Science.gov

Sample records for deep-inelastic collisions studied

  1. Nuclear structure studies of 202Hg and 203Tl using deep-inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gass, Emily; McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Barrett, J. S.; Loveland, W.; Yanez, R.; Zhu, S.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Chiara, C. J.; Harker, J. L.; Walters, W. B.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclei with a few valence nucleons outside 208Pb are crucial for testing the nuclear shell model and guiding our understanding of single particle structure. Data in this region are also potentially relevant to nuclear astrophysics. This analysis focused on the high-spin structure of 202Hg and 203Tl. Excited states in these nuclei were populated through deep-inelastic reactions from a beam of 136Xe and that was incident on a thick target of 208Pb in the Gammasphere array at Argonne National Laboratory. The level schemes of 202Hg and 203Tl were extended by locating a new isomer in each nucleus and a number of new high-spin states built on top of the isomers. The newly-observed states will be discussed in the context of the shell model. Supported by US DOE under the SULI Program and Grant Nos. DE-FG06-97ER41026 and DE-FG02-94ER40834 and Contract Nos. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and DE-AC02-06CH10886.

  2. Population of high spin states by quasi-elastic and deep inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, H.; Knott, C. N.; Winchell, D. F.; Saladin, J. X.; Kaplan, M. S.; de Faro, L.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Blue, R. A.; Ronningen, R. M.; Morrissey, D. J.; Lee, I. Y.; Dietzsch, O.

    1988-09-01

    The feasibility of populating high spin states using reactions induced by a 10 MeV/nucleon 22Ne beam on 170Er was studied. The experiment was carried out using a multidetector array for high resolution γ-ray spectroscopy, a 14 element sum-multiplicity spectrometer and six ΔE-E telescopes. Detailed information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanisms associated with various reaction channels. Deep inelastic collisions are shown to be a promising tool for high spin spectroscopy in regions of the chart of nuclides which are not accessible by other reactions.

  3. Population of high spin states by quasi-elastic and deep inelastic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Takai, H.; Knott, C.N.; Winchell, D.F.; Saladin, J.X.; Kaplan, M.S.; de Faro, L.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Blue, R.A.; Ronningen, R.M.; Morrissey, D.J.; and others

    1988-09-01

    The feasibility of populating high spin states using reactions induced by a 10 MeV/nucleon /sup 22/Ne beam on /sup 170/Er was studied. The experiment was carried out using a multidetector array for high resolution ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy, a 14 element sum-multiplicity spectrometer and six ..delta..E-E telescopes. Detailed information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanisms associated with various reaction channels. Deep inelastic collisions are shown to be a promising tool for high spin spectroscopy in regions of the chart of nuclides which are not accessible by other reactions.

  4. Microscopic calculations of heavy-residue formation in quasielastic and deep-inelastic collisions below the Fermi energy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souliotis, G. A.; Shetty, D. V.; Galanopoulos, S.; Yennello, S. J.

    2007-10-01

    During the last several years we have undertaken a systematic study of heavy residues formed in quasi-elastic and deep- inelastic collisions near and below the Fermi energy [1,2]. Presently, we are exploring the possibility of extracting information on the dynamics by comparing our heavy residue data to calculations using microscopic models based on the quantum molecular dynamics approach (QMD). We have performed detailed calculations of QMD type using the recent version of the constrained molecular dynamics code CoMD of M. Papa [3]. CoMD is especially designed for reactions near the Fermi energy. It implements an effective interaction with a nuclear-matter compressibility of K=200 (soft EOS) with several forms of the density dependence of the nucleon-nucleon symmetry potential. CoMD imposes a constraint in the phase space occupation for each nucleon, thus restoring the Pauli principle at each time step of the collision. Results of the calculations and comparisons with our residue data will be presented and discussed in detail. [1] G.A. Souliotis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 022701 (2003); Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 204 166 (2003). [2] G.A. Souliotis et al., Phys. Lett. B 588, 35 (2004). [3] M. Papa et al., Phys. Rev. C 64, 024612 (2001).

  5. Structure of ²⁰⁷Pb populated in ²⁰⁸Pb + ²⁰⁸Pb deep-inelastic collisions*

    DOE PAGES

    Shand, C. M.; Wilson, E.; Podolyák, Zs.; ...

    2015-01-01

    The yrast structure of 207Pb above the 13/2+ isomeric state has been investigated in deep-inelastic collisions of 208Pb and 208Pb at ATLAS, Argonne National Laboratory. New and previously observed transitions were measured using the Gammasphere detector array. The level scheme of 207Pb is presented up to ~ 6 MeV, built using coincidence and γ-ray intensity analyses. In addition, the spin and parity assignments of states were made, based on angular distributions and comparisons to shell model calculations.

  6. Structure of ²⁰⁷Pb populated in ²⁰⁸Pb + ²⁰⁸Pb deep-inelastic collisions*

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, C. M.; Wilson, E.; Podolyák, Zs.; Grawe, H.; Brown, B. A.; Fornal, B.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Bowry, M.; Bunce, M.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, R. J.; Chiara, C. J.; Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Deo, A. Y.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Hoffman, C. R.; Kempley, R. S.; Kondev, F. G.; Lane, G. J.; Lauritsen, T.; Lotay, G.; Reed, M. W.; Regan, P. H.; Rodriguez-Triguero, C.; Seweryniak, D.; Szpak, B.; Walker, P. M.; Zhu, S.

    2015-01-01

    The yrast structure of 207Pb above the 13/2+ isomeric state has been investigated in deep-inelastic collisions of 208Pb and 208Pb at ATLAS, Argonne National Laboratory. New and previously observed transitions were measured using the Gammasphere detector array. The level scheme of 207Pb is presented up to ~ 6 MeV, built using coincidence and γ-ray intensity analyses. In addition, the spin and parity assignments of states were made, based on angular distributions and comparisons to shell model calculations.

  7. Study of Σ(1385) and Ξ(1321) hyperon and antihyperon production in deep inelastic muon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Y.; Alexandrov, Y.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Y.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, C.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanshin, Y.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Y. A.; Kisselev, Y.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Y. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Morreale, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Y.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2013-10-01

    Large samples of Λ, Σ(1385) and Ξ(1321) hyperons produced in the deep-inelastic muon scattering off a 6LiD target were collected with the COMPASS experimental setup at CERN. The relative yields of Σ(1385)+, Σ(1385)-, , , Ξ(1321)-, and hyperons decaying into were measured. The ratios of heavy-hyperon to Λ and heavy-antihyperon to were found to be in the range 3.8 % to 5.6 % with a relative uncertainty of about 10 %. They were used to tune the parameters relevant for strange particle production of the LEPTO Monte Carlo generator.

  8. Deep Inelastic Transfer Reactions - A New Way to Exotic Nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sophie; Beliuskina, Olga

    2014-05-01

    We studied deep inelastic multinucleon transfer reactions in collisions of 64Ni+207Pb and 48Ca+238U at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The experiments were performed at the velocity filter SHIP at GSI Darmstadt. One of the goals was to investigate if deep inelastic transfer is superior to fragmentation reactions for producing neutron-rich isotopes in the astrophysically interesting region of nuclei along the magic neutron number N = 126. With both collision systems, rather neutron-rich transfer products were populated, some of them reaching out to the limits of the present chart of nuclides. New isotopes could not be identified. A comparison of the measured transfer cross-sections and yields with those from fragmentation reactions allowed for interesting conclusions.

  9. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering in an AdS/CFT inspired model: A phenomenological study

    SciTech Connect

    Betemps, M. A.; Goncalves, V. P.; Santana Amaral, J. T. de

    2010-05-01

    The analytical treatment of the nonperturbative QCD dynamics is one of the main open questions of the strong interactions. Currently, it is only possible to get some qualitative information about this regime considering other QCD-like theories, as, for example, the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory, where one can perform calculations in the nonperturbative limit of large 't Hooft coupling using the anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT). Recently, the high energy scattering amplitude was calculated in the AdS/CFT approach, applied to deep-inelastic scattering and confronted with the F{sub 2} HERA data. In this work we extend the nonperturbative AdS/CFT inspired model for diffractive processes and compare its predictions with a perturbative approach based on the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. We demonstrate that the AdS/CFT inspired model is not able to describe the current F{sub 2}{sup D(3)} HERA data and predicts a similar behavior to that from the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation in the range 10{sup -7} < or approx. x{sub P} < or approx. 10{sup -4}. At smaller values of x{sub P} the diffractive structure function is predicted to be energy independent.

  10. Transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy ion induced transfer reactions are usually considered to fall into two categories. Quasi-elastic processes, on one hand, are characterized by small energy transfers, with one-nucleon transfer reactions being a typical example. These processes are dominant for grazing collisions, and are generally described within simple one-step DWBA calculations. Deep inelastic reactions, on the other hand, occur for more central collisions where the interaction time is longer and subsequently more energy and particles can be exchanged. Quasi-elastic collisions dominate transfer reactions induced by light heavy ions (e.g., /sup 16/O) at energies not too high above the barrier, while deep inelastic collisions are observed mainly in reactions induced by heavier projectiles (Kr, Xe). In this contribution, we discuss the transition between these two processes for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb. /sup 48/Ti is located between light (/sup 16/O) and heavy (Kr) projectiles and should be well suited for a study of the interrelation between quasi- and deep-inelastic reactions. The experiments were performed with a 300 MeV /sup 48/Ti beam obtained from the Argonne National Laboratory superconducting linac. The outgoing particles were momentum analyzed in a split pole magnetic spectrograph and detected in the focal plane by a position sensitive ionization chamber. The specific energy loss, the magnetic rigidity and the total energy of the outgoing particles were measured enabling mass and Z-identification. The energy resolution was about 3 MeV, determined by the thickness of the /sup 208/Pb target, and thus excluded study of transfer reactions to discrete final states. Angular distributions were measured in the range theta/sub lab/ = 20/sup 0/ to 80/sup 0/ in steps of 5/sup 0/. 8 refs.

  11. Parity violation in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, P.

    1994-04-01

    AA beam of polarized electrons at CEBAF with an energy of 8 GeV or more will be useful for performing precision measurements of parity violation in deep inelastic scattering. Possible applications include precision tests of the Standard Model, model-independent measurements of parton distribution functions, and studies of quark correlations.

  12. NEW APPROACHES: Deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, J.

    1998-01-01

    Feynman diagrams can be used to explain deep inelastic scattering, but it must be remembered that the emission and absorption of a photon are not independent events - the underlying field is important.

  13. Production of Ξ- in deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, N. Mohammad; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discussed about the possible mechanism on how strange baryon are being produced. The discovery of strange quarks in cosmic rays before the quarks model being proposed makes the searches become more interesting, as it has long lifetimes. The inclusive deep inelastic scattering of Ξ- has been studied in electron-proton collisions with ZEUS detector at HERA. We also studied HERA kinematics and phase space.

  14. Production of Ξ{sup −} in deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS detector at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Nasir, N. Mohammad Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we discussed about the possible mechanism on how strange baryon are being produced. The discovery of strange quarks in cosmic rays before the quarks model being proposed makes the searches become more interesting, as it has long lifetimes. The inclusive deep inelastic scattering of Ξ{sup −} has been studied in electron-proton collisions with ZEUS detector at HERA. We also studied HERA kinematics and phase space.

  15. Nuclear PDFs from neutrino deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    I. Schienbein; J. Y. Yu; C. Keppel; J. G. Morfin; F. Olness; J.F. Owens

    2007-11-13

    We study nuclear effects in charged current deep inelastic neutrino--iron scattering in the framework of a chi^2-analysis of parton distribution functions. We extract a set of iron PDFs and show that under reasonable assumptions it is possible to constrain the valence, light sea and strange quark distributions. We compare our results with nuclear parton distribution functions from the literature and find good agreement. Our iron PDFs are used to compute nuclear correction factors which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs.

  16. Statistical properties of deep inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1983-08-01

    The multifaceted aspects of deep-inelastic heavy-ion collisions are discussed in terms of the statistical equilibrium limit. It is shown that a conditional statistical equilibrium, where a number of degrees of freedom are thermalized while others are still relaxing, prevails in most of these reactions. The individual degrees of freedom that have been explored experimentally are considered in their statistical equilibrium limit, and the extent to which they appear to be thermalized is discussed. The interaction between degrees of freedom on their way towards equilibrium is shown to create complex feedback phenomena that may lead to self-regulation. A possible example of self-regulation is shown for the process of energy partition between fragments promoted by particle exchange. 35 references.

  17. QCD studies in ep collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  18. Deep-inelastic muon scattering from nuclei with hadron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H.; Kaufman, S.

    1995-08-01

    Deep-inelastic lepton scattering from nuclei provides a direct look at the quark structure of nuclear matter. These reactions revealed the first convincing evidence that the structure of nucleons is modified in the nuclear medium and had profound implications on the understanding of nuclear dynamics. FNAL experiment E665, using the 490-GeV muon beams at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, provides new information on the nuclear effects on nucleon properties by studying deep-inelastic muon scattering with coincident hadron detection. The high beam energy makes the experiment particularly suited to the study of the region of x < 0.1 (where x is the fraction of the momentum of the nucleon carried by the struck quark in the infinite momentum frame), and total center-of-mass hadronic energy > 25 GeV, where hard QCD processes are expected to become evident and there are little data from other deep-inelastic measurements.

  19. The Excitation of High Spin States with Quasielastic and Deep Inelastic Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Clinton Neal

    1988-12-01

    The feasibility of populating high spin states using reactions induced by a 220 MeV ^{22 }Ne beam on a ^{170} Er target was studied. The experiment was carried out using a multidetector array for high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, a 14 element sum multiplicity spectrometer and six DeltaE-E particle telescopes. Detailed information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanisms associated with various reaction channels. Deep inelastic collisions are shown to be a promising tool for high spin spectroscopy in regions of the chart of nuclides which are not accessible by other reactions.

  20. The excitation of high spin states with quasi-elastic and deep inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, C.N.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of populating high spin states using reactions induced by a 220 MeV {sup 22}Ne beam on a {sup 170}Er target was studied. The experiment was carried out using a multidetector array for high resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, a 14 element sum multiplicity spectrometer and six {Delta}E-E particle telescopes. Detailed information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanisms associated with various reaction channels. Deep inelastic collisions are shown to be a promising tool for high spin spectroscopy in regions of the chart of nuclides which are not accessible by other reactions.

  1. Recovery Act - Measurement of Parity Violation in Deep Inelastic Scattering and Studies of the Nucleon Spin Structure at JLab 6 and 11 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xiaochao

    2016-03-10

    spectrometer, called “SoLID”. Once built, SoLID can be used for other topics such as using PVDIS on a proton target to measure the valence quark distributions, using PVDIS on a polarized target to measure new electro-weak interference structure functions of the nucleon, and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering experiments. SoLID will greatly enhance the exploration potential of JLab. The proposed program will first focus on completion of the 6 GeV PVDIS experiment, its data analysis and publishing physics results. This 6 GeV experiment will explore whether precision PVDIS measurements are feasible, will set limits on the hadronic physics effects, and will improve our knowledge on the quark neutral weak couplings, optimally by a factor of six. Starting early 2010, efforts will be spent on preparation for the 11 GeV program, focusing on simulations of SoLID, optimization and construction of the SoLID detector package, and studies of the polarized 3He target and its improvements. Funding support for the whole program is requested here.

  2. Studies of N ~ 40 Ni isotopes via neutron-knockout (nKO) and deep-inelastic (DI) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiara, C. J.; Recchia, F.; Gade, A.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Walters, W. B.

    2013-10-01

    V. BADER, T. BAUGHER, D. BAZIN, J.S. BERRYMAN, B.A. BROWN, C. LANGER, N. LARSON, S.N. LIDDICK, E. LUNDERBERG, S. NOJI, C. PROKOP, S.R. STROBERG, S. SUCHYTA, D. WEISSHAAR, S. WILLIAMS, NSCL/MSU, M. ALBERS, M. ALCORTA, P.F. BERTONE, M.P. CARPENTER, J. CHEN, C.R. HOFFMAN, F.G. KONDEV, T. LAURITSEN, A.M. ROGERS, D. SEWERYNIAK, S. ZHU, ANL, C.M. CAMPBELL, LBNL, H.M. DAVID, D.T. DOHERTY, U. of Edinburgh/ANL, A. KORICHI, CSNSM-IN2P3/ANL, C.J. LISTER, U. of Mass.-Lowell, K. WIMMER, Central Mich. U. -- Excited states in 68Ni were populated in 2nKO reactions at NSCL. Prompt γ rays were detected with the GRETINA array located in front of the S800 separator. A hodoscope at the S800 focal plane captured the 68Ni ions, where isomeric decays could be correlated with prompt γ rays. Decay of the first excited state, a 0+ isomer, was observed, confirming that its energy substantially differs from the literature value. Comparing the decay patterns of excited states with shell-model calculations provides insight into their underlying structure. Data from 70Zn + 208Pb DI reactions studied with Gammasphere provide results consistent with the 2nKO. Single-particle strengths are also under investigation in the odd- A Ni isotopes via 1nKO reactions. Supported in part by the DoE (DE-FG02-94ER40834, DE-AC02-06CH11357), NSF (PHY-1102511), and NNSA (DE-NA0000979).

  3. Deep inelastic scattering near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, J.; Back, B.; Chan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Deep inelastic scattering was recently observed in heavy ion reactions at incident energies near and below the Coulomb barrier. Traditional models of this process are based on frictional forces and are designed to predict the features of deep inelastic processes at energies above the barrier. They cannot be applied at energies below the barrier where the nuclear overlap is small and friction is negligible. The presence of deep inelastic scattering at these energies requires a different explanation. The first observation of deep inelastic scattering near the barrier was in the systems {sup 124,112}Sn + {sup 58,64}Ni by Wolfs et al. We previously extended these measurements to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni and currently measured the system {sup 124}Xe + {sup 58}Ni. We obtained better statistics, better mass and energy resolution, and more complete angular coverage in the Xe + Ni measurements. The cross sections and angular distributions are similar in all of the Sn + Ni and Xe + Ni systems. The data are currently being analyzed and compared with new theoretical calculations. They will be part of the thesis of J. Gehring.

  4. Pion in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Povh, B.

    2008-10-13

    The forward neutron production in the ep collisions at 300 GeV measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at DESY has been used to estimate the total probability for the proton fluctuation into n{pi}{sup +} and p{pi}{sup 0}. The probability found is on the order of the 30%. This number is compared with the numbers of obtained for the probability of quark fluctuation into {pi}{sup +} from several alternative DIS processes (Gottfried sum rule, polarized structure function) and the axial-vector coupling constant, where the pion fluctuation is believed to play an important role.

  5. Deep inelastic scattering in conformal QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2010-03-01

    We consider the Regge limit of a CFT correlation function of two vector and two scalar operators, as appropriate to study small-x deep inelastic scattering in mathcal{N} = 4 SYM or in QCD assuming approximate conformal symmetry. After clarifying the nature of the Regge limit for a CFT correlator, we use its conformal partial wave expansion to obtain an impact parameter representation encoding the exchange of a spin j Reggeon for any value of the coupling constant. The CFT impact parameter space is the three-dimensional hyperbolic space H 3, which is the impact parameter space for high energy scattering in the dual AdS space. We determine the small-x structure functions associated to the exchange of a Reggeon. We discuss unitarization from the point of view of scattering in AdS and comment on the validity of the eikonal approximation. We then focus on the weak coupling limit of the theory where the amplitude is dominated by the exchange of the BFKL pomeron. Conformal invariance fixes the form of the vector impact factor and its decomposition in transverse spin 0 and spin 2 components. Our formalism reproduces exactly the general results predict by the Regge theory, both for a scalar target and for γ* - γ* scattering. We compute current impact factors for the specific examples of mathcal{N} = 4 SYM and QCD, obtaining very simple results. In the case of the R-current of mathcal{N} = 4 SYM, we show that the transverse spin 2 component vanishes. We conjecture that the impact factors of all chiral primary operators of mathcal{N} = 4 SYM only have components with 0 transverse spin.

  6. Quantum Chromodynamics and Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. Keith

    2016-10-01

    This article first describes the parton model which was the precursor of the QCD description of hard scattering processes. After the discovery of QCD and asymptotic freedom, the first successful applications were to Deep Inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The subsequent application of QCD to processes with two initial state hadrons required the understanding and proof of factorization. To take the fledgling theory and turn it into the robust calculational engine it has become today, required a number of technical and conceptual developments which will be described. Prospects for higher loop calculations are also reviewed.

  7. Deep inelastic neutron scattering in condensed hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Celli, Milva; Zoppi, Marco

    1996-02-01

    The neutron cross-section of molecular hydrogen that is measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS) is compared with two distinct models. One is a generalization of the molecular Young and Koppel model (1964) that takes into account the modification to the translational kinetic energy that is induced by quantum effects. The second model assumes a free particle wave function for the final state of the proton (C. Andreani et al., 1995). The comparison between these two models, and with the experimental results, provides information on the crossover between the molecular and atomic regime of hydrogen in DINS.

  8. Phenomenology of deep-inelastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1983-03-01

    The field of heavy-ion deep-inelastic reactions is reviewed with particular attention to the experimental picture. The most important degrees of freedom involved in the process are identified and illustrated with relevant experiments. Energy dissipation and mass transfer are discussed in terms of particles and/or phonons exchanged in the process. The equilibration of the fragment neutron-to-proton ratios is inspected for evidence of giant isovector resonances. The angular momentum effects are observed in the fragment angular distributions and the angular momentum transfer is inferred from the magnitude and alignment of the fragments spins. The possible sources of light particles accompanying the deep-inelastic reactions are discussed. The use of the sequentially emitted particles as angular momentum probes is illustrated. The significance and uses of a thermalized component emitted by the dinucleus is reviewed. The possible presence of Fermi jets in the prompt component is shown to be critical to the justification of the one-body theories.

  9. Precise QCD Predictions for the Production of Dijet Final States in Deep Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Currie, James; Gehrmann, Thomas; Niehues, Jan

    2016-07-22

    The production of two-jet final states in deep inelastic scattering is an important QCD precision observable. We compute it for the first time to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. Our calculation is fully differential in the lepton and jet variables and allows one to impose cuts on the jets in both the laboratory and the Breit frame. We observe that the NNLO corrections are moderate in size, except at kinematical edges, and that their inclusion leads to a substantial reduction of the scale variation uncertainty on the predictions. Our results will enable the inclusion of deep inelastic dijet data in precision phenomenology studies.

  10. Introduction to the study of collisions between heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bayman, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    Current investigations concerning the collisions of nuclei governed by small de Broglie wavelengths are reviewed. The wave packets localize nuclei in regions small compared to their diameters. Cross sections are examined for potential scattering, elastic scattering, quasi-molecular states, peripheral particle-transfer reactions, fusion, and deep inelastic collisions. Theories of fusion and deep inelastic collisions are summarized. This paper is in the nature of a review-tutorial. 45 references, 51 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

  11. Deep Inelastic Scattering on Ultracold Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    We discuss Bragg scattering on both Bose and Fermi gases with strong short-range interactions in the deep inelastic regime of large wave vector transfer q , where the dynamic structure factor is dominated by a resonance near the free-particle energy ℏω =ɛq=ℏ2q2/2 m . Using a systematic short-distance expansion, the structure factor at high momentum is shown to exhibit a nontrivial dependence on frequency characterized by two separate scaling regimes. First, for frequencies that differ from the single-particle energy by terms of order O (q ) (i.e., small deviations compared to the single-particle energy), the dynamic structure factor is described by the impulse approximation of Hohenberg and Platzman. Second, deviations of order O (q2) (i.e., of the same order or larger than the single-particle energy) are described by the operator product expansion, with a universal crossover connecting both regimes. The scaling is consistent with the leading asymptotics for a number of sum rules in the large momentum limit. Furthermore, we derive an exact expression for the shift and width of the single-particle peak at large momentum due to interactions, thus extending a result by Beliaev [J. Exp. Theor. Phys. 7, 299 (1958)] for the low-density Bose gas to arbitrary values of the scattering length a . The shift exhibits a maximum around q a ≃1 , which is connected with a maximum in the static structure factor due to strong short-range correlations. For Bose gases with moderate interaction strengths, the theoretically predicted shift is consistent with the value observed by Papp et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 135301 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.135301]. Finally, we develop a diagrammatic theory for the dynamic structure factor which accounts for the correlations beyond Bogoliubov theory. It covers the full range of momenta and frequencies and provides an explicit example for the emergence of asymptotic scaling at large momentum.

  12. Response functions for deep inelastic scattering from 40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deady, M.; Williamson, C. F.; Wong, J.; Zimmerman, P. D.; Blatchley, C.; Finn, J. M.; Lerose, J.; Sioshansi, P.; Altemus, R.; McCarthy, J. S.; Whitney, R. R.

    1983-08-01

    Deep inelastic electron scattering cross sections have been measured from 40Ca at energies between 100 and 375 MeV and at scattering angles of 90° and 140°. Longitudinal and transverse response functions at three-vector momentum transfers of 330, 370, and 410 MeV/c were extracted from these data using a Rosenbluth separation. The integrated longitudinal response functions for the three momentum transfers are found to have, respectively, 65%, 75%, and 90% of the longitudinal strength predicted by the Fermi gas model. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Deep inelastic electron scattering from 40Ca, extracted transverse and longitudinal response functions.

  13. Energy dissipation in heavy systems: the transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; van den Berg, A.; Kolata, J.J.; Kovar, D.G.; Kutschera, W.; Rosner, G.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Yntema, J.L.; Lee, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of medium mass projectiles (A = 28 - 64) with /sup 208/Pb has been studied using a split-pole spectrograph which allows single mass and charge identification. The reaction process in all systems studied so far is dominated by quasi-elastic neutron transfer reactions, especially at incident energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition to the quasi-elastic component deep inelastic contributions are present in all reaction channels. The good mass and charge separation allows to generate Wilczynski plots for individual channels; for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb we observe that the transition between the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic reactions occurs around Q = -(30 to 35) MeV.

  14. Toward a QCD analysis of jet rates in deep-inelastic Muon-Proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic Muon-Proton scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates defined by the JADE clustering algorithm are compared to perturbative Quantum chromodynamics (PQCD) and different Monte Carlo model predictions. The applicability of the jet-parton duality hypothesis is studied. We obtain hadronic jet rates which are approximately a factor of two higher than PQCD predictions at the parton level. Possible causes for this discrepancy are discussed.

  15. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  16. Jet rates from deep inelastic muon scattering in the W range of 15 to 35 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.

    1991-08-01

    Production rates of forward jets in deep inelastic muon scattering are studied using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The evolution of di-jet rates with W is compared to QCD first order predictions in the W range of 15 to 25 GeV. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Deep Inelastic Scattering results from the first year of HERA operation

    SciTech Connect

    Magill, S.R.

    1993-12-31

    The first year of operation of the HERA electron-proton collider has resulted in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) Physics results from both the H1 and ZEUS experiments. Reported here are the H1 and ZEUS measurements of the proton structure function F{sub 2} at higher Q{sup 2} and lower x than previously reported from fixed target experiments. Also included are the results of QCD studies on hadronic final states and jets, and the observation of high Q{sup 2} charged current events from both experiments. Finally, the observation of events with large rapidity gaps by the ZEUS collaboration is also reported.

  18. NLO QCD corrections to graviton induced deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, W. J.; Vryonidou, E.

    2011-06-01

    We consider Next-to-Leading-Order QCD corrections to ADD graviton exchange relevant for Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments. We calculate the relevant NLO structure functions by calculating the virtual and real corrections for a set of graviton interaction diagrams, demonstrating the expected cancellation of the UV and IR divergences. We compare the NLO and LO results at the centre-of-mass energy relevant to HERA experiments as well as for the proposed higher energy lepton-proton collider, LHeC, which has a higher fundamental scale reach.

  19. Deep inelastic electron scattering from iron 56 and other tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, R. M.

    1980-03-01

    Deep inelastic electron scattering data on iron 56 are presented for angles of 160 degrees, 140 degrees and 90 degrees and at incident energies ranging from 372 MeV to 100 MeV. Radiative contributions from real target bremsstrahlung and from the continuum are included. The data were separated into longitudinal, Sl(q, omega) and transverse, ST(q, omega) response functions. A Coulomb sum rule for constant q is formulated and compared with an independent particle model (Fermi gas). Short range correlations, finite size effects, effective momentum transfer and final state interactions are considered in an attempt to explain the observed discrepancies.

  20. Neutrino-Nucleon Deep Inelastic Scattering in MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrick, Anne; Minerva Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Neutrino-Nucleon Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events provide a probe into the structure of the nucleus that cannot be accessed via charged lepton-nucleon interactions. The MINERvA experiment is stationed in the Neutrinos from the Main Injector (NuMI) beam line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The projected sensitivity of nuclear structure function analyses using MINERvA's suite of nuclear targets (C, CH, Fe and Pb) in the upgraded 6 GeV neutrino energy NuMI beam will be explored, and their impact discussed.

  1. Final-state interactions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off the Deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    Wim Cosyn, Misak Sargsian

    2011-07-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off the Deuteron with production of a slow nucleon in recoil kinematics is studied in the virtual nucleon approximation, in which the final state interaction (FSI) is calculated within general eikonal approximation. The cross section is derived in a factorized approach, with a factor describing the virtual photon interaction with the off-shell nucleon and a distorted spectral function accounting for the final-state interactions. One of the main goals of the study is to understand how much the general features of the diffractive high energy soft rescattering accounts for the observed features of FSI in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Comparison with the Jefferson Lab data shows good agreement in the covered range of kinematics. Most importantly, our calculation correctly reproduces the rise of the FSI in the forward direction of the slow nucleon production angle. By fitting our calculation to the data we extracted the W and Q{sup 2} dependences of the total cross section and slope factor of the interaction of DIS products, X, off the spectator nucleon. This analysis shows the XN scattering cross section rising with W and decreasing with an increase of Q{sup 2}. Finally, our analysis points at a largely suppressed off-shell part of the rescattering amplitude.

  2. Final-state interactions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off the deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosyn, W.; Sargsian, M.

    2011-07-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off the deuteron with production of a slow nucleon in recoil kinematics is studied in the virtual nucleon approximation, in which the final-state interaction (FSI) is calculated within generalized eikonal approximation. The cross section is derived in a factorized approach, with a factor describing the virtual photon interaction with the off-shell nucleon and a distorted spectral function accounting for the final-state interactions. One of the main goals of the study is to understand how much the general features of the diffractive high-energy soft rescattering accounts for the observed features of FSI in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Comparison with the Jefferson Lab data shows good agreement in the covered range of kinematics. Most importantly, our calculation correctly reproduces the rise of the FSI in the forward direction of the slow nucleon production angle. By fitting our calculation to the data we extracted the W and Q2 dependencies of the total cross section and slope factor of the interaction of DIS products, X, off the spectator nucleon. This analysis shows the XN-scattering cross section rising with W and decreasing with an increase of Q2. Finally, our analysis points at a largely suppressed off-shell part of the rescattering amplitude.

  3. Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons and Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropy in Deep Inelastic Scattering Dijet Production at High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-12-17

    In this study, we determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small x by solving the Balitsky–Jalilian-Marian–Iancu–McLerran–Weigert–Leonidov–Kovner rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions, we estimate the amplitude of cos2Φ azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering dijet production at high energies. We find sizable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of v2=~10%.

  4. Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons and Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropy in Deep Inelastic Scattering Dijet Production at High Energy

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-12-17

    In this study, we determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small x by solving the Balitsky–Jalilian-Marian–Iancu–McLerran–Weigert–Leonidov–Kovner rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions, we estimate the amplitude of cos2Φ azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering dijet production at high energies. We find sizable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of v2=~10%.

  5. Bessel-Weighted Asymmetries in Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    D. Boer, L. Gamberg, B.U. Musch, A. Prokudin

    2011-10-01

    The concept of weighted asymmetries is revisited for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. We consider the cross section in Fourier space, conjugate to the outgoing hadron's transverse momentum, where convolutions of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions become simple products. Individual asymmetric terms in the cross section can be projected out by means of a generalized set of weights involving Bessel functions. Advantages of employing these Bessel weights are that they suppress (divergent) contributions from high transverse momentum and that soft factors cancel in (Bessel-) weighted asymmetries. Also, the resulting compact expressions immediately connect to previous work on evolution equations for transverse momentum dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions and to quantities accessible in lattice QCD. Bessel weighted asymmetries are thus model independent observables that augment the description and our understanding of correlations of spin and momentum in nucleon structure.

  6. Photon-jet cross sections in deep-inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurenche, P.; Fontannaz, M.

    2015-02-01

    We present the complete next-to-leading order calculation of isolated prompt photon production in association with a jet in deep-inelastic scattering. The calculation involves, direct, resolved, and fragmentation contributions. It is shown that defining the transverse momenta in the proton virtual-photon frame (CM), as usually done, or in the laboratory frame, as done in some experiments, is not equivalent and leads to important differences concerning the perturbative approach. In fact, using the latter frame may preclude, under certain conditions, the calculation of the next-to-leading order correction to the important resolved component. A comparison with the latest ZEUS data is performed and good agreement is found in the perturbatively stable regions.

  7. Towards semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering at next-to-next-to-leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderle, Daniele; de Florian, Daniel; Rotstein Habarnau, Yamila

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we compute the first set of O (αs2) corrections to semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering structure functions. We start by studying the impact of the contribution of the partonic subprocesses that open at this order for the longitudinal structure function. We perform the full calculation analytically, and obtain the expression of the factorized cross section at this order. Special care is given to the study of their flavor decomposition structure. We analyze the phenomenological effect of the corrections finding that, even though expected to be small a priori, it turns out to be sizable with respect to the previous order known, calling for a full next-to-next-to-leading order calculation.

  8. The exclusive production of Rho mesons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulmahn, Jeffrey W.

    1997-11-01

    The exclusive production of ρ0 mesons in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) was studied using data obtained with the ZEUS detector from the 1994 HERA run. The cross section for this process has been determined in the range 3 < Q2 < 30 [ GeV2] and 42 < W < 141 [ GeV], subject to the restrictions pT2 < 0.6 [ GeV2] and 0.4 < M/piπ/

  9. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y[sub cut], in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W [approx equal] 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x [approx equal] 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of [alpha][sub s], are studied.

  10. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y{sub cut}, in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W {approx_equal} 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x {approx_equal} 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of {alpha}{sub s}, are studied.

  11. Agreement of neutrino deep inelastic scattering data with global fits of parton distributions.

    PubMed

    Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A

    2013-05-24

    The compatibility of neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering data within the universal, factorizable nuclear parton distribution functions has been studied independently by several groups in the past few years. The conclusions are contradictory, ranging from a violation of the universality up to a good agreement, most of the controversy originating from the use of the neutrino-nucleus data from the NuTeV Collaboration. Here, we pay attention to non-negligible differences in the absolute normalization between different neutrino data sets. We find that such variations are large enough to prevent a tensionless fit to all data simultaneously and could therefore misleadingly point towards nonuniversal nuclear effects. We propose a concrete method to deal with the absolute normalization and show that an agreement between independent neutrino data sets is established.

  12. D^* production in deep-inelastic scattering at low Q^2

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Inclusive production of D* mesons in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA is studied in the range 5 < Q{sup 2} < 100 GeV{sup 2} of the photon virtuality and 0.02 < y < 0.70 of the inelasticity of the scattering process. The visible range for the D* meson is p{sub T} (D*) > 1.25 GeV and |{eta}(D*)| < 1.8. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2004 to 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 347 pb{sup -1}. Single and double differential cross sections are measured. The results are compared to QCD predictions.

  13. Self Organizing Maps for use in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askanazi, Evan

    2015-04-01

    Self Organizing Maps are a type of artificial neural network that has been proven to be particularly useful in solving complex problems in neural biology, engineering, robotics and physics. We are attempting to use the Self Organizing Map to solve problems and probe phenomenological patterns in subatomic physics, specifically in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS). In DIS there is a cross section in electron hadron scattering that is dependent on the momentum fraction x of the partons in the hadron and the momentum transfer of the virtual photon exchanged. There is a soft cross part of this cross section that currently can only be found through experimentation; this soft part is comprised of Structure Functions which in turn are comprised of the Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). We aim to use the Self Organizing Process, or SOP, to take theoretical models of these PDFs and fit it to the previous, known data. The SOP will also be used to probe the behavior of the PDFs in particular at large x values, in order to observe how they congregate. The ability of the SOPto take multidimensional data and convert it into two dimensional output is anticipated to be particularly useful in achieving this aim.

  14. QCD analysis of neutrino charged current structure function F2 in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleem, M.; Aleem, F.

    1985-01-01

    An analytic expression for the neutrino charged current structure function F sub 2 (x, Q sup 2) in deep inelastic scattering, consistent with quantum chromodynamics, is proposed. The calculated results are in good agreement with experiment.

  15. Momentum space saturation model for deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive hadron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, E. A. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; de Oliveira, E. G.

    2011-08-01

    We show how the Santana Amaral-Gay Ducati-Betemps-Soyez (AGBS) model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark (and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This aspect is overcome, and a description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kinds of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agrees very well with available experimental data.

  16. Contribution of twist-3 multigluon correlation functions to single spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beppu, Hiroo; Yoshida, Shinsuke; Koike, Yuji; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2010-09-01

    As a possible source of the single transverse-spin asymmetry, we study the contribution from purely gluonic correlation represented by the twist-3 ''three-gluon correlation'' functions in the transversely polarized nucleon. We first define a complete set of the relevant three-gluon correlation functions, and then derive its contribution to the twist-3 single-spin-dependent cross section for the D-meson production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, which is relevant to determine the three-gluon correlations. Our cross-section formula differs from the corresponding result in the literature, and the origin of the discrepancy is clarified.

  17. Measurement of Charged and Neutral Current e-p Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections at High Q2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J.; Norman, D. J.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; ZajaÇ, J.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hessling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mańczak, O.; Ng, J. S.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Surrow, B.; Voss, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zhou, J. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Kharchilava, A.; Leich, A.; Mattingly, M.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Wulff, N.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Freidhof, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, J. I.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Mainusch, J.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. Y.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Blair, G. A.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Daniels, D.; Devenish, R. C.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Luffman, P. E.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Schwarzer, O.; Seifert, R. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Kochocki, J.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchuła, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Ali, I.; Badgett, W. F.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Cardy, M. L.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1995-08-01

    Deep inelastic e-p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared Q2 above 400 GeV2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections dσ/dQ2 are presented. From the Q2 dependence of the CC cross section, the mass term in the CC propagator is determined to be MW = 76+/-16+/-13 GeV.

  18. Single-spin beam asymmetry in semi-exclusive deep-inelastic electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; C. E. Carlson

    2003-05-01

    Recent measurements from Jefferson Lab show significant beam single spin asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering. The asymmetry is due to interference of longitudinal and transverse photoabsorption amplitudes which have different phases induced by the final-state interaction between the struck quark and the target spectators. We developed a dynamical model for a single-spin beam asymmetry in deep-inelastic scattering. Our results are consistent with the experimentally observed magnitude of this effect. We conclude that similar mechanisms involving quark orbital angular momentum ('Sivers effect') are responsible for both target and beam single-spin asymmetries.

  19. Combination and QCD analysis of charm production cross section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bołd, T.; Brümmer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hüttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jönsson, L.; Jüngst, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kötz, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kowalski, H.; Krämer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohmann, W.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O. Y.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Müller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Y.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pluciński, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Šálek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schönberg, V.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wünsch, E.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of open charm production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are combined. Reduced cross sections σ_red^{cbar{c}} for charm production are obtained in the kinematic range of photon virtuality 2.5≤ Q 2≤2000 GeV2 and Bjorken scaling variable 3ṡ10-5≤ x≤5ṡ10-2. The combination method accounts for the correlations of the systematic uncertainties among the different data sets. The combined charm data together with the combined inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from HERA are used as input for a detailed NLO QCD analysis to study the influence of different heavy flavour schemes on the parton distribution functions. The optimal values of the charm mass as a parameter in these different schemes are obtained. The implications on the NLO predictions for W ± and Z production cross sections at the LHC are investigated. Using the fixed flavour number scheme, the running mass of the charm quark is determined.

  20. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    DOE PAGES

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy.more » However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.« less

  1. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  2. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerν A Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5-50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x <0.1 . This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice et al. (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  3. Open charm production in deep inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order at HERA.

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B. W.

    1999-09-20

    An introduction and overview of charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA is given. The existing next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations are then reviewed, and key results are summarized. Finally, comparisons are made with the most recent HERA data, and unresolved issues are highlighted.

  4. Determination of electron-nucleus collisions geometry with forward neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, L.; Aschenauer, E.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-29

    There are a large number of physics programs one can explore in electron-nucleus collisions at a future electron-ion collider. Collision geometry is very important in these studies, while the measurement for an event-by-event geometric control is rarely discussed in the prior deep-inelastic scattering experiments off a nucleus. This paper seeks to provide some detailed studies on the potential of tagging collision geometries through forward neutron multiplicity measurements with a zero degree calorimeter. As a result, this type of geometry handle, if achieved, can be extremely beneficial in constraining nuclear effects for the electron-nucleus program at an electron-ion collider.

  5. Distorted spin dependent spectral function of {sup 3}He and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptari, Leonya P.; Del Dotto, Alessio; Pace, Emanuele; Salme, Giovanni; Scopetta, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    The spin dependent spectral function, relevant to describe polarized electron scattering off polarized {sup 3}He, is studied, within the Plane Wave Impulse Approximation and taking into account final state interaction effects (FSI). In particular, the case of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SiDIS) is considered, evaluating the FSI of the hadronizing quark with the nuclear remnants. It is shown that particular kinematical regions can be selected to minimize the latter effects, so that parton distributions in the neutron can be accessed. On the other side, in the regions where FSI dominates, the considered reactions can elucidate the mechanism of hadronization of quarks during the propagation in the nuclear medium. It is shown that the obtained spin dependent spectral function can be directly applied to investigate the SiDIS reaction e-vector + {sup 3}He-vector to h+X, where the hadron h originates from the current fragmentation. Experiments of this type are being performed at JLab to extract neutron transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. As a case study, a different SiDIS process, with detection of slow (A-1) systems in the final state, is considered in more details, in order to establish when nuclear structure effects and FSI can be distinguished from elementary reactions on quasi-free nucleons. It is argued that, by a proper choice of kinematics, the origin of nuclear effects in polarized DIS phenomena and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which is not reachable in inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

  6. Two Photon Exchange in Quasi-elastic and Deep-inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Averett, Todd D.; Katich, Joseph; Zhao Bo

    2011-10-24

    In this paper, I present an overview and preliminary results from three experiments at Jefferson Lab that were recently completed using a {sup 3}He gas target with polarization oriented normal to the scattering plane of unpolarized incident electrons. A target single spin asymmetry was formed by periodically flipping the direction of the target spin. In the reaction {up_arrow}{sup 3}He(e,e'), the Born contribution is expected to be zero, giving direct sensitivity to two photon exchange. This asymmetry was measured in the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic regimes with 0.1 < Q{sup 2} < 1.0 GeV{sup 2}. The asymmetry is predicted to decrease by two-orders of magnitude for deep-inelastic versus quasi-elastic scattering. Preliminary results from these experiments will be presented.

  7. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Diancheng

    2013-12-01

    The parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) offers us a useful tool to study the weak neutral couplings and the hadronic structure of the nucleon, and provides high precision tests on the Standard Model. During the 6 GeV PVDIS experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the parity-violating asymmetries A{sub PV} of a polarized electron beam scattering off an unpolarized deuteron target in the deep inelastic scattering region were precisely measured at two Q2 values of 1.1 and 1.9 (GeV/c)2. The asymmetry at Q2=1.9 (GeV/c)2 can be used to extract the weak coupling combination 2C2u - C2d, assuming the higher twist effect is small. The extracted result from this measurement is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, and improves the precision by a factor of five over previous data. In addition, combining the asymmetries at both Q2 values provides us extra knowledge on the higher twist effects. The parity violation asymmetries in the resonance region were also measured during this experiment. These results are the first APV data in the resonance region beyond the Δ (1232). They provide evidence that the quark hadron duality works for APV at the (10-15)% level, and set constraints on nucleon resonance models that are commonly used for background calculations to other parity-violating electron scattering measurements.

  8. Measurements of transverse momentum in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Griffioen

    2012-12-01

    With mounting experimental evidence that only a small fraction of the proton's spin comes from the spins of its quarks and gluons, the quest for orbital angular momentum has begun. The parton distributions relevant to this depend on transverse quark momenta. Recent CLAS semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements probe these new transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions using longitudinally polarized beams and targets and detecting {pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup 0} in the final state.

  9. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, [ital y][sub [ital cut

  10. Tuning of the Charged Hadrons Multiplicities for Deep Inelastic Interactions in NEUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, Christophe; Hartz, Mark

    We describe a procedure to tune the charged hadron multiplicities for deep inelastic events produced by the NEUT neutrino interaction generator. This tuning uses a model based on Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling, whose parameters are obtained by fitting multiplicity data from deuterium bubble chamber experiments. After tuning, the multiplicities of the events generated by NEUT are found to be in good agreement with the measurements from the bubble chamber experiments.

  11. Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Polifka, Richard

    2015-04-10

    The QCD factorization theorem in diffraction is tested by comparing diffractive jet production data to QCD predictions based on fits to inclusive diffractive cross section data. H1 measured dijet production with a leading proton detected in the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer (VFPS), both in deep-inelastic scattering and in photoproduction. The DIS measurements are complemented by measurements of dijet production with an associated rapidity gap and in a data sample selected with a leading proton in the Forward Proton Spectrometer (FPS)

  12. Transverse response functions in deep inelastic electron scattering for 40Ca, 48Ca, and 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziani, Z. E.; Barreau, P.; Bernheim, M.; Morgenstern, J.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Altemus, R.; McCarthy, J.; Orphanos, L. J.; Whitney, R. R.; Capitani, G. P.; de Sanctis, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.

    1985-03-01

    Deep-inelastic inclusive electron-scattering cross sections from 40Ca, 48Ca, and 56Fe have been measured at 60°, 90°, and 140° and at energy transfers including the Δ(3,3) region. The transverse response function in the momentum interval 300 MeV/c<||q-->||<600 MeV/c was extracted by the Rosenbluth prescription. Different theoretical approaches to the quasielastic region are compared to the data. A mass-number scaling is observed.

  13. Interplay of threshold resummation and hadron mass corrections in deep inelastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, Alberto; Anderle, Daniele P.; Ringer, Felix

    2015-02-01

    We discuss hadron mass corrections and threshold resummation for deep-inelastic scattering lN-->l'X and semi-inclusive annihilation e+e- → hX processes, and provide a prescription how to consistently combine these two corrections respecting all kinematic thresholds. We find an interesting interplay between threshold resummation and target mass corrections for deep-inelastic scattering at large values of Bjorken xB. In semi-inclusive annihilation, on the contrary, the two considered corrections are relevant in different kinematic regions and do not affect each other. A detailed analysis is nonetheless of interest in the light of recent high precision data from BaBar and Belle on pion and kaon production, with which we compare our calculations. For both deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive annihilation, the size of the combined corrections compared to the precision of world data is shown to be large. Therefore, we conclude that these theoretical corrections are relevant for global QCD fits in order to extract precise parton distributions at large Bjorken xB, and fragmentation functions over the whole kinematic range.

  14. Interplay of threshold resummation and hadron mass corrections in deep inelastic processes

    DOE PAGES

    Accardi, Alberto; Anderle, Daniele P.; Ringer, Felix

    2015-02-01

    We discuss hadron mass corrections and threshold resummation for deep-inelastic scattering lN-->l'X and semi-inclusive annihilation e+e- → hX processes, and provide a prescription how to consistently combine these two corrections respecting all kinematic thresholds. We find an interesting interplay between threshold resummation and target mass corrections for deep-inelastic scattering at large values of Bjorken xB. In semi-inclusive annihilation, on the contrary, the two considered corrections are relevant in different kinematic regions and do not affect each other. A detailed analysis is nonetheless of interest in the light of recent high precision data from BaBar and Belle on pion and kaonmore » production, with which we compare our calculations. For both deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive annihilation, the size of the combined corrections compared to the precision of world data is shown to be large. Therefore, we conclude that these theoretical corrections are relevant for global QCD fits in order to extract precise parton distributions at large Bjorken xB, and fragmentation functions over the whole kinematic range.« less

  15. Search for a narrow baryonic state decaying to p KS0 and p ‾ KS0 in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    A search for a narrow baryonic state in the p KS0 and p ‾ KS0 system has been performed in ep collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 358pb-1 taken in 2003-2007. The search was performed with deep inelastic scattering events at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV for exchanged photon virtuality, Q2, between 20 and 100GeV2. Contrary to evidence presented for such a state around 1.52 GeV in a previous ZEUS analysis using a sample of 121 pb-1 taken in 1996-2000, no resonance peak was found in the p (p ‾) KS0 invariant-mass distribution in the range 1.45-1.7 GeV. Upper limits on the production cross section are set.

  16. AdS Black Disk Model for Small-x Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2010-08-01

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple anti-de Sitter black disk model to describe saturation in deep inelastic scattering. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, FT˜FL˜x-ω, where ω is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio FL/FT is given by the universal value (1+ω)/(3+ω), independently of the target. For γ*-γ* scattering at high energies we obtain explicit expressions and ratios for the total cross sections of transverse and longitudinal photons in terms of the single parameter ω.

  17. Measurement of Beam-Spin Asymmetries for Deep Inelastic pi{sup +} Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    H. Avakian; Volker D. Burkert; Latifa Elouadrhiri; et. al.

    2002-12-01

    We report the first evidence for a non-zero beam-spin azimuthal asymmetry in the electroproduction of positive pions in the deep-inelastic region. Data have been obtained using a polarized electron beam of 4.3 GeV and with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The amplitude of the sin phi modulation increases with the momentum of the pion relative to the virtual photon, z, with an average amplitude of 0.038+/-0.005+/-0.003 for 0.5

  18. Jet production in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Melanson, H.L.

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of jet rates in deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The JADE algorithm is used to define jets in the kinematic region 9 < W < 33 GeV. Data taken on a proton target are analyzed within the QCD framework, with the goal of extracting [alpha][sub s]. Results on the Q[sup 2] dependence of the average transverse momentum of jets are used to demonstrate the running of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s]. In addition, first measurements of the production of jets from heavy nuclei in the region x[sub B[sub j

  19. Hadron transverse momentum distributions in muon deep inelastic scattering at 160 GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Morreale, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.-F.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2013-08-01

    Multiplicities of charged hadrons produced in deep inelastic muon scattering off a 6LiD target have been measured as a function of the DIS variables x Bj , Q 2, W 2 and the final state hadron variables p T and z. The distributions are fitted with a single exponential function at low values of to determine the dependence of on x Bj , Q 2, W 2 and z. The z-dependence of is shown to be a potential tool to extract the average intrinsic transverse momentum squared of partons, , as a function of x Bj and Q 2 in a leading order QCD parton model.

  20. Nuclear dependence of structure functions in the shadowing region of deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.; Qiu, Jianwei

    1988-07-27

    A discussion of nuclear shadowing in deep inelastic lepton scattering is presented. We show that the parton recombination model suggests that shadowing should begin to occur at larger values of Bjorken x as A increases. This expectation as well as that of weak dependence on Q/sup 2/, and the trend of the x dependence of the shadowing phenomenon are consistent with recent data. Shadowing at small x is combined with nuclear bound state effects, responsible for nuclear dependence at larger x, to provide description of the A dependence of the structure function for the entire range of x. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Deep inelastic cross-section measurements at large y with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The reduced cross sections for e+p deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different center-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. The cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q2, were obtained in the region 0.13≤y ≤0.75, where y denotes the inelasticity and 5≤Q2≤110 GeV2. The proton structure functions F2 and FL were extracted from the measured cross sections.

  2. Measurement of D*± production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-05-01

    The production of D *± mesons in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured for exchanged photon virtualities 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2, using an integrated luminosity of 363 pb-1 with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Differential cross sections have been measured and compared to next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The cross-sections are used to extract the charm contribution to the proton structure functions, expressed in terms of the reduced charm cross section, σ_{red}^{{coverline{c}}} . Theoretical calculations based on fits to inclusive HERA data are compared to the results.

  3. Quantal nucleon diffusion: Central collisions of symmetric nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayik, S.; Yilmaz, O.; Yilmaz, B.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    The quantal diffusion mechanism of nucleon exchange is studied in the central collisions of several symmetric heavy ions in the framework of the stochastic mean-field (SMF) approach. Since, at bombarding energies below the fusion barrier, dinuclear structure is maintained, it is possible to describe nucleon exchange as a diffusion process familiar from deep-inelastic collisions. Quantal diffusion coefficients, including memory effects, for proton and neutron exchanges are extracted microscopically employing the SMF approach. The quantal calculations of neutron and proton variances are compared with the semiclassical results.

  4. Polarized Electron - Polarized Deuteron Deep-Inelastic Scattering in Electron-Ion Collider with Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsian, Misak; Cosyn, Wim; Weiss, Christian

    2015-10-01

    For the past several years there have been an intensive research and development for the possible electron-ion collider that will be able to probe deep inelastic processes at unprecedentedly high energies in eA channel. One of the important advantages of the collider kinematics in DIS processes is the possibility for an unambiguous separation of hadrons emerging from DIS and hadrons fragmenting from the target nucleus. This creates a unique possibility for tagging the interacting nucleon with the recoil slow fragments in the DIS process. The situation is most clean for the deuteron target in which case the recoil particle is a nucleon. In addition, the possibility of having polarized deuteron beams will create unprecedented opportunities in probing polarization degrees of freedom for parton distributions in the interacting bound nucleon. In this work we develop a theoretical framework for the polarized electron-polarized deuteron deep inelastic scattering in which the recoil nucleon is detected in the target fragmentation region. Two main contributions for which theoretical models are developed are the plane-wave impulse approximation, in which no reinteractions are taking place between the final state products of DIS and the recoil nucleon.

  5. Single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and Drell-Yan processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Hwang, Dae Sung; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Schmidt, Ivan; Sievert, Matthew D.

    2013-07-01

    We examine in detail the diagrammatic mechanisms which provide the change of sign between the single transverse spin asymmetries measured in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and in the Drell-Yan process (DY). This asymmetry is known to arise due to the transverse spin dependence of the target proton combined with a T-odd complex phase. Using the discrete symmetry properties of transverse spinors, we show that the required complex phase originates in the denominators of rescattering diagrams and their respective cuts. For simplicity, we work in a model where the proton consists of a valence quark and a scalar diquark. We then show that the phases generated in SIDIS and in DY originate from distinctly different cuts in the amplitudes, which at first appears to obscure the relationship between the single-spin asymmetries in the two processes. Nevertheless, further analysis demonstrates that the contributions of these cuts are identical in the leading-twist Bjorken kinematics considered, resulting in the standard sign-flip relation between the Sivers functions in SIDIS and DY. Physically, this fundamental, but yet untested, prediction occurs because the Sivers effect in the Drell-Yan reaction is modified by the initial-state “lensing” interactions of the annihilating antiquark, in contrast to the final-state lensing which produces the Sivers effect in deep inelastic scattering.

  6. First search for the EMC effect and nuclear shadowing in neutrino nucleus deep inelastic scattering at MINERVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Joel A.

    Decades of research in electron-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS) have provided a clear picture of nuclear physics at high momentum transfer. While these effects have been clearly demonstrated by experiment, the theoretical explanation of their origin in some kinematic regions has been lacking. Particularly, the effects in the intermediate regions of Bjorken-x, anti-shadowing and the EMC effect have no universally accepted quantum mechanical explanation. In addition, these effects have not been measured systematically with neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering, due to experiments lacking multiple heavy targets. The MINERνA (Main Injector Experiment ν-A) experiment, located in the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermilab, is designed explicitly to measure these kind of effects with neutrinos. MINEνA is equipped with solid targets of graphite, iron, lead and plastic scintillator. The plastic scintillator region provides excellent particle tracking capabilities, and the MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) near detector is used as a downstream muon spectrometer. The exposure of multiple nuclear targets to an identical neutrino beam allows for a systematic study of these nuclear effects. An analysis of the MINERνA DIS data on carbon, iron, lead and plastic scintillator has been conducted in the energy region 5 ≤ E ν < 50 GeV and thetamu < 17°. The data are presented as ratios of the total cross section (sigma(E ν)) as well as the differential cross section with respect to Bjorken-x (dsigma/dxbj) of carbon, iron and lead to scintillator. The total cross section data is useful for deciphering gross nuclear effects which effect neutrino energy reconstruction. No significant differences between simulation and MINνA DIS data are observed in the total cross section. The ratios of the xbj differential ratios however, may provide clues for decoding long standing questions about the EMC effect. The MINERνA data tend to

  7. First Search for the EMC Effect and Nuclear Shadowing in Neutrino Nucleus Deep Inelastic Scattering at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research in electron-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS) have provided a clear picture of nuclear physics at high momentum transfer. While these effects have been clearly demonstrated by experiment, the theoretical explanation of their origin in some kinematic regions has been lacking. Particularly, the effects in the intermediate regions of Bjorken-x, anti-shadowing and the EMC effect have no universally accepted quantum mechanical explanation. In addition, these effects have not been measured systematically with neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering, due to experiments lacking multiple heavy targets.

  8. Single and Double Spin Asymmetries for Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on Proton and Deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, Suman; Kuhn, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions encode information on the transverse motion of quarks and gluons inside the nucleon, and may help us understand their orbital angular momentum. The TMDs can be accessed from the target and double spin asymmetries of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) reactions, where the asymmetries, AUL and ALL are convolutions of the fragmentation functions and the TMDs. The EG1-DVCS experiment with CLAS at Jefferson Lab measured semi-inclusive pion production on longitudinally polarized proton and deuteron targets with polarized electrons of 6 GeV. We will show preliminary results on target single spin asymmetries and target-beam double spin asymmetries for these reactions.

  9. New measurement of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross sections at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picuric, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    A combined measurement is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised e±p scattering at HERA. The H1 and ZEUS collaborations collected total integrated luminosities of approximately 500 pb-1 each, divided about equally between e+p and e-p scattering. They include data taken at electron (positron) beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV corresponding to centre-of-mass energy of 320, 300, 251 and 225 GeV respectively. This enabled the two collaborations to explore a large phase space in Bjorken x and negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2. The combination method takes the correlations of the systematic uncertainties into account, resulting in improved accuracy.

  10. Jet production in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Melanson, H.L.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of jet rates in deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The JADE algorithm is used to define jets in the kinematic region 9 < W < 33 GeV. Data taken on a proton target are analyzed within the QCD framework, with the goal of extracting {alpha}{sub s}. Results on the Q{sup 2} dependence of the average transverse momentum of jets are used to demonstrate the running of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. In addition, first measurements of the production of jets from heavy nuclei in the region x{sub B{sub j}} > 0.001 are discussed. Initial results indicate a suppression in the rate of two forward jets in carbon, calcium and lead as compared to deuterium. All results presented are preliminary.

  11. Measurement of azimuthal hadron asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off unpolarised nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joerg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Orlov, I.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rychter, A.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szableski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2014-09-01

    Spin-averaged asymmetries in the azimuthal distributions of positive and negative hadrons produced in deep inelastic scattering were measured using the CERN SPS longitudinally polarised muon beam at 160 GeV/c and a 6LiD target. The amplitudes of the three azimuthal modulations cos⁡ϕh, cos⁡2ϕh and sin⁡ϕh were obtained binning the data separately in each of the relevant kinematic variables x, z or pTh and binning in a three-dimensional grid of these three variables. The amplitudes of the cos⁡ϕh and cos⁡2ϕh modulations show strong kinematic dependencies both for positive and negative hadrons.

  12. Deep inelastic separated response functions from 40Ca and 48Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deady, M.; Williamson, C. F.; Zimmerman, P. D.; Altemus, R.; Whitney, R. R.

    1986-06-01

    Deep inelastic scattering cross sections have been measured for 40Ca and 48Ca at electron energies between 100 and 375 MeV at scattering angles of 90° and 140°. Longitudinal and transverse response functions at three-momentum transfers between 250 and 410 MeV/c have been extracted using a Rosenbluth separation. The response functions are compared to calculations modeling the nucleus as a noninteracting relativistic Fermi gas. The model is found to agree with the observed transverse response function in the region of expected quasi-free nucleon knockout, but the model overestimates the observed longitudinal response. Comparisons of the response functions of the two isotopes are made, and differences between 40Ca and 48Ca are seen.

  13. Measurement of isolated photons accompanied by jets in deep inelastic ep scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-08-01

    The production of isolated high-energy photons accompanied by jets has been measured in deep inelastic ep scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA, using an integrated luminosity of 326 pb. Measurements were made for exchanged photon virtualities, Q2, in the range 10 to 350 GeV. The photons were measured in the transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 4

  14. Measurement of D ± production in deep inelastic ep scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-05-01

    Charm production in deep inelastic ep scattering was measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. Charm quarks were identified by reconstructing D ± mesons in the D ± → K ∓π±π± decay channel. Lifetime information was used to reduce combinatorial background substantially. Differential cross sections were measured in the kinematic region 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2, 0 .02 < y < 0 .7, 1 .5 < p T ( D ±) < 15 GeV and | η( D ±)| < 1 .6, where Q 2 is the photon virtuality, y is the inelasticity, and p T ( D ±) and η( D ±) are the transverse momentum and the pseudorapidity of the D ± meson, respectively. Next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the data. The charm contribution, F_2^{{coverline{c}}} , to the proton structure-function F 2 was extracted.

  15. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e^± p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 372 pb^{-1}. The measurement was performed for γ ^{*}- p centre-of-mass energies in the range 90< W < {250} {GeV} and for photon virtualities Q^2 > {25} {GeV2}. Energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ , where β =x/x_IP, x is the Bjorken variable and x_IP is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ ^{*}-dijet plane and the γ ^{*}-e^± plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β . The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  16. The Dynamical Dipole Radiation in Dissipative Collisions with Exotic Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, M.; Colonna, M.; Rizzo, C.; Baran, V.

    Heavy Ion Collisions (HIC) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation. In this work we present a selection of reaction observables in dissipative collisions particularly sensitive to the isovector part of the interaction, i.e. to the symmetry term of the nuclear Equation of State (EoS). At low energies the behavior of the symmetry energy around saturation influences dissipation and fragment production mechanisms. We will first discuss the recently observed Dynamical Dipole Radiation, due to a collective neutron-proton oscillation during the charge equilibration in fusion and deep-inelastic collisions. We will review in detail all the main properties, yield, spectrum, damping and angular distributions, revealing important isospin effects. Reactions induced by unstable 132Sn beams appear to be very promising tools to test the sub-saturation Isovector EoS. Predictions are also presented for deep-inelastic and fragmentation collisions induced by neutron rich projectiles. The importance of studying violent collisions with radioactive beams at low and Fermi energies is finally stressed.

  17. Nucleon-nucleon correlations and multiquark cluster effects in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton scattering off

    SciTech Connect

    Simula, S.

    1994-04-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton scattering off nuclei is investigated assuming that virtual boson absorption occurs on a hadronic cluster which can be either a two-nucleon correlated pair or a six-quark bag. The differences in the energy distribution of nucleons produced in backward and forward directions are analyzed both at x<1 and x>1.

  18. Light-particle emission as a probe of the rotational degrees of freedom in deep-inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L.G.

    1982-05-01

    The emission of alpha particles in coincidence with the most deeply inelastic heavy-ion reactions has been studied for /sup 181/Ta/sup +/ /sup 165/Ho at 1354 MeV laboratory energy and /sup nat/Ag + /sup 84/Kr at 664 MeV. Alpha particle energy spectra and angular distributions, in coincidence with a projectile-like fragment, were acquired both in the reaction plane and out of the reaction plane at a fixed in-plane angle. The in-plane data for both systems are employed to show that the bulk of the alpha particles in coincidence with the deep-inelastic exit channel can be explained by evaporation from the fully accelerated fragments. Average velocity diagrams, ..cap alpha..-particle energy spectra as a function of angle in several rest frames, and ..cap alpha..-particle angular distributions are presented. The out-of-plane alpha particle angular distributions and the gamma-ray multiplicities are used to study the transfer and partitioning of angular momentum between the two fragments. For the /sup nat/Ag + /sup 84/Kr system, individual fragment spins are extracted form the alpha particle angular distributions as a function of mass asymmetry while the sum of the fragment spins is derived from the gamma-ray multiplicities. These data, together with the fragment kinetic energies, are consistent with rigid rotation of an intermediate complex consisting of two substantially deformed spheroids in near proximity. These data also indicate that some angular momentum fractionation exists at the largest asymmetries examined. Out-of-plane alpha particle distributions, gamma-ray multiplicities, fragment spins as well as the formalism for the spin evaluation at various levels of sophistication are presented.

  19. Transverse Spin Structure of the Nucleon through Target Single Spin Asymmetry in Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic $(e,e^\\prime \\pi^\\pm)$ Reaction at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H; Chen, J -P; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Huang, M; Afanasev, A; Anselmino, M; Avakian, H; Cates, G; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; de Jager, C; Garibaldi, F; Hu, B T; Jiang, X; Kumar, K S; Li, X M; Lu, H J; Meziani, Z -E; Ma, B -Q; Mao, Y J; Peng, J -C; Prokudin, A; Schlegel, M; Souder, P; Xiao, Z G; Ye, Y; Zhu, L

    2011-01-01

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV energy upgrade provides a golden opportunity to perform precision studies of the transverse spin and transverse-momentum-dependent structure in the valence quark region for both the proton and the neutron. In this paper, we focus our discussion on a recently approved experiment on the neutron as an example of the precision studies planned at JLab. The new experiment will perform precision measurements of target Single Spin Asymmetries (SSA) from semi-inclusive electro-production of charged pions from a 40-cm long transversely polarized $^3$He target in Deep-Inelastic-Scattering kinematics using 11 and 8.8 GeV electron beams. This new coincidence experiment in Hall A will employ a newly proposed solenoid spectrometer (SoLID). The large acceptance spectrometer and the high polarized luminosity will provide precise 4-D ($x$, $z$, $P_T$ and $Q^2$) data on the Collins, Sivers, and pretzelocity asymmetries for the neutron through the azimuthal angular dependence. The full 2$\\pi$ azimuthal angular coverage in the lab is essential in controlling the systematic uncertainties. The results from this experiment, when combined with the proton Collins asymmetry measurement and the Collins fragmentation function determined from the e$^+$e$^-$ collision data, will allow for a quark flavor separation in order to achieve a determination of the tensor charge of the d quark to a 10% accuracy. The extracted Sivers and pretzelocity asymmetries will provide important information to understand the correlations between the quark orbital angular momentum and the nucleon spin and between the quark spin and nucleon spin.

  20. Parity Violating Deep Inelastic Electron Scattering from the Deuteron at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kai

    2013-02-01

    An experiment that measured the parity violating (PV) asymmetry Ad in e-2H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at Q2 ~ 1.10 and 1.90 (GeV/c)2 and xB ~ 0.3 was completed in experimental Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The asymmetry can be used to extract the neutral weak coupling combination (2C2u-C2d), providing a factor of five to six improvement over the current world data. To achieve this precision, asymmetries of the 10-4 level needed to be measured at event rates up to 500 kHz with high electron detection efficiency and high pion background rejection capability. A specialized scaler-based counting data acquisition system (DAQ) with hardware-based particle identification was successfully implemented. The statistical quality of the asymmetry measurement agreed with the Gaussian distribution to over five orders of magnitudes and the experimental goal of 3-4% statistical uncertainty was achieved. The design and performance of the new DAQ system is presented with the preliminary asymmetry results given in the end.

  1. Multiplicities of charged kaons from deep-inelastic muon scattering off an isoscalar target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N. V.; Anosov, V.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O. M.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G. V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Roskot, M.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Thiel, A.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2017-04-01

    Precise measurements of charged-kaon multiplicities in deep inelastic scattering were performed. The results are presented in three-dimensional bins of the Bjorken scaling variable x, the relative virtual-photon energy y, and the fraction z of the virtual-photon energy carried by the produced hadron. The data were obtained by the COMPASS Collaboration by scattering 160 GeV muons off an isoscalar 6LiD target. They cover the kinematic domain 1(GeV / c) 2 5 GeV /c2 in the invariant mass of the hadronic system. The results from the sum of the z-integrated K+ and K- multiplicities at high x point to a value of the non-strange quark fragmentation function larger than obtained by the earlier DSS fit.

  2. Simulator for the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering experiment in the Solenoidal Large Intensity Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jack; Hall A SoLID Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Solenoid Large Intensity Detector (SoLID) particle detector is the main detector that will be used for high energy particle experiments in Hall A that will be used with the 12 GeV electron beam at the Jefferson Lab. SoLID geometries were writen to be implemented in Geant4 using openGL as the visualization tool. This will allow us to test how the calorimeter, a specific yet integral part of the SoLID detector, detects the particles that result from electron beams colliding with targets. The goal is to simulate the approved experiments for the SoLID detector, starting with the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment. This will provide critical information regarding the effectiveness of the calorimeter's design for such experiments. The expectation is that a Shashlik calorimeter will prove effective for the experiments approved for the SoLID detector. The ideal number of layers, or types of material for said layers, is an aspect of the calorimeter that will require testing through the simulations.The geometry files allow an easily-packaged program that can be shared amongst any collaborators interested in the SoLID experiments. NSF Grant No. 714001.

  3. Ordered analysis of heavy flavor production in deep-inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. S.; Roberts, R. G.

    1998-06-01

    At low Q2, charm production in deep-inelastic scattering is adequately described by assuming generation in electroweak boson-light parton scattering (dominantly boson-gluon fusion), which naturally incorporates the correct threshold behavior. At high Q2 this description is inadequate, since it does not sum logs in Q2/m2c, and is replaced by the treatment of the charm quark as a light parton. We show how the problem of going from one description to the other can be solved in a satisfactory manner to all orders. The key ingredient is the constraint of matching the evolution of the physical structure function F2 order by order in αs(Q2), in addition, to the matching of the value of F2 itself. This leads to new expressions for the coefficient functions associated with the charm parton, which are unique in incorporating both the correct threshold and asymptotic behaviors at each order in perturbation theory. The use of these improved coefficients leads to an improvement in global fits and an excellent description of the observed F2,charm.

  4. Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron

    DOE PAGES

    Cosyn, Wim; Melnitchouk, Wally; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2014-01-16

    We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~<2 GeV and a continuum contribution for larger W as the relevant set of effective hadron states entering the final-state interaction amplitude. The results show sizeable on-shell FSI contributions for Bjorken x ~> 0.6 andmore » Q2 < 10 GeV2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.« less

  5. Longitudinal-Transverse Separation of Deep-Inelastic Scattering at Low Q² on Nucleons and Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tvaskis, Vladas

    2004-12-06

    Since the early experiments at SLAC, which discovered the nucleon substructure and led to the development of the quark parton model, deep inelastic scattering (DIS) has been the most powerful tool to investigate the partonic substructure of the nucleon. After about 30 years of experiments with electron and muon beams the nucleon structure function F2(x,Q2) is known with high precision over about four orders of magnitude in x and Q2. In the region of Q2 > 1 (GeV/c)2 the results of the DIS measurements are interpreted in terms of partons (quarks and gluons). The theoretical framework is provided in this case by perturbative Quantum Chromo Dynamics (pQCD), which includes scaling violations, as described by the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equations. The description starts to fail when Q2 becomes of the order of 1 (GeV/c)2, where non-perturbative effects (higher-twist effects), which are still not fully understood, become important (non-pQCD). The sensitivity for order-n twist effects increases with decreasing Q2, since they include a factor 1/(Q2n) (n ≥ 1).

  6. Electroweak higher-order effects and theoretical uncertainties in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, K.-P.O.; Dittmaier, S.; Hollik, W.

    2005-11-01

    A previous calculation of electroweak O({alpha}) corrections to deep-inelastic neutrino scattering, as e.g. measured by NuTeV and NOMAD, is supplemented by higher-order effects. In detail, we take into account universal two-loop effects from {delta}{alpha} and {delta}{rho} as well as higher-order final-state photon radiation off muons in the structure function approach. Moreover, we make use of the recently released O({alpha})-improved parton distributions MRST2004QED and identify the relevant QED factorization scheme, which is DIS-like. As a technical by-product, we describe slicing and subtraction techniques for an efficient calculation of a new type of real corrections that are induced by the generated photon distribution. A numerical discussion of the higher-order effects suggests that the remaining theoretical uncertainty from unknown electroweak corrections is dominated by nonuniversal two-loop effects and is of the order 0.0003 when translated into a shift in sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}=1-M{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub Z}{sup 2}. The O({alpha}) corrections implicitly included in the parton distributions lead to a shift of about 0.0004.

  7. Measurement of the diffractive structure function in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Norman, D. J. P.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Capua, M.; Garfagnini, A.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarębska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zając, J.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Große-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mainusch, J.; Mańczak, O.; Monteiro, T.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Surrow, B.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zhou, J. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Kharchilava, A.; Leich, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Wulff, N.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Freidhof, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, J. I.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. Y. H.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P. O.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Fernandez, J. P.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Martinez, M.; Del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Tickner, J. R.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Waters, D. S.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Schwarzer, O.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchula, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Ali, I.; Badgett, W. F.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Cardy, M. L.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the inclusive properties of diffractive deep inelastic scattering events produced in ep interactions at HERA. The events are characterised by a rapidity gap between the outgoing proton system and the remaining hadronic system. Inclusive distributions are presented and compared with Monte Carlo models for diffractive processes. The data are consistent with models where the pomeron structure function has a hard and a soft contribution. The diffractive structure function is measured as a function of x ℙ, the momentum fraction lost by the proton, of β, the momentum fraction of the struck quark with respect to x ℙ, and of Q 2 in the range 6.3·10-4< x ℙ <10-2, 0.1<β<0.8 and 8< Q 2<100 GeV2. The dependence is consistent with the form x ℙ where a=1.30±0.08(stat) {-0.14/+0.08} (sys) in all bins of β and Q 2. In the measured Q 2 range, the diffractive structure function approximately scales with Q 2 at fixed β. In an Ingelman-Schlein type model, where commonly used pomeron flux factor normalisations are assumed, it is found that the quarks within the pomeron do not saturate the momentum sum rule.

  8. Final-State Interactions and Single-Spin Asymmetries in Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Hwang, Dae Sung; Schmidt, Ivan; /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso

    2007-11-14

    Recent measurements from the HERMES and SMC collaborations show a remarkably large azimuthal single-spin asymmetries A{sub UL} and A{sub UT} of the proton in semi-inclusive pion leptoproduction {gamma}*(q)p {yields} {pi}X. We show that final-state interactions from gluon exchange between the outgoing quark and the target spectator system leads to single-spin asymmetries in deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering at leading twist in perturbative QCD; i.e., the rescattering corrections are not power-law suppressed at large photon virtuality q{sup 2} at fixed x{sub bj}. The existence of such single-spin asymmetries requires a phase difference between two amplitudes coupling the proton target with J{sup z}{sub p} = {+-}1/2 to the same final-state, the same amplitudes which are necessary to produce a nonzero proton anomalous magnetic moment. We show that the exchange of gauge particles between the outgoing quark and the proton spectators produces a Coulomb-like complex phase which depends on the angular momentum L{sup z} of the proton's constituents and thus is distinct for different proton spin amplitudes. The single-spin asymmetry which arises from such final-state interactions does not factorize into a product of structure function and fragmentation function, and it is not related to the transversity distribution {delta}q(x;Q) which correlates transversely polarized quarks with the spin of the transversely polarized target nucleon.

  9. Polarised Parton Densities from the Fits to the Deep Inelastic Spin Asymmetries on Nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelski, Jan; Tatur, Stanislaw

    2001-07-01

    We have updated our next to leading order QCD fit for polarised parton densities [S. Tatur, J. Bartelski, M. Kurzela, Acta Phys. Pol. B31, 647 (2000)] using recent experimental data on the deep inelastic spin asymmetries on nucleons. Our distributions have functional form inspired by the unpolarised ones given by MRST (Martin, Roberts, Stirling and Thorne) fit. In addition to usually used data sample (averaged over variable Q2 for the same value of x variable) we have also considered the points with the same x and different Q2. Our fits to both groups of data give very similar results with substantial antiquark contribution in the measured region of x. In the first case we get rather small (Δ G=0.31) gluon polarisation. For the non averaged data the best fit is obtained when gluon contribution vanishes at Q2=1GeV2. Our new parametrisation of parton densities and additional experimental data taken into account do not change much our previous results.

  10. Triple gluon coupling, Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly, and polarized deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, C.S.; Li, B.A.

    1980-05-01

    An unusual effect of triple gluon coupling and the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly on the flavor singlet part of the polaried deep inelastic scattering structure function ..nu..G/sub 1/(Q/sup 2/,x) are discussed. Namely, the x-integral I/sub S/(Q/sup 2/) of this function is Q/sup 2/-independent both in parton model and leading logarithm calculations, but the first order nonleading logarithm calculation produces a term growing like (-lnlnQ/sup 2/), dominating over the parton model contributions at large Q/sup 2/. The detection of this unusual term will amount to an experimental confirmation of the existence of triple gluon coupling and the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly. Technically, this term comes from a new axial vector gluon operator which is introduced in the Wilson expansion. Other results of this paper include a discussion of mass-sensitive and mass-insensitive structure functions and the derivation of the expression for, and the relations between, some of these structure functions.

  11. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarized positron beam at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarized positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections dσ/dQ2, dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the reduced cross section σ˜ are measured in the kinematic region Q2>185GeV2 and y<0.9, where Q2 is the four-momentum transfer squared, x the Bjorken scaling variable and y the inelasticity of the interaction. The measurements are performed separately for positively and negatively polarized positron beams. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 135.5pb-1 collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007 at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F˜3 and F3γZ are determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

  12. CT14QED parton distribution functions from isolated photon production in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Pumplin, Jon; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the implementation of quantum electrodynamic (QED) evolution at leading order (LO) along with quantum chromodynamic (QCD) evolution at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the CTEQ-TEA global analysis package. The inelastic contribution to the photon parton distribution function (PDF) is described by a two-parameter ansatz, coming from radiation off the valence quarks, and based on the CT14 NLO PDFs. Setting the two parameters to be equal allows us to completely specify the inelastic photon PDF in terms of the inelastic momentum fraction carried by the photon, p0γ, at the initial scale Q0=1.295 GeV . We obtain constraints on the photon PDF by comparing with ZEUS data [S. Chekanov et al. (ZEUS Collaboration), Phys. Lett. B 687, 16 (2010)] on the production of isolated photons in deep inelastic scattering, e p →e γ +X . For this comparison we present a new perturbative calculation of the process that consistently combines the photon-initiated contribution with the quark-initiated contribution. Comparison with the data allows us to put a constraint at the 90% confidence level of p0γ≲0.14 % for the inelastic photon PDF at the initial scale of Q0=1.295 GeV in the one-parameter radiative ansatz. The resulting inelastic CT14QED PDFs will be made available to the public. In addition, we also provide CT14QEDinc PDFs, in which the inclusive photon PDF at the scale Q0 is defined by the sum of the inelastic photon PDF and the elastic photon distribution obtained from the equivalent photon approximation.

  13. Theoretical studies of molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) total integral reactive cross sections and vibrationally resolved reaction probabilities for F + H2 = HF + H; (2) a theoretical study of inelastic O + N2 collisions; (3) body frame close coupling wave packet approach to gas phase atom-rigit rotor inelastic collisions; (4) wave packet study of gas phase atom-rigit motor scattering; (5) the application of optical potentials for reactive scattering; (6) time dependent, three dimensional body frame quantal wave packet treatment of the H + H2 exchange reaction; (7) a time dependent wave packet approach to atom-diatom reactive collision probabilities; (8) time dependent wave packet for the complete determination of s-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions; (9) a comparison of three time dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron-atom elastic scattering cross sections; and (10) a numerically exact full wave packet approach to molecule-surface scattering.

  14. Measurement of Single and Double Spin Asymmetries in Deep Inelastic Pion Electroproduction with a Longitudinally Polarized Target

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, H; Bosted, P; Elouadrhiri, L; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Crabb, D; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; DeVita, R; DeSanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Dhamija, S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; Eugenio, P; Fegan, S; Fersch, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S S; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal,; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Konczykowski, P; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McCracken, M E; McKInnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niroula, M R; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Perrin, Y; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Protopopescu; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stapanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2010-12-01

    We report the first measurement of the transverse momentum dependence of double spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of pions in deep inelastic scattering off the longitudinally polarized proton. Data have been obtained using a polarized electron beam of 5.7 GeV with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). A significant non-zero $\\sin2\\phi$ single spin asymmetry was also observed for the first time indicating strong spin-orbit correlations for transversely polarized quarks in the longitudinally polarized proton. The azimuthal modulations of single spin asymmetries have been measured over a wide kinematic range.

  15. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  16. From simple to complex reactions: Nuclear collisions near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1992-12-01

    Collisions between two heavy nuclei produce a diverse spectrum of reaction modes which is much wider than that observed in light ion studies. For the latter case, two processes are observed: direct reactions and compound nucleus formation. Heavy ion reaction studies on the other hand have identified additional processes such as deep-inelastic scattering, incomplete fusion and quasi-fission reactions. While the boundaries between the various processes are usually not well defined, it is generally accepted that with increasing overlap of the two nuclei the interaction evolves from distant collisions where only elastic scattering and Coulomb excitation processes occur, through grazing-type collisions associated with quasi-elastic reactions to deep-inelastic and fusion-fission processes requiring a substantial nuclear overlap. Varying the bombarding energy is a convenient way to change the overlap of the two nuclei. Measurements of excitation functions can thus probe the onset and the interplay of the various reaction modes. Experiments at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier are particularly suited for comparisons with theoretical predictions since the small number of degrees of freedom involved in the interaction greatly simplifies the calculations. In the first part of this contribution a short overview is given on the status of heavy ion reaction studies at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In the second part two experiments, one involving simple and the other studying complex reactions, are discussed in more detail.

  17. From simple to complex reactions: Nuclear collisions near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    Collisions between two heavy nuclei produce a diverse spectrum of reaction modes which is much wider than that observed in light ion studies. For the latter case, two processes are observed: direct reactions and compound nucleus formation. Heavy ion reaction studies on the other hand have identified additional processes such as deep-inelastic scattering, incomplete fusion and quasi-fission reactions. While the boundaries between the various processes are usually not well defined, it is generally accepted that with increasing overlap of the two nuclei the interaction evolves from distant collisions where only elastic scattering and Coulomb excitation processes occur, through grazing-type collisions associated with quasi-elastic reactions to deep-inelastic and fusion-fission processes requiring a substantial nuclear overlap. Varying the bombarding energy is a convenient way to change the overlap of the two nuclei. Measurements of excitation functions can thus probe the onset and the interplay of the various reaction modes. Experiments at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier are particularly suited for comparisons with theoretical predictions since the small number of degrees of freedom involved in the interaction greatly simplifies the calculations. In the first part of this contribution a short overview is given on the status of heavy ion reaction studies at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In the second part two experiments, one involving simple and the other studying complex reactions, are discussed in more detail.

  18. Transverse momentum broadening in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian; Xing, Hongxi

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of higher-twist collinear factorization, transverse momentum broadening for the final hadrons in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic e +A collisions is studied at the next-to-leading order (NLO) in perturbative QCD. Through explicit calculations of real and virtual corrections at twist 4, the transverse-momentum-weighted differential cross section due to double scattering is shown to factorize at NLO and can be expressed as a convolution of twist-4 nuclear parton correlation functions, the usual twist-2 fragmentation functions and hard parts which are finite and free of any divergences. A QCD evolution equation is also derived for the renormalized twist-4 quark-gluon correlation function which can be applied to future phenomenological studies of transverse momentum broadening and jet quenching at NLO.

  19. Experimental studies of N/Z equilibration in peripheral collisions using fragment yield ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Keksis, A. L.; May, L. W.; Kohley, Z.; Soisson, S. N.; Stein, B. C.; Wuenschel, S.; Yennello, S. J.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Galanopoulos, S.; Shetty, D. V.; Tripathi, R.; Li, B. A.

    2010-05-15

    Peripheral collisions of {sup 40}Ca and {sup 48}Ca projectiles at 32 MeV/nucleon on {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn targets were studied in this work. The fragments of the projectile-like source (quasiprojectile) were collected with a charged-particle multidetector array. The average value of the neutron-to-proton ratio N/Z of the quasiprojectiles formed in the reactions was determined with two approaches. The first is a direct reconstruction approach using isotopically resolved fragments and is hindered by undetected neutrons leading to lower N/Z values. The second approach, based on the assumption of early fragment formation, employs yield ratios of fragment isobars and is not hindered by undetected neutrons. Using this approach, the amount of N/Z mixing that occurred in the quasiprojectiles (compared to a fully N/Z equilibrated system) was found to be approximately 53%. The experimental results were compared with model calculations. First, the phenomenological DIT (deep inelastic transfer) model was used, followed by the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). The results of these calculations are in close agreement with the data and indicate that the mean number of undetected neutrons increases with the N/Z of the composite system, accounting for the difference observed between the two approaches of quasiprojectile N/Z determination. Second, the microscopic transport model IBUU (isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck) was employed, providing preliminary results in reasonable agreement with the data. The determination of the degree of N/Z equilibration employing the present fragment yield ratio approach may provide a valuable probe to study the isospin part of the nuclear equation of state in conjunction with detailed microscopic models of the collisions in the Fermi energy regime.

  20. Next-to-leading order transverse momentum-weighted Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering: The role of the three-gluon correlator

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Ling -Yun; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Prokudin, Alexei; ...

    2015-12-22

    Here, we study the Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering. We concentrate on the contribution from the photon-gluon fusion channel at O(αem2αs), where three-gluon correlation functions play a major role within the twist-3 collinear factorization formalism. We establish the correspondence between such a formalism with three-gluon correlation functions and the usual transverse momentum-dependent (TMD) factorization formalism at moderate hadron transverse momenta. We derive the coefficient functions used in the usual TMD evolution formalism related to the quark Sivers function expansion in terms of the three-gluon correlation functions. We further perform the next-to-leading order calculation for themore » transverse momentum-weighted spin-dependent differential cross section and identify the off-diagonal contribution from the three-gluon correlation functions to the QCD collinear evolution of the twist-3 Qiu-Sterman function.« less

  1. Measurement of the cross section ratio σψ(2S)/σJ/ψ(1S) in deep inelastic exclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciborowsk, Jacek

    2016-11-01

    The exclusive deep inelastic electroproduction of ψ (2S) and J/ψ (1S) at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 317 GeV has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the kinematic range 2 < Q2 < 80 GeV2, 30 < W < 210 GeV and |t| < 1 GeV2, where Q2 is the photon virtuality, W is the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy and t is the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex. The data for 2 < Q2 < 5 GeV2 were taken in the HERAI running period and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 114 pb-1. The data for 5 < Q2 < 80 GeV2 are from both HERAI and HERAII periods and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 468 pb-1. The decay modes analysed were μ+ μ- and J/ψ (1S) π+ π- for the ψ (2S) and μ+ μ- for the J/ψ(1S). The cross-section ratio σψ(2S)/σJ/ψ(1S) has been measured as a function of Q2; W and t. The results are compared to predictions of QCD-inspired models of exclusive vector-meson production.

  2. Next-to-leading order transverse momentum-weighted Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering: The role of the three-gluon correlator

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ling -Yun; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Prokudin, Alexei; Vitev, Ivan

    2015-12-22

    Here, we study the Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering. We concentrate on the contribution from the photon-gluon fusion channel at O(αem2αs), where three-gluon correlation functions play a major role within the twist-3 collinear factorization formalism. We establish the correspondence between such a formalism with three-gluon correlation functions and the usual transverse momentum-dependent (TMD) factorization formalism at moderate hadron transverse momenta. We derive the coefficient functions used in the usual TMD evolution formalism related to the quark Sivers function expansion in terms of the three-gluon correlation functions. We further perform the next-to-leading order calculation for the transverse momentum-weighted spin-dependent differential cross section and identify the off-diagonal contribution from the three-gluon correlation functions to the QCD collinear evolution of the twist-3 Qiu-Sterman function.

  3. Measurement of the cross-section ratio σψ(2S)/σJ/ψ(1S) in deep inelastic exclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    The exclusive deep inelastic electroproduction of ψ (2 S) and J / ψ (1 S) at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 317 GeV has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the kinematic range 2

  4. Multiplicities of charged pions and charged hadrons from deep-inelastic scattering of muons off an isoscalar target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alexeev, M. G.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N. V.; Anosov, V.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O. M.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuhn, R.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G. V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Montuenga, P.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Roskot, M.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiplicities of charged pions and charged hadrons produced in deep-inelastic scattering were measured in three-dimensional bins of the Bjorken scaling variable x, the relative virtual-photon energy y and the relative hadron energy z. Data were obtained by the COMPASS Collaboration using a 160GeV muon beam and an isoscalar target (6LiD). They cover the kinematic domain in the photon virtuality Q2 > 1(GeV / c) 2, 0.004 < x < 0.4, 0.2 < z < 0.85 and 0.1 < y < 0.7. In addition, a leading-order pQCD analysis was performed using the pion multiplicity results to extract quark fragmentation functions.

  5. First measurement of unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from a 3He target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, C.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liu, T.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H.-J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J.-C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L.-G.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wang, Y.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) differential cross sections in 3He(e ,e'π±)X have been measured for the first time in Jefferson Lab experiment E06-010 with a 5.9 GeV e- beam on a 3He gas target. The experiment focuses on the valence quark region, covering a kinematic range 0.12

  6. Combination of differential D∗± cross-section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Buniatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Avila, K. B. Cantun; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Figiel, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hladky, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Morozov, A.; Muhammad Nasir, N.; Müller, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shushkevich, S.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stanco, L.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Thompson, P. D.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Trofymov, A.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Wünsch, E.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Žáček, J.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2015-09-01

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D ∗±-meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q 2 > 5 GeV2, electron inelasticity 0 .02 < y < 0 .7 and the D ∗± meson's transverse momentum p T( D ∗) > 1 .5 GeV and pseudorapidity | η( D ∗)| < 1 .5. The combination procedure takes into account all correlations, yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. Double-differential cross sections d2 σ/d Q 2d y are combined with earlier D ∗± data, extending the kinematic range down to Q 2 > 1 .5 GeV2. Perturbative next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  7. Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with forward proton spectrometers in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, F. D.; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Bizot, J. C.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bołd, T.; Brümmer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Dubak, A.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hüttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jönsson, L.; Jüngst, M.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Krämer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O. Y.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Müller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Y.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pluciński, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Šálek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schönberg, V.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Sloan, T.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wünsch, E.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhokin, A.; Zichichi, A.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2012-10-01

    A combination of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA is presented. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering data at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt{s}=318 GeV where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account, resulting in an improved precision of the cross section measurement which reaches 6 % for the most precise points. The combined data cover the range 2.5< Q 2<200 GeV2 in photon virtuality, 0.00035 < {x_{{P}}}< 0.09 in proton fractional momentum loss, 0.09<| t|<0.55 GeV2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 0.0018< β<0.816 in β=x/{x_{{P}}}, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable.

  8. Study of multi-nucleon transfer reactions in 58, 64Ni + 207Pb collisions at the velocity filter SHIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, V. F.; Heinz, S.; Hofmann, S.; Ackermann, D.; Heredia, J. A.; Heßberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.

    2013-09-01

    We investigated multi-nucleon transfer reactions in collisions of 58Ni + 207Pb and 64Ni + 207Pb at Coulomb barrier energies. The new aspect is that we used a velocity filter (SHIP at GSI) for the separation of the heavy target-like transfer products from background events. The isotopic identification was performed via the decay properties of the reaction products. The goal of the experiment was to study the characteristics of multi-nucleon transfer reactions in the region of heavy nuclei and the applicability of existing separation and detection techniques, which are usually used for identification of heavy fusion-evaporation residues, to heavy transfer products. This was motivated by recent theoretical results from macroscopic-microscopic models which suggest deep inelastic transfer reactions in heavy systems as a means to produce new neutron-rich isotopes in the region of N = 126 and in the region of superheavy nuclei. In this paper we present the isotopic yields, the excitation functions and the excitation energies of the heavy transfer products with Z > 82 as well as the influence of shell effects on the reaction products. The influence of the different neutron numbers of the projectiles is also discussed.

  9. Study of deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons off polarized deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriki, M.

    1996-03-01

    This thesis describes a 29GeV electron - nucleon scattering experiment carried out at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Highly polarized electrons are scattered off a polarized ND{sub 3} target. Scattered electrons are detected by two spectrometers located in End Station A (ESA) at angles of 4.5{degrees} and 7{degrees} with respect to the beam axis. We have measured the spin structure function g{sub 1} of deuteron over the range of 0.029 < x < 0.8 and 1. 0 < Q{sup 2} < 12.0(GeV/c){sup 2}. This integral indicates a discrepancy of more than three standard deviations from the prediction of the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule, 0.068{+-}0.005 at Q{sup 2} = 3.0(GeV/c){sup 2} while our result of g{sub 1}{sup d} in good agreement with SMC results. Combined with g{sub 1} of the proton, the measurement of {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1}(g{sub 1}{sup d}-g{sub 1}{sup n}) is 0.169{+-}0.008. We also obtained the strong coupling constant at Q{sup 2} = 3.0(GeV/c){sup 2} to be 0.417{sub -0.110}{sup +0.086}, using the power correction for the sum rule up to third order of {alpha}{sub s}. This result is in agreement with the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}(Q{sup 2}) = 3.0(GeV/c{sup 2}) obtained from various experiments. Using our deuteron results and the axial vector couplings of hyperon decays, the total quark polarization along the nucleon spin is found to be 0.286{+-}.055, implying that quarks carry only 30% of the nucleon spin. The strange sea quark polarization is also determined to be -0.101 {+-} .023. These measurements are in agreement with other experiments and provide the world`s most precise measurement of these quark polarizations. 80 refs., 151 figs., 23 tabs.

  10. Systematic study of neutron-rich rare isotope production in peripheral heavy-ion collisions below the Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountas, P. N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Bonasera, A.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed calculations of the yields of projectilelike fragments (with focus on the neutron-rich isotopes) are presented for the interaction of 86Kr (15 MeV/nucleon) with 64Ni, 58Ni, and 124Sn, 112Sn, as well as 86Kr (25 MeV/nucleon) with 124Sn and compared with our recently published experimental data for these reactions. The calculations are based on a two-step approach: the dynamical stage of the collision was described with the microscopic constrained molecular dynamics (CoMD) model, as well as the phenomenological deep-inelastic transfer (DIT) model and its modified (DITm) version. The deexcitation of the hot projectile fragments was performed with the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) and the binary-decay model gemini, which provided nearly similar results for the neutron-rich products from the reactions studied. An overall good agreement of the calculations with the experimental results, especially for near-projectile isotopes was observed using both the CoMD model and the DITm model for the dynamical stage. The successful description of the production of neutron-rich isotopes with the CoMD model is of particular importance, due to the predictive power of the microscopic approach that essentially does not depend on the reaction dynamics. Our studies to date suggest that peripheral heavy-ion collisions at this energy range (i.e., well above the Coulomb barrier, but below the Fermi energy), if induced by neutron-rich rare-isotope beams of adequate intensity may offer a unique route to access extremely neutron-rich rare isotopes toward the astrophysical r -process path and the presently uncharted neutron drip line.

  11. Simultaneous extraction of transversity and Collins functions from new semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and e{sup +}e{sup -} data

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmino, Mauro; Boglione, Mariaelena; D'Alesio, Umberto; Melis, Stefano; Murgia, Francesco; Prokudin, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    We present a global re-analysis of the most recent experimental data on azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, from the HERMES and COMPASS Collaborations, and in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} h{sub 1} h{sub 2} X processes, from the Belle Collaboration. The transversity and the Collins functions are extracted simultaneously, in the framework of a revised global analysis in which a new parameterisation of the unknown functions is also tested.

  12. Measurement of “pretzelosity” asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized He3 target

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; ...

    2014-11-24

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized ³He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16 < x < 0.35 and 1.4 < Q² < 2.7 GeV². Our results show that both π± on 3He and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  13. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich products of heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thick-target {gamma}{gamma} coincidence techniques are being used to explore the spectroscopy of otherwise hard-to-reach neutron-rich products of deep-inelastic heavy ion reactions. Extensive {gamma}{gamma} coincidence measurements were performed at ATLAS using pulsed beams of {sup 80}Se, {sup 136}Xe, and {sup 238}U on lead-backed {sup 122,124}Sn targets with energies 10-15% above the Coulomb barrier. Gamma-ray coincidence intensities were used to map out yield distributions with A and Z for even-even product nuclei around the target and around the projectile. The main features of the yield patterns are understandable in terms of N/Z equilibration. We had the most success in studying the decays of yrast isomers. Thus far, more than thirty new {mu}s isomers in the Z = 50 region were found and characterized. Making isotopic assignments for previously unknown {gamma}-ray cascades proves to be one of the biggest problems. Our assignments were based (a) on rare overlaps with radioactivity data, (b) on the relative yields with different beams, and (c) on observed cross-coincidences between {gamma} rays from light and heavy reaction partners. However, the primary products of deep inelastic collisions often are sufficiently excited for subsequent neutron evaporation, so {gamma}{gamma} cross-coincidence results require careful interpretation.

  14. Next-to-leading order QCD factorization for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering at twist 4.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian; Xing, Hongxi

    2014-03-14

    Within the framework of a high-twist approach, we calculate the next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD corrections to the transverse momentum broadening in semi-inclusive hadron production in deeply inelastic e+A collisions, as well as lepton pair production in p+A collisions. With explicit calculations of both real and virtual contributions, we verify, for the first time, the factorization theorem at twist 4 in NLO for the nuclear-enhanced transverse momentum weighted differential cross section and demonstrate the universality of the associated twist-4 quark-gluon correlation function. We also identify the QCD evolution equation for the twist-4 quark-gluon correlation function in a large nucleus, which can be solved to determine the scale dependence of the jet transport parameter in the study of jet quenching.

  15. Polarized gluon distributions from high-pT pair hadron productions in polarized deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanishi, Teruya; Yu-Bing, Dong; Morii, Toshiyuki

    2001-06-01

    To study the polarized gluon density Δg(x) in the nucleon, we propose the high-pT pair charmed hadron production process in polarized lp scattering. The double spin asymmetry ALL for this process is a good observable for testing the models of Δg(x). .

  16. Access quark information in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering at JLab-12GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiadong

    2009-01-01

    We outline a plan for a detailed study of SIDIS hadron-multiplicities (pion and kaon). The goal of this plan is to firmly establish the kinematic region over which SIDIS reaction can be reliably interpreted to the next-to-leading-order QCD in terms of parton distributions and fragmentation functions.

  17. Measurement of beauty production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA using decays into electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bolilyi, O.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Y.; Łużniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Y.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.

    2011-02-01

    The production of beauty quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared Q 2>10 GeV2, using an integrated luminosity of 363 pb-1. The beauty events were identified using electrons from semileptonic b decays with a transverse momentum 0.9 < pTe < 8 GeV and pseudorapidity | η e |<1.5. Cross sections for beauty production were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty contribution to the proton structure function F 2 was extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of Bjorken- x and Q 2.

  18. Evidence for a nonequilibrated dinuclear system in dissipative collisions at 19 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Bini, M.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Poggi, G.; Charity, R. J.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Tanaka, M. H.; Wessels, J. P.

    1991-12-01

    Exclusive measurements of two- and three-body events were performed for the system 120Sn+100Mo at 19.1 MeV/nucleon. Most ternary events are consistent with sequential processes in which one of the two deep-inelastic fragments fissions. For such events large differences are found between the fission probabilities of projectilelike and targetlike fragments of a given mass, this probability being larger for the nucleus which gained nucleons. This behavior demonstrates that there is a lack of equilibrium at the end of the deep-inelastic collision.

  19. Particle production in the Color Glass Condensate: from electron-proton DIS to proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.; Mäntysaari, H.

    2014-06-01

    We study single inclusive hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions in the CGC framework. The parameters in the calculation are obtained by fitting electron-proton deep inelastic scattering data. The obtained dipole-proton amplitude is generalized to dipole-nucleus scattering without any additional nuclear parameters other than the Woods-Saxon distribution. We show that it is possible to use an initial condition without an anomalous dimension and still obtain a good description of the HERA inclusive cross section and LHC single particle production measurements. We argue that one must consistently use the proton transverse area as measured by a high virtuality probe in DIS also for the single inclusive cross section in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions, and obtain a nuclear modification factor RpA that at midrapidity approaches unity at large momenta and at all energies.

  20. Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Lepton Scattering: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gehrmann, T; Roberts, R. G.; Whalley, M. R.; Durham HEP Database Group

    Gehrmann, Roberts, and Whalley in their 1999 paper, A Compilation of Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Scattering, published in volume 25 of Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics) note that these data will continue to be relevant to the next generation of hadron colliders. They present data on the unpolarized structure functions F2 and xF3, R D ._L=_T /, the virtual photon asymmetries A1 and A2 and the polarized structure functions g1 and g2, from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei. Data are presented in both tabular and graphical format and include predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functionsö as well. The data gathered from the relevant collaborations at DOE's Fermilab, SLAC, and JLAB are available, and so are data from related collaborations based at CERN and DESY. The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also include in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  1. Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X

    SciTech Connect

    Katich, Joseph; Qian, Xin; Zhao, Yuxiang; Allada, Kalyan; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Elliott; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cornejo, Juan; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Ding, Huaibo; Dolph, Peter; Dutta, Chiranjib; Dutta, Dipangkar; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilad, Gilad; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Guo, Lei; Hamilton, David; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jijun; Huang, Min; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jin, Ge; Jones, Mark; Kelleher, Aidan; Kim, Wooyoung; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Y; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lu, Hai-jiang; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Oh, Yoomin; Osipenko, Mikhail; Parno, Diana; Peng, Jen-chieh; Phillips, Sarah; Posik, Matthew; Puckett, Andrew; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Ransome, Ronald; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Schulte, Elaine; Shahinyan, Albert; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Sirca, Simon; Stepanyan, Stepan; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tang, Liguang; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vilardi, Ignazio; Wang, Kebin; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Z; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zong, Xing

    2014-07-01

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry in deep-inelastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero in the Born approximation. The experiment, conducted at Jefferson Lab using a 5.89 GeV electron beam, covers a range of 1.72 GeV, which is non-zero at the 2.75sigma level. Theoretical calculations, which assume two-photon exchange with quasi-free quarks, predict a neutron asymmetry of O(10−4) when both photons couple to one quark, and O(10−2) for the photons coupling to different quarks. Our measured asymmetry agrees both in sign and magnitude with the prediction that uses input based on the Sivers transverse momentum distribution obtained from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  2. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  3. Leading neutron production in e+p collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Crittenden, J.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Słomiński, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Dannheim, D.; Derrick, M.; Drews, G.; Fourletova, J.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Gutsche, O.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hillert, S.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Lelas, D.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martínez, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Pellmann, I.-A.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Surrow, B.; Wessoleck, H.; Wichmann, R.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Hanlon, S.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Bodmann, B.; Carli, T.; Holm, U.; Klimek, K.; Krumnack, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Milite, M.; Salehi, H.; Stonjek, S.; Wick, K.; Ziegler, A.; Ziegler, Ar; Collins-Tooth, C.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Grzelak, G.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Heaphy, E. A.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R. B.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Heusch, C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; Loizides, J. H.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Sztuk, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Li, L.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Fourletov, S.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2002-08-01

    The production of neutrons carrying at least 20% of the proton beam energy ( x L> 0.2 ) in e+p collisions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for a wide range of Q2, the photon virtuality, from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering. The neutron-tagged cross section, ep→ e' Xn, is measured relative to the inclusive cross section, ep→ e' X, thereby reducing the systematic uncertainties. For xL> 0.3, the rate of neutrons in photoproduction is about half of that measured in hadroproduction, which constitutes a clear breaking of factorisation. There is about a 20% rise in the neutron rate between photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering, which may be attributed to absorptive rescattering in the γp system. For 0.64< xL<0.82, the rate of neutrons is almost independent of the Bjorken scaling variable x and Q2. However, at lower and higher xL values, there is a clear but weak dependence on these variables, thus demonstrating the breaking of limiting fragmentation. The neutron-tagged structure function, FLN(3)2( x, Q2, xL), rises at low values of x in a way similar to that of the inclusive F2( x, Q2) of the proton. The total γπ cross section and the structure function of the pion, Fπ2( xπ, Q2) where xπ= x/(1- xL), have been determined using a one-pion-exchange model, up to uncertainties in the normalisation due to the poorly understood pion flux. At fixed Q2, Fπ2 has approximately the same x dependence as F2 of the proton.

  4. A high-statistics measurement of transverse spin effects in dihadron production from muon-proton semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joerg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Orlov, I.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rychter, A.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2014-09-01

    A measurement of the azimuthal asymmetry in dihadron production in deep-inelastic scattering of muons on transversely polarised proton (NH3) targets is presented. They provide independent access to the transversity distribution functions through the measurement of the Collins asymmetry in single hadron production. The data were taken in the year 2010 with the COMPASS spectrometer using a 160 GeV/c muon beam of the CERN SPS, increasing by a factor of about four the overall statistics with respect to the previously published data taken in the year 2007. The measured sizeable asymmetry is in good agreement with the published data. An approximate equality of the Collins asymmetry and the dihadron asymmetry is observed, suggesting a common physical mechanism in the underlying fragmentation.

  5. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He3 target

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Y. X.; Wang, Y.; Allada, K.; ...

    2014-11-03

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1 < xbj<0.4 for K+ and K– production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for K+ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for K– favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. Whilemore » the K+ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the K– results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.« less

  6. The multistring model VENUS for ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, K.

    1988-02-01

    The event generator VENUS is based on a multistring model for heavy ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies. The model is a straightforward extension of a successful model for soft proton-proton scattering, the latter one being consistent with e/sup )plus/)e/sup )minus/) annihilation and deep inelastic lepton scattering. Comparisons of VENUS results with pA and recent AA data alow some statements about intranuclear cascading. 18 refs., 7 figs

  7. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.; Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation.

  8. Single/Double-Spin Asymmetry Measurements of Semi-Inclusive Pion Electroproduction on a Transversely Polarized 3He Target through Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Qian

    2012-06-01

    Parton distribution functions, which represent the flavor and spin structure of the nucleon, provide invaluable information in illuminating quantum chromodynamics in the confinement region. Among various processes that measure such parton distribution functions, semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is regarded as one of the golden channels to access transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions, which provide a 3-D view of the nucleon structure in momentum space. The Jefferson Lab experiment E06-010 focuses on measuring the target single and double spin asymmetries in the 3He(e, e'pi+,-)X reaction with a transversely polarized 3He target in Hall A with a 5.89 GeV electron beam. A leading pion and the scattered electron are detected in coincidence by the left High-Resolution Spectrometer at 16{sup o} and the BigBite spectrometer at 30{sup o} beam right, respectively. The kinematic coverage concentrates in the valence quark region, x {approx} 0.1-0.4, at Q2 {approx}1-3 Gev{sub 2}. The Collins and Sivers asymmetries of 3He and neutron are extracted. In this review, an overview of the experiment and the final results are presented. Furthermore, an upcoming 12-GeV program with a large acceptance solenoidal device and the future possibilities at an electron-ion collider are discussed.

  9. Measurement of Single Spin Asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering Reaction n(e, e'π+) X at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Allada, Kalyan

    2010-06-01

    What constitutes the spin of the nucleon? The answer to this question is still not completely understood. Although we know the longitudinal quark spin content very well, the data on the transverse quark spin content of the nucleon is still very sparse. Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) using transversely polarized targets provide crucial information on this aspect. The data that is currently available was taken with proton and deuteron targets. The E06-010 experiment was performed at Jefferson Lab in Hall-A to measure the single spin asymmetries in the SIDIS reaction n(e, e'π±/K±)X using transversely polarized 3He target. The experiment used the continuous electron beam provided by the CEBAF accelerator with a beam energy of 5.9 GeV. Hadrons were detected in a high-resolution spectrometer in coincidence with the scattered electrons detected by the BigBite spectrometer. The kinematic coverage focuses on the valence quark region, x = 0.19 to 0.34, at Q2 = 1.77 to 2.73 (GeV/c)2. This is the first measurement on a neutron target. The data from this experiment, when combined with the world data on the proton and the deuteron, will provide constraints on the transversity and Sivers distribution functions on both the u and d-quarks in the valence region. In this work we report on the single spin asymmetries in the SIDIS n(e, e'π+)X reaction.

  10. Combination of measurements of inclusive deep inelastic {e^{± }p} scattering cross sections and QCD analysis of HERA data. H1 and ZEUS Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antunović, B.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt Dubak, A.; Behrens, U.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Buniatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Figiel, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henkenjohann, P.; Hladkỳ, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Katzy, J.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, K.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Morozov, A.; Muhammad Nasir, N.; Müller, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shushkevich, S.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stanco, L.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Thompson, P. D.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Trofymov, A.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Wünsch, E.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Žáček, J.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    A combination is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections previously published by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at HERA for neutral and charged current e^{± }p scattering for zero beam polarisation. The data were taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV and an electron beam energy of 27.5 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb^{-1} and span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q^2, and Bjorken x. The correlations of the systematic uncertainties were evaluated and taken into account for the combination. The combined cross sections were input to QCD analyses at leading order, next-to-leading order and at next-to-next-to-leading order, providing a new set of parton distribution functions, called HERAPDF2.0. In addition to the experimental uncertainties, model and parameterisation uncertainties were assessed for these parton distribution functions. Variants of HERAPDF2.0 with an alternative gluon parameterisation, HERAPDF2.0AG, and using fixed-flavour-number schemes, HERAPDF2.0FF, are presented. The analysis was extended by including HERA data on charm and jet production, resulting in the variant HERAPDF2.0Jets. The inclusion of jet-production cross sections made a simultaneous determination of these parton distributions and the strong coupling constant possible, resulting in α _s(M_Z^2)=0.1183 ± 0.0009 (exp) ± 0.0005(model/parameterisation) ± 0.0012(hadronisation) ^{+0.0037}_{-0.0030}(scale). An extraction of xF_3^{γ Z} and results on electroweak unification and scaling violations are also presented.

  11. High speed video analysis study of elastic and inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andrew; Beckey, Jacob; Aravind, Vasudeva; Clarion Team

    We study inelastic and elastic collisions with a high frame rate video capture to study the process of deformation and other energy transformations during collision. Snapshots are acquired before and after collision and the dynamics of collision are analyzed using Tracker software. By observing the rapid changes (over few milliseconds) and slower changes (over few seconds) in momentum and kinetic energy during the process of collision, we study the loss of momentum and kinetic energy over time. Using this data, it could be possible to design experiments that reduce error involved in these experiments, helping students build better and more robust models to understand the physical world. We thank Clarion University undergraduate student grant for financial support involving this project.

  12. Measurement of the A-dependence of the EMC effect and R in deep-inelastic electron scattering from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, S.E.

    1984-08-01

    Significant differences in the inelastic structure functions of Fe, Al, and deuterium nuclei have recently been observed in muon and electron scattering experiments. This has been interpreted as a distortion of the quark momentum distributions in bound nucleons. To study the A-dependence of this effect, we have measured differential cross sections for the inelastic scattering of electrons from deuterium, He, Be, C, Al, Ca, Fe, Ag, and Au over a large kinematic range (x values between 0.09 and 0.9 and Q/sup 2/ values of 2, 5, 10, and 15 (GeV/c)/sup 2/). The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) provided electrons with incident energies (E) ranging from 8 to 24.5 GeV. The SLAC 8-GeV/c spectrometer was used at 23 settings to detect electrons with energies (E') from 3.1 to 8.4 GeV scattered at angles (theta) between 11 and 23/sup 0/.

  13. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-09-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  14. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  15. Coincidence studies of ion-molecule collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Itzhak, Itzik

    1998-05-01

    Two of the simplest collision systems one can imagine are H^+ + H(1s) and H^+ + D(1s). Electron transfer is resonant in the first and nearly resonant in the latter because of the 3.7 meV gap between the H(1s) and D(1s). Once the collision velocity becomes small enough quantum effects become more pronounced and the electron transfer rate as a function of collision energy exhibits many resonances(G. Hunter and M. Kuriyan, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 358), 321 (1977).^,(J.P. Davis and W.R. Thorson, Can. J. Phys. 56), 996 (1978).. However, most of the interesting features appear at very low energies, of a few meV, and these collision systems which are the ``theorist's dream'' become a nightmare to experimentalists. Nevertheless, we are undertaking the challenging measurement of near resonant electron transfer in the H^+ + D(1s) collision system. When a HD molecule is ionized quickly, such that the transition to the HD^+ molecular ion is vertical, about 1% of the HD^+(1sσ) is in the vibrational continuum. The transition probability falls off approximately exponentially above threshold and its width is about 200 meV. During the dissociation, the electron initially centered on the D core can make a transition to the H core when the 2pσ and 1sσ potential energy curves associated with the two dissociation limits get close to each other. It is important to note that during molecular dissociation the ``avoided crossing'' is crossed only once in contrast to twice during a full collision. Using a localized cold HD target and 3D imaging of the low energy H^+ and D^+ dissociation fragments one can experimentally determine the transition probability between these two states as a function of the dissociation energy. Clearly, a recoil energy resolution of the order of a meV is necessary, which is the primary experimental challenge.

  16. Measurement of “pretzelosity” asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized He3 target

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Huang, J.; Katich, J.; Wang, Y.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. -P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z. -E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J. C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R. D.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L. -G.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.

    2014-11-24

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized ³He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16 < x < 0.35 and 1.4 < Q² < 2.7 GeV². Our results show that both π± on 3He and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  17. Measurement of transverse single-spin asymmetries for Dijet production in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stevens, J; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zawisza, M; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2007-10-05

    We report the first measurement of the opening angle distribution between pairs of jets produced in high-energy collisions of transversely polarized protons. The measurement probes (Sivers) correlations between the transverse spin orientation of a proton and the transverse momentum directions of its partons. With both beams polarized, the wide pseudorapidity (-1< or = eta < or = +2) coverage for jets permits separation of Sivers functions for the valence and sea regions. The resulting asymmetries are all consistent with zero and considerably smaller than Sivers effects observed in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. We discuss theoretical attempts to reconcile the new results with the sizable transverse spin effects seen in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and forward hadron production in pp collisions.

  18. Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry Ayn in the Deep Inelastic Region from the Reaction 3He(e,e')

    SciTech Connect

    Katich, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    A first measurement of the inclusive target single-spin asymmetry, Any, has been performed in deep-inelastic scattering of electrons from a 3He target polarized normal to the electron scattering plane. This asymmetry is void of contributions at the Born level, and thus is a direct observable for two-photon physics. The experiment was performed in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility from October 2008 through early February 2009. The measurement is the first from a polarized neutron target. The final overall precision is several times better than previously existing SLAC proton data, and significantly extends the kinematic range over which the asymmetry has been measured. The asymmetry was measured at five kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region covering Q2 = 1 - 3 GeV2 and xB = 0.16 to 0.41. The asymmetry varied from 0.006 to 0.071 with astatistical precision at the 10-2 level.

  19. Skyrme tensor force in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Fracasso, S.; Barton, M. C.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Background: It is generally acknowledged that the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) method provides a useful foundation for a fully microscopic many-body theory of low-energy heavy ion reactions. The TDHF method is also known in nuclear physics in the small-amplitude domain, where it provides a useful description of collective states, and is based on the mean-field formalism, which has been a relatively successful approximation to the nuclear many-body problem. Currently, the TDHF theory is being widely used in the study of fusion excitation functions, fission, and deep-inelastic scattering of heavy mass systems, while providing a natural foundation for many other studies. Purpose: With the advancement of computational power it is now possible to undertake TDHF calculations without any symmetry assumptions and incorporate the major strides made by the nuclear structure community in improving the energy density functionals used in these calculations. In particular, time-odd and tensor terms in these functionals are naturally present during the dynamical evolution, while being absent or minimally important for most static calculations. The parameters of these terms are determined by the requirement of Galilean invariance or local gauge invariance but their significance for the reaction dynamics have not been fully studied. This work addresses this question with emphasis on the tensor force. Method: The full version of the Skyrme force, including terms arising only from the Skyrme tensor force, is applied to the study of collisions within a completely symmetry-unrestricted TDHF implementation. Results: We examine the effect on upper fusion thresholds with and without the tensor force terms and find an effect on the fusion threshold energy of the order several MeV. Details of the distribution of the energy within terms in the energy density functional are also discussed. Conclusions: Terms in the energy density functional linked to the tensor force can play a non

  20. Studies of Fluctuation Processes in Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, Sakir

    2016-04-14

    The standard one-body transport approaches have been extensively applied to investigate heavy-ion collision dynamics at low and intermediate energies. At low energies the approach is the mean-field description of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. At intermediate energies the approach is extended by including a collision term, and its application has been carried out mostly in the semi-classical framework of the Boltzmann-Uhling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model. The standard transport models provide a good understanding of the average properties of the collision dynamics in terms of the effective interactions in both low and intermediate energies. However, the standard models are inadequate for describing the fluctuation dynamics of collective motion at low energies and disassembling of the nuclear system into fragments at intermediate energies resulting from the growth of density fluctuations in the spinodal region. Our tasks have been to improve the standard transport approaches by incorporating fluctuation mechanisms into the description. There are mainly two different mechanisms for fluctuations: (i) Collisional fluctuations generated by binary nucleon collisions, which provide the dominant mechanism at intermediate energies, and (ii) One-body mechanism or mean-field fluctuations, which is the dominant mechanism at low energies. In the first part of our project, the PI extended the standard transport model at intermediate energies by incorporating collisional mechanism according to the “Generalized Langevin Description” of Mori formalism. The PI and his collaborators carried out a number of applications for describing dynamical mechanism of nuclear multi fragmentations, and nuclear collective response in the semi-classical framework of the approach, which is known as the Boltzmann-Langevin model. In the second part of the project, we considered dynamical description at low energies. Because of the effective Pauli blocking, the collisional dissipation and

  1. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He3 target

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y. X.; Wang, Y.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. -P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, C.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z. -E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J. -C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L. -G.; Tobias, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.

    2014-11-03

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1 < xbj<0.4 for K+ and K production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for K+ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for K favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. While the K+ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the K results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.

  2. Beam-Target Double-Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized He3 Target at 1.4

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, J.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; ...

    2012-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. The kinematics focused on the valence quark region, 0.16 < x < 0.35 with 1.4 < Q2 < 2.7 GeV2. The corresponding neutron ALT asymmetries were extracted from the measured 3He asymmetries and proton/3He cross section ratios using the effective polarization approximation. These new data probe the transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function g1Tq and therefore provide access to quark spin-orbit correlations. Our results indicate a positive azimuthal asymmetry for π- production on 3Hemore » and the neutron, while our π+ asymmetries are consistent with zero.« less

  3. Beam-target double-spin asymmetry A{LT} in charged pion production from deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized {3}He target at 1.4

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Allada, K; Dutta, C; Katich, J; Qian, X; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y; Aniol, K; Annand, J R M; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C; Bosted, P; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D; Chen, C; Chen, J-P; Chen, W; Chirapatpimol, K; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Cornejo, J C; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deng, X; Deur, A; Ding, H; Dolph, P A M; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Guo, L; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, M; Ibrahim, H F; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Jones, M K; Kelleher, A; Kim, W; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; Lerose, J J; Li, X; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lu, H-J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z-E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Muñoz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J C; Phillips, S K; Posik, M; Puckett, A J R; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R D; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H; Sirca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L-G; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y-W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X; Zong, X

    2012-02-03

    We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry A{LT} for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized {3}He target. The kinematics focused on the valence quark region, 0.16

  4. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radici, Marco; Ricci, Alessandro M.; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-08-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions, and it allows us to test its universality.

  5. Kinetic study of wall collisions in a coaxial Hall discharge.

    PubMed

    Meezan, Nathan B; Cappelli, Mark A

    2002-09-01

    Coaxial Hall discharges (also known as Hall thrusters, stationary plasma thrusters, and closed-drift accelerators) are cross-field plasma sources under development for space propulsion applications. The importance of the electron-wall interaction to the Hall discharge operation is studied the through analysis of experimental data and simulation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) inside the discharge channel. Experimental time-average plasma property data from a laboratory Hall discharge are used to calculate the electron conductivity and to estimate the rate of wall-loss collisions. The electron Boltzmann equation is then solved in the local field limit, using the experimental results as inputs. The equation takes into account ionization and wall collisions, including secondary electrons produced at the wall. Local electron balances are used to calculate the sheath potential at the insulator walls. Results show an EEDF depleted at high energy due to electron loss to the walls. The calculated EEDFs agree well with experimental electron temperature data when the experimentally determined effective collision frequency is used for electron momentum transport. The electron wall-loss and wall-return frequencies are extremely low compared to those predicted by a Maxwellian of equal average energy. The very low frequency of wall collisions suggests that secondary electrons do not contribute to cross-field transport. This conclusion holds despite significant experimental uncertainty.

  6. Angular correlations in three-jet events in ep collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-03-01

    Three-jet production in deep inelastic ep scattering and photoproduction was investigated with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of up to 127pb-1. Measurements of differential cross sections are presented as functions of angular correlations between the three jets in the final state and the proton-beam direction. These correlations provide a stringent test of perturbative QCD and show sensitivity to the contributions from different color configurations. Fixed-order perturbative calculations assuming the values of the color factors CF, CA, and TF as derived from a variety of gauge groups were compared to the measurements to study the underlying gauge group symmetry. The measured angular correlations in the deep inelastic ep scattering and photoproduction regimes are consistent with the admixture of color configurations as predicted by SU(3) and disfavour other symmetry groups, such as SU(N) in the limit of large N.

  7. First measurement of unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from a He3 target [First measurement of unpolarized SIDIS cross section from a 3He target

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, X.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; ...

    2017-03-24

    Here, the unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) differential cross sections in 3He(e,e'π±)X have been measured for the first time in Jefferson Lab experiment E06-010 with a 5.9 GeV e– beam on a 3He gas target. The experiment focuses on the valence quark region, covering a kinematic range 0.12 < xbj < 0.45,1 < Q2 < 4(GeV/c)2,0.45 < zh < 0.65, and 0.05 < Pt < 0.55GeV/c. The extracted SIDIS differential cross sections of π± production are compared with existing phenomenological models while the 3He nucleus approximated as two protons and one neutron in a plane-wave picture, in multidimensional bins. Withinmore » the experimental uncertainties, the azimuthal modulations of the cross sections are found to be consistent with zero.« less

  8. Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-15

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W^{±} and Z/γ^{*} boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at sqrt[s]=510  GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W^{±} were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  9. Measurement of Longitudinal Spin Asymmetries for Weak Boson Production in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W± and Z/γ* boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at √s =510 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W± were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  10. Domain Engineering Validation Case Study: Synthesis for the Air Traffic Display/Collision Warning Monitor Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    AD-A259 407 DTIC itELECTE JANI2 6 1993 C DOMAIN ENGINEERING VALIDATION CASE STUDY: SYNTHESIS FOR THE AIR TRAFFIC DISPLAY/COLLISION WARNING MONITOR...Kramer, DARPA/ SISTO, Arl., VA 22203 1-26-93 JK DOMAIN ENGINEERING VALIDATION CASE STUDY: SYNTHESIS FOR THE AIR TRAFFIC DISPLAY/COLLISION WARNING MONITOR...COLLISION WARNING MONITOR CASE STUDY WITH AUTOMATION ............... C-1 C .1 Introduction .............................................................. C -1

  11. A study of vorticity formation in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becattini, F.; Inghirami, G.; Rolando, V.; Beraudo, A.; Del Zanna, L.; De Pace, A.; Nardi, M.; Pagliara, G.; Chandra, V.

    2015-09-01

    We present a quantitative study of vorticity formation in peripheral ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at GeV by using the ECHO-QGP numerical code, implementing relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics in the causal Israel-Stewart framework in dimensions with an initial Bjorken flow profile. We consider different definitions of vorticity which are relevant in relativistic hydrodynamics. After demonstrating the excellent capabilities of our code, which proves to be able to reproduce Gubser flow up to 8 fm/ c, we show that, with the initial conditions needed to reproduce the measured directed flow in peripheral collisions corresponding to an average impact parameter fm and with the Bjorken flow profile for a viscous Quark Gluon Plasma with fixed, a vorticity of the order of some /fm can develop at freeze-out. The ensuing polarization of baryons does not exceed 1.4 % at midrapidity. We show that the amount of developed directed flow is sensitive to both the initial angular momentum of the plasma and its viscosity.

  12. Theoretical study of mutual neutralization in He++H- collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Åsa; Nkambule, Sifiso M.; Orel, Ann E.

    2016-08-01

    Total and differential cross sections for mutual neutralization in He+ and H- collisions at low to intermediate (0.001 eV to 100 eV) are calculated ab initio and fully quantum mechanically. Atomic final-state distributions and isotope effects are investigated. The theoretical model includes dynamics on eleven coupled states of +2Σ symmetry, where autoionization is incorporated. The potential-energy curves, autoionization widths, and nonadiabatic couplings of electronic resonant states of HeH are computed by combining structure calculations with electron scattering calculations. The nuclear dynamics is studied using a strict diabatic representation of the resonant states. Effects of rotational couplings between +2Σ and 2Π electronic states are investigated in the pure precession approximation.

  13. PREFACE: International Symposium on Entrance Channel Effect on the Reaction Mechanism in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, Giorgio; Nasirov, Avazbek K.; Mandaglio, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the Symposium has been to widen and detail the discussion of problems arising in front of experimental and theoretical groups, and to find overlap between different approaches and methods which are devoted to the studying dynamics of nuclear reactions. Therefore, the reaction product yields are determined by various processes in competition. The main topics of the Symposium have been devoted to the following well sounded problems of nuclear reactions: The synthesis of superheavy elements and the study of exotic nuclei far from the valley of the beta stability. The production mechanism of the observed new elements and isotopes. The study of transfer reactions as a way to understand mechanism of evolution of from the deep-inelastic collisions to fusion regime. The study of non-equilibrium stage of the reaction mechanism and distribution of the excitation energy between binary reaction products including spontaneous fission products are still important to have a correct presentation about the whole reaction mechanism. The similarities and difference between fusion-fission and quasifission products. Unambiguity in estimation of the realistic fusion cross sections by the experimental and theoretical methods. Angular anisotropy of the complete and incomplete fusion reaction products. The effect of the nuclear shell structure in formation of the mass symmetric and asymmetric fission products. The investigation of the role of angular momentum, mass asymmetry and orientation angles of the symmetry axes of colliding nuclei in the entrance channel in formation of the evaporation residues, mass and angular distribution of the fusion-fission and quasifission products. Multi-fragmentation and symmetry energy. The new experimental and theoretical investigations on these and related topics allow researchers to improve knowledge about nucleus-nucleus interaction dynamics and to make conclusions about perspectives in the study of the landscape of islands superheavy

  14. Rapidity gaps in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D. |

    1995-12-31

    A simple semiquantitative picture of diffractive electroproduction is described. Although the diffractive component of F{sub 2} is approximately independent of Q{sup 2} and W{sup 2}, this mechanism is ``soft,`` i.e. it depends upon large-distance physics and is not readily describable within perturbative QCD.

  15. Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Paul

    2011-07-15

    Recent inclusive charged and neutral current scattering data from HERA are presented. Emphasis is placed on the resulting constraints on the proton parton densities and on the influence of low x proton structure on diffraction.

  16. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in vec p + vec p collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2007-10-07

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production at mid-rapidity in polarized p + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5 < p{sub T} < 30 GeV/c, are substantially more precise than previous measurements. They provide significant new constraints on the gluon spin contribution to the nucleon spin through the comparison to predictions derived from one global fit of polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  17. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  18. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  19. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at √{s }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cudd, A. B.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, AL L, in polarized p p collisions at center-of-mass energy √{s }=200 GeV . The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC p p data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3 σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x >0.05 .

  20. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in p[over -->] + p[over -->] collisions at sqrt[s]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zawisza, M; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2008-06-13

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) for inclusive jet production at midrapidity in polarized p + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  1. Exclusive study of nuclear collisions at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; E895 Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    We propose to carry out a systematic and exclusive measurement of the energy and mass dependence of particle production, correlations and collective effects in Au+Au collisions. We wish to determine the highest compression achievable in nuclear matter and to study its properties. We shall search for evidence for an exotic Equation of State, that is, new physics such as Resonance Matter, Exotica, and QGP. We are also interested in signatures of critical phenomena in dilute nuclear matter. We propose to measure the four-momentum of light mass particles ({pi}{sup {plus_minus}}, K{sub s}{sup 0}, K{sup {plus_minus}}, {Lambda}, n,p,d, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 6}He, and the isotopes of Li and Be), projectile fragments from Z = 6 to Z = 79, and anti-proton production. The majority of the data will be acquired, on an event by event basis, from a state-of-the-art Time Projection Chamber (EOSTPC) built and used at LBL by the EOC collaboration. The TPC provides continuous tracking, almost 4{pi} acceptance and particle identification for the light mass particles.

  2. A Computational Study of Systemic Hydration in Vocal Fold Collision

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical stresses develop within vocal fold (VF) soft tissues, due to phonation-associated vibration and collision. These stresses in turn affect the hydration of VF tissue and thus influence voice health. In this paper, high-fidelty numerical computations are described taking into account fully three-dimensional geometry, realistic tissue and air properties, and high-amplitude vibration and collision. A segregated solver approach is employed, using sophisticated commercial solvers for both the VF tissue and glottal airflow domains. The tissue viscoelastic properties were derived from a biphasic formulation. Two cases were considered, whereby the tissue viscoelastic properties corresponded to two different volume fractions of the fluid phase of the VF tissue. For each case, hydrostatic stresses occurring as a result of vibration and collision were investigated. Assuming the VF tissue to be poroelastic, interstitial fluid movement within VF tissue was estimated from the hydrostatic stress gradient. Computed measures of overall VF dynamics (peak air-flow velocity, magnitude of VF deformation, frequency of vibration and contact pressure) were well within the range of experimentally observed values. The VF motion leading to mechanical stresses within the VFs and their effect on the interstitial fluid flux is detailed. It is found that average deformation and vibration of VFs tends to increase the state of hydration of the VF tissue whereas VF collision works to reduce hydration. PMID:23531170

  3. A computational study of systemic hydration in vocal fold collision.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stresses develop within vocal fold (VF) soft tissues due to phonation-associated vibration and collision. These stresses in turn affect the hydration of VF tissue and thus influence voice health. In this paper, high-fidelity numerical computations are described, taking into account fully 3D geometry, realistic tissue and air properties, and high-amplitude vibration and collision. A segregated solver approach is employed, using sophisticated commercial solvers for both the VF tissue and glottal airflow domains. The tissue viscoelastic properties were derived from a biphasic formulation. Two cases were considered, whereby the tissue viscoelastic properties corresponded to two different volume fractions of the fluid phase of the VF tissue. For each case, hydrostatic stresses occurring as a result of vibration and collision were investigated. Assuming the VF tissue to be poroelastic, interstitial fluid movement within VF tissue was estimated from the hydrostatic stress gradient. Computed measures of overall VF dynamics (peak airflow velocity, magnitude of VF deformation, frequency of vibration and contact pressure) were well within the range of experimentally observed values. The VF motion leading to mechanical stresses within the VFs and their effect on the interstitial fluid flux is detailed. It is found that average deformation and vibration of VFs tend to increase the state of hydration of the VF tissue, whereas VF collision works to reduce hydration.

  4. Studies of QCD structure in high-energy collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nadolsky, Pavel M.

    2016-06-26

    Studies of QCD structure in high-energy collisions” is a research project in theoretical particle physics at Southern Methodist University funded by US DOE Award DE-SC0013681. The award furnished bridge funding for one year (2015/04/15-2016/03/31) between the periods funded by Nadolsky’s DOE Early Career Research Award DE-SC0003870 (in 2010-2015) and a DOE grant DE-SC0010129 for SMU Department of Physics (starting in April 2016). The primary objective of the research is to provide theoretical predictions for Run-2 of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC physics program relies on state-of-the-art predictions in the field of quantum chromodynamics. The main effort of our group went into the global analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs) employed by the bulk of LHC computations. Parton distributions describe internal structure of protons during ultrarelivistic collisions. A new generation of CTEQ parton distribution functions (PDFs), CT14, was released in summer 2015 and quickly adopted by the HEP community. The new CT14 parametrizations of PDFs were obtained using benchmarked NNLO calculations and latest data from LHC and Tevatron experiments. The group developed advanced methods for the PDF analysis and estimation of uncertainties in LHC predictions associated with the PDFs. We invented and refined a new ’meta-parametrization’ technique that streamlines usage of PDFs in Higgs boson production and other numerous LHC processes, by combining PDFs from various groups using multivariate stochastic sampling. In 2015, the PDF4LHC working group recommended to LHC experimental collaborations to use ’meta-parametrizations’ as a standard technique for computing PDF uncertainties. Finally, to include new QCD processes into the global fits, our group worked on several (N)NNLO calculations.

  5. A rear-end collision risk assessment model based on drivers' collision avoidance process under influences of cell phone use and gender-A driving simulator based study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomeng; Yan, Xuedong; Wu, Jiawei; Radwan, Essam; Zhang, Yuting

    2016-12-01

    Driver's collision avoidance performance has a direct link to the collision risk and crash severity. Previous studies demonstrated that the distracted driving, such as using a cell phone while driving, disrupted the driver's performance on road. This study aimed to investigate the manner and extent to which cell phone use and driver's gender affected driving performance and collision risk in a rear-end collision avoidance process. Forty-two licensed drivers completed the driving simulation experiment in three phone use conditions: no phone use, hands-free, and hand-held, in which the drivers drove in a car-following situation with potential rear-end collision risks caused by the leading vehicle's sudden deceleration. Based on the experiment data, a rear-end collision risk assessment model was developed to assess the influence of cell phone use and driver's gender. The cell phone use and driver's gender were found to be significant factors that affected the braking performances in the rear-end collision avoidance process, including the brake reaction time, the deceleration adjusting time and the maximum deceleration rate. The minimum headway distance between the leading vehicle and the simulator during the rear-end collision avoidance process was the final output variable, which could be used to measure the rear-end collision risk and judge whether a collision occurred. The results showed that although cell phone use drivers took some compensatory behaviors in the collision avoidance process to reduce the mental workload, the collision risk in cell phone use conditions was still higher than that without the phone use. More importantly, the results proved that the hands-free condition did not eliminate the safety problem associated with distracted driving because it impaired the driving performance in the same way as much as the use of hand-held phones. In addition, the gender effect indicated that although female drivers had longer reaction time than male drivers in

  6. COLLISIONS OF POROUS CLUSTERS: A GRANULAR-MECHANICS STUDY OF COMPACTION AND FRAGMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ringl, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Bertoldi, Dalia S.

    2012-06-20

    The collision of granular clusters can result in a number of complex outcomes from sticking to partial or full destruction of the clusters. These outcomes will contribute to the size distribution of dust aggregates, changing their optical properties and their capability to contribute to solid-state astrochemistry. We study the collision of two clusters of equal size, formed by approximately 7000 sub-{mu}m grains each, with a mass and velocity range that is difficult to sample in experiments. We obtain the outcome of the collision: compaction, fragmentation, and size distribution of ejecta, and type of outcome, as a function of velocity and impact parameter. We compare our results to other models and simulations, at both atomistic and continuum scales, and find some agreement together with some discrepancies. We also study collision-induced compaction as a function of cluster size, up to sizes of N = 250, 000, and find that for large clusters considerably higher compactions result at higher velocities.

  7. Study On Electron Collisions With Zn-like W Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, A.; Pais, V.; Totolici, M. C.; Stancalie, V.

    2008-04-07

    The present work gives new refined results for electron impact excitation rates and collision strengths for transitions of type [Ar]3d{sup 10}4snl->[Ar]3d{sup 10}4sn';l', n, n' = 4,5, and {delta}J = 0,l in Zn-like W ion. We have examined the position and widths of the resonant states of type ls{sup 2}2s2p{sup 6}3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4s{sup 2}nl. Autoionizing states can radically alter the low temperature behavior of collision rates, and are a major contributor to opacity. Preliminary results for Auger rates are presented. Hartree-Fock calculations have been carried out followed by a configuration interaction (CI) in intermediate coupling using the suite of Cowan's codes.

  8. A numerical study on collisions of icy bodies using SPH method combined with GRAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, M.; Genda, H.; Ida, S.

    2009-12-01

    We have worked on the collisions of icy bodies using Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics (SPH) method combined with Gravity PipE (GRAPE) in order to understand the basic behavior of icy bodies during impacts. Collisions of Mars-size rocky bodies have been investigated well, because those collisions are related to the origin of the moon and the formation of the terrestrial planets. On the other hand, collisions of icy bodies have not been studied yet, although these collisions would frequently occur in the solar and extra-solar systems, such as the formation of icy exoplanets. Through our research, we figure out the effect of ice during impact in detail. Our SPH code has two special features. First, GRAvity PipE computer (GRAPE) is used, which calculates the gravitational force of each particle up to 100 times faster than usual computers. Second, SESAME equation of state database is used to build a realistic model, taking into account the effect of phase change. In this research, we focused on differences and similarities between collisions of icy bodies and those of rocky ones, such as a merging criterion. Agnor & Asphaug (2004) have shown that a collision of rocky Mars-size protoplanets leads to an inelastic collision when its relative velocities are smaller than 1.4-1.5v, 1.1-1.2v, 1.1-1.2v when its impact angles are 30, 45, and 60 degrees, respectively. Here, v means escape velocity. The same calculations for icy bodies are performed in our numerical code. They have shown that the merging criterion of icy bodies is the same as that of rocky bodies. In addition to the merging criterion, we also clarify the relationship between impact parameters and the change of solid, liquid/vapor mass ratio due to impacts.

  9. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, J.J.

    1993-12-01

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  10. The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE): studying the collision behavior of submillimeter-sized dust aggregates on the suborbital rocket flight REXUS 12.

    PubMed

    Brisset, Julie; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Weidling, René; Blum, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE) is a novel approach to study the collision properties of submillimeter-sized, highly porous dust aggregates. The experiment was designed, built, and carried out to increase our knowledge about the processes dominating the first phase of planet formation. During this phase, the growth of planetary precursors occurs by agglomeration of micrometer-sized dust grains into aggregates of at least millimeters to centimeters in size. However, the formation of larger bodies from the so-formed building blocks is not yet fully understood. Recent numerical models on dust growth lack a particular support by experimental studies in the size range of submillimeters, because these particles are predicted to collide at very gentle relative velocities of below 1 cm/s that can only be achieved in a reduced-gravity environment. The SPACE experiment investigates the collision behavior of an ensemble of silicate-dust aggregates inside several evacuated glass containers which are being agitated by a shaker to induce the desired collisions at chosen velocities. The dust aggregates are being observed by a high-speed camera, allowing for the determination of the collision properties of the protoplanetary dust analog material. The data obtained from the suborbital flight with the REXUS (Rocket Experiments for University Students) 12 rocket will be directly implemented into a state-of-the-art dust growth and collision model.

  11. The suborbital particle aggregation and collision experiment (SPACE): Studying the collision behavior of submillimeter-sized dust aggregates on the suborbital rocket flight REXUS 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisset, Julie; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Weidling, René; Blum, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE) is a novel approach to study the collision properties of submillimeter-sized, highly porous dust aggregates. The experiment was designed, built, and carried out to increase our knowledge about the processes dominating the first phase of planet formation. During this phase, the growth of planetary precursors occurs by agglomeration of micrometer-sized dust grains into aggregates of at least millimeters to centimeters in size. However, the formation of larger bodies from the so-formed building blocks is not yet fully understood. Recent numerical models on dust growth lack a particular support by experimental studies in the size range of submillimeters, because these particles are predicted to collide at very gentle relative velocities of below 1 cm/s that can only be achieved in a reduced-gravity environment. The SPACE experiment investigates the collision behavior of an ensemble of silicate-dust aggregates inside several evacuated glass containers which are being agitated by a shaker to induce the desired collisions at chosen velocities. The dust aggregates are being observed by a high-speed camera, allowing for the determination of the collision properties of the protoplanetary dust analog material. The data obtained from the suborbital flight with the REXUS (Rocket Experiments for University Students) 12 rocket will be directly implemented into a state-of-the-art dust growth and collision model.

  12. Anisotropic mechanoresponse of energetic crystallites: a quantum molecular dynamics study of nano-collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Misawa, Masaaki; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Shimamura, Kohei; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Vashishta, Priya

    2016-05-01

    At the nanoscale, chemistry can happen quite differently due to mechanical forces selectively breaking the chemical bonds of materials. The interaction between chemistry and mechanical forces can be classified as mechanochemistry. An example of archetypal mechanochemistry occurs at the nanoscale in anisotropic detonating of a broad class of layered energetic molecular crystals bonded by inter-layer van der Waals (vdW) interactions. Here, we introduce an ab initio study of the collision, in which quantum molecular dynamic simulations of binary collisions between energetic vdW crystallites, TATB molecules, reveal atomistic mechanisms of anisotropic shock sensitivity. The highly sensitive lateral collision was found to originate from the twisting and bending to breaking of nitro-groups mediated by strong intra-layer hydrogen bonds. This causes the closing of the electronic energy gap due to an inverse Jahn-Teller effect. On the other hand, the insensitive collisions normal to multilayers are accomplished by more delocalized molecular deformations mediated by inter-layer interactions. Our nano-collision studies provide a much needed atomistic understanding for the rational design of insensitive energetic nanomaterials and the detonation synthesis of novel nanomaterials.At the nanoscale, chemistry can happen quite differently due to mechanical forces selectively breaking the chemical bonds of materials. The interaction between chemistry and mechanical forces can be classified as mechanochemistry. An example of archetypal mechanochemistry occurs at the nanoscale in anisotropic detonating of a broad class of layered energetic molecular crystals bonded by inter-layer van der Waals (vdW) interactions. Here, we introduce an ab initio study of the collision, in which quantum molecular dynamic simulations of binary collisions between energetic vdW crystallites, TATB molecules, reveal atomistic mechanisms of anisotropic shock sensitivity. The highly sensitive lateral collision

  13. Experimental and Numerical Study of Bright Matter- Wave Soliton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Nguyen, J. H. V.; Dyke, P.; Hulet, R. G.

    2014-05-01

    We create pairs of bright matter-wave solitons from Bose-Einstein condensates of 7Li atoms by tuning the scattering length to a negative value. We examine the collision of a pair of solitons formed in a quasi-1-D harmonic trap as a function of their relative phase. While the solitons pass through one another without change in shape or amplitude, they nonetheless exhibit an effective interaction that can be either repulsive or attractive depending on their relative phase. Furthermore, we observe a discontinuous jump in the soliton motion that causes the dipole mode oscillation frequency to shift to values greater than the trap frequency. The result is compared to numerical solution of the 3-D Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Work supported by the NSF, ONR, an ARO MURI, and the Welch Foundation.

  14. Studies on argon collisions with smooth and rough tungsten surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ozhgibesov, M S; Leu, T S; Cheng, C H; Utkin, A V

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate argon scattering behaviors on the smooth and rough tungsten surfaces. Current work deals with numerical simulation of nanoscale heat transfer process accompanying with rarefied gas-solid substrate interactions using molecular dynamics (MD) method. Taking into account that this method is very time consuming, MD simulation using CUDA capable Graphic Cards is implemented. The results found that imperfection of the surface significantly influences on gas atom's momentum change upon collision. However, the energy exchange rate remains unchanged regardless to the surface roughness. This finding is in contrast with the results in extant literatures. We believed the results found in this paper are important for both numerical and theoretical analyses of rarefied gas flow in micro- and nano-systems where the choice of boundary conditions significantly influences flow.

  15. Metal vapor target for precise studies of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W. Vorobyev, G.; Herfurth, F.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Spillmann, U.; Guo, D.; Trotsenko, S.; Gumberidze, A.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2014-05-15

    Although different ion-atom collisions have been studied in various contexts, precise values of cross-sections for many atomic processes were seldom obtained. One of the main uncertainties originates from the value of target densities. In this paper, we describe a unique method to measure a target density precisely with a combination of physical vapor deposition and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. This method is preliminarily applied to a charge transfer cross-section measurement in collisions between highly charged ions and magnesium vapor. The final relative uncertainty of the target density is less than 2.5%. This enables the precise studies of atomic processes in ion-atom collisions, even though in the trial test the deduction of precise capture cross-sections was limited by other systematic errors.

  16. Experimental Studies Of Pilot Performance At Collision Avoidance During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    Efforts to increase airport capacity include studies of aircraft systems that would enable simultaneous approaches to closely spaced parallel runway in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The time-critical nature of a parallel approach results in key design issues for current and future collision avoidance systems. Two part-task flight simulator studies have examined the procedural and display issues inherent in such a time-critical task, the interaction of the pilot with a collision avoidance system, and the alerting criteria and avoidance maneuvers preferred by subjects.

  17. Formal Verification of Curved Flight Collision Avoidance Maneuvers: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzer, André; Clarke, Edmund M.

    Aircraft collision avoidance maneuvers are important and complex applications. Curved flight exhibits nontrivial continuous behavior. In combination with the control choices during air traffic maneuvers, this yields hybrid systems with challenging interactions of discrete and continuous dynamics. As a case study illustrating the use of a new proof assistant for a logic for nonlinear hybrid systems, we analyze collision freedom of roundabout maneuvers in air traffic control, where appropriate curved flight, good timing, and compatible maneuvering are crucial for guaranteeing safe spatial separation of aircraft throughout their flight. We show that formal verification of hybrid systems can scale to curved flight maneuvers required in aircraft control applications. We introduce a fully flyable variant of the roundabout collision avoidance maneuver and verify safety properties by compositional verification.

  18. Dynamical study of low Earth orbit debris collision avoidance using ground based laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, N. S.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate the orbital velocity changes due to the effect of ground based laser force. The resulting perturbations of semi-major axis, miss distance and collision probability of two approaching objects are studied. The analytical model is applied for low Earth orbit debris of different eccentricities and area to mass ratio and the numerical test shows that laser of medium power ∼5 kW can perform a small change Δ V ‾ of an average magnitude of 0.2 cm/s which can be accumulated over time to be about 3 cm/day. Moreover, it is confirmed that applying laser Δ V ‾ results in decreasing collision probability and increasing miss distance in order to avoid collision.

  19. Theoretical study of charge transfer dynamics in collisions of C6+ carbon ions with pyrimidine nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus-Montabonel, M. C.

    2012-07-01

    A theoretical approach of the charge transfer dynamics induced by collision of C6+ ions with biological targets has been performed in a wide collision energy range by means of ab-initio quantum chemistry molecular methods. The process has been investigated for the target series thymine, uracil and 5-halouracil corresponding to similar molecules with different substituent on carbon C5. Such a study may be related to hadrontherapy treatments by C6+carbon ions and may provide, in particular, information on the radio-sensitivity of the different bases with regard to ion-induced radiation damage. The results have been compared to a previous analysis concerning the collision of C4+ carbon ions with the same biomolecular targets and significant charge effects have been pointed out.

  20. Novel High Transverse Momentum Phenomena in Hadronic and Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2009-04-10

    I discuss a number of novel phenomenological features of QCD in high transverse momentum reactions. The presence of direct higher-twist processes, where a proton is produced directly in the hard subprocess, can explain the 'baryon anomaly' - the large proton-to-pion ratio seen at RHIC in high centrality heavy ion collisions. Direct hadronic processes can also account for the deviation from leading-twist PQCD scaling at fixed x{sub T} = 2 p{sub T}/{radical}s. I suggest that the 'ridge' --the same-side long-range rapidity correlation observed at RHIC in high centrality heavy ion collisions is due to the imprint of semihard DGLAP gluon radiation from initial-state partons which have transverse momenta biased toward the trigger. A model for early thermalization of the quark-gluon medium is also outlined. Rescattering interactions from gluon-exchange, normally neglected in the parton model, have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, leading to leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, nuclear shadowing--all leading-twist dynamics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. Anti shadowing is shown to be quark flavor specific and thus different in charged and neutral deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering. I also discuss other aspects of quantum effects in heavy ion collisions, such as tests of hidden color in nuclear wavefunctions, the use of diffraction to materialize the Fock states of a hadronic projectile and test QCD color transparency, and the important consequences of color-octet intrinsic heavy quark distributions in the proton for particle and Higgs production at high x{sub F}. I also discuss how the AdS/CFT correspondence between Anti-de Sitter space and conformal gauge theories allows one to compute the analytic form of frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of

  1. Collision-induced fusion of two single-walled carbon nanotubes: A quantitative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Fei; Meng, Xiang-Rui; Wang, Dong-Qi; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-07-01

    The coalescence processes of two (6, 0) single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated via coaxial collision based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding molecular dynamics method. According to the structure characteristics of the nanotubes, five impact cases are studied to explore the coalescence processes of the nanotubes. The simulation shows that various kinds of carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene sheets, graphene nanoribbons, and single-walled carbon nanotubes with larger diameters, are created after collision. Moreover, some defects formed in the carbon nanomaterials can be eliminated, and even the final configurations which are originally fragmented can almost become intact structures by properly quenching and annealing.

  2. Theorectical Studies of Excitation in Low-Energy Electron-Polyatomic Molecule Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Isaacs, W A; Orel, A E; Meyer, H D

    2001-08-13

    This paper focuses on the channeling of energy from electronic to nuclear degrees of freedom in electron-polyatomic molecule collisions. We examine the feasibility of attacking the full scattering problem, both the fixed-nuclei electronic problem and the post-collision nuclear dynamics, entirely from first principles. The electron-CO{sub 2} system is presented as an example. We study resonant vibrational excitation, showing how a6 initio, fixed-nuclei electronic cross sections can provide the necessary input for a multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear vibrational dynamics.

  3. Identity method to study chemical fluctuations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, Marek; Grebieszkow, Katarzyna; Mackowiak, Maja; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2011-05-15

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the chemical composition of the hadronic final state of relativistic heavy-ion collisions carry valuable information on the properties of strongly interacting matter produced in the collisions. However, in experiments incomplete particle identification distorts the observed fluctuation signals. The effect is quantitatively studied and a new technique for measuring chemical fluctuations, the identity method, is proposed. The method fully eliminates the effect of incomplete particle identification. The application of the identity method to experimental data is explained.

  4. Introduction to TETHYS—an interdisciplinary GIS database for studying continental collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. D.; Flower, M. F. J.; Sultan, M. I.; Sandvol, E.

    2006-05-01

    The TETHYS GIS database is being developed as a way to integrate relevant geologic, geophysical, geochemical, geochronologic, and remote sensing data bearing on Tethyan continental plate collisions. The project is predicated on a need for actualistic model 'templates' for interpreting the Earth's geologic record. Because of their time-transgressive character, Tethyan collisions offer 'actualistic' models for features such as continental 'escape', collision-induced upper mantle flow magmatism, and marginal basin opening, associated with modern convergent plate margins. Large integrated geochemical and geophysical databases allow for such models to be tested against the geologic record, leading to a better understanding of continental accretion throughout Earth history. The TETHYS database combines digital topographic and geologic information, remote sensing images, sample-based geochemical, geochronologic, and isotopic data (for pre- and post-collision igneous activity), and data for seismic tomography, shear-wave splitting, space geodesy, and information for plate tectonic reconstructions. Here, we report progress on developing such a database and the tools for manipulating and visualizing integrated 2-, 3-, and 4-d data sets with examples of research applications in progress. Based on an Oracle database system, linked with ArcIMS via ArcSDE, the TETHYS project is an evolving resource for researchers, educators, and others interested in studying the role of plate collisions in the process of continental accretion, and will be accessible as a node of the national Geosciences Cyberinfrastructure Network—GEON via the World-Wide Web and ultra-high speed internet2. Interim partial access to the data and metadata is available at: http://geoinfo.geosc.uh.edu/Tethys/ and http://www.esrs.wmich.edu/tethys.htm. We demonstrate the utility of the TETHYS database in building a framework for lithospheric interactions in continental collision and accretion.

  5. Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Wallace P.; Johnson, Gregory D.; Strickland, Dale M.; Young, Jr., David P.; Sernka, Karyn J.; Good, Rhett E.

    2001-08-01

    It has been estimated that from 100 million to well over 1 billion birds are killed annually in the United States due to collisions with human-made structures, including vehicles, buildings and windows, powerlines, communication towers, and wind turbines. Although wind energy is generally considered environmentally friendly (because it generates electricity without emitting air pollutants or greenhouse gases), the potential for avian fatalities has delayed and even significantly contributed to blocking the development of some windplants in the U.S. Given the importance of developing a viable renewable source of energy, the objective of this paper is to put the issue of avian mortality associated with windpower into perspective with other sources of avian collision mortality across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed summary of the mortality data collected at windplants and put avian collision mortality associated with windpower development into perspective with other significant sources of avian collision mortality across the United States. We provide a summary of data collected at many of the U.S. windplants and provide annual bird fatality estimates and projections for all wind turbines in the U.S. For comparison, we also review studies of avian collision mortality from other major human-made structures and report annual bird fatality estimates for these sources. Other sources also significantly contribute to overall avian mortality. For example, the National Audubon Society estimates avian mortality due to house cats at 100 million birds per year. Pesticide use, oil spills, disease, etc., are other significant sources of unintended avian mortality. Due to funding constraints, the scope of this paper is limited to examining only avian mortality resulting from collisions with human-made obstacles.

  6. Two-Jet Differential Cross-Section and Structure Functions in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at SQRT.S = 1.8 Tev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robert M.

    Data from the 1987 run of the Collider Detector at Fermilab has been used to measure the two jet differential cross section d^3sigma/dE_ t deta_1 deta_2 in proton antiproton collisions at sqrt{s} = 1.8 TeV. For this measurement, one jet was restricted to the central region |eta_1 | < 0.6, where eta_1 and eta_2 are the pseudorapidity of the two jets with largest transverse energy in the event, and E_ t is the transverse energy of the centrally produced jet. Leading order QCD and the similarity of subprocess scattering angular distributions in a modified "single effective subprocess" approximation have been used to extract the "proton effective structure function" in parametric form. Using lowest order QCD, and quark and anti-quark structure functions evolved from deep inelastic scattering measurements, the gluon structure function of the proton has been estimated from the measured two jet differential cross section. The two jet differential cross section, effective structure function, and gluon structure function from CDF are all in agreement with the predictions of lowest order QCD and structure functions evolved from deep inelastic scattering measurements.

  7. Studies of Λc production in pp and p-Pb collisions 1 with ALICE at 2 the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meninno, Elisa

    2017-03-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) was designed to study the strongly interacting medium created in heavy-ion collisions at LHC energies, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Heavy quarks (charm and beauty), produced in the early stages of the collisions, are among the most powerful probes to study this state of matter. To study the QGP effects, it is important to establish reference data, which is done by analysing results from pp and p-Pb collisions. We report on the charmed baryon Λc measurement in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV and in p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV with the ALICE experiment, through the reconstruction of the decay channels Λc+ → p KS0 and Λc+ → pK-π+.

  8. LOW-x Dynamics Through Jet Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferencei, Jozef; H1; ZEUS Collaborations

    One of the most challenging aspects of low x proton structure is the study of QCD dynamics - the evolution of partons between different kinematic regimes. In electron-proton deep-inelastic scattering, this can be investigated by studying processes in the target region of the proton - forward going jets. In this paper various measurements made at HERA by the H1 and ZEUS experiments are presented and compared to Monte Carlo models and fixed-order QCD calculations.

  9. The effects of collision energy, vibrational mode, and vibrational angular momentum on energy transfer and dissociation in NO2+-rare gas collisions: an experimental and trajectory study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Uselman, Brady W; Boyle, Jason M; Anderson, Scott L

    2006-10-07

    A combined experimental and trajectory study of vibrationally state-selected NO2+ collisions with Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe is presented. Ne, Ar, and Kr are similar in that only dissociation to the excited singlet oxygen channel is observed; however, the appearance energies vary by approximately 4 eV between the three rare gases, and the variation is nonmonotonic in rare gas mass. Xe behaves quite differently, allowing efficient access to the ground triplet state dissociation channel. For all four rare gases there are strong effects of NO2+ vibrational excitation that extend over the entire collision energy range, implying that vibration influences the efficiency of collision to internal energy conversion. Bending excitation is more efficient than stretching; however, bending angular momentum partially counters the enhancement. Direct dynamics trajectories for NO2+ + Kr reproduce both the collision energy and vibrational state effects observed experimentally and reveal that intracomplex charge transfer is critical for the efficient energy transfer needed to drive dissociation. The strong vibrational effects can be rationalized in terms of bending, and to a lesser extent, stretching distortion enhancing transition to the Kr+ -NO2 charge state.

  10. The impact of pedestrian countdown signals on pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions: a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Camden, Andi; Buliung, Ron; Rothman, Linda; Macarthur, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether pedestrian countdown signals (PCS) reduce pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions in the city of Toronto, Canada. Methods A quasi-experimental study design was used to evaluate the effect of PCS on the number of pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions in the city of Toronto, from January 2000 to December 2009. Each intersection acted as its own control. We compared the number of pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions per intersection-month before and after the intervention. Stratified models were used to evaluate effect modification by pedestrian age, injury severity and location (urban vs inner suburbs). Poisson regression analysis with repeated measures (generalised estimating equations) was used to estimate the RR and 95% CI. Results The analysis included 9262 pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions at 1965 intersections. The RR of collisions after PCS installation was 1.014 (95% CI 0.958 to 1.073), indicating no statistically significant effect of PCS on collisions. There was no evidence to suggest effect modification between PCS and collisions by age, injury severity or location. Conclusion The installation of PCS at 1965 signalised intersections in Toronto did not reduce the number of pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions at these intersections. PMID:22157206

  11. Theoretical and experimental studies of elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A. C.; Olsen, S. L.; Slattery, P.; Tipton, P.; Das, A.; Hagen, C. R.; Rajeev, S. G.; Okubo, S.

    This report discusses fixed target experimentation at Fermilab; the D-zero collider experiment at Fermilab; deep inelastic lepton nucleon scattering; non-accelerator experiments and non-linear quantum electrodynamics (QED); the AMY experiment at TRISTAN and other activities at KEK; the collider detector at Fermilab; laser switched linac; preparations for experiments at the SSC; search for massive stable particles; and the Advanced Study Institute on techniques and concepts of high energy physics.

  12. Constraints on the collision and the pre-collision tectonic configuration between India and Asia from detrital geochronology, thermochronology, and geochemistry studies in the lower Indus basin, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Guangsheng; Najman, Yani; Guillot, Stéphane; Roddaz, Martin; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Métais, Grégoire; Carter, Andrew; Marivaux, Laurent; Solangi, Sarfraz H.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the timing of India-Asia collision is a fundamental prerequisite for understanding the evolution of the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen and its role in global climate, oceanic chemistry, and ecological evolution. Despite much active research, the basic pre-collision tectonic configuration and the timing of terminal India-Asia suturing remain debated. For example, debates regarding when and how the intervening Kohistan-Ladakh arc was sutured with India and Asia still remain elusive; some models propose the arc collided with Asia at about 100 Ma, with India-Asia collision at ca. 55 Ma, whilst a newer model proposed the arc's collision with India at 50 Ma and subsequently with Asia at 40 Ma. Another example is the recent proposition that an oceanic Greater India Basin separated the Tethyan Himalaya microcontinent from the remaining Indian plate until 20- 25 Ma with the consumption of this oceanic basin marking the final collision at this time. These controversies relate to whether the commonly documented 50 Ma contact represents the terminal India-Asia suturing or the amalgamation between various arcs or microcontinents with India or Asia. Here we present an integrated provenance study of geochronology, thermochronology, and geochemistry on the late Cretaceous-Pleistocene sediments from the lower Indus basin on the Indian plate. The detrital zircon U-Pb and fission track data show a reversal in sediment source from a pure Indian signature to increasing inputs from the suture zone and the Asian plate between the middle Paleocene and early Oligocene. The Nd and Sr isotopes narrow down this change to 50 Ma by revealing input of Asian detritus and the establishment of a Nd & Sr isotopic pattern similar to the present-day Indus Fan by 50 Ma, with no significant variations up section, contrary to what might be expected if later major collisions had occurred. Our isotopic data indicate that Greater India was occupied by a fluvial-deltaic system, analogous to the

  13. a Study of Low Energy Electron-Molecule and Ion - Collisions Using Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollars, Byron George

    Low energy collisions between Rydberg atoms and neutral molecules have been investigated over a wide range of principal quantum numbers n, and for several different neutral targets. The results have been used to validate the free-electron, independent particle model of Rydberg atom collisions. Comparison between theory and experiment show that at large values of n, ionization of Rb(nS,nD) Rydberg atoms in the reaction: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). Rb(nS,nD) + SF(,6) (--->) Rb('+) = SF(,6)('-) (1). (TABLE ENDS). proceeds by electron transfer from the Rydberg atom to the SF(,6) molecule. The rate constants measured for this reaction are much the same as for the attachment of free, low-energy electrons to SF(,6). Thus, Rydberg collision studies can provide information about low-energy free electron interactions. Studies of the rate constants for free ion production in the reaction: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). K(nD) + SF(,6) (--->) K('+) + SF(,6)('-) (2). (TABLE ENDS). showed these to decrease sharply at smaller n, falling far below the value expected on the basis of Rydberg electron attachment to SF(,6). This behavior is attributed not to breakdown of the free-electron model, but to post -attachment electrostatic interactions between the product ions, which are formed closer to each other at lower n. Model calculations that take this electrostatic interaction into account confirm this prediction. Other Rydberg atom collision processes, such as: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). K(nD) + O(,2) (--->) K('+) + O(,2)('-) (3). K(nD) + H(,2)O (--->) KH(,2)O('+) + e('-) (4). (TABLE ENDS). have been studied, as they require both the Rydberg ion core and electron to participate in the collision. Since O(,2)('-) ions formed by free electron attachment have short lifetimes against autodetachment, the observation of long-lived O(,2)('-) reaction product suggests that the K('+) core ion plays a role in stabilizing the excited O(,2)('-) ions formed by Rydberg electron attachment. Stable

  14. Studying the interplay of strong and electromagnetic forces in heavy-ion collisions with NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybicki, A.; Szczurek, A.; Kłusek-Gawenda, M.; Sputowska, I.

    2016-08-01

    In the following we stress the advantages of the NICA research programme in the context of studying the spectator-induced electromagnetic phenomena present in heavy-ion collisions. We point at the specific interest of using these phenomena as a new, independent source of information on the space-time evolution of the reaction and of the non-perturbative process of particle production. We propose an extended series of measurements of well-defined observables to be performed in different types of nuclear reactions and in the whole range of collision energies available to NICA. We expect these measurements to bring very valuable new insight into the mechanism of non-perturbative strong interactions, complementary to the studies made at the SPS at CERN, RHIC at BNL, and the LHC.

  15. Theoretical and experimental studies of elementary physics. Annual technical progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A.C.; Slattery, P.; Tipton, P.; Das, A.; Hagen, C.R.; Rajeev, S.G.; Okubo, S.; Orr, L.

    1993-05-01

    The various components of the high-energy physics research program at the University of Rochester are presented. (I)Fixed-target experimentation at FNAL includes studies of direct photon production by p and {pi} on H, Be, and Cu, and hybrid mesons and other physics issues in Coulomb excitation at high energies. (II)The status of the GEM (Gammas, Electrons, and Muons) Experiment at the SSC is given. (III)The D-Zero experiment at FNAL is reviewed. (IV)Deep inelastic lepton--nucleon scattering experiments are summarized: electron scattering experiments at SLAC, FNAL neutrino quad triplet runs, FNAL neutrino sign selected experiments, and SDC cosmic ray test and test beam calibration. (V)Studies of nonlinear QED at SLAC concentrated on a study of QED at critical field strength in intense laser--high-energy electron collisions. (VI)Development work on the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) emphasized the CDF silicon vertex detector, the end plug calorimeter, and the SDC tile/fiber calorimetry. (VII)The theoretical physics effort is sketched.

  16. An experimental study on low-velocity low-gravity collisions into granular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, C.; Murdoch, N.; Mimoun, D.

    2014-07-01

    The Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) is scheduled to launch the asteroid sample-return mission, Hayabusa-2, to target body 1999 JU_3 in December 2014 [1]. The spacecraft will arrive at the C-type near-Earth asteroid in mid-2018 and deploy several science payloads to its surface. Among these payloads is a 10-kg lander, the Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout (MASCOT), provided by the German Space Agency (DLR) with cooperation from the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). MASCOT will reach the asteroid's surface with an anticipated impact speed of 10--20 cm/s. In addition to housing four instruments for in-situ science investigation, MASCOT contains a mobility mechanism that will correct its orientation and enable it to ''hop'' to various measurement sites [2]. Based on thermal infrared observations [3,4,5] and previous space missions [6,7], it is strongly believed that 1999 JU_3 is covered by loose regolith. The asteroid's granular surface, in combination with the low surface gravity, makes it difficult to predict the lander's collision behavior from existing theoretical models. However, to ensure that MASCOT can successfully fulfill its mission, it is vital to understand the rebound dynamics of the lander in the asteroid surface environment. The objective of this work, derived from the needs of current and future asteroid missions, is to present an experiment designed to study low-velocity, low-gravity collisions into granular surfaces. The experiment measures the amount of energy lost during impact via a projectile's coefficient of restitution and also the acceleration profile of the projectile during collision. The key challenge to designing an asteroid collision experiment is finding a way to simulate reduced gravity conditions on the Earth so that the prevailing forces in micro-gravity collisions can be reflected in the experimental results. The proposed way to achieve this goal is to let a free-falling projectile impact a surface with a constant downward

  17. Using computer simulations to study relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joelle Lynn

    1998-12-01

    One of the most exciting topics in high-energy nuclear physics is the study of the potential phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Information about this transition, if it exists and can be experimentally determined, would be vital in understanding confinement of quarks and gluons inside hadrons. New accelerators, RHIC and LIIC, will be online in the next few years and will focus on finding evidence for this transition. RHIC will collide Au on Au at center of mass energies equal to 200 GeV/nucleon and create a high density, high temperature state of matter. To study the large particle multiplicities that will occur at these experiments, computer simulations are being developed. Within this thesis, one type of simulation will be detailed and used to study the invariant mass spectrum of leptons pairs measured at CERN SPS and several hadronic observables that could be measured at RHIC.

  18. A kinetic study of solar wind electrons in the transition region from collision dominated to collisionless flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lie-Svendsen, O.; Leer, E.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the evolution of the velocity distribution function of a test population of electrons in the solar corona and inner solar wind region, using a recently developed kinetic model. The model solves the time dependent, linear transport equation, with a Fokker-Planck collision operator to describe Coulomb collisions between the 'test population' and a thermal background of charged particles, using a finite differencing scheme. The model provides information on how non-Maxwellian features develop in the distribution function in the transition region from collision dominated to collisionless flow. By taking moments of the distribution the evolution of higher order moments, such as the heat flow, can be studied.

  19. Study of cervical muscle response and injury of driver during a frontal vehicle collision.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenhai; Li, Chuzhao; Hu, Hongyu; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Chaoyang; Yu, Huili

    2015-01-01

    Frontal vehicle collisions can cause injury to a driver's cervical muscles resulting from intense changes in muscle strain and muscle load. This study investigated the influence of collision forces in a sled test environment using a modified Hybrid III 50th percentile dummy equipped with simulated spring-type muscles. Cervical muscle responses including strain and load of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), splenius capitis (SPL), and trapezius (TRP) were analyzed, and muscle injury was assessed. The SCM, SPL, and TRP suffered average peak muscle strains of 21%, 40%, and 23%, respectively, exceeding the injury threshold. The average peak muscle loads of the SCM, SPL and TRP were 11 N, 25 N, and 25 N, respectively, lower than the ultimate failure load. The SPL endured the largest injury, while the injuries to the SCM and TRP were relatively small. This is a preliminary study to assess the cervical muscle of driver during a frontal vehicle collision. This study provides a foundation for investigating the muscle response and injury in sled test environments, which can lead to the improvement of occupant protections.

  20. A study on the coagulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters to determine their collision efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, Abhijeet; Sander, Markus; Janardhanan, Vinod; Kraft, Markus

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the physical interaction between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their clusters of different sizes in laminar premixed flames. Two models are employed for this study: a detailed PAH growth model, referred to as the kinetic Monte Carlo - aromatic site (KMC-ARS) model [Raj et al., Combust. Flame 156 (2009) 896-913]; and a multivariate PAH population balance model, referred to as the PAH - primary particle (PAH-PP) model. Both the models are solved by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. PAH mass spectra are generated using the PAH-PP model, and compared to the experimentally observed spectra for a laminar premixed ethylene flame. The position of the maxima of PAH dimers in the spectra and their concentrations are found to depend strongly on the collision efficiency of PAH coagulation. The variation in the collision efficiency with various flame and PAH parameters is studied to determine the factors on which it may depend. A correlation for the collision efficiency is proposed by comparing the computed and the observed spectra for an ethylene flame. With this correlation, a good agreement between the computed and the observed spectra for a number of laminar premixed ethylene flames is found. (author)

  1. Electrostatic ion beam trap for electron collision studies

    SciTech Connect

    Heber, O.; Witte, P.D.; Diner, A.; Bhushan, K.G.; Strasser, D.; Toker, Y.; Rappaport, M.L.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Altstein, N.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a system combining an ion beam trap and a low energy electron target in which the interaction between electrons and vibrationally cold molecular ions and clusters can be studied. The entire system uses only electrostatic fields for both trapping and focusing, thus being able to store particles without a mass limit. Preliminary results for the electron impact neutralization of C{sub 2}{sup -} ions and aluminum clusters are presented.

  2. Study of Molecular Collision Dynamics for Chemical Laser Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    have concentrated our studies on photosensitive oxidizers such as chlorine dioxide (ClO 2) and hydrazoic acid (HN3) combined with carbon -containing fuel...resulting in intense emission throughout the visible spectrum. The emission was observed well downstream from the UV laser ignition region in an observation...sustaining by branched chain kinetics and no significant excitation by the initial UV laser pulse occurred. -- - - I a*- - - - . -a | .. nNI.. 6 As one

  3. Collision induced dissociation study of ester-based polyurethane fragmentation reactions.

    PubMed

    Gies, Anthony P; Hercules, David M

    2014-01-15

    A combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) collision induced dissociation (CID) and ion mobility separations (IMS) was used to study a complex mixture composed of unreacted polyester starting material (polybutylene adipate) and polyurethane (PUR) end products. Collision induced dissociation fragmentation identified two primary fragmentation mechanisms of PURs, which were used to generate a general fragmentation model. Predicted fragment ions were used to distinguish: (1) linear and cyclic PURs, (2) hard-block and soft-block PURS, (3) the degree of "blockiness" within hard- and soft-block PURs, (4) the location of the MDI linkages within each PUR chain, and (5) the relative intensities of various isobars intermingled within a precursor mass peak. These results were consistent with the observed IMS separations.

  4. Dilepton Production In Ion-Ion Collisions Studied Using HADES

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, A.; Krizek, F.; Pleskac, R.; Pospisil, V.; Taranenko, A.; Tlusty, P.; Wagner, V.; Agakichiev, H.; Froehlich, I.; Gilardi, C.; Kuehn, W.; Lehnert, J.; Lins, E.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Perez, T.; Ritman, J.; Spruck, B.; Toia, A.; Traxler, M.

    2007-10-26

    The High-Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer installed at GSI Darmstadt is a second generation experiment to study production of dielectron pairs from proton, pion and nucleus induced reactions at the SIS/BEVALAC energy regime. During period 2002-4 medium-resolution data have been taken with HADES on the light C+C system at 1 and 2 AGeV. The data analysis confirms former finding of the DLS collaboration. First physics run on slightly heavier system Ar+KCl was carried out will almost full HADES setup at 2005.

  5. Time-dependent quantum wave packet dynamics to study charge transfer in heavy particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song Bin; Wu, Yong; Wang, Jian Guo

    2016-12-01

    The method of time-dependent quantum wave packet dynamics has been successfully extended to study the charge transfer/exchange process in low energy two-body heavy particle collisions. The collision process is described by coupled-channel equations with diabatic potentials and (radial and rotational) couplings. The time-dependent coupled equations are propagated with the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method and the modulo squares of S-matrix is extracted from the wave packet by the flux operator with complex absorbing potential (FCAP) method. The calculations of the charge transfer process 12Σ+ H-(1s2) +Li(1 s22 s ) →22Σ+ /32 Σ+ /12 Π H(1 s ) +Li-(1s 22 s 2 l ) (l =s ,p ) at the incident energy of about [0.3, 1.3] eV are illustrated as an example. It shows that the calculated reaction probabilities by the present FCAP reproduce that of quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling very well, including the peak structures contributed by the resonances. Since time-dependent external interactions can be directly included in the present FCAP calculations, the successful implementation of FCAP provides us a powerful potential tool to study the quantum control of heavy particle collisions by lasers in the near future.

  6. Probability of satellite collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for computing the probability of a collision between a particular artificial earth satellite and any one of the total population of earth satellites. The collision hazard incurred by the proposed modular Space Station is assessed using the technique presented. The results of a parametric study to determine what type of satellite orbits produce the greatest contribution to the total collision probability are presented. Collision probability for the Space Station is given as a function of Space Station altitude and inclination. Collision probability was also parameterized over miss distance and mission duration.

  7. Effect of viscosity on droplet-droplet collision outcome: Experimental study and numerical comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotaas, Cecilie; Havelka, Pavel; Jakobsen, Hugo A.; Svendsen, Hallvard F.; Hase, Matthias; Roth, Norbert; Weigand, Bernhard

    2007-10-01

    The influence of viscosity on droplet-droplet collision behavior at ambient conditions was studied experimentally and numerically. N-decane, monoethyleneglycol (MEG), diethyleneglycol (DEG), and triethyleneglycol were used as liquid phase providing viscosities in the range from 0.9to48mPas. Collision Weber numbers ranged approximately from 10 to 420. A direct numerical simulation code, based on the volume-of-fluid concept, was used for the simulations. Experimentally, observations of two droplet streams using a modified stroboscopic technique (aliasing method) were used to investigate the whole range of impact parameters during one experimental run. The experimental method has previously been verified for the water/air system [C. Gotaas et al., Phys. Fluids 19, 102105 (2007)]. In the present work, it was tested and validated for the n-decane/air system. Measured data agree well with those published in the literature. Well-defined regions of stretching separation and coalescence were identified, while reflexive separation regions were not found by using a single sinusoidal disturbance. However, the onset of reflexive separation was identified for MEG and DEG using an amplitude modulation technique. The results show that the criteria for onset of reflexive separation for viscous fluids provided by Y. I. Jiang et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 234, 177 (1992)] are not valid. This is consistent with the results given by K. D. Willis and M. Orme [Exp. Fluids 34, 28 (2003)]. A new empirical correlation for the onset of reflexive separation for high viscosity fluids is presented. The borders between coalescing and stretching separation were shifted toward higher Weber numbers with increasing viscosity. The lack of occurrence of reflexive separation for the single sinusoidal disturbance (small droplets), as well as the stretching separation boundary shift, can be explained by dissipation of collision kinetic energy in viscous flows inside the merged droplet after collision. Results

  8. W boson studies in pPb and PbPb collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapon, Émilien; CMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The electroweak W bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and thus constitute clean probes of the initial state of nuclear collisions. They provide a unique constraint on the nuclear parton distributions, in particular on the antiquarks from the sea. A first analysis of PbPb data has confirmed the medium-blind characteristic of the electroweak bosons. With the new pPb data collected at the beginning of 2013, nuclear matter without the creation of a hot medium can hence be studied. Being 10 times more prevalent than Z bosons, the yield of W bosons recorded from pPb collisions allows precise comparisons to theoretical predictions. A yield of approximately 20 000 W is observed in pPb collisions in both the muon and electron channels. In this paper the CMS measurements of W bosons in PbPb at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of \\sqrt{sNN} = 2.76 TeV and from the new pPb data at \\sqrt{sNN} = 5.02 TeV are reported. The charge asymmetry, forward/backward asymmetry and fully corrected yields will be shown.

  9. Anomalous transport model study of chiral magnetic effects in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yifeng; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Using an anomalous transport model for massless quarks and antiquarks, we study the effect of a magnetic field on the elliptic flows of quarks and antiquarks in relativistic heavy ion collisions. With initial conditions from a blast wave model and assuming that the strong magnetic field produced in noncentral heavy ion collisions can last for a sufficiently long time, we obtain an appreciable electric quadrupole moment in the transverse plane of a heavy ion collision. The electric quadrupole moment subsequently leads to a splitting between the elliptic flows of quarks and antiquarks. The slope of the charge asymmetry dependence of the elliptic flow difference between positively and negatively charged particles is positive, which is expected from the chiral magnetic wave formed in the produced QGP and observed in experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, only if the Lorentz force acting on the charged particles is neglected and the quark-antiquark scattering is assumed to be dominated by the chirality changing channel.

  10. Ionization and excitation in collisions between antiprotons and H(1s) atoms studied with Sturmian bases

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Thomas G.

    2011-02-15

    Coupled two-center as well as one-center Sturmian cross sections have been determined for ionization and excitation in p-bar-H(1s) collisions at p-bar energies from 1 to 16 000 keV, following the author's recent work for p-H(1s) collisions [Phys. Rev. A 80, 032701 (2009)]. Basis convergence is studied in detail. Results for ionization and excitation are compared to other coupled-state results and to numerical results, as well as limited experimental results for ionization only. Except for the large, two-center coupled-Gaussian-pseudostate calculation of Toshima for ionization only [Phys. Rev. A 64, 024701 (2001)], previous calculations employed one-center bases, including a one-center Sturmian calculation by Igarashi et al. [Phys. Rev. A 61, 062712 (2000)]. A strong contrast with p-H collisions is confirmed at intermediate energies, while at high energies the extent of agreement is revealed between coupled-state results for the two collisional systems, as well as with first Born results.

  11. Complete data acquisition and analysis system for low-energy electron-molecule collision studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Pamir; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2015-09-01

    A complete data acquisition system has been developed that can work with any personal computer irrespective of the operating system installed on it. The software can be used in low and intermediate electron-energy collision studies with ground-state molecules in gas phase using a combination of RS-232, GPIB, and USB-interfaced devices. Various tabletop instruments and nuclear instrumentation module (NIM) -based electronics have been interfaced and have communicated with the software, which is based on LabVIEW. This is tested with dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and polar dissociation studies to oxygen molecule and successfully used in a DEA study of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

  12. Constraints on the collision and the pre-collision tectonic configuration between India and Asia from detrital geochronology, thermochronology, and geochemistry studies in the lower Indus basin, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Guangsheng; Najman, Yani; Guillot, Stephane; Roddaz, Martin; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Metais, Gregoire; Carter, Andrew; Marivaux, Laurent; Solangi, Sarfraz

    2016-04-01

    The timing of India-Asia suturing in the Western Himalaya is complex, with the relative timings of collision between the Indian plate and Asian plate with the Kohistan Island arc and a proposed Tethyan Himalayan microcontinent, debated. Here we present an integrated provenance study of geochronology, thermochronology, and geochemistry on the late Cretaceous-Pleistocene sediments from the lower Indus basin on the Indian plate. The detrital zircon U-Pb and fission track data show a reversal in sediment source from a pure Indian signature to increasing inputs from the suture zone and the Asian plate between the middle Paleocene and early Oligocene. The Nd and Sr isotopes narrow down this change to 50 Ma by revealing input of Asian detritus and the establishment of a Nd & Sr isotopic pattern similar to that of the present-day Indus Fan by 50 Ma, with no significant variations up section, contrary to what might be expected if later major collisions had occurred. Our isotopic data indicate that since 50 Ma, Greater India was occupied by a fluvial-deltaic system, analogous to the present-day Indus and named as the Paleo-Indus, which has been transporting Asian detritus southward across the suture zone and Kohistan-Ladakh arc. This suggests that no other ocean basins were located between India and Asia after this time in this region. Our data require that in the west, the India-Asia collision was accomplished by ˜50 Ma.

  13. Acute cannabis consumption and motor vehicle collision risk: systematic review of observational studies and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Jill A; Cartwright, Jennifer L

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the acute consumption of cannabis (cannabinoids) by drivers increases the risk of a motor vehicle collision. Design Systematic review of observational studies, with meta-analysis. Data sources We did electronic searches in 19 databases, unrestricted by year or language of publication. We also did manual searches of reference lists, conducted a search for unpublished studies, and reviewed the personal libraries of the research team. Review methods We included observational epidemiology studies of motor vehicle collisions with an appropriate control group, and selected studies that measured recent cannabis use in drivers by toxicological analysis of whole blood or self report. We excluded experimental or simulator studies. Two independent reviewers assessed risk of bias in each selected study, with consensus, using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Risk estimates were combined using random effects models. Results We selected nine studies in the review and meta-analysis. Driving under the influence of cannabis was associated with a significantly increased risk of motor vehicle collisions compared with unimpaired driving (odds ratio 1.92 (95% confidence interval 1.35 to 2.73); P=0.0003); we noted heterogeneity among the individual study effects (I2=81). Collision risk estimates were higher in case-control studies (2.79 (1.23 to 6.33); P=0.01) and studies of fatal collisions (2.10 (1.31 to 3.36); P=0.002) than in culpability studies (1.65 (1.11 to 2.46); P=0.07) and studies of non-fatal collisions (1.74 (0.88 to 3.46); P=0.11). Conclusions Acute cannabis consumption is associated with an increased risk of a motor vehicle crash, especially for fatal collisions. This information could be used as the basis for campaigns against drug impaired driving, developing regional or national policies to control acute drug use while driving, and raising public awareness. PMID:22323502

  14. Symmetry Energy Effects on Low Energy Dissipative Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, C.; Baran, V.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Odsuren, M.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the reaction path followed by Heavy Ion Collisions with exotic nuclear beams at low energies. We focus on the interplay between reaction mechanisms, fusion vs. break-up (fast-fission, deep-inelastic), that in exotic systems is expected to be influenced by the symmetry energy term at densities around the normal value. The method described here, based on the event by event evolution of phase space quadrupole collective modes, will nicely allow to extract the fusion probability at relatively early times, when the transport results are reliable. Fusion probabilities for reactions induced by 132Sn on 64,58Ni targets at 10 AMeV are evaluated. We obtain larger fusion cross sections for the more n-rich composite system, and, for a given reaction, with a soft symmetry term above saturation. A collective charge equilibration mechanism (the Dynamical Dipole Resonance, DDR) is revealed in both fusion and break-up events, depending on the stiffness of the symmetry term just below saturation. Finally we investigate the effect of the mass asymmetry in the entrance channel for systems with the same overall isospin content and similar initial charge asymmetry. As expected we find reduced fusion probabilities for the more mass symmetric case, while the DDR strength appears not much affected. This is a nice confirmation of the prompt nature of such collective isovector mode.

  15. Bus Stops and Pedestrian-Motor Vehicle Collisions in Lima, Peru: A Matched Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Quistberg, D. Alex; Koepsell, Thomas D.; Johnston, Brian D.; Boyle, Linda Ng; Miranda, J. Jaime; Ebel, Beth E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between bus stop characteristics and pedestrian-motor vehicle collisions. Design Matched case-control study where the units of study were pedestrian crossing. Setting Random sample of 11 police commissaries in Lima, Peru. Data collection occurred from February, 2011 to September, 2011. Participants 97 intersection cases representing 1,134 collisions and 40 mid-block cases representing 469 collisions that occurred between October, 2010 and January, 2011 and their matched controls. Main Exposures Presence of a bus stop and specific bus stop characteristics. Main Outcome Occurrence of a pedestrian-motor vehicle collision. Results Intersections with bus stops were three times more likely to have a pedestrian-vehicle collision (OR 3.28, 95% CI 1.53-7.03), relative to intersections without bus stops. Both formal and informal bus stops were associated with a higher odds of a collision at intersections (OR 6.23, 95% CI 1.76-22.0 and OR 2.98, 1.37-6.49). At mid-block sites, bus stops on a bus-dedicated transit lane were also associated with collision risk (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.02-5.42). All bus stops were located prior to the intersection, contrary to practices in most high income countries. Conclusions In urban Lima, the presence of a bus stop was associated with a three-fold increase in risk of a pedestrian collision. The highly competitive environment among bus companies may provide an economic incentive for risky practices such as dropping off passengers in the middle of traffic and jockeying for position with other buses. Bus stop placement should be considered to improve pedestrian safety. PMID:24357516

  16. Electron-H2 Collisions Studied Using the Finite Element Z-Matrix Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have applied the Z-matrix method, using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians, to study e-H2 elastic and inelastic collisions. Special attention is paid to the quality of the basis set and the treatment of electron correlation. The calculated cross sections are invariant, to machine accuracy, with respect to the choice of parameters a, b, d, e as long as they satisfy Equation (3). However, the log derivative approach, i.e., the choice a = -e = 1, b = d = 0 appears to converge slightly faster than other choices. The cross sections agree well with previous theoretical results. Comparison will be made with available experimental data.

  17. A spectroscopic study of hydrogen atom and molecule collisions. Progress report, 1994--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Kielkopf, J.F.

    1997-01-15

    In this project the fundamental processes which occur in low energy collisions of excited states of atomic hydrogen with other atoms and ions are being studied with optical, vacuum ultraviolet and laser spectroscopy. This report covers the period from 1994 to early 1997. We begin here with a brief description of the status of the work at the beginning of this project period, then discuss the goals for this period, our results, and the work in progress now. As the accompanying renewal proposal describes in more detail, the purpose of our work is to understand low energy atom-atom collisions during which light is emitted or absorbed. Because of their fundamental character, such collisions of atomic hydrogen could play a central role if experimental data could be compared with a priori theory. Some interactions involving atomic hydrogen can be calculated very accurately, namely those of H{sub 2}, H{sup +}{sub 2} H{sub 3}, and H{sup +}{sub 3}, and simpler diatomic radicals including OH, CH, and NH. The primary difficulty from the experimental side has been the development of techniques to observe neutral atomic hydrogen interactions at densities high enough for spectral line broadening effects to be observable. This specific research discusses in this report are: laser-produced plasmas in H{sub 2},H{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}+Na; layman alpha wing; line shape theory; ArF laser interaction with H{sub 2}; and work in progress.

  18. Measurement of single-target spin asymmetries in the electroproduction of negative pions in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic reaction n(e,e'π-)X on a transversely polarized 3He target

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Chiranjib

    2010-06-14

    The experiment E06010 measured the target single spin asymmetry (SSA) in the semiinclusive deep inelastic (SIDIS) n(e,e'π-)X reaction with a transversely polarized 3He target as an e ective neutron target. This is the very rst independent measurement of the neutron SSA, following the measurements at HERMES and COMPASS on the proton and the deuteron. The experiment acquired data in Hall A at Je erson Laboratory with a continuous electron beam of energy 5.9 GeV, probing the valence quark region, with x = 0.13 → 0.41, at Q2 = 1.31 → 3.1 GeV2. The two contributing mechanisms to the measured asymmetry, viz, the Collins effect and the Sivers effect can be realized through the variation of the asymmetry as a function of the Collins and Sivers angles. The neutron Collins and Sivers moments, associated with the azimuthal angular modulations, are extracted from the measured asymmetry for the very first time and are presented in this thesis. The kinematics of this experiment is comparable to the HERMES proton measurement. However, the COMPASS measurements on deuteron and proton are in the low-x region. The results of this experiment are crucial as the first step toward the extraction of quark transversity and Sivers distribution functions in SIDIS. With the existing results on proton and deuteron, these new results on neutron will provide powerful constraints on the transversity and Sivers distributions of both the u and d-quarks in the valence region.

  19. Hybrid ion-atom trap for studying ultra-cold collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Oleg P.; Lin, Jian; Smith, W. W.

    2003-05-01

    We built an apparatus for studying ultra-cold collisions between atoms and atomic or molecular ions. Atomic sodium vapor is produced from getters in the ultra-high vacuum chamber. The atoms are trapped in a vapor-cell magneto-optical trap (MOT) by capturing a low-velocity component of a thermal distribution into the region between two anti-Helmholtz coils. A localized cloud of cold Na atoms was successfully generated for MOT types I and II. The cooling transitions were stimulated by the red-detuned Na D2 line emission from a single-frequency stabilized ring-dye laser. The repumping frequency was generated by an electro-optical modulator (EOM) at 1.712 GHz. The loading time constant, ˜ 500 ms, was measured from the fluorescence intensity increase when the magnetic field is suddenly turned on. A linear Paul ion trap, centered on the MOT, is designed to trap Ca^+ ions, produced by electronic bombardment of neutral calcium atoms from a tube oven. A detector is provided for product ions from charge-transfer collisions or photoassociative ionization. We are testing the various components of the completed apparatus. This work is supported by NSF grant # PHY-9988215 and in part by the University of CT Research Foundation.

  20. Unravelling the dissociation pathways of acetic acid upon electron transfer in potassium collisions: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Meneses, G; Widmann, C; Cunha, T; Gil, A; Ferreira da Silva, F; Calhorda, M J; Limão-Vieira, P

    2017-01-04

    Electron transfer in alkali-molecule collisions with gas phase acetic acid and its deuterated analogues resulting in OH(-) formation requires considerable internal rearrangement in the temporary negative ion. At a collision energy well above the threshold of negative ion formation, electron transfer from potassium to CH3COOH/CH3COOD and CD3COOH results not only in H transfer from CH3 to COOH/COOD, but also in H release from COOH and subsequent rearrangement to eliminate OH(-). These processes are also investigated by theoretical post-Hartree-Fock and DFT calculations. The combination of both studies reveals that the most favourable intermediate mechanism occurs via diol formation. Such intramolecular H transfer is reported here for the first time in the context of electron transfer induced dissociation experiments in alkali-molecule collisions. A comprehensive fragmentation study is presented and dissociation mechanisms are suggested.

  1. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    PubMed

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-05

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold.

  2. Experimental apparatus to study cold collisions in sodium spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nematollahi, Delaram; Foster, Aaron; Yates, Kyle; Altermatt, Joseph; Lee, Hyoyeon; Zhang, Qimin; Schwettmann, Arne

    2015-05-01

    We present our progress on building an apparatus to study matter-wave quantum optics in spin space, including our design of the sodium oven, Zeeman slower, vacuum and laser systems. The nonlinear interaction needed to implement quantum optical devices with matter waves will be provided by spin-exchange collisions in a sodium spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Microwave dressing will allow us to exert precise control over the collisional dynamics and tune the system to behave as an interferometer in spin space with reduced noise, or as a phase-sensitive amplifier for sensitive atom number measurements. Apart from microwave dressing, we are also planning to study the effect of Rydberg excitations on the collisional spin dynamics of the gas.

  3. Experimental and theoretical study of CO collisions with CH3- and CF3-terminated self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, William A.; Morris, John R.; Troya, Diego

    2009-02-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the dynamics of collisions of the CO molecule with organic surfaces. Experimentally, we scatter CO at 60 kJ mol-1 and 30° incident angle from regular (CH3-terminated) and ω-fluorinated (CF3-terminated) alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and measure the time-of-flight distributions at the specular angle after collision. At a theoretical level, we carry out classical-trajectory simulations of the same scattering process using CO/SAM potential-energy surfaces derived from ab initio calculations. Agreement between measured and calculated final translational energy distributions justifies use of the calculations to examine dynamical behavior of the gas/surface system not available directly from the experiment. Calculated state-to-state energy-transfer properties indicate that the collisions are notably vibrationally adiabatic. Similarly, translational energy transfer from and to CO rotation is relatively weak. These trends are examined as a function of collision energy and incident angle to provide a deeper understanding of the factors governing state-to-state energy transfer in gas/organic-surface collisions.

  4. Reaction mechanisms and their interaction time in dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    De Rosa, A.; Fioretto, E.; Inglima, G.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Setola, R. ); Cardella, G.; Papa, M.; Pappalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.; Wang, Q. ); Napoli, D.R.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F.; Signorini, C.; Stefanini, A.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Angular distributions of fragments emitted in the reaction {sup 19}F+{sup 63}Cu measured in the range {theta}{sub lab}=10{degree} to 120{degree} at incident energy between 100 to 108 MeV (lab) have been analyzed according to available models for deep inelastic collisions with the aim to evidence different mechanisms contributing to such reactions. The analysis was performed in the framework of Strutinsky model taking into account both the development of Kun and of Abul-Magd and Simbel. To determine the interaction times, previously published excitation functions were also analyzed in the framework of Kun's model of cross section statistical fluctuations and near-side and far-side scattering were taken into account separately. It was pointed out that the rotational energy dissipation occurs in a limited angular range around the grazing angle. The presence of two distinct reaction mechanisms, each of them characterized by an interaction time, was also evidenced by comparing the energy averaged angular distributions to the Abul-Magd and Simbel model for dissipative collisions.

  5. SYSTEMATIC STUDIES OF HEAVY ION COLLISIONS TO SEARCH FOR QUARK-GLUON PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Fuqiang Wang

    2007-11-29

    This is the final technical report for DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator (OJI) Award, 'Systematic Studies of Heavy Ion Collisions to Search for Quark-Gluon Plasma', grant DE-FG02-02ER41219, Principal Investigator (PI) Fuqiang Wang. The research under the grant was divided into two phases. The first concentrated on systematic studies of soft hadron production at low transverse momentum (p{sub T}), in particular the production of (anti-)baryon and strangeness in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. The second concentrated on measurements of di-hadron and multi-hadron jet-correlations and investigations of medium response to jets. The research was conducted at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL with the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment. The total grant is $214,000. The grant established a PC farm solely used for this research. The PC farm consists of 8 nodes with a total of 16 CPUs and 3 disk servers of total 2 TB shared storage. The current balance of the grant is $19,985. The positive balance is because an initial purchase of $22,600 for the PC farm came out of the PI's start-up fund due to the lateness of the award. The PC farm is an integral part of the Purdue Physics Department's computer cluster. The grant supported two Ph.D. graduate students. Levente Molnar was supported from July 2002 to December 2003, and worked on soft hadron production. His thesis title is Systematics of Identified Particle Production in pp, d-Au and Au-Au Collisions at RHIC Energies. He graduated in 2006 and now is a Postdoctoral fellow at INFN Sezione di Bari, Italy working on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. Jason Ulery was supported from January 2004 to July 2007. His thesis title is Two- and Three-Particle Jet-Like Correlations. He defended his thesis in October 2007 and is moving to Frankfurt University, Germany to work on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The research by this grant resulted in 7 journal publications (2 PRL, 1 PLB, 1 PRC, 2 submitted and

  6. Collisions with Springs: A Useful Context for the Study of Analytical Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twomey, Patrick; O'Sullivan, Colm; O'Riordan, John; Fahy, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal describes an experimental demonstration of the conservation of total momentum before, during, and after an elastic collision between two bodies. The experiment also appears to show that total kinetic energy is conserved in the process, including "during" the collision. There is a danger that this may give rise to…

  7. Quantum Scattering Study of Ro-Vibrational Excitations in N+N(sub 2) Collisions under Re-entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Stallcop, James R.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Huo, Winifred M.

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional time-dependent quantum dynamics approach using a recently developed ab initio potential energy surface is applied to study ro-vibrational excitation in N+N2 exchange scattering for collision energies in the range 2.1- 3.2 eV. State-to-state integral exchange cross sections are examined to determine the distribution of excited rotational states of N(sub 2). The results demonstrate that highly-excited rotational states are produced by exchange scattering and furthermore, that the maximum value of (Delta)j increases rapidly with increasing collision energies. Integral exchange cross sections and exchange rate constants for excitation to the lower (upsilon = 0-3) vibrational energy levels are presented as a function of the collision energy. Excited-vibrational-state distributions for temperatures at 2,000 K and 10,000 K are included.

  8. Theoretical study on collision dynamics of H{sup +} + CH{sub 4} at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Cong-Zhang; Wang, Jing; Wang, Feng

    2014-02-07

    In this work we make an investigation on collision dynamics of H{sup +} + CH{sub 4} at 30 eV by using time-dependent density functional theory coupled with molecular dynamics approach. All possible reactions are presented based on 9 incident orientations. The calculated fragment intensity is in nice agreement with experimental results. The mechanism of reaction transition for dissociation and proton exchange processes is explained by the intra-molecule energy transfer. However, the energy loss of the proton is in poor agreement with experimental results. The discrepancy is attributed to the mean-field treatment of potential surface. We also studied the dependence on initial velocity of both proton and methane. In addition, we find that for dynamical evolution a different self-interaction correction (SIC) may lead to different results, but with respect to the position of rainbow angle, average-density SIC seems to have reasonable correction.

  9. Single molecule study of DNA collision with elliptical nanoposts conveyed by hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Viero, Yannick; He, Qihao; Fouet, Marc; Bancaud, Aurélien

    2013-12-01

    Periodic arrays of micro- or nanopillars constitute solid-state matrices with excellent properties for DNA size separation. Nanofabrication technologies offer many solutions to tailor the geometry of obstacle arrays, yet most studies have been conducted with cylinders arranged in hexagonal lattices. In this report, we investigate the dynamics of single DNA collision with elliptical nanoposts using hydrodynamic actuation. Our data show that the asymmetry of the obstacles has minor effect on unhooking dynamics, and thus confirm recent predictions obtained by Brownian dynamics simulations. In addition, we show that the disengagement dynamics are correctly predicted by models of electrophoresis, and propose that this consistency is associated to the confinement in slit-like channels. We finally conclude that elliptical posts are expected to marginally improve the performances of separation devices.

  10. Studies of electron-molecule collisions - Applications to e-H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brescansin, L. M.; Lima, M. A. P.; Gibson, T. L.; Mckoy, V.; Huo, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic differential and momentum transfer cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons by H2O are reported for collision energies from 2 to 20 eV. These fixed-nuclei static-exchange cross sections were obtained using the Schwinger variational approach. In these studies the exchange potential is directly evaluated and not approximated by local models. The calculated differential cross sections, obtained with a basis set expansion of the scattering wave function, agree well with available experimental data at intermediate and larger angles. As used here, the results cannot adequately describe the divergent cross sections at small angles. An interesting feature of the calculated cross sections, particularly at 15 and 20 eV, is their significant backward peaking. This peaking occurs in the experimentally inaccessible region beyond a scattering angle of 120 deg. The implication of this feature for the determination of momentum transfer cross sections is described.

  11. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the vibrational quenching of hydroxyl radicals through collision with O atoms.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Raji; Dolgos, Michelle; Hinde, Robert J

    2007-02-08

    The collisional removal of vibrationally excited OH radicals by O atoms is studied by the quasiclassical trajectory method. To evaluate the effect of different topological features on the scattering processes two different global potential energy surfaces, DMBE IV and TU, are used. Results for reactive, exchange, and inelastic scattering probabilities are reported for central collisions (with zero total angular momentum) with a fixed relative translational energy for vibrational levels of OH ranging from nu=1 to v=8. Vibrational state distributions of product molecules are also compared on the two potential energy surfaces. Both surfaces predict higher probabilities for reaction than for exchange or inelastic scattering. The vibrational state distributions of the product diatomic molecules are different on the two surfaces. In particular, the two surfaces give substantially different probabilities for multiquantum OH vibrational relaxation transitions OH(v)+O-->OH(v')+O.

  12. Bubble collision with gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study vacuum bubble collisions with various potentials including gravitation, assuming spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry. We use numerical calculations from double-null formalism. Spherical symmetry can mimic the formation of a black hole via multiple bubble collisions. Planar and especially hyperbolic symmetry describes two bubble collisions. We study both cases, when two true vacuum regions have the same field value or different field values, by varying tensions. For the latter case, we also test symmetric and asymmetric bubble collisions, and see details of causal structures. If the colliding energy is sufficient, then the vacuum can be destabilized, and it is also demonstrated. This double-null formalism can be a complementary approach in the context of bubble collisions.

  13. Computational Study of Electron-Molecule Collisions Related to Low-Temperature Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1997-10-01

    Computational study of electron-molecule collisions not only complements experimental measurements, but can also be used to investigate processes not readily accessible experimentally. A number of ab initio computational methods are available for this type of calculations. Here we describe a recently developed technique, the finite element Z-matrix method. Analogous to the R-matrix method, it partitions the space into regions and employs real matrix elements. However, unlike the implementation of the R-matrix method commonly used in atomic and molecular physics,(C. J. Gillan, J. Tennyson, and P. G. Burke, Chapter 10 in Computational Methods for Electron-Molecule Collisions), W. M. Huo and F. A. Gianturco, Editors, Plenum, New York (1995), p. 239. the Z-matrix method is fully variational.(D. Brown and J. C. Light, J. Chem. Phys. 101), 3723 (1994). In the present implementation, a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians is used to represent the continuum electron, thus offering full flexibility without imposing fixed boundary conditions. Numerical examples include the electron-impact dissociation of N2 via the metastable A^3Σ_u^+ state, a process which may be important in the lower thermosphere, and the dissociation of the CF radical, a process of interest to plasma etching. To understand the dissociation pathways, large scale quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for all target states which dissociate to the lowest five limits in the case of N_2, and to the lowest two limits in the case of CF. For N_2, the structural calculations clearly show the preference for predissociation if the initial state is the ground X^1Σ_g^+ state, but direct dissociation appears to be preferable if the initial state is the A^3Σ_u^+ state. Multi-configuration SCF target functions are used in the collisional calculation,

  14. Normal and Anomalous Diffusion: An Analytical Study Based on Quantum Collision Dynamics and Boltzmann Transport Theory.

    PubMed

    Mahakrishnan, Sathiya; Chakraborty, Subrata; Vijay, Amrendra

    2016-09-15

    Diffusion, an emergent nonequilibrium transport phenomenon, is a nontrivial manifestation of the correlation between the microscopic dynamics of individual molecules and their statistical behavior observed in experiments. We present a thorough investigation of this viewpoint using the mathematical tools of quantum scattering, within the framework of Boltzmann transport theory. In particular, we ask: (a) How and when does a normal diffusive transport become anomalous? (b) What physical attribute of the system is conceptually useful to faithfully rationalize large variations in the coefficient of normal diffusion, observed particularly within the dynamical environment of biological cells? To characterize the diffusive transport, we introduce, analogous to continuous phase transitions, the curvature of the mean square displacement as an order parameter and use the notion of quantum scattering length, which measures the effective interactions between the diffusing molecules and the surrounding, to define a tuning variable, η. We show that the curvature signature conveniently differentiates the normal diffusion regime from the superdiffusion and subdiffusion regimes and the critical point, η = ηc, unambiguously determines the coefficient of normal diffusion. To solve the Boltzmann equation analytically, we use a quantum mechanical expression for the scattering amplitude in the Boltzmann collision term and obtain a general expression for the effective linear collision operator, useful for a variety of transport studies. We also demonstrate that the scattering length is a useful dynamical characteristic to rationalize experimental observations on diffusive transport in complex systems. We assess the numerical accuracy of the present work with representative experimental results on diffusion processes in biological systems. Furthermore, we advance the idea of temperature-dependent effective voltage (of the order of 1 μV or less in a biological environment, for example

  15. Amplitude modulation of alpha-band rhythm caused by mimic collision: MEG study.

    PubMed

    Yokosawa, Koichi; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Kikuzawa, Daichi; Aoyama, Gakuto; Takahashi, Makoto; Kuriki, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Detection of a collision risk and avoiding the collision are important for survival. We have been investigating neural responses when humans anticipate a collision or intend to take evasive action by applying collision-simulating images in a predictable manner. Collision-simulating images and control images were presented in random order to 9 healthy male volunteers. A cue signal was also given visually two seconds before each stimulus to enable each participant to anticipate the upcoming stimulus. Magnetoencephalograms (MEG) were recorded with a 76-ch helmet system. The amplitude of alpha band (8-13 Hz) rhythm when anticipating the upcoming collision-simulating image was significantly smaller than that when anticipating control images even just after the cue signal. This result demonstrates that anticipating a negative (dangerous) event induced event-related desynchronization (ERD) of alpha band activity, probably caused by attention. The results suggest the feasibility of detecting endogenous brain activities by monitoring alpha band rhythm and its possible applications to engineering systems, such as an automatic collision evasion system for automobiles.

  16. Puck collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauge, E. H.

    2012-09-01

    Collisions between two ice hockey pucks sliding on frictionless ice are studied, with both inelasticity and frictional contact between the colliding surfaces of the two pucks taken into account. The latter couples translational and rotational motion. The full solution depends on the sign and magnitude of the initial mismatch between the surface velocities at the point of contact. The initial state defines two physically distinct regimes for the friction coefficient. To illustrate the complexities, we discuss at length the typical situation (well known from curling) when puck number 1 is initially at rest, and is hit by puck number 2 with an arbitrary impact parameter, velocity and angular velocity. We find that the total outgoing angle between the pucks exceeds \\frac{1}{2}\\pi if and only if the collision leads to a net increase in the translational part of the kinetic energy. The conditions for this to happen are scrutinized, and the results are presented both analytically and numerically by a set of representative curves. This paper is written with an ambitious undergraduate, and her teacher, in mind.

  17. Searching for gluon number fluctuations effects in eA collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kugeratski, M. S.; Gonçalves, V. P.; Santana Amaral, J. T. de

    2014-11-11

    We propose to investigate the gluon number fluctuations effects in deep inelastic electron-ion scattering at high energies. We estimate the nuclear structure function F{sub 2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2}), as well the longitudinal and charm contributions, using a generalization for nuclear targets of the Golec-Biernat-Wusthoff (GBW) model which describes the electron proton HERA data. Here we consider that the nucleus at high energies acts as an amplifier of the physics of high parton densities. For a first investigation we study the scattering with Ca and Pb nuclei. Our preliminary results predict that the effects of gluon number fluctuations are small in the region of the future electron ion collider.

  18. Quasiclassical trajectory study of fast H-atom collisions with acetylene.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-Chang; Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M

    2012-06-07

    Translationally hot H collisions with the acetylene are investigated using quasiclassical trajectory calculations, on a recent full-dimensional ab initio-based potential energy surface. Three outcomes are focused on: non-reactive energy transfer via prompt collisions, non-reactive energy transfer via the formation of the vinyl complex, and reactive chemical H-atom exchange, also via complex formation. The details of these outcomes are presented and correlated with the collision lifetime. Large energy transfer is found via complex formation, which can subsequently decay back to reactants, a non-reactive event, or to new products, a reactive event. For the present system, these two events are experimentally indistinguishable.

  19. Evaluation of human behavior in collision avoidance: a study inside immersive virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Michel; Chagnon, Miguel; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2009-04-01

    During our daily displacements, we should consider the individuals advancing toward us in order to avoid a possible collision with our congeneric. We developed an experimental design in a virtual immersion room, which allows us to evaluate human capacities for avoiding collisions with other people. In addition, the design allows participants to interact naturally inside this immersive virtual reality setup when a pedestrian is moving toward them, creating a possible risk of collision. Results suggest that the performance is associated with visual and motor capacities and could be adjusted by cognitive social perception.

  20. Collision tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  1. Garnet geochronology: improvements and application in studying India-Asia collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Matthijs; Scherer, Erik; Mezger, Klaus; Lee, Jeffrey; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Kooijman, Ellen; Stearns, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Garnet enables constraints on all parameters relevant to lithosphere studies: pressure, temperature, strain, and time. This aspect, in combination with its widespread occurrence in metamorphic rocks, make the mineral a prime target in research into the dynamics of mountain belts. Our ability to obtain and interpret precise age constraints from garnet Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd data has greatly improved over the years. This contribution highlights recent enhancements in garnet geochronology and demonstrates the versatility of this method in two case studies set in the India-Asia collision zone. To enable a more effective use of garnet geochronology, we investigated the retentiveness of Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotope signatures in naturally metamorphosed garnet. A grain-size dependent Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd analysis of garnet was done on a sample of a slowly cooled Archean granulite from the Pikwitonei Granulite Domain, Canada. Comparison of the apparent ages to the known thermal history of this rock allowed constraints on chronometer systematics at high temperature. Diffusive re-equilibration is shown to occur to a small (Sm-Nd) to minor, if not insignificant (Lu-Hf), extent during high temperature metamorphism, thus firmly establishing the Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd chronometers as reliable, well-characterized dating tools. Garnet Lu-Hf chronology was done to show that mid-crustal flow and 'Barrovian-type' metamorphism of rocks now exposed in the North Himalayan Gneiss Domes in Central Tibet commenced in the early Eocene. This result is the first to confirm that crustal thickening and contraction in the Tibetan Himalaya was broadly synchronous with the collision between Greater India and Eurasia. Garnet dating and thermometry, and rutile U-Pb thermochronology on granulites from the Pamir (an exposed segment of deep Asia) revealed a history of heating to 750-830 °C, commencing at 37 Ma in the South Pamir and occurring progressively later northward. The data advocate a causal link between Indian slab

  2. An investigation of the effects of the common cold on simulated driving performance and detection of collisions: a laboratory study

    PubMed Central

    Jamson, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present research was to investigate whether individuals with a common cold showed impaired ability on a simulated driving task and the ability to detect potential collisions between moving objects. Design The study involved comparison of a healthy group with a group with colds. These scores were adjusted for individual differences by collecting further data when both groups were healthy and using these scores as covariates. On both occasions, volunteers rated their symptoms and carried out a simulated driving session. On the first occasion, volunteers also carried out a collision detection task. Setting University of Leeds Institute for Transport Studies. Sample Twenty-five students from the University of Leeds. Ten volunteers were healthy on both occasions and 15 had a cold on the first session and were healthy on the second. Main outcome measures In the collision detection task, the main outcomes were correct detections and response to a secondary identification task. In the simulated driving task, the outcomes were speed, lateral control, gap acceptance, overtaking behaviour, car following, vigilance and traffic light violations. Results Those with a cold detected fewer collisions and had a higher divided attention error than those who were healthy. Many basic driving skills were unimpaired by the illness. However, those with a cold were slower at responding to unexpected events and spent a greater percentage of time driving at a headway of <2 s. Conclusions The finding that having a common cold is associated with reduced ability to detect collisions and respond quickly to unexpected events is of practical importance. Further research is now required to examine the efficacy of information campaigns and countermeasures such as caffeine. PMID:22761287

  3. Study of isolated prompt photon production in p -Pb collisions for the ALICE kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goharipour, Muhammad; Mehraban, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Prompt photon production is known as a powerful tool for testing perturbative QCD predictions and also the validity of parton densities in the nucleon and nuclei, especially of the gluon. In this work, we have performed a detailed study on this subject, focusing on the isolated prompt photon production in p -Pb collisions at forward rapidity at the LHC. The impact of input nuclear modifications obtained from different global analyses by various groups on several quantities has been investigated to estimate the order of magnitude of the difference between their predictions. We have also studied in detail the theoretical uncertainties in the results due to various sources. We found that there is a remarkable difference between the predictions from the nCTEQ15 and other groups in all ranges of photon transverse momentum pTγ. Their differences become more explicit in the calculation of the nuclear modification ratio and also the yield asymmetry between the forward and backward rapidities rather than single differential cross sections. We emphasize that future measurements with ALICE will be very useful, not only for decreasing the uncertainty of the gluon nuclear modification, but also to accurately determine its central values, especially in the shadowing region.

  4. A study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (pT > 0.5 GeV/c, |η| < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η-Φspace; “toward”, “away”, and “transverse”. Furthermore, the average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the “underlying event”. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the “hard component” (initial and final-state radiation) from the “beam-beammore » remnant” and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. We found that the center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.« less

  5. A study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (pT > 0.5 GeV/c, |η| < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η-Φspace; “toward”, “away”, and “transverse”. Furthermore, the average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the “underlying event”. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the “hard component” (initial and final-state radiation) from the “beam-beam remnant” and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. We found that the center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  6. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.; Aaltonen, T; Albrow, M; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (p(T) > 0.5 GeV/c, vertical bar eta vertical bar < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies root s = 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta - phi space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  7. Hydrodynamics of discrete-particle models of spherical colloids: a multiparticle collision dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Poblete, Simón; Wysocki, Adam; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic properties of a spherical colloid model, which is composed of a shell of point particles by hybrid mesoscale simulations, which combine molecular dynamics simulations for the sphere with the multiparticle collision dynamics approach for the fluid. Results are presented for the center-of-mass and angular velocity correlation functions. The simulation results are compared with theoretical results for a rigid colloid obtained as a solution of the Stokes equation with no-slip boundary conditions. Similarly, analytical results of a point-particle model are presented, which account for the finite size of the simulated system. The simulation results agree well with both approaches on appropriative time scales; specifically, the long-time correlations are quantitatively reproduced. Moreover, a procedure is proposed to obtain the infinite-system-size diffusion coefficient based on a combination of simulation results and analytical predictions. In addition, we present the velocity field in the vicinity of the colloid and demonstrate its close agreement with the theoretical prediction. Our studies show that a point-particle model of a sphere is very well suited to describe the hydrodynamic properties of spherical colloids, with a significantly reduced numerical effort.

  8. Collision-induced light scattering in a thin xenon layer between graphite slabs - MD study.

    PubMed

    Dawid, A; Górny, K; Wojcieszyk, D; Dendzik, Z; Gburski, Z

    2014-08-14

    The collision-induced light scattering many-body correlation functions and their spectra in thin xenon layer located between two parallel graphite slabs have been investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. The results have been obtained at three different distances (densities) between graphite slabs. Our simulations show the increased intensity of the interaction-induced light scattering spectra at low frequencies for xenon atoms in confined space, in comparison to the bulk xenon sample. Moreover, we show substantial dependence of the interaction-induced light scattering correlation functions of xenon on the distances between graphite slabs. The dynamics of xenon atoms in a confined space was also investigated by calculating the mean square displacement functions and related diffusion coefficients. The structural property of confined xenon layer was studied by calculating the density profile, perpendicular to the graphite slabs. Building of a fluid phase of xenon in the innermost part of the slot was observed. The nonlinear dependence of xenon diffusion coefficient on the separation distance between graphite slabs has been found.

  9. Rotational alignment effects in NO(X) + Ar inelastic collisions: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Eyles, C J; Hornung, B; Nichols, B; Aoiz, F J; Jambrina, P G; Stolte, S; de Miranda, M P

    2013-03-14

    Rotational angular momentum alignment effects in the rotational inelastic scattering of NO(X) with Ar have been investigated by means of close-coupled quantum mechanical, quasi-classical trajectory, and Monte Carlo hard shell scattering calculations. It has been shown that the hard shell nature of the interaction potential at a collision energy of Ecoll = 66 meV is primarily responsible for the rotational alignment of the NO(X) molecule after collision. By contrast, the alternating trend in the quantum mechanical parity resolved alignment parameters with change in rotational state Δj reflects differences in the differential cross sections for NO(X) parity conserving and changing collisions, rather than an underlying difference in the collision induced rotational alignment. This suggests that the rotational alignment and the differential cross sections are sensitive to rather different aspects of the scattering dynamics. The applicability of the kinematic apse model has also been tested and found to be in excellent agreement with exact quantum mechanical scattering theory provided the collision energy is in reasonable excess of the well depth of the NO(X)-Ar potential energy surface.

  10. A New Apparatus for Studies of Low Energy Electron Collisions with Nucleotide Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duron, Jessica; Hargreaves, Leigh

    Low-energy electrons, the most copiously produced by-product of radiation cancer therapy, have been shown to be a strong driver of DNA damage in living cells [1]. Quantitative data describing these collisions are presently rare due to technological challenges in performing electron scattering measurements from the nucleobases, e.g. uracil, thymine, guanine, etc. These challenges include the low-vapor pressure of commercial samples (which are powders at room temperature), and the difficulty in making accurate flow measurements from heated gas sources, required to establish the absolute scale of the measured data. Based on techniques pioneered in positron collision physics [2], a new apparatus is presently undergoing commissioning at the California State University Fullerton, which aims to address these issues. We will make the first cross-section measurements for slow (E0 < 30eV) electron collisions with nucleotides. We will report design parameters and ongoing progress in the commissioning of this new experiment.

  11. Rotational alignment effects in NO(X) + Ar inelastic collisions: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Eyles, C J; Hornung, B; Nichols, B; Aoiz, F J; Jambrina, P G; Stolte, S

    2013-03-14

    Rotational angular momentum alignment effects in the rotationally inelastic collisions of NO(X) with Ar have been investigated at a collision energy of 66 meV by means of hexapole electric field initial state selection coupled with velocity-map ion imaging final state detection. The fully quantum state resolved second rank renormalized polarization dependent differential cross sections determined experimentally are reported for a selection of spin-orbit conserving and changing transitions for the first time. The results are compared with the findings of previous theoretical investigations, and in particular with the results of exact quantum mechanical scattering calculations. The agreement between experiment and theory is generally found to be good throughout the entire scattering angle range. The results reveal that the hard shell nature of the interaction potential is predominantly responsible for the rotational alignment of the NO(X) upon collision with Ar.

  12. Photo and Collision Induced Isomerization of a Cyclic Retinal Derivative: An Ion Mobility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan, Neville J. A.; Scholz, Michael S.; Hansen, Christopher S.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Adamson, Brian D.; Bieske, Evan J.

    2016-09-01

    A cationic degradation product, formed in solution from retinal Schiff base (RSB), is examined in the gas phase using ion mobility spectrometry, photoisomerization action spectroscopy, and collision induced dissociation (CID). The degradation product is found to be N- n-butyl-2-(β-ionylidene)-4-methylpyridinium (BIP) produced through 6π electrocyclization of RSB followed by protonation and loss of dihydrogen. Ion mobility measurements show that BIP exists as trans and cis isomers that can be interconverted through buffer gas collisions and by exposure to light, with a maximum response at λ = 420 nm.

  13. Fragmentation Patterns and Mechanisms of Singly and Doubly Protonated Peptoids Studied by Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianhua; Tian, Yuan; Hossain, Ekram; Connolly, Michael D.

    2016-04-01

    Peptoids are peptide-mimicking oligomers consisting of N-alkylated glycine units. The fragmentation patterns for six singly and doubly protonated model peptoids were studied via collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The experiments were carried out on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source. Both singly and doubly protonated peptoids were found to fragment mainly at the backbone amide bonds to produce peptoid B-type N-terminal fragment ions and Y-type C-terminal fragment ions. However, the relative abundances of B- versus Y-ions were significantly different. The singly protonated peptoids fragmented by producing highly abundant Y-ions and lesser abundant B-ions. The Y-ion formation mechanism was studied through calculating the energetics of truncated peptoid fragment ions using density functional theory and by controlled experiments. The results indicated that Y-ions were likely formed by transferring a proton from the C-H bond of the N-terminal fragments to the secondary amine of the C-terminal fragments. This proton transfer is energetically favored, and is in accord with the observation of abundant Y-ions. The calculations also indicated that doubly protonated peptoids would fragment at an amide bond close to the N-terminus to yield a high abundance of low-mass B-ions and high-mass Y-ions. The results of this study provide further understanding of the mechanisms of peptoid fragmentation and, therefore, are a valuable guide for de novo sequencing of peptoid libraries synthesized via combinatorial chemistry.

  14. Study of open charm production in proton+proton collisions at center of mass energies = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsyk, Sergey

    2005-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with its unique electron identification system enables us to perform high precision measurements of electron yields. By measuring electron production at high transverse momentum, we can disentangle the contribution of electrons originating from semi-leptonic decays of heavy quarks (charm or bottom) from the less interesting "photonic" decay modes of light mesons. D/B mesons carry single heavy valence quarks and are usually referred to as "Open Charm" and "Open Bottom" particles, differentiating them from Closed Flavor particles such as J/psi, and Y mesons. Due to the large mass of the heavy quarks, their production mechanisms can be adequately explained by perturbative QCD (pQCD) theory. This dissertation presents the measurement of electrons from heavy flavor decays in proton + proton collisions at RHIC at collision energy s = 200 GeV over a wide range of transverse moment (0.4 < pT < 5 GeV/c). Two independent analysis techniques of signal extraction were performed. The "Cocktail" subtraction is based on the calculation and subtraction of the expected "photon-related" electron background based upon measured yields of light mesons. The "Converter" subtraction is based upon a direct measurement of photon yields achieved introducing additional material in the PHENIX acceptance and deducing the photon abundance by measuring the increase in electron yield. This is the first measurement of the Open Charm crossection at this collision energy and it is an important baseline measurement for comparison with nucleus + nucleus collisions. The modification of Open Charm production in heavy ion collisions compared to the presented p + p result can be used to study the final state interaction of the heavy quarks with hot dense matter inside the collisions. The results of the Open Charm measurements are compared to current pQCD predictions both in Leading Order (LO) O a2s and Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) O a3s

  15. Electromagnetic effects on meson production: a new tool for studying the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybicki, Andrzej; Szczurek, Antoni; Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Davis, Nikolaos; Ozvenchuk, Vitalii; Kiełbowicz, Mirosław

    2016-11-01

    We review our studies of spectator-induced electromagnetic (EM) effects on the emission of charged mesons in the final state of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. We argue that these effects offer sensitivity to the distance dE between the charged meson formation zone at freeze-out and the spectator system. As such, they can serve as an independent, new tool to probe the space-time and longitudinal evolution of the system created in the collision. As a phenomenological application for this tool in the context of resonance production and decay, we obtain a first estimate of the time of pion emission from EM effects. This we compare to existing HBT data.

  16. Theoretical study of head-on collision of dust acoustic solitary waves in a strongly coupled complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, S. Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2014-05-15

    We investigate the propagation characteristics of two counter propagating dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) undergoing a head-on collision, in the presence of strong coupling between micron sized charged dust particles in a complex plasma. A coupled set of nonlinear dynamical equations describing the evolution of the two DASWs using the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation technique is derived. The nature and extent of post collision phase-shifts of these solitary waves are studied over a wide range of dusty plasma parameters in a strongly and a weakly coupled medium. We find a significant change in the nature and amount of phase delay in the strongly coupled regime as compared to a weakly coupled regime. The phase shift is seen to change its sign beyond a threshold value of compressibility of the medium for a given set of dusty plasma parameters.

  17. A spectroscopic study of hydrogen atom and molecule collision. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kielkopf, John F.

    2002-07-01

    The fundamental processes which occur in low-energy collisions of excited states of the hydrogen atom with other neutral atoms, protons, and electrons in dense plasmas were investigated in this project. Theoretical and experimental results for the Lyman and Balmer series are described here, including references to recent publications resulting from this project.

  18. Studies of the nucler equation of state using numerical calculations of nuclear drop collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso, C. T.; Leblanc, J. M.; Wilson, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical calculation for the full thermal dynamics of colliding nuclei was developed. Preliminary results are reported for the thermal fluid dynamics in such processes as Coulomb scattering, fusion, fusion-fission, bulk oscillations, compression with heating, and collisions of heated nuclei.

  19. Studies of relativistic heavy ion collisions. Final report, July 16, 1987--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Madansky, L.

    1997-12-31

    As a member of the DLS collaboration, the Hopkins group participated in all aspects of the experiment and the analysis of the results. The recent work involved measurements of dielectrons from p-p, p-d collisions as well as heavy ion Ca-Ca collisions at high densities. These results show the expected effects of bremsstrahlung vector meson decay and Dalitz decay but still show that some varieties of the low mass cross-sections disagree with various theoretical estimates, which could indicate other effects of high nuclear density. The Hopkins group has also been an initial member of the STAR collaboration and helped initiate the proposal for jet searches in the heavy ion experiments at RHIC. The group was instrumental in initiating the first stage of an electro-magnetic calorimeter for these experiments. The group also joined (E896) the Ho experiment. This work was primarily devoted to finding the existence of an elementary system containing strange quarks. An initial experiment was done recently at which Hopkins provided various beam counters. The final work is expected to commence in the fall of `98. Finally, the group has contributed to a number of experiments involving polarization effects in nuclear collisions, searching for production of antimatter, and other aspects of relativistic collisions of heavy ions using the facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

  20. Experimal study of young male drivers' responses to vehicle collision using EMG of lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenhai; Li, Chuzhao; Hu, Hongyu; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Chaoyang; Yu, Huili

    2015-01-01

    A driver's response to a front-coming vehicle collision consists of braking reaction time and braking behavior. The purpose was to investigate drivers' responses at different speeds, relative distances, and particularly the behavior on the accelerator at the collision moment. Twelve young men participated in driving simulator tests. Vehicle parameters and electromyograms (EMGs) of the drivers' tibialis anterior muscles were recorded and responses were analyzed. The drivers' braking reaction time windows were divided into pre-motor time, muscle activation time, accelerator release time, and movement time. By comparing the reaction times and collision times, braking behaviors were investigated. It was found that movement times (r = -0.281) decreased with speed. Pre-motor times (r = 0.326) and muscle activation times (r = 0.281) increased with relative distance. At the collision moment, the probability of the driver's lower extremity being on the accelerator, in the air, and on the brake pedal was 7.4%, 18.9%, and 73.7%, respectively. With higher speeds and smaller distances, the lower extremity was more likely to be in the air or even on the accelerator in different muscle activation states. The driver will collide in normal driving postures which muscles are not or not fully activated in very urgent situation.

  1. Experimental Study of Collision Detection Schema Used by Pilots During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1996-01-01

    An experimental flight simulator study was conducted to examine the mental alerting logic and thresholds used by subjects to issue an alert and execute an avoidance maneuver. Subjects flew a series of autopilot landing approaches with traffic on a closely-spaced parallel approach; during some runs, the traffic would deviate towards the subject and the subject was to indicate the point when they recognized the potential traffic conflict, and then indicate a direction of flight for an avoidance maneuver. A variety of subjects, including graduate students, general aviation pilots and airline pilots, were tested. Five traffic displays were evaluated, with a moving map TCAS-type traffic display as a baseline. A side-task created both high and low workload situations. Subjects appeared to use the lateral deviation of the intruder aircraft from its approach path as the criteria for an alert regardless of the display available. However, with displays showing heading and/or trend information, their alerting thresholds were significantly lowered. This type of range-only schema still resulted in many near misses, as a high convergence rate was often established by the time of the subject's alert. Therefore, the properties of the intruder's trajectory had the greatest effect on the resultant near miss rate; no display system reliably caused alerts timely enough for certain collision avoidance. Subjects' performance dropped significantly on a side-task while they analyzed the need for an alert, showing alert generation can be a high workload situation at critical times. No variation was found between subjects with and with out piloting experience. These results suggest the design of automatic alerting systems should take into account the range-type alerting schema used by the human, such that the rationale for the automatic alert should be obvious to, and trusted by, the operator. Although careful display design may help generate pilot/automation trust, issues such as user non

  2. An airborne magnetometry study across Zagros collision zone along Ahvaz-Isfahan route in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskooi, Behrooz; Abedi, Maysam

    2015-12-01

    Convergence between the Eurasian and Arabian plates formed the Zagros orogenic belt between Late Cretaceous and Pliocene as a relatively young and active fold-thrust belt in Iran. The structural geology along Ahvaz to Isfahan route across Zagros is investigated employing magnetic data in order to determine the crustal structure in the collision zone of the two Palaeo-continents. Airborne magnetometry data with a line space of survey of 7.5 km have been used to image the variations of the apparent magnetic susceptibility along this route. At first the airborne data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance subtle changes of the Earth's magnetic field. Then 3D inverse modeling of magnetic data was implemented, while the cross section of the magnetic susceptibility variations along the route was mapped down to a depth of 100 km. The acquired magnetic susceptibility model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data as well. In addition, the analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole magnetic data leading to the determination of active faults in Zagros fold-thrust belt (ZFTB) structural zone based upon the generated peaks. Some probable locations of fault events were also suggested in Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ). The locations of faults correspond well to the magnetic susceptibility variations on the inverted section. Probable direction, slope and depth extension of these faults were also plotted on the magnetic susceptibility model, showing an intensively tectonized zone of the SSZ. The main difference between two domains is that the Eurasian plate seems to contain high magnetic susceptible materials compared to the Arabian plate. The recovered model of the apparent magnetic susceptibility values indicated that the average thickness of the non-magnetic sedimentary units is about 11 km and the Curie depth locates approximately at depth of 24 km for the whole studied area.

  3. Computational Study of Electron-Molecule Collisions Related to Low-Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Computational study of electron-molecule collisions not only complements experimental measurements, but can also be used to investigate processes not readily accessible experimentally. A number of ab initio computational methods are available for these types of calculations. Here we describe a recently developed technique, the finite element Z-matrix method, Analogous to the R-matrix, method, it partitions the space into regions and employs real matrix elements. However, unlike the implementation of the R-matrix method commonly used in atomic and molecular physics, the Z-matrix method is fully variational. In the present implementation, a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians is used to represent the continuum electron, thus offering full flexibility without imposing fixed boundary conditions. Numerical examples include the electron-impact dissociation of N2 via the metastable A3Su+ state, a process which may be important in the lower thermosphere, and the dissociation of the CF radical, a process of interest to plasma etching. To understand the dissociation pathways, large scale quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for all target states which dissociate to the lowest five limits in the case of N2, and to the lowest two limits in the case of CF. For N2, the structural calculations clearly show the preference for predissociation if the initial state is the ground X1 Sg+ state, but direct dissociation appears to be preferable if the initial state is the A3Su+ state. Multi-configuration SCF target functions are used in the collisional calculation.

  4. Experimental study of the space-time development of the particle production process in hadron-nucleon collisions, using massive target nucleus as a detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental study of the space-time development of the particle production process in hadronic collisions at its initial stage was performed. Massive target nuclei have been used as fine detectors of properties of the particle production process development within time intervals smaller than 10 to the 22nd power s and spatial distances smaller than 10 to the 12th power cm. In hadron-nucleon collisions, in particular in nucleon-nucleon collisions, the particle production process goes through intermediate objects in 2 yields 2 type endoergic reactions. The objects decay into commonly observed resonances and paricles.

  5. Trajectory and Model Studies of Collisions of Highly Excited Methane with Water Using an ab Initio Potential.

    PubMed

    Conte, Riccardo; Houston, Paul L; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-12-17

    Quasi-classical trajectory studies have been performed for the collision of internally excited methane with water using an accurate methane-water potential based on a full-dimensional, permutationally invariant analytical representation of energies calculated at a high level of theory. The results suggest that most energy transfer takes place at impact parameters smaller than about 8 Bohr; collisions at higher impact parameters are mostly elastic. Overall, energy transfer is fairly facile, with values for ⟨ΔEdown⟩ and ⟨ΔEup⟩ approaching almost 2% of the total excitation energy. A classical model previously developed for the collision of internally excited molecules with atoms (Houston, P. L.; Conte, R.; Bowman, J. M. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 4695-4710) has been extended to cover collisions of internally excited molecules with other molecules. For high initial rotational levels, the agreement with the trajectory results is quite good (R(2) ≈ 0.9), whereas for low initial rotational levels it is only fair (R(2) ≈ 0.7). Both the model and the trajectories can be characterized by a four-dimensional joint probability distribution, P(J1,f,ΔE1,J2,f,ΔE2), where J1,f and J2,f are the final rotational levels of molecules 1 and 2 and ΔE1 and ΔE2 are the respective changes in internal energy. A strong anticorrelation between ΔE1 and ΔE2 is observed in both the model and trajectory results and can be explained by the model. There is evidence in the trajectory results for a small amount of V ↔ V energy transfer from the water, which has low internal energy, to the methane, which has substantial internal energy. This observation suggests that V ↔ V energy transfer in the other direction also occurs.

  6. A study on the static and impact structural behavior of concrete filled steel tubular members under Tsunami flotsam collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effendi, Mahmud Kori; Kawano, Akihiko

    2017-03-01

    The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake triggered the Tsunami which caused massive great damage of the structural building either by the Tsunami waves themselves or by the Tsunami flotsam impact. With respect to the wave pressure, the loads by wave pressure are treated as statically equivalent loads. On the other hand, with respect to the collision of flotsam, the quantitative design method has not been established so far. The collision between Tsunami flotsam and concrete filled steel tubular (CFT) member is studied. Specimens consist of square, circular, and diamond cross-sectional shapes. The three dimensional finite element analysis (FEM) by MSC Marc Mentat (2012) was performed to evaluate static behavior of CFT members subjected to concentrated lateral load. The tip shape of lateral load is intended the collision with Tsunami flotsam. The solid element is used for steel tubes and infill concrete, respectively. The contact analysis between tip shapes of load and the steel as well as the concrete and steel are also considered. The fiber element analysis program developed by Kawano (1995) is employed to the impact response analysis. The members are modelled by beam-column elements with a cross section consisting of stress fibers. The collision model is developed to consider that Tsunami flotsam with the velocity 7m/sec collides with the CFT members. The gap element is employed to model the contact and separation between Tsunami flotsam and CFT members. The precision of analytical models of the FEM analysis and the frame analysis is confirmed by the comparison with the experimental test results. The FEM analysis is capable reproducing the deflected shape of the static test which also same as those of impact test results. It is discussed the comparison of energy absorption capacity of a CFT member under both impact and static loading.

  7. A novel facility for reduced-gravity testing: A setup for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, C.; Murdoch, N.; Cherrier, O.; Morales Serrano, S.; Valeria Nardi, C.; Janin, T.; Avila Martinez, I.; Gourinat, Y.; Mimoun, D.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents an experimental design for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces in low-gravity. In the experiment apparatus, reduced-gravity is simulated by releasing a free-falling projectile into a surface container with a downward acceleration less than that of Earth's gravity. The acceleration of the surface is controlled through the use of an Atwood machine, or a system of pulleys and counterweights. The starting height of the surface container and the initial separation distance between the projectile and surface are variable and chosen to accommodate collision velocities up to 20 cm/s and effective accelerations of ˜0.1 to 1.0 m/s2. Accelerometers, placed on the surface container and inside the projectile, provide acceleration data, while high-speed cameras capture the collision and act as secondary data sources. The experiment is built into an existing 5.5 m drop tower frame and requires the custom design of all components, including the projectile, surface sample container, release mechanism, and deceleration system. Data from calibration tests verify the efficiency of the experiment's deceleration system and provide a quantitative understanding of the performance of the Atwood system.

  8. A numerical study of the derailment caused by collision of a rail vehicle using a virtual testing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun Jik; Koo, Jeong Seo

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the wheel-lift and roll-over derailment mechanisms caused by train collisions using a precise virtual testing model (VTM) of a Korean high-speed train. The VTM was a complex, nonlinear finite element model composed of the shell, beam, solid, spring, and surface contact elements for the car body, bogies, suspensions, and wheel-rail interfaces. The VTM was validated by checking the errors in the total energy and the dynamic responses of the spring elements. To achieve a quick, dynamic relaxation of the dead weight of the VTM before the collision analysis, the artificial damping method and the artificial force method were introduced and numerically evaluated. The surface-to-surface contact model from commercial software, Ls-Dyna, was applied to the VTM in order to simulate the derailment mechanisms caused by collision accidents. The numerical analyses of the VTM colliding with a large deformable obstacle or a rigid wall revealed for the first time that a mixed slip/roll-over-type derailment mechanism generally occurs. Furthermore, the simulation results were consistent with the results from a simplified theoretical derailment model of a wheel set.

  9. A novel facility for reduced-gravity testing: A setup for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sunday, C; Murdoch, N; Cherrier, O; Morales Serrano, S; Valeria Nardi, C; Janin, T; Avila Martinez, I; Gourinat, Y; Mimoun, D

    2016-08-01

    This work presents an experimental design for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces in low-gravity. In the experiment apparatus, reduced-gravity is simulated by releasing a free-falling projectile into a surface container with a downward acceleration less than that of Earth's gravity. The acceleration of the surface is controlled through the use of an Atwood machine, or a system of pulleys and counterweights. The starting height of the surface container and the initial separation distance between the projectile and surface are variable and chosen to accommodate collision velocities up to 20 cm/s and effective accelerations of ∼0.1 to 1.0 m/s(2). Accelerometers, placed on the surface container and inside the projectile, provide acceleration data, while high-speed cameras capture the collision and act as secondary data sources. The experiment is built into an existing 5.5 m drop tower frame and requires the custom design of all components, including the projectile, surface sample container, release mechanism, and deceleration system. Data from calibration tests verify the efficiency of the experiment's deceleration system and provide a quantitative understanding of the performance of the Atwood system.

  10. Collisions of energetic particles with atoms, molecules & solids: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quashie, Edwin Exam

    used in studying the ion-molecule interactions at lower ion velocities. We reported here H+ + CH4 collision dynamics at E = 30 eV. Different exchange-correlation (XC) approximations were implemented and their important roles are studied systematically. For a single orientation of CH4 our rainbow angle at E = 30 eV agrees well with experimental and other theoretical values.

  11. Eye movement and brake reactions to real world brake-capacity forward collision warnings--a naturalistic driving study.

    PubMed

    Wege, Claudia; Will, Sebastian; Victor, Trent

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this field operational test study is to assess visual attention allocation and brake reactions in response to a brake-capacity forward collision warning (B-FCW), which is designed similarly to all forward collision warnings on the market for trucks. Truck drivers' reactions immediately after the warning (threat-period) as well as a few seconds after the warning (post-threat-recovery-period) are analyzed, both with and without taking into consideration the predictability of an event and driver distraction. A B-FCW system interface should immediately direct visual attention toward the threat and allow the driver to make a quick decision about whether or not to brake. To investigate eye movement reactions, we analyzed glances 30s before and 15s after 60 naturally occurring collision warning events. The B-FCW events were extracted from the Volvo euroFOT database, which contains data from 30 Volvo trucks driving for approximately 40000 h for four million kilometers. Statistical analyses show that a B-FCW leads to immediate attention allocation toward the roadway and drivers hit the brake. In addition to this intended effect during the threat-period, a rather unexpected effect within the post-threat-recovery-period was discovered in unpredictable events and events with distracted drivers. A few seconds after a warning is issued, eye movements are directed away from the road toward the warning source in the instrument cluster. This potentially indicates that the driver is seeking to understand the circumstances of the warning. Potential reasons for this are discussed: properties relating to the termination of the warning information, the position of the visual and/or audio warning, the conspicuity of the warning, the duration of the warning, and the modality of the warning. The present results are particularly valuable because all on-market collision warning systems in trucks (and almost all in cars) involve visual warnings positioned in the instrument

  12. A stochastic, local mode study of neon-liquid surface collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Phillips, Leon F

    2011-01-14

    Equations of motion for a fast, light rare gas atom passing over a liquid surface are derived and used to infer the dynamics of neon collisions with squalane and perfluorinated polyether surfaces from experimental data. The equations incorporate the local mode model of a liquid surface via a stochastic process and explicitly account for impulsive collisional energy loss to the surface. The equations predict angular distributions for scattering of neon that are in good quantitative agreement with experimental data. Our key dynamical conclusions are that experimental angular distributions derive mainly from local mode surface topography rather than from structural features of individual surface molecules, and that the available data for these systems can be accounted for almost exclusively by single collisions between neon atoms and the liquid surface.

  13. Ion-biomolecule collisions studied within the independent atom model including geometric screening corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdde, H. J.; Achenbach, A.; Kalkbrenner, T.; Jankowiak, H. C.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    A recently introduced model to account for geometric screening corrections in an independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions is applied to proton collisions from amino acids and DNA and RNA nucleobases. The correction coefficients are obtained from using a pixel counting method (PCM) for the exact calculation of the effective cross sectional area that emerges when the molecular cross section is pictured as a structure of (overlapping) atomic cross sections. This structure varies with the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to the projectile beam direction and, accordingly, orientation-independent total cross sections are obtained from averaging the pixel count over many orientations. We present net capture and net ionization cross sections over wide ranges of impact energy and analyze the strength of the screening effect by comparing the PCM results with Bragg additivity rule cross sections and with experimental data where available. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  14. A TPC detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; Arthur, A.; Beiser, F.; Harnden, C.W.; Jones, R.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lee, K.; Matis, H.S.; Nakamura, M.; McParland, C.; Nesbitt, D.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Pugh, H.G.; Ritter, H.G.; Symons, T.J.M.; Weiman, H.; Wright, R. ); Rudge, A. )

    1990-04-01

    The design of the time projection chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity ({approx}200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described.

  15. A case study of a collision tumor composed of cancers of the bile duct and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hideki; Furukawa, Daisuke; Yazawa, Naoki; Masuoka, Yoshihito; Yamada, Misuzu; Tobita, Kosuke; Kawashima, Yohei; Ogawa, Masami; Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Nakagohri, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    In this case report, we describe the extremely rare case of a collision tumor comprising cancers of the bile duct and the pancreas. A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of obstructive jaundice. He was diagnosed with pancreatic head cancer, and we performed a pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection. At laparotomy, there were two palpable masses in the vicinity of the confluence of the cystic duct and the head of the pancreas. The resected specimen demonstrated tumors at the confluence of the cystic duct and in the pancreatic head. Histopathological examination demonstrated a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma in the pancreatic head and a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma at the confluence of the cystic duct. Immunostaining was negative for p53 and MUC6 in the pancreatic head tumor; however, immunostaining was positive for both in the tumor located at the confluence of the cystic duct. The two tumors were histologically different and were diagnosed as collision cancer caused by the collision of the bile duct and pancreatic cancers.

  16. Predicting Risk of Motor Vehicle Collisions in Patients with Glaucoma: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Carolina P. B.; Tatham, Andrew J.; Boer, Erwin R.; Abe, Ricardo Y.; Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Rosen, Peter N.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of longitudinal Useful Field of View (UFOV) and simulated driving measurements to predict future occurrence of motor vehicle collision (MVC) in drivers with glaucoma. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Participants 117 drivers with glaucoma followed for an average of 2.1 ± 0.5 years. Methods All subjects had standard automated perimetry (SAP), UFOV, driving simulator, and cognitive assessment obtained at baseline and every 6 months during follow-up. The driving simulator evaluated reaction times to high and low contrast peripheral divided attention stimuli presented while negotiating a winding country road, with central driving task performance assessed as “curve coherence”. Drivers with MVC during follow-up were identified from Department of Motor Vehicle records. Main Outcome Measures Survival models were used to evaluate the ability of driving simulator and UFOV to predict MVC over time, adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results Mean age at baseline was 64.5 ± 12.6 years. 11 of 117 (9.4%) drivers had a MVC during follow-up. In the multivariable models, low contrast reaction time was significantly predictive of MVC, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.19 per 1 SD slower reaction time (95% CI, 1.30 to 3.69; P = 0.003). UFOV divided attention was also significantly predictive of MVC with a HR of 1.98 per 1 SD worse (95% CI, 1.10 to 3.57; P = 0.022). Global SAP visual field indices in the better or worse eye were not predictive of MVC. The longitudinal model including driving simulator performance was a better predictor of MVC compared to UFOV (R2 = 0.41 vs R2 = 0.18). Conclusions Longitudinal divided attention metrics on the UFOV test and during simulated driving were significantly predictive of risk of MVC in glaucoma patients. These findings may help improve the understanding of factors associated with driving impairment related to glaucoma. PMID:26426342

  17. Cold collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in a magnetic field: An ab initio study of He + CH2(X~) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Grinev, T. A.; Yu, H.-G.; Dalgarno, A.; Kłos, Jacek; Ma, Lifang; Alexander, Millard H.

    2012-09-01

    We develop a rigorous quantum mechanical theory for collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. The theory is based on a fully uncoupled space-fixed basis set representation of the multichannel scattering wave function. Explicit expressions are presented for the matrix elements of the scattering Hamiltonian for spin-1/2 and spin-1 polyatomic molecular radicals interacting with structureless targets. The theory is applied to calculate the cross sections and thermal rate constants for spin relaxation in low-temperature collisions of the prototypical organic molecule methylene [CH_2(tilde{X}^3B_1)] with He atoms. To this end, two accurate three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the He-CH_2(tilde{X}^3B_1) complex are developed using the state-of-the-art coupled-cluster method including single and double excitations along with a perturbative correction for triple excitations and large basis sets. Both PESs exhibit shallow minima and are weakly anisotropic. Our calculations show that spin relaxation in collisions of CH2, CHD, and CD2 molecules with He atoms occurs at a much slower rate than elastic scattering over a large range of temperatures (1 μK-1 K) and magnetic fields (0.01-1 T), suggesting excellent prospects for cryogenic helium buffer-gas cooling of ground-state ortho-CH_2(tilde{X}^3B_1) molecules in a magnetic trap. Furthermore, we find that ortho-CH2 undergoes collision-induced spin relaxation much more slowly than para-CH2, which indicates that magnetic trapping can be used to separate nuclear spin isomers of open-shell polyatomic molecules.

  18. Cold collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in a magnetic field: an ab initio study of He + CH2(X) collisions.

    PubMed

    Tscherbul, T V; Grinev, T A; Yu, H-G; Dalgarno, A; Kłos, Jacek; Ma, Lifang; Alexander, Millard H

    2012-09-14

    We develop a rigorous quantum mechanical theory for collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. The theory is based on a fully uncoupled space-fixed basis set representation of the multichannel scattering wave function. Explicit expressions are presented for the matrix elements of the scattering Hamiltonian for spin-1/2 and spin-1 polyatomic molecular radicals interacting with structureless targets. The theory is applied to calculate the cross sections and thermal rate constants for spin relaxation in low-temperature collisions of the prototypical organic molecule methylene [CH(2)(X(3)B(1))] with He atoms. To this end, two accurate three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the He-CH(2)(X(3)B(1)) complex are developed using the state-of-the-art coupled-cluster method including single and double excitations along with a perturbative correction for triple excitations and large basis sets. Both PESs exhibit shallow minima and are weakly anisotropic. Our calculations show that spin relaxation in collisions of CH(2), CHD, and CD(2) molecules with He atoms occurs at a much slower rate than elastic scattering over a large range of temperatures (1 μK-1 K) and magnetic fields (0.01-1 T), suggesting excellent prospects for cryogenic helium buffer-gas cooling of ground-state ortho-CH(2)(X(3)B(1)) molecules in a magnetic trap. Furthermore, we find that ortho-CH(2) undergoes collision-induced spin relaxation much more slowly than para-CH(2), which indicates that magnetic trapping can be used to separate nuclear spin isomers of open-shell polyatomic molecules.

  19. Computational Study of Collisions Between O(3P) and NO(2Pi) at Temperatures Relevant to the Hypersonic Flight Regime

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-29

    LIST DTIC/OCP 8725 John J. Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official Record... AFRL -RV-PS- AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2015-0072 TR-2015-0072 COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF COLLISIONS BETWEEN O(3P) AND NO(2Π) AT TEMPERATURES RELEVANT TO THE...UNLIMITED. AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, NM

  20. F + H2 collisions on two electronic potential energy surfaces - Quantum-mechanical study of the collinear reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, I. H.; Baer, M.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    Collinear quantum calculations are carried out for reactive F + H2 collisions on two electronic potential energy surfaces. The resulting transmission and reflection probabilities exhibit much greater variation with energy than single-surface studies would lead us to anticipate. Transmission to low-lying product channels is increased by orders of magnitude by the presence of the second surface; however, branching ratios among product states are found to be independent of the initial electronic state of the reactants. These apparently contradictory aspects of the calculation are discussed and a tentative explanation put forward to resolve them.

  1. Pion shadowing as a tool to study the topology of heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A.C.; Turrisi, R.; Barbera, R.; Riggi, F.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R.; Russo, G.

    1997-05-01

    The pion reabsorption effect has been exploited, through a new analysis technique, to study the topological distribution of nuclear matter in the course of a heavy-ion collision at intermediate energies. The azimuthal angular distribution of pions with respect to the reaction plane and the angular correlations between pions and projectilelike fragments have been investigated. Quantitative estimations of the pion production time scale and of the impact parameter range involved are provided. The experimental results are successfully compared with the predictions of a microscopic theoretical model based on the solution of the Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov transport equation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Observational and modeling studies of collision-coalescence in marine stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Mikael K.

    Low clouds cover over a quarter of the planet's surface in the annual mean and exert a significant cooling effect on global climate. Despite their importance, the representation of such clouds in global circulation models remains a major source of uncertainty in projections of future climate. The lifetime of such clouds can be modified by precipitation, which is observed to occur 20--40% of the time in stratocumulus over the ocean. The processes by which precipitation forms are also highly uncertain and accurate quantitative precipitation forecasting remains a grand challenge in meteorology. The goal of this research is to explore and evaluate the representation of clouds in observations and models of the atmosphere, with a focus on improving our understanding of the primary process responsible for liquid precipitation formation, collision-coalescence. The first goal of this research is to develop a metric for the dynamical "age" of small cumulus for use in contexting in situ observations. The lifetime of shallow cumulus is typically under an hour hence the metric must be accurate for a single measurement of the cloud. It is found that the deviation of cloud total water mixing ratio from the mean surface mixed layer total water mixing ratio is an effective measure because the mechanism by which total water mixing ratio is diluted, entrainment, is irreversible. Collision-coalescence is notoriously difficult to observe in situ and its implementation in models of the atmosphere is highly uncertain because it is an inherently local process, dependent on interactions of drops on length scales as small as micrometers. The second goal of this dissertation is to assess the ability of theoretically derived collision-coalescence rates to explain observations of cloud drops in marine stratocumulus off the coast of Monterey, California. Drop size spectra averaged over length scales of 1.5 and 30 kilometers are found to require enhancements of collision rates that vary as a

  3. A TPC (Time Projection Chamber) detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; Arthur, A.; Bieser, F.; Harnden, C.W.; Jones, R.; Klienfelder, S.; Lee, K.; Matis, H.S.; Nakamura, M.; McParland, C.; Nesbitt, D.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Pugh, H.G.; Ritter, H.G.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wieman, H.; Wright, M.; Wright, R. ); Rudge, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity ({approx} 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. An updated study of the O+ - O collision frequency using corresponding FPI and ISR thermospheric wind experiments at Millstone Hill.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Lima, A. J.; Holt, J. M.; Noto, J.

    2015-12-01

    O+-O collision frequency is an important aeronomic parameter associated with upper atmospheric momentum and energy exchanges between O+ and O. In an analysis of Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) and Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) data, Burnside [1987] suggested a modification factor (1.7) to the traditional value of O+-O collision frequency. Determining more accurately the Burnside Factor has been the subject for many prior studies with different techniques. This study revisits the Burnside Factor by using an extended FPI and ISR dataset from Millstone Hill. The FPI data used are from an updated high-resolution instrument, which began operation in 2009. The study included data from 95 nights between 2010 and 2015 when the FPI and ISR (with both zenith and steerable antennas) were all operating. Nights with high Ap were excluded, leaving 1235 data points in total. The same frequentist approach applied previously in Buonsanto et al. [1997] (using 21 experiments) yields similar right-skewed Burnside Factor distribution on this data. In this study we will discuss results derived using different statistical approaches, including median, mean, and the Bayes theorem. The latter method appears to give an estimated median well below 1.0.

  5. Electron-Electron Interaction in Ion-Atom Collisions Studied by Projectile State-Resolved Auger Electron Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Do-Hyung

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the problem of dynamic electron-electron interactions in fast ion-atom collisions using projectile Auger electron spectroscopy. The study was carried out by measuring high-resolution projectile KLL Auger electron spectra as a function of projectile energy for the various collision systems of 0.25-2 MeV/u O^{q+} and F^ {q+} incident on H_2 and He targets. The electrons were detected in the beam direction, where the kinematic broadening is minimized. A zero-degree tandem electron spectrometer system was developed and showed the versatility of zero-degree measurements of collisionally-produced atomic states. The zero-degree binary encounter electrons (BEe), quasifree target electrons ionized by the projectiles in head-on collisions, were observed as a strong background in the KLL Auger electron spectrum. They were studied by treating the target ionization as 180^circ Rutherford elastic scattering in the projectile frame, and resulted in a validity test of the impulse approximation (IA) and a way to determine the spectrometer efficiency. An anomalous q-dependence, in which the zero-degree BEe yields increase with decreasing projectile charge state (q), was observed. State-resolved KLL Auger cross sections were determined by using the BEe normalization and thus the cross sections of the electron -electron interactions such as resonant transfer-excitation (RTE), electron-electron excitation (eeE), and electron -electron ionization (eeI) were determined. Projectile 2l capture with 1s to 2p excitation by the captured target electron was observed as an RTE process with Li-like and He-like projectiles and the measured RTEA (RTE followed by Auger decay) cross sections showed good agreement with an RTE-IA treatment and RTE alignment theory. Projectile 1s to 2p excitation by a target electron was observed an an eeE process with Li-like projectiles. Projectile 1s ionization by a target electron was observed as an eeI process with Be-like projectiles

  6. Examining the Association Between Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Motor Vehicle Collision Involvement: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McGwin, Gerald; Mitchell, Bradford; Searcey, Karen; Albert, Michael A.; Feist, Richard; Mason, John O.; Thomley, Martin; Owsley, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about motor vehicle collision (MVC) risk in older drivers with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The purpose of this study is to examine associations between MVC involvement and AMD presence and severity. Methods In a retrospective cohort study pooling the samples from four previous studies, we examined associations between MVC rate and older drivers with early, intermediate, or advanced AMD as compared to those in normal eye health. MVC data were based on accident reports obtained from the state agency that compiles this information. Results MVC rate was highest among those in normal eye health and progressively declined among those with early and intermediate disease, and then increased for those with advanced AMD. However, only for drivers with intermediate AMD was the MVC rate significantly different (lower) as compared to those in normal eye health, regardless of whether the rate was defined in terms of person-years (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13–0.89) or person-miles (RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.13–0.91) of driving. Conclusion These results suggest that older drivers with intermediate AMD have a reduced risk of collision involvement. Further research should investigate whether self-regulatory driving practices by these drivers (avoiding challenging driving situations) underlies this reduced risk. PMID:23832967

  7. Will Allis Prize for the Study of Ionized Gases: Electron Collisions - Experiment, Theory, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, and molecules represent one of the very early topics of quantum mechanics. In spite of the field's maturity, a number of recent developments in detector technology (e.g., the ``reaction microscope'' or the ``magnetic-angle changer'') and the rapid increase in computational resources have resulted in significant progress in the measurement, understanding, and theoretical/computational description of few-body Coulomb problems. Close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists worldwide continue to produce high-quality benchmark data, which allow for thoroughly testing and further developing a variety of theoretical approaches. As a result, it has now become possible to reliably calculate the vast amount of atomic data needed for detailed modelling of the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres, the interpretation of astrophysical data, optimizing the energy transport in reactive plasmas, and many other topics - including light-driven processes, in which electrons are produced by continuous or short-pulse ultra-intense electromagnetic radiation. I will highlight some of the recent developments that have had a major impact on the field. This will be followed by showcasing examples, in which accurate electron collision data enabled applications in fields beyond traditional AMO physics. Finally, open problems and challenges for the future will be outlined. I am very grateful for fruitful scientific collaborations with many colleagues, and the long-term financial support by the NSF through the Theoretical AMO and Computational Physics programs, as well as supercomputer resources through TeraGrid and XSEDE.

  8. Study of the fragmentation of a displacement cascade in subcascades within the Binary Collision Approximation framework

    SciTech Connect

    Luneville, Laurence; Simone, David; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    When a material is subjected to irradiation, many primary defects are cre- ated at the atomic level by sequences of ballistic collision events to form highly disordered regions defined as displacement cascades. The long term evolution of materials under irradiation is dictated by the number and the spatial distribution of the surviving defects in the displacement cascade. The peculiar power law shape of collision cross sections is responsible for the frag- mentation of a displacement cascade into smaller subcascades. However, it remains difficult to define a subcascade. Within the fractal geometry frame- work, we demonstrate in this work that the set of atomic trajectories in a displacement cascade exhibit a fractal behavior. From this analysis, we present a new criterion to describe the fragmentation of a displacement cas- cade and to calculate the distribution and the number of defects from this fragmentation. Such an analysis provides the natural framework to estimate the number of defects created in a displacement cascade to integrate with results of MD simulations. From this defiintion of the fragmentation of a displacement cascade, this work gives some new insights to describe both the primary defects produced in a material under irradiation and then to compare different irradiations performed with different particles.

  9. Study of injuries combining computer simulation in motorcycle-car collision accidents.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Jin, Xian-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Yun; Shen, Jie; Chen, Yi-Jiu; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2008-05-20

    This paper presents the approach of computer simulation to clarify the questions faced by forensic experts about what causes the various injuries characteristic of two motorcycle victims, including the motorcycle driver and the back seat occupant on the motorcycle, and how to exactly confirm which one of them is the motorcycle driver. Two typical motorcycle-car accident cases were reconstructed to analyze the movement and the load of both the motorcycle driver and the back seat occupant in the collision course. In case one, the back seat occupant suffered fatal head injuries when he fell on the ground after being thrown higher than the motorcycle driver over the top of the car. In case two, the compressive force loaded by the right tibia of the back seat occupant was larger and more durative compared with the motorcycle driver; the back seat occupant suffered a bursting fracture injury of his right tibia. These results might be useful for forensic experts in dealing with similar motorcycle-car collision accidents in the future.

  10. Productivity of "collisions generate heat" for reconciling an energy model with mechanistic reasoning: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Robertson, Amy D.

    2015-06-01

    We observe teachers in professional development courses about energy constructing mechanistic accounts of energy transformations. We analyze a case in which teachers investigating adiabatic compression develop a model of the transformation of kinetic energy to thermal energy. Among their ideas is the idea that thermal energy is generated as a byproduct of individual particle collisions, which is represented in science education research literature as an obstacle to learning. We demonstrate that in this instructional context, the idea that individual particle collisions generate thermal energy is not an obstacle to learning, but instead is productive: it initiates intellectual progress. Specifically, this idea initiates the reconciliation of the teachers' energy model with mechanistic reasoning about adiabatic compression, and leads to a canonically correct model of the transformation of kinetic energy into thermal energy. We claim that the idea's productivity is influenced by features of our particular instructional context, including the instructional goals of the course, the culture of collaborative sense making, and the use of certain representations of energy.

  11. Neo-Alpine orogeny: a case study for micro-ocean micro-plate subduction and collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissling, E.; Lippitsch, R.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Schmid, S.

    2003-04-01

    In the tectonically complex Alpine region, three different plates (European, Adriatic, and Ligurian) amalgamated when the orogen formed. Knowledge of the actual structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system is of great importance for understanding the evolution of this orogen and the interactions between the three lithospheric blocks. In order to illuminate the structure of the uppermost mantle high-resolution teleseismic tomography was performed. At the temporary TRANSALP array, waveforms from teleseismic earthquakes were recorded and by including wave forms registered at permanent regional stations throughout the Alpine region, a high-quality data set of 4200 manually picked P-arrivals from 22 teleseismic events with even azimuthal distribution was compiled. In a previous study, a 3D crustal model was established based on controlled-source seismology data representing the large-scale shallow Alpine structure, which clearly reflects the effects of the Africa-Europe plate collision by crustal indentations. Tests with synthetic data document that the combination of (1) non-linear inversion, (2) high-quality teleseismic data, and (3) usage of an a priori 3D crustal model in assessing incoming teleseismic wave front distortion, does allow for reliably resolving structures of about 60 km minimal length with a velocity variation in the order of +/- 1% in the upper mantle. Tomographic results clearly reveal two separate lithospheric slabs beneath the Alpine orogen. In the western and central Alps, the slab is partly attached to the European lithosphere and dips steeply toward SSW. From beneath the Tauern window on eastward beneath the Eastern Alps (EA), the second slab is attached to the Adriatic lithosphere and gently dips toward NE. Results of numerical dynamic modelling of internal lithosphere structure and slab geometries suggest, that subduction of European oceanic lithosphere continued in the west, while early transpression-collision occurred in the Eastern

  12. Parameter study and CFD analysis of head on collision and dynamic behavior of two colliding ferrofluid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Ali; Hassan Hashemabadi, Seyed

    2017-03-01

    In the present study a computational fluid dynamics approach is implemented to investigate the dynamic behavior of two freely suspended ferrofluid droplets under the effect of uniform magnetic field. The colliding droplets are tracked from their initial state to a new equilibrium state which will be obtained for the new produced droplet after the coalescence. During collision time the shape of each droplet and also the variations of their energies are investigated and discussed. For the simulation, a finite volume based solver is modified based on the open source solver library (OpenFOAM®) which is capable of coupling the flow field and magnetostatic equations. A coupled scheme of volume of fluid and level-set methods is applied for interface capturing. The simulation results are validated based on the available numerical and experimental results reported in the literature. In order to evaluate the effect of parameters on the magnetic induced coalescence of ferrofluid droplets a dimensional analysis based on the Buckingham π theorem is implemented. Based on the simulation results and dimensional analysis a new correlation is proposed which is capable to predict the collision time for two ferrofluid droplets in a relatively wide range of properties and operating conditions.

  13. An application of the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method to the study of collisions between highly charged ions and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.A.; Olson, R.E.

    1999-06-01

    We have developed a classical trajectory Monte Carlo code for use in the study of collisions between highly charged ions and systems with multiple targets, such as surfaces. We have simulated a collision between the bare ions C{sup 6+}, Kr{sup 36+}, Ne{sup 10+}, Ar{sup 18+}, and Xe{sup 54+}, and a configuration of approximately 400 individual atoms. The projectile has an initial energy of 0.25 keV/u with the velocity perpendicular to the surface. To simulate a simplified surface, the target atoms are held in a simple cubic lattice arrangement by the use of Morse potentials between target nuclei. Each target nucleus has one electron with a binding energy of 12 eV initially localized about it. Initial conditions of the electrons are restricted to represent the 2p electrons of LiF anions. The forces between all particles are calculated at each step in the simulation and the trajectory of every particle is followed. Results for the critical radius of capture, and the principal numbers are shown. Details of the capture of the first three electrons by Ar{sup 18+} as it approaches the surface are given. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Depolarized light scattering studies of the collision induced polarizability anisotropy of atoms and spherical top molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmur, D. A.; Manterfield, M. R.; Robinson, D. J.

    New measurements are reported of the density dependent depolarization ratio for argon, krypton, xenon, methane and sulphur hexafluoride, and the results are analysed to provide values for the second and third depolarization virial coefficients. The relationships between the second depolarization virial coefficient, the zeroth moment of the two-body Rayleigh spectrum and the second Kerr virial coefficient are considered, and it is shown that they now provide consistent results for the collision-induced pair polarizability anisotropy. Former inconsistencies are attributed to insufficient allowance for the effects of three-body interactions. Calculations of the second and third depolarization virial coefficients based on the DID model and using the Maitland-Smith potential are in excellent agreement with the experimental results for argon, krypton and xenon.

  15. A study of a collision avoidance system mounted on a curved ground plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, P. H.; Burnside, W. D.; Rojas, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    Research conducted on a traffic advisory and collision avoidance system (TCAS 2) mounted on a curved ground plane is described. It is found that a curved finite ground plane can be used as a good simulation model for the fuselage of an aircraft but may not be good enough to model a whole aircraft due to the shadowing of the vertical stabilizer, wings, etc. The surface curvature of this curved disc significantly affects the monopulse characteristics in the azimuth plane but not as much in the elevation plane. These variations of the monopulse characteristics verify the need of a lookup table for the 64 azimuth beam positions. The best location of a TCAS 2 array on a Boeing 737 is to move it as far from the vertical stabilizer as possible.

  16. Electron transfer, excitation, and ionization in {alpha}-H collisions studied with a Sturmian basis

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Thomas G.

    2007-12-15

    Cross sections have been determined for electron transfer, direct excitation, and ionization in collisions between {alpha} particles and H(1s) atoms at {alpha} energies 3 keV-38.4 MeV, extending earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 25, 697 (1982)] restricted to total transfer at 20-200 keV. Transfer as well as excitation cross sections into individual states up to 3d have been determined with several coupled-Sturmian pseudostate bases, and tests of basis sensitivity have been carried out. These and ionization cross sections have been compared with existing experimental and other coupled-state results. Structure is observed in the lower-energy excitation cross sections, which is believed not to be an artifact of the bases used. Ionization and excitation cross sections have also been compared with corresponding Born results at higher energies.

  17. Hydration Energies of Zinc(II): Threshold Collision-Induced Dissociation Experiments and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Theresa E.; Carl, D. R.; Armentrout, P. B.

    2009-11-01

    The first experimentally determined sequential bond dissociation energies of Zn2+(H2O)n complexes, where n = 6-10, are measured using threshold collision-induced dissociation in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer coupled with an electrospray ionization source. Kinetic energy dependent cross sections are obtained and analyzed to yield 0 K threshold measurements for the loss of one and two water ligands after accounting for multiple collisions, kinetic shifts, and energy distributions. The threshold measurements are then converted from 0 to 298 K values to give the hydration energies for sequentially losing one water from each parent complex. Theoretical geometry optimizations and single-point energy calculations are performed using several levels of theory for comparison to experiment. Although different levels of theory disagree on the ground-state conformation of most complexes examined here leading to potential ambiguities in the final thermochemical values, calculations at the MP2(full) level provide the best agreement with experiment. On this basis, the present experiments are most consistent with the inner solvent shell of Zn2+ being five waters, except for Zn2+(H2O)6 where all waters bind directly to the metal ion. The charge separation process, Zn2+(H2O)n → ZnOH+(H2O)m + H+(H2O)n-m-1, which is in competition with the loss of water from the parent complex, is also observed for n = 6-8. These processes are analyzed in detail in the following paper.

  18. Theoretical Studies Relating to the Interaction of Radiation with Matter: Atomic Collision Processes Occurring in the Presence of Radiation Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    Two-Level System, Aromic Coherence, Zeeman Coherence, Dressed-Atom Picture, Degenerate Four -Wave Mixing. S20 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse, *Ida If...Coherences: (S) Effects of Collisions on Zeeman Coherences (1r) Collision Effects in Degenerate- Four -Wave-Mixing, ~ (5) Dressed-Atom Picture in Laser...Effects of collisions on Zeeman coherences, (4) Colision effects in degenerate- four -wave-mixing, and (5) Dressed-atom picture in laser spectroscopy. 1. Two

  19. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and themore » number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (ε) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq<1 GeV. Combining all of the above scaling and normalizations, we observe a near-universal scaling, with the exception of the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of v2/(nq∙ε∙N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.« less

  20. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (ε) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq<1 GeV. Combining all of the above scaling and normalizations, we observe a near-universal scaling, with the exception of the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of v2/(nq∙ε∙N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.

  1. The association between a lifetime history of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and future neck pain: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nolet, Paul S; Côté, Pierre; Cassidy, J David; Carroll, Linda J

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this population-based cohort study was to investigate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury from a motor vehicle collision and the development of troublesome neck pain. The current evidence suggests that individuals with a history of neck injury in a traffic collision are more likely to experience future neck pain. However, these results may suffer from residual confounding. Therefore, there is a need to test this association in a large population-based cohort with adequate control of known confounders. We formed a cohort of 919 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild neck pain in September 1995. At baseline, participants were asked if they ever injured their neck in a motor vehicle collision. Six and twelve months later, we asked about the presence of troublesome neck pain (grade II-IV) on the chronic pain grade questionnaire. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain while controlling for known confounders. The follow-up rate was 73.5% (676/919) at 6 months and 63.1% (580/919) at 1 year. We found a positive association between a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain after controlling for bodily pain and body mass index (adjusted HRR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.12-4.10). Our analysis suggests that a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision is a risk factor for developing future troublesome neck pain. The consequences of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision can have long lasting effects and predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of neck pain.

  2. Study of Excited Ξ Baryons in p̅p-Collisions with the P¯ANDA Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütz, Jennifer; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Ritman, James; Stockmanns, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the excitation pattern of baryons is indispensable for the understanding of non-perturbative QCD. Up to now only the nucleon excitation spectrum has been subject to systematic experimental studies, while very little is known on excited states of double or triple strange baryons. In studies of antiproton-proton collisions, the P̅ANDA experiment is well-suited for a comprehensive baryon spectroscopy program in the multi-strange and charm sector. In the present study we focus on excited Ξ- states. For final states containing a Ξ- Ξ̅+ pair, cross sections of the order of μb are expected, corresponding to production rates of ~ 106/d at a luminosity L = 1031 cm-2 s-1. Here we present the reconstruction of the reaction p̅p → Ξ (1820)- Ξ̅+ with Ξ (1820)- → Λ K- and its charged conjugate channel with the P̅ANDA detector.

  3. A Study of Nuclear effects in Drell-Yan and Charmonia Productions in p-A collisions at Fermilab E906/SeaQuest Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; E906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Strong suppressions of charmonia have been observed in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. The suppressions exhibit strong nucleus A and kinematic dependences, especially with Feynman-x/rapidity and transverse momentum pT. Such suppression in heavy ion collisions is predicted to be an important signature for the formation of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) due to color screening, however, there are also other non-QGP effects, such as initial state parton energy loss, parton shadowing and final state breakup. It is important to quantify the contributions from the cold nuclear matter, which could be achieved through studying charmonia and Drell-Yan productions in proton-nucleus collisions where no significant QGP is expected. E906/SeaQuest is a fixed-target dimuon experiment at Fermilab using the 120 GeV proton beam from the Main Injector. E906 has been taking high statistic data samples of p+p, p+d, p+C, p+Fe and p+W collisions since 2014 and will continue data taking until the summer of 2017. E906 measures J / ψ ,ψ' and Drell-Yan productions in the dimuon channel in p+p and p+A collisions over a wide range of kinematic coverage, that is optimal for the study of the cold nuclear matter effects. Recently, we released the first preliminary results will be presented.

  4. Studies of jet quenching using isolated-photon + jet correlations in PbPb and pp collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.

    2013-01-01

    Results from the first study of isolated-photon + jet correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reported. The analysis uses data from PbPb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 150 μb-1 recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. For events containing an isolated photon with transverse momentum pTγ > 60 GeV / c and an associated jet with pTJet > 30 GeV / c, the photon + jet pT imbalance is studied as a function of collision centrality and compared to pp data and PYTHIA calculations at the same collision energy. Using the pTγ of the isolated photon as an estimate of the momentum of the associated parton at production, this measurement allows an unbiased characterisation of the in-medium parton energy loss. For more central PbPb collisions, a significant decrease in the ratio pTJet / pTγ relative to that in the PYTHIA reference is observed. Furthermore, significantly more pTγ > 60 GeV / c photons in PbPb are observed not to have an associated pTJet > 30 GeV / c jet, compared to the reference. However, no significant broadening of the photon + jet azimuthal correlation is observed.

  5. Driving with pets and motor vehicle collision involvement among older drivers: a prospective population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Huisingh, Carrie; Levitan, Emily B.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Objective Distracted driving is a major cause of motor vehicle collision (MVC) involvement. Pets have been identified as potential distraction to drivers, particularly in the front. This type of distraction could be worse for those with impairment in the cognitive aspects of visual processing. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between driving with pets and rates of motor vehicle collision involvementin a cohort of older drivers. Methods A three-year prospective was conducted in a population-based sample of 2000 licensed drivers aged 70 years and older. At the baseline visit, a trained interviewer asked participants about pet ownership, whether they drive with pets, how frequently, and where the pet sits in the vehicle. Motor vehicle collision (MVC) involvement during the three-year study period was obtained from the Alabama Department of Public Safety. At-fault status was determined by the police officer who arrived on the scene. Participants were followed until the earliest of death, driving cessation, or end of the study period. Poisson regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted rate ratios (RR) examining the association between pet ownership, presence of a pet in a vehicle, frequency of driving with a pet, and location of the pet inside with vehicle with any and at-fault MVC involvement. We examined whether the associations differed by higher order visual processing impairment status, as measured by Useful Field Of View, Trails B, and Motor-free Visual Perception Test. Results Rates of crash involvement were similar for older adults who have ever driven with a pet compared to those who never drove with their pet (RR=1.15, 95% CI 0.76-1.75). Drivers who reported always or sometimes driving with their pet had higherMVC rates compared topet owners who never drive with a pet, but this association was not statistically significant (RR=1.39, 95% CI 0.86-2.24). In terms of location, those reporting having a pet frequently ride in the

  6. Theoretical study of the dynamics of AR collisions with C2H6 and C2F6 at hyperthermal energy.

    PubMed

    Tasić, Uros; Hein, Pyae; Troya, Diego

    2007-05-10

    We present a classical-trajectory study of the dynamics of high-energy (5-12 eV) collisions between Ar atoms and the C2H6 and C2F6 molecules. We have constructed the potential-energy surfaces for these systems considering separately the Ar-molecule interactions (intermolecular potential) and the interactions within the molecule (intramolecular potential). The intermolecular surfaces consist of pairwise empirical potentials derived from high-accuracy ab initio calculations. The intramolecular potentials for C2H6 and C2F6 are described using specific-reaction-parameters semiempirical Hamiltonians and are calculated "on the fly", i.e., while the trajectories are evolving. Trajectory analysis shows that C2F6 absorbs more energy than C2H6 and is more susceptible to collision-induced dissociation (CID). C-C bond-breakage processes are more important than C-H or C-F bond breakage at the energies explored in this work. Analysis of the reaction mechanism for CID processes indicates that, although C-C breakage is mostly produced by side-on collisions, head-on collisions are more efficient in producing C-F or C-H dissociation. Our results suggest that high-energy collisions between closed-shell species of the natural low-Earth-orbit environment and spacecraft can contribute to the observed degradation of polymers that coat spacecraft surfaces.

  7. Study of W boson production in PbPb and pp collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.

    2012-08-01

    A measurement is presented of W-boson production in PbPb collisions carried out at a nucleon-nucleon (NN) centre-of-mass energy √{sNN} of 2.76 TeV at the LHC using the CMS detector. In data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3μb-1, the number of W → μνμ decays is extracted in the region of muon pseudorapidity |ημ | < 2.1 and transverse momentum pTμ > 25 GeV / c. Yields of muons found per unit of pseudorapidity correspond to (159 ± 10 (stat.) ± 12 (syst.)) ×10-8W+ and (154 ± 10 (stat.) ± 12 (syst.)) ×10-8W- bosons per minimum-bias PbPb collision. The dependence of W production on the centrality of PbPb collisions is consistent with a scaling of the yield by the number of incoherent NN collisions. The yield of W bosons is also studied in a sample of pp interactions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 231nb-1. The individual W+ and W- yields in PbPb and pp collisions are found to agree, once the neutron and proton content in Pb nuclei is taken into account. Likewise, the difference observed in the dependence of the positive and negative muon production on pseudorapidity is consistent with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  8. Rotationally resolved IR-diode laser studies of ground-state CO2 excited by collisions with vibrationally excited pyridine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy A; Kim, Kilyoung; Mayhew, Maurine; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2008-03-27

    Relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyridine (C5NH5) by collisions with carbon dioxide has been investigated using diode laser transient absorption spectroscopy. Vibrationally hot pyridine (E' = 40,660 cm(-1)) was prepared by 248 nm excimer laser excitation followed by rapid radiationless relaxation to the ground electronic state. Pyridine then collides with CO2, populating the high rotational CO2 states with large amounts of translational energy. The CO2 nascent rotational population distribution of the high-J (J = 58-80) tail of the 00(0)0 state was probed at short times following the excimer laser pulse to measure rate constants and probabilities for collisions populating these CO2 rotational states. Doppler spectroscopy was used to measure the CO2 recoil velocity distribution for J = 58-80 of the 00(0)0 state. The energy-transfer distribution function, P(E,E'), from E' - E approximately 1300-7000 cm(-1) was obtained by re-sorting the state-indexed energy-transfer probabilities as a function of DeltaE. P(E,E') is fit to an exponential or biexponential function to determine the average energy transferred in a single collision between pyridine and CO2. Also obtained are fit parameters that can be compared to previously studied systems (pyrazine, C6F6, methylpyrazine, and pyrimidine/CO2). Although the rotational and translational temperatures that describe pyridine/CO2 energy transfer are similar to previous systems, the energy-transfer probabilities are much smaller. P(E,E') fit parameters for pyridine/CO2 and the four previously studied systems are compared to various donor molecular properties. Finally, P(E,E') is analyzed in the context of two models, one indicating that P(E,E') shape is primarily determined by the low-frequency out-of-plane donor vibrational modes, and the other that indicates that P(E,E') shape can be determined from how the donor molecule final density of states changes with DeltaE.

  9. Gyrokinetic neoclassical study of the bootstrap current in the tokamak edge pedestal with fully non-linear Coulomb collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Hager, Robert; Chang, C. S.

    2016-04-08

    As a follow-up on the drift-kinetic study of the non-local bootstrap current in the steep edge pedestal of tokamak plasma by Koh et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 072505 (2012)], a gyrokinetic neoclassical study is performed with gyrokinetic ions and drift-kinetic electrons. Besides the gyrokinetic improvement of ion physics from the drift-kinetic treatment, a fully non-linear Fokker-Planck collision operator—that conserves mass, momentum, and energy—is used instead of Koh et al.'s linearized collision operator in consideration of the possibility that the ion distribution function is non-Maxwellian in the steep pedestal. An inaccuracy in Koh et al.'s result is found in the steepmore » edge pedestal that originated from a small error in the collisional momentum conservation. The present study concludes that (1) the bootstrap current in the steep edge pedestal is generally smaller than what has been predicted from the small banana-width (local) approximation [e.g., Sauter et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2834 (1999) and Belli et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095010 (2008)], (2) the plasma flow evaluated from the local approximation can significantly deviate from the non-local results, and (3) the bootstrap current in the edge pedestal, where the passing particle region is small, can be dominantly carried by the trapped particles in a broad trapped boundary layer. In conclusion, a new analytic formula based on numerous gyrokinetic simulations using various magnetic equilibria and plasma profiles with self-consistent Grad-Shafranov solutions is constructed.« less

  10. Gyrokinetic neoclassical study of the bootstrap current in the tokamak edge pedestal with fully non-linear Coulomb collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, Robert; Chang, C. S.

    2016-04-01

    As a follow-up on the drift-kinetic study of the non-local bootstrap current in the steep edge pedestal of tokamak plasma by Koh et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 072505 (2012)], a gyrokinetic neoclassical study is performed with gyrokinetic ions and drift-kinetic electrons. Besides the gyrokinetic improvement of ion physics from the drift-kinetic treatment, a fully non-linear Fokker-Planck collision operator—that conserves mass, momentum, and energy—is used instead of Koh et al.'s linearized collision operator in consideration of the possibility that the ion distribution function is non-Maxwellian in the steep pedestal. An inaccuracy in Koh et al.'s result is found in the steep edge pedestal that originated from a small error in the collisional momentum conservation. The present study concludes that (1) the bootstrap current in the steep edge pedestal is generally smaller than what has been predicted from the small banana-width (local) approximation [e.g., Sauter et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2834 (1999) and Belli et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095010 (2008)], (2) the plasma flow evaluated from the local approximation can significantly deviate from the non-local results, and (3) the bootstrap current in the edge pedestal, where the passing particle region is small, can be dominantly carried by the trapped particles in a broad trapped boundary layer. A new analytic formula based on numerous gyrokinetic simulations using various magnetic equilibria and plasma profiles with self-consistent Grad-Shafranov solutions is constructed.

  11. Gyrokinetic neoclassical study of the bootstrap current in the tokamak edge pedestal with fully non-linear Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Robert; Chang, C. S.

    2016-04-08

    As a follow-up on the drift-kinetic study of the non-local bootstrap current in the steep edge pedestal of tokamak plasma by Koh et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 072505 (2012)], a gyrokinetic neoclassical study is performed with gyrokinetic ions and drift-kinetic electrons. Besides the gyrokinetic improvement of ion physics from the drift-kinetic treatment, a fully non-linear Fokker-Planck collision operator—that conserves mass, momentum, and energy—is used instead of Koh et al.'s linearized collision operator in consideration of the possibility that the ion distribution function is non-Maxwellian in the steep pedestal. An inaccuracy in Koh et al.'s result is found in the steep edge pedestal that originated from a small error in the collisional momentum conservation. The present study concludes that (1) the bootstrap current in the steep edge pedestal is generally smaller than what has been predicted from the small banana-width (local) approximation [e.g., Sauter et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2834 (1999) and Belli et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095010 (2008)], (2) the plasma flow evaluated from the local approximation can significantly deviate from the non-local results, and (3) the bootstrap current in the edge pedestal, where the passing particle region is small, can be dominantly carried by the trapped particles in a broad trapped boundary layer. In conclusion, a new analytic formula based on numerous gyrokinetic simulations using various magnetic equilibria and plasma profiles with self-consistent Grad-Shafranov solutions is constructed.

  12. Two-year follow-up of the Collision Auto Repair Safety Study (CARSS).

    PubMed

    Bejan, Anca; Parker, David L; Brosseau, Lisa M; Xi, Min; Skan, Maryellen

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the sustainability of health and safety improvements in small auto collision shops 1 year after the implementation of a year-long targeted intervention. During the first year (active phase), owners received quarterly phone calls, written reminders, safety newsletters, and access to online services and in-person assistance with creating safety programs and respirator fit testing. During the second year (passive phase), owners received up to three postcard reminders regarding the availability of free health and safety resources. Forty-five shops received an evaluation at baseline and at the end of the first year (Y1). Of these, 33 were evaluated at the end of the second year (Y2), using the same 92-item assessment tool. At Y1, investigators found that between 70 and 81% of the evaluated items were adequate in each business (mean = 73% items, SD = 11%). At Y2, between 63 and 89% of items were deemed adequate (mean = 73% items, SD = 9.5%). Three safety areas demonstrated statistically significant (P < 0.05) changes: compressed gasses (8% improvement), personal protective equipment (7% improvement), and respiratory protection (6% decline). The number of postcard reminders sent to each business did not affect the degree to which shops maintained safety improvements made during the first year of the intervention. However, businesses that received more postcards were more likely to request assistance services than those receiving fewer.

  13. Study of π0 pair production in single-tag two-photon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, M.; Uehara, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Nakazawa, H.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Atmacan, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Ko, B. R.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rauch, J.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Teramoto, Y.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We report a measurement of the differential cross section of π0 pair production in single-tag two-photon collisions, γ*γ →π0π0, in e+e- scattering. The cross section is measured for Q2 up to 30 GeV2, where Q2 is the negative of the invariant mass squared of the tagged photon, in the kinematic range 0.5 GeV

  14. Perspective Study of Charmonium and Exotics in Antiproton-Proton Annihilation and Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanov, Mikhail; Olsen, Stephen; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    The spectroscopy of exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. Together with charmonium, these provide a good tool for testing theories of the strong interactions including both perturbative and non-perturbative QCD, lattice QCD, potential and other phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of exotics spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimentally observed states with masses above the Dbar{D} threshold region are considered. Experimental results from different collaborations (BES, BaBar, Belle, LHCb) are analyzed with special attention given to recently discovered hidden charm states. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-lying charmonium states and others as tetraquarks with hidden charm. It has been shown that charged/neutral tetraquarks must have their neutral/charge partners with mass values differ by at most a few MeV/c2, hypotheses that tend to coincide with those proposed by Maiani and Polosa. However, measurements of different decay modes are needed before firm conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using a high quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c and proton-proton collisions with momentum up to 26 GeV/c.

  15. Effect of collision cascades on dislocations in tungsten: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, B. Q.; Fitzgerald, S. P.; Hou, Q.; Wang, J.; Li, M.

    2017-02-01

    Tungsten (W) is the prime candidate material for the divertor and other plasma-facing components in DEMO. The point defects (i.e. vacancies and self-interstitials) produced in collision cascades caused by incident neutrons aggregate into dislocation loops (and voids), which strongly affect the mechanical properties. The point defects also interact with existing microstructural features, and understanding these processes is crucial for modelling the long term microstructural evolution of the material under fusion conditions. In this work, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of cascades interacting with initially straight edge dislocation dipoles. It was found that the residual vacancy number usually exceeds the residual interstitial number for cascades interacting with vacancy type dipoles, but for interstitial type dipoles these are close. We observed that a cascade near a dislocation promotes climb, i.e. it facilitates the movement of point defects along the climb direction. We also observed that the dislocations move easily along the glide direction, and that kinks are formed near the centre of the cascade, which then facilitate the movement of the dipoles. Some dipoles are sheared off by the cascade, and this is dependent on PKA energy, position, direction, and the width of dipole.

  16. Intraplate deformation due to continental collisions: A numerical study of deformation in a thin viscous sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Morgan, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    A model of crustal deformation from continental collision that involves the penetration of a rigid punch into a deformable sheet is investigated. A linear viscous flow law is used to compute the magnitude and rate of change of crustal thickness, the velocity of mass points, strain rates and their principal axes, modes of deformation, areal changes, and stress. In general, a free lateral boundary reduces the magnitude of changes in crustal thickening by allowing material to more readily escape the advancing punch. The shearing that occurs diagonally in front of the punch terminates in compression or extension depending on whether the lateral boundary is fixed or free. When the ratio of the diameter of the punch to that of the sheet exceeds one-third, the deformation is insenstive to the choice of lateral boundary conditions. When the punch is rigid with sharply defined edges, deformation is concentrated near the punch corners. With non-rigid punches, shearing results in deformation being concentrated near the center of the punch. Variations with respect to linearity and nonlinearity of flow are discussed.

  17. Two-Year Follow-up of the Collision Auto Repair Safety Study (CARSS)

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, Anca; Parker, David L.; Brosseau, Lisa M.; Xi, Min; Skan, Maryellen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the sustainability of health and safety improvements in small auto collision shops 1 year after the implementation of a year-long targeted intervention. During the first year (active phase), owners received quarterly phone calls, written reminders, safety newsletters, and access to online services and in-person assistance with creating safety programs and respirator fit testing. During the second year (passive phase), owners received up to three postcard reminders regarding the availability of free health and safety resources. Forty-five shops received an evaluation at baseline and at the end of the first year (Y1). Of these, 33 were evaluated at the end of the second year (Y2), using the same 92-item assessment tool. At Y1, investigators found that between 70 and 81% of the evaluated items were adequate in each business (mean = 73% items, SD = 11%). At Y2, between 63 and 89% of items were deemed adequate (mean = 73% items, SD = 9.5%). Three safety areas demonstrated statistically significant (P < 0.05) changes: compressed gasses (8% improvement), personal protective equipment (7% improvement), and respiratory protection (6% decline). The number of postcard reminders sent to each business did not affect the degree to which shops maintained safety improvements made during the first year of the intervention. However, businesses that received more postcards were more likely to request assistance services than those receiving fewer. PMID:25539646

  18. From local to hydrodynamic friction in Brownian motion: A multiparticle collision dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Theers, Mario; Westphal, Elmar; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G

    2016-03-01

    The friction and diffusion coefficients of rigid spherical colloidal particles dissolved in a fluid are determined from velocity and force autocorrelation functions by mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations. Colloids with both slip and no-slip boundary conditions are considered, which are embedded in fluids modeled by multiparticle collision dynamics with and without angular momentum conservation. For no-slip boundary conditions, hydrodynamics yields the well-known Stokes law, while for slip boundary conditions the lack of angular momentum conservation leads to a reduction of the hydrodynamic friction coefficient compared to the classical result. The colloid diffusion coefficient is determined by integration of the velocity autocorrelation function, where the numerical result at shorter times is combined with the theoretical hydrodynamic expression for longer times. The suitability of this approach is confirmed by simulations of sedimenting colloids. In general, we find only minor deviations from the Stokes-Einstein relation, which even disappear for larger colloids. Importantly, for colloids with slip boundary conditions, our simulation results contradict the frequently assumed additivity of local and hydrodynamic diffusion coefficients.

  19. Comparisons and scaling rules between N+N2 and N2+N2 collision induced dissociation cross sections from atomistic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, F.; Garcia, E.; Laganà, A.

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative knowledge of elementary processes involved in plasmas are key to successfully perform accurate kinetic simulations. The issue is the huge amount of data to treat, both in the dynamical calculation and in the kinetic simulation. The aim of this paper is to study the dissociation in atom–molecule (AM) and molecule–molecule (MM) collisions involving nitrogen, obtained by molecular dynamics calculations considering vibrational states in the range 10–50 and collision energy up to 10 eV, in order to formulate suitable scaling laws resulting in less expensive computational procedures and easier to handle treatments in kinetic simulations. It is shown that, while a direct substitution of MM dissociation cross sections with AM ones might be acceptable only at very high collision energy, scaling laws application allows to obtain quite good results on almost the whole energy range of interest.

  20. Study of B Meson Production in p+Pb Collisions at √[S(NN)]=5.02 TeV Using Exclusive Hadronic Decays.

    PubMed

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Finkel, A; Gude, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Fangmeier, C; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kamalieddin, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Meier, F; Monroy, J; Ratnikov, F; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; George, J; Godshalk, A; Harrington, C; Iashvili, I; Kaisen, J; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Brinkerhoff, A; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Ji, W; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Malik, S; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Sun, J; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Harel, A; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Petrillo, G; Verzetti, M; Demortier, L; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Lath, A; Nash, K; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Foerster, M; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Mueller, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Ni, H; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wolfe, E; Wood, J; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Christian, A; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Friis, E; Gomber, B; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Ruggles, T; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Sharma, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2016-01-22

    The production cross sections of the B^{+}, B^{0}, and B_{s}^{0} mesons, and of their charge conjugates, are measured via exclusive hadronic decays in p+Pb collisions at the center-of-mass energy sqrt[s_{NN}]=5.02  TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The data set used for this analysis corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 34.6  nb^{-1}. The production cross sections are measured in the transverse momentum range between 10 and 60  GeV/c. No significant modification is observed compared to proton-proton perturbative QCD calculations scaled by the number of incoherent nucleon-nucleon collisions. These results provide a baseline for the study of in-medium b quark energy loss in Pb+Pb collisions.

  1. Study of Z boson production in pPb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fang, W.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.

    2016-08-01

    The production of Z bosons in pPb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV is studied by the CMS experiment via the electron and muon decay channels. The inclusive cross section is compared to pp collision predictions, and found to scale with the number of elementary nucleon-nucleon collisions. The differential cross sections as a function of the Z boson rapidity and transverse momentum are measured. Though they are found to be consistent within uncertainty with theoretical predictions both with and without nuclear effects, the forward-backward asymmetry suggests the presence of nuclear effects at large rapidities. These results provide new data for constraining nuclear parton distribution functions.

  2. Mechanistic study of the collision-induced dissociation of sodium-cationized polylactide oligomers: a joint experimental and theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    De Winter, Julien; Lemaur, Vincent; Marsal, Philippe; Coulembier, Olivier; Cornil, Jérôme; Dubois, Philippe; Gerbaux, Pascal

    2010-07-01

    The low-kinetic energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) behavior of different sodium-cationized polylactide (PLA) oligomers was thoroughly investigated to shed some light on the analytical potentialities of CID experiments in the context of polymer characterization. Indeed, investigation of several end-groups modified PLA reveals that, in addition to the expected end-group specific dissociations, collisionally-excited PLA.Na(+) suffer from a backbone cleavage. The so-obtained sodium-bound dimer cations consecutively undergo the loss of a monomeric residue that corresponds to neutral acrylic acid. The experimental observations, performed on a hybrid Q-ToF instrument, were totally corroborated by a theoretical study involving DFT calculations, molecular mechanics, and molecular dynamics calculations.

  3. Study of inclusive J/ψ production in two-photon collisions at LEP II with the DELPHI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Bellunato, T.; Belous, K.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carimalo, C.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, Ch.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kurowska, J.; Laforge, B.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nygren, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, Ph.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    Inclusive J/ψ production in photon-photon collisions has been observed at LEP II beam energies. A clear signal from the reaction γγ→J/ψ+X is seen. The number of observed N(J/ψ→μ+μ-) events is 36±7 for an integrated luminosity of 617 pb-1, yielding a cross-section of σ(J/ψ+X)=45±9(stat)±17(syst) pb. Based on a study of the event shapes of different types of γγ processes in the PYTHIA program, we conclude that (74±22)% of the observed J/ψ events are due to 'resolved' photons, the dominant contribution of which is most probably due to the gluon content of the photon.

  4. Study of inclusive /J/ψ production in two-photon collisions at LEP II with the DELPHI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Bellunato, T.; Belous, K.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carimalo, C.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, Ch.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kurowska, J.; Laforge, B.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nygren, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, Ph.; Zupan, M.

    2003-07-01

    Inclusive /J/ψ production in photon-photon collisions has been observed at LEP II beam energies. A clear signal from the reaction /γγ-->J/ψ+X is seen. The number of observed N(J/ψ-->μ+μ-) events is /36+/-7 for an integrated luminosity of 617 pb-1, yielding a cross-section of /σ(J/ψ+X)=45+/-9(stat)+/-17(syst) pb. Based on a study of the event shapes of different types of /γγ processes in the PYTHIA program, we conclude that /(74+/-22)% of the observed /J/ψ events are due to `resolved' photons, the dominant contribution of which is most probably due to the gluon content of the photon.

  5. A Study into the Collision-induced Dissociation (CID) Behavior of Cross-Linked Peptides.

    PubMed

    Giese, Sven H; Fischer, Lutz; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-03-01

    Cross-linking/mass spectrometry resolves protein-protein interactions or protein folds by help of distance constraints. Cross-linkers with specific properties such as isotope-labeled or collision-induced dissociation (CID)-cleavable cross-linkers are in frequent use to simplify the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here, we analyzed the mass spectrometric behavior of 910 unique cross-linked peptides in high-resolution MS1 and MS2 from published data and validate the observation by a ninefold larger set from currently unpublished data to explore if detailed understanding of their fragmentation behavior would allow computational delivery of information that otherwise would be obtained via isotope labels or CID cleavage of cross-linkers. Isotope-labeled cross-linkers reveal cross-linked and linear fragments in fragmentation spectra. We show that fragment mass and charge alone provide this information, alleviating the need for isotope-labeling for this purpose. Isotope-labeled cross-linkers also indicate cross-linker-containing, albeit not specifically cross-linked, peptides in MS1. We observed that acquisition can be guided to better than twofold enrich cross-linked peptides with minimal losses based on peptide mass and charge alone. By help of CID-cleavable cross-linkers, individual spectra with only linear fragments can be recorded for each peptide in a cross-link. We show that cross-linked fragments of ordinary cross-linked peptides can be linearized computationally and that a simplified subspectrum can be extracted that is enriched in information on one of the two linked peptides. This allows identifying candidates for this peptide in a simplified database search as we propose in a search strategy here. We conclude that the specific behavior of cross-linked peptides in mass spectrometers can be exploited to relax the requirements on cross-linkers.

  6. Studies of multi-quasiparticle k-isomers in rare-earth and trans-fermium nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, F. G.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Khoo, T. L.; Lane, G. J.; Byrne, A. P.; Kibedi, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritzen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Chowdhury, P.; Tandel, S. K.; Australian National Univ.; Univ. of Massachusetts Lowell

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear K-isomers play an important role in understanding the structure of deformed axially symmetric nuclei. Examples are presented of recent studies in the rare-earth region (A {approx} 180) using deep-inelastic and multi-nucleon transfer reactions, and in the trans-fermium region (A {approx} 250) using fusion-evaporation reactions. A specific two-level mixing scenario is invoked to explain the unusual decay of the K{sup {pi}} = 13{sup +} isomer in {sup 174}Lu. The identification of 2- and 4-quasiparticle isomers in {sup 254}No is discussed and predictions of similar isomers in neighboring No and Rf nuclei are presented.

  7. Airborne Collision Avoidance System X

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    avoidance system on behalf of the Federal Aviation Adminis- tration (FAA). The current Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System II (TCAS II...which are used on board an aircraft. The tables provide a cost for each action—no alert , a traffic advisory alerting pilots about nearby aircraft, or a...suitabil- ity than does TCAS II; studies show that ACAS X reduces mid-air collision risk by 59% and unnecessary disruptive alerts by 25% when

  8. Do speed cameras reduce collisions?

    PubMed

    Skubic, Jeffrey; Johnson, Steven B; Salvino, Chris; Vanhoy, Steven; Hu, Chengcheng

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of speed cameras along a 26 mile segment in metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona. Motor vehicle collisions were retrospectively identified according to three time periods - before cameras were placed, while cameras were in place and after cameras were removed. A 14 mile segment in the same area without cameras was used for control purposes. Five cofounding variables were eliminated. In this study, the placement or removal of interstate highway speed cameras did not independently affect the incidence of motor vehicle collisions.

  9. Experimental Study of the Effects of Collision of Water Droplets in a Flow of High-Temperature Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, D. V.; Volkov, R. S.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Using high-speed video recording and cross-correlation "tracer" visualization, the authors have investigated the regularities of the processes of collision of water droplets (characteristic parameters: radii 0.025-0.25 mm, velocities of motion 0.5-12 m/s, and relative concentration 0.001-0.0012 m3 of liquid droplets in 1 m3 of the gas) in their motion in a flow of high-temperature (about 1100 K) gases. The characteristic effects of collision of two droplets, at which combined droplets are formed (coagulation occurs) and conditions for spreading or fragmentation of the latter are implemented, have been singled out. The values of the Weber and Reynolds numbers for droplets before and after the collisions have been established. The influences of the velocities of motion, the dimensions, and the angles of intersection of mechanical trajectories of droplets on the effects of collisions have been determined.

  10. Multiplicity fluctuation and phase transition in high-energy collision — A chaos-based study with complex network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaduri, Susmita; Ghosh, Dipak

    2016-12-01

    Multiplicity fluctuation provides enough information concerning the dynamics of particle production process and even signature of phase transition from hadronic to QGP phase expected in ultrarelativistic nuclear collision. Numerous analyses reported on the fluctuation pattern of pions have been studied from theoretical and phenomenological approaches. Also the fractal properties have been explored to characterize quantitative degree of fluctuation. The present work reports a study of pion fluctuation from a radically different perspective, using science of complexity. For this we have taken two different interactions — one hadron-nucleus and other nucleus-nucleus, namely π--AgBr (350 GeV) and 32S-AgBr (200 AGeV). We have analyzed both data in the light of complex network analysis, viz. visibility graph method. The data reveal that power of the scale-freeness in visibility graph (PSVG), a quantitative parameter related to Hurst exponent, may provide information on the degree of fluctuation. Further, in a recent work, it was shown that phase transition can also be studied using the same methodology. Based on the result of the present study we further propose to use this methodology, where critical phenomena are to be assessed — even in case of pion fluctuation, for obtaining the QGP like phase transition.

  11. Collisions of Vortex Filament Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2014-12-01

    We consider the problem of collisions of vortex filaments for a model introduced by Klein et al. (J Fluid Mech 288:201-248, 1995) and Zakharov (Sov Phys Usp 31(7):672-674, 1988, Lect. Notes Phys 536:369-385, 1999) to describe the interaction of almost parallel vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. Since the results of Crow (AIAA J 8:2172-2179, 1970) examples of collisions are searched as perturbations of antiparallel translating pairs of filaments, with initial perturbations related to the unstable mode of the linearized problem; most results are numerical calculations. In this article, we first consider a related model for the evolution of pairs of filaments, and we display another type of initial perturbation leading to collision in finite time. Moreover, we give numerical evidence that it also leads to collision through the initial model. We finally study the self-similar solutions of the model.

  12. Risk Factors for Motor Vehicle Collisions in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Kenya; Awano-Tanabe, Sachiko; Ono, Takeshi; Shiba, Daisuke; Murata, Hiroshi; Asaoka, Ryo; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the incidence rate of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) in patients with no ocular pathology other than primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and determine the putative risk factors for MVCs in this group of patients. Methods We designed a prospective cohort study across three centers utilizing a consecutive sampling method to identify all patients with POAG between the ages of 40 and 80 years old. Patients with glaucoma were consecutively screened for eligibility. All study participants answered a questionnaire about motor vehicle collisions at baseline, and answered the questionnaire again every 12 months (± 1 month) after baseline for three years. A binocular integrated visual field was calculated for each patient by merging a patient’s monocular Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA) visual fields (VFs), using the ‘best sensitivity’ method. Patients with incident MVCs were defined as the “MVC+” group and patients without incident MVCs were defined as the “MVC-" group. Adjusted odds ratios for the incidence of MVCs were estimated with a logistic regression model. Results One hundred and ninety-one Japanese POAG patients were analyzed in this study. The age of the participants was 63.7 ± 10.2 [mean ± standard deviation]. A total of 28 participants experienced a MVC during the follow up period of three years (4.9% per year). Ten patients (5.2%) experienced a MVC in the first year, 13 patients (6.8%) in the second year, and 11 patients (5.8%) in the third year (some patients experienced multiple MVCs over different years). Best corrected visual acuity in the worst eye was significantly worse in the MVC+ group (0.03 ± 0.01, mean ± standard deviation, LogMar) compared with the MVC- group (0.01 ± 0.003, p = 0.01), and was the only variable identified as a significant predictor of future MVCs in the multiple logistic regression model [odds ratio: 1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1 to 1.4]. Conclusion Deterioration in visual acuity in the

  13. Quantum study of Eley-Rideal reaction and collision induced desorption of hydrogen atoms on a graphite surface. II. H-physisorbed case.

    PubMed

    Martinazzo, Rocco; Tantardini, Gian Franco

    2006-03-28

    Following previous investigation of collision induced (CI) processes involving hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphite [R. Martinazzo and G. F. Tantardini, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 124702 (2006)], the case in which the target hydrogen atom is initially physisorbed on the surface is considered here. Several adsorbate-substrate initial states of the target H atom in the physisorption well are considered, and CI processes are studied for projectile energies up to 1 eV. Results show that (i) Eley-Rideal cross sections at low collision energies may be larger than those found in the H-chemisorbed case but they rapidly decrease as the collision energy increases; (ii) product hydrogen molecules are vibrationally very excited; (iii) collision induced desorption cross sections rapidly increase, reaching saturation values greater than 10 A2; (iv) trapping of the incident atoms is found to be as efficient as the Eley-Rideal reaction at low energies and remains sizable (3-4 A2) at high energies. The latter adsorbate-induced trapping results mainly in formation of metastable hot hydrogen atoms, i.e., atoms with an excess energy channeled in the motion parallel to the surface. These atoms might contribute in explaining hydrogen formation on graphite.

  14. Numerical study of charge transfer in ion-ion collisions using the lattice time-dependent Schr"odinger equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, T.; Pindzola, M. S.; Lee, T.-G.; Schultz, D. R.

    2006-05-01

    Br"auning, et.al. (J. Phys. B, 38, p2311) recently measured cross sections of charge transfer in collisions of He^2+ with Li^2+. At the same time, they also performed calculations of the cross sections of this collision system and of collisions of H^+ with He^+ using the basis generator method (BGM). For the former system, BGM seems to overestimate the cross sections compared to their experiment, while for the latter system, BGM provides excellent agreement with past experiments. Since both are ion-ion collision with asymmetrical nuclear charges involving one electron, BGM agreeing one system but the other points to a situation requiring further study. Motivated by this question, we have performed atomic orbital coupled channel (AOCC) calculations for both systems. When we use our most complete basis set for the calculations, we obtain results close to BGM on both systems. However, results from AOCC do not readily converge with regard to the size of the basis sets and therefore results were not conclusive. We also have performed the lattice time-dependent Schr"odinger equation (LTDSE) calculations. Preliminary results for both systems by LTDSE are close to BGM. In this presentation, we compare BGM, AOCC and LTDSE with the experiment. This research used resources of NCCS at ORNL and NERSC, and was supported by DOE OFES.

  15. Angle and energy resolved studies of the collision-induced dissociation of polyatomic molecular ions: Baseline studies of CH[sub 4][sup +] and C[sub 3]H[sub 8][sup +

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    A deeper fundamental understanding of the collision process and subsequent dissociation for polyatomic ions is essential to optimize future studies of collision induced dissociation (CID). An instrument was developed with an unique system of electrostatic lenses that allows CID to be observed in the energy range from a few tenths of an eV to several thousand eV. The instrument permits daughter ion distributions to be mapped in angle and energy. The CID spectra of methane and propane were investigated at keV energies using a commercial tandem mass spectrometer. The relative abundances of the daughter ions, the energy deposition, and kinetic energy release were determined as a function of collision gas was also investigated and interpreted in terms of center of mass (CM) collision energy and the Massey adiabatic criterion most probable energy deposition. The daughter ion abundance, kinetic energy transfer, and kinetic energy release were observed as a function of collision gas, CM collision energy and attenuation of the primary ion beam. A simple model is proposed to describe the effect of multiple collisions on the CID process. Propane molecular ion CID was investigated with the new instrument at laboratory energies ranging from 18 eV to 1 keV and CM collision energies ranging from 1.5 eV to 450 eV. The daughter ion distributions obtained from these experiments show that there is no change in mechanism between CID observed in quadrupole instruments at eV energies and CID observed in sector instruments at keV lab energies. The energy and angular distribution of CID daughter ions is close to the CM with large CM scattering angles at low energy and shifts to near the elastic scattering circle and small CM scattering angles at high lab energies.

  16. Parental bereavement after the death of an offspring in a motor vehicle collision: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bolton, James M; Au, Wendy; Walld, Randy; Chateau, Dan; Martens, Patricia J; Leslie, William D; Enns, Murray W; Sareen, Jitender

    2014-01-15

    Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) are the leading cause of death in young people in North America. The effects of such deaths on parents have not been systematically studied. Administrative data sets were used to identify all parents (n = 1,458) who had an offspring die in a MVC between 1996 and 2008 in the province of Manitoba, Canada. They were matched to general population control parents who had not had offspring die from any sudden cause during the study period. Generalized estimating equations were used to compare the rates of physician-diagnosed mental and physical disorders, social factors, and treatment utilization in the 2 parent groups in the 2 years before and after offspring death, with adjustment for confounding factors. The risk of depression among bereaved parents almost tripled (adjusted prevalence ratio = 2.85, 95% confidence interval: 2.44, 3.33; P < 0.001) during the 2 years after death of an offspring. Significant increases in the risk of anxiety disorders (adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.45, 95% confidence interval: 1.26, 1.67; P < 0.001) were also observed. When compared with nonbereaved parents, bereaved parents had significant increases in the risks of depression (P < 0.001), anxiety disorders (P < 0.001), marital break-up (P = 0.015), and physician visits for mental illness (P < 0.001) in the post-death period. In conclusion, parents who lose an offspring in a MVC experience considerable mental illness and marital disruption.

  17. a Study on the Mechanism of OCCUPANT'S Cervical Injury by Low Speed Rear-End Collision of Automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Wonhak; Kim, Yongchul; Choi, Hyeonki

    Neck injury in rear-end car collisions is an increasing concern in the field of traffic safety. This injury commonly occurs at rear-end impact, however the injury mechanisms for whiplash remain a mystery. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively analyze the head and neck kinematics during the low-speed rear-end impact of automobiles. It is important to produce data that is related as closely as possible to the in vivo situation. So, we performed a sled test which simulated rear-end impacts with a velocity of 0.6 m/s with five normal healthy male subjects. 3-D motion analysis system was used to document motion data of two situations. When we compare the values of angular velocity and acceleration of head and neck, the peak magnitudes of inclined seated posture were smaller than those of upright seated posture. The result of this study is expected to provide insight that will aid in determining the mechanism of whiplash which is crucial to the identification of possible injury mechanisms.

  18. Measurement of hadron suppression and study of its connection with vanishing v3 at low √{sNN} in Au + Au collisions with STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, Stephen.

    2016-12-01

    At top RHIC and LHC energies the suppression of high transverse momentum (pT) hadrons provides evidence for partonic energy loss in QGP. We study partonic energy loss in the RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) by investigating the centrality dependence of the binary-collision-scaled high-pT yields. Observing a decrease of the scaled yield in more central collisions is proposed as a possible signature for jet quenching. Even at energies and centralities where this signature is lost a QGP may still be formed since competing phenomena responsible for enhancements may overwhelm the suppression from energy loss. Measurements in several ranges of pT from √{sNN} = 7.7 , 11.5 , 14.5 , 19.6 , 27 , 39 , 62.4, and 200 GeV data show that relative hadron suppression persists at least down to 14.5 GeV. To further investigate both the possible formation of a QGP at these lower energies and whether the observed hadron suppression coincides with the onset of other QGP signatures, we examine the energy and centrality dependence of v3. Models have shown that the development of v3 requires the presence of a low viscosity phase early in the collision. We find that for collisions with Npart < 50, v3 disappears for energies below 14.5 GeV, suggestive of a turn-off of the QGP. But for Npart < 50, v3 persists down to the lowest energies. Together, these signatures provide possible evidence for the formation of a QGP in the lowest energy collisions at RHIC.

  19. Heavy ion collision dynamics of 10,11B+10,11B reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, BirBikram; Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) of Gupta and collaborators has been applied successfully to the decay of very-light (A ˜ 30), light (A ˜ 40-80), medium, heavy and super-heavy mass compound nuclei for their decay to light particles (evaporation residues, ER), fusion-fission (ff), and quasi-fission (qf) depending on the reaction conditions. We intend to extend here the application of DCM to study the extreme case of decay of very-light nuclear systems 20,21,22Ne∗ formed in 10,11B+10,11B reactions, for which experimental data is available for their binary symmetric decay (BSD) cross sections, i.e., σBSD. For the systems under study, the calculations are presented for the σBSD in terms of their preformation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. Interesting results are that in the decay of such lighter systems there is a competing reaction mechanism (specifically, the deep inelastic orbiting of non-compound nucleus (nCN) origin) together with ff. We have emipirically estimated the contribution of σnCN. Moreover, the important role of nuclear structure characteristics via P0 as well as angular momentum ℓ in the reaction dynamics are explored in the study.

  20. Experimental study of neutron-rich nuclei near the N = 82 closed shell using the {sub 40}{sup 96}Zr+{sub 50}{sup 124}Sn reaction with GASP and PRISMA-CLARA arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, W.; Torres, D. A.; Cristancho, F.; Medina, N. H.; Chapman, R.; Smith, J. F.; Mengoni, D.; Truesdale, V.; Grocutt, L.; Mulholland, K.; Kumar, V.; Hadinia, B.; Labiche, M.; Liang, X.; O'Donell, D.; Ollier, J.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.; Spohr, K. M.; Wady, P.; and others

    2014-11-11

    In this contribution an experimental study of the deep-inelastic reaction {sub 40}{sup 96}Zr+{sub 50}{sup 124}Sn at 530 MeV, using the GASP and PRISMA-CLARA arrays, is presented. The experiments populate a wealth of projectile-like and target-like binary fragments, in a large neutron-rich region around N ≥ 50 and Z ≈ 40. Preliminary results on the study of the yrast and near-yrast states for {sup 95}Nb will be shown, along with a comparison of the experimental yields obtained in the experiments.

  1. Systematic Study of Two-Pion Production in NN Collisions--from Single-Baryon to Di-Baryon Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Skorodko, T.; Bashkanov, M.; Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Khakimova, O.; Kren, F.; Pricking, A.; Wagner, G. J.

    2010-08-05

    The two-pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions has been studied by exclusive and kinematically complete experiments from threshold up to T{sub p} = 1.36 GeV at CELSIUS-WASA. At near-threshold energies the total and differential distributions for the {pi}{sup +{pi}-} and {pi}{sup 0{pi}0} channels are dominated by Roper excitation and its decay into N{sigma}s and {Delta}{pi} channels. At beam energies T{sub p}>1.1 GeV the {Delta}{Delta} excitation governs the two-pion production process. In the {pi}{sup +{pi}+} channel evidence is found for the excitation of a higher-lying I =3/2 resonance, favorably the {Delta}(1600). The isovector fusion processes leading to the deuteron and to quasi-stable {sup 2}He, respectively, exhibit no or only a modest ABC-effect, i.e. low-mass enhancement in the {pi}{pi}-invariant mass spectrum, and can be described by conventional t-channel {Delta}{Delta} excitation. On the other hand, the isoscalar fusion process to the deuteron exhibits a dramatic ABC-effect correlated with a narrow resonance-like energy dependence in the total cross section with a width of only 50 MeV and situated at a mass 90 MeV below the {Delta}{Delta} mass.

  2. An Isoratio Method to Study Free Energy and Temperature Effects in Intermediate Mass Fragments Produced in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Qiao, Chun-Yuan; Ding, Tian-Tian; Niu, Fei; Song, Yi-Dan; Niu, Yi-Fei

    2016-07-01

    An isoratio method, i.e., the isotopic (isotonic) ratio among three isotopes (isotones), is proposed to study the free energy and temperature effects in the intermediate mass fragments produced in heavy-ion collisions. The parameterizations for the free energy of nucleus at low temperature, which have been proposed in the framework of the density functional theory using the SKM skymre interaction, are adopted to calculate the temperature-dependent free energy of fragment. By analyzing the measured yields of fragments in the 140A MeV 58,64Ni + 9Be reactions, it is verified that the free energy in the isoratio is almost the same for different reactions. A temperature-dependent pairing-energy is introduced into the parameterizations for free energy, which reveals that the weakened pairing energy at the low temperature accounts for the weakened or disappearing odd-even staggering in isoratio. Supported by the Program for Science and Technology Innovation Talents in Universities of Henan Province under Grant No. 13HASTIT046, the Creative Experimental Project of National Undergraduate Students (CEPNU201510476017)

  3. Bonding energetics in clusters formed by cesium salts: a study by collision-induced dissociation and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Maria, Pierre-Charles; Massi, Lionel; Box, Natzaret Sindreu; Gal, Jean-François; Burk, Peeter; Tammiku-Taul, Jaana; Kutsar, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In relation to the interaction between (137)Cs and soil organic matter, electrospray mass spectrometry experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out on the dissociation of positively charged adducts formed by cesium nitrate and cesium organic salts attached to a cesium cation [Cs(CsNO(3))(CsA)](+) (A = benzoate, salicylate, hydrogen phthalate, hydrogen maleate, hydrogen fumarate, hydrogen oxalate, and hydrogen malonate ion). These mixed clusters were generated by electrospray from methanol solutions containing cesium nitrate and an organic acid. Collision-induced dissociation of [Cs(CsNO(3))(CsA)](+) in a quadrupole ion trap gave [Cs(CsNO(3))](+) and [Cs(CsA)](+) as major product ions. Loss of HNO(3) was observed, and also CO(2) loss in the case of A = hydrogen malonate. Branching ratios for the dissociation into [Cs(CsNO(3))](+) and [Cs(CsA)](+) were treated by the Cooks' kinetic method to obtain a quantitative order of bonding energetics (enthalpies and Gibbs free energies) between Cs(+) and the molecular salt (ion pair) CsA, and were correlated with the corresponding values calculated using DFT. The kinetic method leads to relative scales of Cs(+) affinities and basicities that are consistent with the DFT-calculated values. This study brings new data on the strong interaction between the cesium cation and molecular salts CsA.

  4. A Study of AIS1 Neck Injury Parameters in 168 Frontal Collisions Using a Restrained Hybrid III Dummy.

    PubMed

    Bohman, K; Boström, O; H Land, Y; Kullgren, A

    2000-11-01

    The research of AIS1 neck injuries has focused on rearend collisions, but a great portion of these injuries occur in frontal impacts. AIS1 neck injuries in frontal impacts can be associated with seat belt use and it can be hypothesized that the seat belt may transfer injurious loads to the neck. This study investigates the influence of the restraint system on the neck loads by using mechanical as well as mathematical (MADYMO) models of the HIII 50(th) percentile dummy. The mathematical simulations were based on 168 frontal crash pulses collected from crash recorders, installed in passenger cars in Sweden. The neck loads were evaluated by a new neck injury criterion NIC(protraction), the upper neck flexion moment and the Nij criterion. It was found that a pretensioner, a load limiter or an airbag have the potential to reduce the neck loads below recently suggested reference values for long-term neck injuries only as well as short- plus long-term neck injuries. Moreover, the interaction between the pretensioner, the load limiter and the airbag was of great importance in order to minimize the neck loads.

  5. Fundamentals of tandem mass spectrometry: a dynamics study of simple C-C bond cleavage in collision-activated dissociation of polyatomic ions at low energy.

    PubMed

    Shukla, A K; Qian, K; Anderson, S; Futrell, J H

    1990-02-01

    The loss of methyl radical in collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of acetone and propane molecular ions has been studied at low energy using a tandem hybrid mass spectrometer. Although the two processes are very similar chemically and energetically, very different dynamical features are observed. Acetyl ions from acetone ion are predominantly backward-scattered, with intensity maxima lying inside and outside the elastic scattering circle, confirming our previous observation that electronically excited states are important in low-energy acetone CAD. Ethyl ions from propane ion show a forward-scattered peak maximum at a nonzero scattering angle, which is consistent with generally accepted models for vibrational excitation and redistribution of energy before dissociation. Both processes demonstrate that CAD at low energy proceeds via small-impact-parameter collisions with momentum transfer. Comparison of the present results with higher energy CAD dynamics studies and earlier work leads to some tentative general conclusions about energy transfer in these processes.

  6. A quantum-classical study of the OH + H2 reactive and inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, Carles; Pacifici, Leonardo; Laganà, Antonio; Coletti, Cecilia

    2017-04-01

    We carried out a study of OH + H2 scattering using a quantum-classical method, treating quantally vibrations and classically both translations and rotations. The good agreement between the state specific quantum-classical reactive probabilities and the corresponding quantum ones prompted the extension of the study to state to state probabilities for non reactive vibrational energy exchange. The study showed that H2 reactive dynamics depends on the vibrational excitation, while the non reactive one is mainly vibrationally adiabatic. On the contrary, OH reactive dynamics is not affected by its vibrational excitation, whereas the non reactive one might produce some pumping up to higher vibrational states.

  7. Collision avoidance timing analysis of DSRC-based vehicles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Antony; Yip, Alice

    2010-01-01

    Dedicated short-range communication (DSRC) has been used in prototyped vehicles to test vehicle-to-vehicle communication for collision avoidance. However, there is little study on how collision avoidance software should behave to best mitigate accident collisions. In this paper, we analyse the timing of events and how they influence software-based collision avoidance strategies. We have found that the warning strategies for collision avoidance are constrained by the timing of events such as DSRC communication latency, detection range, road condition, driver reaction and deceleration rate. With these events, we define two collision avoidance timings: critical time to avoid collision and preferred time to avoid collision, and they dictate the design of software-based collision avoidance systems.

  8. Exclusive production of vector mesons in pp and pp-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cisek, Anna; Schaefer, Wolfgang; Szczurek, Antoni

    2011-07-15

    Protons and antiprotons at collider energies are a source of high energy Weizsaecker-Williams photons. This opens up a possibility to study at the LHC exclusive photoproduction of heavy vector mesons at energies much larger than possible at the HERA accelerator.We present selected results on the production of vector mesons {rho}, {omega}, {phi}, J/{Psi} and {Upsilon}. We show distributions in rapidity, transverse momentum of mesons and azimuthal angle between outgoing protons for RHIC, Tevatron and LHC energies. The absorption effects are discussed.The amplitude for {gamma}p{yields}Vp is calculated in a pQCD k{sub T}-factorization approach with an unintegrated gluon distribution constrained by inclusive deep-inelastic structure function. The total cross section for diffractive meson (virtual) photo-production as a function of energy and photon virtuality is calculated and compared to HERA data. We also discuss the ratio of the first radial excitation state (2S) to the ground state (1S) in diffractive J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production.

  9. Beam-Target Double-Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized He3 Target at 1.4<Q2<2.7 GeV2

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Katich, J.; Qian, X.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. -P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z. -E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J. C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R. D.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L. -G.; Tobias, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.

    2012-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. The kinematics focused on the valence quark region, 0.16 < x < 0.35 with 1.4 < Q2 < 2.7 GeV2. The corresponding neutron ALT asymmetries were extracted from the measured 3He asymmetries and proton/3He cross section ratios using the effective polarization approximation. These new data probe the transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function g1Tq and therefore provide access to quark spin-orbit correlations. Our results indicate a positive azimuthal asymmetry for π- production on 3He and the neutron, while our π+ asymmetries are consistent with zero.

  10. Origin of collision-induced molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Hornung, B; Aoiz, F J

    2013-11-01

    Collision-induced rotational angular momentum orientation is a fundamental property of molecular scattering, which is sensitive to the balance between attractive and repulsive forces at play during collision. Here, we quantify a new mechanism leading to orientation, which is purely quantum mechanical in origin. Although the new mechanism is quite general, and will operate more widely in atomic and molecular scattering, it is observed here for impulsive hard shell collisions, for which the orientation vanishes classically. The quantum mechanism can thus be studied in isolation from other processes. The orientation is proposed to originate from the nonlocal nature of the quantum mechanical collision encounter.

  11. Collision Repair Campaign

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  12. Observation and studies of jet quenching in PbPb collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-08-01

    Jet production in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV was studied with the CMS detector at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 inverse microbarns. Jets are reconstructed using the energy deposited in the CMS calorimeters and studied as a function of collision centrality. With increasing collision centrality, a striking imbalance in dijet transverse momentum is observed, consistent with jet quenching. The observed effect extends from the lower cut-off used in this study (jet transverse momentum = 120 GeV/c) up to the statistical limit of the available data sample (jet transverse momentum approximately 210 GeV/c). Correlations of charged particle tracks with jets indicate that the momentum imbalance is accompanied by a softening of the fragmentation pattern of the second most energetic, away-side jet. The dijet momentum balance is recovered when integrating low transverse momentum particles distributed over a wide angular range relative to the direction of the away-side jet.

  13. Comparative study between Glauber-Velasco and the Stochastic Vacuum models for high energy hadronic collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilard, D.; Kodama, T.

    2016-04-01

    The outlines of the Glauber-Velasco (GV) and the Stochastic Vacuum models (SVM) for describing pp elastic scattering are presented. The amplitudes and the cross-sections of both models are investigated and compared at √s = 7TeV. The asymptotic energy behaviour for the SVM is also studied.

  14. Study on the top quark pair production mechanism in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Naganoma, Junji

    2008-03-01

    The study of the top quark pair production mechanism in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is described. The main subjects are the measurements of the top quark pair production cross section, the top quark mass and a search for a new particle decaying to the top quark pair. The analyses are based on 1.9 fb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Run II experiment between March 2002 and May 2007, using the lepton+jets events. The measured top quark pair production cross section is 8.2 ± 0.5 (stat.) ± 0.8 (syst.) ± 0.5 (lum.) pb, which is slightly higher than the standard model prediction at the top mass of 175 GeV/c2. The top quark mass is an important parameter in the standard model, and also in the experimental studies. The measured top quark mass if 171.6 ± 2.0 (stat.) ± 1.3(syst.) GeV/c2. Finally, they report on a search for a new gauge boson decaying to t$\\bar{t}$, which interferes with the standard model gluon in the q$\\bar{q}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ production process. They call such a hypothetical particle a 'Massive Gluon'. The observed t$\\bar{t}$ invariant mass distribution is consistent with the standard model expectations, and also the measured massive gluon coupling strength with quarks is consistent within a statistical fluctuation of the standard model expectation in the wide range of the massive gluon masses and widths. They set the upper and lower limits on the coupling strength of the massive gluon.

  15. COLLISION AVOIDANCE TRAINING USING A DRIVING SIMULATOR IN DRIVERS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE: A PILOT STUDY.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Jeffrey D; Rizzo, Matthew; Anderson, Steven W; Dastrup, Elizabeth; Uc, Ergun Y

    2009-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) impairs driving performance, and simulator studies have shown increased crashes compared to controls. In this pilot study, eight drivers with PD participated in three drive sessions with multiple simulator intersections of varying visibility and traffic load, where an incurring vehicle posed a crash risk. Over the course of the three sessions (once every 1-2 weeks), we observed reduction in crashes (p=0.059) and reaction times (p=0.006) to the vehicle incursion. These findings suggest that our simulator training program is feasible and potentially useful in drivers with PD. Future research questions include transfer of training to different driving tasks, duration of benefit, and the effect on long term real life outcomes in comparison to a standard intervention (e.g., driver education class) in a randomized trial.

  16. Experimental Study of Three-Nucleon Dynamics in the Dp Breakup Collisions Using the WASA Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłos, B.; Ciepał, I.; Jamróz, B.; Khatri, G.; Kistryn, S.; Kozela, A.; Magiera, A.; Parol, W.; Skwira-Chalot, I.; Stephan, E.

    2017-03-01

    Until recently, all calculations of breakup observables were carried out in a non-relativistic regime. The relativistic treatment of the breakup reaction in 3 N system is quite a new achievement. The detailed study of various aspects of few-nucleon system dynamics in medium energy region, with a particular emphasis on investigation of relativistic effects and their interplay with three nucleon force (3NF) becomes feasible with increasing available energy in the three nucleon system. Therefore an experiment to investigate the ^1H(d, pp)n breakup cross section using a deuteron beam of 300, 340, 380 and 400 MeV and the WASA detector has been performed at COSY-Jülich. The almost 4π geometry of the WASA detector gives an unique possibility to study variety of kinematic configurations, which reveal different sensitivity to aspects of dynamics of the three nucleon system. The main steps of the analysis, including energy calibration, PID, normalization and efficiency studies, and their impact on the final accuracy of the result, are discussed.

  17. Collision-energy-resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy of p-benzoquinone: Study of electronic structure and anisotropic interaction with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Naoki; Okamura, Kohji; Ohno, Koichi

    2004-06-01

    Collision energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) of p-benzoquinone with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms indicates that interaction potentials between p-benzoquinone and He*(2 3S) are highly anisotropic in the studied collision energy range (100-250 meV). Attractive interactions were found around the C=O groups for in-plane and out-of-plane directions, while repulsive interactions were found around CH bonds and the benzenoid ring. Assignment of the first four ionic states of p-benzoquinone and an analogous methyl-substituted compound was examined with CEDPICS and anisotropic distributions of the corresponding two nonbonding oxygen orbitals (nO+,nO-) and two πCC orbitals (πCC+,πCC-). An extra band that shows negative CEDPICS was observed at ca. 7.2 eV in Penning ionization electron spectrum.

  18. Systematic study of the experimental measurements on J/ψ cross sections and kinematic distributions in p+p collisions at different energies

    DOE PAGES

    Zha, Wangmei; Huang, Bingchu; Ma, Rongrong; ...

    2016-02-29

    The world experimental data on cross section and kinematic distribution in p + p and p + A collisions at √s = 6.8 – 7000 GeV are systematically examined in this work. The √s dependence of the inclusive cross section, rapidity, and transverse momentum distributions are studied phenomenologically. Also, we explore empirical formulas to obtain the total cross section, rapidity, and transverse momentum (pT) distribution. This is crucial for the interpretation of A + A J/ψ results at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider when the p + p reference data are not available. In addition, the cross section atmore » midrapidity and transverse momentum distributions in p + p collisions at √s = 39 and 62.4 GeV are evaluated.« less

  19. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-massmore » dependence of the oscillations.« less

  20. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-mass dependence of the oscillations.

  1. Insights on the Quaternary Tectonic Evolution of the SE Indonesia Arc-Continent Collision from the Study of Uplifted Coral Terraces on Sumba Island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, F.; Rigaud, S.; Chiang, H. W.; Djamil, Y. S.; Herdiyanti, T.; Johnny, J.; Ildefonso, S.; Meilano, I.; Bijaksana, S.; Abidin, H. Z.; Tapponnier, P.; Wang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Sumba Island is uniquely positioned within the Sunda-Banda forearc, at the transition between oceanic subduction and arc-continent collision. There, the convergence between the Sunda and Australian plates is accommodated along at least three major structures: the megathrust, the Savu backthrust located south of Sumba and the Flores backthrust located north of the volcanic arc. The incipient collision in the vicinity of Sumba is responsible for coastal vertical movements. Quaternary reefal deposits form spectacular uplifted flights of terraces, which directly overlie Mid Miocene - Early Pliocene deep carbonate and volcaniclastic rocks at elevations exceeding 500m. Although aerial fossil reefs extensively rim the northern and eastern coasts of Sumba, studies have been limited to Cape Laundi where an uplift rate of 0.2-0.5 m/kyr is estimated for the last 400 kyr, partly on the basis of alpha-spectrometric U/Th dating. At the island scale, the relief morphology and the hydrographic network point to a N-S asymmetry, indicating a general tilt toward the north. A subducting seafloor asperity and south-dipping normal faults have been postulated to generate this asymmetry. However as the pattern and kinematics of the deformation remain partially determined, structures and processes capable of driving such deformation and accommodating the nascent collision may be undisclosed. New topographic data coupled with field observations and coral mass-spectrometric U/Th dating allow investigating the morphology, stratigraphy and age of the fossil reef terraces at the island scale. Tectonic structures disrupting the topography are identified and their activities are relatively dated with respect to fossil reef terraces. The deformation pattern of Sumba is characterized, especially in Cape Laundi where the uplift rate is re-evaluated. Through a multi-disciplinary study, we intend to reconstruct the tectonic evolution of Sumba island and, at a larger scale, of the collision in SE

  2. Formation of the phenyl radical [C6H5(X(2)A1)] under single collision conditions: a crossed molecular beam and ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangtong; Jones, Brant; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Kaiser, Ralf I; Chin, Christine; Kislov, Vadim V; Mebel, Alexander M

    2010-03-03

    Reactions of dicarbon molecules (C(2)) with C(4)H(6) isomers such as 1,3-butadiene represent a potential, but hitherto unnoticed, route to synthesize the first aromatic C(6) ring in hydrocarbon flames and in the interstellar medium where concentrations of dicarbon transient species are significant. Here, crossed molecular beams experiments of dicarbon molecules in their X(1)Sigma(g)(+) electronic ground state and in the first electronically excited a(3)Pi(u) state have been conducted with 1,3-butadiene and two partially deuterated counterparts (1,1,4,4-D4-1,3-butadiene and 2,3-D2-1,3-butadiene) at two collision energies of 12.7 and 33.7 kJ mol(-1). Combining these scattering experiments with electronic structure and RRKM calculations on the singlet and triplet C(6)H(6) surfaces, our investigation reveals that the aromatic phenyl radical is formed predominantly on the triplet surface via indirect scattering dynamics through a long-lived reaction intermediate. Initiated by a barrierless addition of triplet dicarbon to one of the terminal carbon atoms of 1,3-butadiene, the collision complex undergoes trans-cis isomerization followed by ring closure and hydrogen migration prior to hydrogen atom elimination, ultimately forming the phenyl radical. The latter step emits the hydrogen atom almost perpendicularly to the rotational plane of the decomposing intermediate and almost parallel to the total angular momentum vector. On the singlet surface, smaller contributions of phenyl radical could not be excluded; experiments with partially deuterated 1,3-butadiene indicate the formation of the thermodynamically less stable acyclic H(2)CCHCCCCH(2) isomer. This study presents the very first experimental evidence, contemplated by theoretical studies, that under single collision conditions an aromatic hydrocarbon molecule can be formed in a bimolecular gas-phase reaction via reaction of two acyclic molecules involving cyclization processes at collision energies highly relevant to

  3. Duration of an Elastic Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding…

  4. Studying collisions in the general physics laboratory with quadrature light emitting diode sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYoung, P. A.; Mulder, B.

    2002-12-01

    We have developed the means to measure position rapidly and precisely as a function of time in the general physics laboratory. These measurements are of sufficient quality that velocities and accelerations can be calculated from the position data using numerical derivatives. The precision of the measurements is such that any disagreement between theoretical expectations and experimental measurements is less than a few percent. Measurements of the system under study can be made as rapidly as every 200 μs, which is faster than the typical time scales over which the system changes. Measuring rapidly also allows one to investigate additional phenomena not previously accessible and to see features of the physics previously unobserved. The measurement system is based on commercially available sensors, computer hardware, and computer software (LABVIEW™). Many general physics laboratories based on this system have been developed but only an investigation of Newton's second law will be described here.

  5. Study of ω-meson production in pp collisions at ANKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsov, S.; Büscher, M.; Hartmann, M.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Khoukaz, A.; Koptev, V.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lehmann, I.; Leontyev, V.; Macharashvili, G.; Maeda, Y.; Mersmann, T.; Merzliakov, S.; Mikirtytchyants, S.; Mussgiller, A.; Oellers, D.; Ohm, H.; Rathmann, F.; Schleichert, R.; Seyfarth, H.; Ströher, H.; Trusov, S.; Valdau, Yu.; Wüstner, P.; Yaschenko, S.; Wilkin, C.

    2007-01-01

    The production of ω-mesons in the pp → ppω reaction has been investigated with the COSY-ANKE spectrometer for excess energies of 60 and 92MeV by detecting the two final protons and reconstructing their missing mass. The large physical background was subtracted using an event-by-event transformation of the proton momenta between the two energies. Differential distributions and total cross-sections were obtained after careful studies of possible systematic uncertainties in the overall ANKE acceptance. The results are compared with the predictions of theoretical models. Combined with data on the φ-meson, a more refined estimate is made of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule violation in the φ/ω production ratio.

  6. Occupant kinematics and shoulder belt retention in far-side lateral and oblique collisions: a parametric study.

    PubMed

    Forman, Jason L; Lopez-Valdes, Francisco; Lessley, David J; Riley, Patrick; Sochor, Mark; Heltzel, Sara; Ash, Joseph; Perz, Rafal; Kent, Richard W; Seacrist, Thomas; Arbogast, Kristy B; Tanji, Hiromasa; Higuchi, Kazuo

    2013-11-01

    In far-side impacts, head contact with interior components is a key injury mechanism. Restraint characteristics have a pronounced influence on head motion and injury risk. This study performed a parametric examination of restraint, positioning, and collision factors affecting shoulder belt retention and occupant kinematics in far-side lateral and oblique sled tests with post mortem human subjects (PMHS). Seven PMHS were subjected to repeated tests varying the D-ring position, arm position, pelvis restraint, pre-tensioning, and impact severity. Each PMHS was subjected to four low-severity tests (6.6 g sled acceleration pulse) in which the restraint or position parameters were varied and then a single higher-severity test (14 g) with a chosen restraint configuration (total of 36 tests). Three PMHS were tested in a purely lateral (90° from frontal) impact direction; 4 were tested in an oblique impact (60° from frontal). All subjects were restrained by a 3-point seatbelt. Occupant motion was tracked with a 3D optoelectric high speed motion capture system. For all restraint configurations, the 60° oblique impact angle was associated with greater lateral head excursion than the 90° impact angle. This unexpected result reflects the increased axial rotation of the torso in the oblique impacts, which allowed the shoulder to displace more relative to the shoulder belt and thus the head to displace more relative to the sled buck. Restraint engagement of the torso and shoulder was actually greater in the purely lateral impacts than in the oblique impacts. Pretensioning significantly reduced lateral head excursion (175 mm average in the low-severity tests across all restraint configurations).

  7. Backing collisions: a study of drivers’ eye and backing behaviour using combined rear-view camera and sensor systems

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, David S; Pradhan, Anuj; Fisher, Donald L; Knodler, Michael A; Muttart, Jeffrey W; Menon, Rajiv; Meissner, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Context Backing crash injures can be severe; approximately 200 of the 2,500 reported injuries of this type per year to children under the age of 15 years result in death. Technology for assisting drivers when backing has limited success in preventing backing crashes. Objectives Two questions are addressed: Why is the reduction in backing crashes moderate when rear-view cameras are deployed? Could rear-view cameras augment sensor systems? Design 46 drivers (36 experimental, 10 control) completed 16 parking trials over 2 days (eight trials per day). Experimental participants were provided with a sensor camera system, controls were not. Three crash scenarios were introduced. Setting Parking facility at UMass Amherst, USA. Subjects 46 drivers (33 men, 13 women) average age 29 years, who were Massachusetts residents licensed within the USA for an average of 9.3 years. Interventions Vehicles equipped with a rear-view camera and sensor system-based parking aid. Main Outcome Measures Subject’s eye fixations while driving and researcher’s observation of collision with objects during backing. Results Only 20% of drivers looked at the rear-view camera before backing, and 88% of those did not crash. Of those who did not look at the rear-view camera before backing, 46% looked after the sensor warned the driver. Conclusions This study indicates that drivers not only attend to an audible warning, but will look at a rear-view camera if available. Evidence suggests that when used appropriately, rear-view cameras can mitigate the occurrence of backing crashes, particularly when paired with an appropriate sensor system. PMID:20363812

  8. Opportunities and limitations for intersection collision intervention-A study of real world 'left turn across path' accidents.

    PubMed

    Sander, Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    Turning across the path of oncoming vehicle accidents are frequent and dangerous. To date not many car manufacturers have introduced Automated Emergency Braking (AEB) systems addressing this type of conflict situation, but it is foreseeable that these scenarios will be part of the Euro NCAP 2020 rating. Nine out of ten collisions are caused by the driver of the turning vehicle. An AEB system evaluating the ego and conflict vehicle driver's possibilities to avoid a pending crash by either braking or steering was specified for application in various constellations of vehicle collisions. In virtual simulation, AEB system parameters were varied, covering parameters that are relevant for driver comfort such as longitudinal and lateral acceleration (to define avoidance possibilities), expected steering maneuvers to avoid conflict, and intervention response characteristics (brake delay and ramp up) to assess the safety benefit. The reference simulation showed a potential of the AEB system in the turning vehicle to avoid approximately half of the collisions. An AEB system of the straight going vehicle was less effective. The effectiveness of the turning vehicle's AEB system increases if spatial limitations for the collision-avoidance steering maneuver are known. Such information could be provided by sensors detecting free space in or around the road environment or geographical information shared via vehicle to cloud communication. AEB interventions rarely result in collision avoidance for turning vehicles with speeds above 40km/h or for straight going vehicles with speeds above 60km/h. State of the art field-of-views of forward looking sensing systems designed for AEB rear-end interventions are capable of addressing turning across path situations.

  9. Global potential energy hypersurface for dynamical studies of energy transfer in HF--HF collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Redmon, M.J.; Binkley, J.S.

    1987-07-15

    The interaction energy of two HF molecules at 1332 individual points has been calculated with Moeller--Plesset (many--body) perturbation theory at the MP4-SDTQ level using a 6-311G** basis set. 293 of the points correspond to stretching of one HF molecule from its equilibrium geometry. No attempt was made to use a sufficiently fine grid to accurately describe the well region corresponding to hydrogen bonding. However, the location and minimum energy are consistent with experiment and other accurate theoretical results. An extensive global fit (rms error of 1 kcal/mol) is reported of 1319 points (below 10 eV of potential energy) using a modified London potential with corrections obtained using polynomials through four-body interactions. A model electrostatic potential represents the long-range interaction. In addition, the use of an expansion in products of three Legendre functions is discussed. It is shown that the latter approach, although accurately fitting the ab initio data, has difficulties interpolating in regions of the surface exhibiting diverse magnitudes of potential energy, and therefore must be used with caution. This surface should be useful for studies of T--V--R processes in this system.

  10. Studies of fluctuation processes in nuclear collisions. Progress report, March 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, S.

    1994-05-01

    This report summarizes the progress on grant No.FG05-89ER40530 during the period March 1, 1993 to April 30, 1994. By extending our previous work on the fluid dynamical treatment of the nuclear collective motion, we deduced from the Boltzmann-Langevin (BL) model a set of transport equations for N collective variables and calculated the associated transport coefficients. Work has also continued on investigating the relation between the BUU model and the BL model for the average evolution. The principle investigator spent a fruitful summer (1993) at LBL, where in collaboration with J. Raindrop, we developed a numerical method for simulating the stochastic evolution of the phase-space density near local equilibrium. Two papers have appeared in Phys. Rev. C and Nucl. Phys. A, two papers have been accepted for publication, both in Nucl. Phys. A, and two manuscripts have been submitted to Z. Phys. A for publication. Several seminars/contributed talks were given at various meetings and an invited talk was presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institution Hot and Dense Matter, Bodrum/Turkey.

  11. A case study on the possible altitude-dependent effects of collisions on sodium airglow emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkhel, S.; Sekar, R.; Chakrabarty, D.; Sridharan, S.

    2010-10-01

    Simultaneous observations of a narrowband sodium (Na) airglow photometer corresponding to the D2 line in conjunction with a Na lidar from Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), India, reveal episodic enhancements in Na airglow intensity during 1930-0142 Indian standard time (IST; IST = UT + 5.5 h) on 18-19 March 2007. This variation is drastically different from the average Na airglow intensity variation for that duration during that month. Interestingly, the Na airglow intensity variation is found to be well correlated with the Na atom concentration variation only at 93.6 km during the period 2312-0142 IST, a period closer to the measurement of mesospheric ozone by the Sounding of Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. Moreover, the correlation coefficient is not significant at 88.5 km, where the Na concentration is maximum. Estimations of the altitude profiles of the volume emission rate of Na airglow corresponding to the D2 line using measured parameters during local postmidnight hours reveal that the peak of volume emission rate is different from 93.6 km. It is suggested that the altitude variation in collisional quenching is needed to match the peak altitude of emission to the altitude where correlation between the Na atom concentration and Na airglow intensity is maximum. The fact that the measured atmospheric pressure reduces by a factor of ˜2.5 as altitude changes from 88.5 to 93.6 km supports this proposition. The case study brings out the sensitivity of Na airglow intensity to the altitude dependence of the collisional quenching that eventually affects Na airglow emission.

  12. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  13. Trajectory surface hopping study of the O((3)P) + C2H2 reaction dynamics: effect of collision energy on the extent of intersystem crossing.

    PubMed

    Rajak, Karunamoy; Maiti, Biswajit

    2014-01-28

    Intersystem crossing (ISC) dynamics plays an important role in determining the product branching in the O((3)P) + C2H2 reaction despite the necessarily small spin-orbit coupling constant values. In this study we investigate the effect of collision energy on the extent of the contribution of a spin non-conserving route through ISC dynamics to the product distributions at the initial collision energies 8.2, 9.5, and 13.1 kcal/mol. A direct dynamics trajectory surface hopping method is employed with potential energy surfaces generated at the unrestricted B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory to perform nonadiabatic dynamics. To make our calculation simpler, nonadibatic transitions were only considered at the triplet-singlet intersections. At the crossing points, Landau-Zener transition probabilities were calculated using spin-orbit coupling constant values computed at the same geometry. The Landau-Zener model for the title reaction is validated against a more rigorous Tully's fewest switches method and found to be working reasonably well as expected because of weak spin-orbit coupling. We have compared our results with the recent crossed molecular beam experiments and observed a very good agreement with respect to the primary product branching ratios. Our calculation revealed that there is no noticeable effect of the initial collision energy on the overall product distributions that corroborates the recent experimental findings. Our calculation indicates, however, that the extent of intersystem crossing contributions varies significantly with collision energy, needed to be verified, experimentally.

  14. Quasi-classical trajectory study of collision energy effect on the stereodynamics of H + BrO → O + HBr reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ting-Xian; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Shi, Ying; Li, Ze-Rui; Jin, Ming-Xing

    2015-04-01

    Quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) studies on the stereodynamics of H + BrO → O + HBr reaction have been performed on the X1A' state of ab initio potential energy surface by Peterson [Peterson K A 2000 J. Chem. Phys. 113 4598] in a collision energy range from 0 kcal/mol to 6 kcal/mol. Two of the polarization-dependent generalized differential cross sections (PDDCSs), (2π/σ)(dσ00/dωt) (PDDCS00) and (2π/σ)(dσ20/dωt) (PDDCS20) are considered. The rotational polarizations of these products show sensitive behaviors to the calculated collision energy range. Furthermore, in order to gain more knowledge about vector correlations, the product angular distribution, P(θr), and the dihedral angle, P(ϕr), are calculated, and the results indicate that both the rotational alignment and orientation of the product are enhanced as collision energy increases. Project supported by the Science Fund from Jilin University, China (Grant No. 419080106440), the Chinese National Fusion Project for ITER (Grant No. 2010GB104003), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 10974069).

  15. Study of ψ(2 S) production and cold nuclear matter effects in pPb collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}=5 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-03-01

    The production of ψ(2 S) mesons is studied in dimuon final states using proton-lead (pPb) collision data collected by the LHCb detector. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 1 .6 nb-1. The nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of the pPb collisions is sqrt{s_{NN}}=5 TeV. The measurement is performed using ψ(2 S) mesons with transverse momentum less than 14 GeV/ c and rapidity y in the ranges 1 .5 < y < 4 .0 and -5 .0 < y < -2 .5 in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass system. The forward-backward production ratio and the nuclear modification factor are determined for ψ(2 S) mesons. Using the production cross-section results of ψ(2 S) and J/ψ mesons from b-hadron decays, the boverline{b} cross-section in pPb collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}=5 TeV is obtained. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. The risk of pedestrian injury and fatality in collisions with motor vehicles, a social ecological study of state routes and city streets in King County, Washington.

    PubMed

    Moudon, Anne Vernez; Lin, Lin; Jiao, Junfeng; Hurvitz, Philip; Reeves, Paula

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the correlates of injury severity using police records of pedestrian-motor-vehicle collisions on state routes and city streets in King County, Washington. Levels of influence on collision outcome considered (1) the characteristics of individual pedestrians and drivers and their actions; (2) the road environment; and (3) the neighborhood environment. Binary logistic regressions served to estimate the risk of a pedestrian being severely injured or dying versus suffering minor or no injury. Significant individual-level influences on injury severity were confirmed for both types of roads: pedestrians being older or younger; the vehicle moving straight on the roadway. New variables associated with increased risk of severe injury or death included: having more than two pedestrians involved in a collision; and on city streets, the driver being inebriated. Road intersection design was significant only in the state route models, with pedestrians crossing at intersections without signals increasing the risk of being injured or dying. Adjusting for pedestrians' and drivers' characteristics and actions, neighborhood medium home values and higher residential densities increased the risk of injury or death. No other road or neighborhood environment variable remained significant, suggesting that pedestrians were not safer in areas with high pedestrian activity.

  17. Maxillofacial injuries in moose-motor vehicle collisions versus other high-speed motor vehicle collisions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sharon; Harrop, A Robertson

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anecdotal experience has suggested that there is a higher frequency of maxillofacial injuries among motor vehicle collisions involving moose. OBJECTIVES: A retrospective cohort study design was used to investigate the incidence of various injuries resulting from moose-motor vehicle collisions versus other high-speed motor vehicle collisions. METHODS: A chart review was conducted among patients presenting to a Canadian regional trauma centre during the five-year period from 1996 to 2000. RESULTS: Fifty-seven moose-motor vehicle collisions were identified; 121 high-speed collisions were randomly selected as a control group. Demographic, collision and injury data were collected from these charts and statistically analyzed. The general demographic features of the two groups were similar. Moose collisions were typically frontal impact resulting in windshield damage. The overall injury severity was similar in both groups. Likewise, the frequency of intracranial, spinal, thoracic and extremity injuries was similar for both groups. The group involved in collisions with moose, however, was 1.8 times more likely then controls to sustain a maxillofacial injury (P=0.004) and four times more likely to sustain a maxillofacial fracture (P=0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Occupants of motor vehicles colliding with moose are more likely to sustain maxillofacial injuries than those involved in other types of motor vehicle collisions. It is speculated that this distribution of injuries relates to the mechanism of collision with these large mammals with a high centre of gravity. PMID:24227930

  18. A framework of boundary collision data aggregation into neighbourhoods.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ge; Wang, Xin; Kwon, Dae-Won

    2015-10-01

    A large portion of the total number of motor collisions can be boundary collisions; therefore, exaggerated or underestimated numbers for boundary collisions aggregated into neighbourhoods may hamper road safety analyses and management. In this paper, we propose a systematic framework for boundary collision aggregation. First, an entropy-based histogram thresholding method is utilized to determine the boundary zone size and identify boundary collisions. Next, the collision density probability distribution is then established, based on the collisions in each neighbourhood. Last, an effective boundary collision aggregation method, called the collision density ratio (CDR), is used to aggregate boundary collisions into neighbourhoods. The proposed framework is applied to collision data in the City of Edmonton for a case study. The experimental results show that the proposed entropy-based histogram thresholding method can identify boundary collision with the high precision and recall, and the proposed CDR method is more effective than the existing methods, the half-to-half ratio method and the one-to-one ratio method, to aggregate boundary collisions into neighbourhoods.

  19. Study of inclusive strange-baryon production and search for pentaquarks in two-photon collisions at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achard, P.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S. V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, S.; Barczyk, A.; Barillère, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Böhm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J. G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de La Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Déglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degré, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; Denotaristefani, F.; de Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M. A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Fisher, W.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Y.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Grenier, G.; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S. R.; Jin, B. N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberría, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, J. K.; Kirkby, J.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kräber, M.; Kraemer, R. W.; Krüger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R. R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G. B.; Muanza, G. S.; Muijs, A. J. M.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Nowak, H.; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Pioppi, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M. A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P. G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Rembeczki, S.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, K.; Roe, B. P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X. W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, C.; Ting, S. C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; van de Walle, R. T.; Vasquez, R.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S. C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zöller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of inclusive production of the Λ, Ξ- and Ξ*(1530) baryons in two-photon collisions with the L3 detector at LEP are presented. The inclusive differential cross sections for Λ and Ξ- are measured as a function of the baryon transverse momentum, pt, and pseudo-rapidity, η. The mean number of Λ, Ξ- and Ξ*(1530) baryons per hadronic two-photon event is determined in the kinematic range 0.4 GeVcollisions through the decay θ+→pK0 S is also presented. No evidence for production of this state is found.

  20. A Fundamental Tandem Mass Spectrometry Study of the Collision-Activated Dissociation of Small Deprotonated Molecules Related to Lignin.

    PubMed

    Marcum, Christopher L; Jarrell, Tiffany M; Zhu, Hanyu; Owen, Benjamin C; Haupert, Laura J; Easton, Mckay; Hosseinaei, Omid; Bozell, Joseph; Nash, John J; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2016-12-20

    The collision-activated fragmentation pathways and reaction mechanisms of 34 deprotonated model compounds representative of lignin degradation products were explored experimentally and computationally. The compounds were evaporated and ionized by using negative-ion mode electrospray ionization doped with NaOH to produce abundant deprotonated molecules. The ions were isolated and subjected to collision-activated dissociation (CAD). Their fragment ions were then isolated and also subjected to CAD. This was repeated until no further fragmentation was observed (up to MS(6) ). This approach enabled the identification of characteristic reaction pathways and delineation of reasonable fragmentation mechanisms for deprotonated molecules containing various functional groups. The varying fragmentation patterns observed for different types of compounds allow for the identification of the functionalities in these compounds. This information was utilized to identify the presence of specific functionalities and their combinations in molecules in an organosolv lignin sample.

  1. An introductory analysis of satellite collision probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton-Wippern, Kitt C.

    This paper addresses a probailistic approach in assessing the probabilities of a satellite collision occurring due to relative trajectory analyses and probability density functions representing the satellites' position/momentum vectors. The paper is divided into 2 parts: Static and Dynamic Collision Probabilities. In the Static Collision Probability section, the basic phenomenon under study is: given the mean positions and associated position probability density functions for the two objects, calculate the probability that the two objects collide (defined as being within some distance of each other). The paper presents the classic Laplace problem of the probability of arrival, using standard uniform distribution functions. This problem is then extrapolated to show how 'arrival' can be classified as 'collision', how the arrival space geometries map to collision space geometries and how arbitrary position density functions can then be included and integrated into the analysis. In the Dynamic Collision Probability section, the nature of collisions based upon both trajectory and energy considerations is discussed, and that energy states alone cannot be used to completely describe whether or not a collision occurs. This fact invalidates some earlier work on the subject and demonstrates why Liouville's theorem cannot be used in general to describe the constant density of the position/momentum space in which a collision may occur. Future position probability density functions are then shown to be the convolution of the current position and momentum density functions (linear analysis), and the paper further demonstrates the dependency of the future position density functions on time. Strategies for assessing the collision probabilities for two point masses with uncertainties in position and momentum at some given time, and thes integrated with some arbitrary impact volume schema, are then discussed. This presentation concludes with the formulation of a high level design

  2. Do Speed Cameras Reduce Collisions?

    PubMed Central

    Skubic, Jeffrey; Johnson, Steven B.; Salvino, Chris; Vanhoy, Steven; Hu, Chengcheng

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of speed cameras along a 26 mile segment in metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona. Motor vehicle collisions were retrospectively identified according to three time periods – before cameras were placed, while cameras were in place and after cameras were removed. A 14 mile segment in the same area without cameras was used for control purposes. Five cofounding variables were eliminated. In this study, the placement or removal of interstate highway speed cameras did not independently affect the incidence of motor vehicle collisions. PMID:24406979

  3. Multidimensional intermittency in hadronic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jicai; Hwa, Rudolph C.

    1992-12-01

    The study of intermittency in high-energy hadronic collisions by the Monte Carlo code ecco is extended to three-dimensional phase space. Strong intermittency is found in agreement with the data. Fluctuation in the impact parameter is responsible for the intermittency in lnpT, and the transverse-momentum conservation leads to negative intermittency slopes in the azimuthal angle φ. The Ochs-Wosiek plots are linear in all dimensions having universal slopes. An exponent ν=1.448 emerges to characterize multiparticle production in pp collisions. The properties of G moments are also examined, and the fractal dimensions determined.

  4. Multidimensional intermittency in hadronic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Hwa, R. C.

    1992-06-01

    The study of intermittency in high-energy hadronic collisions by the Monte Carlo code ECCO is extended to 3-dimensional phase space. Strong intermittency is found in agreement with the data. Fluctuation in the impact parameter is responsible for the intermittency in 1np(sub T), and the transverse-momentum conservation leads to negative intermittency slopes in the azimuthal angle (phi). The Ochs-Wosiek plots are linear in all dimensions having universal slopes. An exponent nu = 1.448 emerges to characterize multiparticle production in pp collisions. The properties of G moments are also examined, and the fractal dimensions determined.

  5. An electrophysiological study of the impact of a Forward Collision Warning System in a simulator driving task.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Mercedes; Fabrigoule, Colette; Deleurence, Philippe; Ndiaye, Daniel; Fort, Alexandra

    2012-08-27

    Driver distraction has been identified as the most important contributing factor in rear-end collisions. In this context, Forward Collision Warning Systems (FCWS) have been developed specifically to warn drivers of potential rear-end collisions. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of a surrogate FCWS and of its reliability according to the driver's attentional state by recording both behavioral and electrophysiological data. Participants drove following a lead motorcycle in a simplified simulator with or without a warning system which gave forewarning of the preceding vehicle braking. Participants had to perform this driving task either alone (simple task) or simultaneously with a secondary cognitive task (dual task). Behavioral and electrophysiological data contributed to revealing a positive effect of the warning system. Participants were faster in detecting the brake light when the system was perfect or imperfect, and the time and attentional resources allocation required for processing the target at higher cognitive level were reduced when the system was completely reliable. When both tasks were performed simultaneously, warning effectiveness was considerably affected at both performance and neural levels; however, the analysis of the brain activity revealed fewer differences between distracted and undistracted drivers when using the warning system. These results show that electrophysiological data could be a valuable tool to complement behavioral data and to have a better understanding of how these systems impact the driver.

  6. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  7. A PYTHIA Simulation Study of Direct-Photon- and π0-Triggered Hadron Correlations in p + p Collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV in Comparison to STAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marble, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have provided evidence for the existence of a new hot and dense state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Proton-proton (p + p) collisions provide a baseline measurement in order to understand the properties of the QGP in heavy-ion collisions. Comparisons of jet yields in Au + Au collisions to those in p + p collisions are done to determine the attenuation of hard-scattered partons in the QGP. In this study, p + p collisions are simulated at a center of mass energy √sNN = 200 GeV using the PYTHIA 8.185 event generator. Jets are studied via two-particle azimuthal correlations, with the recoil jet analyzed via charged-hadron yields on the away-side (Δφ approx. π) of a π0 or a direct-photon trigger. The away-side charged-hadron per-trigger yields at mid-rapidity (| η|<1), for transverse momenta pTassoc. >1.2 GeV/c, are obtained for π0 and direct-photon triggers for | η|<1 and pTtrig. >8 GeV/c. The fraction of transverse momentum carried by triggered π0 from its hard-scattered ancestors is studied to understand the energy imbalance between the triggered π0 and the outgoing parton in p + p collisions. PYTHIA simulation results of the away-side charged-hadron yields, for π0 and direct-photon triggers, are in reasonable agreement with the data collected in p + p collisions at the STAR experiment.

  8. A guided-ion beam study of the reactions of Xe{sup +} and Xe{sup 2+} with NH{sub 3} at hyperthermal collision energies

    SciTech Connect

    Levandier, Dale J.; Chiu, Yu-Hui

    2010-10-21

    We have measured the absolute cross sections for reactions of Xe{sup +} and Xe{sup 2+} with NH{sub 3} at collision energies in the range from near-thermal to {approx}34 and {approx}69 eV, respectively. For Xe{sup +}, the cross section for charge transfer, the only exothermic channel, decreases from {approx}200 A{sup 2} below 0.1 eV to {approx}12 A{sup 2} at the highest energies studied. The production of NH{sub 3}{sup +} is the only channel observed below 5 eV, above which a small amount of NH{sub 2}{sup +} is also formed. In Xe{sup 2+} reactions, the main products observed are NH{sub 3}{sup +} and NH{sub 2}{sup +}. The charge transfer cross section decreases monotonically from {approx}80 to {approx}6 A{sup 2} over the studied energy range. The NH{sub 2}{sup +} cross section is similar to the charge transfer cross section at the lowest energies, and exhibits a second component above 0.4 eV, with a maximum of 65 A{sup 2} at 0.7 eV, above which the cross section decreases to {approx}30 A{sup 2} at the highest energies studied. At energies above 10 eV, a small amount of NH{sup +} is also observed in Xe{sup 2+} collisions. Product recoil velocity distributions were determined at selected collision energies, using guided-ion beam time-of-flight methods.

  9. Study of substructure of high transverse momentum jets produced in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alon, R.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Duchovni, E.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Perez, G.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-05-03

    A study of the substructure of jets with transverse momentum greater than 400 GeV/c produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and recorded by the CDF II detector is presented. The distributions of the jet mass, angularity, and planar flow are measured for the first time in a sample with an integrated luminosity of 5.95 fb⁻¹. The observed substructure for high mass jets is consistent with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  10. Study of hadronic event-shape variables in multijet final states in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.

    2014-10-14

    Event-shape variables, which are sensitive to perturbative and nonperturbative aspects of quantum chromodynamic (QCD) interactions, are studied in multijet events recorded in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV. Events are selected with at least one jet with transverse momentum pT > 110 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| < 2.4, in a data sample corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5 fb–1. As a result, the distributions of five event-shape variables in various leading jet pT ranges are compared to predictions from different QCD Monte Carlo event generators.

  11. Precise study of the Z/γ* boson transverse momentum distribution in pp collisions using a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Ćwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-03-25

    Using 7.3 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, we measure the distribution of the variable φ(η)*, which probes the same physical effects as the Z/γ* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. A QCD prediction is found to describe the general features of the φ(η)* distribution, but is unable to describe its detailed shape or dependence on boson rapidity. A prediction that includes a broadening of transverse momentum for small values of the parton momentum fraction is strongly disfavored.

  12. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  13. Using head-on collisions to compare risk of driver death by frontal air bag generation: a matched-pair cohort study.

    PubMed

    Braver, Elisa R; Kufera, Joseph A; Alexander, Melvin T; Scerbo, Marge; Volpini, Karen; Lloyd, Joseph P

    2008-03-01

    US air bag regulations were changed in 1997 to allow tests of unbelted male dummies in vehicles mounted and accelerated on sleds, resulting in longer crash pulses than rigid-barrier crashes. This change facilitated depowering of frontal air bags and was intended to reduce air bag-induced deaths. Controversy ensued as to whether sled-certified air bags could increase adult fatality risk. A matched-pair cohort study of two-vehicle, head-on, fatal collisions between drivers involving first-generation versus sled-certified air bags during 1998-2005 was conducted by using Fatality Analysis Reporting System data. Sled certification was ascertained from public information and a survey of automakers. Conditional Poisson regression for matched-pair cohorts was used to estimate risk ratios adjusted for age, seat belt status, vehicle type, passenger car size, and model year for driver deaths in vehicles with sled-certified air bags versus first-generation air bags. For all passenger-vehicle pairs, the adjusted risk ratio was 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.77, 0.98). In head-on collisions involving only passenger cars, the adjusted risk ratio was 1.04 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 1.29). Increased fatality risk for drivers with sled-certified air bags was not observed. A borderline significant interaction between vehicle type and air bag generation suggested that sled-certified air bags may have reduced the risk of dying in head-on collisions among drivers of pickup trucks.

  14. Study of discrete-particle effects in a one-dimensional plasma simulation with the Krook type collision model

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Po-Yen; Chen, Liu; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2015-09-15

    The thermal relaxation time of a one-dimensional plasma has been demonstrated to scale with N{sub D}{sup 2} due to discrete particle effects by collisionless particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, where N{sub D} is the particle number in a Debye length. The N{sub D}{sup 2} scaling is consistent with the theoretical analysis based on the Balescu-Lenard-Landau kinetic equation. However, it was found that the thermal relaxation time is anomalously shortened to scale with N{sub D} while externally introducing the Krook type collision model in the one-dimensional electrostatic PIC simulation. In order to understand the discrete particle effects enhanced by the Krook type collision model, the superposition principle of dressed test particles was applied to derive the modified Balescu-Lenard-Landau kinetic equation. The theoretical results are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results when the collisional effects dominate the plasma system.

  15. Sentiment analysis of Chinese microblogging based on sentiment ontology: a case study of `7.23 Wenzhou Train Collision'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Hongwei; He, Shaoyi

    2013-12-01

    Sentiment analysis of microblogging texts can facilitate both organisations' public opinion monitoring and governments' response strategies development. Nevertheless, most of the existing analysis methods are conducted on Twitter, lacking of sentiment analysis of Chinese microblogging (Weibo), and they generally rely on a large number of manually annotated training or machine learning to perform sentiment classification, yielding with difficulties in application. This paper addresses these problems and employs a sentiment ontology model to examine sentiment analysis of Chinese microblogging. We conduct a sentiment analysis of all public microblogging posts about '7.23 Wenzhou Train Collision' broadcasted by Sina microblogging users between 23 July and 1 August 2011. For every day in this time period, we first extract eight dimensions of sentiment (expect, joy, love, surprise, anxiety, sorrow, angry, and hate), and then build fuzzy sentiment ontology based on HowNet and semantic similarity for sentiment analysis; we also establish computing methods of influence and sentiment of microblogging texts; and we finally explore the change of public sentiment after '7.23 Wenzhou Train Collision'. The results show that the established sentiment analysis method has excellent application, and the change of different emotional values can reflect the success or failure of guiding the public opinion by the government.

  16. Numerical study of charge transfer processes in collisions of Be^4+ and He^2+ with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Tatsuya; Pindzola, Michael S.; Lee, Teck-Gee

    2005-05-01

    We have calculated state-selective charge-transfer cross sections in collisions of Be^(4+ with H(1s) and of He^2+ with H(1s). We have used the lattice time-dependent Schr"odinger equation (LTDSE) approach, the atomic orbital coupled channel (AOCC) method, and the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. The calculations are performed with impact energy ranging between 1keV/u and 1MeV/u. With a well chosen basis-function set, we have found that AOCC gives good agreement with LTDSE. Also, with regard to Wigner's n-3 law, we have found that CTMC gives good extrapolations to the cross sections calculated by LTDSE and AOCC toward high n levels such as for those greater than 6. Thus, in our presentation, we will propose theoretical values of the total charge-transfer cross sections for these collision systems based on a combination of the most reliable results of the various method. This research used resources of the Center for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725, and also of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  17. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  18. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  19. Unmanned Aircraft Systems Human-in-the-Loop Controller and Pilot Acceptability Study: Collision Avoidance, Self-Separation, and Alerting Times (CASSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Vincent, Michael J.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Munoz, Cesar; Chamberlain, James P.; Volk, Paul; Arthur, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been mandated by the Congressional funding bill of 2012 to open the National Airspace System (NAS) to Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). With the growing use of unmanned systems, NASA has established a multi-center "UAS Integration in the NAS" Project, in collaboration with the FAA and industry, and is guiding its research efforts to look at and examine crucial safety concerns regarding the integration of UAS into the NAS. Key research efforts are addressing requirements for detect-and-avoid (DAA), self-separation (SS), and collision avoidance (CA) technologies. In one of a series of human-in-the-loop experiments, NASA Langley Research Center set up a study known as Collision Avoidance, Self-Separation, and Alerting Times (CASSAT). The first phase assessed active air traffic controller interactions with DAA systems and the second phase examined reactions to the DAA system and displays by UAS Pilots at a simulated ground control station (GCS). Analyses of the test results from Phase I and Phase II are presented in this paper. Results from the CASSAT study and previous human-in-the-loop experiments will play a crucial role in the FAA's establishment of rules, regulations, and procedures to safely, efficiently, and effectively integrate UAS into the NAS.

  20. Researches on interactions of satellite-speed helium atoms with aluminum and quartz surfaces. [atomic collisions with aluminum skin (structural member) of satellites (laboratory study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S. M.; Knuth, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Three major areas were experimentally studied: (1) energy transfer in collisions of satellite-speed (700 m/sec) helium atoms with a cleaned satellite-type aluminum surface was investigated using the molecular-beam technique. Spatial and energy distributions of reflected helium atoms were measured and analyzed, (2) The gross accommodation coefficient for a satellite-speed (7000 m/sec) helium beam entering a 2-inch-diameter aluminum spherical cavity was determined by measuring the exit velocity distribution of the leaving helium atoms using a metastable time-of-flight method. Results indicate that the 7000-m/sec satellite-speed helium atoms entering the cavity gain full accommodation with the room-temperature inner surface of the sphere through a large number of collisions before leaving the spherical cavity; and (3) the feasibility of producing a satellite-speed atomic hydrogen beam by arc-heating, for use in studies of interactions of satellite-surfaces with hydrogen atoms under laboratory conditions, was investigated. It was found that a stable arc-heated molecular hydrogen beam can be obtained using the arc-heater, and that a partially dissociated hydrogen beam can be produced. Photographs of laboratory equipment are shown.

  1. A full dimensional time-dependent wave packet study for the H4 four-center, collision induced dissociation, and single exchange reactions: reaction probabilities for J=0.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunpeng; Lee, Soo-Y; Zhang, Dong H

    2006-01-07

    A time-dependent initial state selected wave packet method has been developed to study the H2(v(1)=10-11,j1=0)+H2'(v2=0,j2=0)-->HH'+HH' four-center (4C) reaction, and two other competing reactions: the H2+H2'-->H+H+H2' collision induced dissociation (CID) and the H2+H2'-->H+HH'+H' single exchange (SE) reaction, in full six dimensions. Initial state-specific total reaction probabilities for these three competing reactions are presented for total angular momentum J=0 and the effects of reagent vibration on reactions are examined. It is found that (a) the CID process is the dominant process over the whole energy range considered in this study, but the 4C and SE processes also have non-negligible probabilities; (b) the SE process has a lower threshold energy than the 4C process, but the SE probability increases slower than the 4C probability as collision energy increases; (c) the vibrational excitation of H2(v1) is much more efficient than translational motion for promoting these processes, in particular to the CID process.

  2. Injuries in Near-Side Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Augenstein, J.; Perdeck, E.; Bowen, J.; Stratton, J.; Singer, M.; Horton, T.; Rao, A.; Digges, K.; Malliaris, A.; Steps, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines crash characteristics and the resulting injuries to occupants whose seat position is on the side of impact in a vehicle exposed to a side collision. The databases of the 1988–96 NASS/CDS and the 1995–98 William Lehman Injury Research Center (WLIRC) are examined in this study. The subset of cases analyzed is those in which there is a vehicle-to-vehicle near-side collision, occupant compartment damage and no subsequent collision or rollover. The WLIRC data contains highly detailed occupant injury data not available in NASS.

  3. Antioscillons from bubble collisions at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersini-Houghton, Laura

    2014-04-01

    We study the role of the topology of bubbles at finite temperatures plays on collisions and the existence of new field configurations. We show that in the case of false vacuum decay at finite temperature, the cylindrical symmetry of bubbles admits a new exotic field with negative energies, the antiperiodic "twisted" field. New field configurations arise generically, not only at finite temperatures but whenever a cluster of bubbles resulting from collisions form nontrivial topologies. The interaction of both configurations induces instabilites on the bubble. Collisions of bubbles occupied by the new fields can lead to the emergence of new structures, named antioscillons.

  4. Collision integrals for isotopic hydrogen molecules.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. J.; Munn, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effects of reduced mass and differences in asymmetry on the collision integrals and thermal diffusion factors of isotopic hydrogen systems. Each system selected for study consisted of two diatoms, one in the j = 0 rotation state and the other in the j = 1 state. The molecules interacted with a Lennard-Jones type potential modified to include angular terms. A set of cross sections and collision integrals were obtained for each system.

  5. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armesto, N.; Dainese, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Masciocchi, S.; Roland, C.; Salgado, C. A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Wiedemann, U. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  6. On the synthesis of neutron-rich isotopes along the N = 126 shell in multinucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beliuskina, O.; Heinz, S.; Zagrebaev, V.; Comas, V.; Heinz, C.; Hofmann, S.; Knöbel, R.; Stahl, M.; Ackermann, D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Maurer, J.; Mann, R.

    2014-10-01

    We performed experimental and theoretical studies of deep inelastic multinucleon transfer reactions in heavy-ion collisions at Coulomb barrier energies. Our goal was to investigate if deep inelastic transfer is superior to fragmentation reactions for producing neutron-rich isotopes in the astrophysically interesting region along the closed neutron shell N = 126 . Here, we will present our results obtained in reactions of 64Ni + 207Pb at 5.0 MeV/nucleon. The experiment was performed at the velocity filter SHIP at GSI Darmstadt. Several transfer products on the neutron-rich side were populated but new isotopes were not observed. A comparison of the measured transfer cross-sections and production yields with those from fragmentation reactions allowed for interesting conclusions.

  7. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    DOE PAGES

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; ...

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by othermore » experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.« less

  8. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    SciTech Connect

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Blumlein, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Garzelli, M. -V.; Guzzi, M.; Kuprash, O.; Moch, S. -O.; Nadolsky, P.; Placakyte, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Schienbein, I.; Starovoitov, P.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.

  9. Studies of dijet transverse momentum balance and pseudorapidity distributions in pPb collisions at $$\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 5.02$$ $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-07-23

    Dijet production has been measured in pPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse-nanobarns was collected using the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The dijet transverse momentum balance, azimuthal angle correlations, and pseudorapidity distributions are studied as a function of the transverse energy in the forward calorimeters (more » $$E_T^{4\\lt |\\eta| \\lt 5.2}$$). For pPb collisions, the dijet transverse momentum ratio and the width of the distribution of dijet azimuthal angle difference are comparable to the same quantities obtained from a simulated pp reference and insensitive to $$E_T^{4\\lt |\\eta| \\lt 5.2}$$. In contrast, the mean value of the dijet pseudorapidity is found to change monotonically with increasing $$E_T^{4\\lt |\\eta| \\lt 5.2}$$, indicating a correlation between the energy emitted at large pseudorapidity and the longitudinal motion of the dijet frame. As a result, the pseudorapidity distribution of the dijet system is compared with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD predictions obtained from both nucleon and nuclear parton distribution functions, and the data more closely match the latter.« less

  10. K0(s) and Lambda0 production studies in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1800 and 630-GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Hiroshima U. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2005-04-01

    The authors present a study of the production of K{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sup 0} in inelastic p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1800 and 630 GeV using data collected by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. Analyses of K{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sup 0} multiplicity and transverse momentum distributions, as well as of the dependencies of the average number and (p{sub T}) of K{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sup 0} on charged particle multiplicity are reported. Systematic comparisons are performed for the full sample of inelastic collisions, and for the low and high momentum transfer subsamples, at the two energies. The p{sub T} distributions extend above 8 GeV/c, showing a (p{sub T}) higher than previous measurements. The dependence of the mean K{sub s}{sup 0}({Lambda}{sup 0}) p{sub T} on the charged particle multiplicity for the three samples shows a behavior analogous to that of charged primary tracks.

  11. Studies of dijet transverse momentum balance and pseudorapidity distributions in pPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 5.02$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-07-23

    Dijet production has been measured in pPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse-nanobarns was collected using the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The dijet transverse momentum balance, azimuthal angle correlations, and pseudorapidity distributions are studied as a function of the transverse energy in the forward calorimeters ($E_T^{4\\lt |\\eta| \\lt 5.2}$). For pPb collisions, the dijet transverse momentum ratio and the width of the distribution of dijet azimuthal angle difference are comparable to the same quantities obtained from a simulated pp reference and insensitive to $E_T^{4\\lt |\\eta| \\lt 5.2}$. In contrast, the mean value of the dijet pseudorapidity is found to change monotonically with increasing $E_T^{4\\lt |\\eta| \\lt 5.2}$, indicating a correlation between the energy emitted at large pseudorapidity and the longitudinal motion of the dijet frame. As a result, the pseudorapidity distribution of the dijet system is compared with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD predictions obtained from both nucleon and nuclear parton distribution functions, and the data more closely match the latter.

  12. Gas-phase dissociation of ionic liquid aggregates studied by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and energy-variable collision induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana M; Coutinho, João A P; Marrucho, Isabel M

    2009-01-01

    Positive singly charged ionic liquid aggregates [(C(n)mim)(m+1)(BF(4))(m)](+) (mim = 3-methylimidazolium; n = 2, 4, 8 and 10) and [(C(4)mim)(m+1)(A)(m)](+) (A = Cl(-), BF(4) (-), PF(6) (-), CF(3)SO(3) (-) and (CF(3)SO(2))(2)N(-)) were investigated by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and energy-variable collision induced dissociation. The electrospray ionisation mass spectra (ESI-MS) showed the formation of an aggregate with extra stability for m = 4 for all the ionic liquids with the exception of [C(4)mim][CF(3)SO(3)]. ESI-MS-MS and breakdown curves of aggregate ions showed that their dissociation occurred by loss of neutral species ([C(n)mim][A])(a) with a >or= 1. Variable-energy collision induced dissociation of each aggregate from m = 1 to m = 8 for all the ionic liquids studied enabled the determination of E(cm, 1/2) values, whose variation with m showed that the monomers were always kinetically much more stable than the larger aggregates, independently of the nature of cation and anion. The centre-of-mass energy values correlate well with literature data on ionic volumes and interaction and hydrogen bond energies.

  13. Studies of Strangeness Production in proton-Nucleus Collision: preliminary results from E910 at BNL-AGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xihong

    1996-10-01

    Strange particle production has been viewed as an interesting probe of Heavy-Ion physics because it has the signature of QGP formation. Using the EOS TPC and downstream drift chambers for tracking and using TOF and Cerenkov counters for particle identification, experiment E910 provides a facility with large acceptance and high resolution for exclusive measurements of proton-nucleus collisions at AGS energy. Production of Λ in both 12.5 GeV/c and 18 GeV/c p+A (A = Au, Cu) from '96 run data has been analyzed. The initial reconstruction results of the Λ invariant mass distribution shows a mass resolution of 2.5MeV/c^2. The Λ yield for different beam energies and target masses has been analyzed and compared with the p+p data and E859 data. The transverse mass and rapidity distributions are also discussed here.

  14. Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS): Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) investigation. Phase 1: Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Malcolm; Davis, Dean; Hollister, Walter; Sorensen, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of the Threat Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) traffic sensor and display being used for meaningful Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) applications has resulted in the Federal Aviation Administration initiating a project to establish the technical and operational requirements to realize this potential. Phase 1 of the project is presented here. Phase 1 was organized to define specific CDTI applications for the terminal area, to determine what has already been learned about CDTI technology relevant to these applications, and to define the engineering required to supply the remaining TCAS-CDTI technology for capacity benefit realization. The CDTI applications examined have been limited to those appropriate to the final approach and departure phases of flight.

  15. Computational study of collisions between O(3P) and NO(2Π) at temperatures relevant to the hypersonic flight regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Nagy, Tibor; Bemish, Raymond J.; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Reactions involving N and O atoms dominate the energetics of the reactive air flow around spacecraft when reentering the atmosphere in the hypersonic flight regime. For this reason, the thermal rate coefficients for reactive processes involving O(3P) and NO(2Π) are relevant over a wide range of temperatures. For this purpose, a potential energy surface (PES) for the ground state of the NO2 molecule is constructed based on high-level ab initio calculations. These ab initio energies are represented using the reproducible kernel Hilbert space method and Legendre polynomials. The global P