.6%; P = .024); however, groups were similar with regard to severity of PTS by the four-level Villalta score (P = .109). In univariate analysis, PTS was more frequent (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval) with higher age (1.06 per year; 1.02-1.09), a body mass index of 25 to 30 kg/m(2) (2.38; 0.71-7.97) and ≥30 kg/m(2) (6.08; 1.75-21.14), proximal vs distal DVT (2.59; 1.12-5.98), and calf swelling ≥3 cm larger than the asymptomatic leg (3.77; 1.66-8.55). In a multivariate analysis, age (1.05; 1.01-1.09) and calf swelling ≥3 cm larger than the asymptomatic leg (2.94; 1.20-7.20) remained predictive for PTS. Compression therapy was used by 78.5% of patients at the 1-year follow-up and by 46.7% at the 3-year follow-up. Both rates were higher in patients with PTS (93.9%) vs no PTS (66.7%). This prospective survey demonstrates a low rate of PTS in patients with a first DVT and no pre-existing DVT, varicose veins, or chronic venous

  2. Low molecular weight heparin for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis: a suitable monitoring in elderly patients?

    PubMed

    Mahé, Isabelle; Drouet, Ludovic; Chassany, Oliver; Grenard, Anne-Sophie; Caulin, Charles; Bergmann, Jean-François

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring of anti-Xa activity (aXa) levels is not routinely required in patients receiving enoxaparine at prophylactic dosages, since aXa is supposed to stay below the manufacturer's recommended range in patients treated for venous thrombosis (0.5-1 IU/ml). In order to aXa in elderly subjects receiving prophylactic enoxaparin, 68 consecutive patients (mean age 82.5 +/- 10.7 years) hospitalized in a medical department receiving 4000 IU enoxaparin daily subcutaneously for the prevention of venous thromboembolic disease were studied. After the first injection of enoxaparin, the aXa of 57.4% patients was superior to 0.5 IU/ml while 69.4% had an aXa higher than 0.5 after 8.4 +/- 1.2 days. A negative relationship between aXa and body weight and a trend towards a positive correlation between aXa and age but not with creatinine clearance were noted. Our findings question the opportunity to monitor aXa in elderly patients receiving 4000 IU enoxaparin as antithrombotic prophylaxis.

  3. Difficult peripheral venous access: clinical evaluation of a catheter inserted with the Seldinger method under ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Pascal; Cronier, Pierrick; Rousseau, Hélène; Vicaut, Eric; Choukroun, Gerald; Chergui, Karim; Chevrel, Guillaume; Maury, Eric

    2014-10-01

    A preliminary observational study was undertaken to evaluate the risk of failure of ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheterization of a deep arm vein for a maximum of 7 days, after peripheral intravenous (PIV) cannulation failure. This prospective study included patients referred to the intensive care unit for placement of a central line, a polyurethane cannula commercialized for arterial catheterization was used for peripheral venous cannulation. Catheter length and diameter were chosen based on preliminary ultrasound measurements of vein diameter and skin-vein distance. Catheterization was successful for all 29 patients. Mean vein diameter was 0.42 ± 0.39 cm; mean vein depth was 0.94 ± 0.52 cm. Mean catheter duration was 6 (median 7) days. Two occluded catheters were removed prematurely. No thrombophlebitis, catheter infection, or extravasation was observed. Our results suggest that catheters inserted with the Seldinger method are adapted to prolonged peripheral deep-vein infusion. Ultrasound can play a role in catheter monitoring by identifying early thrombosis formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Microcirculatory efficacy of topical treatment with aescin + essential phospholipids gel in venous insufficiency and hypertension: new clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, G; Cesarone, M R; Dugall, M

    2004-01-01

    Aescin + essential phospholipids (AEPL) topical gels are used for local treatment of venous and microcirculatory alterations (varicose veins, chronic venous insufficiency). Bruises, swelling, thrombophlebitis, and contusions are effectively treated with AEPL. Active ingredients are escinate and essential phospholipids (EPL). The aim of this new study was the evaluation of the efficacy of the effects of AEPL gel on the microcirculation in subjects with chronic venous insufficiency, venous hypertension (CVH), and venous microangiopathy. Patients were assessed measuring skin flux with laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). After 2 weeks of local treatment, all individual values (100%) were significantly decreased (p < 0.05), indicating an improvement in the microcirculation. In all treated patients, flux decreased at least 30% (indicating a decrease in the level of venous microangiopathy) (p < 0.05). Considering these observations, topical treatment with AEPL in areas of venous microangiopathy is beneficial, can prevent ulceration, and improves the skin healing processes.

  5. Microcirculatory efficacy of topical treatment with aescin + essential phospholipids gel on transcutaneous PO2 in venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Belcaro, G; Ippolito, E; Ricci, A; Ruffini, M; Dugall, M

    2004-01-01

    A gel including aescin, essential phospholipids (EPL), and heparin (EG) has been used for many years for local treatment of venous, microcirculatory alterations (varicose veins, chronic venous insufficiency). Bruises, swelling, thrombophlebitis, and contusions are effectively treated with this compound. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the efficacy of the effects of an AEPL (aescin+EPL) gel on the microcirculation in subjects with chronic venous insufficiency, venous hypertension (CVH), and venous microangiopathy. Transcutaneous PO(2) was measured at the perimalleolar region. After 2 weeks of treatment, all individual values (100%) were significantly increased (p < 0.05). In all patients, PO(2) increased, indicating a decrease in level of venous microangiopathy. Considering transcutaneous skin PO(2), treatment with AEPL in areas of venous microangiopathy is beneficial in the prevention of ulceration and improves skin healing.

  6. Retrievable Günther Tulip Vena Cava Filter in the prevention of pulmonary embolism in patients with acute deep venous thrombosis in perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Köcher, Martin; Krcova, Vera; Cerna, Marie; Prochazka, Martin

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the retrievable Günther Tulip Vena Cava Filter in the prevention of pulmonary embolism in patients with acute deep vein thrombosis in the perinatal period and to discuss the technical demands associated with the filter's implantation and retrieval. Between 1996 until 2007, eight women (mean age 27.4 years, range 20-42 years) with acute deep iliofemoral venous thrombosis in the perinatal period of pregnancy and increased risk of pulmonary embolism during delivery were indicated for retrievable Günther Tulip Vena Cava Filter implantation. All filters were inserted and removed under local anesthesia from the jugular approach. The Günther Tulip Vena Cava Filter was implanted suprarenally in all patients on the day of caesarean delivery. In follow-up cavograms performed just before planned filter removal, no embolus was seen in the filter in any patient. In all patients the filter was retrieved without complications on the 12th day after implantation. Retrievable Günther Tulip Vena Cava Filters can be inserted and removed in patients during the perinatal period without major complications.

  7. Idraparinux versus standard therapy in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis in cancer patients: a subgroup analysis of the Van Gogh DVT trial.

    PubMed

    van Doormaal, Frederiek F; Cohen, Alexander T; Davidson, Bruce L; Decousus, Herve; Gallus, Alexander S; Gent, Michael; Piovella, Franco; Prins, Martin H; Raskob, Gary E; Büller, Harry R

    2010-07-01

    Standard treatment with heparin followed by vitamin K antagonists is frequently complicated by bleeding and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients with VTE. To compare the efficacy, safety and overall survival of long-term idraparinux treatment to standard therapy in cancer patients we conducted a post-hoc analysis in the subgroup of non-active and active cancer patients included in the Van Gogh DVT clinical trial. The cancer patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and without pulmonary embolism (PE) were randomised to standard treatment or a once-weekly subcutaneous injection of idraparinux (2.5 mg), a synthetic pentasaccharide. 421 cancer patients were included. A total of 220 patients received idraparinux and 201 were allocated to standard therapy for three months (8%) or six months (92%). A recurrent VTE was observed during the first six months in 2.5% (n=5) of the idraparinux recipients compared to 6.4% (n=12) in the standard therapy group (hazard ratio 0.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]; 0.14-1.11). The rate of bleeding was comparable (odds ratio 0.89, 95% CI; 0.50-1.59). The outcomes were similar at three months after randomisation in all patients. Of the idraparinux recipients, 22.7% (n=50) died during the study period compared to 48 patients (23.9%) in the standard treatment group (hazard ratio 0.99, 95% CI; 0.66-1.48). In conclusion, no significant safety or survival differences were observed between cancer patients with DVT treated with idraparinux for six months compared to standard therapy. Fewer recurrent VTEs were observed in the idraparinux group; however, this was not statistically significant and also because of study limitations this should be interpreted with caution.

  8. Prognostic significance of residual venous obstruction in patients with treated unprovoked deep vein thrombosis: a patient-level meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Donadini, Marco P; Ageno, Walter; Antonucci, Emilia; Cosmi, Benilde; Kovacs, Michael J; Le Gal, Grégoire; Ockelford, Paul; Poli, Daniela; Prandoni, Paolo; Rodger, Marc; Saccullo, Giorgia; Siragusa, Sergio; Young, Laura; Bonzini, Matteo; Caprioli, Monica; Dentali, Francesco; Iorio, Alfonso; Douketis, James D

    2014-01-01

    Residual venous obstruction (RVO) could improve the stratification of the risk of recurrence after unprovoked deep vein thrombosis (DVT), but results from clinical studies and study-level meta-analyses are conflicting. It was the objective of this analysis to determine if RVO is a valid predictor of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with a first unprovoked DVT who had received at least three months of anticoagulant therapy. Individual patient data were obtained from the datasets of original studies, after a systematic search of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library), supplemented by manual reviewing of the reference lists and contacting content experts. A multivariate, shared-frailty Cox model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for recurrent VTE, including, as covariates: RVO; age; sex; anticoagulation duration before RVO assessment; and anticoagulation continuation after RVO assessment. A total of 2,527 patients from 10 prospective studies were included. RVO was found in 1,380 patients (55.1%) after a median of six months from a first unprovoked DVT. Recurrent VTE occurred in 399 patients (15.8%) during a median follow-up of 23.3 months. After multivariate Cox analysis, RVO was independently associated with recurrent VTE (HR = 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.65). The association was stronger if RVO was detected early, i.e. at three months after DVT (HR = 2.17; 95% CI: 1.11-4.25), but non-significant if detected later, i.e. >6 months (HR = 1.19; 95% CI: 0.87-1.61). In conclusion, after a first unprovoked DVT, RVO is a weak overall predictor of recurrent VTE. The association is stronger if RVO is detected at an earlier time (3 months) after thrombosis.

  9. Role of IVC Filters in Endovenous Therapy for Deep Venous Thrombosis: The FILTER-PEVI (Filter Implantation to Lower Thromboembolic Risk in Percutaneous Endovenous Intervention) Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, Mohsen; Bay, Curt; Skrocki, Laura; Lawson, David; Mazdeh, Shahnaz

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the necessity of and recommend indications for inferior vena cava (IVC) filter implantation during percutaneous endovenous intervention (PEVI) for deep venous thrombosis (DVT).BackgroundPEVI has emerged as a powerful tool in the management of acute proximal DVT. Instrumentation of extensive fresh thrombus is potentially associated with iatrogenic pulmonary embolism (PE). The true frequency of this complication has not been studied in a randomized fashion. We evaluated IVC filter implantation during PEVI for DVT. Methods: A total of 141 patients with symptomatic proximal DVT undergoing PEVI for symptomatic DVT were randomized to receive an IVC filter (70 patients) or no filter (71 patients; control group). The anticoagulation and PEVI regimen were similar between the two groups. Patients with development of symptoms suggestive of PE underwent objective testing for PE. Results: PE developed in 1 of the 14 symptomatic patients in the filter group and 8 of the 22 patients in the control group (P = 0.048). There was no mortality in any group. Three patients (4.2%) in the control group had transient hemodynamic instability necessitating resuscitory efforts. Predictors of iatrogenic PE were found to be PE at admission; involvement of two or more adjacent venous segments with acute thrombus; inflammatory form of DVT (severe erythema, edema, pain, and induration); and vein diameter of {>=}7 mm with preserved architecture. Conclusions: IVC filter implantation during PEVI reduces the risk of iatrogenic PE by eightfold without a mortality benefit. A selective approach may be exercised in filter implantation during PEVI.

  10. CT venography for deep venous thrombosis: can it predict catheter-directed thrombolysis prognosis in patients with iliac vein compression syndrome?

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Woo; Jae, Hwan Jun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Min, Sang-Il; Min, Seung-Kee; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT venography for catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) in iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS) patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. Among the 201 consecutive patients treated in our interventional suite for DVT from January 2001 to June 2013, 48 IVCS patients (12 men, 36 women) who underwent pre-procedural CT venography, CDT with stenting, and follow-up imaging were analyzed. To identify possible determinants of 6-month patency, CT venography was evaluated with Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analyses. Based on the analyses, image-based criteria were established and compared to the current symptom duration-based approach by receiver-operating-characteristic curve analyses and the McNemar test. Recoiling of external iliac vein (EIV) diameter (<120 %) [hazard ratio (HR) 28.652, p = .007] and severe rim enhancement (HR 20.545, p = .016) were significant risk factors for venous occlusion within 6 months of CDT. The dual-parameter image-based criteria were significantly superior to the current symptom duration-based approach in terms of area under the curve value (p = .010) and predictive accuracy (p = .031). With a 2-point cut-off, the proposed criteria demonstrated a 66.7 % sensitivity, 100.0 % specificity, and 92.9 % predictive accuracy for identifying non-responders of CDT. CT venography may be useful in assessing CDT prognoses in IVCS patients, particularly to identify non-responders who demonstrate recoiling of EIV diameter and rim enhancement on CT venography.

  11. [Isolated iliac deep venous thrombosis. Study of 48 cases seen in 7 years among 18,297 echo-Doppler evaluations of the lower limbs].

    PubMed

    Barrellier, M T; Lezin, B; Monsallier, J M

    2001-12-01

    Isolated iliac venous thrombosis (IIVT) is uncommon. Duplex ultrasonography of the iliac vessels is not recommended and not generally performed. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of IIVT in a hospital recruitment population and to identify characteristic features of onset which might be associated with this localization in order to better target explorations. The study included 18,297 patients referred for Duplex-ultrasonographic exploration of possible deep vein thrombosis of the lower limbs between January 1st 1994 and December 31st 2000. Selection of isolated iliac thrombosis, defined as the absence of retrograde extension to the common femoral vein, was made from the digitalized data recorded daily. The following factors were tested: sex, age, absence of clinical signs in the lower limb, presence of pulmonary signs. The raw odds ratios were calculated followed by construction of a multivariate logistic regression model. The circumstances of onset were retrieved from the patient's medical files. Isolated iliac venous thrombosis was discovered in 48 patients, i.e. 0.26% (95% CI 0.19%-0.35%) in the recruitment population and 0.82% (95% CI 0.61%-1.09%) among the 5827 patients with thrombosis. The common iliac was involved predominantly (35 out of 48). The left side predominated in women compared with men (24/36 versus 4/12) (p = 0.04). Specifically female circumstances (oral contraceptives, peri-obstetrical period) always led to a left localization. For the other identified circumstances (cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, orthopedic surgery, pelvic trauma), there was no predominant side. Variables explaining the multivariate model were sex, age (less than or more than 35 years), suspected pulmonary embolism, and age interaction with suspected pulmonary embolism. For women, the risk of IIVT was twice as high as for men (OR = 1.97, 95% CI 1.02-3.81). Young age was also a risk factor for IIVT and increased with suspected pulmonary embolism

  12. The Diagnostic Value of 3-Dimensional Sampling Perfection With Application Optimized Contrasts Using Different Flip Angle Evolutions (SPACE) MRI in Evaluating Lower Extremity Deep Venous Thrombus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Xie, Ruyi; Zhang, Xiaoli; Morelli, John; Yan, Xu; Zhu, Xiaolei; Li, Xiaoming

    2017-07-12

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging utilizing sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions (SPACE) in detecting deep venous thrombus (DVT) of the lower extremity and evaluating clot burden. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Ninety-four consecutive patients (42 men, 52 women; age range, 14-87 years; average age, 52.7 years) suspected of lower extremity DVT underwent ultrasound (US) and SPACE. The venous visualization score for SPACE was determined by 2 radiologists independently according to a 4-point scale (1-4, poor to excellent). The sensitivity and specificity of SPACE in detecting DVT were calculated based on segment, limb, and patient, with US serving as the reference standard. The clot burden for each segment was scored (0-3, patent to entire segment occlusion). The clot burden score obtained with SPACE was compared with US using a Wilcoxon test based on region, limb, and patient. Interobserver agreement in assessing DVT (absent, nonocclusive, or occlusive) with SPACE was determined by calculating Cohen kappa coefficients. The mean venous visualization score for SPACE was 3.82 ± 0.50 for reader 1 and 3.81 ± 0.50 for reader 2. For reader 1, sensitivity/specificity values of SPACE in detecting DVT were 96.53%/99.90% (segment), 95.24%/99.04% (limb), and 95.89%/95.24% (patient). For reader 2, corresponding values were 97.20%/99.90%, 96.39%/99.05%, and 97.22%/95.45%. The clot burden assessed with SPACE was not significantly different from US (P > 0.05 for region, limb, patient). Interobserver agreement of SPACE in assessing thrombosis was excellent (kappa = 0.894 ± 0.014). Non-contrast-enhanced 3-dimensional SPACE magnetic resonance imaging is highly accurate in detecting lower extremity DVT and reliable in the evaluation of clot burden. SPACE could serve as an important alternative for patients in whom US

  13. [Developmental venous anomaly (DVA)].

    PubMed

    Zimmer, A; Hagen, T; Ahlhelm, F; Viera, J; Reith, W; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G

    2007-10-01

    As congenital anatomic variants of venous drainage, developmental venous anomalies (DVA) represent up to 60% of all cerebral vascular malformations. The prior term "venous angioma" is a misnomer implicating an abnormal vascular structure with an increased bleeding risk. They are often found incidentally and are hardly ever symptomatic. Their morphologic characteristics are dilated vessels in the white matter, which converge on a greater collector vein, forming the typical caput medusae. They drain into the superficial or deep venous system. The frequent association with other, potentially bleeding-prone vascular malformations is clinically relevant, in particular cavernous angioma, which might require therapeutic action. Therefore, coincident vascular lesions need to be actively sought by appropriate additional imaging techniques.

  14. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  15. Presence of varicose veins in cancer patients increases the risk for occurrence of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Königsbrügge, O; Lötsch, F; Reitter, E-M; Brodowicz, T; Zielinski, C; Pabinger, I; Ay, C

    2013-11-01

    Cancer patients are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). We investigated the association of a history of VTE, superficial thrombophlebitis, or the presence of varicose veins with the occurrence of VTE during the course of cancer. Cancer patients were recruited in a prospective cohort study, the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study. Patients who had VTE within 3 months before study inclusion were excluded. At study inclusion, history of VTE, history of superficial thrombophlebitis, and presence of varicose veins were recorded. Primary end point was the occurrence of symptomatic VTE. Hazard ratios were obtained using the competing risk analysis according to Fine and Gray. The cohort consisted of 1270 patients followed over a median of 590 days. A history of VTE was found in 66 patients (5.2%), superficial thrombophlebitis in 79 patients (6.2%), and varicose veins in 160 patients (12.6%). Ninety-eight patients (7.7%) developed VTE during follow-up. The hazard ratios for the risk of VTE in patients with a history of VTE or superficial thrombophlebitis were 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 0.67-3.07) and 1.94 (1.04-3.61), respectively, and 2.01 (1.26-3.21) in those with varicose veins. In multivariable analysis including history of VTE, history of superficial thrombophlebitis, presence of varicose veins, and other patient-related factors, the presence of varicose veins (2.10 [1.29-3.41]) remained significantly associated with an increased risk of VTE. The presence of varicose veins is associated with an elevated risk of VTE in cancer patients. This clinical parameter could be useful for individual risk assessment of VTE in these patients. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  16. Residual vein obstruction to predict the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with deep vein thrombosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Carrier, M; Rodger, M A; Wells, P S; Righini, M; LE Gal, G

    2011-06-01

     Residual vein obstruction (RVO) detected on compression ultrasonography of the leg after a few months of anticoagulation therapy might be able to identify patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) at high risk of having a recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE).  To determine whether RVO is associated with an increased risk of recurrent events in patients with DVT.  A systematic literature search strategy was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. We selected 14 articles (nine prospective cohort studies and five randomized controlled trials) that included patients with DVT who had an assessment for RVO with the use of compression ultrasonography. Two reviewers independently extracted data onto standardized forms.  Overall, the presence of RVO was not associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE (odds ratio [OR] 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-1.7) in patients with unprovoked DVT who stopped oral anticoagulation therapy at the time of RVO assessment. However, RVO was significantly associated with recurrent VTE in patients with any (unprovoked or provoked) DVT (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.0).  RVO was associated with a modestly increased risk of recurrent VTE in patients with DVT (unprovoked and provoked). However, RVO did not seem to be a predictor of recurrent VTE in patients with unprovoked DVT following anticoagulation discontinuation. Further prospective studies are needed to assess the role of RVO in patients with unprovoked DVT. © 2011 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. Thalidomide induced deep venous thrombosis in a case of steroid dependent erythema nodosum leprosum- a management conundrum.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Upinder; Chakrabarti, Sankha Shubhra; Gambhir, Indrajeet Singh; Singh, Rohit

    2017-05-18

    Thalidomide, previously banned owing to the issues of teratogenicity is being used and tested for a variety of dermatological and non dermatological conditions. The drug has been approved for the management of ENL and Multiple myeloma. The drug is commonly known to produce adverse effects like peripheral neuropathy and constipation. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is one of the serious adverse effects seen with thalidomide use, especially in malignancies and is relatively uncommon in non cancer settings like ENL. Here we report a case of DVT induced after 8 months of use of thalidomide in a young patient of 22 years age suffering from ENL. The case also highlights the problems faced in the management of refractory ENL and the treatment of DVT in the setting of multiple drug interactions and financial constraints. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Catheter-directed thrombolysis in management of postpartum lower limb deep venous thrombosis – A case series

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, B.C.; Patra, Soumya; Nagesh, C.M.; Reddy, Babu; Manjunath, C.N.

    2015-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major health problem in pregnancy and postpartum period. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is safe and effective in the management of symptomatic DVT. Value of CDT in postpartum DVT is not fully evaluated. We describe five patients presenting with acute iliofemoral DVT in their early postpartum period who were treated with mechanical thromboaspiration and CDT. The CDT was done using streptokinase infusion and unfractionated heparin. Percutaneous angioplasty was done in patients with symptomatic residual lesion following thrombolysis. Patients were discharged with oral anticoagulant and compression stockings. This approach was successful in all five cases. Percutaneous endovascular therapy using CDT, mechanical thromboaspiration, and balloon angioplasty is safe and effective in iliofemoral DVT in postpartum period. PMID:26995437

  19. Cannula thrombophlebitis: a study in volunteers comparing polytetrafluoroethylene, polyurethane, and polyamide-ether-elastomer cannulae.

    PubMed

    Larsson, N; Stenberg, K; Linder, L E; Curelaru, I

    1989-04-01

    Cannulae made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE: n = 11), thermoplastic polyether-urethane (TPEU: n = 11), and a new test material, polyamide-ether-elastomer (XLON: n = 10) were inserted into the veins of the dorsum of the hand in 32 healthy volunteers (10 women and 22 men), 21-50 years old. The cannulae were intended to be left in place for 5 days. No infusion was given and the dressings were not exchanged. The resulting thrombophlebitis, defined as two or more of the symptoms pain, redness, oedema and hardness, was estimated on a scale which took into account the incidence, location, intensity, and duration of the symptoms. Except for one volunteer in the XLON group, all the volunteers developed thrombophlebitis, generally observed on the third day of cannulation, and being more frequent and intense over the cannulae (P less than 0.001) and at the tip (P less than 0.01) than at the insertion sites. Pain and oedema were, on the whole, the most frequent and severe symptoms during the period of indwelling. After withdrawal, hardness was the most intense, and together with pain, the most long-lasting (up to 10 days) symptom. The differences between the materials in thrombophlebitis incidence and intensity were statistically significant only when each symptom was analysed separately. Thus, the PTFE cannulae caused more pain and hardness (probably because of greater platelet adhesion and a relatively greater stiffness), while the TPEU and XLON cannulae produced more periphlebitis (redness and oedema), probably because of potentially irritant and antigenic substances leaking from them (polyurethane oligomers and polyamide/polyethyleneglycol oligomers).

  20. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic action of transdermal glyceryltrinitrate in the treatment of infusion-related thrombophlebitis.

    PubMed

    Berrazueta, J R; Poveda, J J; Ochoteco, J; Amado, J A; Puebla, F; Salas, E; Sarabia, M

    1993-01-01

    We have carried out a prospective double-blind randomized study in 40 patients with infusion-related thrombophlebitis. Twenty-two patients were included in the glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) ointment group and 18 patients in the control heparinoid group. Pain was assessed by an analogue scale. At 48 hours the analgesic index was 84.6 +/- 18 units with GTN and 49 +/- 45 units with heparinoid ointment (P < 0.01). Faster relief of oedema was also observed in the GTN-treated group. All signs of thrombophlebitis were relieved in less than 4 days in the GTN group compared with 9 days in the controls (P < 0.005). We conclude that transdermal GTN is useful therapy for infusion-related thrombophlebitis showing evidence of anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect.

  1. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic action of transdermal glyceryltrinitrate in the treatment of infusion-related thrombophlebitis.

    PubMed Central

    Berrazueta, J. R.; Poveda, J. J.; Ochoteco, J.; Amado, J. A.; Puebla, F.; Salas, E.; Sarabia, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have carried out a prospective double-blind randomized study in 40 patients with infusion-related thrombophlebitis. Twenty-two patients were included in the glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) ointment group and 18 patients in the control heparinoid group. Pain was assessed by an analogue scale. At 48 hours the analgesic index was 84.6 +/- 18 units with GTN and 49 +/- 45 units with heparinoid ointment (P < 0.01). Faster relief of oedema was also observed in the GTN-treated group. All signs of thrombophlebitis were relieved in less than 4 days in the GTN group compared with 9 days in the controls (P < 0.005). We conclude that transdermal GTN is useful therapy for infusion-related thrombophlebitis showing evidence of anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect. PMID:8383319

  2. Streptococcus constellatus Causing Septic Thrombophlebitis of the Right Ovarian Vein with Extension into the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Abdallah; Haddad, Amy; Naqvi, Amir; Onyesoh, Ngozi U.; Malik, Rushdah; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcus constellatus collectively with Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius constitute the Streptococcus anginosus (formerly Streptococcus milleri) group. Though they are commonly associated with abscesses, bacteremia with subsequent septic thrombophlebitis is extremely rare, and resulting mortality is infrequent. Case Presentation. We report a case of a previously healthy 60-year-old African American female who presented with Streptococcus constellatus bacteremia associated with septic thrombophlebitis to the right ovarian vein extending into the inferior vena cava. She was urgently treated with antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusion. Septic thrombophlebitis has a clinical presentation that is often misleading. Therefore, a high clinical index of suspicion and the use of appropriate imaging modalities (computed tomography) are essential in recognizing and confirming this diagnosis. Prompt treatment is warranted. Surgical thrombectomies have been successfully replaced by a combination of antibiotics and anticoagulation therapy. PMID:26171262

  3. Streptococcus constellatus Causing Septic Thrombophlebitis of the Right Ovarian Vein with Extension into the Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Abdallah; Haddad, Amy; Naqvi, Amir; Onyesoh, Ngozi U; Malik, Rushdah; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcus constellatus collectively with Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius constitute the Streptococcus anginosus (formerly Streptococcus milleri) group. Though they are commonly associated with abscesses, bacteremia with subsequent septic thrombophlebitis is extremely rare, and resulting mortality is infrequent. Case Presentation. We report a case of a previously healthy 60-year-old African American female who presented with Streptococcus constellatus bacteremia associated with septic thrombophlebitis to the right ovarian vein extending into the inferior vena cava. She was urgently treated with antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusion. Septic thrombophlebitis has a clinical presentation that is often misleading. Therefore, a high clinical index of suspicion and the use of appropriate imaging modalities (computed tomography) are essential in recognizing and confirming this diagnosis. Prompt treatment is warranted. Surgical thrombectomies have been successfully replaced by a combination of antibiotics and anticoagulation therapy.

  4. Endothelial cell protein C receptor gene 6936A/G and 4678G/C polymorphisms as risk factors for deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zoheir, Naguib; Eldanasouri, Nabiel; Abdel-Aal, Asmaa A; Hosny, Karim Adel; Abdel-Ghany, Wafaa M

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) enhances the generation of activated protein C by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. A soluble form of EPCR (sEPCR) is present in plasma. Two polymorphisms in the EPCR gene (6936A/G and 4678G/C) have been reported to influence the risk of venous thromboembolism. We aimed to investigate the relation between EPCR gene polymorphisms (6936A/G and 4678C/G) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and their relations to sEPCR level. This study involved 90 patients with DVT and 90 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Plasma levels of sEPCR were measured in 45 cases of the primary DVT by ELISA. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used for detection of EPCR polymorphisms (6936A/G and 4678G/C). Regarding 6936A/G, our results demonstrated that mutant genotypes (AG, GG) were associated with an increased risk for DVT [P < 0.001, odds ratio (OR) 4.125, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.198-7.740] as well as its mutant allele G (P < 0.001, OR 2.549, 95% CI 1.601-4.061). The mutant genotypes were associated with increased levels of sEPCR. Although in 4678G/C, our results demonstrated that the mutant genotype (CC) was considered as a protective factor against DVT (P = 0.014, OR 0.289, 95% CI 0.108-0.776) as well as its mutant allele C (P = 0.02, OR 0.600, 95% CI 0.388-0.927), but it had no effect on sEPCR level. Our data suggest that 6936A/G polymorphism is a risk factor for DVT and is associated with elevated plasma levels of sEPCR, while 4678G/C polymorphism plays a role in protection against DVT.

  5. Risk of deep venous thrombosis in elective neurosurgical procedures: a prospective, Doppler ultrasound-based study in children 12 years of age or younger.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Andrea G; White, Ian K; Shaikh, Kashif A; Smith, Jodi L; Ackerman, Laurie L; Fulkerson, Daniel H

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) from deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is significant in neurosurgical patients. VTE is considered a leading cause of preventable hospital deaths and preventing DVT is a closely monitored quality metric, often tied to accreditation, hospital ratings, and reimbursement. Adult protocols include prophylaxis with anticoagulant medications. Children's hospitals may adopt adult protocols, although the incidence of DVT and the risk or efficacy of treatment is not well defined. The incidence of DVT in children is likely less than in adults, although there is very little prospectively collected information. Most consider the risk of DVT to be extremely low in children 12 years of age or younger. However, this consideration is based on tradition and retrospective reviews of trauma databases. In this study, the authors prospectively evaluated pediatric patients undergoing a variety of elective neurosurgical procedures and performed Doppler ultrasound studies before and after surgery. METHODS A total of 100 patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. All of the patients were between the ages of 1 month and 12 years and were undergoing elective neurosurgical procedures. The 91 patients who completed the protocol received a bilateral lower-extremity Doppler ultrasound examination within 48 hours prior to surgery. Patients did not receive either medical or mechanical DVT prophylaxis during or after surgery. The ultrasound examination was repeated within 72 hours after surgery. An independent, board-certified radiologist evaluated all sonograms. We prospectively collected data, including potential risk factors, details of surgery, and details of the clinical course. All patients were followed clinically for at least 1 year. RESULTS There was no clinical or ultrasound evidence of DVT or VTE in any of the 91 patients. There was no clinical evidence of VTE in the 9 patients who did not complete the protocol. CONCLUSIONS In this

  6. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile.

  7. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile. PMID:24436666

  8. Sex differences in utilization and outcomes of catheter-directed thrombolysis in patients with proximal lower extremity deep venous thrombosis - Insights from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample.

    PubMed

    Lakhter, Vladimir; Zack, Chad J; Brailovsky, Yevgeniy; Chatterjee, Saurav; Aggarwal, Vikas; Rao, Koneti A; Crabbe, Deborah; Zhao, Huaqing; Choi, Eric; Kolluri, Raghu; Bashir, Riyaz

    2017-04-01

    Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of proximal lower extremity (LE) deep venous thrombosis (DVT). However, sex differences in utilization and safety outcomes of CDT in these patients are unknown. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database was used to identify all patients with a principal discharge diagnosis of proximal LE or caval DVT who underwent CDT between January 2005 and December 2011 in the United States. We evaluated the comparative safety outcomes of CDT among a propensity-matched group of 1731 men versus 1731 women. Among 108,243 patients with proximal LE or caval DVT, 4826 patients (4.5%) underwent CDT. Overall, women underwent CDT less often compared to men (4.1% vs 4.9%, p<0.01, respectively). The rates of CDT increased between 2005 and 2011 for both women (2.1% to 5.9%, p<0.01) and men (2.5% to 7.5%, p<0.01). There was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality (1.2% vs 1.3%, p=0.76). Women were noted to have higher rates of blood transfusions (11.7% vs 8.8%, p<0.01), but lower rates of intracranial hemorrhage (0.5% vs 1.2%, p=0.03) and gastrointestinal bleeding (0.9% vs 2.2%, p<0.01) compared with men. Women were more likely to undergo inferior vena cava filter placement (37.0% vs 32.1%, p<0.01). In this large nationwide cohort, women with proximal DVT were less likely to receive CDT compared to men. Although mortality rates were similar, women were noted to have higher blood transfusion rates while men had more episodes of intracranial and gastrointestinal bleeding.

  9. Impact of type of surgery on deep venous thrombi and pulmonary emboli: a look at twenty seven thousand hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Greenberg, Sarah E; Jahangir, Alex A; Mir, Hassan H; Obremskey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-10-01

    Deep venous thrombi (DVT) and pulmonary emboli (PE) are common complications in hip fracture patients. It is imperative that orthopaedists know the patient risk factors for DVT and PE, including if type of surgery plays a role. To this end, we used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) database to identify significant risk factors. From the 2006-2011 ACS NSQIP database, 27,441 patients with hip fractures were identified using a Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code search. DVT and PE complications, type of surgery based on CPT code, patient demographics, medical comorbidities and operative factors were identified for each patient. Fisher's exact tests were used to (1) determine if rates of DVT and PE significantly differed based on type of surgery and (2) identify significant associations between patient factors and development of DVT/PE. These significant factors were then used as covariates in multivariable analysis to determine which risk factors predicted postoperative DVT/PE. Of the 27,441 hip fracture patients, 449 (1.6 %) developed DVT/PE. There was a significant difference in rates of DVT/PE based on surgery (p = 0.015): patients undergoing intramedullary nailing of inter-/peri-/subtrochanteric femoral fractures had the highest rates of DVT/PE (2.06 %). After multivariate analysis, renal failure and recent surgery were significant risk factors for DVT/PE. This study was the first to show through large, multicentre, prospective data that type of hip fracture surgery impacts rates of DVT/PE. We further identified two additional risk factors orthopaedists should be aware of. Knowing these risk factors will help in peri-operative planning to reduce complications.

  10. Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-1 Is a Valuable Marker for the Prediction of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Tumor Metastasis in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wufeng

    2017-01-01

    Activation of blood coagulation contributes to cancer progression. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1) is the main inhibitor of extrinsic coagulation pathway. The aim of this study is to assess the predicting significance of TFPI-1 for thrombotic complication and metastasis in lung cancer patients. Total of 188 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were included in this study. Plasma TFPI-1, D-dimer (D-D), antithrombin (AT), Fibrinogen (Fbg), and coagulating factor VIII activity (FVIII:C) were measured. In NSCLC patients, significantly decreased TFPI-1 and AT and increased D-D, Fbg, and FVIII:C levels were observed, and there was a significant correlation between TFPI-1 and other hemostatic parameters (P < 0.001, resp.). NSCLC patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or metastasis had significantly lower TFPI-1 levels than those without DVT or metastasis (P < 0.01, resp.). Multivariate regression revealed that TFPI-1 acted as a predictor for DVT or tumor metastasis in NSCLC patients [OR: 4.15 or 3.28, P < 0.05, resp.]. The area under ROC curve of TFPI-1 was 0.905 (95% CI, 0.842~0.967) or 0.828 (95% CI, 0.742~0.915) for predicting DVT or metastasis (P < 0.001, resp.). The optimal point of TFPI-1 was 57.7 or 54.3 ng/mL for predicting DVT or metastasis, respectively. Combination of TFPI-1 and D-D measurements can improve the predicting power for DVT or metastasis in NSCLC patients. Our findings suggested that TFPI-1 was a valuable predictor of DVT and tumor metastasis in NSCLC patients. PMID:28246607

  11. Proof-of-Concept Evaluation of the SailValve Self-Expanding Deep Venous Valve System in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Doeke; Vink, Aryan; Moll, Frans L; de Borst, Gert J

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the SailValve, a new self-expanding deep venous valve concept based on a single polytetrafluoroethylene cusp floating up and down in the bloodstream like a sail, acting as a flow regulator and allowing minimal reflux to reduce thrombogenicity. Both iliac veins of 5 pigs were implanted with SailValve devices; the first animal was an acute pilot experiment to show the feasibility of accurately positioning the SailValve via a femoral access. The other 4 animals were followed for 2 weeks (n=2) or 4 weeks (n=2) under a chronic implantation protocol. Patency and valve function were evaluated directly in all animals using ascending and descending phlebography after device placement and at termination in the chronic implant animals. For reasons of clinical relevance, a regimen of clopidogrel and calcium carbasalate was administered. Histological analysis was performed according to a predefined protocol by an independent pathologist. Deployment was technically feasible in all 10 iliac veins, and all were patent directly after placement. No perioperative or postoperative complications occurred. Ascending phlebograms in the follow-up animals confirmed the patency of all valves after 2 or 4 weeks. Descending phlebograms showed full function in 5 of 8 valves. Limited reflux was seen in 1 valve (4-week group), and the function in the remaining 2 valves (2-week group) was insufficient because of malpositioning. No macroscopic thrombosis was noted on histology. Histology in the follow-up groups revealed a progressive inflammatory reaction to the valves. This animal study shows the potential of the SailValve concept with sufficient valve function after adequate positioning and no (thrombogenic) occlusions after short-term follow-up. Future research is essential to optimize valve material and long-term patency.

  12. Rivaroxaban: a review of its use in the treatment of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism and the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Burness, Celeste B; Perry, Caroline M

    2014-02-01

    Rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)), an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor, is approved for the initial treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), as well as the prevention of recurrent DVT and PE. It is administered at a fixed oral dose and does not require routine coagulation monitoring. In the EINSTEIN-DVT and EINSTEIN-PE trials, in over 8,000 patients with DVT and/or PE, a single-drug approach with rivaroxaban was shown to be noninferior to standard therapy consisting of subcutaneous enoxaparin sodium overlapping with and followed by an oral dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonist (enoxaparin-VKA) with regard to the incidence of symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) after 3, 6 or 12 months of treatment. Rivaroxaban was generally well tolerated in patients with DVT or PE, with no significant between-group differences in clinically relevant bleeding between the rivaroxaban and enoxaparin-VKA groups. Notably, rivaroxaban was associated with a significantly lower rate of major bleeding compared with enoxaparin-VKA when EINSTEIN-DVT and EINSTEIN-PE data were pooled. Pharmacoeconomic analyses indicated that rivaroxaban may be a cost-effective alternative to enoxaparin-VKA for the treatment of DVT or PE and prevention of recurrent VTE. Extended prophylaxis with rivaroxaban reduced the incidence of symptomatic recurrent VTE to a greater extent than placebo in the EINSTEIN-Extension trial, but was associated with a non-significant increase in the risk of clinically relevant bleeding compared with placebo. In conclusion, rivaroxaban is a reasonable alternative to standard therapy for the treatment of DVT and PE, and as extended thromboprophylaxis.

  13. Risk factors and presentation of deep venous thrombosis among Asian patients: a hospital-based case-control study in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ker-Kan; Koh, Woon-Puay; Chao, Alexandre K H

    2007-07-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is perceived to occur less frequently among Asians than Caucasians, although the reason for this has not been fully understood. Hence, there may be differences in risk factors and presentations among Asian patients compared to their Caucasian counterparts. This study examined the association of classical risk factors and presentations among Asian patients with DVT. We retrospectively reviewed 862 symptomatic patients referred to the vascular diagnostic laboratory in a hospital for suspected DVT over a 30-month period. Two hundred and seventy-seven patients (32.1%) tested positive for DVT on duplex ultrasound. After adjusting for age and gender, ethnicity was not a statistically significant demographic factor associated with DVT. Two hundred and seventy-one patients diagnosed as having DVT on ultrasound were matched for age, gender, and ethnicity to negative controls to study the significance of risk factors and presenting symptoms or signs. In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for DVT included immobility (odds ratio [OR] = 2.61, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.63-4.15], malignancy (OR = 1.77, 95% CI 1.01-3.10), and a history of thrombophilia (OR = 9.95, 95% CI 1.26-78.87). The significant forms of DVT presentation were limb swelling (OR = 2.53, 95% CI 1.41-4.54) and pulmonary embolism (OR = 11.45, 95% CI 3.23-40.59). Fever of more than 37.5 degrees C was a negative predictive factor (OR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.23-0.76). This study shows that the common risk factors of DVT such as surgery and fractures do not affect Asians as much as Caucasians. Instead, thrombophilia and underlying malignancy are prominent risk factors among Asians. Diagnosis of DVT in Asians based on clinical grounds can also be problematic as few presentations are specific.

  14. The Risk of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism in Primary Sjögren Syndrome: A General Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Aviña-Zubieta, J Antonio; Jansz, Michael; Sayre, Eric C; Choi, Hyon K

    2017-08-01

    To estimate the future risk and time trends of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in individuals with newly diagnosed primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) in the general population. Using a population database that includes all residents of British Columbia, Canada, we created a study cohort of all patients with incident SS and up to 10 controls from the general population matched for age, sex, and entry time. We compared incidence rates (IR) of pulmonary embolism (PE), deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and VTE between the 2 groups according to SS disease duration. We calculated HR, adjusting for confounders. Among 1175 incident pSS cases (mean age 56.7 yrs, 87.6% women), the IR of PE, DVT, and VTE were 3.9, 2.8, and 5.2 per 1000 person-years (PY), respectively; the corresponding rates in the comparison cohort were 0.9, 0.8, and 1.4 per 1000 PY. Compared with non-SS individuals, the multivariable HR for PE, DVT, and VTE among SS cases were 4.07 (95% CI 2.04-8.09), 2.80 (95% CI 1.27-6.17), and 2.92 (95% CI 1.66-5.16), respectively. The HR matched for age, sex, and entry time for VTE, PE, and DVT were highest during the first year after SS diagnosis (8.29, 95% CI 2.57-26.77; 4.72, 95% CI 1.13-19.73; and 7.34, 95% CI 2.80-19.25, respectively). These findings provide population-based evidence that patients with pSS have a substantially increased risk of VTE, especially within the first year after SS diagnosis. Further research into the involvement of monitoring and prevention of VTE in SS may be warranted.

  15. Administering aspirin, rivaroxaban and low-molecular-weight heparin to prevent deep venous thrombosis after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yue; Tian, Shaoqi; Wang, Yuanhe; Sun, Kang

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of aspirin, rivaroxaban and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for post total knee arthroplasty (TKA) deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis. Between July 2011 and July 2013, a prospective randomized controlled trial was performed on 324 patients with osteoarthritis who underwent primary unilateral TKA. Twelve hours after the surgery, Group A was given oral rivaroxaban at a dose of 10 mg/day. Group B was given subcutaneous LMWH at a dose of 4000 AxaIU (0.4 ml)/day and Group C was given oral aspirin at a dose of 100 mg/day. All three groups were treated for 14 days, and all of the patients were followed for 4 weeks. The incidence of DVT, dominant/hidden blood loss, the incidence of wound complications and the incidence of subcutaneous ecchymosis in the affected extremities were compared between the three groups. The incidence of DVT was lower in Group A compared with the other two groups [3 (2.94%) vs. 14 (12.50%), P = 0.029; 3 (2.94%) vs. 18 (16.36%), P = 0.017]. However, hidden blood loss [1.71 (1.19-2.97) vs. 1.18 (0.77-2.31), P = 0.009; 1.71 (1.19-2.97) vs. 1.30 (0.61-2.43), P = 0.004] and wound complications [5 (4.90) vs. 3 (2.67), P = 0.027; 5 (4.90) vs. 2 (1.82), P = 0.014] were more common in Group A than in the other groups. There were no significant differences between Group B and Group C in the incidence of DVT [14 (12.50%) vs. 18 (16.36%), P = 0.831], hidden blood loss [1.18 (0.77-2.31) vs. 1.30 (0.61-2.43), P = 0.327] or wound complications [3 (2.67) vs. 2 (1.82), P = 0.209]. No significant differences in the incidence of limb swelling were found between the three groups [38 (37.25%) vs. 28 (25.00%) vs. 24 (21.82%), P = 0.247]. Group A had a higher incidence of subcutaneous ecchymosis in the affected extremities than Group C [74 (72.55%) vs. 54 (49.09%), P = 0.039], but there were no significant differences between Groups A and B [74 (72.55%) vs. 62

  16. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  17. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed. PMID:26091450

  18. Imaging of venous compression syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ganguli, Suvranu; Ghoshhajra, Brian B.; Gupta, Rajiv; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Venous compression syndromes are a unique group of disorders characterized by anatomical extrinsic venous compression, typically in young and otherwise healthy individuals. While uncommon, they may cause serious complications including pain, swelling, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism, and post-thrombotic syndrome. The major disease entities are May-Thurner syndrome (MTS), variant iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS), venous thoracic outlet syndrome (VTOS)/Paget-Schroetter syndrome, nutcracker syndrome (NCS), and popliteal venous compression (PVC). In this article, we review the key clinical features, multimodality imaging findings, and treatment options of these disorders. Emphasis is placed on the growing role of noninvasive imaging options such as magnetic resonance venography (MRV) in facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and tailored intervention. PMID:28123973

  19. Epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, D.D.; Lijfering, W.M.; Barreto, S.M.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Rezende, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Venous thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common disease that frequently recurs. Recurrence can be prevented by anticoagulants, but this comes at the risk of bleeding. Therefore, assessment of the risk of recurrence is important to balance the risks and benefits of anticoagulant treatment. This review briefly outlines what is currently known about the epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis, and focuses in more detail on potential new risk factors for venous recurrence. The general implications of these findings in patient management are discussed. PMID:22183247

  20. Role of screening tests for deep venous thrombosis in asymptomatic adults with acute spinal cord injury: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Julio C; Fehlings, Michael G

    2007-08-01

    Systematic review. To examine the evidence to support practice guidelines for screening for DVT in asymptomatic adults with acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) who undergo pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. Despite the fact that pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis has been widely used since the 1980s, deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and subsequent pulmonary embolism (PE) still account for approximately 10% of deaths during the first year following SCI. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from the earliest achievable date to December 2005. We only included clinical studies that used a screening test for DVT and the gold standard diagnostic tests for DVT (i.e., lower limb venography) and for PE (i.e., lung arteriogram) in adults with traumatic SCI who underwent drug thromboprophylaxis during the acute stage after SCI. The search yielded 188 articles, of which 9 articles fulfilled the criteria to be included in our review. Screening for DVT was performed in 3 randomized clinical trials and 6 case series. The protocol of these studies included the use of D-Dimer (1 of 9), I-labeled fibrinogen (2 of 9), ultrasound (1 of 9), impedance plethysmography (1 of 9), impedance plethysmography and Doppler in combination (1 of 9), Duplex (1 of 9) or venography (2 of 9) as screening test for DVT. Based on the pooled data of these studies, asymptomatic DVT was detected in 16.9% of SCI population. Only 4 studies reported the occurrence of PE in 4.4% of cases. There is insufficient evidence to support (or refute) a recommendation for routine screening for DVT in adults with acute traumatic SCI under thromboprophylaxis. However, there is level II-2 evidence that screening could detect asymptomatic DVT in 22.7% of those individuals. Although additional investigation is needed, we hypothesize that weekly screening for DVT during the first 13 weeks post-SCI could detect most of the asymptomatic DVT events in this patient population. D-Dimer, ultrasound, and MR venography could be considered

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of Dabigatran Compared to Vitamin-K Antagonists for the Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis in the Netherlands Using Real-World Data.

    PubMed

    van Leent, Merlijn W J; Stevanović, Jelena; Jansman, Frank G; Beinema, Maarten J; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) present an effective anticoagulant treatment in deep venous thrombosis (DVT). However, the use of VKAs is limited because of the risk of bleeding and the necessity of frequent and long-term laboratory monitoring. Therefore, new oral anticoagulant drugs (NOACs) such as dabigatran, with lower rates of (major) intracranial bleeding compared to VKAs and not requiring monitoring, may be considered. To estimate resource utilization and costs of patients treated with the VKAs acenocoumarol and phenprocoumon, for the indication DVT. Furthermore, a formal cost-effectiveness analysis of dabigatran compared to VKAs for DVT treatment was performed, using these estimates. A retrospective observational study design in the thrombotic service of a teaching hospital (Deventer, The Netherlands) was applied to estimate real-world resource utilization and costs of VKA monitoring. A pooled analysis of data from RE-COVER and RE-COVER II on DVT was used to reflect the probabilities for events in the cost-effectiveness model. Dutch costs, utilities and specific data on coagulation monitoring levels were incorporated in the model. Next to the base case analysis, univariate probabilistic sensitivity and scenario analyses were performed. Real-world resource utilization in the thrombotic service of patients treated with VKA for the indication of DVT consisted of 12.3 measurements of the international normalized ratio (INR), with corresponding INR monitoring costs of €138 for a standardized treatment period of 180 days. In the base case, dabigatran treatment compared to VKAs in a cohort of 1,000 DVT patients resulted in savings of €18,900 (95% uncertainty interval (UI) -95,832, 151,162) and 41 (95% UI -18, 97) quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained calculated from societal perspective. The probability that dabigatran is cost-effective at a conservative willingness-to pay threshold of €20,000 per QALY was 99%. Sensitivity and scenario analyses also

  2. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  3. CORRIGENDUM to Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Owing to errors made by the authors, Charles J. Glueck, Kevin Lee, Marloe Prince, Vybhav Jetty, Parth Shah, and Ping Wang, the following article contains errors. Glueck CJ, Lee K, Prince M, et al. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant. J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep. 2016;4(3):1-6. doi: 10.1177/2324709616661833 PMID:28321420

  4. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis can affect any venous circulation. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep-vein thrombosis of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, pulmonary embolism. VTE is a fairly common disease, particularly in older age, and is associated with reduced survival, substantial health-care costs, and a high rate of recurrence. VTE is a complex (multifactorial) disease, involving interactions between acquired or inherited predispositions to thrombosis and various risk factors. Major risk factors for incident VTE include hospitalization for surgery or acute illness, active cancer, neurological disease with leg paresis, nursing-home confinement, trauma or fracture, superficial vein thrombosis, and—in women—pregnancy and puerperium, oral contraception, and hormone therapy. Although independent risk factors for incident VTE and predictors of VTE recurrence have been identified, and effective primary and secondary prophylaxis is available, the occurrence of VTE seems to be fairly constant, or even increasing. PMID:26076949

  5. [Chronic venous insufficiency in postthrombotic syndrome and varicose veins].

    PubMed

    Hafner, Jürg; Mayer, D; Amann, B; French, L E; Läuchli, S; Hofer, T; Ramelet, A-A; Jeanneret, Ch

    2010-10-06

    Venous disorders have a high prevalence and require approximately 1% of health budgets of industrialized countries. The postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) is defined by subjective symptoms and morphologic trophical skin changes following deep venous thrombosis. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in risk situations, easy availability of diagnostic tools (D-dimers, colour-coded duplex sonography) and early detection of deep venous thrombosis, as well as immediate therapeutic anticoagulation along with leg compression during the acute phase and over a two year period of time significantly reduce the incidence of PTS. Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) includes trophical skin and soft tissue pathologies of the lower leg due to venous hypertension in the distal venous system of the lower extremity. Roughly, two main causes can be distinguished. (A) Deep venous insufficiency (A1 in postthrombotic syndrome; A2 in primary deep venous insufficiency) and (B) superficial venous reflux, usually varicose veins. Compression therapy, surgical ablation of superficial venous reflux, and tangential ablation with split skin graft (shave treatment) of refractory venous ulcers are the mainstays in the treatment of CVI.

  6. Duplex evaluation of venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Labropoulos, Nicos; Leon, Luis R

    2005-03-01

    Duplex ultrasound is the most useful examination for the evaluation of venous valvular incompetence. Multi-frequency 4 to 7-MHz linear array transducers are typically used for this assessment of superficial and deep reflux. The examination is done with the patient standing and manual compression maneuvers are used to initiate reflux. Automatic rapid inflation and deflation cuffs may be used when a standard stimulus is needed. Cutoff values for reflux have been defined. Perforating veins must be identified and flow direction during compression recorded. When ulcers are present, duplex ultrasound is used to investigate veins of the ulcerated legs. Venous outflow obstruction is also studied by duplex ultrasound and chronic changes in deep and superficial veins following deep venous thrombosis noted. The main drawback in evaluation of chronic obstruction is inability to quantify hemodynamic significance. Anatomic variations in superficial and deep veins are common and their identification is necessary. Reporting results of duplex ultrasound studies must take into consideration the proper classification of venous disease as well as the new anatomic terms that have been accepted.

  7. Venous thromboembolic disease after hybrid hip arthroplasty with negative duplex screening.

    PubMed

    Beuhler, K O; D'Lima, D D; Colwell, C W; Otis, S M; Walker, R H

    1999-04-01

    Postoperative duplex ultrasonography screening after total hip arthroplasty has been shown to identify patients who may require treatment or additional monitoring for venous thromboembolic disease. The potential for manifestation of venous thromboembolic disease subsequent to screening remains a concern. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of symptomatic venous thromboembolic disease after total hip arthroplasty and after inhospital prophylaxis, inhospital screening with negative results for proximal deep venous thrombosis, and no posthospitalization venous thromboembolic disease prophylaxis. One hundred fifty patients undergoing primary hybrid total hip arthroplasty and using pneumatic compression stockings and aspirin as prophylaxis against venous thromboembolic disease were screened for deep venous thrombosis with duplex ultrasonography on the fourth day after surgery. Duplex ultrasonography screening revealed 17 (11.3%) patients with asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis. In response to duplex ultrasonography screening, these patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis received therapeutic anticoagulation. Of 133 patients with a duplex screen with negative results for proximal deep venous thrombosis, 131 (98.5%) continued to have no symptoms of venous thromboembolic disease and two (1.5%) began to have symptoms for venous thromboembolic disease (one with proximal deep venous thrombosis, one with nonfatal pulmonary embolism) during 12 months of clinical followup after total hip arthroplasty. The overall prevalence of venous thromboembolic disease requiring anticoagulation was 19 of 150 (12.6%) patients. The remaining 131 (87.4%) were not exposed to the risks of postoperative anticoagulation and did not have subsequent symptomatic venous thromboembolic disease.

  8. [NHG guideline 'Deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolus'].

    PubMed

    de Jong, Jip; Lucassen, Wim A M; Geersing, Geert-Jan; Burgers, Jako S; Wiersma, Tjerk

    2015-01-01

    The revised Dutch College of General Practitioners (Nederlands Huisartsen Genootschap [NHG]) guideline 'Deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolus' includes recommendations for the treatment of patients with deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and thrombophlebitis, and for the exclusion of pulmonary embolism (PE). The general practitioner (GP) can exclude the presence of DVT or PE in some patients by using a decision rule and a D-dimer test. When using D-dimer test as a point-of-care test, meticulous care is essential during the test procedure and storage of blood. The GP can treat many patients with DVT; the NHG guideline does not advise use of direct oral anticoagulants. In the case of an isolated DVT in the calf, treatment with anticoagulants or ultrasound follow-up can be chosen in consultation with the patient or on the basis of regional agreements. In the case of patients with superficial thrombophlebitis, a wait-and-see approach is usually sufficient.

  9. Lower extremity venous reflux

    PubMed Central

    Baliyan, Vinit; Tajmir, Shahein; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Venous incompetence in the lower extremity is a common clinical problem. Basic understanding of venous anatomy, pathophysiologic mechanisms of venous reflux is essential for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. The complex interplay of venous pressure, abdominal pressure, venous valvular function and gravitational force determine the venous incompetence. This review is intended to provide a succinct review of the pathophysiology of venous incompetence and the current role of imaging in its management. PMID:28123974

  10. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Lee, Kevin; Prince, Marloe; Jetty, Vybhav; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    When exogenous testosterone or treatments to elevate testosterone (human chorionic gonadotropin [HCG] or Clomid) are prescribed for men who have antecedent thrombophilia, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism often occur and may recur despite adequate anticoagulation if testosterone therapy is continued. A 55-year-old white male was referred to us because of 4 thrombotic events, 3 despite adequate anticoagulation over a 5-year period. We assessed interactions between thrombophilia, exogenous testosterone therapy, and recurrent thrombosis. In 2009, despite low-normal serum testosterone 334 ng/dL (lower normal limit [LNL] 300 ng/dL), he was given testosterone (TT) cypionate (50 mg/week) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG; 500 units/week) for presumed hypogonadism. Ten months later, with supranormal serum T (1385 ng/dL, upper normal limit [UNL] 827 ng/dL) and estradiol (E2) 45 pg/mL (UNL 41 pg/mL), he had a pulmonary embolus (PE) and was then anticoagulated for 2 years (enoxaparin, then warfarin). Four years later, on TT-HCG, he had his first deep venous thrombosis (DVT). TT was stopped and HCG continued; he was anticoagulated (enoxaparin, then warfarin, then apixaban, then fondaparinux). One year after his first DVT, on HCG, still on fondaparinux, he had a second DVT (5/315), was anticoagulated (enoxaparin + warfarin), with a Greenfield filter placed, but 8 days later had a second PE. Thrombophilia testing revealed the lupus anticoagulant. After stopping HCG, and maintained on warfarin, he has been free of further DVT-PE for 9 months. When DVT-PE occur on TT or HCG, in the presence of thrombophilia, TT-HCG should be stopped, lest DVT-PE reoccur despite concurrent anticoagulation.

  11. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Glueck, Charles J.; Lee, Kevin; Prince, Marloe; Jetty, Vybhav; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: When exogenous testosterone or treatments to elevate testosterone (human chorionic gonadotropin [HCG] or Clomid) are prescribed for men who have antecedent thrombophilia, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism often occur and may recur despite adequate anticoagulation if testosterone therapy is continued. Case Presentation: A 55-year-old white male was referred to us because of 4 thrombotic events, 3 despite adequate anticoagulation over a 5-year period. We assessed interactions between thrombophilia, exogenous testosterone therapy, and recurrent thrombosis. In 2009, despite low-normal serum testosterone 334 ng/dL (lower normal limit [LNL] 300 ng/dL), he was given testosterone (TT) cypionate (50 mg/week) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG; 500 units/week) for presumed hypogonadism. Ten months later, with supranormal serum T (1385 ng/dL, upper normal limit [UNL] 827 ng/dL) and estradiol (E2) 45 pg/mL (UNL 41 pg/mL), he had a pulmonary embolus (PE) and was then anticoagulated for 2 years (enoxaparin, then warfarin). Four years later, on TT-HCG, he had his first deep venous thrombosis (DVT). TT was stopped and HCG continued; he was anticoagulated (enoxaparin, then warfarin, then apixaban, then fondaparinux). One year after his first DVT, on HCG, still on fondaparinux, he had a second DVT (5/315), was anticoagulated (enoxaparin + warfarin), with a Greenfield filter placed, but 8 days later had a second PE. Thrombophilia testing revealed the lupus anticoagulant. After stopping HCG, and maintained on warfarin, he has been free of further DVT-PE for 9 months. Conclusion: When DVT-PE occur on TT or HCG, in the presence of thrombophilia, TT-HCG should be stopped, lest DVT-PE reoccur despite concurrent anticoagulation. PMID:27536705

  12. Factors related to venous ulceration: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Vlajinac, Hristina; Marinkovic, Jelena; Maksimovic, Milos; Radak, Djordje

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the factors related to venous ulceration. Patients with venous ulceration (278 patients) were compared with 1401 patients in other categories of clinical classification of venous disease (clinical, etiologic, anatomic, and pathophysiological [CEAP]). Demographic, anthropometric, and clinical data were collected. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. According to multivariate analyses, risk factors for venous ulceration were age, male sex, personal history of superficial and deep venous thrombosis, diabetes, high blood pressure, skeletal or joint disease in the legs and emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, higher body mass index and physical inactivity, parental history of ankle ulcer as well as reflux in deep and perforator veins, deep obstruction, and combination of reflux and obstruction. It seems reasonable to pay special attention to patients in whom the postulated risk factors for venous ulceration are present.

  13. Anatomy of the foot venous pump: physiology and influence on chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Uhl, J-F; Gillot, C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the location of the venous foot pump using an anatomical study. Four hundred cadaveric feet were injected with green neoprene latex followed by a dissection. A coloured segmentation of the venous system was achieved. The Lejars' concept of the venous sole of the foot is incorrect: the true blood venous reservoir of the foot is located deeply in the plantar veins, between the plantar muscles. The medial and mostly lateral plantar veins converge into the plexus shaped calcaneal crossroad, where the blood is ejected upwards into the two posterior tibial veins. In addition, the several medial perforators of the foot directly connect the deep system (medial plantar veins) to the superficial venous system (medial marginal vein). This forms a true 'medial functional unit' which is unique in the limb given its directional flow is from deep to superficial. In conclusion, the plantar veins play an important role in the physiology of the venous return since a venous reservoir of 25 mL of blood is mobilized upwards with each step during walking. Therefore, the impairment of the foot pump by a static foot disorder should be considered as an important risk factor for chronic venous disease, and should be evaluated and corrected in any patient with venous insufficiency.

  14. [Venous thromboembolic disease: presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in its clinical spectrum includes both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, which is usually a complication of deep vein thrombosis. It is a relatively common disease with significant morbidity and requires an accurate diagnosis. They are numerous risk factors for venous thromboembolism, and there is evidence that the risk of thromboembolic disease increases proportionally to the number of predisposing risk factors present. The primary care physician should know the risk factors and suspect the presence of venous thromboembolic disease when there is a compatible clnical picture. The treatment for this pathology is anticoagulation. We report a patient with cardiovascular risk factors who was seen with pain in the right leg and shortness of breath and referred to the hospital with suspected venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation and pleural effusion. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of thrombophlebitis in peripheral veins with Vialon and PTFE-Teflon cannulas: a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Payne-James, J. J.; Rogers, J.; Bray, M. J.; Rana, S. K.; McSwiggan, D.; Silk, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    A series of 54 normal subjects were randomised to have either a Vialon or a PTFE-Teflon peripheral vein cannula inserted in a vein in each forearm to observe the development of thrombophlebitis. Cannulas were inspected twice daily for up to 5 days to observe the development of three signs, erythema, oedema or hardness and one symptom, pain. Each sign and symptom was recorded twice daily at three points, the cannula insertion site, the mid-point of the cannula and the cannula tip. The degree of change was recorded as less than 1, 1-2 and greater than 2 cm. Any cannula causing any sign greater than 2 cm was removed. By the end of the study over 40% of both types of cannula had been removed. There were no significant differences between the numbers of each type of cannula removed at any time point throughout the duration of the study. There were no significant differences in the amounts of erythema or hardness, but minimally increased swelling was observed at the mid-point of the PTFE-Teflon cannulas (P = 0.022). Despite the theoretical superiority of Vialon as a cannula material, under controlled conditions there appears to be little difference in its inherent capacity to cause the thrombophlebitis. PMID:1929137

  16. D-dimer use for deep venous thrombosis exclusion in elderly patients: a comparative analysis of three different approaches to establish cut-off values for an assay with results expressed in D-dimer units.

    PubMed

    Cini, M; Legnani, C; Frascaro, M; Sartori, M; Cosmi, B; Palareti, G

    2014-10-01

    The use of adapted cut-off values in the elderly, combined with clinical probability (PTP), increases the proportion of patients in whom venous thromboembolism (VTE) can be safely excluded, compared with the conventional cut-off value of 500 μg/L fibrinogen equivalent units (FEU). We evaluated the clinical performance of three different approaches to establish cut-off values for a D-dimer assay whose results are expressed in D-dimer units (D-DU). HemosIL D-dimer HS assay (Instrumentation Laboratory) was performed in 279 consecutive outpatients with suspected deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and nonhigh PTP. Considering patients >60 years, the number of negative D-dimer results increased using the modified (376 ng/mL if ≥60 years) and the age-adjusted cut-off (age years × 5 ng/mL if >50 years) compared to the conventional one (230 ng/mL for all patients; 54.6%, 58.2%, and 25.0%, respectively), with no false-negative results. The higher increase was observed in patients >80 years (43.9%, 56.1%, and 8.8%, respectively). For the HemosIL D-dimer HS, the use of specific cut-off values in older subjects with suspected DVT and nonhigh PTP increases the number of patients in whom DVT can be safely excluded. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Spontaneous multisystem deep venous thrombosis as an unusual presentation of Behçet's disease in a young Afro-Caribbean patient.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Anuja

    2015-07-23

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune mediated multisystem vasculitis. It is most prevalent in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean patients and considered rare in Afro-Caribbean populations. The disease phenotype in Afro-Caribbean patients is more severe with systemic involvement, in particular lesions affecting the vascular system known as angio-Behçet's. The archetypal triad of disease in Behçet's includes oral stomatitis, genital ulceration and ocular lesions, however, the variety of symptoms patients experience is recognised by the revised International Criteria for Behçet's disease and is reflected in the clinical scoring criteria. The authors report an unusual case of Behçet's disease in a young Afro-Caribbean patient presenting with spontaneous bilateral renal, cerebral and pulmonary venous thrombosis as first presentation. Physicians should be aware of the aggressive and atypical manner in which Behçet's can present in Afro-Caribbean patients in order to avoid diagnostic delay and remain vigilant for thromboembolic lesions in this population. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lauren; Seraj, Samina

    2010-04-15

    Venous ulcer, also known as stasis ulcer, is the most common etiology of lower extremity ulceration, affecting approximately 1 percent of the U.S. population. Possible causes of venous ulcers include inflammatory processes resulting in leukocyte activation, endothelial damage, platelet aggregation, and intracellular edema. The primary risk factors for venous ulcer development are older age, obesity, previous leg injuries, deep venous thrombosis, and phlebitis. On physical examination, venous ulcers are generally irregular, shallow, and located over bony prominences. Granulation tissue and fibrin are typically present in the ulcer base. Associated findings include lower extremity varicosities, edema, venous dermatitis, and lipodermatosclerosis. Venous ulcers are usually recurrent, and an open ulcer can persist for weeks to many years. Severe complications include cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and malignant change. Poor prognostic factors include large ulcer size and prolonged duration. Evidence-based treatment options for venous ulcers include leg elevation, compression therapy, dressings, pentoxifylline, and aspirin therapy. Surgical management may be considered for ulcers that are large in size, of prolonged duration, or refractory to conservative measures.

  19. Developmental Venous Anomaly: Benign or Not Benign.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Rie; Srivatanakul, Kittipong

    2016-09-15

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), previously called venous angiomas, are the most frequently encountered cerebral vascular malformations. However, DVA is considered to be rather an extreme developmental anatomical variation of medullary veins than true malformation. DVAs are composed of dilated medullary veins converging centripetally into a large collecting venous system that drains into the superficial or deep venous system. Their etiology and mechanism are generally accepted that DVAs result from the focal arrest of the normal parenchymal vein development or occlusion of the medullary veins as a compensatory venous system. DVAs per se are benign and asymptomatic except for under certain unusual conditions. The pathomechanisms of symptomatic DVAs are divided into mechanical, flow-related causes, and idiopathic. However, in cases of DVAs associated with hemorrhage, cavernous malformations (CMs) are most often the cause rather than DVAs themselves. The coexistence of CM and DVA is common. There are some possibilities that DVA affects the formation and clinical course of CM because CM related to DVA is generally located within the drainage territory of DVA and is more aggressive than isolated CM in the literature. Brain parenchymal abnormalities surrounding DVA and cerebral varix have also been reported. These phenomena are considered to be the result of venous hypertension associated with DVAs. With the advance of diagnostic imagings, perfusion study supports this hypothesis demonstrating that some DVAs have venous congestion pattern. Although DVAs should be considered benign and clinically silent, they can have potential venous hypertension and can be vulnerable to hemodynamic changes.

  20. Developmental Venous Anomaly: Benign or Not Benign

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Rie; SRIVATANAKUL, Kittipong

    2016-01-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), previously called venous angiomas, are the most frequently encountered cerebral vascular malformations. However, DVA is considered to be rather an extreme developmental anatomical variation of medullary veins than true malformation. DVAs are composed of dilated medullary veins converging centripetally into a large collecting venous system that drains into the superficial or deep venous system. Their etiology and mechanism are generally accepted that DVAs result from the focal arrest of the normal parenchymal vein development or occlusion of the medullary veins as a compensatory venous system. DVAs per se are benign and asymptomatic except for under certain unusual conditions. The pathomechanisms of symptomatic DVAs are divided into mechanical, flow-related causes, and idiopathic. However, in cases of DVAs associated with hemorrhage, cavernous malformations (CMs) are most often the cause rather than DVAs themselves. The coexistence of CM and DVA is common. There are some possibilities that DVA affects the formation and clinical course of CM because CM related to DVA is generally located within the drainage territory of DVA and is more aggressive than isolated CM in the literature. Brain parenchymal abnormalities surrounding DVA and cerebral varix have also been reported. These phenomena are considered to be the result of venous hypertension associated with DVAs. With the advance of diagnostic imagings, perfusion study supports this hypothesis demonstrating that some DVAs have venous congestion pattern. Although DVAs should be considered benign and clinically silent, they can have potential venous hypertension and can be vulnerable to hemodynamic changes. PMID:27250700

  1. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed.

  2. Venous Claudication in Iliofemoral Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Delis, Konstantinos T.; Bountouroglou, Dimitris; Mansfield, Averil O.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the long-term impact of iliofemoral thrombosis (I-FDVT) on walking capacity, venous hemodynamic status, CEAP class, venous clinical severity, and quality of life, and determined the prevalence of venous claudication. Materials and Methods: All patients with prior I-FDVT, assessed at our institution since 1990, were called for follow-up. Those with walking impairment due to arterial disease (ABI < 1.0 postexercise) or unrelated causes and those thrombectomized or thrombolyzed were excluded; 39 patients (22–83 years, median 46 years) were included. Median follow-up was 5 years (range 1–23 years). Investigation included classification in CEAP and Venous Clinical Severity Scoring (VCSS) systems, air-plethysmography (outflow fraction [OF], venous filling index [VFI], residual volume fraction [RVF]) and venous duplex, treadmill (3.5 km/h, 10%) to determine initial (ICD) and absolute (ACD) claudication distances, and quality of life assessment (SF-36). Nonaffected limbs of patients with unilateral I-FDVT (37 of 39) comprised the control group. Data are presented as median and interquartile range. Results: A total of 81% of limbs with I-FDVT had superficial and deep reflux and 19% superficial reflux; reflux in control limbs was 29.7% (P < 0.001) and 27% (P > 0.2), respectively; 43.6% (17 of 39; 95% CI, 27–60%) of patients developed venous claudication ipsilateral to I-FDVT (ICD: 130 m, range 105–268 m), compelling 15.4% (6 of 39; 95% CI, 3.5–27%) to discontinue treadmill (ACD: 241 m, range 137–298 m). Limbs with prior I-FDVT had a lower OF (37%, range 32.2–43%; P < 0.001), abnormally higher VFI (3.8 mL/s, range 2.5–5.7 mL/s; P < 0.001), and RVF (45%, range 32.5–51.5%; P = 0.006), and clinical impairment in CEAP and VCSS systems (P < 0.0001). Patients with I-FDVT had impaired physical functioning (P = 0.02) and role (P = 0.033), general health (P = 0.001), social function (P = 0.047), and mental health (P = 0.043). Conclusions: A

  3. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    PubMed

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-01

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates.

  4. Anatomic considerations for central venous cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Michael P; Heller, Stephanie F; Rivera, Mariela

    2011-01-01

    Central venous cannulation is a commonly performed procedure which facilitates resuscitation, nutritional support, and long-term vascular access. Mechanical complications most often occur during insertion and are intimately related to the anatomic relationship of the central veins. Working knowledge of surface and deep anatomy minimizes complications. Use of surface anatomic landmarks to orient the deep course of cannulating needle tracts appropriately comprises the crux of complication avoidance. The authors describe use of surface landmarks to facilitate safe placement of internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral venous catheters. The role of real-time sonography as a safety-enhancing adjunct is reviewed. PMID:22312225

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinases as Potential Targets in the Venous Dilation Associated with Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Kucukguven, Arda; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Varicose veins (VVs) are a common venous disease of the lower extremity characterized by incompetent valves, venous reflux, and dilated and tortuous veins. If untreated, VVs could lead to venous thrombosis, thrombophlebitis and chronic venous leg ulcers. Various genetic, hormonal and environmental factors may lead to structural changes in the vein valves and make them incompetent, leading to venous reflux, increased venous pressure and vein wall dilation. Prolonged increases in venous pressure and vein wall tension are thought to increase the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Members of the MMPs family include collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins, membrane-type MMPs and others. MMPs are known to degrade various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). MMPs may also affect the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle, causing changes in the vein relaxation and contraction mechanisms. ECs injury also triggers leukocyte infiltration, activation and inflammation, which lead to further vein wall damage. The vein wall dilation and valve dysfunction, and the MMP activation and superimposed inflammation and fibrosis would lead to progressive venous dilation and VVs formation. Surgical ablation is an effective treatment for VVs, but may be associated with high recurrence rate, and other less invasive approaches that target the cause of the disease are needed. MMP inhibitors including endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) and pharmacological inhibitors such as zinc chelators, doxycycline, batimastat and marimastat, have been used as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer, autoimmune and cardiovascular disease. However, MMP inhibitors may have side effects especially on the musculoskeletal system. With the advent of new genetic and pharmacological tools, specific MMP inhibitors with fewer undesirable effects could be useful to retard the progression and prevent the recurrence of VVs. PMID:23316963

  6. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis Is a Safe and Alternative Therapeutic Approach in the Management of Postpartum Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, B C; Patra, Soumya; Nagesh, C M; Reddy, Babu; Manjunath, C N

    2015-12-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major health problem in pregnancy and postpartum period. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is safe and effective in management of symptomatic DVT. Value of CDT in postpartum DVT is not fully evaluated. We describe five patients presenting with acute iliofemoral DVT in their early postpartum period who were treated with mechanical thromboaspiration and CDT. The CDT was done using streptokinase infusion and unfractionated heparin. Percutaneous angioplasty was done in patients with symptomatic residual lesion following thrombolysis. Patients were discharged with oral anticoagulant and compression stockings. This approach was successful in all four cases. Percutaneous endovascular therapy using CDT, mechanical thromboaspiration, and balloon angioplasty is safe and effective in iliofemoral DVT in postpartum period.

  7. Lesson of the month 1: Spontaneous septic thrombophlebitis presenting with bacteraemia diagnosed by PET-CT scan.

    PubMed

    Harnett, Patrick; Jain, Shaifali

    2017-10-01

    Spontaneous septic thrombophlebitis is a rare complication of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia. Its true incidence is unknown as septic thrombus is not often considered as a source in the typical 'screen' of tests used to find the source of a bacteraemia.Positron emission tomography computerised tomography (PET-CT) is becoming increasingly available to physicians, is highly sensitive and yields specific anatomical information regarding abnormal metabolically active sites in infection, inflammation and neoplasia.In this case, PET-CT enabled the identification of the source of a septic thrombus and enabled focused management. PET-CT should be considered as part of the raft of tests used to identify an obscure source of fever/bacteraemia. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  8. Patterns of venous reflux and obstruction in patients with skin damage due to chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Labropoulos, Nicos; Patel, Parag J; Tiongson, Jay E; Pryor, Landon; Leon, Luis R; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos K

    2007-01-01

    Identified were characteristics of individuals with skin damage related to chronic venous disease. Patients with chronic venous disease (n = 164) were evaluated with duplex ultrasound imaging and were placed in classes 4, 5, and 6 according to the CEAP classification. Their findings were compared with 100 class 2 controls. The prevalence of deep venous thrombosis was higher in the study group (23.7%) versus controls (5.1%; P < .0001), as was the prevalence of deep, perforator, and combined patterns of disease (P < .0001, P < .0007, and P < .0001). The mean duration of disease in controls 2 was shorter compared with the study group (P = .0019). The prevalence of reflux and obstruction within the study group was higher than in controls (P = .0021). Skin changes accurately reflect severity of chronic venous disease. Superficial and perforator vein reflux is the major cause of disease.

  9. Bioengineered valves for the venous circulation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Benedikt; Hafner, Jürg; Willenberg, Torsten; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2016-11-01

    Chronic insufficiency of lower extremity venous valves represents a frequent structural disorder of the vascular system being responsible for a substantial global disease load. While in the field of superficial valve insufficiency surgical as well as endoluminal interventions represent good therapeutic options with high rates of complete remission of symptoms, only limited options exist in the field of deep venous reflux today. Bioengineered, autologous cell-based, endothelialized valve constructs may open up new therapeutic options in these patients, potentially offering novel treatment options in cases with severe insufficiency of deep venous segments in the future. Areas covered: This review summarizes previous reports focusing on venous valve replacement and bioengineering, also including first preclinical in vivo studies and first clinical trials in patients. In particular, the aspects of current technical and medical limitations of venous valve bioengineering approaches preventing clinical translation and potential solutions by upcoming technologies will be discussed as part of this review. Expert commentary: Bioengineered replacement valves may open up novel options in the treatment of venous valve disease in defined patient groups in the future. However, preventing thromboembolic complications will remain the bottle-neck for clinical translation of the technologies involved.

  10. Venous drainage of the face.

    PubMed

    Onishi, S; Imanishi, N; Yoshimura, Y; Inoue, Y; Sakamoto, Y; Chang, H; Okumoto, T

    2017-04-01

    The venous anatomy of the face was examined in 12 fresh cadavers. Venograms and arteriovenograms were obtained after the injection of contrast medium. In 8 of the 12 cadavers, a large loop was formed by the facial vein, the supratrochlear vein, and the superficial temporal vein, which became the main trunk vein of the face. In 4 of the 12 cadavers, the superior lateral limb of the loop vein was less well developed. The loop vein generally did not accompany the arteries of the face. Cutaneous branches of the loop vein formed a polygonal venous network in the skin, while communicating branches ran toward deep veins. These findings suggest that blood from the dermis of the face is collected by the polygonal venous network and enters the loop vein through the cutaneous branches, after which blood flows away from the face through the superficial temporal vein, the facial vein, and the communicating branches and enters the deep veins. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Venous syndromes and pulmonary embolism in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gladman, D D; Urowitz, M B

    1980-08-01

    Deep vein thrombophlebitis (DVT) and pulmonary emboli (PE) have been uncommonly reported manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This may be partly due to their being masked by other more familiar lesions of the lungs and extremities in SLE. We have identified 17 patients with SLE from a population of 180 being followed up prospectively who had 21 attacks of DVT and/or PE. Of the total of 21 episodes the SLE was considered to be active in 14, inactive in 6, and variable in a patient with recurring phlebitis. The incidence of hyperlipidaemia, smoking history, and use of birth control medication or corticosteroids was not higher in these patients. These clinical findings thus constitute additional features of SLE occurring in about 9% of patients and may be significance for morbidity and mortality.

  12. Evaluation of nonpermanent inferior vena cava filter placement in patients with deep venous thrombosis after lower extremity fracture: A single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ye; Zhao, Jun; Mei, Jiacai; Shao, Mingzhe; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Haisheng

    2016-09-01

    To investigate nonpermanent inferior vena cava (IVC) filter in the prevention of perioperative pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients of lower extremity and/or pelvic bone fracture with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Lower extremity or pelvic bone fracture patients with lower extremity DVT hospitalized in our hospital from January 2003 to October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Data was analyzed for age, gender, position of fracture, position of proximal of thrombosis, indications of placement, complications, retrieval rate, and rate of entrapped filter clot. Patients who underwent IVC filter placement were selected as the filter group. The patients who did not perform IVC filter placement after 2008 and the cases between January 2003 and December 2007 were selected as control group 1 and control group 2, respectively. The incidence of perioperative symptomatic PE and mortality were analyzed. A total of 2763 cases complicated with DVT underwent orthopedic surgery between January 2003 and October 2014. 823 nonpermanent filters were inserted. All filters were successfully deployed with no major complications. After a mean 14.2 days indwelling time, all of temporary filters were removed. Retrieval was attempted in 556 patients with retrievable filters and was successful in 545 (98%); mean indwelling time was 16.3 days. The total retrieval rate was 90%. The incidence of PE in the filter group was significantly lower compared with the two control groups. Among the patients who received chemical anticoagulant therapy, the incidence of PE in filter group, control group 1 and control group 2 were 0.14%, 1.60% and 2.10%, respectively. The incidence of PE in filter group was also significant lower compared with control groups. Nonpermanent IVC filter placement seems like to be a safe and effective method for preventing perioperative symptomatic and fatal PE in bone fracture patients with DVT in the present retrospective study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. A study on the safety, efficacy, and efficiency of sulodexide compared with acenocoumarol in secondary prophylaxis in patients with deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cirujeda, J Lasierra; Granado, P Coronel

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out to study the safety and efficacy of a fixed dosage of sulodexide compared to adjusted dosages (INR) of acenocoumarol as secondary prophylaxis in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in lower limbs. An economic evaluation based on the criteria of use in normal clinical practice was also performed. One hundred and fifty patients of both sexes were included, all over 18 years of age and diagnosed with proximal DVT of the lower limbs by color echo-Doppler, and with clinical evolution of less than 1 month. The patients were initially treated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and urokinase in accordance with the established protocol. They were then randomized to continue treatment with acenocoumarol and INR adjustments every 30 days, or with sulodexide. Treatment was extended for 3 months with monthly follow-up visits and a final visit at 3 months posttreatment. No differences between the groups were detected concerning demographic or basal characteristics in clinical evolution or adverse reactions. In the group treated with sulodexide, no major/minor hemorrhagic complications were detected. On the other hand, in the acenocoumarol group, 1 major hemorrhage and 9 minor hemorrhages were produced (13.3%), reaching statistical difference in relation to the sulodexide group (p = 0.014; CI from 95% of 4.7% to 19.4%). Regarding the economic impact, treatment costs with sulodexide are much less than those with acenocoumarol, the data confirmed by the sensitivity analyses performed. The results prove the efficacy, safety, and efficiency of sulodexide as a secondary prophylaxis in thromboembolic disease, avoiding hemorrhagic risks and the monitoring of patients, and providing significant savings to the health system.

  14. Venous ulcers of the lower limb: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sasanka S.

    2012-01-01

    Venous ulcers are the most common ulcers of the lower limb. It has a high morbidity and results in economic strain both at a personal and at a state level. Chronic venous hypertension either due to primary or secondary venous disease with perforator paucity, destruction or incompetence resulting in reflux is the underlying pathology, but inflammatory reactions mediated through leucocytes, platelet adhesion, formation of pericapillary fibrin cuff, growth factors and macromolecules trapped in tissue result in tissue hypoxia, cell death and ulceration. Duplex scan with colour flow is the most useful investigation for venous disease supplying information about patency, reflux, effects of proximal and distal compression, Valsalva maneuver and effects of muscle contraction. Most venous disease can be managed conservatively by leg elevation and compression bandaging. Drugs of proven benefit in venous disease are pentoxifylline and aspirin, but they work best in conjunction with compression therapy. Once ulceration is chronic or the patient does not respond to or cannot maintain conservative regime, surgical intervention treating the underlying venous hypertension and cover for the ulcer is necessary. The different modalities like sclerotherapy, ligation and stripping of superficial varicose veins, endoscopic subfascial perforator ligation, endovenous laser or radiofrequency ablation have similar long-term results, although short-term recovery is best with radiofrequency and foam sclerotherapy. For deep venous reflux, surgical modalities include repair of incompetent venous valves or transplant or transposition of a competent vein segment with normal valves to replace a post-thrombotic destroyed portion of the deep vein. PMID:23162226

  15. Venous ulcers of the lower limb: Where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sasanka S

    2012-05-01

    Venous ulcers are the most common ulcers of the lower limb. It has a high morbidity and results in economic strain both at a personal and at a state level. Chronic venous hypertension either due to primary or secondary venous disease with perforator paucity, destruction or incompetence resulting in reflux is the underlying pathology, but inflammatory reactions mediated through leucocytes, platelet adhesion, formation of pericapillary fibrin cuff, growth factors and macromolecules trapped in tissue result in tissue hypoxia, cell death and ulceration. Duplex scan with colour flow is the most useful investigation for venous disease supplying information about patency, reflux, effects of proximal and distal compression, Valsalva maneuver and effects of muscle contraction. Most venous disease can be managed conservatively by leg elevation and compression bandaging. Drugs of proven benefit in venous disease are pentoxifylline and aspirin, but they work best in conjunction with compression therapy. Once ulceration is chronic or the patient does not respond to or cannot maintain conservative regime, surgical intervention treating the underlying venous hypertension and cover for the ulcer is necessary. The different modalities like sclerotherapy, ligation and stripping of superficial varicose veins, endoscopic subfascial perforator ligation, endovenous laser or radiofrequency ablation have similar long-term results, although short-term recovery is best with radiofrequency and foam sclerotherapy. For deep venous reflux, surgical modalities include repair of incompetent venous valves or transplant or transposition of a competent vein segment with normal valves to replace a post-thrombotic destroyed portion of the deep vein.

  16. Risk factors for peripheral venous disease resemble those for venous thrombosis: the San Diego Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, M; Callas, PW; Denenberg, JO; Bovill, EG; Criqui, MH

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinically silent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is common and may cause chronic venous disease that resembles post-thrombotic syndrome. Objective We evaluated whether peripheral venous disease in a general population shares risk factors with DVT. Methods In an established cohort of 2,404 men and women, the San Diego Population Study, peripheral venous disease was evaluated using physical exam, symptom assessment, and venous ultrasound. We performed a case control study including 308 cases in 4 hierarchical groups by severity, and 346 controls without venous abnormalities, frequency matched to cases by 10-year age group, race and sex. Cases and controls had no prior history of venous thrombosis. Hemostatic risk factors were measured in cases and controls. Results Accounting for age, obesity and family history of leg ulcer, ORs for elevated factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, D-dimer, and for factor V Leiden were 1.4 (95% CI 0.9–2.1), 1.5 (CI 1.0–2.3), 1.7 (CI 1.1–2.8), and 1.1 (CI 0.5–2.4), respectively. These associations were larger in the two most severe case groups; ORs 2.0 (CI 1.0–3.8), 1.7 (CI 0.9–3.3), 2.7 (CI 1.2–6.1) and 2.3 (CI 0.8–7.1). Each hemostatic factor was also associated with severity of venous disease, for example elevated D-dimer was associated with a 2.2-fold increased odds of being in one higher severity group. Prothrombin 20210A was not associated with venous disease. Conclusions DVT risk factors are associated with presence and severity of peripheral venous disease. Results support a hypothesis that peripheral venous disease may sometimes be post-thrombotic syndrome due to previous unrecognized DVT. PMID:20492466

  17. Peripheral venous complications of a hyperosmolar (960 mOsm) nutritive mixture: The effect of heparin and hydrocortisone. A multicenter double-blinded random study in 98 patients.

    PubMed

    Messing, B; Leverve, X; Rigaud, D; Krummel, Y; Botta, D; Latarget, J; Mudry, P; Guignier, M

    1986-02-01

    Peripheral intravenous nutrition with hyperosmolar solutions usually results in a high rate of venous complications. The aim of this multicenter double blind randomised study in 98 patients has been to measure: (a) tolerance by the peripheral veins being perfused with a protein-glucose-lipid nutritive mixture of 960 mOsm/l (group A, n = 33), (b) the protective effect of the additive to the nutritive mixture of either heparin: 1000 IU/1 (group B, n = 32) or heparin with hydrocortisone (5 mg/l) group C, n = 33). Tolerance by the veins was evaluated on a single vein site during a 48 h perfusion with 21 per day. The following complications: oedema, erythema, induration, thrombophlebitis led to the interruption of the perfusion. The rate of interruptions of perfusions for total venous complications and for thrombophlebitis has been respectively: at 24 h, in group A: 39 and 15%, in group B: 6 and 3%, in group C: 12 and 0%; at 48 h: in group A: 82 and 42%, in group B: 53 and 18%, in group C: 36 and 6%. Venous complication rates for 24 and 48 h were significantly lower in groups B and C (p<0.05) than in group A and there was no inter group difference between groups B and C. These results suggest that peripheral venous nutrition infusing 14.1 g of nitrogen and 8.5 MJ per day can be performed with a hyperosmolar solution of 960 mOsm/1, if that heparin be added to the nutritive mixture and the perfusion site be changed daily. Under these conditions the observed venous complications rate is equal to or less than 6% of cases.

  18. Pycnogenol® in chronic venous insufficiency and related venous disorders.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Om P

    2014-03-01

    The present review provides an update of the biological profile of Pycnogenol in the light of its use in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and related venous disorders such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), post-thrombotic syndrome, long haul air-travel-related leg oedema, venous ulcers and acute haemorrhoids. Pycnogenol is a French maritime pine bark extract produced from the outer bark of Pinus pinaster Ait. subsp. atlantica. Its strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasodilator activities, antithrombotic effects and collagen stabilizing properties make it uniquely able to target the multi facet pathophysiology of CVI and related venous disorders. Clinical studies have shown that it can reduce oedema of the legs in CVI, reduce the incidence of deep venous thrombosis during long haul flights and enhance the healing of venous ulcers and haemorrhoidal episodes by topical application and/or oral administration. This review highlights clinical research findings on the safety, compliance and efficacy of Pycnogenol, including its use in combination products.

  19. Venous Thromboembolism Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, R.W.; Hsieh, T.J.; Aubut, JA. L.; Eng, J.J.; Krassioukov, A.; Tu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the published literature on the treatment of deep venous thromboembolism post-spinal cord injury (SCI). Data Sources MEDLINE/Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles addressing the treatment of deep venous thromboembolism post-SCI. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale, while non-RCTs were assessed using the Downs and Black evaluation tool. Study Selection Studies included RCTs, non-RCTS, cohort, case-control, case series, pre-post, and postinterventional studies. Case studies were included only when no other studies were available. Data Extraction Data extracted included demographics, the nature of the study intervention, and study results. Data Synthesis Levels of evidence were assigned to the interventions using a modified Sackett scale. Conclusions Twenty-three studies met inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies examined various pharmacologic interventions for the treatment or prevention of deep venous thrombosis in SCI patients. There was strong evidence to support the use of low molecular weight heparin in reducing venous thrombosis events, and a higher adjusted dose of unfractionated heparin was found to be more effective than 5000 units administered every 12 hours, although bleeding complication was more common. Nonpharmacologic treatments were also reviewed, but again limited evidence was found to support these treatments. PMID:19236977

  20. Prevention and treatment of venous ulceration.

    PubMed Central

    Negus, D.

    1985-01-01

    Venous ulcers are related to incompetence of the direct calf and ankle perforating veins, the majority of which follow deep vein thrombosis. Prevention of the latter by intravenous micro-dose heparin (1 unit/kg/hour) is effective, safe and inexpensive. Its efficacy has been proved in two controlled clinical trials. Venous ulcers have been treated by perforating vein ligation, with saphenous ligation and stripping where necessary, and with the addition of permanent knee-length elastic compression stockings in patients with femoro-popliteal incompetence. This regimen has achieved a 92% long-term success rate in patients without rheumatoid arthritis. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3890671

  1. ASSESSMENT OF VENOUS THROMBOSIS IN ANIMAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    SP, Grover; CE, Evans; AS, Patel; B, Modarai; P, Saha; A, Smith

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and common complications, including pulmonary embolism and post thrombotic syndrome, represent a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Experimental models of venous thrombosis have provided considerable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate thrombus formation and subsequent resolution. Here we critically appraise the ex vivo and in vivo techniques used to assess venous thrombosis in these models. Particular attention is paid to imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, micro computed tomography and high frequency ultrasound that facilitate longitudinal assessment of thrombus size and composition. PMID:26681755

  2. Venous insufficiency and thromboembolic disease in bariatric surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Bellen, Bonno van; Godoy, Ivan de Barros; Reis, Andrea Almeida; Bertevello, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Morbid obesity is associated with various co-morbidities, including chronic venous insufficiency. Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for morbid obesity, but with potential risks and possible complications, including venous thromboembolism. To determine the prevalence of clinical and ultrasonographic signs of chronic venous insufficiency in morbid obese patients in preparation for bariatric surgery and the incidence of post-operative venous thromboembolic disease. Patients on work-up for bariatric surgery of Centro Terapêutico Especializado em Fígado (CETEFI) and Pro-Gastro surgical teams of the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo were included. The analysed data were pre-operative findings for venous insufficiency (CEAP - clinical, etiological, anatomical, physiopathologic - classification and venous ultrasonographic findings), type of surgery (open or laparoscopic), abdominal circumference, body mass index (BMI) and post-operative ultrasonography search for venous insufficiency and deep venous thrombosis. Between March 2007 and December 2009, 95 patient candidates for bariatric surgery had clinical and duplex scan evaluation of the lower limbs venous system. Of the 95 patients, 53 were submitted to the surgical procedure. There was a predominance of women (77.9%), the average age was 38.5 years, average preoperative weight 124.6 kg and average BMI of 45.5 kg/m2. Regarding obesity, 16.8% were obese, and 83.1% were morbidly obese. In relation to the venous findings, 86.3% of the patients did fit CEAP classification less than 3 and 13.7% greater than or equal to 3. Among the post-operative complications, there were four cases of wound infection. Three patients developed post-operative distal venous thrombosis (7.5%), but no one had clinically manifested pulmonary embolism. No relation between BMI, CEAP classification and venous ultrasonographic findings were found. Although prophylaxis was used in all patients, the incidence of post

  3. Inflammation and peripheral venous disease. The San Diego Population Study.

    PubMed

    Cushman, M; Callas, P W; Allison, M A; Criqui, M H

    2014-09-02

    The inflammatory response to healing in venous thrombosis might cause vein damage and post-thrombotic syndrome. Inflammation may also be involved in venous insufficiency apart from deep-vein thrombosis. We studied the association of inflammation markers with venous insufficiency in a general population sample. We characterised 2,404 men and women in a general population cohort for peripheral venous disease and its severity using physical exam, symptom assessment, and venous ultrasound. Inflammation markers, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, interleukin 1-beta (IL-1-beta), IL-8, IL-10, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin, monocyte chemoattractant-1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) were compared in 352 case participants with peripheral venous disease and 352 controls with no venous abnormalities frequency matched to cases by age, sex and race. Associations were also evaluated including a subset of 108 cases of severe venous disease, as previously defined. Odds ratios (95% CI), for peripheral venous disease for biomarkers in the top quartile (adjusting for age, race, sex, body mass index and history of venous thrombosis) were 1.8 (1.1-3.0), 1.6 (1.0-2.5) and 1.5 (0.9-2.3) for CRP, fibrinogen and IL-10, respectively. Associations were larger considering cases of severe venous disease, with odds ratios for these three analytes of 2.6 (1.2-5.9), 3.1 (1.3-7.3) and 2.2 (1.1-4.4), and for IL-8: 2.4 (1.1-5.2). There was no association of IL-1-beta, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, MCP-1 or VEGF with overall cases or severe venous disease. In conclusion, a subset of inflammation markers were associated with increased risk of peripheral venous disease, suggesting potential therapeutic targets for treatment.

  4. Sulodexide in the treatment of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Giuseppe Maria

    2012-04-01

    Chronic venous disease encompasses a range of venous disorders, including those involving the lower limbs resulting from venous hypertension. The spectrum of chronic venous disease signs and symptoms shows variable severity, ranging from mild (aching, pain, and varicose veins) to severe (venous ulcers). The pathophysiology of chronic venous disease is characterized by venous hypertension, which triggers endothelial dysfunction and inflammation leading to microcirculatory and tissue damage, and eventually to varicose veins and venous ulcers. Sulodexide is an orally active mixture of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) polysaccharides with established antithrombotic and profibrinolytic activity. The agent is used in the treatment of a number of vascular disorders with increased risk of thrombosis, including intermittent claudication, peripheral arterial occlusive disease and post-myocardial infarction. Sulodexide differs from heparin because it is orally bioavailable and has a longer half-life and a smaller effect on systemic clotting and bleeding. An increasing body of preclinical evidence shows that sulodexide also exerts anti-inflammatory, endothelial-protective, and pleiotropic effects, supporting its potential efficacy in the treatment of chronic venous disease. Clinical studies of sulodexide have shown that the agent is associated with significant improvements in the clinical signs and symptoms of venous ulcers, and is therefore a recommended therapy in combination with local wound care and bandages for patients with persistent venous leg ulcers. Preliminary evidence supports the use of sulodexide in the prevention of recurrent deep venous thrombosis. Sulodexide was generally safe and well tolerated in clinical trials, without hemorrhagic complications. Sulodexide therefore appears to be a favorable option for the treatment of all stages of chronic venous disease and for the prevention of disease progression.

  5. Venous thromboembolic disease in colorectal patients.

    PubMed

    McNally, Michael P; Burns, Christopher J

    2009-02-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease, which includes deep vein thromboses as well as pulmonary emboli, can be a significant complication in the postoperative patient. In particular, colorectal patients often carry a higher risk for venous thromboembolism when compared with patients undergoing other operative procedures. Features unique to colorectal patients are the high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease or malignancy. Typically, these patients will undergo lengthy pelvic procedures, which also contribute to a cumulative risk of venous thrombosis. It is critical that all patients and the proposed operative procedure are appropriately risk stratified. Risk stratification allows for easier implementation of an appropriate prophylactic strategy. There are a wide range of safe and effective mechanical and pharmacologic measures available. The authors provide very specific recommendations, but note that clinical judgment plays a significant role.

  6. Multiple venous thrombosis complicating central venous cannulation in a non cancer patient - a case report.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ce; Menkiti, Id; Desalu, I; Thomas, Mo

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is a common procedure for critically ill patients. Like all procedures, it has its complications, one of which is thrombosis. Reports of thrombosis are commoner among cancer patients. We present a 37 year old non cancer patient who developed thrombi in both right and left internal jugular veins, 10 and 13 days respectively after insertion of central venous catheter. This was detected by ultrasound scans of the neck while attempting re-cannulation for parenteral feeding. She also had left lower limb deep venous thrombosis, confirmed by doppler scan, which was managed with low molecular weight heparin and warfarin. The patient was subsequently treated with streptokinase. A repeat scan of the internal jugular veins 4 days after thrombolysis revealed a reduction in size of the thrombi. Symptoms of deep venous thrombosis improved and she was transferred to the wards where she made remarkable improvement. This case illustrates the potential usefulness of ultrasound guided-central line insertion in patients who have had central venous lines inserted previously in order to detect thrombi.

  7. Cerebral venous infarction during a high altitude expedition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S; Chng, S M; Singh, R

    2009-08-01

    Bilateral venous infarction of the brain due to thrombosis of the deep cerebral venous system is relatively rare, accounting for approximately 3-8 percent of all cases of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). Known risk factors include the use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, puerperium, malignancy and thrombophilic states. CVT, in the setting of acute mountain sickness (AMS), has rarely been reported. We present an unusual occurrence of bilateral deep subcortical venous infarction in a previously-well, 39-year-old woman, who developed AMS during a high altitude expedition in Nepal. The possible mechanisms responsible for this unfortunate event include dehydration with resultant relative polycythaemia and raised intracranial pressure at high altitudes. CVT should be considered in mountain climbers presenting with progressive neurological deterioration that is not solely attributable to AMS.

  8. Management of Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Finks, Shannon W.; Trujillo, Toby C.; Dobesh, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review clinical data on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) used in the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) as well as practical considerations when using these products. Data Sources: Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar for VTE, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and relevant drug international nonproprietary names were conducted. Additional online searches were conducted for prescribing information. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Relevant articles on dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban for the management of VTE compared with oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; published between 1966 and December 2015) were reviewed and summarized, together with information on dosing, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interactions. Data Synthesis: The DOACs have the potential to circumvent many of the disadvantages of VKAs. At a minimum, they greatly increase the available therapeutic options, thus providing a greater opportunity for clinicians to select a management option that best fits the needs of individual patients. Despite the significant advance that DOACs represent, they are not without risk and require careful consideration of a number of clinical issues to optimize safety and efficacy. Conclusions: The emergence of DOACs for the management of thromboembolic disorders represents a paradigm shift from oral VKAs. The DOACs provide similar efficacy and improved safety in selected patients as compared with VKAs. Clinicians treating VTE need to be familiar with the intricacies involved in using these agents, including the appropriate dose selection for the relevant indication, avoidance of drug-drug and drug-disease interactions, and consideration of dose adjustments in specific clinical situations, such as organ dysfunction. PMID:26917821

  9. Sulodexide for the Prevention of Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism: The Sulodexide in Secondary Prevention of Recurrent Deep Vein Thrombosis (SURVET) Study: A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Giuseppe M; Bignamini, Angelo A; Davì, Giovanni; Palareti, Gualtiero; Matuška, Jiří; Holý, Martin; Pawlaczyk-Gabriel, Katarzyna; Džupina, Andrej; Sokurenko, German Y; Didenko, Yury P; Andrei, Laurentia D; Lessiani, Gianfranco; Visonà, Adriana

    2015-11-17

    Patients with a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism have a high risk of recurrence after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy. Extending anticoagulation reduces the risk of recurrence but is associated with increased bleeding. Sulodexide, a glycosaminoglycan, exerts antithrombotic and profibrinolytic actions with a low bleeding risk when administered orally, but its benefit for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism is not well known. In this multicenter, double-blind study, 615 patients with first-ever unprovoked venous thromboembolism who had completed 3 to 12 months of oral anticoagulant treatment were randomly assigned to sulodexide 500 lipasemic units twice daily or placebo for 2 years, in addition to elastic stockings. The primary efficacy outcome was recurrence of venous thromboembolism. Major or clinically relevant bleeding was the primary safety outcome. Venous thromboembolism recurred in 15 of the 307 patients who received sulodexide and in 30 of the 308 patients who received placebo (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27-0.92; P=0.02). The analysis in which lost to follow-up was assigned to failure yielded a risk ratio among treated versus control subjects of 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.35-0.85; P=0.009). No major bleeding episodes occurred; 2 patients in each treatment group had a clinically relevant bleeding episode. Adverse events were similar in the 2 groups. Sulodexide given after discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment reduced the risk of recurrence in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism, with no apparent increase of bleeding risk. URL: https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/. Identifier: EudraCT number 2009-016923-77. © 2015 The Authors.

  10. Outcome of venous stenting following catheter directed thrombolysis for acute proximal lower limb venous thrombosis: a prospective study with venous Doppler follow-up at 1-year.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, B C; Patra, Soumya; Reddy, Babu; Nagesh, C M; Agarwal, Naveen; Manjunath, C N

    2015-10-01

    Functional outcome of venous stent placement for the management of acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) following catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), remain undefined. The purpose of this study was to assess immediate and intermediate term outcomes among patients treated with venous stenting following CDT in patients with proximal lower limb DVT. Thirty consecutive patients aged between 20-70 years with proximal lower limb DVT formed the study group. The mean duration of CDT done with streptokinase was 4.5 ± 1.3 days. Patients with residual venous obstruction and/or large clot burden were treated further with venous angioplasty and/or stenting. Primary endpoint was to evaluate the safety, efficacy and patency of venous stenting in the management of incomplete result following CDT. After 12 months, post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) was assessed clinically using Villalta scale and deep venous patency was assessed through duplex ultrasound. We studied 8 (5 female and 3 male) patients with 9 (3 left and 6 right) limb involvement and 13 stent (4 balloon expandable and 9 self expandable) placement. All patients improved clinically immediately following venous stenting. Technical success was achieved in all patients. One patient developed pulmonary embolism during course of hospital stay. One patient had stent thrombosis and PTS and another patient died due to carcinoma breast during follow-up. Deep venous stenting is an effective mode of treatment in proximal acute lower limb DVT with high late patency rate up to 1-year.

  11. Large plaque-like glomuvenous malformation (glomangioma) simulating venous malformation.

    PubMed

    Vercellino, N; Nozza, P; Oddone, M; Bava, G L

    2006-07-01

    Glomuvenous malformations and venous malformations are vascular lesions that can be distinguished on the basis of clinical and pathological features. A vascular lesion of the skin and superficial and deep soft tissues of a lower limb in a 5-year-old child is described. The clinical and radiological features, including skeletal muscle involvement, were typical of venous malformation, whereas the histopathological features were those of a glomuvenous malformation. The clinical and histopathological features are briefly discussed.

  12. Necrotizing Fasciitis on the Right Side of the Neck with Internal Jugular Vein Thrombophlebitis and Septic Emboli: A Case of Lemierre’s-Like Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    NGUYEN, Dang; YAACOB, Yazmin; HAMID, Hamzaini; MUDA, Sobri

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre’s syndrome (LS) is a rare life-threatening infective condition typically starting with an oropharyngeal infection causing thrombophlebitis and metastatic abscesses. The most common aetiology of LS is Fusobacterium necrophorum; however, it can also occur after infection with other organisms. LS mainly affects young healthy adults. The initial infection site can be in the head and neck or in the abdomen. The morbidity rate of this disease is high despite aggressive treatments. In this article, we report a 63-year-old male patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, presenting with Klebsiella pneumoniae infection-induced necrotizing fasciitis on the right side of the neck, leading to LS. PMID:24643401

  13. Modified closed chamber sutureless technique for anomalous pulmonary venous connection

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Karunakaran, Jayakumar; Dharan, Baiju Sashidhar

    2017-01-01

    Visibility continues to be a major problem during repair of obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) resulting in frequent use of deep hypothermia and low flow bypass. Sutureless technique for primary repair of anomalous pulmonary venous connection is fast becoming popular. In this described modification of sutureless technique through the lateral approach, the left atrium is marsupialized around the common pulmonary venous chamber, except on the right lateral aspect, providing a bloodless field with minimal retraction of heart facilitating the surgery at mild hypothermia. This technique can be particularly useful in small confluence obstructed TAPVC and in mixed TAPVC. PMID:28163429

  14. Venous angiomata: treatment with sclerosant foam.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Bergan, John J; Yamada, Clayton; Mekenas, Lisa

    2005-07-01

    Venous angiomata, or venous malformations, are often present at birth, although they may not be evident until later. They consist of a spongy tangle of veins, and these lesions usually vary in size. Treatment of venous angiomata is often requested for cosmetic reasons, but painful ulcerations, nerve compression, functional disability can command care. This presentation describes management using sclerosant foam as the treating agent. During a 30-month period ending March 2004, 1,321 patients were investigated for venous disorders at the Vein Institute of La Jolla. Fourteen (incidence 1%) were found to have venous angiomata (: nine women). The age range was 15-76 years (mean 30.8 +/- 18.6). Lesions were classified by the Hamburg system and were primarily venous, extratruncular in 12 patients and combined extratruncular and truncular in two patients. Eight patients, three males, had manifestations of lower extremity Klippel-Trenaunay (syndrome; six had only venous angiomas. Only 10 of the 14 patients were treated. All patients were studied by Doppler duplex examination. Selected lesions were chosen for helical computed tomographic studies. Magnetic resonance venography was also used to image the lesions, define the deep circulation, note connections with normal circulation, identify vessels for therapeutic access, and determine infiltration of the lesion into adjacent soft tissue. Foam was produced by the Tessari two syringes one three-way stopcock teclinique, with the air to Polidocanol ratio being 4 or 5 to 1. This was used at 1% or 2% concentration, specific for each patient. The SonoSite 190 plus Duplex Doppler was used for ultrasound guidance, whenever deep access was required and to monitor progress and effects of treatment. A goal was set for each patient before treatment was begun. Ten patients were treated, and four await treatment. The mean number of treatments was 3.6 +/- 2.8 (range 1-10). A primary goal of pain-free healing was set in patients with

  15. Venous thromboembolism in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Clifford M

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increasing in the pediatric population. Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have an increased risk of thrombosis due to central venous catheters (CVCs), as well as acquired thrombophilia secondary to inflammation, or deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins due to vitamin K deficiency and/or liver dysfunction. CVC-associated thrombosis commonly results in line occlusion, but may develop into serious life-threatening conditions such as deep venous thrombosis (DVT), superior vena cava syndrome or pulmonary embolism (PE). Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) may be a long complication. Local occlusion of the catheter tip may be managed with instillation of thrombolytics (such as tPA) within the lumen of the catheter; however, CVC-associated thrombosis involving the proximal veins is most often is treated with systemic anticoagulation. Initial treatment with heparin is a standard approach, but thrombolytic therapy, which may carry higher bleeding risks, should be considered for life and limb threatening episodes of VTE. Recommended duration of anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or warfarin ranges from 3 to 6 months for major removable thrombotic risks; longer anticoagulation is considered for recurrent thrombosis, major persistent thrombophilia, or the continued presence of a major risk factor such as a CVC. While CVCs are the most common risk for development of VTE in children, studies have not demonstrated a clear benefit with routine use of systemic thromboprophylaxis. The incidence and risk factors of VTE in CF patients will be reviewed and principles of diagnosis and management will be summarized.

  16. [Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)].

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Simon, J

    2009-10-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is an important and frequent disease for dermatologists, phlebologists and general practitioners. There are various hypotheses for the ethiopathology in CVI, e. g. hormone receptors and impairments concerning the venous contraction or relaxation of the vessel wall and the venous valves might play an important role. At the moment, colour doppler-duplex sonography seems to be the diagnostic method of choice. Modern therapeutic options include compression systems alone or in combination with topical or systemic treatment including minimal invasive methods like endovenous laser or radiofrequency obliteration or foam sclerotherapy.

  17. Dealing with the venous congestion of free flaps: venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, Koray; Kankaya, Yüksel; Uysal, Afşin; Koçer, Uğur

    2008-11-01

    For head and neck reconstruction after tumor ablation surgery, free flaps are mostly the chosen treatment modality for most of the centers. Coping with venous insufficiency and increasing venous outflow of the flap during this process increases the success rate. To increase venous outflow, triple-lumen central venous catheter is inserted to one of the donor veins of the flap that has venous insufficiency and one intact vein anastomosis.

  18. Clinical presentation and patterns of venous reflux in Thai patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI).

    PubMed

    Kanchanabat, B; Wongmahisorn, Y; Stapanavatr, W; Kanchanasuttirak, P; Manomaiphiboon, A

    2010-09-01

    To study the extent of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) in Thai patients by assessing venous clinical severity scores (VCSSs), venous disability scores (VDSs) and prevalence of lower limb venous reflux in a cohort of patients attending a vascular surgery clinic. Prospective comparative cohort study. All patients presenting with CVI (Clinical, Etiology, Anatomy and Pathophysiology (CEAP) C4-6) in our vascular surgery clinic between October 2006 and December 2008 were enrolled and compared with the same number of control patients. A standardised interview was conducted to document each patient's history of venous disease, VCSS and VDS. Duplex ultrasonography of selected superficial and deep veins was performed. There were 41 patients, mean age 58 years and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.7. Of 58 limbs, 35%, 19% and 47% were of CEAP clinical stages C4, C5 and C6, respectively. Previous deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was reported by 7% and major leg trauma by 9% of patients. The mean VCSS was 9.7 and mean VDS was 1.0. VDS 2 or 3 were found in 10% of patients. The VCSS 2 and 3 for pain, oedema and inflammation were found in 22%, 26% and 0% of C6 legs. The prevalence of combined superficial and deep vein reflux was 71%. The prevalence of isolated superficial and deep vein reflux were 8% and 17%, respectively. One patient had iliac vein occlusion. Compared with the control group, risk factors that were found to be significant were physical findings of varicose veins, history of leg trauma, standing posture and BMI. Thai patients with CVI were relatively young. Visible varicose veins, pain, oedema and inflammation were uncommon and most patients could maintain their usual activities despite advanced venous disease. An association with obesity was not common. Despite a low prevalence of a history of previous DVT, the prevalence of deep vein reflux was high and commonly combined with superficial venous reflux. Copyright 2010 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published

  19. [Central venous blood gas analysis].

    PubMed

    Marano, Marco; D'Amato, Anna; Guiotto, Giovanna; Schiraldi, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The hemodialysis might interfere with patients hemodynamic, as the technique allows a sophisticated game with extra and intravascular fluids. As the cardiocirculatory response could sometimes be unpredictable, it is interesting to collect valuable information by reaching a deep understanding of the tissue metabolism which is mirrored by the blood gas analysis of variations in arterial and central venous blood samples. Particularly interesting are the time course variations of the central venous hemoglobin saturation (ScvO2), which are directly related to the patient with O2-demand as well as to the O2-Delivery (DO2). The ScvO2 is determined by four parameters (cardiac output, Hb concentration, arterial Hb saturation and O2 consumption): If the fluids subtraction during dialysis was about to determine an occult hypoperfusion, the ScvO2 reduction would be a timely warning sign to be considered. Moreover, while the normal veno-arterial PCO2 difference is 2-4 mmHg, whenever a mismatch between O2-demand and DO2arise, a larger v-aPCO2 difference should be observed.

  20. Venous ulcer review

    PubMed Central

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers? Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recurrence. Implementation: Potential pitfalls to avoid are: Failure to exclude underlying arterial disease before application of compression.Unusual-looking ulcers or those slow to heal should be biopsied to exclude malignant transformation. PMID:21673869

  1. [Disseminated arterial occlusions revealing bilateral venous thrombosis with paradoxical embolisms].

    PubMed

    Elsendoorn, A; Desport, E; Vialle, R; Frat, J-P; Bridoux, F; Touchard, G

    2009-06-01

    Paradoxical embolism is a diagnosis of exclusion. Clinical triad associates deep venous thrombosis with or without pulmonary embolism, arterial embolism, and intracardiac communication with right-to-left shunt. The intracardiac communication is generally related to a patent foramen ovale (PFO). We report a 75-year-old patient, who presented with bilateral deep venous thrombosis of the legs, complicated by massive pulmonary embolism and paradoxical embolisms through a PFO. This resulted in cerebral, mesenteric, splenic and bilateral kidney infarctions. A promptly initiated anticoagulant treatment allowed a favourable outcome.

  2. [Role of blood refluxes in the genesis of venous trophic disorders in patients with chronic venous insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Sukovatykh, B S; Belikov, L N; Akatov, A L; Itinson, A I; Sukovatykh, M B

    2007-01-01

    The authors analyzed the results of a comprehensive examination of 120 patients with class C6 chronic venous insufficiency according to the CEAP classification, and open trophic ulcers. The patients were subdivided into 2 groups. Group One comprised a total of 75 patients with varicosity, and Group Two consisted of 45 patients with post-thrombotic disease. The localization, intensity and length of the refluxes of blood in the venous system of the affected extremity were determined by means of ultrasonographic angioscanning. Examining the patients with varicosity revealed that in 81.4% the main haemodynamic factor leading to development of the ulcer was a high-intensity, total-subtotal blood reflux along the superficial veins, and in 9.3% - high-intensity superficial and deep refluxes of blood. We failed to determine the blood reflux priority in 9.3% of patients. The trophic ulcers had developed under the effect of low-intensity refluxes of blood in the superficial, deep and perforating veins in elderly patients on the background of heart failure. The most damaging influence on the microcirculatory bed in patients with post-thrombotic disease with recanalization of deep veins is exerted by a high-intensity total reflux of blood in the popliteal and talocrural segments of the venous system of the lower extremities, which was revealed in 68.9% of patients. The developing pathological flow of blood from the muscular-venous pump of the cms into the deep veins of the foot induces perforating insufficiency on the foot and crus, thus creating two zones of venous hypertension above and beneath the ankle. The major factor of trophic ulcers development in patients with segmental obliteration (17.8%) and insufficient recanalization of deep veins (13.3%) was venous hypertension in the distal portions of the affected extremity. Blood refluxes in deep veins of the ankle were of a low-intensity pattern, and played an auxiliary role in development of trophic disorders.

  3. Obesity and lower limb venous disease - The epidemic of phlebesity.

    PubMed

    Davies, Huw Ob; Popplewell, Matthew; Singhal, Rishi; Smith, Neil; Bradbury, Andrew W

    2017-05-01

    Introduction Lower limb venous disease affects up to one half, and obesity up to one quarter, of the adult population. Many people are therefore affected by, and present to health services for the treatment of both conditions. This article reviews the available evidence of pathophysiological and clinical relationship between obesity and varicose veins, chronic venous insufficiency and ulceration and deep vein thrombosis. Methods A literature search of PubMed and Cochrane libraries was performed in accordance with PRISMA statement from 1946 to 2015, with further article identification from following cited references for articles examining the relationship between obesity and venous disease. Search terms included obesity, overweight, thrombosis, varicose veins, CEAP, chronic venous insufficiency, treatment, endovenous, endothermal, sclerotherapy, bariatric surgery and deep vein thrombosis. Results The proportion of the population suffering from lower limb venous disease and obesity is increasing. Obesity is an important risk factor for all types of lower limb venous disease, and obese patients with lower limb venous disease are more likely to be symptomatic as a result of their lower limb venous disease. The clinical diagnosis, investigation, imaging and treatment of lower limb venous disease in obese people present a number of challenges. The evidence base underpinning medical, surgical and endovenous management of lower limb venous disease in obese people is limited and such treatment may be associated with worse outcomes and increased risks when compared to patients with a normal body mass index. Conclusion Lower limb venous disease and obesity are both increasingly common. As such, phlebologists will be treating ever greater numbers of obese patients with lower limb venous disease, and clinicians in many other specialties are going to be treating a wide range of obesity-related health problems in people with or at risk of lower limb venous disease. Unfortunately

  4. Treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Wells, Philip S; Forgie, Melissa A; Rodger, Marc A

    2014-02-19

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a common, potentially lethal condition with acute morbidity. To review the etiology of VTE and the 3 phases of VTE treatment: acute (first 5-10 days), long-term (from end of acute treatment to 3-6 months), and extended (beyond 3-6 months). Cochrane reviews, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials, as well as other clinical trials for topics not covered by the former, were reviewed. Literature searches using broad terms were used to find meta-analyses published in the last 15 years. The ninth edition of the American College of Chest Physicians Antithrombotic Therapy Guidelines was used to supplement the literature search. Guidelines from specialty organizations were consulted when relevant. The Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health was searched for relevant cost-effectiveness studies. We also searched our own literature database of 8386 articles for relevant research. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) along with with vitamin K antagonists and the benefits and proven safety of ambulation have allowed for outpatient management of most cases of DVT in the acute phase. Development of new oral anticoagulants further simplifies acute-phase treatment and 2 oral agents can be used as monotherapy, avoiding the need for LMWH. Patients with PE can also be treated in the acute phase as outpatients, a decision dependent on prognosis and severity of PE. Thrombolysis is best reserved for severe VTE; inferior vena cava filters, ideally the retrievable variety, should be used when anticoagulation is contraindicated. In general, DVT and PE patients require 3 months of treatment with anticoagulants, with options including LMWH, vitamin K antagonists, or direct factor Xa or direct factor IIa inhibitors. After this time, decisions for further treatment are based on balancing the risk of VTE recurrence, determined by etiology of the VTE (transient risk factors

  5. [Homocysteine and venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Monnerat, C; Hayoz, D

    1997-09-06

    Congenital homocysteinuria is a rare inherited metabolic disorder with early onset atherosclerosis and arterial and venous trombosis. Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is more frequently encountered and is recognized as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Several case-control studies demonstrate an association between venous thromboembolism and moderate hyperhomocysteinemia. A patient with moderate hyperhomocysteinemia has a 2-3 relative risk of developing an episode of venous thromboembolism. The occurrence of mild hyperhomocysteinemia in heterozygotes for the mutation of Leiden factor V involves a 10-fold increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism. The biochemical mechanism by which homocysteine may promote thrombosis is not fully recognized. Homocysteine inhibits the expression of thrombomodulin, the thrombin cofactor responsible for protein C activation, and inhibits antithrombin-III binding. Treatment with folic acid reduces the plasma level of homocysteinemia, but no study has demonstrated its efficacy in reducing the incidence of venous thromboembolism or atherosclerosis. Hyperhomocysteinemia should be included in the screening of abnormalities of hemostasis and thrombosis in patients with idiopathic thromboembolism, and mild hyperhomocysteinemia may justify a trial of folic acid.

  6. [Definition, classification and diagnosis of chronic venous insufficiency - part II].

    PubMed

    Kasperczak, Jarosław; Ropacka-Lesiak, Mariola; Breborowicz, H Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Venous insufficiency can be defined as a fixed venous outflow disturbance of the limbs. It is caused by the malfunction of the venous system, that may or may not be associated with venous valvular insufficiency and may involve the superficial or deep venous system of the lower limbs, or both. The CEAP scale includes clinical, etiologic, anatomic and pathophysiologic aspects and has been used in the assessment of venous insufficiency Clinical classification comprises of 7 groups. It takes into account the appearance of the skin of the lower limbs, presence of edema, teleangiectasis and varicose ulcers. CLINICAL GRADING: Group C0 - no visible changes in the clinical examination; Group C1 - telangiectasis, reticular veins, redness of the skin around the ankles; Group C2 - varicose veins, Group C3 - the presence of edema without skin changes; Group C4 - lesions dependent of venous diseases (discoloration, blemishes, lipodermatosclerosis); C5 Group - skin changes described above with signs of healed venous ulcers; Group C6 - skin lesions such as in groups C1 to C4 plus active venous ulcers. ETIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION INCLUDES: Ec - congenital defects of the venous system, Ep - primary pathological changes of the venous system, without identification of their causes; Es - secondary causes of venous insufficiency of known etiology (post-thrombotic, post-traumatic, etc.). There are many methods of assessing the venous system. One of the most accurate methods is an ascending phlebography which is especially useful in determining detailed anatomy of the venous system, venous patency and identification of perforans veins. The second method may be a descending phlebography useful in determining the venous reflux and morphology of venous valves. Another radiological method is varicography in which the injection of the contrast medium directly into the veins is performed. It is especially useful in the ,,mapping" of venous connections. Trans-uterine phlebography when contrast

  7. Apixaban or Dalteparin in Reducing Blood Clots in Patients With Cancer Related Venous Thromboembolism

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-10

    Cerebral Vein Thrombosis; Deep Vein Thrombosis; Gonadal Thrombosis; Hepatic Thrombosis; Malignant Neoplasm; Mesenteric Thrombosis; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm; Portal Vein Thrombosis; Pulmonary Embolism; Renal Vein Thrombosis; Splenic Thrombosis; Venous Thromboembolism

  8. [Venous thrombosis of atypical location in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Campos Balea, Begoña; Sáenz de Miera Rodríguez, Andrea; Antolín Novoa, Silvia; Quindós Varela, María; Barón Duarte, Francisco; López López, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complication that frequently occurs in patients with neoplastic diseases. Several models have therefore been developed to identify patient subgroups diagnosed with cancer who are at increased risk of developing VTE. The most common forms of thromboembolic episodes are deep vein thrombosis in the lower limbs and pulmonary thromboembolism. However, venous thrombosis is also diagnosed in atypical locations. There are few revisions of unusual cases of venous thrombosis. In most cases, VTE occurs in the upper limbs and in the presence of central venous catheters, pacemakers and defibrillators. We present the case of a patient diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy who developed a thrombosis in the upper limbs (brachial and axillary).

  9. Venous thromboembolism and prothrombotic parameters in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oduber, C E U; van Beers, E J; Bresser, P; van der Horst, C M A M; Meijers, J C M; Gerdes, V E A

    2013-06-01

    In Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS), a congenital combined vascular (capillary, venous and lymphatic) malformation with localised disturbed growth, venous thromboembolisms (VTEs) are frequently reported in small cohorts. We quantified the frequency of VTE by screening a large KTS-patient cohort with duplex compression ultrasonography. Additionally, we performed a case-control study to evaluate whether coagulation alterations were related to VTE and magnitude of vascular malformations as quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty-nine (39%) of 75 patients had signs of current or previous VTE, including superficial venous thrombosis, six (8%) of whom had a deep venous thrombosis or a pulmonary embolism. Compared with 105 controls, 54 adult patients (both: median age 33 years) had higher plasma levels of D-dimer, medians 266 (IQR 195-366) versus 457 (IQR 270-3840) mg÷l (p.

  10. A failure of preoperative duplex imaging to diagnose a lower extremity venous aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic venous insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Roy Wesley; Parkerson, Godfrey Ross; Ottinger, Mary; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Park, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We present a case of recurrent bilateral lower extremity venous stasis ulcers in association with a superficial venous aneurysm at the right saphenofemoral junction that was misdiagnosed on preoperative duplex scanning. Methods: A 53-year-old female presented to our clinic with 6-year history of bilateral lower extremity venous stasis ulcers. Her past medical history was significant for refractory venous stasis ulcers of the bilateral lower extremities present for 6 years and morbid obesity. Results: Preoperative venous duplex demonstrated severe venous insufficiency of the superficial and deep systems, but a venous aneurysm was not appreciated. During the high ligation of the right saphenofemoral junction, a 3 × 4 × 5 cm aneurysm was encountered. Repair consisted of aneurysm resection, high ligation of the greater saphenous vein, dissociation of the great saphenous and anterior saphenous veins, and stab phlebectomy of large varicose veins of the thigh and lower leg. The patient recovered uneventfully and experienced complete healing of the venous stasis ulcer in several weeks. Conclusion: Superficial venous aneurysms of the lower extremity are rare and can be often missed on preoperative duplex ultrasound imaging. Large diameter measurements of the proximal greater saphenous vein and obesity increase the risk of misdiagnosing venous aneurysms with duplex imaging; therefore, clinical suspicion must remain high. These aneurysms can be associated with significant symptoms for which repair is indicated. PMID:28255445

  11. Central venous obstruction in the thorax.

    PubMed

    Collin, G; Jones, R G; Willis, A P

    2015-06-01

    Central venous stenosis and occlusion can occur secondary to a spectrum of conditions ranging from aggressive malignancy to benign extrinsic anatomical compression in otherwise healthy individuals. Irrespective of aetiology, significant morbidity in the acute setting and long term can occur unless prompt accurate diagnosis and appropriate management is initiated, the radiologist being central to both. The present review will provide radiologists with a thorough illustration and explanation of the range of central venous conditions in the thorax (including deep vein thrombosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, haemodialysis, and malignancy related causes), the salient imaging findings and interventional management using case examples from the authors' practice. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Venous thromboembolism and antithrombotic therapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wee-Shian; Rey, Evelyne; Kent, Nancy E; Chan, Wee-Shian; Kent, Nancy E; Rey, Evelyne; Corbett, Thomas; David, Michèle; Douglas, M Joanne; Gibson, Paul S; Magee, Laura; Rodger, Marc; Smith, Reginald E

    2014-06-01

    To present an approach, based on current evidence, for the diagnosis, treatment, and thromboprophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in pregnancy and postpartum. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library from November 2011 to July 2013 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g. pregnancy, venous thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, pulmonary thrombosis) and key words (e.g., maternal morbidity, pregnancy complications, thromboprophylaxis, antithrombotic therapy). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English or French. There were no date restrictions. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care (Table 1).

  13. Central venous access.

    PubMed

    Ganeshan, Arul; Warakaulle, Dinuke R; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access plays an important role in the management of an ever-increasing population of patients ranging from those that are critically ill to patients with difficult clinical access. Interventional radiologists are key in delivering this service and should be familiar with the wide range of techniques and catheters now available to them. A comprehensive description of these catheters with regard to indications, technical aspects of catheterization, success rates, and associated early and late complications, as well as a review of various published guidelines on central venous catheter insertion are given in this article.

  14. The jugular venous pressure revisited

    PubMed Central

    CHIACO, JOHN MICHAEL S. CHUA; PARIKH, NISHA I.; FERGUSSON, DAVID J.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of the jugular venous pressure is often inadequately performed and undervalued. Here, we review the physiologic and anatomic basis for the jugular venous pressure, including the discrepancy between right atrial and central venous pressures. We also describe the correct method of evaluating this clinical finding and review the clinical relevance of the jugular venous pressure, especially its value in assessing the severity and response to treatment of congestive heart failure. Waveforms reflective of specific conditions are also discussed. PMID:24085809

  15. Compression and venous surgery for venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mosti, Giovanni

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews published data on the effects of surgery and compression in the treatment of venous ulcers and the best options for compression therapy. Randomized controlled studies reveal that surgery and compression have similar effectiveness in healing ulcers but surgery is more effective in preventing recurrence. Most leg ulcers have a venous pathophysiology and occur because of venous ambulatory hypertension caused by venous reflux and impairment of the venous pumping function. Proposed surgical interventions range from crossectomy and stripping to perforator vein interruption and endovascular procedures (laser, radiofrequency). More conservative procedures (foam sclerotherapy, conservative hemodynamic treatment) have also been proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg – a condition often referred to as deep vein thrombosis. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation ... leg. This condition is often referred to as deep vein thrombosis or DVT. These clots may break ...

  17. Septic thrombophlebitis of the superior mesenteric vein with bacteraemia caused by Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus intermedius as a complication of diverculitis.

    PubMed

    Hadano, Yoshiro; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2013-02-05

    A 68-year-old Japanese man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis was admitted to our hospital because of fever and haematemesis. On day 3, his blood culture became positive for Gram-negative bacilli and Gram-positive cocci, and contrast-enhanced abdominal CT revealed acute septic thrombophlebitis of the superior mesenteric vein with caecal diverculitis. Antimicrobial therapy with ampicillin-sulbactam and anticoagulant therapy were started and the blood culture grew Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus intermedius. On hospital day 7, the patient's condition began to improve in response to the therapy, therefore, the ampicillin-sulbactam and anticoagulant therapy was continued for 42 days. The patient was discharged home on hospital day 45. B fragilis bacteraemia of unknown source should caution the physician to search for an intra-abdominal focus, such as thrombosis of the portal vein or mesenteric vein.

  18. Successful Treatment of Dental Infection-Induced Chronic Cavernous Sinus Thrombophlebitis With Antibiotics and Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Zheng, Bo; Chen, Kangning; Gui, Li

    2015-08-01

    Two patients developed cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis from a tooth infection. A 36-year-old man experienced a severe headache with bilateral third and sixth cranial nerve palsies after extraction of his left upper third molar. Another 53-year-old diabetic man developed fever, headache, and bilateral complete ophthalmoplegia after a tooth infection. The brain magnetic resonance imaging scans of both patients showed bilateral cavernous sinus partial thrombosis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics plus low-molecular-weight heparin successfully resolved all symptoms. Both patients recovered fully without any recurrence at the 3-month follow-up visit. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Venous oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Venous access in oncology].

    PubMed

    Lesimple, T; Béguec, J F; Levêque, J M

    1998-10-31

    Many treatments administered to cancer patients require venous access either via a peripheral vein or a larger central vein at the risk of local or systemic infection, thrombus formation or venous occlusion and dysfunction. Insertion of a central catheter is an invasive procedure which must be conducted under conditions of rigorous asepsia. Strict rules based on well-defined protocols must be applied throughout its use. Local or systemic infectious complications account for 18 to 25% of all nosocomial infections and are often related to colonisation of the puncture site by a Gram positive germ. In case of infection, ablation of the central catheter is not mandatory for diagnosis or antibiotic treatment. Reported at varying frequencies in the literature from 4 to 42%, thrombus formation is unpredictable and often difficult to diagnose. Anticoagulants or fibrolytic agents are indicated but it may also be necessary to withdraw the catheter. Displacement, rupture, obstruction and extravasation are frequent complications. Back flow must be checked in all venous accesses and free flow carefully verified. The access must remain patent throughout the period of use, guaranteed by a standard heparinization and rinsing protocol. This complications must not mask the important progress achieved with the use of central venous access for specific and symptomatic treatment in cancer patients.

  1. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Samia Ben; Touati, Nahla; Baccouche, Hela; Drissi, Cyrine; Romdhane, Neila Ben; Hentati, Fayçal

    2016-01-01

    Data regarding cerebral venous thrombosis in North Africa are scarce. This study aims to identify the clinical features, risk factors, outcome, and prognosis of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tunisia. Data of 160 patients with radiologically confirmed cerebral venous thrombosis, hospitalized in Mongi Ben Hmida National Institute of Neurology (Tunis, Tunisia), were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The mean age was 37.3 years with a female predominance (83.1%). The mode of onset was subacute in most cases (56.2%). Headache was the most common symptom (71.3%), and focal neurologic symptoms were the main clinical presentation (41.8%). The most common sites of thrombosis were the superior sagittal sinus (65%) and the lateral sinus (60.6%). More than 1 sinus was involved in 114 (71.2%) patients. Parenchymal lesions observed in 85 (53.1%) patients did not correlate with cerebral venous thrombosis extent. Major risk factors were obstetric causes (pregnancy and puerperium) found in 46 (38.6% of women aged <50 years) patients, followed by anemia (28.1%) and congenital or acquired thrombophilia (16.2%). Mortality rate was of 6.6%. Good outcome at 6 months (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) was observed in 105 (87.5%)of 120 patients available for follow-up. Predictors of poor outcome were altered consciousness and elevated plasma C-reactive protein levels. Clinical and radiologic presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tunisia was quite similar to other parts of the world with, however, a particularly high frequency of obstetric causes. Plasma C-reactive protein level should be considered as a prognostic factor in CVT.

  2. Contribution of recurrent venous thrombosis and inherited thrombophilia to the pathogenesis of postthrombotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kreidy, Raghid

    2015-01-01

    Postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a common complication of deep vein thrombosis. This study aims to assess the role of recurrent venous thrombosis and inherited thrombophilia in the pathogenesis of PTS. A series of 206 patients diagnosed with lower extremity venous thrombosis were retrospectively reviewed. The PTS was observed in 30.58% of the patients. Recurrent venous thrombosis was identified in 3.4% of the patients without PTS and in 33.3% of patients with PTS (P < .001). Inherited thrombophilia alone or in association with recurrent venous thrombosis was more commonly detected when PTS was moderate to severe (P = .04 and <.001) or severe (P < .001). Recurrent venous thrombosis increases the incidence of PTS significantly. The severity of PTS raises when an underlying thrombophilia is present either alone or in association with recurrent venous thrombosis.

  3. Ambulatory Status Protects against Venous Thromboembolism in Acute Mild Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Sisante, Jason-Flor V; Abraham, Michael G; Phadnis, Milind A; Billinger, Sandra A; Mittal, Manoj K

    2016-10-01

    Ischemic stroke patients are at high risk (up to 18%) for venous thromboembolism. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study to understand the predictors of acute postmild ischemic stroke patient's ambulatory status and its relationship with venous thromboembolism, hospital length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. We identified 522 patients between February 2006 and May 2014 and collected data about patient demographics, admission NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale), venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, ambulatory status, diagnosis of venous thromboembolism, and hospital outcomes (length of stay, mortality). Chi-square test, t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test, and binary logistic regression were used for statistical analysis as appropriate. A total of 61 (11.7%), 48 (9.2%), and 23 (4.4%) mild ischemic stroke patients developed venous thromboembolism, deep venous thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism, respectively. During hospitalization, 281 (53.8%) patients were ambulatory. Independent predictors of in-hospital ambulation were being married (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.10-2.49), being nonreligious (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.34-3.62), admission NIHSS (per unit decrease in NIHSS; OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.39-1.91), and nonuse of mechanical venous thromboembolism prophylaxis (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.02-2.61). After adjusting for confounders, ambulatory patients had lower rates of venous thromboembolism (OR .47, 95% CI .25-.89), deep venous thrombosis (OR .36, 95% CI .17-.73), prolonged length of hospital stay (OR .24, 95% CI .16-.37), and mortality (OR .43, 95% CI .21-.84). Our findings suggest that for hospitalized acute mild ischemic stroke patients, ambulatory status is an independent predictor of venous thromboembolism (specifically deep venous thrombosis), hospital length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Insights from venous oxygen profiles: oxygen utilization and management in diving California sea lions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Birgitte I; Ponganis, Paul J

    2013-09-01

    The management and depletion of O2 stores underlie the aerobic dive capacities of marine mammals. The California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) presumably optimizes O2 store management during all dives, but approaches its physiological limits during deep dives to greater than 300 m depth. Blood O2 comprises the largest component of total body O2 stores in adult sea lions. Therefore, we investigated venous blood O2 depletion during dives of California sea lions during maternal foraging trips to sea by: (1) recording venous partial pressure of O2 (P(O2)) profiles during dives, (2) characterizing the O2-hemoglobin (Hb) dissociation curve of sea lion Hb and (3) converting the P(O2) profiles into percent Hb saturation (S(O2)) profiles using the dissociation curve. The O2-Hb dissociation curve was typical of other pinnipeds (P50=28±2 mmHg at pH 7.4). In 43% of dives, initial venous S(O2) values were greater than 78% (estimated resting venous S(O2)), indicative of arterialization of venous blood. Blood O2 was far from depleted during routine shallow dives, with minimum venous S(O2) values routinely greater than 50%. However, in deep dives greater than 4 min in duration, venous S(O2) reached minimum values below 5% prior to the end of the dive, but then increased during the last 30-60 s of ascent. These deep dive profiles were consistent with transient venous blood O2 depletion followed by partial restoration of venous O2 through pulmonary gas exchange and peripheral blood flow during ascent. These differences in venous O2 profiles between shallow and deep dives of sea lions reflect distinct strategies of O2 store management and suggest that underlying cardiovascular responses will also differ.

  5. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 16, Number 8, August 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    myocardial infarction ; stroke; burn; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; venous injury; venous... infarction 451.1 Phlebitis and thrombophlebitis, of deep vessels oflower extremities 451.11 Phlebitis and thrombophlebitis, femoral vein (deep...ct ob er Ja nu ar y A pr il Ju ly O ct ob er Ja nu ar y A pr il Ju ly O ct ob er Ja nu ar y A pr il Ju ly N um be r o f c om pl et ed fo rm s

  6. [Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Otero Candelera, Remedios; Grau Segura, Enric; Jiménez Castro, David; Uresandi Romero, Fernando; López Villalobos, José Luis; Calderón Sandubete, Enrique; Medrano Ortega, Francisco Javier; Cayuela Domínguez, Aurelio

    2008-03-01

    The recommendations on venous thromboprophylaxis have been updated on the basis of current evidence reviewed by a multidisciplinary team. The problem has been approached with regard to its relevance in both surgical and nonsurgical patients. It should be noted that these recommendations were drawn up for use in Spain and, therefore, should be implemented with the drugs and therapeutic practices authorized and generally accepted in this country.

  7. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-02

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  8. Unusual venous sinuses.

    PubMed

    Srijit, D; Shipra, P

    2007-01-01

    The dural venous sinuses lie in between the two layers of the dura mater. The dural venous sinuses are important, because they receive blood from the brain and the cranial bones. All sinuses are related to the inner surface of the skull, except for the inferior sagittal and the straight sinus. The sinuses related to the inner surface of the skull produce impressions on it. During routine ostelogical teaching for undergraduate medical students, we observed an unusual oblique sinus, which connected the right and the left transverse sinuses. This unusual oblique sinus measured 2 cm and had a course from the right to the left side. The superior sagittal sinus turned onto the right but at a much higher level than the left transverse sinus. Although these sinuses communicated with each other, the normal position of the confleunce of the sinus (meeting point of superior sagittal sinus, right and left transverse sinus and the occipital sinus) was not seen. The impression meant for the posterior lobe of the left cerebral hemisphere was distinctly greater than that of the right side. The presence of such an anomaly suggests a possible developmental defect or handedness of the individual. The knowledge of the anatomical variations of the dural venous sinuses may have great clinical implications during venography, shunt surgeries and also helpful for neurologists and radiologists in addition to academic interest (Fig. 2, Ref 10) Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  9. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease: the UIP consensus according to scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung B; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth; Meissner, Mark; Kalodiki, Evi; Allegra, Claudio; Antignani, Pier L; Bækgaard, Niels; Beach, Kirk; Belcaro, Giovanni; Black, Stephen; Blomgren, Lena; Bouskela, Eliete; Cappelli, Massimo; Caprini, Joseph; Carpentier, Patrick; Cavezzi, Attilio; Chastanet, Sylvain; Christenson, Jan T; Christopoulos, Demetris; Clarke, Heather; Davies, Alun; Demaeseneer, Marianne; Eklöf, Bo; Ermini, Stefano; Fernández, Fidel; Franceschi, Claude; Gasparis, Antonios; Geroulakos, George; Gianesini, Sergio; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Gloviczki, Peter; Huang, Ying; Ibegbuna, Veronica; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kistner, Robert; Kölbel, Tilo; Kurstjens, Ralph L; Labropoulos, Nicos; Laredo, James; Lattimer, Christopher R; Lugli, Marzia; Lurie, Fedor; Maleti, Oscar; Markovic, Jovan; Mendoza, Erika; Monedero, Javier L; Moneta, Gregory; Moore, Hayley; Morrison, Nick; Mosti, Giovanni; Nelzén, Olle; Obermayer, Alfred; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Parsi, Kurosh; Partsch, Hugo; Passariello, Fausto; Perrin, Michel L; Pittaluga, Paul; Raju, Seshadri; Ricci, Stefano; Rosales, Antonio; Scuderi, Angelo; Slagsvold, Carl E; Thurin, Anders; Urbanek, Tomasz; M VAN Rij, Andre; Vasquez, Michael; Wittens, Cees H; Zamboni, Paolo; Zimmet, Steven; Ezpeleta, Santiago Z

    2016-06-01

    There are excellent guidelines for clinicians to manage venous diseases but few reviews to assess their hemodynamic background. Hemodynamic concepts that evolved in the past have largely remained unchallenged in recent decades, perhaps due to their often complicated nature and in part due to emergence of new diagnostic techniques. Duplex ultrasound scanning and other imaging techniques which evolved in the latter part of the 20th century have dominated investigation. They have greatly improved our understanding of the anatomical patterns of venous reflux and obstruction. However, they do not provide the physiological basis for understanding the hemodynamics of flow, pressure, compliance and resistance. Hemodynamic investigations appear to provide a better correlation with post-treatment clinical outcome and quality of life than ultrasound findings. There is a far better prospect for understanding the complete picture of the patient's disability and response to management by combining ultrasound with hemodynamic studies. Accordingly, at the instigation of Dr Angelo Scuderi, the Union Internationale de Phlebologie (UIP) executive board commissioned a large number of experts to assess all aspects of management for venous disease by evidence-based principles. These included experts from various member societies including the European Venous Forum (EVF), American Venous Forum (AVF), American College of Phlebology (ACP) and Cardiovascular Disease Educational and Research Trust (CDERT). Their aim was to confirm or dispel long-held hemodynamic principles and to provide a comprehensive review of venous hemodynamic concepts underlying the pathophysiology of lower limb venous disorders, their usefulness for investigating patients and the relevant hemodynamic changes associated with various forms of treatment. Chapter 1 is devoted to basic hemodynamic concepts and normal venous physiology. Chapter 2 presents the mechanism and magnitude of hemodynamic changes in acute deep vein

  10. [Medial venous catheter or midline (MVC)].

    PubMed

    Carrero Caballero, Ma Carmen; Montealegre Sanz, María; Cubero Pérez, Ma Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Current clinical practice is characterised for importance of the patient's quality of life and the need to reduce the costs of their treatment. We search intravenous therapy alternatives that meet the needs of the patient, reducing the complications associated with the use of venous catheters. Scientific evidence shows that there are midline venous catheters that offer patients and professionals the possibility of extending the duration of infusion therapy, using more venous compatibility materials, and with less risk of infection. The Midlines are becoming in a safe an efficient device for intravenous therapy, continuous and intermittent infusion, provided the necessary care by expert nurses. Midline catheters are peripheral venous access devices between 3 to 10 inches in length (8 to 25 cm). Midlines are usually placed in an upper arm vein, such as the brachial or cephalic, and the distal extreme ends below the level of the axillary line. Midlines catheters implanted in the cephalic or deep basilica veins get more blood flow. This large blood volume justifies the lower risk of mechanical or chemical phlebitis. Midlines are routinely used for two to six weeks. Due that the extrem of these catheters does not extend beyond the axillary line, there are limitations for its use: type of infused drugs, velocity of infusion, etc. In general, solutions that have pH 5 to 9, or an osmolarity less than 500 mOsm are appropriate for infusion through a Midline. Its use is recommended in case of treatments over 7 days with low irritant capacity fluids. According to the Infusion Nurses Society's standards of practice, Midline catheters are appropriate for all intravenous fluids that would normally be administered through a short peripheral IV Importantly, due that the catheter does not pass through the central veins, Midlines can be placed without a chest X-ray to confirm placement. For certain situations, Midlines are suitable for acute units and even for care home settings

  11. Idiopathic versus secondary venous thromboembolism. Findings of the RIETE registry.

    PubMed

    Pedrajas, J M; Garmendia, C; Portillo, J; Gabriel, F; Mainez, C; Yera, C; Monreal, M

    2014-10-01

    The Computerized Registry of Patients with Venous Thromboembolism (RIETE) is a prospective registry that consecutively includes patients diagnosed with venous thromboembolism. We compared the clinical presentation and response to anticoagulant treatment in patients with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (IVT) versus secondary venous thromboembolism (SVT, associated with a risk factor). We analyzed the differences in clinical characteristics, comorbidity, treatment and events during the first 3months after the diagnosis of venous thromboembolism in patients with IVT or SVT and according to their initial clinical presentation. A total of 39,921 patients with IVT (n=18,029; 45.1%) or SVT (n=21,892; 54.9%) were enrolled. The patients with IVT had a greater history of venous thromboembolism than those diagnosed with SVT (p<.001). The initial treatment was similar for the 2 groups, but more inferior vena cava filters were placed in the SVT group (p<.001). In the long term, low-molecular-weight heparin was used more often in the SVT group than in the IVT group. At 90days, bleeding, death and the recurrence of venous thromboembolism were significantly more frequent in the SVT group. The multivariate analysis confirmed that IVT was associated with fewer major (OR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.50-0.61; p<.001) and fatal (OR, 0.41; 95%CI, 0.29-0.62; p<.001) bleedings, fewer relapses (OR, 0.58; 95%CI, 0.39-0.78; p<.001) and fewer fatal pulmonary embolisms (OR, 0.29; 95%CI, 0.12-0.52; p<.001). These differences were maintained in patients whose venous thromboembolism started with a pulmonary embolism or with deep vein thrombosis. IVT has a better prognosis than SVT at 90days of the diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E Andrea

    2011-12-21

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide

  13. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids

  14. [Epidemiology of chronic venous diseases].

    PubMed

    Rabe, Eberhard; Berboth, Gabriele; Pannier, Felizitas

    2016-06-01

    Overview of the recent knowledge in epidemiology of chronic venous diseases. Systematic search and discussion of recent studies concerning epidemiology of chronic venous diseases. The more recent epidemiologic studies of venous diseases in which the CEAP classification was used showed a prevalence of 60-70 % CEAP clinical class C0 and C1, app. 25 % for C2 and C3 and up to 5 % for C4 to C6 with skin changes or venous ulcers. The incidence of varicose veins is app. 2 % per year. Chronic venous diseases like varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency belong to the most frequent diseases in our adult population.

  15. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in cancer: novel findings from the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study (CATS).

    PubMed

    Königsbrügge, Oliver; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2014-05-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs frequently in patients with cancer and contributes to elevated morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for the occurrence of VTE events in patients with cancer have been investigated in numerous clinical studies. For now more than 10 years, the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study (CATS) has focused on the identification of parameters predictive of future VTE occurrence. CATS has contributed to new findings, which may help identify patients at high risk of developing VTE, by means of biomarkers (such as D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1+2, soluble P-selectin, platelet count, coagulation factor VIII activity, thrombin generation potential, etc.). The association of tissue factor bearing microparticles and the mean platelet volume with the risk of VTE was also elaborately investigated in the framework of CATS. More recently CATS has researched clinical and clinicopathologic parameters which contribute to identification of patients at risk of VTE. The type of cancer is one of the most important risk factor for VTE occurrence. Also the stage of cancer and the histological grade of a tumor have been found to be associated with the occurrence of cancer-related VTE. In further investigations, venous diseases including a history of previous VTE, a history of superficial thrombophlebitis and the presence of varicose veins, have been associated with the risk of VTE in CATS.

  16. Orbital venous pattern in relation to extraorbital venous drainage and superficial lymphatic vessels in rats.

    PubMed

    Maloveska, Marcela; Kresakova, Lenka; Vdoviakova, Katarina; Petrovova, Eva; Elias, Mario; Panagiotis, Artemiou; Andrejcakova, Zuzana; Supuka, Peter; Purzyc, Halina; Kissova, Viktoria

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the normal and variant anatomy of extraorbital and intraorbital venous drainage together with retroorbital communication, and determine the lymphatic drainage from the superficial orbital region with a potential outlet of lymphatic vessel into the venous bloodstream. The study of the venous system was carried out on 32 Wistar rats by using corrosion casts methods and radiography, while the lymphatic system was studied in 12 Wistar rats following ink injection. Superficially, orbital veins are connected with extraorbital veins running through angular vein of the eye and the superficial temporal vein, and via the pterygoid plexus with the maxillary vein, which provide readily accessible communication routes in the spread of infection. The extent of intraorbital and periorbital venous drainage was ensured by the dorsal and ventral external ophthalmic vein through the infraorbital vein, which together formed the principal part of the ophthalmic plexus. Venous drainage of the eyeball was carried out mainly by the vortex veins, ciliary veins and internal ophthalmic vein. The highest variability, first presented by differences in structural arrangement and formation of anastomoses, was observed within the ventral external ophthalmic vein (22 cases) and the medial vortex vein (10 cases). Four vortex veins, one vein in each quadrant of the eye, were observed in rats. The vortex vein located on the ventral side of the eyeball was occasionally found as two veins (in four cases) in the present study. The lymphatic vessel from the lower eyelid entered into the mandibular lymph centre, and from the upper eyelid entered into the superficial cervical lymph centre, but both drained into the deep cranial cervical lymph node. The direct entry of lymph entering the veins without passing through lymph nodes was not observed.

  17. Compression therapy for venous disease.

    PubMed

    Attaran, Robert R; Ochoa Chaar, Cassius I

    2017-03-01

    For centuries, compression therapy has been utilized to treat venous disease. To date it remains the mainstay of therapy, particularly in more severe forms such as venous ulceration. In addition to mechanisms of benefit, we discuss the evidence behind compression therapy, particularly hosiery, in various forms of venous disease of the lower extremities. We review compression data for stand-alone therapy, post-intervention, as DVT prevention, post-thrombotic syndrome and venous ulcer disease. We also review the data comparing compression modalities as well as the use of compression in mixed arteriovenous disease.

  18. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha2 antagonists, zinc), peri

  19. Venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E Andrea; Jones, June

    2008-09-15

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha(2) antagonists, zinc), peri-ulcer injection of granulocyte-macrophage colony

  20. [Travel and venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Hallundbæk Mikkelsen, Kristian; Knudsen, Stine Ulrik; Nannestad Jørgensen, Lars

    2013-10-28

    A literature study on the association between travel and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is conducted. Studies examining the risk of travel-associated VTE, predisposing factors and prophylactic measures are presented. It is concluded that the absolute risk of travel-associated VTE is low and holds a 2-4 fold increase after travel. The risk increases with duration, presence of other risk factors for VTE and extremes of height. Stockings reduces the risk of asymptomatic VTE. Heparin is presumed to constitute protection whereas there is no evidence of a prophylactic effect of acetylsalicylic acid.

  1. Venous thromboembolism and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    D’Uva, Maristella; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Strina, Ida; De Placido, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, the association between a hypercoagulable state and its causes and adverse pregnancy outcome, in particular recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) has been studied extensively. Although the first studies were focused only on the association between thrombophilia and RPL, subsequent studies underlined also a potential role of antithrombotic treatment to prevent vascular complication such as venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy. Thromboprophylaxis should be considered also for pregnant subjects carriers of molecular thrombophilia or that previously experienced VTE, in order to prevent VTE during pregnancy, while antithrombotic treatment for VTE should be performed during all pregnant periods. PMID:22282678

  2. Venous thromboembolism and travel: is there an association?

    PubMed

    Milne, R

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the association between venous thromboembolism and travel. There are plausible physiological reasons why sitting still for long periods (particularly in the cramped conditions of most aircraft) might predispose to venous thromboembolism. This may have been the explanation for the apparent excess of deaths from pulmonary embolism seen during the first months of the London blitz. No published controlled studies of thromboembolism and travel were identified, but eight case reports were analysed. They covered 25 people aged from 19 to 84 years with deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism following travel. The reports suggest that long journeys are a particular risk and that there are often no symptoms until many hours after leaving the plane (so conventional methods of assessing the hazards of air travel may underestimate the problem). It is concluded that the literature tends to support the hypothesis that venous thromboembolism is associated with travel, but that carefully controlled studies are needed to test this properly.

  3. Imaging of deep venous thrombosis in patients using a radiolabelled anti-D-dimer Fab' fragment (99mTc-DI-DD3B6/22-80B3): results of a phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, David; Socrates, Angelides; Eisenberg, Paul; Larcos, George; Roach, Paul; Gerometta, Michael; Smart, Richard; Tsui, Wendy; Scott, Andrew M

    2009-02-01

    (99m)Tc-DI-DD3B6/22-80B3 (ThromboView, hereafter abbreviated to (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab') is a radiolabelled humanised monoclonal Fab' fragment with affinity and specificity for D-dimer domains of cross-linked fibrin. Detection of thromboembolic events has been demonstrated in canine models. The study objectives were evaluation of safety and characterisation of biodistribution, immunogenicity and pharmacokinetic profile of increasing doses of (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' in subjects with acute lower-limb DVT. Twenty-six patients with acute lower limb DVT were enrolled. Of these, 21 received a single intravenous dose of 0.5 mg (n = 6), 1.0 mg (n = 9) or 2 mg (n = 6) (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab'. Blood and urine samples and gamma camera images were collected to 24 h after administration for pharmacokinetic and dosimetry analysis. Vital signs, electrocardiography, hematological and biochemical data and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) levels were monitored for up to 30 days following administration. Patients were assigned to either planar or single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging of the thorax at 4 h following injection. Thirty-five adverse events were reported in 15 of the 21 subjects. Those deemed possibly related to administration of (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' included mild hypertension, mild elevation of LD (lactate dehydrogenase) and moderate elevation of ALT (alanine transaminase). HAHA assays remained negative. Pharmacokinetics and organ dosimetry were comparable to prior normal volunteer data. Localisation of Thromboview to sites of known thrombus was evident as early as 30 min post-injection. In subjects with acute DVT, (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' was well tolerated with favourable characteristics for the detection of acute venous thrombosis.

  4. Primary anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome causing recurrent venous thrombosis and thrombocytopenia in a patient with Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Elebrashy, Ibrahim; Yousief, Elham; Saif, Aasem

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of Addison's disease presenting with recurrent deep venous thrombosis and thrombocytopenia and proved to have primary anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. The case report highlights the shared autoimmune nature of both diseases.

  5. Three-dimensional venous anatomy of the dermis observed using stereography

    PubMed Central

    Imanishi, Nobuaki; Kishi, Kazuo; Chang, Hak; Nakajima, Hideo; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2008-01-01

    Veins of the dermis have been investigated mainly by histological methods in the fields of anatomy and histology, and a large number of schemata of the veins have been depicted in a variety of textbooks. However, the schemata are usually two-dimensional and it is therefore difficult to envisage the actual vasculature of the dermal veins. In this study, we performed a stereographic study of the skin of three fresh cadavers that had been injected with radio-opaque dye, which was dispersed throughout the entire body. A venous network consisting of venous polygons of various sizes existed just under the dermis or in the deep zone of the dermis, which is generally called the subdermal venous plexus. There were many small vessels towards the inside of each venous polygon, and most of them ascended, branching off stereoscopically. Those branches anastomosed with each other, and they formed the dermal and subpapillary venous plexuses. However, there was little vascular connection between dermal venous plexuses of different venous polygons. The characteristic structure of the dermal venous plexus has been considered to bring about venous congestion of the skin in various clinical situations. PMID:18422525

  6. [Promoting venous return in plaster cast by AV impulse system. A preclinical study].

    PubMed

    Bulitta, C; Kock, H J; Hanke, J; Sievers, K W; Schmit-Neuerburg, K P

    1996-08-01

    A new pneumatic compression pump--the AV-impulse system--causes increased return of venous blood from the lower limbs to the heart and increases total blood flow in the lower limbs by emptying the plantar venous plexus. Up to date there exist no experiences with using this system in plaster cast. We studied the maximum venous blood flow, the venous blood flow per minute and the venous diameters above the popliteal and femoral vein by duplexsonography in 12 lower limbs of 6 healthy persons before and after applying below-the-knee plaster casts. After applying the plaster cast we observed a slight increase in venous diameter (p = 0.02). By using the AV-impulse-system we observed a significant increase in maximum venous blood flow and venous blood flow per minute (p < 0.05). We demonstrated a significant increase of venous blood return in the deep veins of the lower limbs after applying a lower limb plaster cast by using the AV-impulse-system. These results indicate the possible benefit of using the AV-impulse-system as a physical method of thromboprophylaxis in orthopaedic and trauma patients with plaster cast immobilisation of the leg.

  7. Three-dimensional gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography used as a "one-stop shop'' imaging procedure for venous thromboembolism: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Obernosterer, Andrea; Aschauer, Manuela; Portugaller, Horst; Köppel, Herwig; Lipp, Rainer W

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis are individual manifestations of a single entity, venous thromboembolic disease. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of 3-dimensional gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography used as an "one-stop shop'' imaging procedure visualizing both the pulmonary arteries and the deep lower venous system within a single investigation. The inclusion criterion was a proven or excluded venous thromboembolism. Diagnosis was based on an imaging work-up for pulmonary embolism including either perfusion lung scan or contrast-enhanced spiral computed tomography, or both, and an imaging work-up for deep venous thrombosis including either venous color-coded duplex sonography or ascending phlebography, or both. A gadolinium-enhanced "one-stop shop'' magnetic resonance angiography was performed within 24 hours of completed diagnostic imaging work-up for pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis in 20 patients. Results of pulmonary magnetic resonance angiography were concordant with perfusion lung scan and/or computed tomography in 90% of patients. Magnetic resonance angiography results of the deep lower venous system were concordant with venous duplex sonography and/or phlebography in 75% of patients and seemed to be more precise in 25% of patients. The "one-stop shop'' imaging procedure using gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography was feasible and proved to offer a reliable and rapid diagnostic approach in thromboembolic disease, sparing patients' exposure to ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast media.

  8. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Deep Vein Thrombosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ... to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein ...

  9. Venous thrombosis - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Deep Vein Thrombosis A.D.A.M., Inc. is ... to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein ...

  10. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  11. Pathophysiology of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D; Mannello, F

    2014-06-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a debilitating condition with a prevalence between 60-70%. The disease pathophysiology is complex and involves genetic susceptibility and environmental factors, with individuals developing visible telengiectasias, reticular veins, and varicose veins. Patient with significant lower extremity symptoms have pain, dermal irritation, swelling, skin changes, and are at risk of developing debilitating venous ulceration. The signature of CVD is an increase in venous pressure referred to as venous hypertension. The various symptoms presenting in CVD and the clinical signs that are observed indicate that there is inflammation, secondary to venous hypertension, and it leads to a number of inflammatory pathways that become activated. The endothelium and glycocalyx via specialized receptors are critical at sensing changes in shear stress, and expression of adhesion molecules allows the activation of leukocytes leading to endothelial attachment, diapedisis, and transmigration into the venous wall/valves resulting in venous wall injury and inflammatory cells in the interstitial tissues. There is a complex of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteases and proteinases, produced by activated leukocytes, that are expressed and unbalanced resulting in an environment of persistent inflammation with the clinical changes that are commonly seen, consisting of varicose veins to more advanced presentations of skin changes and venous ulceration. The structural integrity of protein and the extracellular matrix is altered, enhancing the progressive events of CVD. Work focusing on metabolic changes, miRNA regulation, inflammatory modulation and the glycocalyx will further our knowledge in the pathophysiology of CVD, and provide answers critical to treatment and prevention.

  12. The characteristics of healthy adults with hardly palpable vein--Relations between easy venous palpation and physical factors.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Mika; Matsumura, Yuko; Sasaki, Shinsuke; Murakami, Naoki; Mori, Masaharu; Ogino, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate relations between ease of venous palpation and various venous factors, and to elucidate characteristics of hardly palpable veins. Healthy adult volunteers (n = 110) were enrolled. The ease of venous palpation was scored from 0: impalpable to 3: well palpable. Venous factors, namely venous depth, elevation, area and minimal pressure that starts to collapse vein, were measured using an ultrasonography before and after tourniquet inflation at 60 mmHg for 60 s. Tourniquet inflation significantly increased the venous area and venous palpation score. The four venous factors correlated significantly with venous palpation score with the following correlation coefficient: Depth (r = -0.542), Elevation (0.486), area (0.258) and start-to-collapse pressure (-0.220). The characteristics of hardly palpable veins were small size, deep location and little elevation. Although vasodilatation facilitated venous palpation, venous depth and elevation were also important and should be included in future studies in which vasodilatation methods are evaluated.

  13. Extra-abdominal venous thromboses at unusual sites.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Ida; De Stefano, Valerio

    2012-09-01

    Venous thrombosis typically involves the lower extremities. Rarely, it can occur in cerebral, splanchnic, or renal veins, with a frightening clinical impact. Other rare manifestations are upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis, that can complicate with pulmonary embolism and post-thrombotic syndrome, and retinal vein occlusion, significantly affecting the quality of life. This review is focused on venous thromboses at unusual extra-abdominal sites. Local infections or cancer are frequent in cerebral sinus-venous thrombosis. Upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis is mostly due to catheters or effort-related factors. Common risk factors are inherited thrombophilia and oral contraceptive use. Acute treatment is based on heparin; in cerebral sinus-venous thrombosis, local or systemic fibrinolysis should be considered in case of clinical deterioration. Vitamin-K antagonists are recommended for 3-6 months; indefinite anticoagulation is suggested for recurrent thrombosis or unprovoked thrombosis and permanent risk factors. However, such recommendations mainly derive from observational studies; there are no data about long-term treatment of retinal vein occlusion.

  14. [Present and future in the management of venous vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, Ľudovít; Gavorníková, Eva

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence and the incidence of chronic and acute venous vascular disease has been shown to be globally very high, in both industrialized and developing countries. Chronic venous diseases of lower extremities are being an integral part of the third millennium's deadly angiopandemy, at the present time. The rate of the most severe cases with advanced stage of venous failure is approximately twice as high in the population (2.1 %) as has been assumed so far. Among venoactive drugs (VAD), micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) of diosmin hesperidin remains the agent with the highest degree of recommendation and it also indicated to pharmacotherapeutical support of leg ulcer healing, along with sulodexide and pentoxifylline. Compressive sclerotherapy, liquid or foam, is a safe and effective invasive method to treat telangiectasias, reticular varicose veins and subcutaneous varicose veins. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) represent one of the therapeutic and preventive options of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and of venous thromboembolism (VTE) with a limitation in patients with malignant conditions and in pregnancy. The most effective is triple simultaneous pharmaco-kinezio-mechano-phlebothromboemboloprophylaxis. Superficial vein thromboses longer than 5 cm are indicated to anticoagulant therapy too.

  15. D-dimer testing and acute venous thromboembolism. A shortcut to accurate diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Becker, D M; Philbrick, J T; Bachhuber, T L; Humphries, J E

    1996-05-13

    D-dimer fragments can be measured easily in plasma and whole blood, and the presence or absence of D-dimer could be useful in the diagnostic evaluation of venous thromboembolism. We systematically reviewed the English literature for articles that compared D-dimer results with those of other tests for deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Twenty-nine studies were selected for detailed review, and we noted wide variability in assay performance, heterogeneity among subjects, and failure to define absence or presence of venous thromboembolism by a comprehensive criterion standard for diagnosis. These methodologic problems limit the generalizability of the published estimates of D-dimer accuracy for deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, and the clinical utility of this potentially important test remains unproved.

  16. Diagnosing venous thromboembolism in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mingo, Rebecca E; Gosling, Matthew G; Farrell, Sally L; Drake, Brent E; Loader, Robert J; Riordan, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We report the imaging outcomes of all pregnant patients referred for suspected thromboembolism over a 43-month period. Methods: We identified 168 patients who underwent ventilation/perfusion (VQ) single-photon emission CT (SPECT), CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) or a Doppler ultrasound scan of the lower legs, as well as a control group of 89 non-pregnant age- and sex-matched patients who underwent VQ SPECT during the same period. Imaging outcomes were recorded, and radiation doses were calculated for individual patients. Results: VQ SPECT and CTPA were equally likely to diagnose pulmonary embolism (PE) in about one patient out of every seven patients investigated. One in three CTPA scans was of suboptimal quality. A Doppler ultrasound examination of the legs will find deep venous thrombosis much less often, in about 1 patient out of every 15 patients investigated. The prevalence of PE in pregnant patients (as diagnosed by VQ SPECT) was similar to that in the non-pregnant, age- and sex-matched control group. The effective dose and the absorbed radiation dose to the maternal breast were lower with VQ SPECT. The foetal dose is comparable for both VQ SPECT and CTPA. Conclusion: VQ SPECT and CTPA provide a similar diagnostic yield for diagnosing PE during pregnancy, but VQ SPECT does so with a lower radiation dose to the mother (effective dose and breast dose). Advances in knowledge: Ours is the first report of the diagnostic performance of VQ SPECT, rather than planar VQ scans, in pregnancy in a routine clinical setting. PMID:27055494

  17. Paradoxical Thromboembolism/ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction via a Patent Foramen Ovale in Sub-Massive Pulmonary Embolism Following an Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis: Is It Time for a Change in the Standard of Care?

    PubMed Central

    Tukaye, Deepali Nivas; Cavallazzi, Rodrigo Silva

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this case study is to discuss a rare case of proven paradoxical thromboembolism captured in-transit. A 23-year-old female with a diagnosis of right internal jugular deep vein thrombus who developed acute onset chest pain, dyspnea and hypotension, was selected for the study. Sub-massive PE and STEMI were diagnosed. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a left ventricular (LV) mass moving across the aortic valve. Soon after, the patient developed numbness of right extremities with non-palpable pulses. A transesophageal echocardiogram revealed absent LV mass, PFO, left atrial mass entering through the PFO and emboli in bilateral pulmonary arteries. We report a case of sub-massive PE and paradoxical proven coronary and upper extremity embolism, captured in-transit, following destabilization of an UEDVT in a patient with PFO.

  18. Conceptual design of a combined device for normothermia and venous compression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Z C; Yost, W F

    2000-04-01

    Hypothermia and venous thrombosis can cause complications during perioperative and postoperative periods which can even be fatal to patients' conditions. Separative devices have currently been used to prevent those two problems. The device proposed here is to combine in a simple unobtrusive fashion the desirable effects of both temperature control and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in perioperative patients. A design chart of the new device is provided and design issues are addressed.

  19. Management of venous malformations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Gresham T; Braswell, Leah

    2012-12-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) frequently occur in the head and neck with a predilection for the parotid gland, submandibular triangle, buccal space, muscles of mastication, lips, and upper aerodigestive tract. They are composed of congenitally disrupted ectatic veins with inappropriate connections and tubular channels. Because VMs have poorly defined boundaries and a tendency to infiltrate normal tissue, they require calculated treatment decisions in the effort to preserve surrounding architecture. Sclerotherapy, surgical excision, neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser therapy, or a combination of these modalities is employed in the management of VMs. Although many small VMs can be cured, the objective is often to control the disease with periodic therapy. Location, size, and proximity to vital structures dictate the type of therapy chosen. Vigilance with long-term follow up is important. This review outlines current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to simple and extensive cervicofacial VMs. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Consequences of Venous Thromboembolism, Including Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Viral; Hewston, Matthew; Yadam, Suman; Ma, Kiet; Singh, Anil C; Cheema, Tariq

    Venous thromboembolism includes both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. They pose a significant risk for morbidity and mortality. In an appropriate clinical setting, invasive interventions, including administration of thrombolytics, anticoagulation, and placement of vena cava filter, are warranted. Bleeding, postthrombotic syndrome, recurrence, and filter-associated complications are few of the complications of this disease. More recently, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension has gained clinical interest in patients with pulmonary embolism and has warranted close follow-up.

  1. Extensive venous thrombosis of the upper extremity in a diabetic patient with a hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state

    PubMed Central

    Park, Juri; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Hee Young; Seo, Ji A; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of extensive venous thrombosis of the upper extremity in a patient with a hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS). Thrombosis of the upper extremities is generally found in 4% of cases with deep venous thrombosis. Extensive, symptomatic venous thrombosis of the upper extremity, as seen in this patient, is rare except with catheter-related thrombosis. Recent studies have supported the safety and efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis in patients with no contraindication to thrombolytic therapy, and have recommended early catheter-directed thrombolysis. Therefore, our patient was treated with early catheter-directed thrombolysis followed by anticoagulation. PMID:17249507

  2. [Functional insufficiency of the venous valve apparatus and venous return from the lower extremities in humans during the standing test].

    PubMed

    Modin, A Iu

    2006-01-01

    The studies were performed with participation of 16 normal subjects with the US Doppler evidence of functional insufficiency of the deep vein valves in a lower extremity. Valve insufficiency was of the latent clinical form without symptoms of chronic venous insufficiency. Functioning of the contralateral leg venous valves was normal in all subjects. Linear velocities of blood flow in the femoral vein in both extremities in the horizontal and vertical position were compared. In the horizontal position, outflow from the deep vein with valve disfunction was 1.5 times (p<0.01) higher comparing with the other leg as the control. In vertical subjects, outflow from the compromised vein was, on the contrary, reduced almost by half as compared with the healthy leg. These features of local phlebohemodynamics at the outlet of insufficient vein appear to determine the intensity of passive mechanic blood redistribution driven by the gravity.

  3. Hyperhomocysteinaemia and chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Stefano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Longo, Paola; Buffone, Gianluca; Molinari, Vincenzo; Stillitano, Domenico M; Gallelli, Luca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic venous ulceration (CVU) is the major cause of chronic wounds of lower extremities, and is a part of the complex of chronic venous disease. Previous studies have hypothesised that several thrombophilic factors, such as hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), may be associated with chronic venous ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of HHcy in patients with venous leg ulcers and the effect of folic acid therapy on wound healing. Eighty-seven patients with venous leg ulcers were enrolled in this study to calculate the prevalence of HHcy in this population. All patients underwent basic treatment for venous ulcer (compression therapy ± surgical procedures). Patients with HHcy (group A) received basic treatment and administered folic acid (1·2 mg/day for 12 months) and patients without HHcy (group B) received only basic treatment. Healing was assessed by means of computerised planimetry analysis. The prevalence of HHcy among patients with chronic venous ulcer enrolled in this study was 62·06%. Healing rate was significantly higher (P < 0·05) in group A patients (78·75%) compared with group B patients (63·33%). This study suggests a close association, statistically significant, between HHcy and CVU. Homocysteine-lowering therapy with folic acid seems to expedite wound healing. Despite these aspects, the exact molecular mechanisms between homocysteine and CVU have not been clearly defined and further studies are needed.

  4. The venous territories (venosomes) of the human body: experimental study and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G I; Caddy, C M; Watterson, P A; Crock, J G

    1990-08-01

    The venous architecture of the integument and the underlying deep tissues was studied in six total-body human fresh cadavers and a series of isolated regional studies of the limbs and torso. A radiopaque lead oxide mixture was injected, and the integument and deep tissues were dissected and radiographed. The sites of the venous perforators were plotted and traced to their underlying parent veins that accompany the source (segmental) arteries. A series of cross-sectional studies were made in one subject to illustrate the course of the perforators between the integument and the deep tissues. The veins were dissected under magnification to identify the site and orientation of the valves. Results revealed a large number of valveless (oscillating) veins within the integument and deep tissues that link adjacent valved venous territories and allow equilibration of flow and pressure throughout the tissue. Where choke arteries define the arterial territories, they are matched by boundaries of oscillating veins in the venous studies. The venous architecture is a continuous network of arcades that follow the connective-tissue framework of the body. The veins converge from mobile to fixed areas, and they "hitchhike" with nerves. The venous drainage mirrors the arterial supply in the deep tissues and in most areas of the integument in the head, neck, and torso. In the limbs, the stellate pattern of the venous perforators is modified by longitudinal channels in the subdermal network. However, when an island flap is raised, these longitudinal channels are disconnected, and once again the arterial and venous patterns match. Our venous studies add strength to the angiosome concept. Where source arteries supply a composite block of tissue, we have demonstrated radiologically and by microdissection that the branches of these arteries are accompanied by veins that drain in the opposite direction and return to the same locus. Hence each angiosome consists of matching arteriosomes and

  5. [Open thrombectomy in acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Pokrovskiĭ, A V; Ignat'ev, I M; Gradusov, E G; Bredikhin, R A

    2017-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing efficacy of open thrombectomy in acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis. From January 2012 to December 2016, a total of 37 patients underwent transfemoral thrombectomy for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis. The Control Group consisted of 24 patients receiving standard anticoagulant therapy. Six patients were subjected to a hybrid operation consisting in thrombectomy supplemented with stenting of the residual compression stenosis of the left common iliac vein (CIV). The outcomes of the operations were controlled by means of duplex scanning. Clinical efficacy of the operations was evaluated with the help of the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and CEAP classification. Patency of the iliofemoral segment at 6 months of follow up after thrombectomy was observed in 92% of patients. At the same time, in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy recanalization of the iliofemoral segment was observed in only 21% (5/24; χ2=31, p<0.01) of cases. Recanalization of the femoropopliteal segment 6 months after thrombectomy was noted to occur in 70% (23/33) of patients. The median of the composite index by the VCSS after 6 months decreased from 7 to 2 (p=0.002). The cumulative patency of the iliofemoral segment 36 months after surgery amounted to 86%. Clinical assessment of the remote results of thrombectomy according to the CEAP classification demonstrated that 90% (19/21) of patients were either free from or had weakly pronounced symptoms of post-thrombotic syndrome. Performing thrombectomy for iliofemoral thrombosis by selective indications using modern methods of restoring patency of deep veins significantly increases efficacy of treating patients presenting with this severe pathology and prevents the development of pronounced manifestations of post-thrombotic syndrome.

  6. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg – a condition often referred to as deep vein thrombosis. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation and has no known harmful effects. If the veins in your abdomen are to be examined, you may be asked not to eat or drink anything but water for six to eight hours beforehand. Otherwise, little ...

  7. Acute venous thromboembolic disease and paradoxical embolism.

    PubMed

    Pérez R, Diego; Maldonado J, Daniela; Andresen H, Max

    2015-04-01

    We report two cases of paradoxical cerebral embolism associated with acute venous thromboembolic disease. The first case corresponds to a 49-year-old woman with sudden onset of dyspnea and syncope, followed by right upper extremity paresis, aphasia and dysarthria. The admission brain computed tomography (CT) was unremarkable, but lung CT showed multilobar and multisegmentary pulmonary embolism. Echocardiography showed dilated right ventricle with impaired systolic function, moderate tricuspid regurgitation, moderate pulmonary hypertension and positive bubble test, suggestive of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) which was successfully closed by endovascular Amplatzer device placement. The patient was discharged with anticoagulation therapy and permanent antiplatelet aggregation therapy. The second case is a 60-year-old woman found unconscious. Neurological examination revealed expressive aphasia, right hemianopsia, right central facial paralysis and right-sided paresis with a National institute of Health Stroke Scale of 19. Brain CT showed signs of acute left middle cerebral artery infarction. Later, she developed greater impairment of consciousness. A new brain CT showed significant edema with mass effect requiring a decompressive craniotomy. Echocardiography showed PFO and lower extremities' Doppler ultrasound showed a left infrapopliteal posterior tibial right deep venous thrombosis. An inferior vena cava filter was placed and two days after surgery, anticoagulation was started.

  8. [Chronic venous disorders and chronic venous diseases: concepts and evaluation].

    PubMed

    Pereira Albino, J

    2008-01-01

    The field of chronic venous disorders suffered, in the past, from lack of precision in diagnosis and classification. These deficiencies led to conflicting reports in studies of management of specific venous problems. To solve these troubles, the CEAP classification for chronic venous disorders was created in 1994, and was incorporated into the International Reporting Standard in Venous Disorders, in 1995. Actually it is generally accepted and used. In 2004 an "ad hoc" committee of the American Venous Forum working with an international liaison committee, has recommended a number of practical changes, that include a refinement of several definitions used in describing these disorders and a simpler alternative to the full (advanced) CEAP classification, the so called basic CEAP version. The author presents a revision of this document and adapts the nomenclature used to the portuguese language. He gives special attention to the fact that CEAP classification is a descriptive one which is associated to a venous severity and a quality of life scores that are instruments for longitudinal research to assess outcomes. Finally the author advises to use of these scores specially when it is necessary to evaluate the outcomes of the treatment with veno- active drugs.

  9. Doppler ultrasound study and venous mapping in chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    García Carriazo, M; Gómez de las Heras, C; Mármol Vázquez, P; Ramos Solís, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is very prevalent. In recent decades, Doppler ultrasound has become the method of choice to study this condition, and it is considered essential when surgery is indicated. This article aims to establish a method for the examination, including venous mapping and preoperative marking. To this end, we review the venous anatomy of the lower limbs and the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency and explain the basic hemodynamic concepts and the terminology required to elaborate a radiological report that will enable appropriate treatment planning and communication with other specialists. We briefly explain the CHIVA (the acronym for the French term "cure conservatrice et hémodynamique de l'insuffisance veineuse en ambulatoire"=conservative hemodynamic treatment for chronic venous insufficiency) strategy, a minimally invasive surgical strategy that aims to restore correct venous hemodynamics without resecting the saphenous vein. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevention of Hospital-Acquired Venous Thromboembolism in Children: A Review of Published Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, E. Vincent S.; Raffini, Leslie J.

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism, which includes deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a potentially preventable condition in children. In adults, pharmacologic prophylaxis has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism in distinct patient cohorts. However, pediatric randomized controlled trials have failed to demonstrate the efficacy of pharmacologic prophylaxis against thrombosis associated with central venous catheters, the most important risk factor for venous thromboembolism in children. Despite the lack of supporting evidence, hospital-based initiatives are being undertaken to try to prevent venous thromboembolism in children. In this study, we sought to review the published guidelines on the prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized children. We identified five guidelines, all of which were mainly targeted at adolescents and used various risk-stratification approaches. In low-risk children, ambulation was the recommended prevention strategy, while mechanical prophylaxis was recommended for children at moderate risk and pharmacologic and mechanical prophylaxis were recommended for the high-risk group. The effectiveness of these strategies has not been proven. In order to determine whether venous thromboembolism can be prevented in children, innovative clinical trial designs are needed. In the absence of these trials, guidelines can be a source of valuable information to inform our practice. PMID:28184368

  11. Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation frequency and antithrombin activity levels in 120 of deep venous thrombosis and 150 of cerebral infarction patients in a single center in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-sen; Tang, Yang-ming; Tang, Mei-qing; Qing, Zi-Ju; Shu, Chang; Tang, Xiang-qi; Deng, Ming-yang; Tan, Li-ming

    2010-09-01

    Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation shows a relatively high frequency in western population. Some studies suggest that the mutation is an independent genetic risk factor both for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and for arterial thrombosis, but whether the mutation has racial difference or has a general significance for thrombophilia remains unclear. In this study we performed an analysis of the prevalence of the mutation in Chinese southern population; Also, the antithrombin activity levels were evaluated in each investigated individual. The studies included 120 patients with DVT, 150 patients with cerebral infarction, and 110 controls. The mutation was detected using polymerase chain reaction/PvuII restrictive fragment length polymorphism procedures. Antithrombin activity assay was done using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that no antithrombin Cambridge II mutation was detected in all three groups (DVT, cerebral infarction and controls), the incidence was 0/380. Plasma antithrombin activity was 91.37% +/- 16.15% in the DVT patients and 102.68% +/- 13.10% in the controls; the antithrombin activity was significantly reduced in the DVT group (P < 0.0001). In DVT patients, eight cases were identified as primary antithrombin deficiency, accounting for an incidence of 6.7%. No significant difference was found for antithrombin activity between cerebral infarction group and controls. These results suggest that antithrombin Cambridge II mutation has a racial difference, and may not be a valuable risk factor of thrombophilia in Asian population, and antithrombin deficiency remains a major genetic risk factor for DVT patients in China.

  12. Case report: central venous catheterization via internal jugular vein with associated formation of perioperative venous thrombosis during surgery in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Minami, Kimito; Mimami, Kimito; Iida, Miki; Iida, Hiroki

    2012-06-01

    An unusual case of central venous catheter (CVC)-related thrombosis during supine surgery in the prone position is presented. A 76-year-old woman was scheduled for elective surgery to repair a broken lumbar instrument. A single-lumen CVC was inserted via the right internal jugular vein. Surgery was performed in the prone position, with the patient's face directed downward in the standard median position (i.e., no rotation), but with slight forward flexion at the neck. After the surgery, the external jugular vein was dilated, and a postoperative X-ray revealed an infiltrative shadow in the right thoracic cavity. Because cervical echography showed dilated cervical veins with a "moyamoya-type" echo, possibly indicating a thrombus, contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed, revealing a venous thrombus in the right internal jugular vein. An internal jugular venous-velocity measurement suggested that her slightly flexed neck position and her prone position during surgery may have kinked the internal jugular vein, causing engorgement with venous blood. The presence of the internal jugular venous catheter may have created thrombogenic conditions. A patient's position during surgery can reduce deep venous-flow velocity, and venous blood may stagnate, contributing greatly to thrombogenicity. We should consider a patient's position during surgery as a risk factor for thrombus formation, and a careful preoperative evaluation should be made as to which route should be chosen for CVC.

  13. Total anomalous pulmonary venous return

    MedlinePlus

    ... atrial septal defect (ASD) or patent foramen ovale (passage between the left and right atria) must exist ... heart disease - TAPVR Images Heart, section through the middle Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return, x-ray Totally ...

  14. Inflammation in chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D

    2013-03-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVUs) occur in approximately 1% of the general population. Risk factors for chronic venous disease (CVD) include heredity, age, female sex and obesity. Although not restricted to the elderly, the prevalence of CVD, especially leg ulcers, increases with age. CVD has a considerable impact on health-care resources. It has been estimated that venous ulcers cause the loss of approximately two million working days and incur treatment costs of approximately $3 billion per year in the USA. Overall, CVD has been estimated to account for 1-3% of the total health-care budgets in countries with developed health-care systems. The pathophysiology of dermal abnormalities in CVU is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation, resulting in altered cellular function and delayed wound healing.

  15. Venous complications of pancreatitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Yashant; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-31

    Pancreatitis is notorious to cause vascular complications. While arterial complications include pseudoaneurysm formation with a propensity to bleed, venous complications can be quite myriad. Venous involvement in pancreatitis often presents with thrombosis. From time to time case reports and series of unusual venous complications associated with pancreatitis have, however, been described. In this article, we review multitudinous venous complications in the setting of pancreatitis and propose a system to classify pancreatitis associated venous complications.

  16. Neonatal Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina M

    2017-01-01

    Neonates are the pediatric population at highest risk for development of venous thromboembolism (VTE), and the incidence of VTE in the neonatal population is increasing. This is especially true in the critically ill population. Several large studies indicate that the incidence of neonatal VTE is up almost threefold in the last two decades. Central lines, fluid fluctuations, sepsis, liver dysfunction, and inflammation contribute to the risk profile for VTE development in ill neonates. In addition, the neonatal hemostatic system is different from that of older children and adults. Platelet function, pro- and anticoagulant proteins concentrations, and fibrinolytic pathway protein concentrations are developmentally regulated and generate a hemostatic homeostasis that is unique to the neonatal time period. The clinical picture of a critically ill neonate combined with the physiologically distinct neonatal hemostatic system easily fulfills the criteria for Virchow's triad with venous stasis, hypercoagulability, and endothelial injury and puts the neonatal patient at risk for VTE development. The presentation of a VTE in a neonate is similar to that of older children or adults and is dependent upon location of the VTE. Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool employed in identifying neonatal VTE, but relatively small vessels of the neonate as well as frequent low pulse pressure can make ultrasound less reliable. The diagnosis of a thrombophilic disorder in the neonatal population is unlikely to change management or outcome, and the role of thrombophilia testing in this population requires further study. Treatment of neonatal VTE is aimed at reducing VTE-associated morbidity and mortality. Recommendations for treating, though, cannot be extrapolated from guidelines for older children or adults. Neonates are at risk for bleeding complications, particularly younger neonates with more fragile intracranial vessels. Developmental alterations in the coagulation proteins as

  17. Understanding Guyton's venous return curves

    PubMed Central

    Feigl, Eric O.

    2011-01-01

    Based on observations that as cardiac output (as determined by an artificial pump) was experimentally increased the right atrial pressure decreased, Arthur Guyton and coworkers proposed an interpretation that right atrial pressure represents a back pressure restricting venous return (equal to cardiac output in steady state). The idea that right atrial pressure is a back pressure limiting cardiac output and the associated idea that “venous recoil” does work to produce flow have confused physiologists and clinicians for decades because Guyton's interpretation interchanges independent and dependent variables. Here Guyton's model and data are reanalyzed to clarify the role of arterial and right atrial pressures and cardiac output and to clearly delineate that cardiac output is the independent (causal) variable in the experiments. Guyton's original mathematical model is used with his data to show that a simultaneous increase in arterial pressure and decrease in right atrial pressure with increasing cardiac output is due to a blood volume shift into the systemic arterial circulation from the systemic venous circulation. This is because Guyton's model assumes a constant blood volume in the systemic circulation. The increase in right atrial pressure observed when cardiac output decreases in a closed circulation with constant resistance and capacitance is due to the redistribution of blood volume and not because right atrial pressure limits venous return. Because Guyton's venous return curves have generated much confusion and little clarity, we suggest that the concept and previous interpretations of venous return be removed from educational materials. PMID:21666119

  18. Anticoagulation Therapy for Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Cundiff, David K

    2004-01-01

    Context On the basis of theoretical rationale, heparoids and vitamin K antagonists are prescribed to prevent complications of venous thromboembolism (VTE, including pulmonary emboli [PE] and deep vein thrombosis [DVT]). They have been employed as the standard of care for treatment of VTE for over 40 years. Objective Critique the evidence supporting the efficacy of anticoagulants for the treatment of VTE in reducing morbidity and/or mortality. Data Sources This includes a search of reference lists and Medline. Study Selection This includes studies concerning the diagnosis and incidence of PE and DVT, efficacy of anticoagulants in preventing complications, risks of anticoagulant therapy, and the costs of diagnosis and the treatment of VTE. Data Extraction I analyzed references cited in reviews and meta-analyses of VTE, and from Medline searches concerning diagnosis and treatment. The data quality and validity of studies depended on the consistency of findings and statistical significance of the data. Data Synthesis No placebo-controlled trials of anticoagulants as treatment of PE with objective criteria for diagnosis have been published. Three randomized trials of anticoagulants vs no anticoagulants in DVT showed no benefit with heparin and vitamin K antagonists (combined all-cause mortality: anticoagulants = 6/66, un-anticoagulated controls = 1/60, P = .07). No placebo-controlled trials of low-molecular-weight heparins or thrombolytic drugs have been done; therefore, their efficacy in VTE depends entirely on randomized comparisons with unfractionated heparin. They have not been proven safer or more efficacious than unfractionated heparin. Thrombolysis causes more major and fatal bleeds than heparin and is no more effective in preventing PE. Diagnosing and treating VTE patients in the United States with anticoagulants costs $3.2 to $15.5 billion per year (1992 dollars). Bleeding and complications of angiography cause 1017-3525 deaths annually. Conclusion

  19. Upper extremity venous thrombosis. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nemmers, D W; Thorpe, P E; Knibbe, M A; Beard, D W

    1990-02-01

    Upper extremity venous thrombosis is a clinical entity with numerous etiologic factors. Only 2% of all cases of deep venous thrombosis involve the upper extremity, and the incidence of pulmonary embolism related to thrombosis in this location is approximately 12%. Primary or "effort" thrombosis of the upper limb is related to the inherent anatomical structure of the thoracic outlet and axillary region. Secondary thrombosis may have such diverse origins as trauma, infection, congestive heart failure, central venous catheters, neoplasms, septic phlebitis, intravenous drug use, and hypercoagulable states. Patients present with peripheral edema and prominent superficial veins, and neurologic symptoms (pain and paresthesias) are usually present as well. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by venography or sonography. Treatment regimens include conservative measures, thrombolysis with fibrinolytic agents, and surgical correction of indicated thoracic outlet and axillary structures. We present an unusual case in which upper extremity venous thrombosis in a young healthy female athlete was associated with the presence of cervical ribs. The patient was successfully treated with focal thrombolysis and surgical resection of her ipsilateral cervical rib.

  20. Graduated compression stockings as prophylaxis for flight-related venous thrombosis: systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang; Lee, Feng-Ping

    2005-07-01

    This paper reports a systematic review whose objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of graduated compression stockings as prophylaxis for flight-related venous thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis and superficial venous thrombosis, after air travel in the general population. Despite the extended history of the use of graduated compression stockings, their application to prevent flight-related thrombosis was not explored until flight-related thrombosis was perceived as a preventable illness. Even now, their effectiveness in preventing flight-related thrombosis remains unresolved. Generic terms including stocking/s, sock/s, or hosiery/hosieries were used to search a variety of electronic databases. Based on the selection criteria, decisions regarding inclusion and exclusion of primary studies were made. Using a meta-analysis software program, relative risk for the incidence of deep vein thrombosis, superficial venous thrombosis, and intention-to-treat analysis was calculated. A total of nine randomized controlled trials were included. In the treatment group, two of 1237 participants developed deep vein thrombosis in comparison with 46 of 1245 in the control group. The weighted relative risk for deep vein thrombosis was 0.08, with fixed 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.23. In the treatment group, four of 826 participants developed superficial venous thrombosis in comparison with seven of 823 in the control group. The weighted relative risk for superficial venous thrombosis was 0.67. with fixed 95% confidence interval 0.24-1.87 (non-significant difference). Using intention-to-treat analysis, the risk for participants in the treatment group was 0.53 times as great as that for those in the control group. This review demonstrates the effectiveness of medium compression pressure, below-knee graduated compression stockings in preventing flight-related deep vein thrombosis but not superficial venous thrombosis in low-medium- or high-risk participants.

  1. Color-Doppler sonography in chronic venous insufficiency: what the radiologist should know.

    PubMed

    Cina, Alessandro; Pedicelli, Alessandro; Di Stasi, Carmine; Porcelli, Alessandra; Fiorentino, Alessandro; Cina, Gregorio; Rulli, Francesco; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2005-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a pathologic condition caused by valvular incompetence, with or without associated venous outflow obstruction, which may affect both the superficial and the deep venous system, causing venous hypertension and stasis. The most common form of CVI is primary varicose veins due to the insufficiency of the saphenous system. Color-Doppler sonography (CDS) is actually the main diagnostic technique of imaging for CVI. In this article, we describe the anatomy, the technique, and the information necessary to the radiologist to perform CDS in chronic venous insufficiency. The knowledge of the venous anatomy is the cornerstone for an adequate sonographic examination. The venous network in the lower extremities is divided into three systems: superficial, deep, and perforating veins. Deep veins are "comitantes" to the corresponding arteries and run under the muscular fascia. Superficial veins course into the subcutaneous fat, superficially to the deep muscular fascia; the main superficial veins are the greater and lesser saphenous and their tributaries. Connection between the saphenous veins are defined as communicating veins. Superficial and deep veins are connected by perforating veins, with flow directed, under normal circumstances, from the superficial to the deep system. The main perforating are the Hunter in the mid thigh, the Dodd in the lower thigh, the Boyd in the upper calf, and the Cockett's in the middle and lower calf. Sonographic examination must be performed in the upright and supine position. Compression sonography and color and PW Doppler are systematically employed to assess the absence of deep venous thrombosis. Femoro-popliteal veins are evaluated with color and PW Doppler for valvular insufficiency with reflux by performing Valsalva maneuver and calf compression. The sapheno-femoral and sapheno-popliteal junctions are examined to identify type of junction, continence, accessory saphenous, and incompetent collaterals

  2. Epidemiology of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Robertson, L; Evans, C; Fowkes, F G R

    2008-01-01

    Chronic venous disease of the legs occurs commonly in the general population in the Western world. Estimates of the prevalence of varicose veins vary widely from 2-56% in men and from 1-60% in women. These variations reflect differences in variability of study populations including age, race and gender, methods of measurement and disease definition. Definitions of chronic venous disease may rely on reports of varicose veins by study participants, based on self-diagnosis or recall of a diagnosis, or on a standardized physical examination. Venous ulceration is less common, affecting approximately 0.3% of the adult population. Age and pregnancy have been established as risk factors for developing varicose veins. Evidence on other risk factors for venous disease is inconclusive. Prolonged standing has been proposed, but results of studies should be interpreted with caution given the difficulty in measuring levels of posture. Obesity has been suggested as a risk factor in women, but appears to be an aggravating factor rather than a primary cause. Other postulated risk factors include dietary intake and smoking, but evidence is lacking. Longitudinal studies using standardized methods of evaluation are required before the true incidence of chronic venous disease and associated risk factors can be determined.

  3. Pulmonary venous sphincters in cattle.

    PubMed

    Aharinejad, S; Egerbacher, M; Nourani, F; Böck, P; Friederici, C; Schraufnagel, D E

    1996-11-01

    The pulmonary veins of rats have regular focal narrowing by tufts of smooth muscle (sphincters) that can contract in response to a variety of stimuli, but these structures are not well studied in other species, and there is little information about their innervation and control. The pulmonary veins of 21 cattle were cast with methacrylate, and the casts were studied by scanning electron microscopy, or the fixed tissue was studied by light microscopy with immunocytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Constrictions occurred in series along the course of veins (9.6/500 microns), giving the cast veins a string-of-pearl look, with narrowing of 33-81% of the outer diameter. No resin appeared beyond the most narrowed veins. The percentage of contraction did not correlate with the diameter of the veins. With immunohistochemistry using antibodies to S-100, protein gene peptide 9.5, neuron-specific enolase, neurofilament 200, and glial fibrillary acidic protein and with transmission electron microscopy, we could identify no neuronal elements associated with the venous smooth muscle tufts. Bronchial smooth muscle bundles in the same sections stained positively. The veins of cattle are unlike the rat because the focal venous smooth muscle protrudes deeply into the venous lumen and may completely obstruct perfusion. If the focal venous muscle has no innervation (this study) and can constrict without blood flow (as shown previously), then the venous constriction and, hence, local blood flow regulation must be controlled by local mediators.

  4. Infection and Venous Thromboembolism in Patients Undergoing Colorectal Surgery: What Is the Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Monn, M. Francesca; Hui, Xuan; Lau, Brandyn D.; Streiff, Michael; Haut, Elliott R.; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Efron, Jonathan E.; Gearhart, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is evidence demonstrating an association between infection and venous thromboembolism. We recently identified this association in the postoperative setting; however, the temporal relationship between infection and venous thromboembolism is not well defined OBJECTIVE We sought to determine the temporal relationship between venous thromboembolism and postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS A retrospective cohort analysis was performed using data for patients undergoing colorectal surgery in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project 2010 database. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome measures were the rate and timing of venous thromboembolism and postoperative infection among patients undergoing colorectal surgery during 30 postoperative days. RESULTS Of 39,831 patients who underwent colorectal surgery, the overall rate of venous thromboembolism was 2.4% (n = 948); 729 (1.8%) patients were diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis, and 307 (0.77%) patients were diagnosed with pulmonary embolism. Eighty-eight (0.22%) patients were reported as developing both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Following colorectal surgery, the development of a urinary tract infection, pneumonia, organ space surgical site infection, or deep surgical site infection was associated with a significantly increased risk for venous thromboembolism. The majority (52%–85%) of venous thromboembolisms in this population occurred the same day or a median of 3.5 to 8 days following the diagnosis of infection. The approximate relative risk for developing any venous thromboembolism increased each day following the development of each type of infection (range, 0.40%–1.0%) in comparison with patients not developing an infection. LIMITATIONS We are unable to account for differences in data collection, prophylaxis, and venous thromboembolism surveillance between hospitals in the database

  5. Brachial insertion of fully implantable venous catheters for chemotherapy: complications and quality of life assessment in 35 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Igor Yoshio Imagawa; Krutman, Mariana; Nishinari, Kenji; Yazbek, Guilherme; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Bomfim, Guilherme André Zottele; Cavalcante, Rafael Noronha; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To prospectively evaluate the perioperative safety, early complications and satisfaction of patients who underwent the implantation of central catheters peripherally inserted via basilic vein. Methods Thirty-five consecutive patients with active oncologic disease requiring chemotherapy were prospectively followed up after undergoing peripheral implantation of indwelling venous catheters, between November 2013 and June 2014. The procedures were performed in the operating room by the same team of three vascular surgeons. The primary endpoints assessed were early postoperative complications, occurring within 30 days after implantation. The evaluation of patient satisfaction was based on a specific questionnaire used in previous studies. Results In all cases, ultrasound-guided puncture of the basilic vein was feasible and the procedure successfully completed. Early complications included one case of basilic vein thrombophlebitis and one case of pocket infection that did not require device removal. Out of 35 patients interviewed, 33 (94.3%) would recommend the device to other patients. Conclusion Implanting brachial ports is a feasible option, with low intraoperative risk and similar rates of early postoperative complications when compared to the existing data of the conventional technique. The patients studied were satisfied with the device and would recommend the procedure to others. PMID:28076593

  6. Systemic venous drainage: can we help Newton?

    PubMed

    Corno, Antonio F

    2007-06-01

    In recent years substantial progress occurred in the techniques of cardiopulmonary bypass, but the factor potentially limiting the flexibility of cardiopulmonary bypass remains the drainage of the systemic venous return. In the daily clinical practice of cardiac surgery, the amount of systemic venous return on cardiopulmonary bypass is directly correlated with the amount of the pump flow. As a consequence, the pump flow is limited by the amount of venous return that the pump is receiving. On cardiopulmonary bypass the amount of venous drainage depends upon the central venous pressure, the height differential between patient and inlet of the venous line into the venous reservoir, and the resistance in the venous cannula(s) and circuit. The factors determining the venous return to be taken into consideration in cardiac surgery are the following: (a) characteristics of the individual patient; (b) type of planned surgical procedure; (c) type of venous cannula(s); (d) type of circuit for cardiopulmonary bypass; (e) strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass; (f) use of accessory mechanical systems to increased the systemic venous return. The careful pre-operative evaluation of all the elements affecting the systemic venous drainage, including the characteristics of the individual patient and the type of required surgical procedure, the choice of the best strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass, and the use of the most advanced materials and tools, can provide a systemic venous drainage substantially better than what it would be allowed by the simple "Law of universal gravitation" by Isaac Newton.

  7. The Ovine Cerebral Venous System: Comparative Anatomy, Visualization, and Implications for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Nitzsche, Björn; Lobsien, Donald; Seeger, Johannes; Schneider, Holm; Boltze, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are significant causes of death and disability in humans. Improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches strongly rely on adequate gyrencephalic, large animal models being demanded for translational research. Ovine stroke models may represent a promising approach but are currently limited by insufficient knowledge regarding the venous system of the cerebral angioarchitecture. The present study was intended to provide a comprehensive anatomical analysis of the intracranial venous system in sheep as a reliable basis for the interpretation of experimental results in such ovine models. We used corrosion casts as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography to scrutinize blood drainage from the brain. This combined approach yielded detailed and, to some extent, novel findings. In particular, we provide evidence for chordae Willisii and lateral venous lacunae, and report on connections between the dorsal and ventral sinuses in this species. For the first time, we also describe venous confluences in the deep cerebral venous system and an ‘anterior condylar confluent’ as seen in humans. This report provides a detailed reference for the interpretation of venous diagnostic imaging findings in sheep, including an assessment of structure detectability by in vivo (imaging) versus ex vivo (corrosion cast) visualization methods. Moreover, it features a comprehensive interspecies-comparison of the venous cerebral angioarchitecture in man, rodents, canines and sheep as a relevant large animal model species, and describes possible implications for translational cerebrovascular research. PMID:24736654

  8. The ovine cerebral venous system: comparative anatomy, visualization, and implications for translational research.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Anke; Stoffel, Michael H; Nitzsche, Björn; Lobsien, Donald; Seeger, Johannes; Schneider, Holm; Boltze, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are significant causes of death and disability in humans. Improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches strongly rely on adequate gyrencephalic, large animal models being demanded for translational research. Ovine stroke models may represent a promising approach but are currently limited by insufficient knowledge regarding the venous system of the cerebral angioarchitecture. The present study was intended to provide a comprehensive anatomical analysis of the intracranial venous system in sheep as a reliable basis for the interpretation of experimental results in such ovine models. We used corrosion casts as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography to scrutinize blood drainage from the brain. This combined approach yielded detailed and, to some extent, novel findings. In particular, we provide evidence for chordae Willisii and lateral venous lacunae, and report on connections between the dorsal and ventral sinuses in this species. For the first time, we also describe venous confluences in the deep cerebral venous system and an 'anterior condylar confluent' as seen in humans. This report provides a detailed reference for the interpretation of venous diagnostic imaging findings in sheep, including an assessment of structure detectability by in vivo (imaging) versus ex vivo (corrosion cast) visualization methods. Moreover, it features a comprehensive interspecies-comparison of the venous cerebral angioarchitecture in man, rodents, canines and sheep as a relevant large animal model species, and describes possible implications for translational cerebrovascular research.

  9. Single Superficial versus Dual Systems Venous Anastomoses in Radial Forearm Free Flap: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shuang; Xu, Zhong-Fei; Duan, Wei-Yi; Liu, Fa-Yu; Huang, Dong-Hui; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Background The radial forearm free flap (RFFF) has been widely used with increasing frequency in head and neck reconstruction following extirpative surgery. The controversy of the venous anastomoses patterns still exists. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between the venous anastomoses patterns and venous compromise. Methods MEDLINE, PubMed, Web of Science, and Wanfang databases were searched for studies reporting the different venous anastomoses patterns of the RFFF. A meta-analysis was conducted using the random effects models. Publication bias and sensitivity analysis were also assessed. Results 6 studies with 992 cases were included in this meta-analysis. The dual anastomosis group tended to have a lower incidence of venous compromise (RR = 1.39). However, the difference was not statistically significant (95%CI: 0.59, 3.24). Conclusions This meta-analysis indicated that performing dual venous anatomoses consisting of superficial and deep systems conferred a tendency of the reduction with regard to venous compromise. PMID:26270854

  10. Treatment of Pelvic Venous Spur (May-Thurner Syndrome) with Self-Expanding Metallic Endoprostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Schoch, Eric; Stuckmann, Gerd; Largiader, Jon; Wigger, Pius; Schoepke, Wolfdietrich; Zollikofer, Christoph L.

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: The application of self-expanding metallic endoprostheses (stents) to treat symptomatic pelvic venous spurs as an alternative to surgery. Methods: Wallstents with a diameter from 14 to 16 mm and one Cragg stent were placed in the left common iliac vein of eight patients (seven women, one man; mean age 42 years) with a symptomatic pelvic venous spur (left deep venous thrombosis or post-thrombotic leg swelling). Four patients had surgical thrombectomy prior to stent placement. Results: Technical success with immediate reduction of left leg circumference was achieved in all eight patients. A primary patency rate of 100% was observed during an average follow-up of 3 years (range 10-121 months). There were no procedural or stent-related complications. Conclusion: The percutaneous transfemoral placement of self-expanding metallic stents is an effective minimally invasive alternative to surgery in the treatment of symptomatic pelvic venous spur.

  11. Venous Thromboembolism – Current Diagnostic and Treatment Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Bosevski, Marijan; Srbinovska-Kostovska, Elizabeta

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis, known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), are associated with a high proportion of morbidity and mortality. AIM: Aim of this review is to emphasise current diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for VTE. RESULTS: No differences have been noticed in European and American guidelines in diagnostic approach of this disorder. Today there is enough clinical information for the use of heparin (either, unfractionated or low molecular) and vitamin K antagonists in the treatment of acute and chronic phases of VTE. Novel oral anticoagulants seem to have some advantages in the treatment of this disorder. Rivaroxaban has been approved widespread, for use as a single-drug approach of VTE. CONCLUSION: Both guidelines are almost similar and good basis for evidence-based treatment of this disorder. PMID:27703586

  12. [Variant anatomy of penile venous vascular bed in adult man].

    PubMed

    Gaĭvoronskiĭ, I V; Mazurenko, R G

    2012-01-01

    The methods of anatomical preparation and X-ray examination were applied after the preliminary injection of blood vessels with the setting and radio-opaque masses, to study the variant anatomy of penile vascular bed. Organ complexes of minor pelvis and perineum, obtained from 54 cadavers of adult men, were used. It was found that the architecture and the places of the confluence of the main veins of penis are very variable. The trunks of the superficial and deep dorsal vein (DDV) may be single or double. Venous trunks tare connected by a network of anastomoses, more developed in the root of the penis. Valve apparatus in the anastomotic veins is presented only in 80% of the observations. Under normal conditions, the valves of the anastomotic veins provide the outflow of blood in DDV of the penis. The data obtained are of practical importance for understanding the anatomical causes of erectile dysfunction of venous origin.

  13. [Anticoagulant treatment of thrombo-embolic venous disease].

    PubMed

    Pinède, Laurent; Ninet, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    The curative anticoagulant treatment of venous thromboembolism is non fractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin, secondly substituted by oral anticoagulant therapy. Early mobilisation and elastic contention should be systematically prescribed. Low molecular weight heparin once or twice a day and early substitution by vitamin K antagonist allow an ambulatory treatment for deep vein thrombosis. It is still recommended a hospital management for patients with symptomatic pulmonary embolism. It is necessary to tailor the duration of anticoagulation individually according to the extension of venous thromboembolism and the presence (or absence) of risk or triggering factors. Bleeding is the major risk of anticoagulant therapy, particularly the vitamin K antagonists, justifying patient's education, adapted and regular biological surveillance, co-ordinated care approach with practical recommendations, patient's self-monitoring.

  14. Arterial versus venous endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    dela Paz, Nathaniel G; D'Amore, Patricia A

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) form the inner lining of all blood vessels from the largest artery and veins, viz., the aorta and venae cavae, respectively, to the capillaries that connect the arterial and venous systems. Because these two major conducting systems of the cardiovasculature differ functionally, it is not surprising that the physical makeup of arteries and veins, including the ECs that line their lumina, are also distinct. Although few would argue that the local environment contributes to the differences between arteries and veins, recent evidence has shown that the specification of arterial and venous identity is largely genetically determined.

  15. Pharmacological prophylaxis of venous thrombo-embolism.

    PubMed

    Flute, P T

    1976-02-07

    The pathogenesis of venous thrombosis is briefly discussed as a basis for the understanding of preventive measures used in this condition. Prophylaxis in venous thrombosis is then reviewed with emphasis on pharmacological treatment, and more particularly on heparin.

  16. Venous leg ulcer in the context of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Lozano Sánchez, F S; Marinel lo Roura, J; Carrasco Carrasco, E; González-Porras, J R; Escudero Rodríguez, J R; Sánchez Nevarez, I; Díaz Sánchez, S

    2014-05-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a frequent disorder with a high socioeconomic impact. Little is known about the possible differences between healed ulcer (C5 group) and active ulcer (C6 group) in terms of disease severity and quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to determine the possible differences in severity disease and QoL between the C5-C6 and C1 (control) group. Data from a national, multicentre, observational and cross-sectional study (n = 1598) were used to compare three groups of CVD: C1 (n = 243), C5 (n = 136) and C6 (n = 70). CVD severity was assessed with the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and QoL with the Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12) and Chronic Lower Limb Venous Insufficiency Questionnaire (CIVIQ-20). Patients with active ulcers had a higher mean total VCSS than patients with healed ulcers (P < 0.05). Both SF-12 and CIVIQ-20 QoL questionnaires indicated a poorer QoL in patients with ulcers than in those with C1 (P < 0.05). Compared with the C5 group, patients with active ulcers (C6) had lower QoL scores, but the differences were not statistically significant. Patients with venous leg ulcers (C5-C6) are associated with high severity and poor QoL. However, the healing of a leg ulcer did not contribute to improvement of QoL.

  17. Preventing venous ulcer recurrence: a review.

    PubMed

    Vowden, Kathryn R; Vowden, Peter

    2006-03-01

    This review article examines the available evidence on both the primary and secondary prevention of venous ulceration, exploring both the individual, social and financial implications of system failures that allow patients to remain at increased risk of recurrent ulceration. The role of both venous disease assessment and corrective superficial venous surgery are discussed in the light of recently published randomised controlled studies on the role of superficial venous surgery as both an adjunct to ulcer healing and ulcer prevention.

  18. [Venous thromboembolic disease and oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Overgaard, K; Hauch, O; Lidegaard, O

    1986-09-08

    Ever since 1961, there has been discussion on possible thromboembolic effects from the use of oral contraceptives. The purpose of this Danish study was to determine if birth-control pill users did have an increased risk of venous thromboembolic disease (VTD), including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. In previous research, morbidity from VTD has been found to show a great variance, as high as 1/330 woman years in 1 study to as low as 1/5,000 woman years in another. In these studies no significant difference was found between users and non-users of oral contraceptives. Only in 1 study was there found to be increased morbidity from VTD among pill users: 1/5,200 woman years, compared with 1/35,000 woman years for non-pill users. As a possible explanation of the pill's effect, several studies have demonstrated a rise in certain coagulation factors, increased fibrinogen and lowered antithrombin III. In the present study, medical records of all women aged 34 or under who had been referred to a Copenhagen hospital between 1981 and 1983 for treatment of phlebographic-or lungescintographic-confirmed VTD were investigated. After controlling for exclusion factors, there remained 35 test subjects between the ages of 16 and 34 (median age 22). Of the 22 cases of known etiology, 16 suffered from iatrogenic VTD. Of 13 women who suffered from VTD of unknown etiology, 69% were pill users, compared with only 29% (a significant difference) in a background-population interview study conducted in Denmark during 1983. With a known disposition to VTD, oral-contraceptive usage meant a relative risk of 0.9 for developing the disease, which figure conforms well with other cited research (in which the risk factor varied from 0.4 to 3.8).

  19. Number and location of venous valves within the popliteal and femoral veins – a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Moore, H M; Gohel, M; Davies, A H

    2011-01-01

    Although deep venous insufficiency is common and important, the anatomy of deep vein valves is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the location, number and consistency of venous valves in the femoral and popliteal veins in normal subjects. A detailed literature search of PubMed was performed. Abstracts and selected full text articles were scrutinised and relevant studies published between 1949 and 2010 reporting anatomical details of deep vein valves were included. From 7470 articles identified by the initial search strategy, nine studies with a total of 476 legs were included in this review. All studies were cadaveric and subjects ranged from stillborn fetuses to 103 years of age. Studies suggested that femoral veins contain between one and six valves, and popliteal veins contain between zero and four valves. Deep vein valves were consistently located in the common femoral vein (within 5 cm of the inguinal ligament), the femoral vein (within 3 cm of the deep femoral vein tributary) and in the popliteal vein near the adductor hiatus. Valves are consistently located at specific locations in the deep veins of the leg, although there is often significant variability between subjects. Further anatomical and functional studies using new imaging modalities available should target these areas to identify whether certain valves play a more important role in venous disease. This may guide us in the development of new treatment options for patients with deep venous disease. PMID:21740424

  20. Common femoral endovenectomy in conjunction with iliac vein stenting to improve venous inflow in severe post-thrombotic obstruction.

    PubMed

    Verma, Himanshu; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2017-01-01

    Post-thrombotic syndrome secondary to iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis is a significant contributor to advanced chronic venous insufficiency. Iliac vein stenting is a standard procedure to treat iliocaval obstruction. In cases with obstruction extending across the groin, venous inflow for an iliac vein stent may be poor and compromise results of iliac vein stenting. Treatment options include extension of stents across the inguinal ligament that may have limitations in improving inflow only from only one vessel. Endovenectomy in this scenario becomes an attractive option with or without iliac vein stenting to provide outflow to the profunda vein, which otherwise is "axially transformed" in chronic iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. We describe a technique of endovenectomy in combination with iliac vein stenting to establish a patent outflow tract for profunda and femoral veins. Accompanying also is a video demonstration of endovenectomy that will help viewers understand more technical aspects of the procedure.

  1. Oral rivaroxaban for symptomatic venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Bauersachs, Rupert; Berkowitz, Scott D; Brenner, Benjamin; Buller, Harry R; Decousus, Hervé; Gallus, Alex S; Lensing, Anthonie W; Misselwitz, Frank; Prins, Martin H; Raskob, Gary E; Segers, Annelise; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Phil; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bounameaux, Henri; Cohen, Alexander; Davidson, Bruce L; Piovella, Franco; Schellong, Sebastian

    2010-12-23

    Rivaroxaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor, may provide a simple, fixed-dose regimen for treating acute deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and for continued treatment, without the need for laboratory monitoring. We conducted an open-label, randomized, event-driven, noninferiority study that compared oral rivaroxaban alone (15 mg twice daily for 3 weeks, followed by 20 mg once daily) with subcutaneous enoxaparin followed by a vitamin K antagonist (either warfarin or acenocoumarol) for 3, 6, or 12 months in patients with acute, symptomatic DVT. In parallel, we carried out a double-blind, randomized, event-driven superiority study that compared rivaroxaban alone (20 mg once daily) with placebo for an additional 6 or 12 months in patients who had completed 6 to 12 months of treatment for venous thromboembolism. The primary efficacy outcome for both studies was recurrent venous thromboembolism. The principal safety outcome was major bleeding or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding in the initial-treatment study and major bleeding in the continued-treatment study. The study of rivaroxaban for acute DVT included 3449 patients: 1731 given rivaroxaban and 1718 given enoxaparin plus a vitamin K antagonist. Rivaroxaban had noninferior efficacy with respect to the primary outcome (36 events [2.1%], vs. 51 events with enoxaparin-vitamin K antagonist [3.0%]; hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.44 to 1.04; P<0.001). The principal safety outcome occurred in 8.1% of the patients in each group. In the continued-treatment study, which included 602 patients in the rivaroxaban group and 594 in the placebo group, rivaroxaban had superior efficacy (8 events [1.3%], vs. 42 with placebo [7.1%]; hazard ratio, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.09 to 0.39; P<0.001). Four patients in the rivaroxaban group had nonfatal major bleeding (0.7%), versus none in the placebo group (P=0.11). Rivaroxaban offers a simple, single-drug approach to the short-term and continued treatment of venous thrombosis that may

  2. Venous Thromboembolism and Marathon Athletes

    MedlinePlus

    ... possible. How Can Athletes Reduce the Likelihood of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism? Preventive measures to reduce the likelihood of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in athletes are ...

  3. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  4. History of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Gianfaldoni, S; Wollina, U; Lotti, J; Gianfaldoni, R; Lotti, T; Roccia, M G

    To retrieve the history of venous ulcers and of skin lesions in general, we must go back to the appearance of human beings on earth. It is interesting to note that cutaneous injuries evolved parallel to human society. An essential first step in the pathogenesis of ulcers was represented by the transition of the quadruped man to Homo Erectus. This condition was characterized by a greater gravitational pressure on the lower limbs, with consequences on the peripheral venous system. Furthermore, human evolution was characterized by an increased risk of traumatic injuries, secondary to his natural need to create fire and hunt (e.g. stones, iron, fire, animal fighting). Humans then began to fight one another until they came to real wars, with increased frequency of wounds and infectious complications. The situation degraded with the introduction of horse riding, introduced by the Scites, who first tamed animals in the 7th century BC. This condition exhibited iliac veins at compression phenomena, favouring the venous stasis. With time, man continued to evolve until the modern age, which is characterized by increased risk factors for venous wounds such as poor physical activity and dietary errors (1, 2).

  5. Chronic Venous Disease and Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Matic, P; Jolic, S; Tanaskovic, S; Soldatovic, I; Katsiki, N; Isenovic, E; Radak, Dj

    2015-07-01

    We report the relations between comorbidities and chronic venous disease. In this cross-sectional study, information was gathered from 1679 Serbian patients. The majority (65.0%) of patients were women. Mild forms of chronic venous disease (clinical, etiologic, anatomic and pathophysiologic [CEAP] classification; C0s-C1) were more frequent in women (11.6%), while severe forms (CEAP C4-C6) were more commonly encountered in men (42.1%). The most frequent comorbidity was emphysema/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in both groups (74.3% in males and 70.6% in females). For females, diabetes mellitus (P < .005), arterial hypertension (P < .000), and skeletal/joint diseases (P < .042) were more commonly found in the C4 to C6 category. Both males and females, with severe form of chronic venous disease, may benefit from additional screening for comorbidities. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of association among comorbidities and chronic venous disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Air travel and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Shanthi; Yach, Derek; Alwan, Ala

    2002-01-01

    There has recently been increased publicity on the risk of venous thrombosis after long-haul flights. This paper reviews the evidence base related to the association between air travel and venous thromboembolism. The evidence consists only of case reports, clinical case-control studies and observational studies involving the use of intermediate end-points, or expert opinion. Some studies have suggested that there is no clear association, whereas others have indicated a strong relationship. On the whole it appears that there is probably a link between air travel and venous thrombosis. However, the link is likely to be weak, mainly affecting passengers with additional risk factors for venous thromboembolism. The available evidence is not adequate to allow quantification of the risk. There are insufficient scientific data on which to base specific recommendations for prevention, other than that leg exercise should be taken during travel. Further studies are urgently needed in order to identify prospectively the incidence of the condition and those at risk. PMID:12077617

  7. Palmar contracture release with arterialized venous instep flap: An anatomical and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Zor, Fatih; Yalçın, Bülent; Tekin, Levent; Eski, Muhitdin; Işık, Selcuk; Şengezer, Mustafa

    2015-07-01

    Plantar skin has similar histologic features to the palmar area and appears to be the ideal tissue for reconstruction of the palmar region. In this study, an anatomic examination was performed to determine the superficial venous architecture of the instep area, and the use of arterialized venous instep flaps for palmar contracture release was assessed. The anatomical study was performed on 12 fresh cadaver feet. The arterialized venous instep flap, including the skin, subcutaneous tissue and superficial venous plexus, was harvested. To determine the venous structure, dissection (n = 6) and injection-corrosion (n = 6) techniques were used. In the clinical study, nine arterialized venous instep flaps were used for palmar contracture release. All flaps were harvested above the deep fascia and included skin, subcutaneous fat, and the superficial venous plexus. At the plantar site of the flap, two or three veins, one of which was used, were dissected for a sufficient length for the arterial anastomosis. The saphenous vein was used for the venous anastomosis. Dissection and injection-corrosion techniques revealed that the flap had 7-12 and 4-6 veins at its plantar and superior edges, respectively, with numerous anastomoses and interconnections between the veins. The flap dimensions were between 3 × 5 cm and 4 × 6 cm. All flaps survived, with two partial flap necrosis that healed with spontaneous epithelization. No debulking procedures were undertaken and all flaps adapted well to the recipient site. The arterialized venous instep flap is a good alternative to reconstruct palmar contractures by adding similar tissue that is thin and pliable with minimal donor site morbidity. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [The meaningfulness of central venous blood samples. Central venous versus mixed venous O2 status].

    PubMed

    Brandt, L; Mertzlufft, F

    1991-03-01

    Both mixed-venous and "central-venous" oxygen status (O2 partial pressure [pO2], O2 saturation [sO2], O2 concentration [cO2], hemoglobin concentration [cHb]) are often considered to adequately represent total-body oxygen supply. Since modern technology has made continuously in vivo measurement possible, mixed-venous O2 saturation (svO2) and partial O2 saturation (psO2) have become extensively used for that purpose. Both venous sites of measurement are used as diagnostic adjuncts regarding hemodynamic status. However, both are associated with certain problems. There is a lack of any clear definition of a "central-venous" site of the catheter tip (right atrium, superior vena cava, inferior vena cava). Instead, the location of the catheter tip depends upon the approach to the central venous system. One must also be aware of significant migrational tendencies of the catheter tip. Thus, "central-venous" samples can only represent the situation in a single portion of the circulation, whereas the respective organ areas may vary considerably with the same catheter from one time point to another. Furthermore, the state of the coronary circulation never can be evaluated. The frequently postulated correlation of mixed-venous and "central-venous" values decreases with increasing deterioration of the cardiovascular system, especially in patients with high cardiovascular risks. The main overall parameters of mixed-venous oxygen status are oxygen content (cvO2), cardiac output (C.O.), and oxygen consumption (QO2) of the tissues. The relation between arterial and mixed-venous O2 status is given by Fick's principle: caO2-cvO2 = QO2/C.O. From this, it becomes obvious that a relation between cvO2 and C.O. may only be presumed if QO2 and caO2 remain constant. Evaluation of O2 availability (AO2) using cvO2 or the determining components of cvO2 seems reasonable only if the modulating influences of C.O. and QO2 are taken into consideration. Therefore, any empirically deduced relation

  9. Intralesional radiofrequency in venous malformations.

    PubMed

    Garg, S; Kumar, S; Singh, Y B

    2015-03-01

    Venous malformations are usually asymptomatic and managed conservatively. Treatment, in the form of laser, sclerotherapy, or resection, is needed only if lesions present with symptoms or cosmetic deformity. The aim of this study was to find out how effective radiofrequency ablation was in patients with incomplete or unsatisfactory resolution of a venous malformation after an intralesional injection of bleomycin. During the 5 year period 2008-2012, we organised a prospective, clinical study at a tertiary care centre. Patients were selected from the outpatient department of the Lady Hardinge Medical College and associated hospitals, New Delhi, India. Five patients with venous malformations were treated by intralesional injection of bleomycin in a dose of 0.5U/kg body weight, which was repeated every 2 weeks for a total of 8 injections. They then had multiple intralesional radiofrequency ablation every 2 months until a satisfactory outcome was achieved. After the initial 8 doses the reduction in the size of the lesions was minimal (less than 50%). After 2-4 applications of radiofrequency ablation there was appreciable reduction in the size of the lesions (about 80%) with good functional and cosmetic outcomes. Radiofrequency ablation is an effective adjunct for patients with venous malformations of the head and neck that have not responded satisfactorily to intralesional injection of bleomycin. To our knowledge radiofrequency ablation after intralesional injection of bleomycin has not previously been described as a treatment for venous malformations. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of a Trellis Device for Endovascular Treatment of Venous Thrombosis Involving a Duplicated Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Saettele, Megan R.; Morelli, John N.; Chesis, Paul; Wible, Brandt C.

    2013-12-15

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are increasingly recognized with CT and venography techniques. Although many patients with IVC anomalies are asymptomatic, recent studies have suggested an association with venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with extensive venous clot involving the infrarenal segment of a duplicated left IVC who underwent pharmacomechanical thrombectomy and tissue plasminogen activator catheter-directed thrombolysis with complete deep venous thrombosis resolution. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the English literature of the use of a Trellis thrombectomy catheter in the setting of duplicated IVC.

  11. Anatomical basis of central venous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark O

    2008-03-01

    Central venous catheter fracture is a rare complication of long-term indwelling subclavian venous access. Subclavian vein access has been the recommended approach for placing central venous catheters. The anatomical landmark method for subclavian access remains a highly successful and nonequipment-dependent method for rapid central access. More recently, the internal jugular vein approach has emerged as the preferred route for long-term central venous access. However, variations in internal jugular vein anatomy make the landmark method less reliable. Use of two-dimensional real-time ultrasound during internal jugular vein access is associated with better success, a lower complication rate, and faster access. A case of central venous catheter fracture initiated an internal review of long-term central venous access procedures. We have converted to a predominantly internal jugular vein approach. This case report and literature review may assist other physicians and institutions in re-evaluating long-term central venous access protocols.

  12. Acute cytomegalovirus infection complicated by venous thrombosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rovery, Clarisse; Granel, Brigitte; Parola, Philippe; Foucault, Cédric; Brouqui, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Background CMV-induced vasculopathy and thrombosis have been reported, but they are rare conditions usually encountered in immunocompromised patients. However more and more complications of CMV infections are recognized in immunocompetent patients. Case presentation We present a case report of a previously healthy adult with cytomegalovirus infection that was complicated by tibiopopliteal deep venous thrombosis and in whom Factor V Leiden heterozygous mutation was found. Conclusion This new case report emphasizes the involvement of cytomegalovirus in induction of vascular thrombosis in patients with predisposing risk factors for thrombosis. It is necessary to screen for CMV infection in patients with spontaneous thrombosis and an history of fever. PMID:16098229

  13. Case of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Unusual Venous Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Susheel Kumar; Pasupaleti, Bhimeswarao; Juluri, Naganarasimharaju

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a relatively rare condition when compared with vascular accidents of arterial origin representing 0.5-1% of all strokes. Unlike arterial infarcts parenchymal changes are seldom present and when present most of the times are reversible. We present a case report of 28-year-old female with thrombosis of internal cerebral veins and straight sinus and hemorrhagic infarcts in bilateral basal ganglia and bilateral thalami .The findings of bilateral symmetrical hyper intensities in basal ganglia and thalami on MRI may be due to various causes of diverse etiology and cerebral venous thrombosis remains an important cause. Early recognition and prompt anticoagulation therapy helps to reduce the mortality to a great extent. The MRI imaging features of straight sinus thrombosis and other imaging differentials are discussed. PMID:26023623

  14. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Di Nisio, Marcello; van Es, Nick; Büller, Harry R

    2016-12-17

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively referred to as venous thromboembolism, constitute a major global burden of disease. The diagnostic work-up of suspected deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism includes the sequential application of a clinical decision rule and D-dimer testing. Imaging and anticoagulation can be safely withheld in patients who are unlikely to have venous thromboembolism and have a normal D-dimer. All other patients should undergo ultrasonography in case of suspected deep vein thrombosis and CT in case of suspected pulmonary embolism. Direct oral anticoagulants are first-line treatment options for venous thromboembolism because they are associated with a lower risk of bleeding than vitamin K antagonists and are easier to use. Use of thrombolysis should be limited to pulmonary embolism associated with haemodynamic instability. Anticoagulant treatment should be continued for at least 3 months to prevent early recurrences. When venous thromboembolism is unprovoked or secondary to persistent risk factors, extended treatment beyond this period should be considered when the risk of recurrence outweighs the risk of major bleeding.

  15. Risk factors, management and primary prevention of thrombotic complications related to the use of central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2012-09-01

    An adequate vascular access is of importance for the treatment of patients with cancer and complex illnesses in the intensive, perioperative or palliative care setting. Deep vein thrombosis and thrombotic occlusion are the most common complications attributed to central venous catheters in short-term and, especially, in long-term use. In this review we will focus on the risk factors, management and prevention strategies of catheter-related thrombosis and occlusion. Due to the lack of randomised controlled trials, there is still controversy about the optimal treatment of catheter-related thrombotic complications, and therapy has been widely adopted using the evidence concerning lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Given the increasing use of central venous catheters in patients that require long-term intravenous therapy, the problem of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis can be expected to increase in the future. We provide data for establishing a more uniform strategy for preventing, diagnosing and treating catheter-related thrombotic complications.

  16. Transient global amnesia: cerebral venous outflow impairment-insight from the abnormal flow patterns of the internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chih-Ping; Hsu, Hung-Yi; Chao, A-Ching; Sheng, Wen-Yung; Soong, Bing-Wen; Hu, Han-Hwa

    2007-11-01

    Cerebral venous reflux is found frequently in transient global amnesia (TGA) patients. The cerebral venous reflux mostly results from left brachiocephalic venous obstruction, and the level of reflux depends on different respiratory status. For further understanding of the role of venous outflow impairment in the pathogenesis of TGA, we used color duplex sonography to reveal the flow patterns in the internal jugular vein (IJV) and its branches (JB) under different respiratory conditions. We compared the frequency of abnormal venous flow of IJV and/or JB on color duplex sonography between 17 TGA patients and 17 age- and gender-matched normal individuals both at rest (regular breathing) and at deep inspiration. Further, these venous-flow abnormalities in IJV and JB were well described. Cranial 3-D time-of-flight magnetic resonance arteriography (MRA) were performed in all patients three to seven days after their TGA attacks and in all normal individuals to analyze the abnormal flow signals in the intracranial venous structures. In the result, abnormal flow-patterns in the left IJV and/or left JB during regular breathing were found more frequently in TGA patients than normal individuals (65% vs. 6%; p < 0.001). These abnormalities in TGA patients were (1) isolated reversed flow in the left JB, (2) segmental reversed flow in the left distal IJV and (3) continuous reversed flow in the left IJV and JB. The MRA study revealed that only the most severe reflux in the IJV causes intracranial venous reflux; six were in the group of continuous reversed flow in left IJV and one was in the group of segmental reversed flow in left distal IJV. These findings suggest that TGA might be one of the clinical manifestations of the "cerebral-type intermittent venous claudication," which stems from cerebral venous outflow impairment, insufficient venous collaterals and specific precipitating factors.

  17. [Anticoagulant treatment of venous thromboembolic disease: optimal duration of antivitamin K therapy. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pinède, L; Ninet, J; Boissel, J P; Pasquier, J

    1994-12-10

    Every clinician managing a patient with venous thromboembolism of the lower limbs is faced with two opposing problems: first the risk of antivitamin K induced haemorrhage requires adequate but not excessive hypocoaguability of limited duration (international normalized ratio between 2 and 3); second the threat of recurrence requiring an adequate level of hypocoaguability of sufficient duration. Recently reported clinical data have greatly changed management attitudes. Current recommendations favour a 6 week regimen of antivitamin K for distal venous thrombosis in patients with thromboembolism of lower limb veins without any other aggravating factor and a 12 week regimen for proximal vein thrombosis or pulmonary emboli, although the therapeutic efficacity and risk remain to be demonstrated with precision. In France, we are conducting a multicentric controlled study with sufficient power (1800 patients) comparing parallel groups of patients: those with distal deep venous thrombosis treated 6 versus 12 week regimens, those with proximal deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary emboli treated 12 versus 24 week regimens. The "DOTAVK" study (Durée Optimale du Traitement Antivitamine K) involves patients with first time venous thrombosis or pulmonary emboli and no underlying neoplasia or coagulation disease. The two criteria of outcome are haemorrhage complications and thromboembolic recurrence during treatment and the first year after treatment withdrawal.

  18. Serratus anterior venous tributary as a second outflow vein in latissimus dorsi free flaps.

    PubMed

    Goh, Terence; Tan, Bien-Keem; Ong, Yee-Siang; Chew, Winston

    2011-10-01

    The latissimus dorsi (LD) flap is a large and reliable myocutaneous flap with a consistently long vascular pedicle. However, the limitation of the thoracodorsal pedicle is that it has only one draining vein for anastomosis. We describe a simple technique of recruiting the tributary vein to the serratus anterior and using it as a second draining vein to alleviate congestion in lower limb reconstruction. The serratus anterior venous tributary segment is cut back to an avalvular segment which averages 5 mm in length. Provision of an additional venous outflow to the flap enabled a second venous anastomosis to the short saphenous vein (N = 1), the long saphenous vein (N = 2), a deep vein (N= 1), and to a deep vein via a vein graft (N = 1), respectively. Five patients with degloving injury of the lower extremity of sizes 150 cm(2) (10 × 15 cm) to 260 cm(2) (10 × 26 cm) underwent successful reconstruction using the LD muscle flap with the serratus anterior tributary vein as a second outflow vein. This serratus anterior venous tributary serves as a useful second outflow channel for alleviating venous congestion during lower limb reconstructive surgery and should be routinely preserved as a lifeboat.

  19. Venous function in the leg after postoperative thrombosis diagnosed with 125I-fibrinogen uptake test.

    PubMed Central

    Lindhagen, A; Bergqvist, D; Hallböök, T; Efsing, H O

    1983-01-01

    The 125I-fibrinogen uptake test (FUT) has been widely used in the past decade to detect postoperative thrombosis. FUT has been shown to correlate well with phlebography, and positive FUT is associated with a high frequency of pulmonary embolism. The long-term venous function of the leg after FUT-detected postoperative thrombosis, however, is inadequately documented. In 179 patients who had been studied after operation with FUT, a follow-up evaluation of FUT as an indicator of risk for development of deep venous insufficiency was made four to five years later. The patients replied to a questionnaire, were clinically examined, and underwent venous strain-gauge plethysmography, venous pressure measurement, and, in some cases, phlebography. No statistically significant differences were found in any of the parameters between legs that had been FUT-positive and those that were FUT-negative at the time of the operation. The frequency of deep venous insufficiency thus was equal in FUT-positive and FUT-negative legs. It was also independent of the site of FUT-detected thrombus in the leg. PMID:6824375

  20. Iatrogenic Major Venous Injury Is Associated with Increased Morbidity of Aortic Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hans, Sachinder S; Vang, Steven; Sachwani-Daswani, Gul

    2017-09-05

    intravascular complication following repair of ruptured AAA. Intraoperative transfusion requirements were 3-28 units, (median 8 units). Three of 9 (33%) surviving patients developed iliofemoral venous thrombosis following repair of iliac/femoral vein injury. Major venous injury during aortic reconstructions occurs more commonly during the repair of ruptured AAA and redo AFG. Following repair of iliac/femoral vein injury, surveillance for possible deep venous thrombosis by duplex imaging should be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Venous thromboembolism: a review of risk and prevention in colorectal surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, David

    2006-10-01

    Hospitalization for surgery has a high risk of developing venous thromboembolism, a condition that encompasses both deep-vein thrombosis and its potentially fatal complication, pulmonary embolism. Colorectal surgery implies a specific high risk for postoperative thromboembolic complications relative to other general surgery. This may be a result of pelvic dissection, the perioperative positioning of these patients, or the presence of additional risk factors common to this patient group, such as cancer, advanced age, or inflammatory bowel disease. The potential impact of venous thromboembolism and the need for effective thromboprophylaxis often are underestimated in these patients. Recommendations for thromboprophylaxis in colorectal surgery patients are based on the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines for thrombosis prevention in general surgery patients, with treatment stratified according to the type of surgery and additional venous thromboembolism risk factors present. Prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin or unfractionated heparin is recommended for colorectal surgery patients classified as moderate to high risk. The small number of studies focusing specifically on colorectal patients, or on cancer or abdominal surgery patients with a colorectal subgroup, has shown that both low-molecular-weight heparin and unfractionated heparin can effectively reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism. Low-molecular-weight heparin has the practical advantage of once-daily administration and shows a lower risk of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. This review will assess the risk of venous thromboembolism in colorectal surgery patients and discuss current evidence-based guidelines and recommendations for prevention of venous thromboembolism.

  2. An enlarged intramuscular venous malformation in the femoral region successfully treated with complete resection

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takuo; Ogata, Dai; Miyano, Kyohei; Tsuchida, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intramuscular venous malformations have been previously described as intramuscular hemangiomas, and various therapies have been applied for their treatment. This condition is relatively rare, and therefore, physicians often struggle to determine the appropriate therapy. We presented a case of an enlarged intramuscular venous malformation relapsed after surgery successfully treated with complete resection. Presentation of case We presented a case of an enlarged intramuscular venous malformation with postoperative recurrence successfully treated with complete resection. A 63-year-old woman presented with a subcutaneous mass in the right distal thigh. She experienced swelling in the right thigh 19 years previously and was diagnosed with a venous aneurysm. Three-dimensional CT angiography confirmed the presence of an irregular vessel assumed to be the feeding vessel, which was dendritically branched from the deep femoral artery. We performed surgical complete resection. Her pain and gait disturbance improved after surgery, and she has not experienced recurrence of the mass for the past 2 years. Discussion Conservative therapy is initially used for venous malformations. Sclerotherapy, laser therapy, or surgical resection is considered after low-dose aspirin therapy, in combination with the use of compressive garments. Surgical resection is indicated for completely resectable lesions and is appropriate for large lesions in terms of cosmetic benefit. However, partial resection may result in excessive bleeding or postoperative recurrence. Conclusion The therapy for venous malformations should be decided based on the degree of disability in daily living, adjacent tissue damage, and cosmetic concerns after appropriate differential diagnostic investigations and biopsy. PMID:26945489

  3. Association between Venous Angioarchitectural Features of Sporadic Brain Arteriovenous Malformations and Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Alexander, M D; Cooke, D L; Nelson, J; Guo, D E; Dowd, C F; Higashida, R T; Halbach, V V; Lawton, M T; Kim, H; Hetts, S W

    2015-05-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is the most serious outcome for brain arteriovenous malformations. This study examines associations between venous characteristics of these lesions and intracranial hemorrhage. Statistical analysis was performed on a prospectively maintained data base of brain AVMs evaluated at an academic medical center. DSA, CT, and MR imaging studies were evaluated to classify lesion side, drainage pattern, venous stenosis, number of draining veins, venous ectasia, and venous reflux. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the association of these angiographic features with intracranial hemorrhage of any age at initial presentation. Exclusively deep drainage (OR, 3.42; 95% CI, 1.87-6.26; P < .001) and a single draining vein (OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.26-3.08; P = .002) were associated with hemorrhage, whereas venous ectasia (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.34-0.78; P = .002) was inversely associated with hemorrhage. Analysis of venous characteristics of brain AVMs may help determine their prognosis and thereby identify lesions most appropriate for treatment. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  4. Evaluation of the time course of vascular responses to venous congestion in the human lower limb.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Mark A; Brown, Margaret D

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the time course of changes in blood flow to the lower leg in response to venous distension--the veni-arteriolar vasoconstrictor response--in 31 healthy males. During a 5-min period of venous distension (thigh cuff pressure 50 mm Hg), calf blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography) decreased more rapidly (within 30 s) compared to skin perfusion (after 2 min, Laser Doppler flowmetry), consistent with disparate filling times of superficial and deeper veins and a greater increase in deep vein volume. On completion of venous filling, vascular resistance in the skin was unchanged from baseline, implying that the reduction in perfusion was solely the result of reduced perfusion pressure. For the whole calf, vascular resistance was unchanged after 1 min but decreased thereafter by 35-45% from baseline, indicating adjustment of pre- or post-capillary resistances to maintain flow. Repeated plethysmographic flow measurements assisted the decrease in resistance, most likely by intermittent compression of the thigh cuff acting to displace blood volume centrally and alleviate congestion. These findings do not support an active veni-arteriolar vasoconstrictor mechanism in response to venous distension alone in the lower leg, and provide evidence of dynamic flow adjustments that should be acknowledged during procedures that involve prolonged periods of venous congestion.

  5. Association Between Venous Angioarchitectural Features of Sporadic Brain Arteriovenous Malformations and Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Matthew D.; Cooke, Daniel L.; Nelson, Jeffrey; Guo, Diana E.; Dowd, Christopher F.; Higashida, Randall T.; Halbach, Van V.; Lawton, Michael T.; Kim, Helen; Hetts, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intracranial hemorrhage is the most serious outcome for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This study examines associations between venous characteristics of these lesions and intracranial hemorrhage. Materials and Methods Statistical analysis was performed on a prospectively maintained database of brain AVMs evaluated at an academic medical center. DSA, CT, and MRI studies were evaluated to classify lesion side, drainage pattern, venous stenosis, number of draining veins, venous ectasia, and venous reflux. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify association of these angiographic features with intracranial hemorrhage of any age at initial presentation. Results Exclusively deep drainage (OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.87–6.26, p<0.001) and a single draining vein (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.26–3.08, p=0.002) were associated with hemorrhage, whereas venous ectasia (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.34–0.78, p=0.002) was inversely associated with hemorrhage. Conclusion Analysis of venous characteristics of brain AVMs may help determine their prognosis and thereby identify lesions most appropriate for treatment. PMID:25634722

  6. Venous stenosis in chronic dialysis patients with a well-functioning arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yaxue; Zhu, Mingli; Cheng, Jiejun; Zhang, Jiwei; Ni, Zhaohui

    2016-02-01

    It is not clear whether patient who is dialyzing with a well-functioning vascular access may appear venous stenosis. The aim is to see the prevalence of central or other vein stenoses/occlusions in patients with asymptomatic, normal functioning fistulas. A total of 54 patients met the inclusion criteria. We performed angiography examinations for these patients and reviewed venography of the superficial and deep venous systems. Among these patients, 21 (39%) were detected positive cases by the angiography, the remainder was negative cases. Thirteen of 54 (24%) had mild central venous stenosis (stenosis <50% diameter with or without collateral branch), 7/54 (13%) had upper arm vein system occlusion or stenosis, another one had anastomotic stenosis. There were no differences in fistula flow dynamics between those with venous abnormalities and those without such as blood flow rate, venous pressures, brachial arterial velocity, and brachial arterial flow rate. We also observed no significant differences in other variables between these two groups (including BMI, hemoglobin, albumin, gender, primary disease, URR, spKt/V P > 0.05). The frequency of venous lesion is not low in hemodialysis patients with a well-functioning AVF. To value the impact of these abnormalities on access, prognosis needs longer time follow-up. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Venous thromboembolic disease and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fennerty, A

    2006-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with cancer. Patients have a 5–6‐fold increase in the risk for a venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared with the general population, increasing to 6–7‐fold for some cancers. Prophylaxis for VTE should be considered whenever additional risk factors intervene. About 10% of patients with an idiopathic VTE will harbour an occult cancer. Half of these can probably be detected after a focused history, examination, routine blood tests and a chest x ray. The remaining cases may be diagnosed with an intensive screening protocol. About 60% of patients diagnosed on screening will have early disease, but we do not know whether screening improves the outcome. Evidence suggests that patients with cancer and a VTE should be treated with low‐molecular‐weight heparin, and treatment continued until the cancer is cured. PMID:17068274

  8. [Treatment of venous thromboembolic disease in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Farge-Bancel, D; Florea, L; Bosquet, L; Debourdeau, P

    2008-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) disease, as defined by the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, occurs among 4 to 20% of patients with cancer and is a leading cause of death among these patients. Use of classical anticoagulation to treat VTE in a cancer patient is associated with a higher risk of major bleeding and of VTE recurrence as compared to noncancer patients. Updated comprehensive and systematic review of current data from the medical literature allows to reconsider the classical approach used for anticoagulant treatment in cancer patients and to implement adapted recommendations. In 2008, the use of daily subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for at least three to six months is recommended as first line therapy to treat VTE disease in cancer patients. If LMWH are contra-indicated (renal insufficiency), other therapeutic approaches are warranted, such as use of unfractionated heparin (UFH) with early introduction of anti-vitamin K for at least three months or venous cava filter in case of absolute contra-indications to anticoagulation. VTE prophylaxis in cancer patients relies on the same therapeutic approaches as currently used for noncancer patients at high risk of VTE. The definition of more specific prophylactic approaches for patients with cancer considered at higher risks of VTE, will be the subject of many clinical trials in the forthcoming years.

  9. Venous thromboembolism at uncommon sites in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Pergantou, Helen; Avgeri, Maria; Komitopoulou, Anna; Xafaki, Panagiota; Kapsimali, Zoey; Mazarakis, Michail; Adamtziki, Eftychia; Platokouki, Helen

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the data of 24 children (whereof 11 neonates), with non-central venous line-related and nonmalignancy-related venous thromboembolism (VTE) at uncommon sites, referred to our Unit from January 1999 to January 2012. Thirty patients who also suffered deep vein thrombosis, but in upper/low extremities, were not included in the analysis. The location of rare site VTE was: portal (n=7), mesenteric (n=2) and left facial vein (n=1), spleen (n=3), lung (n=3), whereas 10 neonates developed renal venous thrombosis. The majority of patients (91.7%) had at least 1 risk factor for thrombosis. Identified thrombophilic factors were: antiphospholipid antibodies (n=2), FV Leiden heterozygosity (n=6), MTHFR C677T homozygosity (n=4), protein S deficiency (n=2), whereas all neonates had age-related low levels of protein C and protein S. All but 6 patients received low-molecular-weight heparin, followed by warfarin in 55% of cases, for 3 to 6 months. Prolonged anticoagulation was applied in selected cases. During a median follow-up period of 6 years, the clinical outcome was: full recovery in 15 patients, evolution to both chronic portal hypertension and esophageal varices in 2 children, and progression to renal failure in 7 of 10 neonates. Neonates are greatly vulnerable to complications after VTE at uncommon sites, particularly renal. Future multicentre long-term studies on neonatal and pediatric VTE at unusual sites are considered worthwhile.

  10. Venous thromboembolism and coffee: critical review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Franchini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background Among the various risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE), nutrients seem to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of this condition. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between coffee intake and venous thrombosis, and we performed a critical review of clinical studies that have been published so far. Methods An electronic search was carried out in Medline, Scopus and ISI Web of Science with the keywords “coffee” AND “venous thromboembolism” OR “deep vein thrombosis” OR “pulmonary embolism” in “Title/Abstract/Keywords”, with no language and date restriction. Results According to our criteria, three studies (two prospective and one case-control) were finally selected (inter-study heterogeneity: 78%; P<0.001). Cumulative data suggests that a modest intake of coffee (i.e., 1-4 cups/day) may be associated with an 11% increased risk of VTE compared to abstainers, whereas a larger intake (i.e., ≥5 coffee/day) may be associated with a 25% decreased risk. Conclusions Our analysis of published data seemingly confirm the existence of a U-shape relationship between coffee intake and VTE, thus exhibiting a trend that overlaps with that previously reported for cardiovascular disease (CVD). PMID:26244139

  11. Guidelines for the treatment of head and neck venous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia Wei; Mai, Hua Ming; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yan An; Fan, Xin Dong; Su, Li Xin; Qin, Zhong Ping; Yang, Yao Wu; Jiang, Yin Hua; Zhao, Yi Fang; Suen, James Y

    2013-01-01

    Venous malformation is one of the most common benign vascular lesions, with approximately 40% of cases appearing in the head and neck. They can affect a patient’s appearance and functionality and even cause life-threatening bleeding or respiratory tract obstruction. The current methods of treatment include surgery, laser therapy, sclerotherapy, or a combined. The treatment of small and superficial venous malformations is relatively simple and effective; however, the treatment of deep and extensive lesions involving multiple anatomical sites remains a challenge for the physicians. For complex cases, the outcomes achieved with one single treatment approach are poor; therefore, individualized treatment modalities must be formulated based on the patient’s condition and the techniques available. Comprehensive multidisciplinary treatments have been adapted to achieve the most effective results. In this paper, based on the national and international literature, we formulated the treatment guidelines for head and neck venous malformations to standardize clinical practice. The guideline will be renewed and updated in a timely manner to reflect cutting-edge knowledge and to provide the best treatment modalities for patients. PMID:23724158

  12. Venous thromboembolism in Latin America: a review and guide to diagnosis and treatment for primary care.

    PubMed

    Ceresetto, Jose Manuel

    2016-01-01

    There are various region-specific challenges to the diagnosis and effective treatment of venous thromboembolism in Latin America. Clear guidance for physicians and patient education could improve adherence to existing guidelines. This review examines available information on the burden of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis in Latin America and the regional issues surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Potential barriers to appropriate care, as well as treatment options and limitations on their use, are discussed. Finally, an algorithmic approach to the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism in ambulatory patients is proposed and care pathways for patients with pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis are outlined for primary care providers in Latin America.

  13. Venous thromboembolism in Latin America: a review and guide to diagnosis and treatment for primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ceresetto, Jose Manuel

    2016-01-01

    There are various region-specific challenges to the diagnosis and effective treatment of venous thromboembolism in Latin America. Clear guidance for physicians and patient education could improve adherence to existing guidelines. This review examines available information on the burden of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis in Latin America and the regional issues surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Potential barriers to appropriate care, as well as treatment options and limitations on their use, are discussed. Finally, an algorithmic approach to the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism in ambulatory patients is proposed and care pathways for patients with pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis are outlined for primary care providers in Latin America. PMID:26872082

  14. [Male impotence. Radiologic venous examinations].

    PubMed

    Delcour, C; Vandenbosch, G; van Bunnen, Y; Charret, F; Struyven, J

    1988-01-01

    A vascular pathology is the most common etiology of male impotence of organic origin and among these vascular problems, the most frequent are represented by the anomalies of the venous drainage. Based on a personal experience of more than 450 radiological examinations, we will describe the techniques of cavernography and cavernometry as well as the effects of intra-cavernous injections of papaverin and we will present the results from the literature.

  15. [Bases of central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Schmalz-Ott, Stéphane; Monti, Matteo; Vollenweider, Peter

    2008-10-29

    Central venous catheterization is a frequently performed procedure in internal medicine units. Residents in training frequently share the same questions, doubts and fears about this procedure : "Should I perform a subclavian catheterization in a patient with mild thrombopenia?"; "Which site has the lesser complication rate?"; "After how long does a catheter need to be replaced?". This mini-review of the current literature tries to answer this and other questions.

  16. Varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Partsch, H

    2009-11-01

    Varicose veins are a very frequent disorder with prevalence in our adult population between 14% for large varices and 59% for small teleangiectasias. Subjective symptoms may be very non-specific. The term "chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)" defines functional abnormalities of the venous system producing advanced symptoms like oedema, skin changes or leg ulcers. Both entities, varicose veins and CVI, may be summarized under the term "chronic venous disorders" which includes the full spectrum of morphological and functional abnormalities of the venous system. A classification system to describe chronic venous disorders regarding clinical appearance, etiology, anatomical distribution and pathophysiology has been proposed under the acronym of CEAP. The revised version of the CEAP classification contains also definitions of clinical signs and suggests three levels of apparative investigations adjusted to the clinical stage. Concerning the etiology of venous disorders controversial theories exist leading to different therapeutic concepts. As a matter of fact there is a vicious circle between structural changes in valves and venous wall and hemodynamic forces leading to reflux and venous hypertension. Different methods for treating varicose veins are available producing satisfactory early outcome in most cases, but followed by a high recurrence rate after years. Chronic venous insufficiency requires "chronic management". Compression therapy by bandages for initial treatment of severe stages and maintenance therapy using medical compression stockings is essential. In addition correction of venous refluxes by surgery or endovenous procedures including echo-guided foam sclerotherapy should be considered in every single case.

  17. Venous thromboembolism: use of graduated compression stockings.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Figueroa, Gloria Patricia; Ojo, Omorogieva

    This article aims to review the use of graduated compression stockings in the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). This is particularly important owing to the increasing number of people who die from hospital-acquired VTE and deep vein thrombosis. In addition, there is the need to raise awareness among nurses and other health professionals on the overall impact of VTE, and the number of patients with a range of conditions including cancer who may be at risk of developing VTE. Graduated compression stockings, when used alone, have been found to be effective in preventing VTE in a number of patients in hospital and community settings. However, there is evidence that when used together with other preventative measures such as pharmacological prophylaxis are more effective than graduated compression stockings alone. It is also important that the correct size of graduated compression stocking is used and how they are applied as these may have a significant impact on VTE. The role of the nurse in thromboprophylaxis and implications for practice are discussed.

  18. [Venous leakage impotence: anatomical and physiological considerations upon gravity cavernosometry and radio-fluorographic cavernosography].

    PubMed

    Arena, F; Peracchia, G; Passari, A; Ferrozzi, F; Cortellini, P

    1995-01-01

    We performed gravity cavernosometry and radio-fluoro-graphic cavernosography with pharmacological intracavernous injection in 15 patients with erectile dysfunction. On the basis of cavernosographyc findings, in the 15 patients leak sites visualized included deep dorsal vein in all 15 patients leak sites visualized included deep dorsal vein in all 15 patients (100%), cavernous veins in 7 (46,6%), glans in 4 (26,6%) and corpus spongiosum in 3 (20%). Aberrant veins documented in 4 patients (26,6%): communicating with the saphenous vein in 2 (13,3%), with scrotal veins and femoral vein in 1 (6,6%). Deep dorsal vein leakage as the only venous site was find in 2 patients (13.3%), 9 (60%) had leakage through 2 venous sites, 3 (20%) had leakage through 3 venous sites and 1 (6,6%) had leakage through 4 venous sites. Correlations among hemodynamic and radiographic observations allowed the identification of 2 types of cavernosometric findings. While type I developed an high intracavernous pressure during gravity infusion, an high intracavernous pressure was not observed in type 2. The FCG by the digital radio-fluoro-graphic digital system permit the possibility of sottraction and rielaboration of images and reduces examination and radiation time. The gravity FCM is simple, not expensive and respect the physiological intracavernous pressure.

  19. [Complications of the deep infections of the neck].

    PubMed

    Kirov, G; Benchev, R; Stoianov, S

    2006-01-01

    Deep infections of the neck are potentially life-threatening for their descending spread along cervical fascia planes towards the mediastinum and development of sepsis after thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. The aim of the present report is to review the complications of the deep neck infections and their surgical treatment for the period of the last 5 years. From 1999 to 2003 29 patients with deep cervical infections were treated surgically. Twelve of the patients had submandibular abscess, 10 cases were with parapharyngeal abscess, 3 with Ludwig's angina, 1 with mastoiditis with exteriorization in the neck and 3 with neck phlegmonas. The infections were most frequently of tonsillar and dental origin. The following complications were observed: 6 cases with acute obstruction of the upper airways treated with tracheostomy; 2 cases with sepsis; 2 with descending mediastinitis; and 1 with acute hemorrhage of stress ulcer of the stomach treated with laparotomy and laparostomy. Combined surgical and massive antibiotic treatment according to the bacteriological findings was carried out. Cervical incisions, jugulotomy and thoracotomy were performed in cases with descending mrdiastinitis. Permanent suction drainage and lavage of the abscess cavities were used. In cervical phlegmonas the surgical wounds were left open against anaerobic infection. Three cases of deep cervical infections, complicated with mediastinitis, sepsis, VII and XI cranial nerves paresis, hemorrhages from the gastrointestinal tract are cited. The third case is interesting with the multiple complications of the deep neck infection--stress ulcer of the stomach, which could not be managed endoscopically because of the compression due to hypopharingeal edema, sepsis, tracheal stenosis. All the patients but one recovered after the treatment. One of them with cervical phlegmona died out of heart arrest in the operating theater after urgent intubation and tracheotomy for airway obstruction. The

  20. The Impact of Race on Advanced Chronic Venous Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Dua, Anahita; Desai, Sapan S; Heller, Jennifer A

    2016-07-01

    The study aimed to determine the association between race and patient variables, hospital covariates, and outcomes in patients presenting with advanced chronic venous insufficiency. The National Inpatient Sample was queried to identify all Caucasian and African-American patients with a primary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis code for venous stasis with ulceration (454.0), inflammation (454.1), or complications (454.2) from 1998 to 2011. CEAP scores were correlated with ICD-9 diagnosis. Demographics, CEAP classification, management, cost of care, length of stay (LOS), and inpatient mortality were compared between races. Statistical analysis was via descriptive statistics, Student's t-test, and the Fisher's exact test. Trend analysis was completed using the Mann-Kendall test. A total of 20,648 patients were identified of which 85% were Caucasian and 15% were African-American. Debridement procedures had the highest costs at $6,096 followed by skin grafting at $4,089. There was an overall decrease in the number of ulcer debridements, vein stripping, and sclerotherapy procedures between 1998 and 2011 (P < 0.05) for both groups. However, African-American patients had significantly more ulcer debridements than their Caucasian counterparts. African-American patients with a primary diagnosis of venous stasis present with more advanced venous disease at a younger age compared with their Caucasian counterparts. This is associated with increased ulcer debridement, deep vein thrombosis rates and hospital charges in the African-American cohort. There are no differences in sclerotherapy or skin grafting procedures, LOS or inpatient mortality between races. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Misplaced central venous catheter in the jugular venous arch exposed during dissection before sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Tae-Eun; Jee, Daelim

    2008-11-01

    Subclavian vein catheterization rarely results in misplacement of the central venous catheter (CVC) into the jugular venous arch (JVA). We present a case of misplacement of the CVC into the JVA during cardiac surgery.

  2. Calf venous compliance measured by venous occlusion plethysmography: methodological aspects.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Johan; Zachrisson, Helene; Lindenberger, Marcus; Ekman, Mikael; Ewerman, Lea; Länne, Toste

    2015-02-01

    Calf venous compliance (C calf) is commonly evaluated with venous occlusion plethysmography (VOP) during a standard cuff deflation protocol. However, the technique relies on two not previously validated assumptions concerning thigh cuff pressure (P cuff) transmission and the impact of net fluid filtration (F filt) on C calf. The aim was to validate VOP in the lower limb and to develop a model to correct for F filt during VOP. Strain-gauge technique was used to study calf volume changes in 15 women and 10 age-matched men. A thigh cuff was inflated to 60 mmHg for 4 and 8 min with a subsequent decrease of 1 mmHg s(-1). Intravenous pressure (P iv) was measured simultaneously. C calf was determined with the commonly used equation [Compliance = β 1 + 2β 2 × P cuff] describing the pressure-compliance relationship. A model was developed to identify and correct for F filt. Transmission of P cuff to P iv was 100 %. The decrease in P cuff correlated well with P iv reduction (r = 0.99, P < 0.001). Overall, our model showed that C calf was underestimated when F filt was not accounted for (all P < 0.01). F filt was higher in women (P < 0.01) and showed a more pronounced effect on C calf compared to men (P < 0.05). The impact of F filt was similar during 4- and 8-min VOP. P cuff is an adequate substitute for P iv in the lower limb. F filt is associated with an underestimation of C calf and differences in the effect of F filt during VOP can be accounted for with the correction model. Thus, our model seems to be a valuable tool in future studies of venous wall function.

  3. Doppler ultrasound venous mapping of the lower limbs

    PubMed Central

    Galeandro, Aldo Innocente; Quistelli, Giovanni; Scicchitano, Pietro; Gesualdo, Michele; Zito, Annapaola; Caputo, Paola; Carbonara, Rosa; Galgano, Giuseppe; Ciciarello, Francesco; Mandolesi, Sandro; Franceschi, Claude; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Background The study aim was to test the accuracy (intra and interobserver variability), sensitivity, and specificity of a simplified noninvasive ultrasound methodology for mapping superficial and deep veins of the lower limbs. Methods 62 consecutive patients, aged 62 ± 11 years, were enrolled. All underwent US-examinations, performed by two different investigators, of both legs, four anatomical parts, and 17 veins, to assess the interobserver variability of evaluation of superficial and deep veins of the lower limbs. Results Overall the agreement between the second versus the first operator was very high in detecting reflux (sensitivity 97.9, specificity 99.7, accuracy 99.5; P = 0.80 at McNemar test). The higher CEAP classification stages were significantly associated with reflux (odds ratio: 1.778, 95% confidence interval: 1.552–2.038; P < 0.001) as well as with thrombosis (odds ratio: 2.765, 95% confidence interval: 1.741–4.389; P < 0.001). Thus, our findings show a strict association between the symptoms of venous disorders and ultrasound evaluation results for thrombosis or reflux. Conclusion This study demonstrated that our venous mapping protocol is a reliable method showing a very low interobserver variability, which makes it accurate and reproducible for the assessment of the morphofunctional status of the lower limb veins. PMID:22371652

  4. Drug treatment of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulceration: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Cheatle, T R; Scurr, J H; Smith, P D

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of venous insufficiency and venous ulceration has for many years relied on established principles of compression and limb elevation. Drug treatment has been of little benefit. In recent years, a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying skin damage in venous disease has allowed more rational pharmacotherapeutic approaches to be made. This review examines these, with special reference to current theories of the cause of venous ulceration. PMID:2061904

  5. Optimizing Venous Drainage Using an Ultrasonic Flow Probe on the Venous Line

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Joshua L.; Young, Haven A.; Lawson, D. Scott; Husain, S. Adil; Calhoon, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: The use of smaller cannulae for minimally invasive surgery techniques and/or aggressive miniaturization of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuitry has necessitated the need to augment venous drainage to achieve adequate flow rates. Vacuum assisted venous drainage (VAVD) has become the dominant method to augment venous drainage. VAVD, however, has been associated with a number of known side effects including increased transmission of gaseous microemboli to the patient, venous line chatter, and increased arterial to venous shunts in the circuit. Historically, our practice has been to monitor the arterial output flow rate and to monitor VAVD by observing venous line chatter and changes in the venous reservoir level. In 2008 our pediatric cardiothoracic service began monitoring venous line flow rates by using a second ultrasonic flow probe placed on the venous line. After 12 months, our staff perfusionists reviewed the impact of monitoring venous line flow rates on VAVD and its known side effects on daily clinical practice. When monitoring venous line flow rates, empiric observation revealed that less overall vacuum pressure was needed for our CPB cases. This novel approach to monitoring venous drainage has aided us in providing optimal vacuum levels and therefore, may reduce some of the known side effects experienced with excessive VAVD. PMID:22164455

  6. Optimizing venous drainage using an ultrasonic flow probe on the venous line.

    PubMed

    Walker, Joshua L; Young, Haven A; Lawson, D Scott; Husain, S Adil; Calhoon, John H

    2011-09-01

    The use of smaller cannulae for minimally invasive surgery techniques and/or aggressive miniaturization of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuitry has necessitated the need to augment venous drainage to achieve adequate flow rates. Vacuum assisted venous drainage (VAVD) has become the dominant method to augment venous drainage. VAVD, however, has been associated with a number of known side effects including increased transmission of gaseous microemboli to the patient, venous line chatter, and increased arterial to venous shunts in the circuit. Historically, our practice has been to monitor the arterial output flow rate and to monitor VAVD by observing venous line chatter and changes in the venous reservoir level. In 2008 our pediatric cardiothoracic service began monitoring venous line flow rates by using a second ultrasonic flow probe placed on the venous line. After 12 months, our staff perfusionists reviewed the impact of monitoring venous line flow rates on VAVD and its known side effects on daily clinical practice. When monitoring venous line flow rates, empiric observation revealed that less overall vacuum pressure was needed for our CPB cases. This novel approach to monitoring venous drainage has aided us in providing optimal vacuum levels and therefore, may reduce some of the known side effects experienced with excessive VAVD.

  7. Travel, venous thromboembolism, and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Alexander S

    2005-02-01

    Current evidence indicates that prolonged air travel predisposes to venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. An effect is seen once travel duration exceeds 6 to 9 hours and becomes obvious in long-haul passengers traveling for 12 or more hours. A recent records linkage study found that increase in thrombosis rate among arriving passengers peaked during the first week and was no longer apparent after 2 weeks. Medium- to long-distance travelers have a 2- to 4-fold increase in relative thrombosis risk compared with nontravelers, but the averaged absolute risk is small (approximately one symptomatic event per 2 million arrivals, with a case-fatality rate of approximately 2%) and there is no evidence that thrombosis is more likely in economy class than in business- or first-class passengers. It remains uncertain whether and to what extent thrombosis risk is increased by short-distance air travel or prolonged travel by motorcar, train, or other means. Most travelers who develop venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism also have one or more other predisposing risk factors that may include older age, obesity, recent injury or surgery, previous thrombosis, venous insufficiency, malignancy, hormonal therapies, or pregnancy. Limited (though theoretically plausible) evidence suggests that factor V Leiden and the prothrombin gene mutation predispose to thrombosis in otherwise healthy travelers. Given that very many passengers with such predispositions do not develop thrombosis, and a lack of prospective studies to link predisposition with disease, it is not now possible to allocate absolute thrombosis risk among intending passengers or to estimate benefit-to-risk ratios or benefit-to-cost ratios for prophylaxis. Randomized comparisons using ultrasound imaging indicate a measurable incidence of subclinical leg vein thrombosis after prolonged air travel, which appears to increase with travel duration and is reduced by graded pressure elastic support stockings. Whether this

  8. The Impact of Central Venous Catheters on Pediatric Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, Julie; Bauman, Mary; Massicotte, Patti

    2017-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) in children is escalating, which is likely linked to the increased incidence of pediatric venous thromboembolism (VTE). In order to better understand the specific risk factors associated with CVC-VTE in children, as well as available prevention methods, a literature review was performed. The overall incidence of CVC-VTE was found to range from 0 to 74%, depending on the patient population, CVC type, imaging modality, and study design. Throughout the available literature, there was not a consistent determination regarding whether a particular type of central line (tunneled vs. non-tunneled vs. peripherally inserted vs. implanted), catheter material, insertion technique, or insertion location lead to an increased VTE risk. The patient populations who were found to be most at risk for CVC-VTE were those with cancer, congenital heart disease, gastrointestinal failure, systemic infection, intensive care unit admission, or involved in a trauma. Both mechanical and pharmacological prophylactic techniques have been shown to be successful in preventing VTE in adult patients, but studies in children have yet to be performed or are underpowered. In order to better determine true CVC-VTE risk factors and best preventative techniques, an increase in large, prospective pediatric trials needs to be performed.

  9. The Impact of Central Venous Catheters on Pediatric Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Jaffray, Julie; Bauman, Mary; Massicotte, Patti

    2017-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) in children is escalating, which is likely linked to the increased incidence of pediatric venous thromboembolism (VTE). In order to better understand the specific risk factors associated with CVC-VTE in children, as well as available prevention methods, a literature review was performed. The overall incidence of CVC-VTE was found to range from 0 to 74%, depending on the patient population, CVC type, imaging modality, and study design. Throughout the available literature, there was not a consistent determination regarding whether a particular type of central line (tunneled vs. non-tunneled vs. peripherally inserted vs. implanted), catheter material, insertion technique, or insertion location lead to an increased VTE risk. The patient populations who were found to be most at risk for CVC-VTE were those with cancer, congenital heart disease, gastrointestinal failure, systemic infection, intensive care unit admission, or involved in a trauma. Both mechanical and pharmacological prophylactic techniques have been shown to be successful in preventing VTE in adult patients, but studies in children have yet to be performed or are underpowered. In order to better determine true CVC-VTE risk factors and best preventative techniques, an increase in large, prospective pediatric trials needs to be performed. PMID:28168186

  10. Venous Access Devices: Clinical Rounds

    PubMed Central

    Matey, Laurl; Camp-Sorrell, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Nursing management of venous access devices (VADs) requires knowledge of current evidence, as well as knowledge of when evidence is limited. Do you know which practices we do based on evidence and those that we do based on institutional history or preference? This article will present complex VAD infection and occlusion complications and some of the controversies associated with them. Important strategies for identifying these complications, troubleshooting, and evaluating the evidence related to lack of blood return, malposition, infection, access and maintenance protocols, and scope of practice issues are presented. PMID:28083553

  11. The clinico-radiological spectrum of masseteric venous malformation: Case report.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Kavita; Umarji, Hemant R; Kadam, Sonali; Agrawal, Neeraj

    2016-11-01

    Due to its location, intra-masseteric venous malformation often mistaken for a parotid swelling and clinical examination alone frequently underestimates the deep extension of the lesion and rarely gives accurate pre-operative diagnosis. But once it is diagnosed, the feasibility of the treatment and the plan of approach depend on accurate delineation of the extent, size and location of the lesion. Therefore, complimentary radiographic studies are essential for its management. In this case report, typical features of venous malformation within the masseter muscle, including clinical findings (turkey wattle sign) and imaging are presented. Ultrasonography and CT scan were non-contributory in the diagnosis, while on MRI, masseteric venous malformations have a typical appearance that allowed early identification, patient education and its management.

  12. Transhepatic Venous Approach for Balloon-assisted Cervical Collateral Venous Access

    SciTech Connect

    Eyheremendy, Eduardo P.; Malizia, Patricio; Sierre, Sergio

    2011-12-15

    Central venous catheter placement is indicated in many situations, and an increasing number of patients require temporary and long-term central catheters. Frequently, patients who have undergone multiple central veins catheterizations develop complete and diffuse venous occlusion, and this constitutes a difficult-to-manage clinical problem. We report a case of a 20-year-old patient who was referred to our department for central venous line placement who manifested bilateral femoral, jugular, and subclavian veins occlusion. A central venous catheter was implanted through a cervical collateral vein, targeting on and puncturing an angioplasty balloon, and advanced into the collateral vein through a transhepatic venous access.

  13. Post thrombotic syndrome following deep vein thrombosis in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Vosicka, Klara; Qureshi, Mahim I; Shapiro, Susan E; Lim, Chung S; Davies, Alun H

    2017-01-01

    Background Although well characterised in adults, less is known about post-thrombotic syndrome in children. In this review, current knowledge regarding paediatric post-thrombotic syndrome is summarised, with particular emphasis on pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis and management. Methods A Medline literature review was performed using search terms 'post thrombotic syndrome', 'post phlebitic syndrome', paediatric and children. Relevant articles were identified and included for summation analysis. Results The incident of paediatric venous thromboembolism is rising. Deep vein thrombosis can cause venous hypertension through a combination of venous reflux, venous obstruction and impairment of the calf muscle pump, leading to development of post-thrombotic syndrome. In children, this is more likely to occur if deep vein thrombosis diagnosis and treatment are delayed, if a higher number of vessels are involved, and if factors such as D-dimer are elevated at diagnosis and throughout treatment. Post-thrombotic syndrome occurs in about 26% of paediatric deep vein thrombosis, though the results of individual studies vary widely. A number of tools exist to diagnose paediatric post-thrombotic syndrome, including the modified Villalta scale and Manco-Johnson instrument. Once post-thrombotic syndrome develops, the mainstay of treatment remains supportive, with little evidence of benefit from pharmacological measures. Conclusion Surgical or interventional treatment is not advised except in exceptional cirumstances, due to variable prognosis of PTS in paediatric populations with rising incidence of paediatric venous thromboembolism, it follows that the prevalence of post-thrombotic syndrome in children may also increase. Evidence-based venous thromboembolism prevention strategies need to be implemented for prevention of deep vein thrombosis, but when it does occur, deep vein thrombosis requires prompt and effective treatment to prevent post-thrombotic syndrome. Optimum

  14. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 × 10−13). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback–Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  15. Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis Mainly Related to Iliofemoral Venous Obstruction by External Tumor Compression in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tzu-Yao; Hsu, Hui-Ching; Wen, Min-Sheng; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Hung, Yu-Hsin; Liaw, Chuang-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Background To study iliofemoral venous thrombosis related to iliofemoral venous obstruction in cancer patients. Methods In this case series study, 829 cancer patients were surveyed for iliofemoral obstruction/thrombosis within 10 years. The criteria for inclusion were: (1) presence of unilateral lower-extremity swelling; (2) computed tomography (CT) scans showing a tumor with external compression of the iliac or femoral vein, and (3) duplex ultrasound scans showing venous thrombosis or venous flow insufficiency over a femoral vein or saphenous vein. Results Sixty-three patients (8%) developed an iliofemoral venous obstruction. The presence of iliofemoral venous thrombosis was detected in 21 of these patients (33%). The rate of iliofemoral venous thrombosis was significantly higher in patients with an invasion of the inguinal region, D-dimer levels >3,000 ng/ml, gastrointestinal cancer, or invasion of the inguinal lymph nodes. However, none of our patients with iliofemoral venous thrombosis had a detection of iliofemoral venous obstruction. Improved lower-extremity swelling was reported in 84% of the patients following combination therapy involving low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and systemic therapy. Conclusion Patients with an iliofemoral venous thrombosis mainly had iliofemoral venous obstruction by external tumor compression. Combination therapy with LMWH and systemic therapy were mandatory for these patients. PMID:27990113

  16. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  17. Stent Placement on Fresh Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schuermann, Karl

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report on the efficacy of fixing fresh venous thrombus to the venous wall by stent placement. Methods: Seven patients underwent stenting to treat acute venous thrombosis. In two patients, the hemodialysis fistula was thrombosed with the thrombus extending into the brachial veins. In three patients, the hemodialysis fistula was patent but massive swelling of the ipsilateral arm was caused by proximal venous thrombosis. Two patients presented with iliac venous thrombosis within stented pelvic veins. Stent placement was preceded by other mechanical thrombectomy methods in all cases. Results: Attachment of thrombus to the venous wall was successful in all cases treated. Acute rethrombosis did not occur. Follow-up patency in dialysis patients was 7.2 {+-} 2.1 months. One patient had rethrombosis of the dialysis graft 3 months after primary treatment. Three patients developed restenosis within a mean period of 7.7 months. One shunt remained patent for 10 months with no event of reobstruction during follow-up. In both patients with iliac stent placement, the vein remained patent over a follow-up period of 8 and 12 months respectively. Conclusion: Stenting fresh venous thrombus can achieve immediate venous patency. It may be used as an alternative approach when all other percutaneous methods fail. Frequent restenosis within stented veins limits its use to very selected cases.

  18. The venous circulation: a piscine perspective.

    PubMed

    Sandblom, Erik; Axelsson, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Vascular capacitance describes the pressure-volume relationship of the circulatory system. The venous vasculature, which is the main capacitive region in the circulation, is actively controlled by various neurohumoral systems. In terrestrial animals, vascular capacitance control is crucial to prevent orthostatic blood pooling in dependent limbs, while in aquatic animals like fish, the effects of gravity are cancelled out by hydrostatic forces making orthostatic blood pooling an unlikely concern for these animals. Nevertheless, changes in venous capacitance have important implications on cardiovascular homeostasis in fish since it affects venous return and cardiac filling pressure (i.e. central venous blood pressure), which in turn may affect cardiac output. The mean circulatory filling pressure is used to estimate vascular capacitance. In unanaesthetized animals, it is measured as the central venous plateau pressure during a transient stoppage of cardiac output. So far, most studies of venous function in fish have addressed the situation in teleosts (notably the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss), while any information on elasmobranchs, cyclostomes and air-breathing fishes is more limited. This review describes venous haemodynamic concepts and neurohumoral control systems in fish. Particular emphasis is placed on venous responses to natural cardiovascular challenges such as exercise, environmental hypoxia and temperature changes.

  19. Optimizing diagnostic testing for venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Patrick; Burnett, Allison E; Zimmerberg-Helms, Jessica; Goot, Taylor; Streiff, Michael B

    2017-07-01

    Diagnostic algorithms for venous thromboembolism exist, but most do not provide detailed guidance as to which patients, if any, may benefit from screening for thrombophilia. This article provides an overview of the optimized diagnosis of venous thromboembolism, with a focus on the appropriate use of thrombophilia screening. Copyright © 2017 Cleveland Clinic.

  20. Acute venous sinus thrombosis after chickenpox infection.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Vijay; Mittal, Lal Chand; Meena, S R; Sharma, Deepti; Khandelwal, Girish

    2014-08-01

    Chickenpox is one of the classic childhood diseases. Recently chicken pox has been reported in adults with more severe systemic and neurological complications. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a life threatening disorder if not treated in time. We report a patient with post varicella CVT as a rare complication of primary Varicella zoster virus. Vasculitic arterial infarction is known while venous stroke has rarely been reported with Varicella-zoster virus infection. Here, we report an immunocompetent 30 yr old male who developed chickenpox after contact with his daughter two month back. He presented with acute neurological deficit, one week after onset of skin lesion. MR venography revealed non-visualisation of left transverse sinus and left sigmoid sinus suggestive of venous sinus thrombosis. Varicella infection is rarely associated with venous sinus thrombosis. Possibly hypercoagulable state produced by the infection or direct invasion of virus in venous endothelial wall with subsequent damage to endothelium leading to thrombosis could be the cause.

  1. Venous pressure in man during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, K. A.; Roecker, L.; Gauer, O. H.; Krause, R.; Wicke, H. J.; Leach, C.; Landry, R.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether the body fluid shift from the lower limbs toward the head that occurs during spaceflight leads to lasting increases of venous pressure in the upper body, venous pressure and hematocrit measurements were made on four astronauts before flight and 1 and 12 hours after recovery and compared with measurements in space. During the mission the hematocrit was elevated and the venous pressure lowered by 1 to 8 centimeters of water as compared with the preflight data. One hour after landing the hematocrit decreased, indicating a hemodilution, venous pressures were unexpectedly high, and a body weight loss of 4 to 5 percent was observed. Twelve hours later the venous pressures were the lowest recorded during the study. The fluid shift apparently takes place during the first several hours of spaceflight. Thereafter, the pressure in the peripheral veins and the central circulation is lower than that measured before flight.

  2. Cervical venous reflux in dynamic brain scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hayt, D B; Perez, L A

    1976-01-01

    Cervical venous reflux, shown by dynamic brain scintigraphy, was investigated through three avenues of approach: (A) by reviewing 371 randomly chosen routine dynamic intracerebral bloodflow studies to estimate its incidence; (B) by correlative positive-contrast superior venacavography in patients with characteristic cervical venous reflux; and (C) by performing dynamic brain scintigraphy while utilizing various positional and physiologic maneuvers to attempt to produce cervical venous reflux in patients who did not exhibit this phenomenon on earlier examination. Although any obstruction of the superior vena cava or a properly timed Valsalva maneuver in selected patients can produce the scintigraphic picture of cervical venous reflux, in most cases it is a normal phenomenon due to incompetent or absent cervical venous valves.

  3. Venous flow during manual lymphatic drainage applied to different regions of the lower extremity in people with and without chronic venous insufficiency: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Crisóstomo, R S S; Candeias, M S; Armada-da-Silva, P A S

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) on venous flow when applied to the medial and lateral aspects of the thigh and leg in patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and healthy subjects. Cross-sectional study. Participants were assessed in a school-based health community attendant service. Fifty-seven subjects participated in this study {mean age: 43 [standard deviation (SD) 14] years, 38 women and 19 men}. Of these, 28 subjects had CVI [mean age 47 (SD 12) years] and 29 subjects did not have CVI [mean age 39 (14) years]. MLD was applied by a certificated physical therapist to the medial and lateral aspects of the thigh and leg. Cross-sectional area; blood flow velocities in the femoral vein, great saphenous vein, popliteal vein and small saphenous vein at baseline and during MLD, measured by duplex ultrasound. Flow volume in the femoral vein increased from baseline [5.19 (SD 3.25)cm(3)/second] when MLD was applied to the medial [7.03 (SD 3.65)cm(3)/second; P≤0.001; mean difference -1.69; 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.42 to -0.97] and lateral [6.16 (SD 3.35)cm(3)/second; P≤0.001; mean difference -1.04; 95% CI -1.70 to -0.39] aspects of the thigh. Venous flow augmentation in the femoral vein and great saphenous vein was higher when MLD was applied to the medial aspect of the thigh (P<0.001), while MLD had a similar effect on venous blood flow regardless of whether it was applied to the medial or the lateral aspect of the leg (P=0.731). MLD increases blood flow in deep and superficial veins. MLD should be applied along the route of the venous vessels for improved venous return. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of central venous physiology of Fontan circulation using peripheral venous pressure.

    PubMed

    Masutani, Satoshi; Kurishima, Clara; Yana, Akiko; Kuwata, Seiko; Iwamoto, Yoichi; Saiki, Hirofumi; Ishido, Hirotaka; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2017-04-01

    Elevated central venous pressure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after the Fontan operation. The difference between mean circulatory filling pressure and central venous pressure, a driving force of venous return, is important in determining dynamic changes in central venous pressure in response to changes in ventricular properties or loading conditions. Thus, noninvasive central venous pressure and mean circulatory filling pressure estimation may contribute to optimal management in patients undergoing the Fontan operation. We tested the hypothesis that central venous pressure and mean circulatory filling pressure in those undergoing the Fontan operation can be simply estimated using peripheral venous pressure and arm equilibrium pressure, respectively. This study included 30 patients after the Fontan operation who underwent cardiac catheterization (median 8.6, 3.4-42 years). Peripheral venous pressure was measured at the peripheral vein in the upper extremities. Mean circulatory filling pressure was calculated by the changes of arterial pressure and central venous pressure during the Valsalva maneuver. Arm equilibrium pressure was measured as equilibrated venous pressure by rapidly inflating a blood pressure cuff to 200 mm Hg. Central venous pressure and peripheral venous pressure were highly correlated (central venous pressure = 1.6 + 0.68 × peripheral venous pressure, R = 0.86, P < .0001). Stepwise multivariable regression analysis showed that only peripheral venous pressure was a significant determinant of central venous pressure. Central venous pressure was accurately estimated using regression after volume loading by contrast injection (R = 0.82, P < .0001). In addition, arm equilibrium pressure measurements were highly reproducible and robustly reflected invasively measured mean circulatory filling pressure (mean circulatory filling pressure = 9.1 + 0.63 × arm equilibrium pressure, R = 0.88, P < .0001). Central venous

  5. Venous hemodynamic improvement after endovenous radiofrequency ablation of saphenous varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Nishibe, Toshiya; Nishibe, Masayasu; Suzuki, Shun; Takahashi, Satoshi; Toguchi, Kayo; Kamiya, Kentaro; Iwahashi, Toru; Ogino, Hitoshi

    2017-02-01

    Endovenous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been a viable treatment option for patients with saphenous varicose veins. The purpose of our study was to assess venous hemodynamic change before and after RFA by using air plethysmography (APG). We prospectively analyzed the data of consecutive 91 patients with 124 limbs who underwent RFA for primary varicose veins. Overall venous hemodynamics of the limb was assessed using APG. The Venous Filling Index (VFI) was determined as a measure of reflux (normal range, <2 mL). Duplex scanning were performed to evaluate saphenous vein occlusion, deep venous thrombus and endovenous heat-induced thrombosis (EHIT). The VFI were significantly reduced from 4.1±3.1 preoperatively to 1.4±1.0, 1.3±0.8 and 1.4±1.2 at 1 week, 1 month and 4 month postoperatively, respectively. The percentage of the VFI >2 mL/s was 77% preoperatively, while it significantly decreased to 17%, 16%, and 18% at 1 week, 1 month, and 4 month postoperatively, respectively. Duplex scanning showed 100% of saphenous vein occlusion and no significant EHIT II-IV. Correction or significant improvement of venous reflux was achieved by RFA. Together with duplex scanning findings, RFA is a safe and hemodynamically effective treatment for varicose veins.

  6. Venous and arterial thrombosis in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ocak, Gurbey; Vossen, Carla Y; Rotmans, Joris I; Lijfering, Willem M; Rosendaal, Frits R; Parlevliet, Karien J; Krediet, Ray T; Boeschoten, Els W; Dekker, Friedo W; Verduijn, Marion

    2011-12-01

    Whether the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis is increased in dialysis patients as compared to the general population is unknown. In addition, it is unknown which subgroups are at highest risk. Furthermore, it is unknown whether having a history of venous thrombosis or arterial thrombosis prior to dialysis treatment increases mortality risk. A total of 455 dialysis patients were followed for objectively verified symptomatic thrombotic events between January 1997 and June 2009. The incidence rates in dialysis patients as compared to the general population was 5.6-fold (95% CI 3.1-8.9) increased for venous thrombosis, 11.9-fold (95% CI 9.3-14.9) increased for myocardial infarction, and 8.4-fold (95% CI 5.7-11.5) increased for ischaemic stroke. The combination of haemodialysis, lowest tertile of albumin, history of venous thrombosis, and malignancy was associated with subsequent venous thrombosis. Increased age, renal vascular disease, diabetes, high cholesterol levels, history of venous thrombosis, and history of arterial thrombosis were associated with subsequent arterial thrombosis. The all-cause mortality risk was 1.9-fold (95% CI 1.1-3.3) increased for patients with a history of venous thrombosis and 1.9-fold (95% CI 1.4-2.6) increased for patients with a history of arterial thrombosis. A potential limitation of this study was that in some risk categories associations with venous thrombosis did not reach statistical significance due to small numbers. In conclusion, dialysis patients have clearly elevated risks of venous thrombosis and arterial thrombosis and occurrence of venous thrombosis or arterial thrombosis prior to the start of dialysis is associated with an increased mortality risk.

  7. Identifying the source of superficial reflux in venous leg ulcers using duplex ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Obermayer, Alfred; Garzon, Katharina

    2010-11-01

    Mapping of venous reflux routes associated with medially or laterally located venous leg ulcers and their source of origin. This prospective report presents the results of duplex investigations performed in consecutive leg ulcer patients, all with venous reflux, in a time period over 2 years. A total of 169 patients (183 legs), with chronic venous leg ulcers (CEAP: C6) were examined in a private practice. The data collection integrated an examination that included medical history and clinical diagnoses and incorporated measurements such as body mass index, oscillometric index, and range of motion of the ankle joint. Venous function was assessed with duplex ultrasound, and the cases were described using the advanced CEAP classification. Additionally, a "sourcing" technique was performed with duplex ultrasound investigation of the ulcer bed and the venous system under manual compression and release of the ulcer. The principle of "sourcing" is to follow venous reflux from the ulcer area to its proximal origin. The detected reflux routes were classified either as "axial" or "crossover" type. A total of 20% of the ulcer patients showed no clinically visible varicose veins. One hundred three patients had medial ulcers, 54 lateral ulcers, 21 medial and lateral, and five had gaiter ulcers. Sixty-four (35%) of the medially located ulcers had reflux in the great saphenous vein (GSV), 28 (15%) showed reflux in the medial perforating veins (axial types), and 11 (6%) had reflux in the small saphenous vein (SSV; crossover type). From 54 patients presenting with lateral ulcers, 25 (14%) showed GSV incompetence (crossover type) and only 13 (7%) SSV incompetence (axial type). Sixteen patients showed refluxes penetrating from deep into lateral perforating veins. Crossover reflux routes were detected in 25 of 54 (46%) legs with lateral and in 11 of 103 (11%) legs with medial ulceration (χ2 44.34; P<.001). In venous ulcer patients, an extended examination (CEAP classification) and a

  8. Global public awareness of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Wendelboe, A M; McCumber, M; Hylek, E M; Buller, H; Weitz, J I; Raskob, G

    2015-08-01

    Data on public awareness about thrombosis in general and venous thromboembolism (VTE) in particular are limited. We aimed to measure the global awareness of thrombosis to address this gap. With Ipsos-Reid, from 22 July to 5 August 2014, we surveyed 800 respondents in their native language from each of Argentina, Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, Thailand, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States to measure general awareness about thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). In each country, respondents were distributed among three age groups: 18-39 years, 40-64 years, and over 65 years of age. Proportions and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Overall, the proportion of respondents that were aware of thrombosis, DVT and PE (68%, 44% and 54%, respectively) was lower than the proportion that was aware of other thrombotic disorders, such as heart attack and stroke (88% and 85%, respectively), and health conditions such as hypertension, breast cancer, prostate cancer and AIDS (90%, 85%, 82% and 87%, respectively). Although there was variation across countries, lower awareness was associated with younger age and being male. Only 45% (95% CI, 43.9-46.5) of respondents were aware that blood clots were preventable, and awareness of cancer, hospitalization and surgery as risk factors was low (16%, 25%, and 36%, respectively). On a global level, public awareness about thrombosis overall, and VTE in particular, is low. Campaigns to increase public awareness about VTE are needed to reduce the burden from this largely preventable thrombotic disorder. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. Duration of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after surgery.

    PubMed

    Kearon, Clive

    2003-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis is indicated while in the hospital after major surgery. There is evidence that the prevalence of asymptomatic deep-vein thrombosis, detected by routine venography after major orthopedic surgery, is lower at hospital discharge in patients who have received 10 days rather than 5 days of prophylaxis. This observation supports the current American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) recommendation for a minimum of 7 to 10 days of prophylaxis after hip and knee replacement, even if patients are discharged from the hospital within 7 days of surgery. As risk of VTE persists for up to 3 months after surgery, patients at high risk for postoperative VTE may benefit from extended prophylaxis (eg, an additional 3 weeks after the first 7 to 10 days). Extended prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) reduces the frequency of postdischarge VTE by approximately two thirds after hip replacement; however, the resultant absolute reduction in the frequency of fatal pulmonary embolism is small (ie, estimated at 1 per 2,500 patients). Indirect evidence suggests that, compared with LMWH, efficacy of extended prophylaxis after hip replacement is greater with fondaparinux, similar with warfarin, and less with aspirin. Extended prophylaxis is expected to be of less benefit after knee than after hip replacement. In keeping with current ACCP recommendations, at a minimum, extended prophylaxis should be used after major orthopedic surgery in patients who have additional risk factors for VTE (eg, previous VTE, cancer). If anticoagulant drug therapy is stopped after 7 to 10 days, an additional month of prophylaxis with aspirin should be considered.

  10. Pulmonary tuberculosis - An emerging risk factor for venous thromboembolism: A case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amitesh; Mrigpuri, Parul; Faye, Abhishek; Bandyopadhyay, Debdutta; Singla, Rupak

    2017-01-01

    One-third of patients with symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) manifest pulmonary embolism, whereas two-thirds manifest deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Overall, 25%–50% of patients with first-time VTE have an idiopathic condition, without a readily identifiable risk factor, and its association with tuberculosis (TB) is a rare occurrence. Deep venous thrombosis has been associated with 1.5%–3.4% cases of TB. Early initiation of anti-TB treatment along with anticoagulant therapy decreases the overall morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. We report three cases of DVT associated with pulmonary TB who were diagnosed due to high index of suspicion as the risk factors for the development of DVT were present in these cases. PMID:28144063

  11. Development of primary superficial venous insufficiency: the ascending theory. Observational and hemodynamic data from a 9-year experience.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Eugenio; De Rango, Paola; Piccioli, Riccardo; Bisacci, Carlo; Pagliuca, Valentino; Genovese, Giuseppe; Bisacci, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Hemodynamic principles suggest that primary venous insufficiency follows the hydrostatic column of venous pressure of the limbs, and therefore, venous reflux begins at the lower points and rises upwards. To test the hypothesis of an "ascending development" of reflux, we carried an observational study to analyze the natural evolution of lower limb venous insufficiency. During 9-year period patients with primary superficial venous disease who refused treatment were followed prospectively with 6-month scheduled clinical and duplex ultrasound examinations. Localization, stage, and evolution of the venous patterns were compared. A total of 104 limbs in 99 patients were analyzed (12 males, 92 female; mean age 48.7 years). Prevalence of reflux was (p < 0.001) more frequent along great-saphenous and its tributaries (78/104, 75%) than nonsaphenous veins. The time of re-examination ranged from 1 to 13 years (mean 4 +/- 3.1 years). With the exception of six remaining stable, all the veins showed a progression of insufficiency (94%); 47 involved deep circulation. In all the worsened refluxes, an extension to reach one or more venous segments at an upper level, uninvolved before, was found. There was no downward oriented pattern of progression. There was no significant difference in age, gender, and type of vein between the stable and progressive diseases. Natural history of primary venous insufficiency is that of a progressive disease, which begins at lower levels of the limbs and develops in an antegrade manner as venous stasis is higher where force of gravity is higher. This data do not support the aggressive and widespread treatment of terminal valve as first approach, but need to be supported by larger studies. Copyright 2010 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. H1N1-Induced Venous Thromboembolic Events? Results of a Single-Institution Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Dimakakos, Evangelos; Vathiotis, Ioannis; Papaspiliou, Aggeliki; Panagiotarakou, Meropi; Manolis, Emmanouil; Syrigos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    We describe the clinical and imaging characteristics of 7 cases with polymerase chain reaction-confirmed novel influenza A H1N1 virus (pH1N1) infection who developed venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) while being hospitalized for influenza pneumonia. Pulmonary embolism (PE) without deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was observed in 6 of 7 cases (85.7%); PE with underlying DVT was found in 1 patient (14.3%). PMID:28018924

  13. Presumed Pulmonary Embolism Following Power-Pulse Spray Thrombectomy of Upper Extremity Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jason; Georgiades, Christos S.; Hong, Kelvin; Kim, Hyun S.

    2006-08-15

    To achieve more effective thrombolysis in a shorter treatment time, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy has been increasingly used in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The power-pulse spray is a new technique to combine chemical and rheolytic effects on clots. We present a case of presumed pulmonary embolism following power-pulse spray treatment for upper extremity DVT which necessitated resuscitation and intubation. The power-pulse spray technique should be used with caution when treating DVT.

  14. The impact of obesity on venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Seidel, A C; Belczak, C E Q; Campos, M B; Campos, R B; Harada, D S

    2015-08-01

    Association between chronic venous disease and obesity has recently been studied, with indications that it may worsen in obese patients. The aim of study was to correlate clinical classes of chronic venous disease according to Clinical Etiology Anatomy Pathophysiology (CEAP) classification and body mass index, as well as to compare the severity of chronic venous disease in obese and nonobese patients. This retrospective cross-sectional prevalence study was conducted at the Maringá State University and Belczak Vascular Center along a period of 2 years, consisting of a random sample of 482 patients with complaints compatible with chronic venous disease. Data obtained from patient's files included gender, age, weight and height (for calculating body mass index), and clinical class (C) of chronic venous disease according to CEAP classification. Statistical analysis included Spearman's correlation coefficient, Chi-square test (for comparing frequencies), and Student's t-test (for comparing means). Significant positive correlation between body mass index and clinical classes was established for women (0.43), but not for men (0.07). Obesity (body mass index  : ≥  : 30.0) was significantly more frequent in patients with chronic venous disease in clinical classes 3 (p < 0.001) and 4 (p = 0.002) and less frequent in patients with chronic venous disease in clinical class 1 (p < 0.001). This study evidenced significant correlation between body mass index and clinical classes of chronic venous disease in women, but not in men. It also corroborated the negative impact of obesity on the clinical severity of chronic venous disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Deep Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1989-01-01

    Summarizes research to find the nature of deep earthquakes occurring hundreds of kilometers down in the earth's mantle. Describes further research problems in this area. Presents several illustrations and four references. (YP)

  16. [Postoperative venous thrombosis in general surgery patients and perioperative prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Horie, Hisanaga; Endo, Noriyuki; Sata, Naohiro; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Nagai, Hideo

    2005-03-01

    In a population of general surgery patients in Western countries, there was a 19% incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and a 1.6% incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE), with 0.9% of patients experiencing fatal PE. In Japan, there was a 15.8% incidence of DVT and a 0.34% incidence of PE, with 0.08% of patients experiencing fatal PE in a population of abdominal surgery patients. The incidences of PE and fatal PE in our department were 0.11% and 0.03%, respectively. We started to use intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) for the prophylaxis of postoperative PE in 1999 and then added elastic stockings in 2002 and low-dose unfractionated heparin (LDUH) in 2003 for prophylaxis. The incidence of PE has dropped and that of fatal PE has become 0% with the use of such prophylactic measures. When the risk of venous thromboembolism of the 15 patients who experienced PE in our department were assessed using the Japanese Guidelines for Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism, 13 patients were assessed as high risk and 2 as low risk. The mean age and mean body mass index of the 15 patients were 54 yeas old and 24.8, respectively, and PE was not limited to obese or elderly patients. Such findings appear to indicate the difficulty of risk assessment for PE. Therefore we started to use IPC, elastic stockings, and LDUH for the prophylaxis of PE and DVT for all general surgery patients from April 2004. These prophylactic measures are recommended for the highest-risk patients in the Japanese Guidelines for Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism. There have so far been no serious bleeding complications with the administration of LDUH. We will continue to observe the effects of prophylaxis and the risk of bleeding.

  17. Upper Body Venous Compliance Exceeds Lower Body Venous Compliance in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.

    1996-01-01

    Human venous compliance hypothetically decreases from upper to lower body as a mechanism for maintenance of the hydrostatic indifference level 'headward' in the body, near the heart. This maintains cardiac filling pressure, and thus cardiac output and cerebral perfusion, during orthostasis. This project entailed four steps. First, acute whole-body tilting was employed to alter human calf and neck venous volumes. Subjects were tilted on a tilt table equipped with a footplate as follows: 90 deg, 53 deg, 30 deg, 12 deg, O deg, -6 deg, -12 deg, -6 deg, O deg, 12 deg, 30 deg, 53 deg, and 90 deg. Tilt angles were held for 30 sec each, with 10 sec transitions between angles. Neck volume increased and calf volume decreased during head-down tilting, and the opposite occurred during head-up tilt. Second, I sought to cross-validate Katkov and Chestukhin's (1980) measurements of human leg and neck venous pressures during whole-body tilting, so that those data could be used with volume data from the present study to calculate calf and neck venous compliance (compliance = (Delta)volume/(Delta)pressure). Direct measurements of venous pressures during postural chances and whole-body tilting confirmed that the local changes in venous pressures seen by Katkov and Chestukhin (1980) are valid. The present data also confirmed that gravitational changes in calf venous pressure substantially exceed those changes in upper body venous pressure. Third, the volume and pressure data above were used to find that human neck venous compliance exceeds calf venous compliance by a factor of 6, thereby upholding the primary hypothesis. Also, calf and neck venous compliance correlated significantly with each other (r(exp 2) = 0.56). Fourth, I wished to determine whether human calf muscle activation during head-up tilt reduces calf venous compliance. Findings from tilting and from supine assessments of relaxed calf venous compliance were similar, indicating that tilt-induced muscle activation is

  18. [Use of mesoglycan in venous pathology].

    PubMed

    Scondotto, G; Catena, G; Aloisi, D

    1997-12-01

    Twenty-five female patients suffering from primary venous insufficiency of the lower limbs underwent parenteral and oral treatment with mesoglycan for 3 months. In addition to an evaluation of the subjective and objective parameters linked to venous insufficiency, all patients underwent lower limb venous echo colour-Doppler and videocapillaroscopy using an optic probe in a perimalleolar or periulcerous site. At the end of treatment, all patients reported an improvement in subjective parameters, which was confirmed by a reduction of distal edema in 22 out of 25 cases. There was also an improvement in capillaroscopic findings (reduction of edema of pericapillary connective tissue, reduction of capillary and venular ectasia.

  19. Measurement of venous compliance (8-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirsk, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    The prime objective of this International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) investigation is to measure the bulk compliance (distensibility) of the veins in the lower leg before, during, and after spaceflight. It is of particular interest whether venous compliance over the range of both positive and negative transmural pressures (various states of venous distention and collapse) changes throughout the duration of spaceflight. Information concerning the occurrence and character of compliance changes could have implications for the design of improved antigravity suits and further the understanding of inflight and postflight venous hemodynamics.

  20. [Mechanical complication of central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Koja, Hiroki; Tokumine, Joho; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure with a high success rate. However, life-threatening complications are occasionally caused by mechanical injury during the catheterization process. Therefore, surgeons should have sufficient knowledge of the potential complications and the effective use of preventative measures when performing catheterization. We herein review and discuss the mechanical complications previously reported to have occurred in association with central venous catheterization. Comprehensive knowledge about various complication-inducing factors, the ability to make a quick and accurate diagnosis of such complications, and sufficient skill to prevent worsening of these complications can thus help patients from suffering lethal complications due to central venous catheterization.

  1. Asian venous thromboembolism guidelines: prevention of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Liew, N C; Chang, Y H; Choi, G; Chu, P H; Gao, X; Gibbs, H; Ho, C O; Ibrahim, H; Kim, T K; Kritpracha, B; Lee, L H; Lee, L; Lee, W Y; Li, Y J; Nicolaides, A N; Oh, D; Pratama, D; Ramakrishnan, N; Robless, P A; Villarama-Alemany, G; Wong, R

    2012-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis is under-utilized in Asia because of the misconception that its incidence is lower in Asians as compared to the Caucasians. The available data on VTE in Asia is limited due to the lack of well-designed multicenter randomized controlled trials as well as non-standardized research designs, making data comparison difficult. Emerging data indicates that the VTE incidence is not low in Asia, and is comparable to that reported in the Western literature in some instances. There is also a trend towards increasing incidence of VTE, as demonstrated by a number of hospital-based studies in Asia. This could be attributed to lifestyle changes, ageing population, increasing awareness of VTE and wider availability of Duplex ultrasound. The risk of VTE in hospitalized patients remain the same in Asians and Caucasians, even though there may be factors that are inherent to patients in Asia that influence the slight variation in incidence. The utilization rate of VTE prophylaxis remains suboptimal in Asia. The Asian Venous Thrombosis Forum (AVTF) comprises participants from various countries such as China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and experts from Australia and Europe. The forum evaluated the available data on VTE from the Asian region and formulated guidelines tailored to meet the needs of the region. We recommend that serious considerations are given to VTE prophylaxis especially in the at-risk group and a formal hospital policy be established to facilitate the implementation. On admission to the hospital, we recommend assessing the patients for both VTE and bleeding risk. We recommend mechanical prophylaxis for patients at increased risk of bleeding and utilizing it as an adjunctive measure in combination with pharmacological prophylaxis in patients with high risk of VTE. For patients undergoing general or gynecological surgery and with moderate risk for VTE, we recommend

  2. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regula